Science.gov

Sample records for regulates peripheral glucose

  1. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhecheng

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients.

  3. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients. PMID:28251164

  4. Regulation of alternate peripheral pathways of glucose catabolism during aerobic and anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hunt, J C; Phibbs, P V

    1983-05-01

    Glucose may be converted to 6-phosphogluconate by alternate pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Glucose is phosphorylated to glucose-6-phosphate, which is oxidized to 6-phosphogluconate during anaerobic growth when nitrate is used as respiratory electron acceptor. Mutant cells lacking glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are unable to catabolize glucose under these conditions. The mutant cells utilize glucose as effectively as do wild-type cells in the presence of oxygen; under these conditions, glucose is utilized via direct oxidation to gluconate, which is converted to 6-phosphogluconate. The membrane-associated glucose dehydrogenase activity was not formed during anaerobic growth with glucose. Gluconate, the product of the enzyme, appeared to be the inducer of the gluconate transport system, gluconokinase, and membrane-associated gluconate dehydrogenase. 6-Phosphogluconate is probably the physiological inducer of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and the dehydratase and aldolase of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Nitrate-linked respiration is required for the anaerobic uptake of glucose and gluconate by independently regulated transport systems in cells grown under denitrifying conditions.

  5. Hyperglycemic glucose concentrations up-regulate the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Relevance to alterations of peripheral nerves in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Muona, P.; Jaakkola, S.; Zhang, R. Z.; Pan, T. C.; Pelliniemi, L.; Risteli, L.; Chu, M. L.; Uitto, J.; Peltonen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy of peripheral nerves obtained from two diabetic patients revealed large deposits of microfibrils and the presence of Luse bodies in the vicinity of perineurial cells. Microfibrils were found to accumulate also in the sciatic nerves of diabetic BB rats; these microfibrillar deposits were shown to contain type VI collagen by immunoelectron microscopy. Connective tissue cells cultured from rat sciatic nerves were exposed to high glucose concentrations. High glucose concentrations up-regulated the mRNA steady-state levels of alpha 1(VI), alpha 2(VI), and alpha 3(VI) chains of type VI collagen and caused accumulation of type VI collagen-containing fibrils in the cultures. Immunostaining and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that perineurial cells, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts expressed type VI collagen at the mRNA and protein levels. The results suggest that the turnover and supramolecular assembly of type VI collagen are perturbed in diabetic nerves and that glucose per se increases the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8494053

  6. Evidence for central regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-12-06

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulation are likely of comparable magnitude, with somewhat delayed central effects and more rapid peripheral effects. Understanding central regulation of glucose metabolism could promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches for such metabolic conditions as diabetes mellitus.

  7. [Glucose homeostasis in children. I. Regulation of blood glucose].

    PubMed

    Otto Buczkowska, E; Szirer, G; Jarosz-Chobot, P

    2001-01-01

    The amount of glucose in the circulation depends on its absorption from the intestine, uptake by and release from the liver and uptake by peripheral tissues. Insulin and glucagon together control the metabolities required by peripheral tissues and both are involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Insulin is considered to be an anabolic hormone in that it promotes the synthesis of protein, lipid and glycogen. The key target tissues for insulin are liver, muscles and adipose tissue. Glucagon acts largely to increase catabolic processes. Between meals or during fast, the most tightly regulated process is the release of glucose from the liver. During fasting glucose is produced from glycogen and is formed by enzymes on the gluconeogenic pathway. Fetal metabolism is directed to ensure anabolism with formation of glycogen, fat and protein. Glucogen is stored in the liver and serves as the immediate source of new glucose during first few hours after birth. Glucose is the most important substrate for brain metabolism. Due to the large size of neonatal brain in relation to body weight cerebral glucose consumption is particularly high. Postnatal hormonal changes have a central role in regulating glucose mobilization through glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The initial glucagon surge is the key adaptive change which triggers the switch to glucose production. The control of insulin and glucagon secretion is of fundamental importance during first hours after birth. Children have a decreased tolerance to starvation when compared with adults, they are more prone to develop hypoglycaemia after short fasting. The faster rate in the fall of blood glucose and gluconeogenic substrates and rapid rate of ketogenesis are characteristic features of fasting adaptation in children.

  8. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  9. The impact of ageing, fasting and high-fat diet on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and glucose-sensing neural networks in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    van den Top, Marco; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Pattaranit, Ratchada; Michael, Natalie J; Munder, Astrid; Pryor, Jack T; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2017-08-23

    Obesity and aging are risk factors for diabetes. Here we investigated effects of aging, obesity and fasting on central and peripheral glucose tolerance and on glucose-sensing neuronal function in the arcuate nucleus of rats, with a view to providing insight into central mechanisms regulating glucose homeostasis and how they change or are subject to dysfunction with aging and obesity. We show that following a glucose load, central glucose tolerance at the level of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma is significantly reduced in rats maintained on high fat diet (HFD). With aging, up to 2 years, central glucose tolerance was impaired in an age-dependent manner whilst peripheral glucose tolerance remained unaffected. Aging-induced peripheral glucose intolerance was improved by a 24 hour fast, whilst central glucose tolerance was not corrected. Pre-wean, immature animals have elevated basal plasma glucose levels and a delayed increase in central glucose levels following peripheral glucose injection compared to mature animals. Electrophysiological recording techniques revealed an energy-status-dependent role for glucose excited, inhibited and adapting neurons along with glucose-induced changes in synaptic transmission. We conclude that aging affects central whilst HFD profoundly affects central and peripheral glucose tolerance, and glucose-sensing neurons adapt function in an energy-status-dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripheral and Central Glucose Sensing In Hypoglycemic Detection

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia poses a serious threat to the integrity of the brain, owing to its reliance on blood glucose as a fuel. Protecting against hypoglycemia is an extended network of glucose sensors located within the brain and in the periphery that serve to mediate responses restoring euglycemia, i.e., counterregulatory responses. This review examines the various glucose sensory loci involved in hypoglycemic detection, with a particular emphasis on peripheral glucose sensory loci and their contribution to hypoglycemic counterregulation. PMID:25180261

  11. PERIPHERAL MECHANISMS IN APPETITE REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as demonstrated by the effects of bariatric surgery). PMID:25241326

  12. Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as shown by the effects of bariatric surgery). Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peripheral Blood Transcriptomic Signatures of Fasting Glucose and Insulin Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian H; Hivert, Marie-France; Peters, Marjolein J; Pilling, Luke C; Hogan, John D; Pham, Lisa M; Harries, Lorna W; Fox, Caroline S; Bandinelli, Stefania; Dehghan, Abbas; Hernandez, Dena G; Hofman, Albert; Hong, Jaeyoung; Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Munson, Peter J; Rybin, Denis V; Singleton, Andrew B; Uitterlinden, André G; Ying, Saixia; Melzer, David; Levy, Daniel; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Florez, Jose C; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Kolaczyk, Eric D

    2016-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genetic loci associated with glycemic traits. However, characterizing the functional significance of these loci has proven challenging. We sought to gain insights into the regulation of fasting insulin and fasting glucose through the use of gene expression microarray data from peripheral blood samples of participants without diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (n = 5,056), the Rotterdam Study (RS) (n = 723), and the InCHIANTI Study (Invecchiare in Chianti) (n = 595). Using a false discovery rate q <0.05, we identified three transcripts associated with fasting glucose and 433 transcripts associated with fasting insulin levels after adjusting for age, sex, technical covariates, and complete blood cell counts. Among the findings, circulating IGF2BP2 transcript levels were positively associated with fasting insulin in both the FHS and RS. Using 1000 Genomes-imputed genotype data, we identified 47,587 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) and 6,695 trans-eQTL associated with the 433 significant insulin-associated transcripts. Of note, we identified a trans-eQTL (rs592423), where the A allele was associated with higher IGF2BP2 levels and with fasting insulin in an independent genetic meta-analysis comprised of 50,823 individuals. We conclude that integration of genomic and transcriptomic data implicate circulating IGF2BP2 mRNA levels associated with glucose and insulin homeostasis. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. PPARδ regulates glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hao; Olson, Peter; Hevener, Andrea; Mehl, Isaac; Chong, Ling-Wa; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Ham, Jungyeob; Kang, Heonjoong; Peters, Jeffrey M.; Evans, Ronald M.

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a collection of obesity-related disorders. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate transcription in response to fatty acids and, as such, are potential therapeutic targets for these diseases. We show that PPARδ (NR1C2) knockout mice are metabolically less active and glucose-intolerant, whereas receptor activation in db/db mice improves insulin sensitivity. Euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic-clamp experiments further demonstrate that a PPARδ-specific agonist suppresses hepatic glucose output, increases glucose disposal, and inhibits free fatty acid release from adipocytes. Unexpectedly, gene array and functional analyses suggest that PPARδ ameliorates hyperglycemia by increasing glucose flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and enhancing fatty acid synthesis. Coupling increased hepatic carbohydrate catabolism with its ability to promote β-oxidation in muscle allows PPARδ to regulate metabolic homeostasis and enhance insulin action by complementary effects in distinct tissues. The combined hepatic and peripheral actions of PPARδ suggest new therapeutic approaches to treat type II diabetes. PMID:16492734

  15. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  16. Breast Milk Hormones and Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Francesco; Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Sorrenti, Miriam; Fissore, Maria Francesca; Oggero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a complex relationship exists between the central nervous system and peripheral organs involved in energy homeostasis. It consists in the balance between food intake and energy expenditure and includes the regulation of nutrient levels in storage organs, as well as in blood, in particular blood glucose. Therefore, food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose homeostasis are strictly connected to each other. Several hormones, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and ghrelin, are involved in this complex regulation. These hormones play a role in the regulation of glucose metabolism and are involved in the development of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Recently, their presence in breast milk has been detected, suggesting that they may be involved in the regulation of growth in early infancy and could influence the programming of energy balance later in life. This paper focuses on hormones present in breast milk and their role in glucose homeostasis. PMID:21760816

  17. Sex-specific effects of prenatal stress on glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paula J; Sullivan, Katie M; Kerrigan, David; Russell, John A; Seckl, Jonathan R; Drake, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid overexposure during pregnancy programmes offspring physiology and predisposes to later disease. However, any impact of ethologically relevant maternal stress is less clear, yet of physiological importance. Here, we investigated in rats the short- and long-term effects in adult offspring of repeated social stress (exposure to an aggressive lactating female) during late pregnancy on glucose regulation following stress, glucose-insulin homoeostasis and peripheral expression of genes important in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism and glucocorticoid action. Prenatal stress (PNS) was associated with reduced birth weight in female, but not male, offspring. The increase in blood glucose with restraint was exaggerated in adult PNS males compared with controls, but not in females. Oral glucose tolerance testing showed no effects on plasma glucose or insulin concentrations in either sex at 3 months; however, at 6 months, PNS females were hyperinsulinaemic following an oral glucose load. In PNS males, plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased, with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of 5α-reductase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα (Ppara)) and a strong trend towards reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (Pgc1α (Ppargc1a)) and Pparγ (Pparg) expression, whereas only Pgc1α mRNA was affected in PNS females. Conversely, in subcutaneous fat, PNS reduced mRNA expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βhsd1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck (Pck1)), adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and diglyceride acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2) in females, but only Pepck mRNA expression was reduced in PNS males. Thus, prenatal social stress differentially programmes glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in male and female offspring. These long-term alterations in physiology may increase susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  18. Exenatide Regulates Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Brain Areas Associated With Glucose Homeostasis and Reward System.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Giuseppe; Iozzo, Patricia; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; Lancaster, Jack; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) have been found in the brain, but whether GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) influence brain glucose metabolism is currently unknown. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of a single injection of the GLP-1RA exenatide on cerebral and peripheral glucose metabolism in response to a glucose load. In 15 male subjects with HbA1c of 5.7 ± 0.1%, fasting glucose of 114 ± 3 mg/dL, and 2-h glucose of 177 ± 11 mg/dL, exenatide (5 μg) or placebo was injected in double-blind, randomized fashion subcutaneously 30 min before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) was measured by positron emission tomography after an injection of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose before the OGTT, and the rate of glucose absorption (RaO) and disposal was assessed using stable isotope tracers. Exenatide reduced RaO0-60 min (4.6 ± 1.4 vs. 13.1 ± 1.7 μmol/min ⋅ kg) and decreased the rise in mean glucose0-60 min (107 ± 6 vs. 138 ± 8 mg/dL) and insulin0-60 min (17.3 ± 3.1 vs. 24.7 ± 3.8 mU/L). Exenatide increased CMRglu in areas of the brain related to glucose homeostasis, appetite, and food reward, despite lower plasma insulin concentrations, but reduced glucose uptake in the hypothalamus. Decreased RaO0-60 min after exenatide was inversely correlated to CMRglu. In conclusion, these results demonstrate, for the first time in man, a major effect of a GLP-1RA on regulation of brain glucose metabolism in the absorptive state.

  19. A link between hepatic glucose production and peripheral energy metabolism via hepatokines.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahed, Aya; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Casteras, Sylvie; Soty, Maud; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Guillou, Hervé; Tourette, Jean-André; Pleche, Nicolas; Zitoun, Carine; Gri, Blandine; Sardella, Anne; Rajas, Fabienne; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a deterioration of glucose tolerance, which associates insulin resistance of glucose uptake by peripheral tissues and increased endogenous glucose production. Here we report that the specific suppression of hepatic glucose production positively modulates whole-body glucose and energy metabolism. We used mice deficient in liver glucose-6 phosphatase that is mandatory for endogenous glucose production. When they were fed a high fat/high sucrose diet, they resisted the development of diabetes and obesity due to the activation of peripheral glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. This was linked to the secretion of hepatic hormones like fibroblast growth factor 21 and angiopoietin-like factor 6. Interestingly, the deletion of hepatic glucose-6 phosphatase in previously obese and insulin-resistant mice resulted in the rapid restoration of glucose and body weight controls. Therefore, hepatic glucose production is an essential lever for the control of whole-body energy metabolism during the development of obesity and diabetes.

  20. Acyl ghrelin acts in the brain to control liver function and peripheral glucose homeostasis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Lockie, Sarah H; Pracht, Corinna; Wu, Qunli; Tups, Alexander; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that peripheral ghrelin regulates glucose metabolism. Here, we designed experiments to examine how central acyl ghrelin infusion affects peripheral glucose metabolism under pair-fed or ad libitum feeding conditions. Mice received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), ghrelin, and allowed to eat ad libitum (icv ghrelin ad lib) or ghrelin and pair-fed to the aCSF group (icv ghrelin pf). Minipumps delivered acyl ghrelin at a dose of 0.25 μg/h at 0.5 μL/h for 7 days. There was no difference in daily blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, triglycerides, or nonesterified fatty acids. Body weight gain and food intake was significantly higher in icv ghrelin ad lib mice. However, both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf groups exhibited heavier white adipose mass. Icv ghrelin pf mice exhibited better glucose tolerance than aCSF or icv ghrelin ad lib mice during a glucose tolerance test, although both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf increased insulin release during the glucose tolerance test. Central acyl ghrelin infusion and pair feeding also increased breakdown of liver glycogen and triglyceride, and regulated genes involved in hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism. Icv ghrelin pf mice had an increase in plasma blood glucose during a pyruvate tolerance test relative to icv ghrelin ad lib or aCSF mice. Our results suggest that under conditions of negative energy (icv ghrelin pf), central acyl ghrelin engages a neural circuit that influences hepatic glucose function. Metabolic status affects the ability of central acyl ghrelin to regulate peripheral glucose homeostasis.

  1. Glucocorticoid regulation of the circadian clock modulates glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Y -L; Bernal, Teresita U; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Yamamoto, Keith R; Feldman, Brian J

    2009-10-13

    Circadian clock genes are regulated by glucocorticoids; however, whether this regulation is a direct or secondary effect and the physiological consequences of this regulation were unknown. Here, we identified glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at multiple clock genes and showed that 3 were directly regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor. We determined that a GRE within the core clock gene Per2 was continuously occupied during rhythmic expression and essential for glucocorticoid regulation of that gene in vivo. We further demonstrated that mice with a genomic deletion spanning this GRE expressed elevated leptin levels and were protected from glucose intolerance and insulin resistance on glucocorticoid treatment but not from muscle wasting. We conclude that Per2 is an integral component of a particular glucocorticoid regulatory pathway and that glucocorticoid regulation of the peripheral clock is selectively required for some actions of glucocorticoids.

  2. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  3. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  4. Hypothalamic AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Clair S.; Lam, Carol K.L.; Chari, Madhu; Cheung, Grace W.C.; Kokorovic, Andrea; Gao, Sun; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A.; Lam, Tony K.T.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the hypothalamus regulates energy homeostasis by sensing nutritional and hormonal signals. However, the role of hypothalamic AMPK in glucose production regulation remains to be elucidated. We hypothesize that bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity alter glucose production. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To introduce bidirectional changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity in vivo, we first knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity in male Sprague-Dawley rats by either injecting an adenovirus expressing the dominant-negative form of AMPK (Ad-DN AMPKα2 [D157A]) or infusing AMPK inhibitor compound C directly into the mediobasal hypothalamus. Next, we independently activated hypothalamic AMPK by delivering either an adenovirus expressing the constitutive active form of AMPK (Ad-CA AMPKα1312 [T172D]) or the AMPK activator AICAR. The pancreatic (basal insulin)-euglycemic clamp technique in combination with the tracer-dilution methodology was used to assess the impact of alternations in hypothalamic AMPK activity on changes in glucose kinetics in vivo. RESULTS Injection of Ad-DN AMPK into the hypothalamus knocked down hypothalamic AMPK activity and led to a significant suppression of glucose production with no changes in peripheral glucose uptake during the clamps. In parallel, hypothalamic infusion of AMPK inhibitor compound C lowered glucose production as well. Conversely, molecular and pharmacological activation of hypothalamic AMPK negated the ability of hypothalamic nutrients to lower glucose production. CONCLUSIONS These data indicate that changes in hypothalamic AMPK activity are sufficient and necessary for hypothalamic nutrient-sensing mechanisms to alter glucose production in vivo. PMID:20682691

  5. A peripheral governor regulates muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Brian R; Shahi, M Reza S

    2011-02-01

    Active skeletal muscles are capable of keeping the global [adenosine triphosphate (ATP)] reasonably constant during exercise, whether it is mild exercise, activating a few motor units, or all-out exercise using a substantial mass of muscle. This could only be accomplished if there were regulatory processes in place not only to replenish ATP as quickly as possible, but also to modulate the rate of ATP use when that rate threatens to exceed the rate of ATP replenishment, a situation that could lead to metabolic catastrophe. This paper proposes that there is a regulatory process or "peripheral governor" that can modulate activation of muscle to avoid metabolic catastrophe. A peripheral governor, working at the cellular level, should be able to reduce the cellular rate of ATP hydrolysis associated with muscle contraction by attenuating activation. This would necessarily cause something we call peripheral fatigue (i.e., reduced contractile response to a given stimulation). There is no doubt that peripheral fatigue occurs. It has been demonstrated in isolated muscles, in muscles in situ with no central nervous system input, and in intact human subjects performing voluntary exercise with small muscle groups or doing whole-body exercise. The regulation of muscle activation is achieved in at least 3 ways (decreasing membrane excitability, inhibiting Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors, and decreasing the availability of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum), making this a highly redundant control system. The peripheral governor attenuates cellular activation to reduce the metabolic demand, thereby preserving ATP and the integrity of the cell.

  6. Brain Glucose Sensors Play a Significant Role in the Regulation of Pancreatic Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Osundiji, Mayowa A.; Lam, Daniel D.; Shaw, Jill; Yueh, Chen-Yu; Markkula, S. Pauliina; Hurst, Paul; Colliva, Carolina; Roda, Aldo; Heisler, Lora K.; Evans, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    As patients decline from health to type 2 diabetes, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) typically becomes impaired. Although GSIS is driven predominantly by direct sensing of a rise in blood glucose by pancreatic β-cells, there is growing evidence that hypothalamic neurons control other aspects of peripheral glucose metabolism. Here we investigated the role of the brain in the modulation of GSIS. To examine the effects of increasing or decreasing hypothalamic glucose sensing on glucose tolerance and insulin secretion, glucose or inhibitors of glucokinase, respectively, were infused into the third ventricle during intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTTs). Glucose-infused rats displayed improved glucose handling, particularly within the first few minutes of the IVGTT, with a significantly lower area under the excursion curve within the first 10 min (AUC0-10). This was explained by increased insulin secretion. In contrast, infusion of the glucokinase inhibitors glucosamine or mannoheptulose worsened glucose tolerance and decreased GSIS in the first few minutes of IVGTT. Our data suggest a role for brain glucose sensors in the regulation of GSIS, particularly during the early phase. We propose that pharmacological agents targeting hypothalamic glucose-sensing pathways may represent novel therapeutic strategies for enhancing early phase insulin secretion in type 2 diabetes. PMID:22210318

  7. Peripheral Insulin Resistance and Impaired Insulin Signaling Contribute to Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Preterm Baboons

    PubMed Central

    McGill-Vargas, Lisa L.; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Seidner, Steven R.; McCurnin, Donald C.; Leland, Michelle M.; Anzueto, Diana G.; Johnson, Marney C.; Liang, Hanyu; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Premature infants develop hyperglycemia shortly after birth, increasing their morbidity and death. Surviving infants have increased incidence of diabetes as young adults. Our understanding of the biological basis for the insulin resistance of prematurity and developmental regulation of glucose production remains fragmentary. The objective of this study was to examine maturational differences in insulin sensitivity and the insulin-signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of 30 neonatal baboons using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Preterm baboons (67% gestation) had reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity shortly after birth (M value 12.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.8 ± 4.4 mg/kg · min in term baboons) and at 2 weeks of age (M value 12.8 ± 2.6 vs 16.3 ± 4.2, respectively). Insulin increased Akt phosphorylation, but these responses were significantly lower in preterm baboons during the first week of life (3.2-fold vs 9.8-fold). Preterm baboons had lower glucose transporter-1 protein content throughout the first 2 weeks of life (8%-12% of term). In preterm baboons, serum free fatty acids (FFAs) did not decrease in response to insulin, whereas FFAs decreased by greater than 80% in term baboons; the impaired suppression of FFAs in the preterm animals was paired with a decreased glucose transporter-4 protein content in adipose tissue. In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance and impaired non-insulin-dependent glucose uptake play an important role in hyperglycemia of prematurity. Impaired insulin signaling (reduced Akt) contributes to the defect in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Counterregulatory hormones are not major contributors. PMID:25560831

  8. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-03-11

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism.

  9. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  10. Hypothalamic Leucine Metabolism Regulates Liver Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya; Lam, Tony K.T.; He, Wu; Pocai, Alessandro; Bryan, Joseph; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Gutiérrez-Juárez, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids profoundly affect insulin action and glucose metabolism in mammals. Here, we investigated the role of the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a key center involved in nutrient-dependent metabolic regulation. Specifically, we tested the novel hypothesis that the metabolism of leucine within the MBH couples the central sensing of leucine with the control of glucose production by the liver. We performed either central (MBH) or systemic infusions of leucine in Sprague-Dawley male rats during basal pancreatic insulin clamps in combination with various pharmacological and molecular interventions designed to modulate leucine metabolism in the MBH. We also examined the role of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP channels) in the effects of leucine. Enhancing the metabolism of leucine acutely in the MBH lowered blood glucose through a biochemical network that was insensitive to rapamycin but strictly dependent on the hypothalamic metabolism of leucine to α-ketoisocaproic acid and, further, insensitive to acetyl- and malonyl-CoA. Functional KATP channels were also required. Importantly, molecular attenuation of this central sensing mechanism in rats conferred susceptibility to developing hyperglycemia. We postulate that the metabolic sensing of leucine in the MBH is a previously unrecognized mechanism for the regulation of hepatic glucose production required to maintain glucose homeostasis. PMID:22187376

  11. FOXN3 regulates hepatic glucose utilization

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K.; Hill, Jonathon T.; Yost, H. Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose, and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human FOXN3 and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  12. Glucose oxidation positively regulates glucose uptake and improves cardiac function recovery after myocardial reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Xu, Jie; Qin, Xinghua; Hou, Zuoxu; Guo, Yongzheng; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianjiang; Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Xing; Gao, Feng

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial reperfusion decreases glucose oxidation and uncouples glucose oxidation from glycolysis. Therapies that increase glucose oxidation lessen myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the regulation of glucose uptake during reperfusion remains poorly understood. Here we found that glucose uptake was remarkably diminished in myocardium following reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats as detected by 18F-labeled and fluorescent-labeled glucose analogs, even though GLUT1 was upregulated by 3 folds and GLUT4 translocation remained unchanged compared with those of sham rats. The decreased glucose uptake was accompanied by suppressed glucose oxidation. Interestingly, stimulating glucose oxidation by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), a rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation, increased glucose uptake and alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. In vitro data in neonatal myocytes showed that PDK4 overexpression decreased glucose uptake, while its knockdown increased glucose uptake, suggesting a role of PDK4 in regulating glucose uptake. Moreover, inhibition of PDK4 increased myocardial glucose uptake with concomitant enhancement of cardiac insulin sensitivity following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. These results showed that the suppressed glucose oxidation mediated by PDK4 contributes to the reduced glucose uptake in myocardium following reperfusion, and enhancement of glucose uptake exerts cardioprotection. The findings suggest that stimulating glucose oxidation via PDK4 could be an efficient approach to improve recovery from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  13. Bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Naeije, M

    2001-12-01

    Bruxism is a controversial phenomenon. Both its definition and the diagnostic procedure contribute to the fact that the literature about the aetiology of this disorder is difficult to interpret. There is, however, consensus about the multifactorial nature of the aetiology. Besides peripheral (morphological) factors, central (pathophysiological and psychological) factors can be distinguished. In the past, morphological factors, like occlusal discrepancies and the anatomy of the bony structures of the orofacial region, have been considered the main causative factors for bruxism. Nowadays, these factors play only a small role, if any. Recent focus is more on the pathophysiological factors. For example, bruxism has been suggested to be part of a sleep arousal response. In addition, bruxism appears to be modulated by various neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. More specifically, disturbances in the central dopaminergic system have been linked to bruxism. Further, factors like smoking, alcohol, drugs, diseases and trauma may be involved in the bruxism aetiology. Psychological factors like stress and personality are frequently mentioned in relation to bruxism as well. However, research to these factors comes to equivocal results and needs further attention. Taken all evidence together, bruxism appears to be mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally.

  14. A link between hepatic glucose production and peripheral energy metabolism via hepatokines

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Wahed, Aya; Gautier-Stein, Amandine; Casteras, Sylvie; Soty, Maud; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Guillou, Hervé; Tourette, Jean-André; Pleche, Nicolas; Zitoun, Carine; Gri, Blandine; Sardella, Anne; Rajas, Fabienne; Mithieux, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by a deterioration of glucose tolerance, which associates insulin resistance of glucose uptake by peripheral tissues and increased endogenous glucose production. Here we report that the specific suppression of hepatic glucose production positively modulates whole-body glucose and energy metabolism. We used mice deficient in liver glucose-6 phosphatase that is mandatory for endogenous glucose production. When they were fed a high fat/high sucrose diet, they resisted the development of diabetes and obesity due to the activation of peripheral glucose metabolism and thermogenesis. This was linked to the secretion of hepatic hormones like fibroblast growth factor 21 and angiopoietin-like factor 6. Interestingly, the deletion of hepatic glucose-6 phosphatase in previously obese and insulin-resistant mice resulted in the rapid restoration of glucose and body weight controls. Therefore, hepatic glucose production is an essential lever for the control of whole-body energy metabolism during the development of obesity and diabetes. PMID:25061558

  15. Peptide regulators of peripheral taste function

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, Cedrick D.; Geraedts, Maartje C.P.; Munger, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    The peripheral sensory organ of the gustatory system, the taste bud, contains a heterogeneous collection of sensory cells. These taste cells can differ in the stimuli to which they respond and the receptors and other signaling molecules they employ to transduce and encode gustatory stimuli. This molecular diversity extends to the expression of a varied repertoire of bioactive peptides that appear to play important functional roles in signaling taste information between the taste cells and afferent sensory nerves and/or in processing sensory signals within the taste bud itself. Here, we review studies that examine the expression of bioactive peptides in the taste bud and the impact of those peptides on taste functions. Many of these peptides produced in taste buds are known to affect appetite, satiety or metabolism through their actions in the brain, pancreas and other organs, suggesting a functional link between the gustatory system and the neural and endocrine systems that regulate feeding and nutrient utilization. PMID:23348523

  16. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies.

  17. Regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R J; Youngren, J F

    1992-11-01

    The entry of glucose into muscle cells is achieved primarily via a carrier-mediated system consisting of protein transport molecules. GLUT-1 transporter isoform is normally found in the sarcolemmal (SL) membrane and is thought to be involved in glucose transport under basal conditions. With insulin stimulation, glucose transport is accelerated by translocating GLUT-4 transporters from an intracellular pool out to the T-tubule and SL membranes. Activation of transporters to increase the turnover number may also be involved, but the evidence is far from conclusive. When insulin binds to its receptor, it autophosphorylates tyrosine and serine residues on the beta-subunit of the receptor. The tyrosine residues are thought to activate tyrosine kinases, which in turn phosphorylate/activate as yet unknown second messengers. Insulin receptor antibodies, however, have been reported to increase glucose transport without increasing kinase activity. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major characteristic of obesity and diabetes mellitus, especially NIDDM. A decrease in the number of insulin receptors and the ability of insulin to activate receptor tyrosine kinase has been documented in muscle from NIDDM patients. Most studies report no change in the intracellular pool of GLUT-4 transporters available for translocation to the SL. Both the quality and quantity of food consumed can regulate insulin sensitivity. A high-fat, refined sugar diet, similar to the typical U.S. diet, causes insulin resistance when compared with a low-fat, complex-carbohydrate diet. On the other hand, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. After an acute bout of exercise, glucose transport in muscle increases to the same level as with maximum insulin stimulation. Although the number of GLUT-4 transporters in the sarcolemma increases with exercise, neither insulin or its receptor is involved. After an initial acute phase, which may involve calcium as the activator, a secondary phase of increased

  18. Effect of Peripheral Electrical Stimulation (PES) on Nocturnal Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Catalogna, Merav; Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Sagi, Roi; Abu-Hamad, Ramzia; Nevo, Uri; Efrati, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulation of hepatic glucose production has been a target for antidiabetic drug development, due to its major contribution to glucose homeostasis. Previous pre-clinical study demonstrated that peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) may stimulate glucose utilization and improve hepatic insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate safety, tolerability, and the glucose-lowering effect of this approach in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Twelve patients with T2DM were recruited for an open label, interventional, randomized trial. Eleven patients underwent, in a crossover design, an active, and a no-intervention control periods, separated with a two-week washout phase. During the active period, the patients received a daily lower extremity PES treatment (1.33Hz/16Hz burst mode), for 14 days. Study endpoints included changes in glucose levels, number of hypoglycemic episodes, and other potential side effects. Endpoints were analyzed based on continuous glucose meter readings, and laboratory evaluation. Results We found that during the active period, the most significant effect was on nocturnal glucose control (P < 0.0004), as well as on pre-meal mean glucose levels (P < 0.02). The mean daily glucose levels were also decreased although it did not reach clinical significance (P = 0.07). A reduction in serum cortisol (P < 0.01) but not in insulin was also detected after 2 weeks of treatment. No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions These results indicate that repeated PES treatment, even for a very short duration, can improve blood glucose control, possibly by suppressing hepatic glucose production. This effect may be mediated via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02727790 PMID:27997608

  19. Effect of Peripheral Electrical Stimulation (PES) on Nocturnal Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Catalogna, Merav; Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Sagi, Roi; Abu-Hamad, Ramzia; Nevo, Uri; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Efrati, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of hepatic glucose production has been a target for antidiabetic drug development, due to its major contribution to glucose homeostasis. Previous pre-clinical study demonstrated that peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) may stimulate glucose utilization and improve hepatic insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate safety, tolerability, and the glucose-lowering effect of this approach in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Twelve patients with T2DM were recruited for an open label, interventional, randomized trial. Eleven patients underwent, in a crossover design, an active, and a no-intervention control periods, separated with a two-week washout phase. During the active period, the patients received a daily lower extremity PES treatment (1.33Hz/16Hz burst mode), for 14 days. Study endpoints included changes in glucose levels, number of hypoglycemic episodes, and other potential side effects. Endpoints were analyzed based on continuous glucose meter readings, and laboratory evaluation. We found that during the active period, the most significant effect was on nocturnal glucose control (P < 0.0004), as well as on pre-meal mean glucose levels (P < 0.02). The mean daily glucose levels were also decreased although it did not reach clinical significance (P = 0.07). A reduction in serum cortisol (P < 0.01) but not in insulin was also detected after 2 weeks of treatment. No adverse events were recorded. These results indicate that repeated PES treatment, even for a very short duration, can improve blood glucose control, possibly by suppressing hepatic glucose production. This effect may be mediated via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02727790.

  20. Regulation of Glucose Metabolism in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Daddaoua, Abdelali; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2009-01-01

    In Pseudomonas putida, genes for the glucose phosphorylative pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway are organized in two operons; one made up of the zwf, pgl, and eda genes and another consisting of the edd, glk, gltR2, and gltS genes. Divergently with respect to the edd gene is the gap-1 gene. Expression from Pzwf, Pedd, and Pgap is modulated by HexR in response to the availability of glucose in the medium. To study the regulatory process in greater detail we purified HexR and showed that it is a monomer in solution. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry assays were done showing that HexR recognizes the Pedd, Pzwf, and Pgap-1 promoters with affinity in the nanomolar range. DNA footprinting assays identified the binding site between +30 and +1 at Pzwf, between +16 and +41 at Pedd, and between −6 and +18 at Pgap-1. Based on DNA sequence alignment of the target sites and isothermal titration calorimetry data, two monomers of HexR bind to a pseudopalindrome with a consensus sequence of 5′-TTGTN7–8ACAA-3′. Binding of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway intermediate 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate to HexR released the repressor from its target operators, whereas other chemicals such as glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, and 6-phosphogluconate did not induce complex dissociation. The phosphorylated effector is likely to be recognized by a sugar isomerase domain located at the C-terminal end of HexR, whereas the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of HexR exhibits high similarity to proteins of the RpiR family of regulators. PMID:19506074

  1. Resistin: regulation of food intake, glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Novelle, Marta G; Vazquez, María Jesús; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Resistin has been identified as a hormone secreted by adipocytes that is under hormonal and nutritional control. This hormone has been suggested to be the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes. In rodents, resistin is mainly located and secreted from adipocytes, even though its expression was also found in several other tissues. However, in humans resistin is expressed primarily by macrophages and seems to be involved in the recruitment of other immune cells and the secretion of pro-inflammatory factors, although its role in insulin resistance cannot be ruled out. In addition to its role in glucose metabolism, resistin has been also involved in the control of hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism and in the regulation of food intake. In this short review, we will summarize the most relevant findings of this hormone in rodents. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. GPR55 and the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nadal, Angel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2017-07-01

    Pathophysiological conditions such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are reportedly associated to over-activation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Therefore, modulation of the ECS offers potential therapeutic benefits on those diseases. GPR55, the receptor for L-α-lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI) that has also affinity for various cannabinoid ligands, is distributed at the central and peripheral level and it is involved in several physiological processes. This review summarizes the localization and role of GPR55 in tissues that are crucial for the regulation of glucose metabolism, and provides an update on its contribution in obesity and insulin resistance. Finally, the therapeutic potential of targeting the GPR55 receptor is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Central and peripheral contributions to dynamic changes in nucleus accumbens glucose induced by intravenous cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of neural, physiological and behavioral effects induced by cocaine is consistent with metabolic neural activation, yet direct attempts to evaluate central metabolic effects of this drug have produced controversial results. Here, we used enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with high-speed amperometry in freely moving rats to examine how intravenous cocaine at a behaviorally active dose affects extracellular glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a critical structure within the motivation-reinforcement circuit. In drug-naive rats, cocaine induced a bimodal increase in glucose, with the first, ultra-fast phasic rise appearing during the injection (latency 6–8 s; ~50 μM or ~5% of baseline) followed by a larger, more prolonged tonic elevation (~100 μM or 10% of baseline, peak ~15 min). While the rapid, phasic component of the glucose response remained stable following subsequent cocaine injections, the tonic component progressively decreased. Cocaine-methiodide, cocaine's peripherally acting analog, induced an equally rapid and strong initial glucose rise, indicating cocaine's action on peripheral neural substrates as its cause. However, this analog did not induce increases in either locomotion or tonic glucose, suggesting direct central mediation of these cocaine effects. Under systemic pharmacological blockade of dopamine transmission, both phasic and tonic components of the cocaine-induced glucose response were only slightly reduced, suggesting a significant role of non-dopamine mechanisms in cocaine-induced accumbal glucose influx. Hence, intravenous cocaine induces rapid, strong inflow of glucose into NAc extracellular space by involving both peripheral and central, non-dopamine drug actions, thus preventing a possible deficit resulting from enhanced glucose use by brain cells. PMID:25729349

  4. Feedback Regulation of Glucose Transporter Gene Transcription in Kluyveromyces lactis by Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Milkowski, C.; Krampe, S.; Weirich, J.; Hasse, V.; Boles, E.; Breunig, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    In the respirofermentative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, only a single genetic locus encodes glucose transporters that can support fermentative growth. This locus is polymorphic in wild-type isolates carrying either KHT1 and KHT2, two tandemly arranged HXT-like genes, or RAG1, a low-affinity transporter gene that arose by recombination between KHT1 and KHT2. Here we show that KHT1 is a glucose-induced gene encoding a low-affinity transporter very similar to Rag1p. Kht2p has a lower Km (3.7 mM) and a more complex regulation. Transcription is high in the absence of glucose, further induced by low glucose concentrations, and repressed at higher glucose concentrations. The response of KHT1 and KHT2 gene regulation to high but not to low concentrations of glucose depends on glucose transport. The function of either Kht1p or Kht2p is sufficient to mediate the characteristic response to high glucose, which is impaired in a kht1 kht2 deletion mutant. Thus, the KHT genes are subject to mutual feedback regulation. Moreover, glucose repression of the endogenous β-galactosidase (LAC4) promoter and glucose induction of pyruvate decarboxylase were abolished in the kht1 kht2 mutant. These phenotypes could be partially restored by HXT gene family members from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results indicate that the specific responses to high but not to low glucose concentrations require a high rate of glucose uptake. PMID:11514503

  5. Regulation of glucose metabolism and the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kong Wah

    2011-08-01

    Complex interactions occur among adipose tissue, the central nervous system, bone and pancreas to integrate bone remodelling, glucose, lipid and energy metabolism. Data obtained largely from the judicious use of gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetic mouse models show that leptin, an adipocyte-secreted product, indirectly inhibits bone accrual through a central pathway comprising the hypothalamus and central nervous system. Increased sympathetic output acting via β2-adrenergic receptors present in osteoblasts decreases bone formation and causes increased bone resorption. Insulin is a key molecular link between bone remodelling and energy metabolism. Insulin signalling in the osteoblasts increases bone formation and resorption as well as the release of undercarboxylated osteocalcin. An increase in the release of bone-derived undercarboxylated osteocalcin into the systemic circulation enables it to act as a circulating hormone to stimulate insulin production and secretion by pancreatic β-cells and adiponectin by adipocytes. Insulin sensitivity increases, lipolysis and fat accumulation decreases while energy expenditure increases. Whether this model of integrative physiology involving the skeleton, pancreas and adipose tissue, so elegantly demonstrated in rodents, is applicable to humans is controversial. The mouse Esp gene, encoding an intracellular tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates insulin signalling in osteoblasts, is a pseudogene in humans, and a homolog for the Esp gene has so far not been identified in humans. A close homologue of Esp, PTP1B, is expressed in human osteoblasts and could take the role of Esp in humans. Data available from the limited number of clinical studies do not provide a sufficient body of evidence to determine whether osteocalcin or undercarboxylated osteocalcin affects glucose metabolism in humans. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Lifestyle, glucose regulation and the cognitive effects of glucose load in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Riby, Deborah M; Graham, Cheryl

    2008-11-01

    Interventions aimed at improving glucose regulatory mechanisms have been suggested as a possible source of cognitive enhancement in the elderly. In particular, previous research has identified episodic memory as a target for facilitation after either moderate increases in glycaemia (after a glucose drink) or after improvements in glucose regulation. The present study aimed to extend this research by examining the joint effects of glucose ingestion and glucose regulation on cognition. In addition, risk factors associated with the development of poor glucose regulation in middle-aged adults were considered. In a repeated measures design, thirty-three middle-aged adults (aged 35-55 years) performed a battery of memory and non-memory tasks after either 25 g or 50 g glucose or a sweetness matched placebo drink. To assess the impact of individual differences in glucose regulation, blood glucose measurements were taken on four occasions during testing. A lifestyle and diet questionnaire was also administered. Consistent with previous research, episodic memory ability benefited from glucose ingestion when task demands were high. Blood glucose concentration was also found to predict performance across a number of cognitive domains. Interestingly, the risk factors associated with poor glucose regulation were linked to dietary impacts traditionally associated with poor health, e.g. the consumption of high-sugar sweets and drinks. The research replicates earlier work suggesting that task demands are critical to the glucose facilitation effect. Importantly, the data demonstrate clear associations between elevated glycaemia and relatively poor cognitive performance, which may be partly due to the effect of dietary and lifestyle factors.

  7. Peripheral circadian oscillators and their rhythmic regulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2003-05-01

    Most of the organisms living on earth show 24 hour (circadian) rhythms that are endogenously controlled by biological clocks. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by the circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. However, recent studies have demonstrated that circadian oscillators can be found in many organs and tissues, and it appears that the circadian oscillators in the periphery are not self-sustained, since, in vitro, the oscillation disappears after a few cycles. Although analysis of the clockwork mechanism indicates that the molecular composition of the clock in the SCN and in the peripheral tissues is very similar, the mechanism responsible for the damping of the circadian oscillation in the periphery is unknown. Recent studies have also indicated that the mammalian circadian system is hierarchically organized in that the SCN (i.e., the master circadian pacemaker) controls the peripheral oscillators in order to coordinate the physiological events in an entire body. The mechanisms by which the SCN controls peripheral oscillators are just starting to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on functioning of these extra-SCN oscillators and the mechanisms the SCN controls peripheral oscillators.

  8. Hormonal regulation of glucose clearance in lactating northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melinda A; Champagne, Cory D; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2008-09-01

    Northern elephant seals exhibit the rare strategy of fasting and lactating concomitantly. We investigated hormonal regulation of glucose clearance in northern elephant seals using glucose tolerance tests (GTT) performed early in lactation and again just prior to weaning. For comparison, identical measurements were made on separate females late in the molt fast. Serial blood samples were used to assess glucose clearance and hormone responses for 3 h post glucose injection. Plasma glucose remained elevated at the end of the sampling period in all groups. Glucose clearance rates were not significantly different among test groups. A significant insulin response was observed in early lactation, no significant response was observed late in lactation and an intermediate response was observed late in the molt fast. The insulin response to a glucose load decreased with adipose tissue proportions. Plasma glucagon decreased significantly following GTT in early and late lactation, although the magnitude of the depression was small in comparison to other species. Hypoinsulemia may be critical to facilitate net lipolysis late in lactation. Consistently low glucose clearance among test groups suggests insulin insensitivity within peripheral tissues. Glucagon suppression independent of insulin release suggests modification of the typical insulin-glucagon counter-regulation. These findings suggest that metabolic features of diabetic-like conditions may be adaptive in the context of long-term fasting.

  9. [Role of peripheral serotonin in the insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Cortés, Víctor Antonio; Galgani, José Eduardo; Olmos, Pablo Roberto; Santos, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    The most studied roles of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) have been related to its action in the Central Nervous System (CNS). However, most of 5HT is produced outside the CNS, mainly in the enterochromaffin cells of the gut. Additionally, other tissues such as the endocrine pancreas, particularly β-cells, have its own serotonin system able to synthesize, secrete and respond to extracellular 5HT through cell surface receptors subtypes that have been grouped in 7 families (HTR1-7). Interestingly, 5HT is stored in granules and released together with insulin from β-cells and its biological significance is likely a combination of intra and extracellular actions. The expression of enzymes involved in 5HT synthesis and their receptors varied markedly in β-pancreatic cells during pregnancy, in parallel with an increase in their insulin secretion potential (probably through the action of Htr3a) and an increase in β-cell mass (through the action of Htr2b and Htr1d). In addition, it has been suggested that gut-derived 5HT may promote hepatic gluconeogenesis during prolonged fasting through Htr2b receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest that peripheral 5HT plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through the differential expression and activation of 5-HT membrane receptors on the surface of hepatocytes, adipocytes and pancreatic β-cells.

  10. Peripheral activation of the Y2-receptor promotes secretion of GLP-1 and improves glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chandarana, Keval; Gelegen, Cigdem; Irvine, Elaine E.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Amouyal, Chloé; Andreelli, Fabrizio; Withers, Dominic J.; Batterham, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of peptide tyrosine–tyrosine (PYY) on feeding is well established but currently its role in glucose homeostasis is poorly defined. Here we show in mice, that intraperitoneal (ip) injection of PYY3-36 or Y2R agonist improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance and enhances insulin secretion; an effect blocked by peripheral, but not central, Y2R antagonist administration. Studies on isolated mouse islets revealed no direct effect of PYY3-36 on insulin secretion. Bariatric surgery in mice, enterogastric anastomosis (EGA), improved glucose tolerance in wild-type mice and increased circulating PYY and active GLP-1. In contrast, in Pyy-null mice, post-operative glucose tolerance and active GLP-1 levels were similar in EGA and sham-operated groups. PYY3-36 ip increased hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels, an effect blocked by ip Y2R antagonist. Collectively, these data suggest that PYY3-36 therefore acting via peripheral Y2R increases hepato-portal active GLP-1 plasma levels and improves nutrient-stimulated glucose tolerance. PMID:24049729

  11. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca2+ in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca2+ channels, K+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, and Na+/H+ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26784222

  12. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kocalis, Heidi E.; Hagan, Scott L.; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K.; Siuta, Michael A.; Laryea, Gloria N.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Printz, Richard L.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing neurons. Rictor deletion in all neurons led to increased fat mass and adiposity, glucose intolerance and behavioral leptin resistance. Disrupting Rictor in POMC neurons also caused obesity and hyperphagia, fasting hyperglycemia and pronounced glucose intolerance. AgRP neuron specific deletion did not impact energy balance but led to mild glucose intolerance. Collectively, we show that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling, especially in POMC-expressing neurons, is important for central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944899

  13. Glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus regulates glucose intake

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Richardson, Errol; Ma, Yue; Holton, Christopher; De Backer, Ivan; Buckley, Niki; Dhillo, Waljit; Bewick, Gavin; Zhang, Shuai; Carling, David; Bloom, Steve; Gardiner, James

    2014-01-01

    The brain relies on a constant supply of glucose, its primary fuel, for optimal function. A taste-independent mechanism within the CNS that promotes glucose delivery to the brain has been postulated to maintain glucose homeostasis; however, evidence for such a mechanism is lacking. Here, we determined that glucokinase activity within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus is involved in regulation of dietary glucose intake. In fasted rats, glucokinase activity was specifically increased in the arcuate nucleus but not other regions of the hypothalamus. Moreover, pharmacologic and genetic activation of glucokinase in the arcuate nucleus of rodent models increased glucose ingestion, while decreased arcuate nucleus glucokinase activity reduced glucose intake. Pharmacologic targeting of potential downstream glucokinase effectors revealed that ATP-sensitive potassium channel and P/Q calcium channel activity are required for glucokinase-mediated glucose intake. Additionally, altered glucokinase activity affected release of the orexigenic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y in response to glucose. Together, our results suggest that glucokinase activity in the arcuate nucleus specifically regulates glucose intake and that appetite for glucose is an important driver of overall food intake. Arcuate nucleus glucokinase activation may represent a CNS mechanism that underlies the oft-described phenomena of the “sweet tooth” and carbohydrate craving. PMID:25485685

  14. Intraportally delivered GLP-1, in the presence of hyperglycemia induced via peripheral glucose infusion, does not change whole body glucose utilization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kathryn M S; Edgerton, Dale S; Rodewald, Tiffany; Scott, Melanie; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Cherrington, Alan D

    2008-02-01

    After a meal, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose levels are significantly greater in the hepatic portal vein than in the artery. We have previously reported that, in the presence of intraportal glucose delivery, a physiological increase of GLP-1 in the hepatic portal vein increases nonhepatic glucose uptake via a mechanism independent of changes in pancreatic hormone secretion. The aim of the present study was to determine whether intraportal glucose delivery is required to observe this effect. Experiments consisted of a 40-min basal period, followed by a 240-min experimental period, during which conscious 42-h fasted dogs received glucose peripherally to maintain arterial plasma glucose levels at approximately 160 mg/dl. In addition, either saline (n = 6) or GLP-1 (1 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1); GLP-1, n = 6) was administered intraportally during the experimental period. As in the previous study, the presence of GLP-1 did not alter pancreatic hormone levels; however, in the present study, intraportal GLP-1 infusion did not result in an increase in whole body glucose utilization. This is despite the fact that arterial and hepatic portal vein GLP-1 levels were maintained at the same level as the previous study. Therefore, a physiological elevation of GLP-1 in the hepatic portal vein does not increase whole body glucose uptake when hyperglycemia is induced by peripheral glucose infusion. This indicates that a physiological increase in GLP-1 augments glucose utilization only when GLP-1 and glucose gradients conditions mimic the postprandial state.

  15. Impaired peripheral glucose sensing in F1 offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Maher A; Helmy, Madiha H; Hanafi, Mervat Y; Mahmoud, Shimaa A; Abo Elfetooh, Hanan

    2014-09-01

    Maternal diabetes can induce permanent changes in glucose homeostasis that can occur pre- and post-natal and leads to type 2 diabetes in adulthood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of maternal diabetes on the F1 offspring peripheral glucose sensing and mitochondrial biogenesis in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of diabetogenic programming. Two groups of female Wistar rats were used (diabetic and control); diabetes was neonatally induced by STZ injection to 5-day old rats. After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks, OGTT was constructed, and serum and tissues were obtained for the assessment of mTFA, mtDNA, UCP2, insulin receptor (IR), phospho-insulin receptor (phospho-IR), and GLUT4. The result indicated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance in the offspring under control diet at the 15th week of age and thereafter while those offspring under HCD showed IGT at 10th week, and diabetes was evidenced at the 25th week of age. This defect in glucose metabolism was preceded by impairment in the phosphorylation of IR and decreased IR and Glut4 that cause impaired glucose sensing together with inhibited mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle and adipose tissues. This study indicated that maternal diabetes caused impaired glucose sensing and insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues and caused change in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Post-natal feeding with HCD may accelerate these changes. Male F1 offspring appears to be more sensitive than females for fetal programming of T2D.

  16. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Kim, Sangwon F

    2011-09-26

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects.

  17. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Karen L.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2011-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects. PMID:21664918

  18. Regulation of glucose homoeostasis by brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Vivian; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Activation of BAT in human beings could also have beneficial metabolic effects that might resolve common complications of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, by ameliorating the glucolipotoxic pathological changes that underlie the development of peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion due to pancreatic β-cell failure. Evidence from rodent models suggests that BAT activation improves glucose homoeostasis through several mechanisms, which could point to new strategies to optimise stimulation of BAT in human beings and reverse insulin resistance in peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mathematical model for glucose regulation in the whole-body system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyuk; Han, Kyungreem; Choi, MooYoung

    2012-01-01

    The human body needs continuous and stable glucose supply for maintaining its biological functions. Stable glucose supply comes from the homeostatic regulation of the blood glucose level, which is controlled by various glucose consuming or producing organs. Therefore, it is important to understand the whole-body glucose regulation mechanism. In this article, we describe various mathematical models proposed for glucose regulation in the human body, and discuss the difficulty and limitation in reproducing real processes of glucose regulation.

  20. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  1. Regulation of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeostasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics.

  2. Lactoferrin potentially facilitates glucose regulation and enhances the incretin effect.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Yuta; Sugiyama, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is known for its physiologically pleiotropic properties. In this study, we investigated whether Lf affects glycemic regulation, including glucose absorption from the small intestine. Bovine Lf (bLf, 100 mg/kg body mass) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection before intravenous (intravenous glucose tolerance test, IVGTT) or oral glucose administration (oral glucose tolerance test, OGTT). With IVGTT, bLf pretreatment had no significant effect on plasma levels of glucose or insulin. With OGTT, the bLf treatment group tended to show lower plasma levels of glucose than the control group at and after the 15 min peak, and decreased levels of plasma glucose at 180 min. The change in plasma levels of insulin from 0 to 30 min was higher in the bLf treatment group than in the control group. Total plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) was lowered at 60 min by the bLf treatment, while an immediate increase in total plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) was observed within the bLf group undergoing OGTT. In addition, bLf was associated with an increase in the amount of glucose absorbed into the everted jejunum sac. These results suggest that Lf could suppress hyperglycemia, accompanied by elevated plasma levels of insulin via transiently accelerating GLP-1 secretion, and that Lf even enhances glucose absorption from the small intestine.

  3. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities.

    PubMed

    Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency.

  4. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V.; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency. PMID:25411385

  5. Fluoride Alteration of [(3)H]Glucose Uptake in Wistar Rat Brain and Peripheral Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Anna; Kuter, Katarzyna; Żelazko, Aleksandra; Głogowska-Gruszka, Anna; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowak, Przemysław

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of postnatal fluoride intake on [3H]glucose uptake and transport in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Sodium fluoride (NaF) in a concentration of 10 or 50 ppm was added to the drinking water of adult Wistar rats. The control group received distilled water. After 4 weeks, respective plasma fluoride levels were 0.0541 ± 0.0135 μg/ml (control), 0.0596 ± 0.0202 μg/ml (10 ppm), and 0.0823 ± 0.0199 μg/ml (50 ppm). Although plasma glucose levels were not altered in any group, the plasma insulin level in the fluoride (50 ppm) group was elevated (0.72 ± 0.13 μg/ml) versus the control group (0.48 ± 0.24 μg/ml) and fluoride (10 ppm) group. In rats receiving fluoride for 4 weeks at 10 ppm in drinking water, [3H]glucose uptake was unaltered in all tested parts of the brain. However, in rats receiving fluoride at 50 ppm, [3H]glucose uptake in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus with hypothalamus was elevated, versus the saline group. Fluoride intake had a negligible effect on [3H]glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, atrium, aorta, kidney, visceral tissue, lung, skin, oral mucosa, tongue, salivary gland, incisor, molars, and jawbone). In neither fluoride group was glucose transporter proteins 1 (GLUT 1) or 3 (GLUT 3) altered in frontal cortex and striatum versus control. On the assumption that increased glucose uptake (by neural tissue) reasonably reflects neuronal activity, it appears that fluoride damage to the brain results in a compensatory increase in glucose uptake and utilization without changes in GLUT 1 and GLUT 3 expression.

  6. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  7. Postprandial glucose regulation and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Hanefeld, Markolf; Leiter, Lawrence; Monnier, Louis; Moses, Alan; Owens, David; Tajima, Naoko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2004-10-25

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for much of the increased mortality and morbidity associated with type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies support the potential of improved glycemic control to reduce cardiovascular complications. An association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) level and the risk for cardiovascular complications has frequently been reported. Most epidemiological data implicate postprandial hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease, whereas the link between fasting glycemia and diabetic complications is inconclusive. Moreover, in many studies, postprandial glycemia is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HbA(1c) level. Postprandial glucose may have a direct toxic effect on the vascular endothelium, mediated by oxidative stress that is independent of other cardiovascular risk factors such as hyperlipidemia. Postprandial hyperglycemia also may exert its effects through its substantial contribution to total glycemic exposure. The present review examines the hypothesis that controlling postprandial glucose level is an important strategy in the prevention of cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes.

  8. Comparison of peripheral nerve damages according to glucose control timing in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jin, H Y; Kang, S M; Liu, W J; Song, C H; Lee, K A; Baek, H S; Park, T S

    2012-09-01

    In addition to tight glucose control, early intensive therapy has been reported to be more important for the prevention of diabetic micro- and macro-vascular complications. What is not known exactly is the quantitative difference according to timing delay in glucose control and whether early period control is really better than late control in terms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In this study, we investigated the effect of timing differences in glucose control on the peripheral nerves in an experimental diabetic model. 5 groups (6-8 rats in each group) were comprised of normal glucose rats (designated control), rats with hyperglycemia (designated DM), rats with glucose control for the entire 28-week study period (designated DM + INS [W0-28]), rats with glucose control for the early 14-week period followed by hyperglycemia for the late 14-week period (designated DM + INS [W0-14]), and rats with hyperglycemia for the early 14-week period followed by glucose control in the late 14-week period (designated DM + INS [W15-28]). We found that the current perception threshold (CPT) was lower in the DM + INS (W0-28) and DM + INS (W15-28) groups than in the DM + INS (W0-14) or DM groups (P<0.05). The mean myelinated fiber area of the sciatic nerve was significantly greater in the DM + INS (W0-28) and DM + INS (W15-28) groups (63.5±2.32 and 60.1±2.14 um, respectively) than in the DM + INS (W0-14) or DM groups (55.5±2.81 or 51.5±2.64 um, respectively) (P<0.05), and the intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) density was significantly higher in the DM + INS (W0-28) and DM + INS (W15-28) groups (6.9±0.46 and 6.8±0.11, respectively) than in the DM + INS (W0-14) or DM groups (59.5±0.32 and 5.3±0.39/mm, respectively) (P<0.05). Our results indicate that continuous glucose control is necessary to alleviate peripheral nerve damage and that glycemic control during the later period may be more important than early period

  9. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Li, Pingping; Le Moan, Natacha; Sachs, Benjamin D.; Schachtrup, Christian; Davalos, Dimitrios; Vagena, Eirini; Bridges, Dave; Kim, Choel; Saltiel, Alan R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is mediated by the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), which is expressed mainly in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 from its intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane is regulated by small guanosine triphosphate hydrolases (GTPases) and is essential for the maintenance of normal glucose homeostasis. Here we show that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a regulator of glucose uptake and insulin resistance. p75NTR knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity on normal chow diet, independent of changes in body weight. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that deletion of the p75NTR gene increases the insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate and suppression of hepatic glucose production. Genetic depletion or shRNA knockdown of p75NTR in adipocytes or myoblasts increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation. Conversely, overexpression of p75NTR in adipocytes decreases insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In adipocytes, p75NTR forms a complex with the Rab5 family GTPases Rab5 and Rab31 that regulate GLUT4 trafficking. Rab5 and Rab31 directly interact with p75NTR primarily via helix 4 of the p75NTR death domain. Adipocytes from p75NTR knockout mice show increased Rab5 and decreased Rab31 activities, and dominant negative Rab5 rescues the increase in glucose uptake seen in p75NTR knockout adipocytes. Our results identify p75NTR as a unique player in glucose metabolism and suggest that signaling from p75NTR to Rab5 family GTPases may represent a unique therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:22460790

  10. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gukhan; Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Min-Seon; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  11. Regulation of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA by central glucose and leptin

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Sidhaye, Aniket; Chohnan, Shigeru; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I.; Lane, M. Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA has been shown to function in global energy homeostasis by modulating food intake and energy expenditure. Little is known, however, about the regulation of malonyl-CoA concentration in the central nervous system. To address this issue we investigated the response of putative intermediates in the malonyl-CoA pathway to metabolic and endocrine cues, notably those provoked by glucose and leptin. Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA rises in proportion to the carbohydrate content of the diet consumed after food deprivation. Malonyl-CoA concentration peaks 1 h after refeeding or after peripheral glucose administration. This response depends on the dose of glucose administered and is blocked by the i.c.v. administration of an inhibitor of glucose metabolism, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). The kinetics of change in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after glucose administration is coincident with the suppression of phosphorylation of AMP kinase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Blockade of glucose utilization in the CNS by i.c.v. 2-DG prevented the effects of glucose on 5′AMP-activated protein kinase, malonyl-CoA, hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and food intake. Finally, we showed that leptin can increase hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and that the increase is additive with glucose administration. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, however, showed no defect in the glucose- or refeeding-induced rise in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after food deprivation, demonstrating that leptin was not required for this effect. These studies show that hypothalamic malonyl-CoA responds to the level of circulating glucose and leptin, both of which affect energy homeostasis. PMID:18032600

  12. PAS kinase: a nutrient sensing regulator of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    DeMille, Desiree; Grose, Julianne H

    2013-11-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase (PASK, PASKIN, and PSK) is a member of the group of nutrient sensing protein kinases. These protein kinases sense the energy or nutrient status of the cell and regulate cellular metabolism appropriately. PAS kinase responds to glucose availability and regulates glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and man. Despite this pivotal role, the molecular mechanisms of PAS kinase regulation and function are largely unknown. This review focuses on what is known about PAS kinase, including its conservation from yeast to man, identified substrates, associated phenotypes and role in metabolic disease.

  13. Osmotic regulation of cellular glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gremeaux, Thierry; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes various approaches allowing the study of hyperosmolarity in the functions of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Hyperosmolarity mimics insulin responses, such as glucose uptake and membrane ruffling, but also antagonizes these insulin effects, which can be evaluated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The molecular mechanisms of these effects can be also investigated by measuring the activation of different signaling pathways: (i) the phosphorylation of docking proteins on tyrosine and serine residues (serines 307 and 632), (ii) the phosphorylation of serine/threonine kinases, and (iii) the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

  14. Brain insulin signalling in the regulation of energy balance and peripheral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diamant, Michaela

    2007-03-30

    The unparalleled global rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes, together with the associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, are referred to as the "diabesity pandemic". Changes in lifestyle occurring worldwide, including the increased consumption of high-caloric foods and reduced exercise, are regarded as the main causal factors. Central obesity and insulin resistance have emerged as important linking components. Understanding the aetiology of the cluster of pathologies that leads to the increased risk is instrumental in the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies. Historically, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver were regarded as key insulin target organs involved in insulin-mediated regulation of peripheral carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism. The consequences of impaired insulin action in these organs were deemed to explain the functional and structural abnormalities associated with insulin resistance. The discovery of insulin receptors in the central nervous system, the detection of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid after peripheral insulin administration and the well-documented effects of intracerebroventricularly injected insulin on energy homeostasis, have identified the brain as an important target for insulin action. In addition to its critical role as a peripheral signal integrating the complex network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that influence parameters of energy balance, central nervous insulin signalling is also implicated in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. This review summarizes the evidence of insulin action in the brain as part of the multifaceted circuit involved in the central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, and discuss the role of impaired central nervous insulin signalling as a pathogenic factor in the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic.

  15. A novel ChREBP isoform in adipose tissue regulates systemic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Herman, Mark A; Peroni, Odile D; Villoria, Jorge; Schön, Michael R; Abumrad, Nada A; Blüher, Matthias; Klein, Samuel; Kahn, Barbara B

    2012-04-19

    The prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide and threatens to shorten lifespan. Impaired insulin action in peripheral tissues is a major pathogenic factor. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adipose tissue through the GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) glucose transporter, and alterations in adipose tissue GLUT4 expression or function regulate systemic insulin sensitivity. Downregulation of human and mouse adipose tissue GLUT4 occurs early in diabetes development. Here we report that adipose tissue GLUT4 regulates the expression of carbohydrate-responsive-element-binding protein (ChREBP; also known as MLXIPL), a transcriptional regulator of lipogenic and glycolytic genes. Furthermore, adipose ChREBP is a major determinant of adipose tissue fatty acid synthesis and systemic insulin sensitivity. We find a new mechanism for glucose regulation of ChREBP: glucose-mediated activation of the canonical ChREBP isoform (ChREBP-α) induces expression of a novel, potent isoform (ChREBP-β) that is transcribed from an alternative promoter. ChREBP-β expression in human adipose tissue predicts insulin sensitivity, indicating that it may be an effective target for treating diabetes.

  16. Mechanism of regulation of glucose production by lipolysis in humans.

    PubMed

    Jahoor, F; Klein, S; Wolfe, R

    1992-03-01

    The relationship between the rate of lipolysis and rate of glucose production (Ra) was investigated in 14- and 86-h fasted humans. [6,6-2H]glucose and [2H]5glycerol were infused to measure glucose and glycerol Ra in response to infusions of nicotinic acid in 14- and 86-h fasted subjects (protocol 1). The response of glucose Ra to nicotinic acid alone and nicotinic acid plus unlabeled glycerol was also measured in 86-h fasted subjects (protocol 2). After a 14-h fast, nicotinic acid caused a 30% decrease in plasma insulin levels and a marked (66%) decrease in plasma free fatty acid levels but did not have any significant effect on glucose Ra and concentration. After 86 h of fasting, nicotinic acid decreased glycerol Ra and hence lipolytic rate by approximately 60%. This caused a significant decrease (P less than 0.05) of 16-20% in glucose Ra and uptake. This decrease in glucose Ra was abolished when unlabeled glycerol was also infused with nicotinic acid to maintain glycerol Ra. These findings suggest that, in normal humans, a decrease in the rate of lipolysis regulates glucose Ra via its effect on the availability of glycerol for gluconeogenesis.

  17. Energy balance regulation by endocannabinoids at central and peripheral levels.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Carmelo; Mazza, Roberta; Obici, Silvana; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2011-09-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a universal and, perhaps, causative feature of obesity. Central nervous system (CNS) circuits that regulate food intake were initially believed to be the targets for dysregulation. However, it is increasingly evident that endocannabinoids affect food intake, energy expenditure and substrate metabolism by acting on peripheral sites. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1r) antagonists can effectively treat obesity and associated metabolic alterations but, unfortunately, cause and exacerbate mood disorders. Drugs restricted to act on peripheral CB1rs might be safer and more effective, retaining the anti-obesity effects but lacking the adverse neurodepressive reactions. This review summarizes the emerging roles of the ECS in energy balance and discusses future pharmacological approaches for developing peripherally restricted CB1r antagonists.

  18. Peripheral, but not central, GLP-1 receptor signaling is required for improvement in glucose tolerance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in mice.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Jill S; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Yin, Huali; Kaplan, Lee M

    2016-05-15

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) causes profound weight loss and remission of diabetes by influencing metabolic physiology, yet the mechanisms behind these clinical improvements remain undefined. After RYGB, levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a hormone that enhances insulin secretion and promotes satiation, are substantially elevated. Because GLP-1 signals in both the periphery and the brain to influence energy balance and glucose regulation, we aimed to determine the relative requirements of these systems to weight loss and improved glucose tolerance following RYGB surgery in mice. By pharmacologically blocking peripheral or central GLP-1R signaling, we examined whether GLP-1 action is necessary for the metabolic improvements observed after RYGB. Diet-induced obese mice underwent RYGB or sham operation and were implanted with osmotic pumps delivering the GLP-1R antagonist exendin-(9-39) (2 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) peripherally; 0.5 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) centrally) for up to 10 wk. Blockade of peripheral GLP-1R signaling partially reversed the improvement in glucose tolerance after RYGB. In contrast, fasting glucose and insulin sensitivity, as well as body weight, were unaffected by GLP-1R antagonism. Central GLP-1R signaling did not appear to be required for any of the metabolic improvements seen after this operation. Collectively, these results suggest a detectable but only modest role for GLP-1 in mediating the effects of RYGB and that this role is limited to its well-described action on glucose regulation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. AlphaB-crystallin regulates remyelination after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Erin-Mai F.; Nakanishi, Stan T.; Hoghooghi, Vahid; Eaton, Shane E. A.; Palmer, Alexandra L.; Frederick, Ariana; Stratton, Jo A.; Stykel, Morgan G.; Zochodne, Douglas W.; Biernaskie, Jeffrey; Ousman, Shalina S.

    2017-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin (αBC) is a small heat shock protein that is constitutively expressed by peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons and Schwann cells. To determine what role this crystallin plays after peripheral nerve damage, we found that loss of αBC impaired remyelination, which correlated with a reduced presence of myelinating Schwann cells and increased numbers of nonmyelinating Schwann cells. The heat shock protein also seems to regulate the cross-talk between Schwann cells and axons, because expected changes in neuregulin levels and ErbB2 receptor expression after PNS injury were disrupted in the absence of αBC. Such dysregulations led to defects in conduction velocity and motor and sensory functions that could be rescued with therapeutic application of the heat shock protein in vivo. Altogether, these findings show that αBC plays an important role in regulating Wallerian degeneration and remyelination after PNS injury. PMID:28137843

  20. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  1. Brain glucose sensing in homeostatic and hedonic regulation.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, Laura; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Thorens, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis as well as homeostatic and hedonic control of feeding is regulated by hormonal, neuronal, and nutrient-related cues. Glucose, besides its role as a source of metabolic energy, is an important signal controlling hormone secretion and neuronal activity, hence contributing to whole-body metabolic integration in coordination with feeding control. Brain glucose sensing plays a key, but insufficiently explored, role in these metabolic and behavioral controls, which when deregulated may contribute to the development of obesity and diabetes. The recent introduction of innovative transgenic, pharmacogenetic, and optogenetic techniques allows unprecedented analysis of the complexity of central glucose sensing at the molecular, cellular, and neuronal circuit levels, which will lead to a new understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases.

  2. Glucose regulates lipid metabolism in fasting king penguins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Orvoine, Jord; Groscolas, René

    2003-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether glucose intervenes in the regulation of lipid metabolism in long-term fasting birds, using the king penguin as an animal model. Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo before, during, and after a 2-h glucose infusion under field conditions. All the birds were in the phase II fasting status (large fat stores, protein sparing) but differed by their metabolic and hormonal statuses, being either nonstressed (NSB; n = 5) or stressed (SB; n = 5). In both groups, glucose infusion at 5 mg.kg-1.min-1 induced a twofold increase in glycemia. In NSB, glucose had no effect on lipolysis (maintenance of plasma concentrations and rates of appearance of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids) and no effect on the plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols (TAG), glucagon, insulin, or corticosterone. However, it limited fatty acid (FA) oxidation, as indicated by a 25% decrease in the plasma level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB). In SB, glucose infusion induced an approximately 2.5-fold decrease in lipolytic fluxes and a large decrease in FA oxidation, as reflected by a 64% decrease in the plasma concentration of beta-OHB. There were also a 35% decrease in plasma TAG, a 6.5- and 2.8-fold decrease in plasma glucagon and corticosterone, respectively, and a threefold increase in insulinemia. These data show that in fasting king penguins, glucose regulates lipid metabolism (inhibition of lipolysis and/or of FA oxidation) and affects hormonal status differently in stressed vs. nonstressed individuals. The results also suggest that in birds, as in humans, the availability of glucose, not of FA, is an important determinant of the substrate mix (glucose vs. FA) that is oxidized for energy production.

  3. Pathways regulating modality-specific axonal regeneration in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, the distal nerve is primed for regenerating axons by generating a permissive environment replete with glial cells, cytokines, and neurotrophic factors to encourage axonal growth. However, increasing evidence demonstrates that regenerating axons within peripheral nerves still encounter axonal-growth inhibitors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Given the generally poor clinical outcomes following peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction, the use of pharmacological therapies to augment axonal regeneration and overcome inhibitory signals has gained considerable interest. Joshi et al. (2014) have provided evidence for preferential or modality-specific (motor versus sensory) axonal growth and regeneration due to inhibitory signaling from Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway regulation. By providing inhibition to the ROCK signaling pathway through Y-27632, they demonstrate that motor neurons regenerating their axons are impacted to a greater extent compared to sensory neurons. In light of this evidence, we briefly review the literature regarding modality-specific axonal regeneration to provide context to their findings. We also describe potential and novel barriers, such as senescent Schwann cells, which provide additional axonal-growth inhibitory factors for future consideration following peripheral nerve injury.

  4. Hepatic mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 selectively regulates glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lawan, Ahmed; Zhang, Lei; Gatzke, Florian; Min, Kisuk; Jurczak, Michael J; Al-Mutairi, Mashael; Richter, Patric; Camporez, Joao Paulo G; Couvillon, Anthony; Pesta, Dominik; Roth Flach, Rachel J; Shulman, Gerald I; Bennett, Anton M

    2015-01-01

    The liver plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and communicates with peripheral tissues to maintain energy homeostasis. Obesity and insulin resistance are highly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the precise molecular details of NAFLD remain incomplete. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) regulate liver metabolism. However, the physiological contribution of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) as a nuclear antagonist of both p38 MAPK and JNK in the liver is unknown. Here we show that hepatic MKP-1 becomes overexpressed following high-fat feeding. Liver-specific deletion of MKP-1 enhances gluconeogenesis and causes hepatic insulin resistance in chow-fed mice while selectively conferring protection from hepatosteatosis upon high-fat feeding. Further, hepatic MKP-1 regulates both interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). Mice lacking hepatic MKP-1 exhibit reduced circulating IL-6 and FGF21 levels that were associated with impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidation and susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. Hence, hepatic MKP-1 serves as a selective regulator of MAPK-dependent signals that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and peripheral tissue energy balance. These results also demonstrate that hepatic MKP-1 overexpression in obesity is causally linked to the promotion of hepatosteatosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Hepatic Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase 1 Selectively Regulates Glucose Metabolism and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lawan, Ahmed; Zhang, Lei; Gatzke, Florian; Min, Kisuk; Jurczak, Michael J.; Al-Mutairi, Mashael; Richter, Patric; Camporez, Joao Paulo G.; Couvillon, Anthony; Pesta, Dominik; Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2014-01-01

    The liver plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and communicates with peripheral tissues to maintain energy homeostasis. Obesity and insulin resistance are highly associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the precise molecular details of NAFLD remain incomplete. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) regulate liver metabolism. However, the physiological contribution of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) as a nuclear antagonist of both p38 MAPK and JNK in the liver is unknown. Here we show that hepatic MKP-1 becomes overexpressed following high-fat feeding. Liver-specific deletion of MKP-1 enhances gluconeogenesis and causes hepatic insulin resistance in chow-fed mice while selectively conferring protection from hepatosteatosis upon high-fat feeding. Further, hepatic MKP-1 regulates both interleukin-6 (IL-6) and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). Mice lacking hepatic MKP-1 exhibit reduced circulating IL-6 and FGF21 levels that were associated with impaired skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidation and susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. Hence, hepatic MKP-1 serves as a selective regulator of MAPK-dependent signals that contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and peripheral tissue energy balance. These results also demonstrate that hepatic MKP-1 overexpression in obesity is causally linked to the promotion of hepatosteatosis. PMID:25312648

  6. IL-17 Regulates Adipogenesis, Glucose Homeostasis, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Luis A.; Shen, Wen-Jun; Joyce-Shaikh, Barbara; Pyatnova, Ekaterina A.; Richards, Andrew G.; Thom, Colin; Andrade, Sofia M.; Cua, Daniel J.; Kraemer, Fredric B.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have the potential to impact a surprising range of diseases, including obesity and its associated metabolic syndrome. In this paper, we show that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17 inhibits adipogenesis, moderates adipose tissue (AT) accumulation, and regulates glucose metabolism in mice. IL-17 deficiency enhances diet-induced obesity in mice and accelerates AT accumulation even in mice fed a low-fat diet. In addition to potential systemic effects, IL-17 is expressed locally in AT by leukocytes, predominantly by γδ T cells. IL-17 suppresses adipocyte differentiation from mouse-derived 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in vitro, and inhibits expression of genes encoding proadipogenic transcription factors, adipokines, and molecules involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. IL-17 also acts on differentiated adipocytes, impairing glucose uptake, and young IL-17–deficient mice show enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Our findings implicate IL-17 as a negative regulator of adipogenesis and glucose metabolism in mice, and show that it delays the development of obesity. PMID:21037091

  7. Mitochondrial Uncoupling and the Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial uncoupling is a physiological process that has direct and indirect consequences on glucose homeostasis. Non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, which is the most well-recognized biological process related to the physiological uncoupling of mitochondria, is caused by uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which mediates a regulated permeabilization of the mitochondrial inner membrane to protons. The uncoupled brown fat mitochondria are specialized to produce heat by oxidizing large amounts of substrates, making brown fat a sink that can actively drain glucose from circulation. This has been confirmed in human studies in which active brown fat was detected by glucose-derivative-based positron emission tomography scans. Thus, UCP1-mediated activation of brown fat appears to be a likely mechanism through which hyperglycemia could be ameliorated. In other tissues, mitochondria are reported to be mildly uncoupled by the UCP1-like proteins, UCP2 and UCP3. The primary role of these other UCPs does not appear to be the oxidation of a metabolic substrate (e.g., glucose) for heat production; instead, they participate in other processes, such as regulating the production of reactive oxygen species and transporting certain metabolites across the mitochondrial membrane. UCP2 activity influences glucose homeostasis by fine tuning intracellular events related to the cellular energy status, thereby controlling insulin secretion, food intake behavior and adiponectin secretion in pancreatic .- cells, brain and white adipose tissue, respectively. UCP3 appears to be more specifically involved in promoting fatty acid oxidation in muscle, and is thus likely to influence glucose metabolism indirectly. Several genetic association studies have related polymorphisms in the genes encoding UCPs with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes phenotypes. In this review, we will focus on what is known about the specific role of mitochondrial uncoupling in glucose metabolism, and its

  8. Islet hormonal regulation of glucose turnover during exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shilo, S; Sotsky, M; Shamoon, H

    1990-01-01

    A decline in plasma insulin and an increase in glucagon are known to occur during intense and/or prolonged exercise. However, it is not established whether changes in insulin and glucagon secretion are involved in the precise matching of hepatic glucose production to the enhanced glucose uptake by muscle during brief, low intensity exercise. We studied the effects of 30-min cycle exercise at 40% of maximal aerobic capacity in healthy subjects and C-peptide-deficient subjects with type 1 diabetes (IDDM) using [3-3H]glucose to estimate glucose turnover. Diabetic subjects were studied during continuous iv insulin infusion, which normalized glucose kinetics before experimental perturbations. In control (saline-infused) experiments, endogenous glucose appearance (Ra) increased by 80-90% above baseline to match the increase in glucose disappearance in both normal and IDDM subjects, even though the latter exercised at fixed levels of plasma free insulin, averaging 203 +/- 19 pmol/L. In other experiments, somatostatin was infused, and glucagon (1.0 ng/kg.min) and insulin (at two different rates) were maintained at constant levels. Infusion of insulin in normal subjects at doses sufficient to maintain constant peripheral plasma insulin was associated with no apparent effect on glucose turnover (plasma insulin, 80 +/- 21 pmol/L, compared to 52 +/- 5 pmol/L during saline; P = NS). However, insulin infusion at doses that normalized the portal insulin concentration (approximately 208 pmol/L) together with glucagon replacement inhibited the rise in glucose production in both normal and IDDM subjects. There were similar 45-55% reductions (P less than 0.03) of the increase in Ra seen with exercise in control experiments. When peripheral plasma free insulin (and presumably portal levels as well) were increased by about 20% in this experimental setting in IDDM (278 +/- 43 pmol/L), the suppression of Ra was even more profound, and Ra failed to increase at all with exercise. We

  9. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P.; Einhorn, William S.; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M.; Hagan, John P.; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E.; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I.; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by blocking let-7 biogenesis. In studies of the Lin28/let-7 pathway, we discovered unexpected roles in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promoted an insulin-sensitized state that resisted high fat diet-induced diabetes, whereas muscle-specific loss of Lin28a and overexpression of let-7 resulted in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occurred in part through let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated the enhanced glucose uptake and insulin-sensitivity conferred by Lin28a in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that let-7 targets were enriched for genes that contain SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. PMID:21962509

  10. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P; Einhorn, William S; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M; Hagan, John P; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q

    2011-09-30

    The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by inhibiting let-7 biogenesis. We have uncovered unexpected roles for the Lin28/let-7 pathway in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promote an insulin-sensitized state that resists high-fat-diet induced diabetes. Conversely, muscle-specific loss of Lin28a or overexpression of let-7 results in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occur, in part, through the let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. In addition, the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, abrogates Lin28a-mediated insulin sensitivity and enhanced glucose uptake. Moreover, let-7 targets are enriched for genes containing SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and control of fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingyu; Simcox, Judith; Mitchell, T. Creighton; Jones, Deborah; Cox, James; Luo, Bai; Cooksey, Robert C.; Boros, Laszlo G.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Excess iron is associated with hepatic damage and diabetes in humans, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are not known. To investigate how iron regulates glucose homeostasis, we fed C57BL/6J male mice with high-iron (HI) diets (2 or 20 g Fe/kg chow). Mice fed an HI diet exhibited elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and liver. Consistent with the increased AMPK activity, glucose uptake was enhanced in mice fed an HI diet. The effects of improved glucose tolerance induced by HI feeding were abolished in transgenic mice with expression of muscle specific dominant-negative AMPK. Glucose output was suppressed in the liver of wild-type mice fed an HI diet, due to decreased expression of gluconeogenic genes and decreased substrate (lactate) from peripheral glycolysis. Iron activated AMPK by increasing deacetylase and decreasing LKB1 acetylation, in turn stimulating the phosphorylation of LKB1 and AMPK. The effects of HI diet were abrogated by treatment of the mice with N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting a redox-dependent mechanism for increasing deacetylase activity. In addition, tissue from iron-fed mice exhibited an elevated AMP/ATP ratio, further contributing to AMPK activation. In summary, a diet high in iron improves glucose tolerance by activating AMPK through mechanisms that include deacetylation.—Huang J., Simcox, J., Mitchell, T. C., Jones, D., Cox, J., Luo, B., Cooksey, R. C., Boros, L. G., McClain, D. A. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice. PMID:23515442

  12. Zinc finger protein 407 (ZFP407) regulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Buchner, David A; Charrier, Alyssa; Srinivasan, Ethan; Wang, Li; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats; Bridges, Dave; Saltiel, Alan R

    2015-03-06

    The glucose transporter GLUT4 facilitates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in peripheral tissues including adipose, muscle, and heart. GLUT4 function is impaired in obesity and type 2 diabetes leading to hyperglycemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and neuropathy. To better understand the regulation of GLUT4 function, a targeted siRNA screen was performed and led to the discovery that ZFP407 regulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. The decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake due to ZFP407 deficiency was attributed to a reduction in GLUT4 mRNA and protein levels. The decrease in GLUT4 was due to both decreased transcription of Glut4 mRNA and decreased efficiency of Glut4 pre-mRNA splicing. Interestingly, ZFP407 coordinately regulated this decrease in transcription with an increase in the stability of Glut4 mRNA, resulting in opposing effects on steady-state Glut4 mRNA levels. More broadly, transcriptome analysis revealed that ZFP407 regulates many peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ target genes beyond Glut4. ZFP407 was required for the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone to increase Glut4 expression, but was not sufficient to increase expression of a PPARγ target gene reporter construct. However, ZFP407 and PPARγ co-overexpression synergistically activated a PPARγ reporter construct beyond the level of PPARγ alone. Thus, ZFP407 may represent a new modulator of the PPARγ signaling pathway.

  13. Peripheral effects of insulin dominate suppression of fasting hepatic glucose production

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N. )

    1990-06-01

    Insulin may suppress hepatic glucose production directly, or indirectly via suppression of release of gluconeogenic substrates from extrasplanchnic tissues. To compare these mechanisms, we performed insulin dose-response experiments in conscious dogs at euglycemia, during somatostatin infusion, and intraportal glucagon replacement. Insulin was sequentially infused either intraportally (0.05, 0.20, 0.40, 1.0, 1.4, and/or 3.0; protocol I) or systemically at half the intraportal rate (0.025, 0.10, 0.20, 0.50, 0.70, and/or 1.5 mU.min-1.kg-1; protocol II). Exogenous glucose infused during clamps was labeled with 3-(3H)glucose (2 microCi/g) to prevent a fall in plasma specific activity (P greater than 0.2) that may have contributed to previous underestimations of hepatic glucose output (HGO). Portal insulins were up to threefold higher during intraportal infusion, but peripheral insulin levels were not different between the intraportal and systemic protocols (7 +/- 5 vs. 9 +/- 1, 12 +/- 4 vs. 13 +/- 6, 16 +/- 3 vs. 27 +/- 5, 70 +/- 23 vs. 48 +/- 8, 83 +/- 3 vs. 86 +/- 21, and 128 vs. 120 +/- 14 microU/ml for paired insulin doses; P greater than 0.06 by analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Despite higher portal insulin levels in protocol I, HGO suppression was equivalent in the two protocols when systemic insulin was matched, from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to near-total suppression at 0.3 mg.min-1.kg-1 at the highest insulin infusion rate (3.0 mU.min-1.kg-1; P less than 0.0001) with intraportal insulin, from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to -0.8 +/- 0.2 mg.min-1.kg-1 in protocol II (P less than 0.001). Suppression of HGO was similar at matched systemic insulin, regardless of portal insulin, suggesting the primacy of insulin's action on the periphery in its restraint of hepatic glucose production.

  14. Peripheral inflammation acutely impairs human spatial memory via actions on medial temporal lobe glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Neil A; Doeller, Christian F; Voon, Valerie; Burgess, Neil; Critchley, Hugo D

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation impairs cognitive performance and is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Rodent studies demonstrated key roles for inflammatory mediators in many processes critical to memory, including long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. They also demonstrated functional impairment of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures by systemic inflammation. However, human data to support this position are limited. Sequential fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography together with experimentally induced inflammation was used to investigate effects of a systemic inflammatory challenge on human MTL function. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning was performed in 20 healthy participants before and after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. After each scanning session, participants performed a virtual reality spatial memory task analogous to the Morris water maze and a mirror-tracing procedural memory control task. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data demonstrated an acute reduction in human MTL glucose metabolism after inflammation. The inflammatory challenge also selectively compromised human spatial, but not procedural, memory; this effect that was independent of actions on motivation or psychomotor response. Effects of inflammation on parahippocampal and rhinal glucose metabolism directly mediated actions of inflammation on spatial memory. These data demonstrate acute sensitivity of human MTL to mild peripheral inflammation, giving rise to associated functional impairment in the form of reduced spatial memory performance. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the observed epidemiologic link between inflammation and risk of age-related cognitive decline and progression of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  16. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  17. Ghrelin's second life: from appetite stimulator to glucose regulator.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2012-07-07

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide hormone produced by the stomach, was the first orexigenic hormone to be discovered from the periphery. The octanoyl modification at Ser³, mediated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), is essential for ghrelin's biological activity. Ghrelin stimulates food intake through binding to its receptor (GRLN-R) on neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is widely expressed throughout the body; accordingly, it is implicated in several other physiological functions, which include growth hormone release, gastric emptying, and body weight regulation. Ghrelin and GRLN-R expression are also found in the pancreas, suggesting a local physiological role. Accordingly, several recent studies now point towards an important role for ghrelin and its receptor in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis, which is the main focus of this review. Several mechanisms of this regulation by ghrelin have been proposed, and one possibility is through the regulation of insulin secretion. Despite some controversy, most studies suggest that ghrelin exerts an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion, resulting in increased circulating glucose levels. Ghrelin may thus be a diabetogenic factor. Obesity-related type 2 diabetes has become an increasingly important health problem, almost reaching epidemic proportions in the world; therefore, antagonists of the ghrelin-GOAT signaling pathway, which will tackle both energy- and glucose homeostasis, may be considered as promising new therapies for this disease.

  18. Ghrelin's second life: From appetite stimulator to glucose regulator

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Pieter-Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide hormone produced by the stomach, was the first orexigenic hormone to be discovered from the periphery. The octanoyl modification at Ser3, mediated by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT), is essential for ghrelin’s biological activity. Ghrelin stimulates food intake through binding to its receptor (GRLN-R) on neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is widely expressed throughout the body; accordingly, it is implicated in several other physiological functions, which include growth hormone release, gastric emptying, and body weight regulation. Ghrelin and GRLN-R expression are also found in the pancreas, suggesting a local physiological role. Accordingly, several recent studies now point towards an important role for ghrelin and its receptor in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis, which is the main focus of this review. Several mechanisms of this regulation by ghrelin have been proposed, and one possibility is through the regulation of insulin secretion. Despite some controversy, most studies suggest that ghrelin exerts an inhibitory effect on insulin secretion, resulting in increased circulating glucose levels. Ghrelin may thus be a diabetogenic factor. Obesity-related type 2 diabetes has become an increasingly important health problem, almost reaching epidemic proportions in the world; therefore, antagonists of the ghrelin-GOAT signaling pathway, which will tackle both energy- and glucose homeostasis, may be considered as promising new therapies for this disease. PMID:22783041

  19. Autotaxin Is Regulated by Glucose and Insulin in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Kenneth; Kane, Daniel A; Touaibia, Mohamed; Kershaw, Erin E; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Kienesberger, Petra C

    2017-04-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is an adipokine that generates the bioactive lipid, lysophosphatidic acid. Despite recent studies implicating adipose-derived ATX in metabolic disorders including obesity and insulin resistance, the nutritional and hormonal regulation of ATX in adipocytes remains unclear. The current study examined the regulation of ATX in adipocytes by glucose and insulin and the role of ATX in adipocyte metabolism. Induction of insulin resistance in adipocytes with high glucose and insulin concentrations increased ATX secretion, whereas coincubation with the insulin sensitizer, rosiglitazone, prevented this response. Moreover, glucose independently increased ATX messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, and activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Glucose also acutely upregulated secreted ATX activity in subcutaneous adipose tissue explants. Insulin elicited a biphasic response. Acute insulin stimulation increased ATX activity in a PI3Kinase-dependent and mTORC1-independent manner, whereas chronic insulin stimulation decreased ATX mRNA, protein, and activity. To examine the metabolic role of ATX in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we incubated cells with the ATX inhibitor, PF-8380, for 24 hours. Whereas ATX inhibition increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and its downstream targets, insulin signaling and mitochondrial respiration were unaffected. However, ATX inhibition enhanced mitochondrial H2O2 production. Taken together, this study suggests that ATX secretion from adipocytes is differentially regulated by glucose and insulin. This study also suggests that inhibition of autocrine/paracrine ATX-lysophosphatidic acid signaling does not influence insulin signaling or mitochondrial respiration, but increases reactive oxygen species production in adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  20. Impact of Diet Composition on Blood Glucose Regulation.

    PubMed

    Russell, Wendy R; Baka, Athanasia; Björck, Inger; Delzenne, Nathalie; Gao, Dan; Griffiths, Helen R; Hadjilucas, Ellie; Juvonen, Kristiina; Lahtinen, Sampo; Lansink, Mirian; Loon, Luc Van; Mykkänen, Hannu; Östman, Elin; Riccardi, Gabriele; Vinoy, Sophie; Weickert, Martin O

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional management of blood glucose levels is a strategic target in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To implement such an approach, it is essential to understand the effect of food on glycemic regulation and on the underlying metabolic derangements. This comprehensive review summarizes the results from human dietary interventions exploring the impact of dietary components on blood glucose levels. Included are the major macronutrients; carbohydrate, protein and fat, micronutrient vitamins and minerals, nonnutrient phytochemicals and additional foods including low-calorie sweeteners, vinegar, and alcohol. Based on the evidence presented in this review, it is clear that dietary components have significant and clinically relevant effects on blood glucose modulation. An integrated approach that includes reducing excess body weight, increased physical activity along with a dietary regime to regulate blood glucose levels will not only be advantages in T2DM management, but will benefit the health of the population and limit the increasing worldwide incidence of T2DM.

  1. Nonruminant Nutrition Symposium: intestinal glucose sensing and regulation of glucose absorption: implications for swine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Shirazi-Beechey, S P; Moran, A W; Bravo, D; Al-Rammahi, M

    2011-06-01

    The Na(+/)glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) is the major route for the transport of dietary sugars from the lumen of the intestine into enterocytes. Regulation of this protein is essential for the provision of glucose to the body and avoidance of intestinal malabsorption. This has important nutritional implications in particular for young and growing animals. It has been demonstrated that dietary sugars and artificial sweeteners increase SGLT1 expression and the capacity of the gut to absorb monosaccharides. Furthermore, diets supplemented with artificial sweeteners have been shown to improve growth and performance of weaning piglets. In this review, after describing the organization of intestinal epithelium, the type of gut hormones released in response to dietary carbohydrates, the mechanism underlying the transcellular transport of glucose in the intestine is outlined. Next, a historical background to the work carried out in various laboratories aimed at identifying molecular mechanisms involved in regulation of intestinal glucose transporter, SGLT1, is described. Subsequently, the more recent data on the role of intestinal glucose, or sweet, sensor T1R2 + T1R3, a G protein-coupled receptor, required for upregulation of SGLT1 by dietary sugars and artificial sweeteners, are presented. The glucose sensor subunits, T1R2 + T1R3, are members of the taste receptor family 1, T1R, and are expressed in the gut enteroendocrine cells. Sensing of dietary sugars and artificial sweeteners by T1R2 + T1R3 activates a pathway in endocrine cells leading to secretion of gut hormones. Finally, after describing molecular mechanisms by which a specific gut hormone released by endocrine cells may regulate SGLT1 expression in the neighboring absorptive enterocytes, the application of these findings to enhancing intestinal capacity to absorb dietary sugars in weaning piglets is presented. A better understanding of the molecular events involved in regulation of SGLT1 will allow the

  2. Regulation of Glucose Utilization by Estradiol in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    alcohols (100, 95, and 80% ethanol (v/v) in H2O) and cleared in xylene, and coverslips were attached with Permount (Fisher Scientific). Slides were...E2) to estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients increases glucose uptake by tumors. Accordingly, downstream metabolic regulators of E2...The goal of the proposal was to study a novel regulatory pathway for E2 induced metabolism via PFKFB3 in breast cancer cells. In the initial

  3. Humanin: A Novel Central Regulator of Peripheral Insulin Action

    PubMed Central

    Muzumdar, Radhika H.; Huffman, Derek M.; Atzmon, Gil; Buettner, Christoph; Cobb, Laura J.; Fishman, Sigal; Budagov, Temuri; Cui, Lingguang; Einstein, Francine H.; Poduval, Aruna; Hwang, David; Barzilai, Nir; Cohen, Pinchas

    2009-01-01

    Background Decline in insulin action is a metabolic feature of aging and is involved in the development of age-related diseases including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). A novel mitochondria-associated peptide, Humanin (HN), has a neuroprotective role against AD-related neurotoxicity. Considering the association between insulin resistance and AD, we investigated if HN influences insulin sensitivity. Methods and Findings Using state of the art clamp technology, we examined the role of central and peripheral HN on insulin action. Continuous infusion of HN intra-cerebro-ventricularly significantly improved overall insulin sensitivity. The central effects of HN on insulin action were associated with activation of hypothalamic STAT-3 signaling; effects that were negated by co-inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3. Peripheral intravenous infusions of novel and potent HN derivatives reproduced the insulin-sensitizing effects of central HN. Inhibition of hypothalamic STAT-3 completely negated the effects of IV HN analog on liver, suggesting that the hepatic actions of HN are centrally mediated. This is consistent with the lack of a direct effect of HN on primary hepatocytes. Furthermore, single treatment with a highly-potent HN analog significantly lowered blood glucose in Zucker diabetic fatty rats. Based upon the link of HN with two age-related diseases, we examined if there were age associated changes in HN levels. Indeed, the amount of detectable HN in hypothalamus, skeletal muscle, and cortex was decreased with age in rodents, and circulating levels of HN were decreased with age in humans and mice. Conclusions We conclude that the decline in HN with age could play a role in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases including AD and T2DM. HN represents a novel link between T2DM and neurodegeneration and along with its analogues offers a potential therapeutic tool to improve insulin action and treat T2DM. PMID:19623253

  4. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  5. Dual Actions of Apolipoprotein A-I on Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion and Insulin-Independent Peripheral Tissue Glucose Uptake Lead to Increased Heart and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Disposal.

    PubMed

    Domingo-Espín, Joan; Lindahl, Maria; Nilsson-Wolanin, Oktawia; Cushman, Samuel W; Stenkula, Karin G; Lagerstedt, Jens O

    2016-07-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) of HDL is central to the transport of cholesterol in circulation. ApoA-I also provides glucose control with described in vitro effects of apoA-I on β-cell insulin secretion and muscle glucose uptake. In addition, apoA-I injections in insulin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice lead to increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and peripheral tissue glucose uptake. However, the relative contribution of apoA-I as an enhancer of GSIS in vivo and as a direct stimulator of insulin-independent glucose uptake is not known. Here, DIO mice with instant and transient blockade of insulin secretion were used in glucose tolerance tests and in positron emission tomography analyses. Data demonstrate that apoA-I to an equal extent enhances GSIS and acts as peripheral tissue activator of insulin-independent glucose uptake and verify skeletal muscle as an apoA-I target tissue. Intriguingly, our analyses also identify the heart as an important target tissue for the apoA-I-stimulated glucose uptake, with potential implications in diabetic cardiomyopathy. Explorations of apoA-I as a novel antidiabetic drug should extend to treatments of diabetic cardiomyopathy and other cardiovascular diseases in patients with diabetes. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Endogenously released GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany; Schurr, Kathleen; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the L cell of the gut in response to oral nutrient delivery. To determine if endogenously released GLP-1 contributes to the incretin effect and postprandial glucose regulation, conscious dogs (n = 8) underwent an acclimation period (t = −60 to −20 min), followed by a basal sampling period (t = −20 to 0 min) and an experimental period (t = 0–320 min). At the beginning of the experimental period, t = 0 min, a peripheral infusion of either saline or GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist, exendin (9–39) (Ex-9, 500 pmol/kg/min), was started. At t = 30 min, animals consumed a liquid mixed meal, spiked with acetaminophen. All animals were studied twice (± Ex-9) in random fashion, and the experiments were separated by a 1–2-week washout period. Antagonism of the GLP-1R did not have an effect, as indicated by repeated-measures MANOVA analysis of the Δ AUC from t = 45–320 min of arterial plasma glucose, GLP-1, insulin, glucagon, and acetaminophen levels. Therefore, endogenous GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog. PMID:21547512

  7. Central insulin-mediated regulation of hepatic glucose production [Review].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Insulin controls hepatic glucose production (HGP) and maintains glucose homeostasis through the direct action of hepatic insulin receptors, as well as the indirect action of insulin receptors in the central nervous system. Insulin acts on insulin receptors in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner, induces hyperpolarization of the hypothalamic neurons, and regulates HGP via the vagus nerve. In the liver, central insulin action augments IL-6 expression in Kupffer cells and activates STAT3 transcription factors in hepatocytes. Activated STAT3 suppresses the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes, thereby reducing HGP. It has become evident that nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids act upon the hypothalamus together with insulin, affecting HGP. On the other hand, HGP control by central insulin action is impeded in obesity and impeded by insulin resistance due to disturbance of PI3K signaling and inflammation in the hypothalamus or inhibition of STAT3 signaling in the liver. Although the mechanism of control of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression by central insulin action is conserved across species, its importance in human glucose metabolism has not been made entirely clear and its elucidation is anticipated in the future.

  8. Peripheral and central venous blood glucose concentrations in dogs and cats with acute arterial thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Klainbart, S; Kelmer, E; Vidmayer, B; Bdolah-Abram, T; Segev, G; Aroch, I

    2014-01-01

    Acute limb paralysis because of arterial thromboembolism (ATE) occurs in cats and less commonly in dogs. ATE is diagnosed based on physical examination findings and, occasionally, advanced imaging. Peripheral, affected limb venous glucose concentration is decreased in ATE, whereas its systemic concentration is within or above reference interval. Client-owned cats and dogs were divided into 3 respective groups: acute limb paralysis because of ATE (22 cats and 9 dogs); acute limb paralysis secondary to orthopedic or neurologic conditions (nonambulatory controls; 10 cats and 11 dogs); ambulatory animals presented because of various diseases (ambulatory controls; 10 cats and 9 dogs). Prospective observational, clinical study. Systemic and local (affected limb) blood glucose concentrations were measured. Their absolute and relative differences (ΔGlu and %ΔGlu, respectively) were compared among groups. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu were significantly higher in the ATE cats and dogs groups, compared to both of their respective controls (P < .0001 and P < .001, respectively). No significant differences were observed between the control groups. Receiver operator characteristics analysis of ΔGlu and %ΔGlu as predictors of ATE had area under the curve of 0.96 and 0.99 in cats, respectively, and 1.00 and 1.00, in dogs, respectively. ΔGlu cutoffs of 30 mg/dL and 16 mg/dL, in cats and dogs, respectively, corresponded to sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 90% in cats, respectively, and 100% in dogs. ΔGlu and %ΔGlu are accurate, readily available, diagnostic markers of acute ATE in paralyzed cats and dogs. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Effects of insulin on peripheral and splanchnic glucose metabolism in noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, R A; Gunnarsson, R; Björkman, O; Olsson, M; Wahren, J

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and site(s) of the insulin resistance were examined in nine normal-weight noninsulin-dependent diabetic (NIDD) subjects. The euglycemic insulin clamp technique (insulin concentration approximately 100 microU/ml) was employed in combination with hepatic and femoral venous catheterization and measurement of endogenous glucose production using infusion of tritiated glucose. Total body glucose metabolism in the NIDD subjects (4.37 +/- 0.45 mg/kg per min) was 38% (P less than 0.01) lower than in controls (7.04 +/- 0.63 mg/kg per min). Quantitatively, the most important site of the insulin resistance was found to be in peripheral tissues. Leg glucose uptake in the diabetic group was reduced by 45% as compared with that in controls (6.0 +/- 0.2 vs. 11.0 +/- 0.1 mg/kg leg wt per min; P less than 0.01). A strong positive correlation was observed between leg and total body glucose uptake (r = 0.70, P less than 0.001). Assuming that muscle is the primary leg tissue responsible for glucose uptake, it could be estimated that 90 and 87% of the infused glucose was disposed of by peripheral tissues in the control and NIDD subjects, respectively. Net splanchnic glucose balance during insulin stimulation was slightly more positive in the control than in the diabetic subjects (0.31 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.05 +/- 0.19 mg/kg per min; P less than 0.07). The difference (0.26 mg/kg per min) in net splanchnic glucose balance in NIDD represented only 10% of the reduction (2.67 mg/kg per min) in total body glucose uptake in the NIDD group and thus contributed very little to the insulin resistance. The results emphasize the importance of the peripheral tissues in the disposal of infused glucose and indicate that muscle is the most important site of the insulin resistance in NIDD. PMID:3894418

  10. Associations of Mindfulness with Glucose Regulation and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Britton, Willoughby B.; Gutman, Roee; Eaton, Charles B.; Buka, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether dispositional mindfulness is associated with glucose regulation and type 2 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N = 399) were from the New England Family Study, a prospective birth cohort, with median age 47 years. Dispositional mindfulness was assessed using the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS). Type 2 diabetes and “normal plasma glucose” were defined using American Diabetes Association criteria. Results Multivariable-adjusted regression analyses demonstrated that participants with high versus low MAAS scores were significantly more likely to have normal plasma glucose levels (prevalence ratio = 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08,1.87)), and were not significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (prevalence ratio = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.38,1.79), adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes and childhood socioeconomic status. Mediation analyses provided evidence of mediation via obesity and sense of control, where indirect effects were prevalence ratios (95% CI) of 1.03 (1.00,1.10) and 1.08 (1.00,1.21), respectively. Conclusions Dispositional mindfulness may be associated with better glucose regulation, in part because of a lower likelihood of obesity and greater sense of control among participants with higher levels of mindfulness. These findings need to be replicated by prospective studies to establish causality and to evaluate potential implications for mindfulness-based interventions to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26931758

  11. Thyroid states regulate subcellular glucose phosphorylation activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Martins Peçanha, Flavia Letícia; Dos Santos, Reinaldo Sousa; da-Silva, Wagner Seixas

    2017-07-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are very important in organism metabolism and regulate glucose utilization. Hexokinase (HK) is responsible for the first step of glycolysis, catalyzing the conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate. HK has been found in different cellular compartments, and new functions have been attributed to this enzyme. The effects of hyperthyroidism on subcellular glucose phosphorylation in mouse tissues were examined. Tissues were removed, subcellular fractions were isolated from eu- and hyperthyroid (T3, 0.25 µg/g, i.p. during 21 days) mice and HK activity was assayed. Glucose phosphorylation was increased in the particulate fraction in soleus (312.4% ± 67.1, n = 10), gastrocnemius (369.2% ± 112.4, n = 10) and heart (142.2% ± 13.6, n = 10) muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the control group. Hexokinase activity was not affected in brain or liver. No relevant changes were observed in HK activity in the soluble fraction for all tissues investigated. Acute T3 administration (single dose of T3, 1.25 µg/g, i.p.) did not modulate HK activity. Interestingly, HK mRNA levels remained unchanged and HK bound to mitochondria was increased by T3 treatment, suggesting a posttranscriptional mechanism. Analysis of the AKT pathway showed a 2.5-fold increase in AKT and GSK3B phosphorylation in the gastrocnemius muscle in the hyperthyroid group compared to the euthyroid group. Taken together, we show for the first time that THs modulate HK activity specifically in particulate fractions and that this action seems to be under the control of the AKT and GSK3B pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  12. Rpl13a small nucleolar RNAs regulate systemic glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyeon; Harris, Alexis N.; Holley, Christopher L.; Mahadevan, Jana; Pyles, Kelly D.; Lavagnino, Zeno; Scherrer, David E.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Zhang, Jessie; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Piston, David W.; Remedi, Maria S.; Urano, Fumihiko; Ory, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that form ribonucleoproteins to guide covalent modifications of ribosomal and small nuclear RNAs in the nucleus. Recent studies have also uncovered additional non-canonical roles for snoRNAs. However, the physiological contributions of these small RNAs are largely unknown. Here, we selectively deleted four snoRNAs encoded within the introns of the ribosomal protein L13a (Rpl13a) locus in a mouse model. Loss of Rpl13a snoRNAs altered mitochondrial metabolism and lowered reactive oxygen species tone, leading to increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets and enhanced systemic glucose tolerance. Islets from mice lacking Rpl13a snoRNAs demonstrated blunted oxidative stress responses. Furthermore, these mice were protected against diabetogenic stimuli that cause oxidative stress damage to islets. Our study illuminates a previously unrecognized role for snoRNAs in metabolic regulation. PMID:27820699

  13. Standing balance and trunk position sense in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)-related peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allon; Russell, James William; Alexander, Neil Burton

    2008-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) affect a large segment of the population. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common complication of T2DM, leading to sensory and motor deficits. While T2DM-related PN often results in balance- and mobility-related dysfunction which manifests as gait instability and falls, little is known about balance capabilities in patients who have evidence of PN related to IGT (IGT-PN). We evaluated patients with IGT-PN on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests as well as a new test of trunk position sense and balance impairment, trunk repositioning errors (TREs). Eight participants aged 50-72 years with IGT-PN, and eight age- and gender-matched controls underwent balance, mobility and trunk repositioning accuracy tests at a university neurology clinic and mobility research laboratory. Compared to controls, IGT-PN participants had as much as twice the magnitude of TREs and stood approximately half as long on the single leg balance test. People with IGT-PN exhibit deficits in standing balance and trunk position sense. Furthermore, there was a significant association between performance on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests, and electrophysiological and clinical measures of neuropathy in IGT-PN participants. Because IGT-related neuropathy represents the earliest stage of diabetic neuropathy, deficits in IGT-PN participants highlight the importance of early screening in the dysglycemic process for neuropathy and associated balance deficits.

  14. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  15. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D

    2016-03-15

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals.

  16. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S.; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals. PMID:26903647

  17. Chromogranin A Regulation of Obesity and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K.; Mahata, Sushil K.

    2017-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a prohormone and granulogenic factor in endocrine and neuroendocrine tissues, as well as in neurons, and has a regulated secretory pathway. The intracellular functions of CgA include the initiation and regulation of dense-core granule biogenesis and sequestration of hormones in neuroendocrine cells. This protein is co-stored and co-released with secreted hormones. The extracellular functions of CgA include the generation of bioactive peptides, such as pancreastatin (PST), vasostatin, WE14, catestatin (CST), and serpinin. CgA knockout mice (Chga-KO) display: (i) hypertension with increased plasma catecholamines, (ii) obesity, (iii) improved hepatic insulin sensitivity, and (iv) muscle insulin resistance. These findings suggest that individual CgA-derived peptides may regulate different physiological functions. Indeed, additional studies have revealed that the pro-inflammatory PST influences insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, whereas CST alleviates adiposity and hypertension. This review will focus on the different metabolic roles of PST and CST peptides in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant models, and their potential use as therapeutic targets. PMID:28228748

  18. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, A R; Kahn, C R

    2001-12-13

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  19. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  20. Adipocytes as regulators of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Evan D.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Adipocytes have been studied with increasing intensity as a result of the emergence of obesity as a serious public health problem and the realization that adipose tissue serves as an integrator of various physiological pathways. In particular, their role in calorie storage makes adipocytes well suited to the regulation of energy balance. Adipose tissue also serves as a crucial integrator of glucose homeostasis. Knowledge of adipocyte biology is therefore crucial for understanding the pathophysiological basis of obesity and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the rational manipulation of adipose physiology is a promising avenue for therapy of these conditions. PMID:17167472

  1. Dynamin 2 regulates biphasic insulin secretion and plasma glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Ji, Chen; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H.; Lou, Xuelin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in insulin granule exocytosis and endocytosis are paramount to pancreatic β cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Here, using temporally controlled gene ablation specifically in β cells in mice, we identified an essential role of dynamin 2 GTPase in preserving normal biphasic insulin secretion and blood glucose homeostasis. Dynamin 2 deletion in β cells caused glucose intolerance and substantial reduction of the second phase of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS); however, mutant β cells still maintained abundant insulin granules, with no signs of cell surface expansion. Compared with control β cells, real-time capacitance measurements demonstrated that exocytosis-endocytosis coupling was less efficient but not abolished; clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) was severely impaired at the step of membrane fission, which resulted in accumulation of clathrin-coated endocytic intermediates on the plasma membrane. Moreover, dynamin 2 ablation in β cells led to striking reorganization and enhancement of actin filaments, and insulin granule recruitment and mobilization were impaired at the later stage of GSIS. Together, our results demonstrate that dynamin 2 regulates insulin secretory capacity and dynamics in vivo through a mechanism depending on CME and F-actin remodeling. Moreover, this study indicates a potential pathophysiological link between endocytosis and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26413867

  2. Peripheral and spinal GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Sylvia; Augustin, Mirjam; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of spinal GABAergic inhibition is demonstrated to contribute to pathologic chronic pain states. We investigated spinal and peripheral GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats. We found that intrathecal but not peripheral administration of muscimol (GABA-A receptor agonist) and baclofen (GABA-B receptor agonist) reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia after plantar incision in rats. Nonevoked pain behavior after incision was unaffected by these agonists. Similarly, nociception in unincised rats was not reduced by the same dose of agonists. Thus, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are involved in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia (but not nonevoked pain). Intrathecal and systemic application of L-838,417, a subtype-selective benzodiazepine site agonist (α2, α3, α5), reduced mechanical and heat hyperalgesia after incision, indicating a role of these subunits in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia. Interestingly, the effects of all agonists were more intense and prolonged on the day after surgery than on the day of incision. Similarly, spinally administered GABA-A and GABA-B antagonists increased pain behavior, again with a greater effect 1 day after incision. One possible explanation for this finding might be that an incision modulates GABA-mediated inhibition 1 day after incision. However, expression of GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and α3 and GABA-B receptor subunits within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord were unchanged after incision, indicating that receptor expression cannot explain a possible modulation of GABAergic inhibition after incision. Thus, other mechanisms need to be considered. In conclusion, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are promising targets for postoperative, incisional pain in humans.

  3. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  4. A glucose-starvation response regulates the diffusion of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Ryan P; Tang, Jeffrey H; Helenius, Jonne; Dultz, Elisa; Brune, Christiane; Holt, Liam J; Huet, Sebastien; Müller, Daniel J; Weis, Karsten

    2016-03-22

    The organization and biophysical properties of the cytosol implicitly govern molecular interactions within cells. However, little is known about mechanisms by which cells regulate cytosolic properties and intracellular diffusion rates. Here, we demonstrate that the intracellular environment of budding yeast undertakes a startling transition upon glucose starvation in which macromolecular mobility is dramatically restricted, reducing the movement of both chromatin in the nucleus and mRNPs in the cytoplasm. This confinement cannot be explained by an ATP decrease or the physiological drop in intracellular pH. Rather, our results suggest that the regulation of diffusional mobility is induced by a reduction in cell volume and subsequent increase in molecular crowding which severely alters the biophysical properties of the intracellular environment. A similar response can be observed in fission yeast and bacteria. This reveals a novel mechanism by which cells globally alter their properties to establish a unique homeostasis during starvation.

  5. Amantadine reduces glucagon and enhances insulin secretion throughout the oral glucose tolerance test: central plus peripheral nervous system mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Lechin, Marcel E; Baez, Scarlet

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the trial was to examine the effects of amantadine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) plus insulin, glucagon and neurotransmitters circulating levels. Previous findings showed that hyperinsulinism and type 2 diabetes are positively associated with neural sympathetic and adrenal sympathetic activities, respectively. These peripheral sympathetic branches depend on the pontine (A5-noradrenergic) and the rostral ventrolateral (C1-adrenergic) medullary nuclei. They are excited by glutamate axons which act at NMDA postsynaptic receptors. Research design and methods One OGTT plus placebo and one OGTT plus oral amantadine test were carried out two weeks apart in 15 caucasic normal voluntary humans. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, plasma-free serotonin, platelet serotonin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were measured throughout the 180-minute testing period. Results Maximal reductions of plasma glucose and glucagon plus exacerbated insulin rises were significantly greater throughout the oral glucose plus amantadine test than those registered throughout the oral glucose plus placebo challenge. The above findings were paralleled by greater than normal noradrenaline/adrenaline plasma ratio increases. In addition, maximal reductions of the platelet serotonin and plasma serotonin circulating values contrasted with the normal rises of these parameters, always registered during the glucose load plus placebo challenge. Conclusion This study supports the theory that amantadine might be a powerful antidiabetic tool and could be added to the therapeutic arsenal against type 2 diabetes. PMID:21437134

  6. Quantitative proteomics identifies unanticipated regulators of nitrogen- and glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Rødkær, Steven V; Pultz, Dennis; Brusch, Michelle; Bennetzen, Martin V; Falkenby, Lasse G; Andersen, Jens S; Færgeman, Nils J

    2014-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying how cells sense, respond, and adapt to alterations in nutrient availability have been studied extensively during the past years. While most of these studies have focused on the linear connections between signaling components, it is increasingly being recognized that signaling pathways are interlinked in molecular circuits and networks such that any metabolic perturbation will induce signaling-wide ripple effects. In the present study, we have used quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) to examine how the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to nitrogen- or glucose starvation. We identify nearly 1400 phosphorylation sites of which more than 500 are regulated in a temporal manner in response to glucose- or nitrogen starvation. By bioinformatics and network analyses, we have identified the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Sic1, the Hsp90 co-chaperone Cdc37, and the Hsp90 isoform Hsp82 to putatively mediate some of the starvation responses. Consistently, quantitative expression analyses showed that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 are required for normal expression of nutrient-responsive genes. Collectively, we therefore propose that Sic1, Cdc37, and Hsp82 may orchestrate parts of the cellular starvation response by regulating transcription factor- and kinase activities.

  7. Loss of melatonin signalling and its impact on circadian rhythms in mouse organs regulating blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Gross, Elena; Labucay, Karin; Wolgast, Sabine; Peschke, Elmar

    2009-03-15

    The transmission of circadian rhythms is mediated by specific promoter sequences binding a particular circadian clock factor. The pineal hormone melatonin acts via G-protein-coupled receptors to synchronise these clock-generated circadian rhythms. The study was aimed to elucidate the possible role of melatonin as a zeitgeber for peripheral clocks in pancreas and liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) provided evidence of the simultaneous expression of the melatonin receptors MT(1) and MT(2) in mouse pancreas, liver and hypothalamus. Melatonin receptor knockout mice were analysed with respect to the clock gene- or clock-output transcripts PER1, DBP and RevErbalpha in pancreas and liver, and both the occurrence of phase shifts and amplitude changes were detected. Circadian PER1 protein expression was found to be retained in melatonin receptor double knockout mice with an increased amplitude as measured by semiquantitative Western blot analysis. Moreover, an impact of melatonin receptor deficiency on insulin transcripts, and altered regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis were monitored in the knockout animals. Insulin secretion from isolated islets of melatonin receptor MT(1), MT(2) or MT(1) and MT(2) double melatonin receptor-knockout animals was found to be increased relative to the wild type. These data support the idea that melatonin synchronises the functions of the major organs involved in blood glucose regulation and negatively acts on the insulin secretion.

  8. Daily rhythms in glucose metabolism: suprachiasmatic nucleus output to peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, S E

    2003-03-01

    The body has developed several control mechanisms to maintain plasma glucose concentrations within strict boundaries. Within those physiological boundaries, a clear daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations is present; this rhythm depends on the biological clock, which is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and is independent of the daily rhythm in food intake. Interestingly, there is also a daily rhythm in glucose uptake, which also depends on the SCN and follows the same pattern as the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations; both rise before the onset of activity. Thus, the SCN prepares the individual for the upcoming activity period in two different ways: by increasing plasma glucose concentrations and by facilitating tissue glucose uptake. In addition to this anticipation of glucose metabolism to expected glucose demands, the SCN also influences, depending on the time of the day, the responses of pancreas and liver to abrupt glucose changes (such as a glucose rise after a meal or hypoglycaemia). This review presents the view that the SCN uses different routes to (i) maintain daily glucose balance and (ii) set the level of the endocrine response to abrupt blood glucose changes.

  9. MKR mice have increased dynamic glucose disposal despite metabolic inflexibility, and hepatic and peripheral insulin insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheesvaran, B.; LeRoith, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Recent work has shown that there can be significant differences when glucose disposal is assessed for high-fat induced insulin resistance by static clamp methods vs dynamic assessment during a stable isotope i.p. glucose tolerance test. MKR mice, though lean, have severe insulin resistance and decreased muscle fatty acid oxidation. Our goal was to assess dynamic vs static glucose disposal in MKR mice, and to correlate glucose disposal and muscle–adipose–liver flux interactions with metabolic flexibility (indirect calorimetry) and muscle characteristics. Methods Stable isotope flux phenotyping was performed using [6,6-2H2]glucose, [U-13C6]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Muscle triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) content was assessed by thin layer chromatography, and histological determination of fibre type and cytochrome c activity performed. Metabolic flexibility was assessed by indirect calorimetry. Results Indirect calorimetry showed that MKR mice used more glucose than FVB/N mice during fasting (respiratory exchange ratio [RER] 0.88 vs 0.77, respectively). Compared with FVB/N mice, MKR mice had faster dynamic glucose disposal, despite increased whole-muscle DAG and TAG, and similar hepatic glucose production with higher fasting insulin and unchanged basal glucose. Fed MKR muscle had more glycogen, and increased levels of GLUT1 and GLUT4 than FVB/N muscle. Histology indicated that MKR soleus had mildly decreased cytochrome c activity overall and more type II (glycolytic) fibres compared with that in FVB/N mice. Conclusions/interpretation MKR muscle adapts to using glucose, with more type II fibres present in red muscle. Fasting RER is elevated and glucose disposal during an i.p. glucose tolerance test is accelerated despite increased muscle DAG and TAG. Metabolic inflexibility may result from the compensatory use of fuel that can be best utilised for energy requirements; static vs dynamic glucose disposal assessments may measure

  10. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of the peripheral nervous system in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Joyce Tang, W; Chen, Jerry S; Zeller, Robert W

    2013-06-15

    The formation of the sensory organs and cells that make up the peripheral nervous system (PNS) relies on the activity of transcription factors encoded by proneural genes (PNGs). Although PNGs have been identified in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, the complexity of their interactions has complicated efforts to understand their function in the context of their underlying regulatory networks. To gain insight into the regulatory network of PNG activity in chordates, we investigated the roles played by PNG homologs in regulating PNS development of the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis. We discovered that in Ciona, MyT1, Pou4, Atonal, and NeuroD-like are expressed in a sequential regulatory cascade in the developing epidermal sensory neurons (ESNs) of the PNS and act downstream of Notch signaling, which negatively regulates these genes and the number of ESNs along the tail midlines. Transgenic embryos mis-expressing any of these proneural genes in the epidermis produced ectopic midline ESNs. In transgenic embryos mis-expressing Pou4, and MyT1 to a lesser extent, numerous ESNs were produced outside of the embryonic midlines. In addition we found that the microRNA miR-124, which inhibits Notch signaling in ESNs, is activated downstream of all the proneural factors we tested, suggesting that these genes operate collectively in a regulatory network. Interestingly, these factors are encoded by the same genes that have recently been demonstrated to convert fibroblasts into neurons. Our findings suggest the ascidian PNS can serve as an in vivo model to study the underlying regulatory mechanisms that enable the conversion of cells into sensory neurons.

  12. Sex-related differences in peripheral glucose metabolism in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Paula, F J; Pimenta, W P; Saad, M J; Paccola, G M; Piccinato, C E; Foss, M C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic response of muscle tissue to glucose ingestion was studied in 10 normal men (M) and women (F) by using the forearm balance technique and indirect calorimetry simultaneously. During the 3 hours after a 75 g--oral glucose load, glucose uptake per unit muscle mass was significantly higher in women than in men, F = 187.3 +/- 26.9 vs M = 116.7 +/- 9.5 mg/100 g forearm muscle (P less than 0.05). A significant difference in muscle glucose fate was also observed since the amount of glucose utilized through a nonoxidative pathway was significantly higher in women, F = 84.5 +/- 2.6% (161.8 +/- 27.3 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs M = 75.3 +/- 2.2% (87.2 +/- 8.6 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05), whereas the amount of glucose oxidized in relation to glucose uptake was significantly higher in men, M = 24.7 +/- 2.2% (28.2 +/- 3.2 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs F = 15.5 +/- 2.6% (27.8 +/- 5.4 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05). No significant differences in insulin response to glucose ingestion were detected between groups. The women showed greater suppression of serum free fatty acids (FFA) levels in relation to basal levels than men. We conclude that: 1) after ingesting 75 g glucose, normal women showed greater glucose uptake per unit muscle mass than normal men, 2) for 3 hours after the ingestion of 75 g glucose, the predominant tendency toward utilizing glucose by a nonoxidative pathway is more marked in normal women than in normal men, and 3) the higher glucose uptake per unit muscle mass in the female group in the presence of an insulin response not significantly different from that of the male group suggests that muscle insulin sensitivity is greater in normal women.

  13. Glucose Regulation and Cognitive Function after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Galioto, Rachel; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is associated with cognitive impairment and bariatric surgery has been shown to improve cognitive functioning. Rapid improvements in glycemic control are common after bariatric surgery and likely contribute to these cognitive gains. We examined whether improvements in glucose regulation are associated with better cognitive function following bariatric surgery. Method A total of 85 adult bariatric surgery patients underwent computerized cognitive testing and fasting blood draw for glucose, insulin, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at baseline and 12 month post-operatively. Results Significant improvements in both cognitive function and glycemic control were observed among patients. After controlling for and baseline factors, 12-month homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance HOMA-IR predicted 12-month digits backward (β = −.253, p < .05), switching of attention- A (β = .156, p < .05), and switching of attention-B (β = −.181, p < .05). Specifically, as HOMA-IR decreased over time, working memory, psychomotor speed, and cognitive flexibility improved. Decreases in HbA1c were not associated with post-operative cognitive improvements. After controlling for baseline cognitive test performance, changes in BMI were also not associated with 12-month cognitive function. Conclusions Small effects of improved glycemic control on improved aspects of attention and executive function were observed following bariatric surgery among severely obese individuals. Future research is needed to identify the underlying mechanisms for the neurocognitive benefits of these procedures. PMID:25875124

  14. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  15. Diauxic Growth of Azotobacter vinelandii on Galactose and Glucose: Regulation of Glucose Transport by Another Hexose.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Y; Pei, H; Bancroft, K; Childers, G W

    1995-02-01

    The growth curve of Azotobacter vinelandii was biphasic when the organism was grown in a medium containing a mixture of galactose and glucose. Galactose was the primary carbon source; glucose was also consumed, but the rate at which it was consumed was lower than the rate at which galactose was consumed during the first phase of growth. Metabolic pathways for both sugars were induced. Cell cultures exhibited a second lag period as galactose was depleted. The length of this lag phase varied from 2 to 10 h depending on the pregrowth history of the cells. The second log growth phase occurred at the expense of the remaining glucose in the medium and was accompanied by induction of the high-maximum rate of metabolism glucose-induced glucose permease and increases in the levels of glucose metabolic enzymes. The second lag phase of diauxie may have been due to the time required for induction of the glucose-induced glucose permease.

  16. Pathways of glucose regulation of monosaccharide transport in grape cells.

    PubMed

    Conde, Carlos; Agasse, Alice; Glissant, David; Tavares, Rui; Gerós, Hernâni; Delrot, Serge

    2006-08-01

    Grape (Vitis vinifera) heterotrophic suspension-cultured cells were used as a model system to study glucose (Glc) transport and its regulation. Cells transported D-[14C]Glc according to simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics superimposed on first-order kinetics. The saturating component is a high-affinity, broad-specificity H+ -dependent transport system (Km = 0.05 mm). Glc concentration in the medium tightly regulated the transcription of VvHT1 (Vitis vinifera hexose transporter 1), a monosaccharide transporter previously characterized in grape berry, as well as VvHT1 protein amount and monosaccharide transport activity. All the remaining putative monosaccharide transporters identified so far in grape were poorly expressed and responded weakly to Glc. VvHT1 transcription was strongly repressed by Glc and 2-deoxy-D-Glc, but not by 3-O-methyl-D-Glc or Glc plus mannoheptulose, indicating the involvement of a hexokinase-dependent repression. 3-O-Methyl-D-Glc, which cannot be phosphorylated, and Glc plus mannoheptulose induced a decrease of transport activity caused by the reduction of VvHT1 protein in the plasma membrane without affecting VvHT1 transcript levels. This demonstrates hexokinase-independent posttranscriptional regulation. High Glc down-regulated VvHT1 transcription and Glc uptake, whereas low Glc increased those parameters. Present data provide an example showing control of plant sugar transporters by their own substrate both at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. VvHT1 protein has an important role in the massive import of monosaccharides into mesocarp cells of young grape berries because it was localized in plasma membranes of the early developing fruit. Protein amount decreased abruptly throughout fruit development as sugar content increases, consistent with the regulating role of Glc on VvHT1 expression found in suspension-cultured cells.

  17. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  18. Novel Roles for the Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transporter-4 in Hippocampally Dependent Memory.

    PubMed

    Pearson-Leary, Jiah; McNay, Ewan C

    2016-11-23

    The insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) is critical for insulin- and contractile-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. GluT4 is also expressed in some hippocampal neurons, but its functional role in the brain is unclear. Several established molecular modulators of memory processing regulate hippocampal GluT4 trafficking and hippocampal memory formation is limited by both glucose metabolism and insulin signaling. Therefore, we hypothesized that hippocampal GluT4 might be involved in memory processes. Here, we show that, in male rats, hippocampal GluT4 translocates to the plasma membrane after memory training and that acute, selective intrahippocampal inhibition of GluT4-mediated glucose transport impaired memory acquisition, but not memory retrieval. Other studies have shown that prolonged systemic GluT4 blockade causes insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, we found that prolonged hippocampal blockade of glucose transport through GluT4-upregulated markers of hippocampal insulin signaling prevented task-associated depletion of hippocampal glucose and enhanced both working and short-term memory while also impairing long-term memory. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of hippocampal AMPA GluR1 subunits and the neuronal GluT3, but decreased expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor, consistent with impaired ability to form long-term memories. Our findings are the first to show the cognitive impact of brain GluT4 modulation. They identify GluT4 as a key regulator of hippocampal memory processing and also suggest differential regulation of GluT4 in the hippocampus from that in peripheral tissues. The role of insulin-regulated glucose transporter-4 (GluT4) in the brain is unclear. In the current study, we demonstrate that GluT4 is a critical component of hippocampal memory processes. Memory training increased hippocampal GluT4 translocation and memory acquisition was impaired by GluT4 blockade. Unexpectedly, whereas long

  19. Phase modulation of insulin pulses enhances glucose regulation and enables inter-islet synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boah; Song, Taegeun; Lee, Kayoung; Kim, Jaeyoon; Han, Seungmin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho; Jo, Junghyo

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner from multiple micro-organs called the islets of Langerhans. The amplitude and phase (shape) of insulin secretion are modulated by numerous factors including glucose. The role of phase modulation in glucose homeostasis is not well understood compared to the obvious contribution of amplitude modulation. In the present study, we measured Ca2+ oscillations in islets as a proxy for insulin pulses, and we observed their frequency and shape changes under constant/alternating glucose stimuli. Here we asked how the phase modulation of insulin pulses contributes to glucose regulation. To directly answer this question, we developed a phenomenological oscillator model that drastically simplifies insulin secretion, but precisely incorporates the observed phase modulation of insulin pulses in response to glucose stimuli. Then, we mathematically modeled how insulin pulses regulate the glucose concentration in the body. The model of insulin oscillation and glucose regulation describes the glucose-insulin feedback loop. The data-based model demonstrates that the existence of phase modulation narrows the range within which the glucose concentration is maintained through the suppression/enhancement of insulin secretion in conjunction with the amplitude modulation of this secretion. The phase modulation is the response of islets to glucose perturbations. When multiple islets are exposed to the same glucose stimuli, they can be entrained to generate synchronous insulin pulses. Thus, we conclude that the phase modulation of insulin pulses is essential for glucose regulation and inter-islet synchronization. PMID:28235104

  20. Phase modulation of insulin pulses enhances glucose regulation and enables inter-islet synchronization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boah; Song, Taegeun; Lee, Kayoung; Kim, Jaeyoon; Han, Seungmin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho; Jo, Junghyo

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner from multiple micro-organs called the islets of Langerhans. The amplitude and phase (shape) of insulin secretion are modulated by numerous factors including glucose. The role of phase modulation in glucose homeostasis is not well understood compared to the obvious contribution of amplitude modulation. In the present study, we measured Ca2+ oscillations in islets as a proxy for insulin pulses, and we observed their frequency and shape changes under constant/alternating glucose stimuli. Here we asked how the phase modulation of insulin pulses contributes to glucose regulation. To directly answer this question, we developed a phenomenological oscillator model that drastically simplifies insulin secretion, but precisely incorporates the observed phase modulation of insulin pulses in response to glucose stimuli. Then, we mathematically modeled how insulin pulses regulate the glucose concentration in the body. The model of insulin oscillation and glucose regulation describes the glucose-insulin feedback loop. The data-based model demonstrates that the existence of phase modulation narrows the range within which the glucose concentration is maintained through the suppression/enhancement of insulin secretion in conjunction with the amplitude modulation of this secretion. The phase modulation is the response of islets to glucose perturbations. When multiple islets are exposed to the same glucose stimuli, they can be entrained to generate synchronous insulin pulses. Thus, we conclude that the phase modulation of insulin pulses is essential for glucose regulation and inter-islet synchronization.

  1. Sodium Glucose Cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) Plays as a Physiological Glucose Sensor and Regulates Cellular Contractility in Rat Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Masanori; Nagao, Tetsuhiko; Yoshinari, Mototaka

    2016-01-01

    Mesangial cells play an important role in regulating glomerular filtration by altering their cellular tone. We report the presence of a sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT) in rat mesangial cells. This study in rat mesangial cells aimed to evaluate the expression and role of SGLT2. The SGLT2 expression in rat mesangial cells was assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Changes in the mesangial cell surface area at different glucose concentrations and the effects of extracellular Na+ and Ca2+ and of SGLT and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) inhibitors on cellular size were determined. The cellular sizes and the contractile response were examined during a 6-day incubation with high glucose with or without phlorizin, an SGLT inhibitor. Western blotting revealed an SGLT2 band, and RT-PCR analysis of SGLT2 revealed the predicted 422-bp band in both rat mesangial and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. The cell surface area changed according to the extracellular glucose concentration. The glucose-induced contraction was abolished by the absence of either extracellular Na+ or Ca2+ and by SGLT and NCX inhibitors. Under the high glucose condition, the cell size decreased for 2 days and increased afterwards; these cells did not contract in response to angiotensin II, and the SGLT inhibitor restored the abolished contraction. These data suggest that SGLT2 is expressed in rat mesangial cells, acts as a normal physiological glucose sensor and regulates cellular contractility in rat mesangial cells.

  2. Brain areas and pathways in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; Serlie, Mireille J; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is the most important source of fuel for the brain and its concentration must be kept within strict boundaries to ensure the organism's optimal fitness. To maintain glucose homeostasis, an optimal balance between glucose uptake and glucose output is required. Besides managing acute changes in plasma glucose concentrations, the brain controls a daily rhythm in glucose concentrations. The various nuclei within the hypothalamus that are involved in the control of both these processes are well known. However, novel studies indicate an additional role for brain areas that are originally appreciated in other processes than glucose metabolism. Therefore, besides the classic hypothalamic pathways, we will review cortico-limbic brain areas and their role in glucose metabolism.

  3. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Regulates Endogenous Glucose Production and Muscle Glucose Uptake Independent of Its Incretin Action

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Julio E.; Bracy, Deanna P.; James, Freyja D.; Julien, Brianna M.; Wasserman, David H.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) diminishes postmeal glucose excursions by enhancing insulin secretion via activation of the β-cell GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r). GLP-1 may also control glucose levels through mechanisms that are independent of this incretin effect. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin clamp) and exercise were used to examine the incretin-independent glucoregulatory properties of the Glp1r because both perturbations stimulate glucose flux independent of insulin secretion. Chow-fed mice with a functional disruption of the Glp1r (Glp1r−/−) were compared with wild-type littermates (Glp1r+/+). Studies were performed on 5-h-fasted mice implanted with arterial and venous catheters for sampling and infusions, respectively. During insulin clamps, [3-3H]glucose and 2[14C]deoxyglucose were used to determine whole-body glucose turnover and glucose metabolic index (Rg), an indicator of glucose uptake. Rg in sedentary and treadmill exercised mice was determined using 2[3H]deoxyglucose. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited increased glucose disappearance, muscle Rg, and muscle glycogen levels during insulin clamps. This was not associated with enhanced muscle insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production and hepatic glycogen accumulation during insulin clamps. This was associated with impaired liver insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice became significantly hyperglycemic during exercise. Muscle Rg was normal in exercised Glp1r−/− mice, suggesting that hyperglycemia resulted from an added drive to stimulate glucose production. Muscle AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in exercised Glp1r−/− mice. This was associated with increased relative exercise intensity and decreased exercise endurance. In conclusion, these results show that the endogenous Glp1r regulates hepatic and muscle glucose flux independent of its ability to enhance insulin secretion. PMID:19008308

  4. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  5. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed ‘artificial sweeteners’. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake. PMID:24060992

  6. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-11-15

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed 'artificial sweeteners'. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake.

  7. Effects of intensified training and subsequent reduced training on glucose metabolism rate and peripheral insulin sensitivity in Standardbreds.

    PubMed

    de Graaf-Roelfsema, Ellen; Keizer, Hans A; van Breda, Eric; Wijnberg, Inge D; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2012-09-01

    To determine the influence of intensified training and subsequent reduced training on glucose metabolism rate and peripheral insulin sensitivity in horses and identify potential markers indicative of early overtraining. 12 Standardbred geldings. Horses underwent 4 phases of treadmill-based training. In phase 1, horses were habituated to the treadmill. In phase 2, endurance training was alternated with high-intensity exercise training. In phase 3, horses were divided into control and intensified training groups. In the intensified training group, training intensity, duration, and frequency were further increased via a protocol to induce overtraining; in the control group, these factors remained unaltered. In phase 4, training intensity was reduced. Standardized exercise tests were performed after each phase and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) tests were performed after phases 2, 3, and 4. 10 of 12 horses completed the study. Dissociation between mean glucose metabolism rate and mean glucose metabolism rate-to-plasma insulin concentration ratio (M:I) was evident in the intensified training group during steady state of HEC testing after phases 3 and 4. After phase 4, mean glucose metabolism rate was significantly decreased (from 31.1 ± 6.8 μmol/kg/min to 18.1 ± 3.4 μmol/kg/min), as was M:I (from 1.05 ± 0.31 to 0.62 ± 0.17) during steady state in the intensified training group, compared with phase 3 values for the same horses. Dissociation between the glucose metabolism rate and M:I in horses that underwent intensified training may reflect non-insulin-dependent increases in glucose metabolism.

  8. Evolution of glucose utilization: Glucokinase and glucokinase regulator protein

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Tan, Huanran

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is an essential nutrient that must be distributed throughout the body to provide energy to sustain physiological functions. Glucose is delivered to distant tissues via be blood stream, and complex systems have evolved to maintain the levels of glucose within a narrow physiological range. Phosphorylation of glucose, by glucokinase, is an essential component of glucose homeostasis, both from the regulatory and metabolic point-of-view. Here we review the evolution of glucose utilization from the perspective of glucokinase. We discuss the origin of glucokinase, its evolution within the hexokinase gene family, and the evolution of its interacting regulatory partner, glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR). Evolution of the structure and sequence of both glucokinase and GCKR have been necessary to optimize glucokinase in its role in glucose metabolism. PMID:24075984

  9. UCP2 regulates mitochondrial fission and ventromedial nucleus control of glucose responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Chitoku; Kim, Jung Dae; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Diano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) plays a critical role in regulating systemic glucose homeostasis. How neurons in this brain area adapt to the changing metabolic environment to regulate circulating glucose levels is ill-defined. Here we show that glucose load results in mitochondrial fission and reduced reactive oxygen species in VMH neurons mediated by dynamin-related peptide 1 (DRP1) under the control of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Probed by genetic manipulations and chemical-genetic control of VMH neuronal circuitry, we unmasked that this mitochondrial adaptation determines the size of the pool of glucose-excited neurons in the VMH, and, that this process regulates systemic glucose homoeostasis. Thus, our data unmasked a critical cellular biological process controlled by mitochondrial dynamics in VMH regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26919426

  10. UCP2 Regulates Mitochondrial Fission and Ventromedial Nucleus Control of Glucose Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Toda, Chitoku; Kim, Jung Dae; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Diano, Sabrina

    2016-02-25

    The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) plays a critical role in regulating systemic glucose homeostasis. How neurons in this brain area adapt to the changing metabolic environment to regulate circulating glucose levels is ill defined. Here, we show that glucose load results in mitochondrial fission and reduced reactive oxygen species in VMH neurons mediated by dynamin-related peptide 1 (DRP1) under the control of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Probed by genetic manipulations and chemical-genetic control of VMH neuronal circuitry, we unmasked that this mitochondrial adaptation determines the size of the pool of glucose-excited neurons in the VMH and that this process regulates systemic glucose homeostasis. Thus, our data unmasked a critical cellular biological process controlled by mitochondrial dynamics in VMH regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glucose-regulated insulin release from acid-disintegrable microgels covalently immobilized with glucose oxidase and catalase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghao; Hu, Huamin; Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2012-11-14

    The fabrication of a novel type of positively charged acid-disintegrable microgel loaded with insulin by electrostatic interactions and covalently immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOx) and catalase by inverse emulsion polymerization is reported, aiming for glucose-regulated insulin release by utilizing GOx/catalase cascade enzymatic reactions to trigger local pH decrease and acid-cleavage of crosslinking moieties. At the same time, a local pH decrease within the microgels also leads to the diminishment of net surface negative charges of encapsulated insulin. The above two factors both synergistically contribute to the prominently enhanced insulin release at high glucose levels (∼10-20 mM) compared to that in the absence of glucose. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Endogenous Nutritive Support after Traumatic Brain Injury: Peripheral Lactate Production for Glucose Supply via Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Johnson, Matthew L.; Horning, Michael A.; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that nutritive needs of injured brains are supported by large and coordinated increases in lactate shuttling throughout the body. To that end, we used dual isotope tracer ([6,6-2H2]glucose, i.e., D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate) techniques involving central venous tracer infusion along with cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who had nonpenetrating head injuries (n=12, all male) were entered into the study after consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from healthy controls (n=6, including one female). As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) for glucose was suppressed after TBI. Near normal arterial glucose and lactate levels in patients studied 5.7±2.2 days (range of days 2–10) post-injury, however, belied a 71% increase in systemic lactate production, compared with control, that was largely cleared by greater (hepatic+renal) glucose production. After TBI, gluconeogenesis from lactate clearance accounted for 67.1% of glucose rate of appearance (Ra), which was compared with 15.2% in healthy controls. We conclude that elevations in blood glucose concentration after TBI result from a massive mobilization of lactate from corporeal glycogen reserves. This previously unrecognized mobilization of lactate subserves hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis. As such, a lactate shuttle mechanism indirectly makes substrate available for the body and its essential organs, including the brain, after trauma. In addition, when elevations in arterial lactate concentration occur after TBI, lactate shuttling may provide substrate directly to vital organs of the body, including the injured brain. PMID:25279664

  13. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improvement of glucose metabolism after bariatric surgery appears to be from the composite effect of the alterations in multiple circulating gut hormone concentrations. However, their individual effect on glucose metabolism during different conditions is not clear. The objective of this study was to...

  14. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  15. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  16. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  17. The laforin-malin complex negatively regulates glycogen synthesis by modulating cellular glucose uptake via glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2012-02-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD.

  18. The Laforin-Malin Complex Negatively Regulates Glycogen Synthesis by Modulating Cellular Glucose Uptake via Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta

    2012-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD. PMID:22124153

  19. High Glucose Up-regulates ADAM17 through HIF-1α in Mesangial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Renzhong; Uttarwar, Lalita; Gao, Bo; Charbonneau, Martine; Shi, Yixuan; Chan, John S. D.; Dubois, Claire M.; Krepinsky, Joan C.

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that ADAM17 mediates high glucose-induced matrix production by kidney mesangial cells. ADAM17 expression is increased in diabetic kidneys, suggesting that its up-regulation may augment high glucose profibrotic responses. We thus studied the effects of high glucose on ADAM17 gene regulation. Primary rat mesangial cells were treated with high glucose (30 mm) or mannitol as osmotic control. High glucose dose-dependently increased ADAM17 promoter activity, transcript, and protein levels. This correlated with augmented ADAM17 activity after 24 h versus 1 h of high glucose. We tested involvement of transcription factors shown in other settings to regulate ADAM17 transcription. Promoter activation was not affected by NF-κB or Sp1 inhibitors, but was blocked by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) inhibition or down-regulation. This also prevented ADAM17 transcript and protein increases. HIF-1α activation by high glucose was shown by its increased nuclear translocation and activation of the HIF-responsive hypoxia-response element (HRE)-luciferase reporter construct. Assessment of ADAM17 promoter deletion constructs coupled with mutation analysis and ChIP studies identified HIF-1α binding to its consensus element at −607 as critical for the high glucose response. Finally, inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream PI3K/Akt, or ADAM17 itself, prevented high glucose-induced HIF-1α activation and ADAM17 up-regulation. Thus, high glucose induces ADAM17 transcriptional up-regulation in mesangial cells, which is associated with augmentation of its activity. This is mediated by HIF-1α and requires EGFR/ADAM17 signaling, demonstrating the potentiation by ADAM17 of its own up-regulation. ADAM17 inhibition thus provides a potential novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26175156

  20. Blood glucose regulation mechanism in depressive disorder animal model during hyperglycemic states.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Min; Park, Soo-Hyun; Sharma, Naveen; Kim, Sung-Su; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-06-01

    Depression is more common among diabetes people than in the general population. In the present study, blood glucose change in depression animal model was characterized by various types of hyperglycemia models such as d-glucose-fed-, immobilization stress-, and drug-induced hyperglycemia models. First, the ICR mice were enforced into chronic restraint stress for 2h daily for 2 weeks to produce depression animal model. The animals were fed with d-glucose (2g/kg), forced into restraint stress for 30min, or administered with clonidine (5μg/5μl) supraspinally or spinally to produce hyperglycemia. The blood glucose level in depression group was down-regulated compared to that observed in the normal group in d-glucose-fed-, restraint stress-, and clonidine-induced hyperglycemia models. The up-regulated corticosterone level induced by d-glucose feeding or restraint stress was reduced in the depression group while the up-regulation of plasma corticosterone level is further elevated after i.t. or i.c.v. clonidine administration in the depression group. The up-regulated insulin level induced by d-glucose feeding or restraint stress was reduced in the depression group. On the other hand, blood corticosterone level in depression group was up-regulated compared to the normal group after i.t. or i.c.v. clonidine administration. Whereas the insulin level in depression group was not altered when mice were administered clonidine i.t. or i.c.v. Our results suggest that the blood glucose level in depression group is down-regulated compared to the normal group during d-glucose-fed-, immobilization stress-, and clonidine-induced hyperglycemia in mice. The down-regulation of the blood glucose level might be one of the important pathophysiologic changes in depression.

  1. CNC-bZIP protein Nrf1-dependent regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongzhi; Fu, Jingqi; Xue, Peng; Zhao, Rui; Dong, Jian; Liu, Dianxin; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tong, Qingchun; Teng, Weiping; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2015-04-01

    The inability of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient insulin in response to glucose stimulation is a major contributing factor to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated both the in vitro and in vivo effects of deficiency of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1) in β-cells on β-cell function and glucose homeostasis. Silencing of Nrf1 in β-cells leads to a pre-T2D phenotype with disrupted glucose metabolism and impaired insulin secretion. Specifically, MIN6 β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf1 (Nrf1-KD) and isolated islets from β-cell-specific Nrf1-knockout [Nrf1(b)-KO] mice displayed impaired glucose responsiveness, including elevated basal insulin release and decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Nrf1(b)-KO mice exhibited severe fasting hyperinsulinemia, reduced GSIS, and glucose intolerance. Silencing of Nrf1 in MIN6 cells resulted in oxidative stress and altered glucose metabolism, with increases in both glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with the elevated basal insulin release and reduced glucose responsiveness. The elevated glycolysis and reduced glucose responsiveness due to Nrf1 silencing likely result from altered expression of glucose metabolic enzymes, with induction of high-affinity hexokinase 1 and suppression of low-affinity glucokinase. Our study demonstrated a novel role of Nrf1 in regulating glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in β-cells and characterized Nrf1 as a key transcription factor that regulates the coupling of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism and GSIS. Nrf1 plays critical roles in regulating glucose metabolism, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion, suggesting that Nrf1 may be a novel target to improve the function of insulin-secreting β-cells.

  2. Glucose level regulation via integral high-order sliding modes.

    PubMed

    Dorel, Lela

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin, or does not properly respond to it. This causes the glucose level in blood to increase. An algorithm based on Integral High-Order Sliding Mode technique is proposed, which keeps the normal blood glucose level automatically releasing insulin into the blood. The system is highly insensitive to inevitable parametric and model uncertainties, measurement noises and small delays.

  3. Lipid storage by adipose tissue macrophages regulates systemic glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Aouadi, Myriam; Vangala, Pranitha; Yawe, Joseph C.; Tencerova, Michaela; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Shen, Yuefei

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory pathways in adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) can impair glucose tolerance in obesity, but ATMs may also be beneficial as repositories for excess lipid that adipocytes are unable to store. To test this hypothesis, we selectively targeted visceral ATMs in obese mice with siRNA against lipoprotein lipase (LPL), leaving macrophages within other organs unaffected. Selective silencing of ATM LPL decreased foam cell formation in visceral adipose tissue of obese mice, consistent with a reduced supply of fatty acids from VLDL hydrolysis. Unexpectedly, silencing LPL also decreased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake (CD36) and esterification in ATMs. This deficit in fatty acid uptake capacity was associated with increased circulating serum free fatty acids. Importantly, ATM LPL silencing also caused a marked increase in circulating fatty acid-binding protein-4, an adipocyte-derived lipid chaperone previously reported to induce liver insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Consistent with this concept, obese mice with LPL-depleted ATMs exhibited higher hepatic glucose production from pyruvate and glucose intolerance. Silencing CD36 in ATMs also promoted glucose intolerance. Taken together, the data indicate that LPL secreted by ATMs enhances their ability to sequester excess lipid in obese mice, promoting systemic glucose tolerance. PMID:24986598

  4. Glucose regulates enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH in skeletal muscle cells; a novel role for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-07-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) is a functionally important metabolite required to support numerous cellular processes. However, despite the identification of numerous NADPH-producing enzymes, the mechanisms underlying how the organellar pools of NADPH are maintained remain elusive. Here, we have identified glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) as an important source of NADPH in mitochondria. Activity analysis, submitochondrial fractionation, fluorescence microscopy, and protease sensitivity assays revealed that G6PDH is localized to the mitochondrial matrix. 6-ANAM, a specific G6PDH inhibitor, depleted mitochondrial NADPH pools and increased oxidative stress revealing the importance of G6PDH in NADPH maintenance. We also show that glucose availability and differences in metabolic state modulate the enzymatic sources of NADPH in mitochondria. Indeed, cells cultured in high glucose (HG) not only adopted a glycolytic phenotype but also relied heavily on matrix-associated G6PDH as a source of NADPH. In contrast, cells exposed to low-glucose (LG) concentrations, which displayed increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial metabolic efficiency, and decreased glycolysis, relied predominantly on isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) as the principal NADPH-producing enzyme in the mitochondria. Culturing glycolytic cells in LG for 48 h decreased G6PDH and increased ICDH protein levels in the mitochondria, further pointing to the regulatory role of glucose. 2-Deoxyglucose treatment also prevented the increase of mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG. The role of glucose in regulating enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH pool maintenance was confirmed using human myotubes from obese adults with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (post-T2DM). Myotubes from post-T2DM participants failed to increase mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG in contrast to mitochondria in myotubes from control participants (non-T2DM). Hence, we not only identified a matrix

  5. Separate responses of karyopherins to glucose and amino acid availability regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2014-01-01

    The importin-β family members (karyopherins) mediate the majority of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Msn5 and Los1, members of the importin-β family, function in tRNA nuclear export. tRNAs move bidirectionally between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Nuclear tRNA accumulation occurs upon amino acid (aa) or glucose deprivation. To understand the mechanisms regulating tRNA subcellular trafficking, we investigated whether Msn5 and Los1 are regulated in response to nutrient availability. We provide evidence that tRNA subcellular trafficking is regulated by distinct aa-sensitive and glucose-sensitive mechanisms. Subcellular distributions of Msn5 and Los1 are altered upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Redistribution of tRNA exportins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm likely provides one mechanism for tRNA nuclear distribution upon glucose deprivation. We extended our studies to other members of the importin-β family and found that all tested karyopherins invert their subcellular distributions upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Glucose availability regulates the subcellular distributions of karyopherins likely due to alteration of the RanGTP gradient since glucose deprivation causes redistribution of Ran. Thus nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution of macromolecules is likely generally altered upon glucose deprivation due to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and redistribution of karyopherins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:25057022

  6. Glucose concentration regulates freeze tolerance in the wood frog Rana sylvatica.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, J P; Lee, R E; Lortz, P H

    1993-08-01

    In spring, the lowest temperature during freezing that can be survived by wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) from southern Ohio is approximately -3 degrees C. We investigated whether the thermal limit of freeze tolerance in these frogs is regulated by tissue levels of glucose, a putative cryoprotectant that is distributed to tissues during freezing. Frogs receiving exogenous glucose injections prior to freezing showed dose-dependent increases in glucose within the heart, liver, skeletal muscle and blood. Tissue glucose concentrations were further elevated during freezing by the production of endogenous glucose. Most glucose-loaded frogs survived freezing to -5 degrees C, whereas all control (saline-injected) frogs succumbed. Further, we investigated some mechanisms by which glucose might function as a cryoprotectant in R. sylvatica. Organ dehydration, a normal, beneficial response that reduces freezing injury to tissues, occurred independently of tissue glucose concentrations. However, elevated glucose levels reduced both body ice content and in vivo erythrocyte injury. These results not only provided conclusive evidence for glucose's cryoprotective role in R. sylvatica, but also revealed that tissue glucose level is a critical determinant of freeze tolerance capacity in this species.

  7. A karyopherin alpha2 nuclear transport pathway is regulated by glucose in hepatic and pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Cassany, Aurélia; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Klein, Christophe; Dalet, Véronique; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of the karyopherin alpha2 nuclear import carrier (also known as importin alpha2) in glucose signaling. In mhAT3F hepatoma cells, GFP-karyopherin alpha2 accumulated massively in the cytoplasm within minutes of glucose extracellular addition and returned to the nucleus after glucose removal. In contrast, GFP-karyopherin alpha1 distribution was unaffected regardless of glucose concentration. Glucose increased GFP-karyopherin alpha2 nuclear efflux by a factor 80 and its shuttling by a factor 4. These glucose-induced movements were not due to glycolytic ATP production. The mechanism involved was leptomycin B-insensitive, but phosphatase- and energy-dependent. HepG2 and COS-7 cells displayed no glucose-induced GFP-karyopherin alpha2 movements. In pancreatic MIN-6 cells, the glucose-induced movements of karyopherin alpha2 and the stimulation of glucose-induced gene transcription were simultaneously lost between passages 28 and 33. Thus, extracellular glucose regulates a nuclear transport pathway by increasing the nuclear efflux and shuttling of karyopherin alpha2 in cells in which glucose can stimulate the transcription of sugar-responsive genes.

  8. Endospanin1 affects oppositely body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis by differentially regulating central leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vauthier, Virginie; Roujeau, Clara; Chen, Patty; Sarkis, Chamsy; Migrenne, Stéphanie; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Rouillé, Yves; Foretz, Marc; Mallet, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Magnan, Christophe; Jockers, Ralf; Dam, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is a major integration center for energy and glucose homeostasis that responds to leptin. Resistance to leptin in the ARC is an important component of the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Recently, we showed that Endospanin1 (Endo1) is a negative regulator of the leptin receptor (OBR) that interacts with OBR and retains the receptor inside the cell, leading to a decreased activation of the anorectic STAT3 pathway. Endo1 is up-regulated in the ARC of high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and its silencing in the ARC of lean and obese mice prevents and reverses the development of obesity.

  9. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-06

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of phosphotransferases in glucose- and xylose-fermenting yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, V.W.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1997-12-31

    This research examined the titers of hexokinase (HK), phosphofructokinase (PFK), and xylulokinase (XUK) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two xylose fermenting yeasts, Pachysolen tannophilus and Candida shehatae, following shifts in carbon source and aeration. Xylose-grown C. shehatae, glucose-grown P. tannophilus, and glucose-grown S. cerevisiae, had the highest specific activities of XUK, HK, and PFK, respectively. XUK was induced by xylose to moderate levels in both P. tannophilus and C. shehatae, but was present only in trace levels in S. cerevisiae. HK activities in P. tannophilus were two to three fold higher when cells were grown on glucose than when grown on xylose, but HK levels were less inducible in C. shehatae. The PFK activities in S. cerevisiae were 1.5 to 2 times higher than in the two xylose-fermenting yeasts. Transfer from glucose to xylose rapidly inactivated HK in P. tannophilus, and transfer from xylose to glucose inactivated XUK in C. shehatae. The patterns of induction and inactivation indicate that the basic regulatory mechanisms differ in the two xylose fermenting yeasts. 42 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Ribosomal S6K1 in POMC and AgRP Neurons Regulates Glucose Homeostasis but Not Feeding Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Katsouri, Loukia; Irvine, Elaine E; Hankir, Mohammed K; Pedroni, Silvia M A; Voshol, Peter J; Gordon, Matthew W; Choudhury, Agharul I; Woods, Angela; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2015-04-21

    Hypothalamic ribosomal S6K1 has been suggested as a point of convergence for hormonal and nutrient signals in the regulation of feeding behavior, bodyweight, and glucose metabolism. However, the long-term effects of manipulating hypothalamic S6K1 signaling on energy homeostasis and the cellular mechanisms underlying these roles are unclear. We therefore inactivated S6K1 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons, key regulators of energy homeostasis, but in contrast to the current view, we found no evidence that S6K1 regulates food intake and bodyweight. In contrast, S6K1 signaling in POMC neurons regulated hepatic glucose production and peripheral lipid metabolism and modulated neuronal excitability. S6K1 signaling in AgRP neurons regulated skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and was required for glucose sensing by these neurons. Our findings suggest that S6K1 signaling is not a general integrator of energy homeostasis in the mediobasal hypothalamus but has distinct roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis by POMC and AgRP neurons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ribosomal S6K1 in POMC and AgRP Neurons Regulates Glucose Homeostasis but Not Feeding Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Mark A.; Katsouri, Loukia; Irvine, Elaine E.; Hankir, Mohammed K.; Pedroni, Silvia M.A.; Voshol, Peter J.; Gordon, Matthew W.; Choudhury, Agharul I.; Woods, Angela; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hypothalamic ribosomal S6K1 has been suggested as a point of convergence for hormonal and nutrient signals in the regulation of feeding behavior, bodyweight, and glucose metabolism. However, the long-term effects of manipulating hypothalamic S6K1 signaling on energy homeostasis and the cellular mechanisms underlying these roles are unclear. We therefore inactivated S6K1 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons, key regulators of energy homeostasis, but in contrast to the current view, we found no evidence that S6K1 regulates food intake and bodyweight. In contrast, S6K1 signaling in POMC neurons regulated hepatic glucose production and peripheral lipid metabolism and modulated neuronal excitability. S6K1 signaling in AgRP neurons regulated skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and was required for glucose sensing by these neurons. Our findings suggest that S6K1 signaling is not a general integrator of energy homeostasis in the mediobasal hypothalamus but has distinct roles in the regulation of glucose homeostasis by POMC and AgRP neurons. PMID:25865886

  13. Regulation of glucose transporters in LLC-PK1 cells: effects of D-glucose and monosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, T; Isselbacher, K J; Rhoads, D B

    1990-01-01

    Regulation of D-glucose transport in the porcine kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 was examined. To identify the sodium-coupled glucose transporter (SGLT), we cloned and sequenced several partial cDNAs homologous to SGLT1 from rabbit small intestine (M. A. Hediger, M. J. Coady, T. S. Ikeda, and E. M. Wright, Nature (London) 330:379-381, 1987). The extensive homology of the two sequences leads us to suggest that the high-affinity SGLT expressed by LLC-PK1 cells is SGLT1. SGLT1 mRNA levels were highest when the D-glucose concentration in the culture medium was 5 to 10 mM. Addition of D-mannose or D-fructose, but not D-galactose, in the presence of 5 mM D-glucose suppressed SGLT1 mRNA levels. SGLT1 activity, measured by methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside uptake, paralleled message levels except in cultures containing D-galactose. Therefore, SGLT1 gene expression may respond either to the cellular energy status or to the concentration of a hexose metabolite(s). By isolating several cDNAs homologous to rat GLUT-1, we identified the facilitated glucose transporter in LLC-PK1 cells as the erythroid/brain type GLUT-1. High-stringency hybridization of a single mRNA transcript to the rat GLUT-1 cDNA probe and failure to observe additional transcripts hybridizing either to GLUT-1 or to GLUT-2 probes at low stringency provide evidence that GLUT-1 is the major facilitated glucose transporter in this cell line. LLC-PK1 GLUT-1 mRNAs were highest at medium D-glucose concentrations of less than or equal to 2 mM. D-Fructose, D-mannose, and to a lesser extent D-galactose all suppressed GLUT-1 mRNA levels. Since the pattern of SGLT1 and GLUT-1 expression differed, particularly in low D-glucose or in the presence of D-galactose, we suggest that the two transporters are regulated independently. Images PMID:2247068

  14. Glucagon-like peptide 1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to regulate glucose metabolism and food intake through vagal afferent neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Tomé, Daniel; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a possible physiologic role for peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in regulating glucose metabolism and food intake. The likely site of action of GLP-1 is on vagal afferent neurons (VANs). The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the central nervous system and influences feeding behavior. Peripheral GLP-1 acts on VANs to inhibit food intake. The mechanism of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is unlike other gut-derived receptors; GLP-1Rs change their cellular localization according to feeding status rather than their protein concentrations. It is possible that several gut peptides are involved in mediating GLP-1R translocation. The mechanism of peripheral GLP-1R translocation still needs to be elucidated. We review data supporting the role of peripheral GLP-1 acting on VANs in influencing glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. We highlight evidence demonstrating that GLP-1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to induce satiation. Our aim was to understand the mechanism of peripheral GLP-1 in the development of noninvasive antiobesity treatments.

  15. Role of multifaceted regulators in cancer glucose metabolism and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; Cao, Ya; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism, “aerobic glycolysis” or “Warburg effect”, is a hallmark of human cancers. There is a cluster of “multifaceted regulators”, which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. They can not only modulate the activities of specific enzymes, but also act as transcriptional activators to regulate the expression of metabolism related genes. Additionally, they can crosstalk with other key factors involved in glucose metabolism and work together to initiate multiple oncogenic processes. These “multifaceted regulators”, especially p53, HIF-1, TIGAR and microRNA, will be focused in this review. And we will comprehensively illustrate their regulatory effects on cancer glucose metabolism, and further elaborate on their clinical significance. In-depth elucidation the role of “multifaceted regulators” in cancer glucose metabolism will provide us novel insights in cancer research field and offer promising therapeutic targets for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26934324

  16. CREBH Maintains Circadian Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating Hepatic Glycogenolysis and Gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunbae; Zheng, Ze; Walker, Paul D; Kapatos, Gregory; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-07-15

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a liver-enriched, endoplasmic reticulum-tethered transcription factor known to regulate the hepatic acute-phase response and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrate that CREBH functions as a circadian transcriptional regulator that plays major roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. The proteolytic cleavage and posttranslational acetylation modification of CREBH are regulated by the circadian clock. Functionally, CREBH is required in order to maintain circadian homeostasis of hepatic glycogen storage and blood glucose levels. CREBH regulates the rhythmic expression of the genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, including liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1), and the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC). CREBH interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) to synergize its transcriptional activities in hepatic gluconeogenesis. The acetylation of CREBH at lysine residue 294 controls CREBH-PPARα interaction and synergy in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. CREBH deficiency leads to reduced blood glucose levels but increases hepatic glycogen levels during the daytime or upon fasting. In summary, our studies revealed that CREBH functions as a key metabolic regulator that controls glucose homeostasis across the circadian cycle or under metabolic stress. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Adipocyte glucose transport regulation by eicosanoid precursors and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose uptake and free fatty acid release by adipocytes are increased by catecholamines. The mechanism of the stimulatory action of catecholamines on glucose uptake may be via eicosanoid production from release fatty acids. Rats were fed iso-nutrient diets with high or low safflower oil. After one month, 5 rats per diet group were fed diets with aspirin or without aspirin for 2 days. Isolated adipocytes from epididymal fat pads were incubated at 37/sup 0/C, gassed with 95% O/sub 2/-5% CO/sub 2/ in KRB buffer with 3% bovine serum albumin and with or without eicosanoid modifiers; a stimulator (10/sup -5/ M norepinephrine, N), or inhibitors (167 ..mu..l of antiserum to prostaglandin E (AntiE) per 1600 ..mu..l or 23mM Asp), or combinations of these. At 2-, 5-, and 10-min incubation, samples of incubation mixtures were taken to measure 2-deoxy glucose transport using /sup 3/H-2-deoxy glucose, /sup 14/C-inulin, and liquid scintillation counter.

  18. Glucose regulates diacylglycerol intracellular levels and protein kinase C activity by modulating diacylglycerol kinase subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Paturzo, Flora; Teperino, Raffaele; Sakane, Fumio; Fiory, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Ungaro, Paola; Valentino, Rossella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2007-11-02

    Although chronic hyperglycemia reduces insulin sensitivity and leads to impaired glucose utilization, short term exposure to high glucose causes cellular responses positively regulating its own metabolism. We show that exposure of L6 myotubes overexpressing human insulin receptors to 25 mm glucose for 5 min decreased the intracellular levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). This was paralleled by transient activation of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) and of insulin receptor signaling. Following 30-min exposure, however, both DAG levels and DGK activity returned close to basal levels. Moreover, the acute effect of glucose on DAG removal was inhibited by >85% by the DGK inhibitor R59949. DGK inhibition was also accompanied by increased protein kinase C-alpha (PKCalpha) activity, reduced glucose-induced insulin receptor activation, and GLUT4 translocation. Glucose exposure transiently redistributed DGK isoforms alpha and delta, from the prevalent cytosolic localization to the plasma membrane fraction. However, antisense silencing of DGKdelta, but not of DGKalpha expression, was sufficient to prevent the effect of high glucose on PKCalpha activity, insulin receptor signaling, and glucose uptake. Thus, the short term exposure of skeletal muscle cells to glucose causes a rapid induction of DGK, followed by a reduction of PKCalpha activity and transactivation of the insulin receptor signaling. The latter may mediate, at least in part, glucose induction of its own metabolism.

  19. Snf1-like protein kinase Ssp2 regulates glucose derepression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Fujita, Yasuko; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-02-01

    The function of two fission yeast genes, SPCC74.03c/ssp2(+) and SPAC23H4.02/ppk9(+), encoding an Snf1-like protein kinase were investigated. Deletion of ssp2(+) caused a partial defect in glucose derepression of inv1(+), fbp1(+), and gld1(+) and in assimilation of sucrose and glycerol, while a mutation in ppk9(+) had no apparent effect. Scr1, a transcription factor involved in glucose repression, localized to the nucleus under glucose-rich conditions and to the cytoplasm during glucose starvation in wild-type cells. In contrast, in the ssp2Δ mutant, Scr1 localized to the nucleus in cells grown in glucose-rich medium as well as in glucose-starved cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that Ssp2 is required for the phosphorylation of Scr1 upon glucose deprivation. Mutation of five putative Ssp2 recognition sites in Scr1 prevented glucose derepression of invertase in glucose-starved cells. These results indicate that Ssp2 regulates phosphorylation and subcellular localization of Scr1 in response to glucose.

  20. Glucose regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Graves, Lee M.; Duncan, Mara C.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is a rich source of energy and the raw material for biomass increase. Many eukaryotic cells remodel their physiology in the presence and absence of glucose. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes changes in transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell polarity in response to glucose availability. Upon glucose starvation, translation initiation and cell polarity are immediately inhibited, and then gradually recover. In this paper, we provide evidence that, as in cell polarity and translation, traffic at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes is regulated by glucose via an unknown mechanism that depends on protein kinase A (PKA). Upon glucose withdrawal, clathrin adaptors exhibit a biphasic change in localization: they initially delocalize from the membrane within minutes and later partially recover onto membranes. Additionally, the removal of glucose induces changes in posttranslational modifications of adaptors. Ras and Gpr1 signaling pathways, which converge on PKA, are required for changes in adaptor localization and changes in posttranslational modifications. Acute inhibition of PKA demonstrates that inhibition of PKA prior to glucose withdrawal prevents several adaptor responses to starvation. This study demonstrates that PKA activity prior to glucose starvation primes membrane traffic at the TGN and endosomes in response to glucose starvation. PMID:21832155

  1. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  2. Yeast HXK2 gene reverts glucose regulation mutation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Edmundo A.; Fernández, Francisco J.; Fierro, Francisco; Mejía, Armando; Marcos, Ana T.; Martín, Juan F.; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mutant Penicillium chrysogenum strain dogR5, derived from strain AS-P-78, does not respond to glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, and is partially deficient in D-glucose phosphorilating activity. We have transformed strain dogR5 with the (hexokinase) hxk2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants recovered glucose control of penicillin biosynthesis in different degrees, and acquired a hexokinase (fructose phosphorylating) activity absent in strains AS- P-78 and dogR5. Interestingly, they also recovered glucose regulation of β-galactosidase. On the other hand, glucokinase activity was affected in different ways in the transformants; one of which showed a lower activity than the parental dogR5, but normal glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis. Our results show that Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 and dogR5 strains lack hexokinase, and suggest that an enzyme with glucokinase activity is involved in glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, thus signaling glucose in both primary and secondary metabolism; however, catalytic and signaling activities seem to be independent. PMID:25477921

  3. Exercise-stimulated glucose uptake - regulation and implications for glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Kleinert, Maximilian; Richter, Erik A; Jensen, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle extracts glucose from the blood to maintain demand for carbohydrates as an energy source during exercise. Such uptake involves complex molecular signalling processes that are distinct from those activated by insulin. Exercise-stimulated glucose uptake is preserved in insulin-resistant muscle, emphasizing exercise as a therapeutic cornerstone among patients with metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. Exercise increases uptake of glucose by up to 50-fold through the simultaneous stimulation of three key steps: delivery, transport across the muscle membrane and intracellular flux through metabolic processes (glycolysis and glucose oxidation). The available data suggest that no single signal transduction pathway can fully account for the regulation of any of these key steps, owing to redundancy in the signalling pathways that mediate glucose uptake to ensure maintenance of muscle energy supply during physical activity. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate the movement of glucose from the capillary bed into the muscle cell and discuss what is known about their integrated regulation during exercise. Novel developments within the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics indicate that the known regulators of glucose uptake are only the tip of the iceberg. Consequently, many exciting discoveries clearly lie ahead.

  4. Yeast HXK2 gene reverts glucose regulation mutation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Edmundo A; Fernández, Francisco J; Fierro, Francisco; Mejía, Armando; Marcos, Ana T; Martín, Juan F; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mutant Penicillium chrysogenum strain dogR5, derived from strain AS-P-78, does not respond to glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, and is partially deficient in D-glucose phosphorilating activity. We have transformed strain dogR5 with the (hexokinase) hxk2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants recovered glucose control of penicillin biosynthesis in different degrees, and acquired a hexokinase (fructose phosphorylating) activity absent in strains AS- P-78 and dogR5. Interestingly, they also recovered glucose regulation of β-galactosidase. On the other hand, glucokinase activity was affected in different ways in the transformants; one of which showed a lower activity than the parental dogR5, but normal glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis. Our results show that Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 and dogR5 strains lack hexokinase, and suggest that an enzyme with glucokinase activity is involved in glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, thus signaling glucose in both primary and secondary metabolism; however, catalytic and signaling activities seem to be independent.

  5. Epigenomic Regulation of Schwann Cell Reprogramming in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ki H.; Hung, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and dynamic transcriptional changes of Schwann cells in response to injury are critical to peripheral nerve repair, yet the epigenomic reprograming that leads to the induction of injury-activated genes has not been characterized. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), which produces a transcriptionally repressive chromatin environment. We find that many promoters and/or gene bodies of injury-activated genes of mature rat nerves are occupied with H3K27me3. In contrast, the majority of distal enhancers that gain H3K27 acetylation after injury are not repressed by H3K27 methylation before injury, which is normally observed in developmentally poised enhancers. Injury induces demethylation of H3K27 in many genes, such as Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is silenced throughout Schwann cell development before injury. In addition, experiments using a Schwann cell-specific mouse knock-out of the Eed subunit of PRC2 indicate that demethylation is a rate-limiting step in the activation of such genes. We also show that some transcription start sites of H3K27me3-repressed injury genes of uninjured nerves are bound with a mark of active promoters H3K4me3, for example, Shh and Gdnf, and the reduction of H3K27me3 results in increased trimethylation of H3K4. Our findings identify reversal of polycomb repression as a key step in gene activation after injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Peripheral nerve regeneration after injury is dependent upon implementation of a novel genetic program in Schwann cells that supports axonal survival and regeneration. Identifying means to enhance Schwann cell reprogramming after nerve injury could be used to foster effective remyelination in the treatment of demyelinating disorders and in identifying pathways involved in regenerative process of myelination. Although recent progress has identified transcriptional determinants of successful reprogramming of the Schwann cell transcriptome

  6. Astrocyte-shed extracellular vesicles regulate the peripheral leukocyte response to inflammatory brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Alex M; Tovar-Y-Romo, Luis B; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Trout, Amanda L; Bae, Mihyun; Kanmogne, Marlene; Megra, Bezawit; Williams, Dionna W; Witwer, Kennith W; Gacias, Mar; Tabatadze, Nino; Cole, Robert N; Casaccia, Patrizia; Berman, Joan W; Anthony, Daniel C; Haughey, Norman J

    2017-04-04

    Brain injury induces a peripheral acute cytokine response that directs the transmigration of leukocytes into the brain. Because this brain-to-peripheral immune communication affects patient recovery, understanding its regulation is important. Using a mouse model of inflammatory brain injury, we set out to find a soluble mediator for this phenomenon. We found that extracellular vesicles (EVs) shed from astrocytes in response to intracerebral injection of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) rapidly entered into peripheral circulation and promoted the transmigration of leukocytes through modulation of the peripheral acute cytokine response. Bioinformatic analysis of the protein and microRNA cargo of EVs identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) as a primary molecular target of astrocyte-shed EVs. We confirmed in mice that astrocytic EVs promoted the transmigration of leukocytes into the brain by inhibiting PPARα, resulting in the increase of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity that triggered the production of cytokines in liver. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms regulating communication between the brain and peripheral immune system and identify astrocytic EVs as a molecular regulator of the immunological response to inflammatory brain damage. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Comparative study of different control techniques for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, Mohammed S

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose regulation is of a great concern for insulin-dependant patients with excessive glucose in blood (hyperglycaemia), or low glucose profile (hypoglycaemia) due to excess insulin delivery. Both conditions can cause dangerous complications for diabetic patients, and hence glucose regulation in blood is of prime importance. Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin in small quantities, allowing the glucose level to remain as close as possible to that of non-diabetics (near 100 mg dl(-1)). Different control techniques are used to maintain the glucose level and most of them depend on an exact mathematical or empirical model of insulin-glucose interaction. Recently, we have proposed different controllers that are based on fuzzy logic and so do not use mathematical modelling, which in general is nonlinear, complex and suffers from uncertainties. PI fuzzy controllers are physically related to classical PI and PID controllers, which are extremely popular. The parameter settings of classical and fuzzy logic controllers are based on deep common physical background. In this manuscript, a comparative study is proposed to evaluate the use of fuzzy logic controllers over other conventional controllers such as PI and PID controllers to maintain the blood glucose level within a normoglycaemic average especially when a diabetic patient is subjected to different conditions.

  8. Leptin and Fasting Regulate Rat Gastric Glucose-Regulated Protein 58

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Susana B.; Caminos, Jorge E.; González, Carmen R.; Vázquez, María J.; Garcés, María F.; Cepeda, Libia A.; García-Rendueles, María E. R.; Iglesias-Gamarra, Antonio; Gómez-Díaz, Consuelo; Lopez, Miguel; Castaño, Justo P.; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    The stomach secretes a wide range of peptides with essential metabolic functions, and thereby plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Disulfide isomerase glucose-regulated protein 58 (GRp58) is a molecular chaperone member of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathway, which is a marker for human gastric cancer. Since GRp58 seems to be regulated by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pattern shift, we used the 2DE gel methodology and peptide mass fingerprinting-protein identification by means of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. We show that gastric mucosa GRp58 is dephosphorylated by fasting, and this effect is blunted when fasted rats are treated with leptin. Furthermore, we assessed the gene expression of GRp58 under different physiological settings known to be associated with energy homeostasis (fasting, leptin treatment and leptin deficiency). We found that intraperitoneal administration of leptin increases whereas leptin deficiency decreases GRp58 mRNA levels. However, GRp58 expression remains unchanged after fasting, indicating that leptin actions on GRp58 are no direct sensitivity to fasting. Dissection of the molecular pathways mediating the interactions between ER stress-related factors and nutrient availability, as well as their target genes, may open a new avenue for the study of obesity and other metabolic disorders. PMID:22121381

  9. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  10. High glucose concentrations induce TNF-α production through the down-regulation of CD33 in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD33 is a membrane receptor containing a lectin domain and a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is able to inhibit cytokine production. CD33 is expressed by monocytes, and reduced expression of CD33 correlates with augmented production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-8. However, the role of CD33 in the inflammation associated with hyperglycemia and diabetes is unknown. Therefore, we studied CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in freshly isolated monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia, monocytes from healthy donors were cultured with different glucose concentrations (15-50 mmol/l D-glucose), and CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine production were assessed. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein-3 (SOCS-3) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also evaluated to address the cellular mechanisms involved in the down-regulation of CD33. Results CD33 expression was significantly decreased in monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes, and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were detected in the plasma of patients compared to healthy donors. Under high glucose conditions, CD33 protein and mRNA expression was significantly decreased, whereas spontaneous TNF-α secretion and SOCS-3 mRNA expression were increased in monocytes from healthy donors. Furthermore, the down-regulation of CD33 and increase in TNF-α production were prevented when monocytes were treated with the antioxidant α-tocopherol and cultured under high glucose conditions. Conclusion Our results suggest that hyperglycemia down-regulates CD33 expression and triggers the spontaneous secretion of TNF-α by peripheral monocytes. This phenomenon involves the generation of ROS and the up-regulation of SOCS-3. These observations support the importance of blood glucose control for maintaining innate immune function and suggest

  11. Extracellular adenosine regulates naive T cell development and peripheral maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Day, Yuan-Ji

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine produced as a byproduct of metabolic activity is present in all tissues and produces dose-dependent suppression of TCR signaling. Naive T cell maintenance depends on inhibition of TCR signals by environmental sensors, which are yet to be fully defined. We produced mice with a floxed adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) gene, Adora2a, and show that either global A2AR deletion or cre-mediated T cell deletion elicits a decline in the number of naive but not memory T cells. A2AR signaling maintains naive T cells in a quiescent state by inhibiting TCR-induced activation of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–AKT pathway, thereby reducing IL-7Rα down-regulation and naive T cell apoptosis. Patterns of IL-7Rα expression on T cells in chimeric mice reconstituted with Adora2a+/+ and Adora2a−/− bone marrow cells suggest that decreased IL-7Rα in naive T cells is a cell-intrinsic consequence of Adora2a deletion. In addition, A2AR expression increases in early thymic T cell development and contributes to progression of double-negative thymic precursors to single-positive thymocytes with increased IL-7Rα expression. Therefore, A2AR signaling regulates T cell development and maintenance to sustain normal numbers of naive T cells in the periphery. PMID:24145516

  12. EndoU is a novel regulator of AICD during peripheral B cell selection

    PubMed Central

    Poe, Jonathan C.; Kountikov, Evgueni I.; Lykken, Jacquelyn M.; Natarajan, Abirami; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Balanced transmembrane signals maintain a competent peripheral B cell pool limited in self-reactive B cells that may produce pathogenic autoantibodies. To identify molecules regulating peripheral B cell survival and tolerance to self-antigens (Ags), a gene modifier screen was performed with B cells from CD22-deficient C57BL/6 (CD22−/−[B6]) mice that undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) and fail to up-regulate c-Myc expression after B cell Ag receptor ligation. Likewise, lysozyme auto-Ag–specific B cells in IgTg hen egg lysozyme (HEL) transgenic mice inhabit the spleen but undergo AICD after auto-Ag encounter. This gene modifier screen identified EndoU, a single-stranded RNA-binding protein of ancient origin, as a major regulator of B cell survival in both models. EndoU gene disruption prevents AICD and normalizes c-Myc expression. These findings reveal that EndoU is a critical regulator of an unexpected and novel RNA-dependent pathway controlling peripheral B cell survival and Ag responsiveness that may contribute to peripheral B cell tolerance. PMID:24344237

  13. High Glucose Enhances Isoflurane-Induced Neurotoxicity by Regulating TRPC-Dependent Calcium Influx.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhongJie; Ma, ChangQing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, QingGuo; Xu, Rui; Zhang, HongFei; Lei, HongYi; Xu, ShiYuan

    2017-01-06

    Isoflurane is a commonly used inhalational anesthetic that can induce neurotoxicity via elevating cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)). High glucose regulates the expression of a family of non-selective cation channels termed transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels that may contribute to Ca(2+) influx. In the present study, we investigated whether high glucose enhances isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by regulating TRPC-dependent Ca(2+) influx. First, we evaluated toxic damage in mice primary cultured hippocampal neurons and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cells) after hyperglycemia and isoflurane exposure. Next, we investigated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, TRPC mRNA expression levels and tested the effect of the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells treated with high glucose or/and isoflurane. Finally, we employed knocked down TRPC6 to demonstrate the role of TRPC in high glucose-mediated enhancement of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that high glucose could enhance isoflurane-induecd toxic damage in primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose enhanced the isoflurane-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) in SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose elevated TRPC mRNA expression, especially that of TRPC6. SKF96365 and knock down of TRPC6 were able to inhibit the high glucose-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) and decrease isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells cultured with high glucose. Our findings indicate that high glucose could elevate TRPC expression, thus increasing Ca(2+) influx and enhancing isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK): An Emerging Regulator of Mammalian Glucose and Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-dan; Zhang, Ji-gang; Wang, Yu-zhu; Liu, Ying; Liu, Gao-lin; Li, Xiao-yu

    2015-09-07

    Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK) is an evolutionarily-conserved nutrient-responsive protein kinase that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism, mitochondrial respiration, phosphorylation, and gene expression. Recent data suggests that mammalian PAS kinase is involved in glucose metabolism and acts on pancreatic islet α/β cells and glycogen synthase (GS), affecting insulin secretion and blood glucose levels. In addition, PASK knockout mice (PASK-/-) are protected from obesity, liver triglyceride accumulation, and insulin resistance when fed a high-fat diet, implying that PASK may be a new target for metabolic syndrome (MetS) treatment as well as the cellular nutrients and energy sensors-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the targets of rapamycin (m-TOR). In this review, we will briefly summarize the regulation of PASK on mammalian glucose and lipid metabolism and its possible mechanism, and further explore the potential targets for MetS therapy.

  15. Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK): An Emerging Regulator of Mammalian Glucose and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-dan; Zhang, Ji-gang; Wang, Yu-zhu; Liu, Ying; Liu, Gao-lin; Li, Xiao-yu

    2015-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase (PASK) is an evolutionarily-conserved nutrient-responsive protein kinase that regulates lipid and glucose metabolism, mitochondrial respiration, phosphorylation, and gene expression. Recent data suggests that mammalian PAS kinase is involved in glucose metabolism and acts on pancreatic islet α/β cells and glycogen synthase (GS), affecting insulin secretion and blood glucose levels. In addition, PASK knockout mice (PASK-/-) are protected from obesity, liver triglyceride accumulation, and insulin resistance when fed a high-fat diet, implying that PASK may be a new target for metabolic syndrome (MetS) treatment as well as the cellular nutrients and energy sensors—adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the targets of rapamycin (m-TOR). In this review, we will briefly summarize the regulation of PASK on mammalian glucose and lipid metabolism and its possible mechanism, and further explore the potential targets for MetS therapy. PMID:26371032

  16. Glucokinase expression is regulated by glucose through O-GlcNAc glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Steffi F; Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Mir, Anne-Marie; Mortuaire, Marlène; Lefebvre, Tony; Guinez, Céline

    2016-09-16

    Blood glucose fluctuates with the fasting-feeding cycle. One of the liver's functions is to maintain blood glucose concentrations within a physiological range. Glucokinase (GCK) or hexokinase IV, is the main enzyme that regulates the flux and the use of glucose in the liver leading to a compensation of hyperglycemia. In hepatocytes, GCK catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. This critical enzymatic reaction is determinant for the metabolism of glucose in the liver which includes glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In liver, simultaneous increase of glucose and insulin enhances GCK activity and gene expression, changes its subcellular location and interaction with regulatory proteins. The post-translational O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) acts as a glucose-sensitive modification and is believed to take part in hepatic glucose sensing by modifying key regulatory proteins. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation in the liver of mice and investigated the role that this modification plays in regulating GCK protein expression. We demonstrated that endogenous GCK expression correlated with O-GlcNAc levels in the pathophysiological model ob/ob mice. More specifically, in response to the pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) contents of GCK increased. Using the GlcNAc specific lectin succinylated-WGA and click chemistry labeling approaches, we demonstrated that GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation. Further, we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated Ogt knock-down not only decreases O-GlcNAc content but also GCK protein level. Altogether, our in vivo and in vitro results demonstrate that GCK expression is regulated by nutrient-sensing O-GlcNAc cycling in liver.

  17. Multiple antibiotics produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens HV37a and their differential regulation by glucose.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Gutterson, N I

    1986-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HV37a inhibited growth of the fungus Pythium ultimum on potato dextrose agar (PDA). An antibiotic activity produced under these conditions was fractionated and partially characterized. Extracts prepared from the PDA on which HV37a was grown revealed a single peak of antibiotic activity on thin-layer chromatograms. Similar extracts were prepared from mutants of HV37a. Their analysis indicated that the antibiotic observed in thin-layer chromatograms was responsible for fungal inhibition observed on PDA. The production of the PDA antibiotic required the presence of glucose, whereas two other antibiotic activities were produced only on potato agar without added glucose. Two mutants (denoted AfuIa and AfuIb) previously characterized as deficient in fungal inhibition on PDA showed altered regulation of the production of all three antibiotics in response to glucose. These mutants were also deficient in glucose dehydrogenase. Mutants isolated as deficient in glucose dehydrogenase were also deficient in fungal inhibition and were grouped into two classes on the basis of complementation analysis with an AfuI cosmid. Glucose regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis therefore involves at least two components and requires glucose dehydrogenase. PMID:3098168

  18. PHLPP regulates hexokinase 2-dependent glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaopeng; Wen, Yang-An; Mitov, Mihail I; C Oaks, Mary; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Gao, Tianyan

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism is considered as one of the most important metabolic alterations adapted by cancer cells in order to generate energy as well as high levels of glycolytic intermediates to support rapid proliferation. PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) belongs to a novel family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that function as tumor suppressors in various types of human cancer. Here we determined the role of PHLPP in regulating glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells. Knockdown of PHLPP increased the rate of glucose consumption and lactate production, whereas overexpression of PHLPP had the opposite effect. Bioenergetic analysis using Seahorse Extracelluar Flux Analyzer revealed that silencing PHLPP expression induced a glycolytic shift in colon cancer cells. Mechanistically, we found that PHLPP formed a complex with Akt and hexokinase 2 (HK2) in the mitochondrial fraction of colon cancer cells and knockdown of PHLPP enhanced Akt-mediated phosphorylation and mitochondrial localization of HK2. Depletion of HK2 expression or treating cells with Akt and HK2 inhibitors reversed PHLPP loss-induced increase in glycolysis. Furthermore, PHLPP knockdown cells became addicted to glucose as a major energy source in that glucose starvation significantly decreased cancer cell survival. As HK2 is the key enzyme that determines the direction and magnitude of glucose flux, our study identified PHLPP as a novel regulator of glucose metabolism by controlling HK2 activity in colon cancer cells. PMID:28179998

  19. Abnormal glucose regulation increases stroke risk in minor ischemic stroke or TIA.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuesong; Jing, Jing; Li, Hao; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Yilong; He, Yan

    2016-10-11

    To investigate whether abnormal glucose regulation contributes to a new stroke in patients with a minor ischemic stroke or TIA. We derived data from the Clopidogrel in High-risk patients with Acute Nondisabling Cerebrovascular Events trial. Patients with a minor stroke or TIA were categorized into 3 groups: patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and normal fasting plasma glucose. The primary outcome was a new stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic) at 90 days. We assessed the association between glucose regulation status and risk of stroke by multivariable Cox regression models adjusted for potential covariates. Among 5,135 included patients, 1,587 (30.9%), 409 (8.0%), and 3,139 (61.1%) patients were identified as DM, IFG, and normal glucose, respectively. Compared with normal glucose, IFG (11.0% vs 6.9%; adjusted hazard ratio [adj HR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-2.19) and DM (15.8% vs 6.9%; adj HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.97-2.88) were associated with increased risk of stroke at 3 months after a minor stroke or TIA after adjusted for potential covariates. We found a weak J-shaped association between fasting plasma glucose and risk of stroke with a nadir of 4.9 mmol/L. Both IFG and DM were associated with an increased risk of stroke in patients with a minor stroke or TIA. NCT00979589. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  20. Fasting regulates EGR1 and protects from glucose- and dexamethasone-dependent sensitization to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Rappa, Francesca; Wei, Min; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Cappello, Francesco; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter D.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting reduces glucose levels and protects mice against chemotoxicity, yet drugs that promote hyperglycemia are widely used in cancer treatment. Here, we show that dexamethasone (Dexa) and rapamycin (Rapa), commonly administered to cancer patients, elevate glucose and sensitize cardiomyocytes and mice to the cancer drug doxorubicin (DXR). Such toxicity can be reversed by reducing circulating glucose levels by fasting or insulin. Furthermore, glucose injections alone reversed the fasting-dependent protection against DXR in mice, indicating that elevated glucose mediates, at least in part, the sensitizing effects of rapamycin and dexamethasone. In yeast, glucose activates protein kinase A (PKA) to accelerate aging by inhibiting transcription factors Msn2/4. Here, we show that fasting or glucose restriction (GR) regulate PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to protect against DXR in part by activating the mammalian Msn2/4 ortholog early growth response protein 1 (EGR1). Increased expression of the EGR1-regulated cardioprotective peptides atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in heart tissue may also contribute to DXR resistance. Our findings suggest the existence of a glucose–PKA pathway that inactivates conserved zinc finger stress-resistance transcription factors to sensitize cells to toxins conserved from yeast to mammals. Our findings also describe a toxic role for drugs widely used in cancer treatment that promote hyperglycemia and identify dietary interventions that reverse these effects. PMID:28358805

  1. Depletion of norepinephrine of the central nervous system Down-regulates the blood glucose level in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Su; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Sharma, Naveen; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-05-04

    DSP-4[N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride] is a neurotoxin that depletes norepinephrine. The catecholaminergic system has been implicated in the regulation of blood glucose level. In the present study, the effect of DSP-4 administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) on blood glucose level was examined in d-glucose-fed and restraint stress mice models. Mice were pretreated once i.c.v. or i.t. with DSP-4 (10-40μg) for 3days, and d-glucose (2g/kg) was fed orally. Blood glucose level was measured 0 (prior to glucose feeding or restraint stress), 30, 60, and 120min after d-glucose feeding or restraint stress. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated blood glucose level in the d-glucose-fed model. Plasma corticosterone level was downregulated in the d-glucose-fed model, whereas plasma insulin level increased in the d-glucose-fed group. The i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reversed the downregulation of plasma corticosterone induced by feeding d-glucose. In addition, the d-glucose-induced increase in plasma insulin was attenuated by the DSP-4 pretreatment. Furthermore, i.c.v. or i.t. pretreatment with DSP-4 reduced restraint stress-induced increases in blood glucose levels. Restraint stress increased plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. The i.c.v. pretreatment with DSP-4 attenuated restraint stress-induced plasma corticosterone and insulin levels. Our results suggest that depleting norepinephrine at the supraspinal and spinal levels appears to be responsible for downregulating blood glucose levels in both d-glucose-fed and restraint stress models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  3. Peripheral and Central Effects of Melatonin on Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pechanova, Olga; Paulis, Ludovit; Simko, Fedor

    2014-01-01

    The pineal hormone, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), shows potent receptor-dependent and -independent actions, which participate in blood pressure regulation. The antihypertensive effect of melatonin was demonstrated in experimental and clinical hypertension. Receptor-dependent effects are mediated predominantly through MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors. The pleiotropic receptor-independent effects of melatonin with a possible impact on blood pressure involve the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging nature, activation and over-expression of several antioxidant enzymes or their protection from oxidative damage and the ability to increase the efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Besides the interaction with the vascular system, this indolamine may exert part of its antihypertensive action through its interaction with the central nervous system (CNS). The imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic vegetative system is an important pathophysiological disorder and therapeutic target in hypertension. Melatonin is protective in CNS on several different levels: It reduces free radical burden, improves endothelial dysfunction, reduces inflammation and shifts the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system in favor of the parasympathetic system. The increased level of serum melatonin observed in some types of hypertension may be a counter-regulatory adaptive mechanism against the sympathetic overstimulation. Since melatonin acts favorably on different levels of hypertension, including organ protection and with minimal side effects, it could become regularly involved in the struggle against this widespread cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25299692

  4. G6PC2: A Negative Regulator of Basal Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Lynley D.; Oeser, James K.; O’Brien, Tracy P.; Wang, Yingda; Faulman, Chandler J.; Dadi, Prasanna K.; Jacobson, David A.; Hutton, John C.; McGuinness, Owen P.; Shiota, Masakazu; O’Brien, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) is associated with increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular-associated mortality. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have linked polymorphisms in G6PC2 with variations in FBG and body fat, although not insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance. G6PC2 encodes an islet-specific, endoplasmic reticulum–resident glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit. A combination of in situ perfused pancreas, in vitro isolated islet, and in vivo analyses were used to explore the function of G6pc2 in mice. G6pc2 deletion had little effect on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, whereas body fat was reduced in female G6pc2 knockout (KO) mice on both a chow and high-fat diet, observations that are all consistent with human GWAS data. G6pc2 deletion resulted in a leftward shift in the dose-response curve for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). As a consequence, under fasting conditions in which plasma insulin levels were identical, blood glucose levels were reduced in G6pc2 KO mice, again consistent with human GWAS data. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was reduced, whereas basal cytoplasmic calcium levels were elevated in islets isolated from G6pc2 KO mice. These data suggest that G6pc2 represents a novel, negative regulator of basal GSIS that acts by hydrolyzing glucose-6-phosphate, thereby reducing glycolytic flux. PMID:23274894

  5. G6PC2: a negative regulator of basal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Pound, Lynley D; Oeser, James K; O'Brien, Tracy P; Wang, Yingda; Faulman, Chandler J; Dadi, Prasanna K; Jacobson, David A; Hutton, John C; McGuinness, Owen P; Shiota, Masakazu; O'Brien, Richard M

    2013-05-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) is associated with increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular-associated mortality. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have linked polymorphisms in G6PC2 with variations in FBG and body fat, although not insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance. G6PC2 encodes an islet-specific, endoplasmic reticulum-resident glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit. A combination of in situ perfused pancreas, in vitro isolated islet, and in vivo analyses were used to explore the function of G6pc2 in mice. G6pc2 deletion had little effect on insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, whereas body fat was reduced in female G6pc2 knockout (KO) mice on both a chow and high-fat diet, observations that are all consistent with human GWAS data. G6pc2 deletion resulted in a leftward shift in the dose-response curve for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). As a consequence, under fasting conditions in which plasma insulin levels were identical, blood glucose levels were reduced in G6pc2 KO mice, again consistent with human GWAS data. Glucose-6-phosphatase activity was reduced, whereas basal cytoplasmic calcium levels were elevated in islets isolated from G6pc2 KO mice. These data suggest that G6pc2 represents a novel, negative regulator of basal GSIS that acts by hydrolyzing glucose-6-phosphate, thereby reducing glycolytic flux.

  6. Personality traits and abnormal glucose regulation in middle-aged Swedish men and women.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Anna-Karin; Gustavsson, J Petter; Hilding, Agneta; Granath, Fredrik; Ekbom, Anders; Ostenson, Claes-Göran

    2012-01-01

    To examine associations between personality and abnormal glucose regulation. This cross-sectional study comprised 2152 men and 3143 women (43-66 years). Oral glucose tolerance test identified 316 men and 213 women with previously unknown impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), IFG+IGT, or type 2 diabetes. Personality traits antagonism (low agreeableness), impulsivity (low conscientiousness), hedonic capacity (high extraversion), negative affectivity (high neuroticism) and alexithymia (low openness) were measured by a self-report inventory. Based on distribution of scores, responses were divided into "low" (<1 SD), "middle" (±1 SD) and "high" (>1 SD). Middle groups were considered reference groups. Prevalence odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. In men, OR for low antagonism was 0.3 (CI 0.2-0.6) (age- and multi-adjusted models) while in women, neither high nor low antagonism was associated to abnormal glucose regulation. Men and women with high hedonic capacity had ORs 0.5 (0.3-0.9) and 0.6 (0.4-1.0), respectively (age- and multi-adjusted models). The other scales illustrated no significant associations. No elevated risk of abnormal glucose regulation was observed for deviating scores on personality scales. Instead, reduced risks were indicated in men with low antagonism, and in men and women with high hedonic capacity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Is contraction-stimulated glucose transport feedforward regulated by Ca2+?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas E; Angin, Yeliz; Sylow, Lykke; Richter, Erik A

    2014-12-01

    In many cell types, Ca(2+) signals to increase the movement and surface membrane insertion of vesicles. In skeletal muscle, Ca(2+) is predominantly released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to initiate contraction. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release is widely believed to be a direct feedforward regulator of the translocation of glucose transporter 4 to the cell surface to facilitate transmembrane glucose transport. This review summarizes the evidence supporting the Ca(2+) feedforward model and its proposed signalling links to regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle and other cell types. The literature is contrasted against our recent findings suggesting that SR Ca(2+) release is neither essential nor adequate to stimulate glucose transport in muscle. Instead, feedback signals through AMPK and mechanical stress are likely to account for most of contraction-stimulated glucose transport. A revised working model is proposed, in which muscle glucose transport during contraction is not directly regulated by SR Ca(2+) release but rather responds exclusively to feedback signals activated secondary to cross-bridge cycling and tension development. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  8. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua P.; Zayasbazan Burgos, Delaine; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA. PMID:26786775

  9. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Burgos, Delaine Zayasbazan; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca; Heart, Emma A

    2016-03-15

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA.

  10. Paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer cell invasion by peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ziv; Cavel, Oren; Kelly, Kaitlyn; Brader, Peter; Rein, Avigail; Gao, Sizhi P; Carlson, Diane L; Shah, Jatin P; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2010-01-20

    The ability of cancer to infiltrate along nerves is a common clinical observation in pancreas, head and neck, prostate, breast, and gastrointestinal carcinomas. For these tumors, nerves may provide a conduit for local cancer progression into the central nervous system. Although neural invasion is associated with poor outcome, the mechanism that triggers it is unknown. We used an in vitro Matrigel dorsal root ganglion and pancreatic cancer cell coculture model to assess the dynamic interactions between nerves and cancer cell migration and the role of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how nerve invasion affects sciatic nerve function. Nerves induced a polarized neurotrophic migration of cancer cells (PNMCs) along their axons, which was more efficient than in the absence of nerves (migration distance: mean = 187.1 microm, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 148 to 226 microm vs 14.4 microm, 95% CI = 9.58 to 19.22 microm, difference = 143 microm; P < .001; n = 20). PNMC was induced by secretion of GDNF, via phosphorylation of the RET-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Nerves from mice deficient in GDNF had reduced ability to attract cancer cells (nerve invasion index: wild type vs gdnf+/-, mean = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.77 vs 0.43, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.44; P < .001; n = 60-66). Tumor specimens excised from patients with neuroinvasive pancreatic carcinoma had higher expression of the GDNF receptors RET and GRFalpha1 as compared with normal tissue. Finally, systemic therapy with pyrazolopyrimidine-1, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the RET pathway, suppressed nerve invasion toward the spinal cord and prevented paralysis in mice. These data provide evidence for paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer invasion by nerves, which may have important implications for potential therapy directed against nerve invasion by cancer.

  11. Glucose regulates RMI1 expression through the E2F pathways in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Akira; Yoshino, Masayasu; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Aramori, Ichiro

    2011-08-01

    RecQ-mediated genome instability 1 (RMI1) has been identified as a novel energy homeostasis-related molecule. While recent studies have suggested that change in RMI1 expression levels in adipose tissue may affect the body's energy balance, no reports have identified the mechanism behind this expression regulation. In the present study, we found that RMI1 expression increased on differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. In addition, glucose stimulation induced RMI1 expression to approximately eight times the baseline level. Further, knockdown of either E2F5 or E2F8 mRNA using siRNA suppressed this glucose-induced up-regulation of RMI1 expression. These results suggest that RMI1 expression may be regulated by glucose, at least in part, via E2F expression.

  12. Thioredoxin Interacting Protein Is a Potential Regulator of Glucose and Energy Homeostasis in Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lekva, Tove; Bollerslev, Jens; Sahraoui, Afaf; Scholz, Hanne; Bøyum, Hege; Evang, Johan Arild; Godang, Kristin; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have described bone as an endocrine organ regulating glucose metabolism, with insulin signaling regulating osteocalcin secretion and osteocalcin regulating β cell function. We have previously demonstrated increased bone expression of TXNIP in patients with endogenous Cushing's syndrome (CS), and we hypothesized that TXNIP could contribute to the dysregulated glucose metabolism in CS. We studied 33 CS patients and 29 matched controls, with bone biopsies from nine patients, before and after surgical treatment. In vitro, the effect of silencing TXNIP (siTXNIP) in osteoblasts, including its effect on human islet cells, was examined. Our major findings were: (i) The high mRNA levels of TXNIP in bone from CS patients were significantly associated with high levels of glucose and insulin, increased insulin resistance, and decreased insulin sensitivity in these patients. (ii) Silencing TXNIP in osteoblasts enhanced their OC response to insulin and glucose and down-regulated interleukin (IL)-8 levels in these cells. (iii) Conditional media from siTXNIP-treated osteoblasts promoted insulin content and anti-inflammatory responses in human islet cells. We recently demonstrated that the thioredoxin/TXNIP axis may mediate some detrimental effects of glucocorticoid excess on bone tissue in CS. Here we show that alterations in this axis also may affect glucose metabolism in these patients. PMID:23691179

  13. Resveratrol regulates neuronal glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity via P21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2).

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Dey, Chinmoy Sankar

    2017-04-01

    We have recently reported P21-activated kinase 2 (PAK2), a serine/threonine kinase as a negative regulator of neuronal glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity. Resveratrol (RSV), a natural polyphenol with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic properties, regulates PAK2 activity in HepG2 and ESC-B5 cell apoptosis. However, regulation of PAK2 by RSV in neuronal insulin signaling pathway, if any, is still unknown. In the present study, RSV treatment significantly increased PAK2 activity under insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant condition, along with a marked decrease in glucose uptake in differentiated N2A cells. Pretreatment with AMPK inhibitor, followed by RSV treatment resulted in reduction in PAK2 activity whereas glucose uptake showed an increase. However, pretreatment with Akt inhibitor and then RSV exposure significantly increased PAK2 activity, with a corresponding decrease in glucose uptake. RSV treatment increased AMPK activity and decreased Akt activity. In conclusion, RSV negatively regulates neuronal glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity via PAK2. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. TUSC5 regulates insulin-mediated adipose tissue glucose uptake by modulation of GLUT4 recycling

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Nigel; Rudigier, Carla; Moest, Hansjörg; Müller, Sebastian; Mrosek, Nadja; Röder, Eva; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Rülicke, Thomas; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Augustin, Robert; Neubauer, Heike; Wolfrum, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Failure to properly dispose of glucose in response to insulin is a serious health problem, occurring during obesity and is associated with type 2 diabetes development. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is facilitated by the translocation and plasma membrane fusion of vesicles containing glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), the rate-limiting step of post-prandial glucose disposal. Methods We analyzed the role of Tusc5 in the regulation of insulin-stimulated Glut4-mediated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we measured Tusc5 expression in two patient cohorts. Results Herein, we report that TUSC5 controls insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes, in vitro and in vivo. TUSC5 facilitates the proper recycling of GLUT4 and other key trafficking proteins during prolonged insulin stimulation, thereby enabling proper protein localization and complete vesicle formation, processes that ultimately enable insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Tusc5 knockout mice exhibit impaired glucose disposal and TUSC5 expression is predictive of glucose tolerance in obese individuals, independent of body weight. Furthermore, we show that TUSC5 is a PPARγ target and in its absence the anti-diabetic effects of TZDs are significantly blunted. Conclusions Collectively, these findings establish TUSC5 as an adipose tissue-specific protein that enables proper protein recycling, linking the ubiquitous vesicle traffic machinery with tissue-specific insulin-mediated glucose uptake into adipose tissue and the maintenance of a healthy metabolic phenotype in mice and humans. PMID:26629404

  15. Blood Glucose Regulation during Prolonged, Submaximal, Continuous Exercise: A Guide for Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Matthew L.

    2010-01-01

    Management of many chronic diseases now includes regular exercise as part of a viable treatment plan. Exercise in the form of prolonged, submaximal, continuous exercise (SUBEX; i.e., ∼30 min to 1 h, ∼40–70% of maximal oxygen uptake) is often prescribed due to its relatively low risk, the willingness of patients to undertake, its efficacy, its affordability, and its ease of prescription. Specifically, patients who are insulin resistant or that have type 2 diabetes mellitus may benefit from regular exercise of this type. During this type of exercise, muscles dramatically increase glucose uptake as the liver increases both glycogenolysis and gluco-neogenesis. While a redundancy of mechanisms is at work to maintain blood glucose concentration ([glucose]) during this type of exercise, the major regulator of blood glucose is the insulin/glucagon response. At exercise onset, blood [glucose] transiently rises before beginning to decline after ∼30 min, causing a subsequent decline in blood [insulin] and rise in blood glucagon. This leads to many downstream effects, including an increase in glucose output from the liver to maintain adequate glucose in the blood to fuel both the muscles and the brain. Finally, when analyzing blood [glucose], consideration should be given to nutritional status (postabsorptive versus postprandial) as well as both what the analyzer measures and the type of sample used (plasma versus whole blood). In view of both prescribing exercise to patients as well as designing studies that perturb glucose homeostasis, it is imperative that clinicians and researchers alike understand the controls of blood glucose homeostasis during SUBEX. PMID:20513337

  16. Functional identification of a neurocircuit regulating blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Thomas H.; Nelson, Jarrell T.; Matsen, Miles E.; Dorfman, Mauricio D.; Guyenet, Stephan J.; Damian, Vincent; Allison, Margaret B.; Scarlett, Jarrad M.; Nguyen, Hong T.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Olson, David P.; Myers, Martin G.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Morton, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies implicate the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) in glycemic control. Here, we report that selective inhibition of the subset of VMN neurons that express the transcription factor steroidogenic-factor 1 (VMNSF1 neurons) blocks recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycemia whereas, conversely, activation of VMNSF1 neurons causes diabetes-range hyperglycemia. Moreover, this hyperglycemic response is reproduced by selective activation of VMNSF1 fibers projecting to the anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (aBNST), but not to other brain areas innervated by VMNSF1 neurons. We also report that neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), a brain area that is also implicated in the response to hypoglycemia, make synaptic connections with the specific subset of glucoregulatory VMNSF1 neurons that project to the aBNST. These results collectively establish a physiological role in glucose homeostasis for VMNSF1 neurons and suggest that these neurons are part of an ascending glucoregulatory LPBN→VMNSF1→aBNST neurocircuit. PMID:27001850

  17. Chronic unpredictable stress regulates visceral adipocyte‐mediated glucose metabolism and inflammatory circuits in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannides, Iordanes; Golovatscka, Viktoriya; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Sideri, Aristea; Salas, Martha; Stavrakis, Dimitris; Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Bradesi, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic psychological stress is a prominent risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of many complex diseases, including major depression, obesity, and type II diabetes. Visceral adipose tissue is a key endocrine organ involved in the regulation of insulin action and an important component in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we examined for the first time the changes on visceral adipose tissue physiology and on adipocyte‐associated insulin sensitivity and function after chronic unpredictable stress in rats. Male rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress for 35 days. Total body and visceral fat was measured. Cytokines and activated intracellular kinase levels were determined using high‐throughput multiplex assays. Adipocyte function was assessed via tritiated glucose uptake assay. Stressed rats showed no weight gain, and their fat/lean mass ratio increased dramatically compared to control animals. Stressed rats had significantly higher mesenteric fat content and epididymal fat pad weight and demonstrated reduced serum glucose clearing capacity following glucose challenge. Alterations in fat depot size were mainly due to changes in adipocyte numbers and not size. High‐throughput molecular screening in adipocytes isolated from stressed rats revealed activation of intracellular inflammatory, glucose metabolism, and MAPK networks compared to controls, as well as significantly reduced glucose uptake capacity in response to insulin stimulation. Our study identifies the adipocyte as a key regulator of the effects of chronic stress on insulin resistance, and glucose metabolism, with important ramifications in the pathophysiology of several stress‐related disease states. PMID:24819750

  18. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  19. Metabolic regulation of lateral hypothalamic glucose-inhibited orexin neurons may influence midbrain reward neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Santiago, Ammy M; Thomas, Mark P; Routh, Vanessa H

    2014-09-01

    Lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin neurons modulate reward-based feeding by activating ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. We hypothesize that signals of peripheral energy status influence reward-based feeding by modulating the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. This hypothesis was tested using electrophysiological recordings of LHA orexin-GI neurons in brain slices from 4 to 6week old male mice whose orexin neurons express green fluorescent protein (GFP) or putative VTA-DA neurons from C57Bl/6 mice. Low glucose directly activated ~60% of LHA orexin-GFP neurons in both whole cell and cell attached recordings. Leptin indirectly reduced and ghrelin directly enhanced the activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by glucose decreases from 2.5 to 0.1mM by 53±12% (n=16, P<0.001) and 41±24% (n=8, P<0.05), respectively. GABA or neurotensin receptor blockade prevented leptin's effect on glucose sensitivity. Fasting increased activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by decreased glucose, as would be predicted by these hormonal effects. We also evaluated putative VTA-DA neurons in a novel horizontal slice preparation containing the LHA and VTA. Decreased glucose increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs; 125 ± 40%, n=9, P<0.05) and action potentials (n=9; P<0.05) in 45% (9/20) of VTA DA neurons. sEPSCs were completely blocked by AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX 20 μM, n=4; APV 20μM, n=4; respectively), demonstrating that these sEPSCs were mediated by glutamatergic transmission onto VTA DA neurons. Orexin-1 but not 2 receptor antagonism with SB334867 (10μM; n=9) and TCS-OX2-29 (2μM; n=5), respectively, blocks the effects of decreased glucose on VTA DA neurons. Thus, decreased glucose increases orexin-dependent excitatory glutamate neurotransmission onto VTA DA neurons. These data suggest that the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin-GI neurons links metabolic state and reward

  20. Mechanistic relationship between the vagal afferent pathway, central nervous system and peripheral organs in appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2016-11-01

    The hypothalamus is a center of food intake and energy metabolism regulation. Information signals from peripheral organs are mediated through the circulation or the vagal afferent pathway and input into the hypothalamus, where signals are integrated to determine various behaviors, such as eating. Numerous appetite-regulating peptides are expressed in the central nervous system and the peripheral organs, and interact in a complex manner. Of such peptides, gut peptides are known to bind to receptors at the vagal afferent pathway terminal that extend into the mucosal layer of the digestive tract, modulate the electrical activity of the vagus nerve, and subsequently send signals to the solitary nucleus and furthermore to the hypothalamus. All peripheral peptides other than ghrelin suppress appetite, and they synergistically suppress appetite through the vagus nerve. In contrast, the appetite-enhancing peptide, ghrelin, antagonizes the actions of appetite-suppressing peptides through the vagus nerve, and appetite-suppressing peptides have attenuated effects in obesity as a result of inflammation in the vagus nerve. With greater understanding of the mechanism for food intake and energy metabolism regulation, medications that apply the effects of appetite-regulating peptides or implantable devices that electrically stimulate the vagus nerve are being investigated as novel treatments for obesity in basic and clinical studies.

  1. Glucose regulates fatty acid binding protein interaction with lipids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Heather A.; Balanarasimha, Madhumitha; Huang, Huan; Kelzer, Matthew S.; Kaliappan, Alagammai; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is characterized by elevated levels of glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), nuclear mechanisms linking glucose and LCFA metabolism are poorly understood. As the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) shuttles LCFA to the nucleus, where L-FABP directly interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the effect of glucose on these processes was examined. In vitro studies showed that L-FABP strongly bound glucose and glucose-1-phosphate (Kd = 103 ± 19 nM and Kd = 20 ± 3 nM, respectively), resulting in altered L-FABP conformation, increased affinity for lipid ligands, and enhanced interaction with PPARα. In living cells, glucose stimulated cellular uptake and nuclear localization of a nonmetabolizable fluorescent fatty acid analog (BODIPY C-16), particularly in the presence of L-FABP. These data suggest for the first time a direct role of glucose in facilitating L-FABP-mediated uptake and distribution of lipidic ligands to the nucleus for regulation of PPARα transcriptional activity. PMID:20628144

  2. Regulation of Glucose Uptake and Enteroendocrine Function by the Intestinal Epithelial Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ussar, Siegfried; Haering, Max-Felix; Fujisaka, Shiho; Lutter, Dominik; Lee, Kevin Y; Li, Ning; Gerber, Georg K; Bry, Lynn; Kahn, C Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Insulin receptors (IRs) and IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR) are major regulators of metabolism and cell growth throughout the body; however, their roles in the intestine remain controversial. Here we show that genetic ablation of the IR or IGF-IR in intestinal epithelial cells of mice does not impair intestinal growth or development or the composition of the gut microbiome. However, the loss of IRs alters intestinal epithelial gene expression, especially in pathways related to glucose uptake and metabolism. More importantly, the loss of IRs reduces intestinal glucose uptake. As a result, mice lacking the IR in intestinal epithelium retain normal glucose tolerance during aging compared with controls, which show an age-dependent decline in glucose tolerance. Loss of the IR also results in a reduction of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) expression from enteroendocrine K-cells and decreased GIP release in vivo after glucose ingestion but has no effect on glucagon-like peptide 1 expression or secretion. Thus, the IR in the intestinal epithelium plays important roles in intestinal gene expression, glucose uptake, and GIP production, which may contribute to pathophysiological changes in individuals with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and other insulin-resistant states. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Differential regulation of baicalin and scutellarin on AMPK and Akt in promoting adipose cell glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le-Le; Xiao, Na; Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Kang; Liu, Baolin; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Baicalin and scutellarin, two flavonoid glucuronic acids isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis, exhibit beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Baicalin and scutellarin are similar in structure except scutellarin has an additional hydroxyl at composition C-4'. In this work, we observed that baicalin and scutellarin promoted glucose disposal in mice and in adipocytes. Baicalin selectively increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), while scutellarin selectively enhanced Akt phosphorylation. Both of them increased AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in basal condition. AMPK inhibitor or knockdown of AMPK by siRNA blocked baicalin-induced AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake, but showed no effects on scutellarin. In contrast, Akt inhibitor and knockdown of Akt with siRNA decreased scutellarin-stimulated glucose uptake but had no effects on baicalin. The molecular dynamic simulations analysis showed that the binding energy of baicalin to AMPK (-34.30kcal/mol) was more favorable than scutellarin (-21.27kcal/mol), while the binding energy of scutellarin (-29.81kcal/mol) to Akt was much more favorable than baicalin (4.04kcal/mol). Interestingly, a combined treatment with baicalin and scutellarin acted synergistically to enhance glucose uptake in adipocytes (combination index: 0.94-0.046). In conclusion, baicalin and scutellarin, though structurally similar, promoted glucose disposal in adipocytes by differential regulation on AMPK and Akt activity. Our data provide insight that multicomponent herbal medicines may act synergistically on multiple targets.

  4. The role of estrogen in adipose tissue metabolism: insights into glucose homeostasis regulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ho; Cho, Hyung Taek; Kim, Young Jun

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an organ with active endocrine function involved in the regulation of energy balance and glucose homeostasis via multiple metabolic signaling pathways targeting the brain, liver, skeletal muscle, pancreas, and other organs. There is increasing evidence demonstrating that the female sex hormone, estrogen, regulates adipose development and improves systemic glucose homeostasis in both males and females. The underlying mechanism linking estrogenic regulation in adipose tissue and systemic glucose metabolism has not been fully elucidated, but is thought to include interactions of estrogen receptor signaling events involving lipolytic and/or lipogenic enzyme activity, free fatty acid metabolism, and adipocytokine production. Thus, understanding the effects of estrogen replacement on adipose tissue biology and metabolism is important in determining the risk of developing obesity-related metabolic disorders in patients undergoing treatment for sex hormone deficiency. In this report, we review literature regarding the role of estrogens and their corresponding receptors in the control of adipose metabolism and glucose homeostasis in both rodents and humans. We also discuss the effects of selective estrogen receptor modulators on glucose metabolism.

  5. CB1 receptors: emerging evidence for central and peripheral mechanisms that regulate energy balance, metabolism, and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Cota, Daniela

    2007-10-01

    Insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and obesity are the major cardiometabolic risk factors contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Owing to the increasing prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and CVD, new and effective pharmacologic therapies are urgently needed. In this regard, the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS), a neuromodulatory system involved in the regulation of various aspects of energy balance and eating behaviour through central and peripheral mechanisms, may present the potential to meet this need. In the central nervous system (CNS), cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors and their respective ligands, the endocannabinoids, have a significant role in the modulation of food intake and motivation to consume palatable food. CB1 receptors have also been found in organs involved in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, such as liver, white adipose tissue, muscle and pancreas. Dysregulation of the ECS has been associated with the development of dyslipidaemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity, and CB1 receptor blockade may have a role in ameliorating these metabolic abnormalities. Thus, pharmacologic options targeting the ECS may provide a novel, effective approach to the prevention and management of CVD, type 2 diabetes and obesity. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet.

  7. Glucose Regulation of Load‐Induced mTOR Signaling and ER Stress in Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Shiraj; Kundu, Bijoy K.; Wu, Henry Cheng‐Ju; Hashmi, S. Shahrukh; Guthrie, Patrick; Locke, Landon W.; Roy, R. Jack; Matherne, G. Paul; Berr, Stuart S.; Terwelp, Matthew; Scott, Brian; Carranza, Sylvia; Frazier, O. Howard; Glover, David K.; Dillmann, Wolfgang H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Entman, Mark L.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in energy substrate metabolism are first responders to hemodynamic stress in the heart. We have previously shown that hexose‐6‐phosphate levels regulate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation in response to insulin. We now tested the hypothesis that inotropic stimulation and increased afterload also regulate mTOR activation via glucose 6‐phosphate (G6P) accumulation. Methods and Results We subjected the working rat heart ex vivo to a high workload in the presence of different energy‐providing substrates including glucose, glucose analogues, and noncarbohydrate substrates. We observed an association between G6P accumulation, mTOR activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and impaired contractile function, all of which were prevented by pretreating animals with rapamycin (mTOR inhibition) or metformin (AMPK activation). The histone deacetylase inhibitor 4‐phenylbutyrate, which relieves ER stress, also improved contractile function. In contrast, adding the glucose analogue 2‐deoxy‐d‐glucose, which is phosphorylated but not further metabolized, to the perfusate resulted in mTOR activation and contractile dysfunction. Next we tested our hypothesis in vivo by transverse aortic constriction in mice. Using a micro‐PET system, we observed enhanced glucose tracer analog uptake and contractile dysfunction preceding dilatation of the left ventricle. In contrast, in hearts overexpressing SERCA2a, ER stress was reduced and contractile function was preserved with hypertrophy. Finally, we examined failing human hearts and found that mechanical unloading decreased G6P levels and ER stress markers. Conclusions We propose that glucose metabolic changes precede and regulate functional (and possibly also structural) remodeling of the heart. We implicate a critical role for G6P in load‐induced mTOR activation and ER stress. PMID:23686371

  8. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction is regulated by nitric oxide and ROS independently of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Steinberg, Gregory R; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, and there is evidence that they do so via interaction with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ROS and NO regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from mice that expressed a muscle-specific kinase dead AMPKalpha2 isoform (AMPK-KD) and wild-type litter mates (WT) were stimulated to contract, and glucose uptake was measured in the presence or absence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). Contraction increased AMPKalpha2 activity in WT but not AMPK-KD EDL muscles. However, contraction increased glucose uptake in the EDL and soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice to a similar extent. In EDL muscles, NAC and l-NMMA prevented contraction-stimulated increases in oxidant levels (dichloroflourescein fluorescence) and NOS activity, respectively, and attenuated contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in both genotypes to a similar extent. In soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice, NAC prevented contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and l-NMMA had no effect. This is likely attributed to the relative lack of neuronal NOS in the soleus muscles compared with EDL muscles. Contraction increased AMPKalpha Thr(172) phosphorylation in EDL and soleus muscles of WT but not AMPK-KD mice, and this was not affected by NAC or l-NMMA treatment. In conclusion, ROS and NO are involved in regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism.

  9. Peripheral tissue-brain interactions in the regulation of food intake.

    PubMed

    López, Miguel; Tovar, Sulay; Vázquez, María J; Williams, Lynda M; Diéguez, Carlos

    2007-02-01

    More than 70 years ago the glucostatic, lipostatic and aminostatic hypotheses proposed that the central nervous system sensed circulating levels of different metabolites, changing feeding behaviour in response to the levels of those molecules. In the last 20 years the rapid increase in obesity and associated pathologies in developed countries has involved a substantial increase in the knowledge of the physiological and molecular mechanism regulating body mass. This effort has resulted in the recent discovery of new peripheral signals, such as leptin and ghrelin, as well as new neuropeptides, such as orexins, involved in body-weight homeostasis. The present review summarises research into energy balance, starting from the original classical hypotheses proposing metabolite sensing, through peripheral tissue-brain interactions and coming full circle to the recently-discovered role of hypothalamic fatty acid synthase in feeding regulation. Understanding these molecular mechanisms will provide new pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity and appetite disorders.

  10. Regulation of sarcolemmal glucose and fatty acid transporters in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Robert W; Luiken, Joost J F P; Bonen, Arend; Glatz, Jan F C

    2008-07-15

    Circulating long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and glucose are the main sources for energy production in the heart. In the healthy heart the ratio of glucose and LCFA oxidation is sensitively balanced and chronic alterations in this substrate mix are closely associated with cardiac dysfunction. While it has been accepted for several years that cardiac glucose uptake is mediated by facilitated transport, i.e. by means of the glucose transport proteins GLUT1 and GLUT4, only in the last few years it has become clear that proteins with high-affinity binding sites to LCFA, referred to as LCFA transporters, are responsible for bulk LCFA uptake. Similar to the GLUTs, the LCFA transporters CD36 and FABP(pm) can be recruited from an intracellular storage compartment to the sarcolemma to increase the rate of substrate uptake. Permanent relocation of LCFA transporters, mainly CD36, from intracellular stores to the sarcolemma is accompanied by accumulation of lipids and lipid metabolites in the heart. As a consequence, insulin signalling and glucose utilization are impaired, leading to decreased contractile activity of the heart. These observations underline the particular role and interplay of substrate carriers for glucose and LCFA in modulating cardiac metabolism, and the development of heart failure. The signalling and trafficking pathways and subcellular machinery regulating translocation of glucose and LCFA transporters are beginning to be unravelled. More knowledge on substrate transporter recycling, especially the similarities and differences between glucose and LCFA transporters, is expected to enable novel therapies aimed at changing the subcellular distribution of glucose and LCFA transporters, thereby manipulating the substrate preference of the diseased heart to help restore cardiac function.

  11. Glucose regulates mitochondrial motility via Milton modification by O-GlcNAc transferase.

    PubMed

    Pekkurnaz, Gulcin; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Wang, Xinnan; Kong, Dong; Schwarz, Thomas L

    2014-07-03

    Cells allocate substantial resources toward monitoring levels of nutrients that can be used for ATP generation by mitochondria. Among the many specialized cell types, neurons are particularly dependent on mitochondria due to their complex morphology and regional energy needs. Here, we report a molecular mechanism by which nutrient availability in the form of extracellular glucose and the enzyme O-GlcNAc Transferase (OGT), whose activity depends on glucose availability, regulates mitochondrial motility in neurons. Activation of OGT diminishes mitochondrial motility. We establish the mitochondrial motor-adaptor protein Milton as a required substrate for OGT to arrest mitochondrial motility by mapping and mutating the key O-GlcNAcylated serine residues. We find that the GlcNAcylation state of Milton is altered by extracellular glucose and that OGT alters mitochondrial motility in vivo. Our findings suggest that, by dynamically regulating Milton GlcNAcylation, OGT tailors mitochondrial dynamics in neurons based on nutrient availability.

  12. CREB1 regulates glucose transport of glioma cell line U87 by targeting GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiaying; Zhang, Can; Mi, Yang; Chen, Fuxue; Du, Dongshu

    2017-06-23

    Glioma is stemmed from the glial cells in the brain, which is accounted for about 45% of all intracranial tumors. The characteristic of glioma is invasive growth, as well as there is no obvious boundary between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, so it is difficult to resect completely with worst prognosis. The metabolism of glioma is following the Warburg effect. Previous researches have shown that GLUT1, as a glucose transporter carrier, affected the Warburg effect, but the molecular mechanism is not very clear. CREB1 (cAMP responsive element-binding protein1) is involved in various biological processes, and relevant studies confirmed that CREB1 protein regulated the expression of GLUT1, thus mediating glucose transport in cells. Our experiments mainly reveal that the CREB1 could affect glucose transport in glioma cells by regulating the expression of GLUT1, which controlled the metabolism of glioma and affected the progression of glioma.

  13. Regulation of Peripheral Nerve Myelin Maintenance by Gene Repression through Polycomb Repressive Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ki H.; Hung, Holly A.; Srinivasan, Rajini; Xie, Huafeng; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2015-01-01

    Myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells requires coordinate regulation of gene repression as well as gene activation. Several chromatin remodeling pathways critical for peripheral nerve myelination have been identified, but the functions of histone methylation in the peripheral nerve have not been elucidated. To determine the role of histone H3 Lys27 methylation, we have generated mice with a Schwann cell-specific knock-out of Eed, which is an essential subunit of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that catalyzes methylation of histone H3 Lys27. Analysis of this mutant revealed no significant effects on early postnatal development of myelin. However, its loss eventually causes progressive hypermyelination of small-diameter axons and apparent fragmentation of Remak bundles. These data identify the PRC2 complex as an epigenomic modulator of mature myelin thickness, which is associated with changes in Akt phosphorylation. Interestingly, we found that Eed inactivation causes derepression of several genes, e.g., Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (Igfbp2), that become activated after nerve injury, but without activation of a primary regulator of the injury program, c-Jun. Analysis of the activated genes in cultured Schwann cells showed that Igfbp2 regulates Akt activation. Our results identify an epigenomic pathway required for establishing thickness of mature myelin and repressing genes that respond to nerve injury. PMID:26041929

  14. MicroRNA-26a regulates insulin sensitivity and metabolism of glucose and lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xianghui; Dong, Bingning; Tian, Yan; Lefebvre, Philippe; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xichun; Pattou, François; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Lou, Fang; Jove, Richard; Staels, Bart; Moore, David D.; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and increased hepatic glucose production, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that have been implicated in the regulation of human diseases, including T2D. miR-26a is known to play a critical role in tumorigenesis; however, its function in cellular metabolism remains unknown. Here, we determined that miR-26a regulates insulin signaling and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Compared with lean individuals, overweight humans had decreased expression of miR-26a in the liver. Moreover, miR-26 was downregulated in 2 obese mouse models compared with control animals. Global or liver-specific overexpression of miR-26a in mice fed a high-fat diet improved insulin sensitivity, decreased hepatic glucose production, and decreased fatty acid synthesis, thereby preventing obesity-induced metabolic complications. Conversely, silencing of endogenous miR-26a in conventional diet–fed mice impaired insulin sensitivity, enhanced glucose production, and increased fatty acid synthesis. miR-26a targeted several key regulators of hepatic metabolism and insulin signaling. These findings reveal miR-26a as a regulator of liver metabolism and suggest miR-26a should be further explored as a potential target for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25961460

  15. MicroRNA-26a regulates insulin sensitivity and metabolism of glucose and lipids.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xianghui; Dong, Bingning; Tian, Yan; Lefebvre, Philippe; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xichun; Pattou, François; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Lou, Fang; Jove, Richard; Staels, Bart; Moore, David D; Huang, Wendong

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and increased hepatic glucose production, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that have been implicated in the regulation of human diseases, including T2D. miR-26a is known to play a critical role in tumorigenesis; however, its function in cellular metabolism remains unknown. Here, we determined that miR-26a regulates insulin signaling and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Compared with lean individuals, overweight humans had decreased expression of miR-26a in the liver. Moreover, miR-26 was downregulated in 2 obese mouse models compared with control animals. Global or liver-specific overexpression of miR-26a in mice fed a high-fat diet improved insulin sensitivity, decreased hepatic glucose production, and decreased fatty acid synthesis, thereby preventing obesity-induced metabolic complications. Conversely, silencing of endogenous miR-26a in conventional diet-fed mice impaired insulin sensitivity, enhanced glucose production, and increased fatty acid synthesis. miR-26a targeted several key regulators of hepatic metabolism and insulin signaling. These findings reveal miR-26a as a regulator of liver metabolism and suggest miR-26a should be further explored as a potential target for the treatment of T2D.

  16. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  17. Regulating Glucose and pH, and Monitoring Oxygen in a Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neat R.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.; Xu, Yuanhang; Gao, Frank

    2006-01-01

    A system that automatically regulates the concentration of glucose or pH in a liquid culture medium that is circulated through a rotating-wall perfused bioreactor is described. Another system monitors the concentration of oxygen in the culture medium.

  18. Glucose induction pathway regulates meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in part by controlling turnover of Ime2p meiotic kinase.

    PubMed

    Gray, Misa; Piccirillo, Sarah; Purnapatre, Kedar; Schneider, Brandt L; Honigberg, Saul M

    2008-08-01

    Several components of the glucose induction pathway, namely the Snf3p glucose sensor and the Rgt1p and Mth1p transcription factors, were shown to be involved in inhibition of sporulation by glucose. The glucose sensors had only a minor role in regulating transcript levels of the two key regulators of meiotic initiation, the Ime1p transcription factor and the Ime2p kinase, but a major role in regulating Ime2p stability. Interestingly, Rgt1p was involved in glucose inhibition of spore formation but not inhibition of Ime2p stability. Thus, the glucose induction pathway may regulate meiosis through both RGT1-dependent and RGT1-independent pathways.

  19. Meta-Modeling of Methylprednisolone Effects on Glucose Regulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; Sukumaran, Siddharth; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective meta-modeling analysis was performed to integrate previously reported data of glucocorticoid (GC) effects on glucose regulation following a single intramuscular dose (50 mg/kg), single intravenous doses (10, 50 mg/kg), and intravenous infusions (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h) of methylprednisolone (MPL) in normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) male Wistar rats. A mechanistic pharmacodynamic (PD) model was developed based on the receptor/gene/protein-mediated GC effects on glucose regulation. Three major target organs (liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) together with some selected intermediate controlling factors were designated as important regulators involved in the pathogenesis of GC-induced glucose dysregulation. Assessed were dynamic changes of food intake and systemic factors (plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA) and leptin) and tissue-specific biomarkers (cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and enzyme activity, leptin mRNA, interleukin 6 receptor type 1 (IL6R1) mRNA and Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA) after acute and chronic dosing with MPL along with the GC receptor (GR) dynamics in each target organ. Upon binding to GR in liver, MPL dosing caused increased glucose production by stimulating hepatic cAMP and PEPCK activity. In adipose tissue, the rise in leptin mRNA and plasma leptin caused reduction of food intake, the exogenous source of glucose input. Down-regulation of IRS-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle inhibited the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose utilization further contributing to hyperglycemia. The nuclear drug-receptor complex served as the driving force for stimulation or inhibition of downstream target gene expression within different tissues. Incorporating information such as receptor dynamics, as well as the gene and protein induction, allowed us to describe the receptor-mediated effects of MPL on glucose regulation in each important tissue. This advanced mechanistic

  20. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (creCD motif), that is, ‘RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW’. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target creCD sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  1. Regulation of glucose tolerance and sympathetic activity by MC4R signaling in the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; McDaniel, Latisha N; Yin, Terry; Khan, Michael; Jiang, Jingwei; Acevedo, Michael R; Walsh, Susan A; Ponto, Laura L Boles; Norris, Andrew W; Lutter, Michael; Rahmouni, Kamal; Cui, Huxing

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) signaling mediates diverse physiological functions, including energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and autonomic activity. Although the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is known to express MC4Rs and to receive input from leptin-responsive arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons, the physiological functions of MC4Rs in the LHA are incompletely understood. We report that MC4R(LHA) signaling regulates glucose tolerance and sympathetic nerve activity. Restoring expression of MC4Rs specifically in the LHA improves glucose intolerance in obese MC4R-null mice without affecting body weight or circulating insulin levels. Fluorodeoxyglucose-mediated tracing of whole-body glucose uptake identifies the interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) as a primary source where glucose uptake is increased in MC4R(LHA) mice. Direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording further reveals that sympathetic traffic to iBAT is significantly increased in MC4R(LHA) mice, which accompanies a significant elevation of Glut4 expression in iBAT. Finally, bilateral iBAT denervation prevents the glucoregulatory effect of MC4R(LHA) signaling. These results identify a novel role for MC4R(LHA) signaling in the control of sympathetic nerve activity and glucose tolerance independent of energy balance. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  2. [Effects of biotin on blood glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes rat model].

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xuesong; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Wenzong; Wang, Zhu

    2015-03-01

    To explore the effect of biotin on blood glucose regulation in rats and its possible mechanism. According to initial body weight and blood glucose, we randomly divided the 90 Wistar rats into 5 groups: the normal control group, model group, biotin low-dose group (0. 6mg/kg BW), biotin medium-dose group (3. 0 mg/kg BW) and biotin high-dose group (6. 0 mg/kg BW). After 2 months, the rats with HFS feed were injected with STZ (25 mg/kg BW) to manufacture diabetic rat model. After the OGTT experiment at 10th week, the blood glucose, insulin, liver/muscle glycogen and other biochemical indexes were detected. The GCK, PCK1 mRNA expression were measured with RT-PCR method. Biotin has a certain improvement on postprandial glucose in diabetic rats. Compared with the model group, the AUC and the 30min postprandial blood glucose of biotin high-dose group were significantly decreased (P <0. 05). Biotin can affect some key enzyme gene in glucose metabolism, such as GCK, PCK1. The possible mechanism of the decreasing biotin blood sugar in diabetic rats may by promoting the synthesis of glycogenand reducing gluconeogenesis.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Controls Glycemia via Regulation of Hepatic Glucose Flux and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Eric D.; Li, Candice Y.; Bina, Holly A.; Lynes, Sara E.; Michael, M. Dodson; Shanafelt, Armen B.; Kharitonenkov, Alexei; Wasserman, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a novel metabolic regulator shown to improve glycemic control. However, the molecular and functional mechanisms underlying FGF21-mediated improvements in glycemic control are not completely understood. We examined FGF21 effects on insulin sensitivity and glucose fluxes upon chronic (daily injection for 8 d) and acute (6 h infusion) administration in ob/+ and ob/ob mice. Results show that chronic FGF21 ameliorated fasting hyperglycemia in ob/ob mice via increased glucose disposal and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity. Acute FGF21 suppressed hepatic glucose production, increased liver glycogen, lowered glucagon, and improved glucose clearance in ob/+ mice. These effects were blunted in ob/ob mice. Neither chronic nor acute FGF21 altered skeletal muscle or adipose tissue glucose uptake in either genotype. In conclusion, FGF21 has potent glycemic effects caused by hepatic changes in glucose flux and improved insulin sensitivity. Thus, these studies define mechanisms underlying anti-hyperglycemic actions of FGF21 and support its therapeutic potential. PMID:19470704

  4. Relationships between glucose excursion and the activation of oxidative stress in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fenping; Lu, Weina; Jia, Chengfang; Li, Hong; Wang, Zhou; Jia, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    The effect of glucose excursions on oxidative stress is an important topic in diabetes research. We investigated this relationship by analyzing markers of oxidative stress and glycemic data from a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in 30 individuals with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 27 subjects with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), and 27 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We compared the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), mean postprandial glucose excursion (MPPGE), and mean postprandial incremental area under the curve (IAUC) with plasma levels of oxidative stress markers 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-OH-dG, and protein carbonyl content in the study subjects. Patients with T2DM or IGR had significantly higher glucose excursions and plasma levels of oxidative stress markers compared to normal controls (P < 0.01 or 0.05). Multiple linear regression analyses showed significant relationships between MAGE and plasma 8-iso-PGF2α, and between MPPGE and plasma 8-OH-dG in patients with IGR or T2DM (P < 0.01 or 0.05). Furthermore, 2h-postprandial glucose level and IAUC were related to plasma protein carbonyl content in the study cohort including T2DM and IGR (P < 0.01). We demonstrate that glucose excursions in subjects with IGR and T2DM trigger the activation of oxidative stress.

  5. Expression of high-affinity glucose transport protein Hxt2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both repressed and induced by glucose and appears to be regulated posttranslationally.

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, D L; Bisson, L F

    1994-01-01

    Expression of putative high-affinity glucose transport protein Hxt2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was repressed 15- to 20-fold in high concentrations of glucose or fructose. S. cerevisiae with either the ssn6-delta 9 or the hxk2-delta 1::URA3 mutation, each of which relieves glucose repression, exhibited high Hxt2p expression in both 2.0% glucose (normally repressing) and 0.05% glucose (normally derepressing) while S. cerevisiae with the snf1-delta 10 mutation, which causes constitutive repression, did not detectably express Hxt2p in either glucose concentration. In addition to repressing at high concentrations, glucose or fructose is required for induction of Hxt2p expression. Hxt2p was not expressed by wild-type S. cerevisiae in media containing only ethanol or galactose as carbon and energy source but was expressed if glucose was added. An hxk2-delta 1::URA3 mutant did not detectably express Hxt2p in ethanol or galactose, but an ssn6-delta9 mutant did highly express Hxt2p in both carbon sources. Thus, simple relief of glucose repression as occurs with hxk2 null mutants is insufficient for high-level Hxt2p expression. Mutation of ssn6, a general transcriptional repressor, does lead to Hxt2p expression in the absence of glucose induction, suggesting relief of an additional negative regulatory system. High expression of Hxt2p does not always result in HXT2-dependent high-affinity transport, implying that Hxt2p activity is regulated posttranslationally. In the high glucose condition for the ssn6 mutant, high-affinity glucose transport is derepressed. Deletion of the HXT2 locus does not diminish this level of transport. However, high-affinity glucose transport is diminished in the ssn6-delta9 hxt2 delta1 double mutant compared with ssn6-delta9 alone in low glucose. Thus, while constitutively expressed in ssn6 mutants, Hxt2p only appears to be active as a transporter under low-glucose conditions. Similarly, Hxt2p was found to be expressed under low-glucose conditions

  6. Insulin regulates GLUT1-mediated glucose transport in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Manuel; García, Maria A; Arrabal, Pilar M; Martínez, Fernando; Yañez, María J; Jara, Nery; Weil, Bernardo; Domínguez, Dolores; Medina, Rodolfo A; Nualart, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of malignant bone cancer, accounting for 35% of primary bone malignancies. Because cancer cells utilize glucose as their primary energy substrate, the expression and regulation of glucose transporters (GLUT) may be important in tumor development and progression. GLUT expression has not been studied previously in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Furthermore, although insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) play an important role in cell proliferation and tumor progression, the role of these hormones on GLUT expression and glucose uptake, and their possible relation to osteosarcoma, have also not been studied. We determined the effect of insulin and IGF-I on GLUT expression and glucose transport in three well-characterized human osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63, SaOs-2, and U2-Os) using immunocytochemical, RT-PCR and functional kinetic analyses. Furthermore we also studied GLUT isoform expression in osteosarcoma primary tumors and metastases by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses. RT-PCR and immunostaining show that GLUT1 is the main isoform expressed in the cell lines and tissues studied, respectively. Immunocytochemical analysis shows that although insulin does not affect levels of GLUT1 expression it does induce a translocation of the transporter to the plasma membrane. This translocation is associated with increased transport of glucose into the cell. GLUT1 is the main glucose transporter expressed in osteosarcoma, furthermore, this transporter is regulated by insulin in human MG-63 cells. One possible mechanism through which insulin is involved in cancer progression is by increasing the amount of glucose available to the cancer cell.

  7. Microbial Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Cell-Cycle Progression in Mammalian Colonocytes

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Wali, Aminah; Brylawski, Bruna P.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    A prodigious number of microbes inhabit the human body, especially in the lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, yet our knowledge of how they regulate metabolic pathways within our cells is rather limited. To investigate the role of microbiota in host energy metabolism, we analyzed ATP levels and AMPK phosphorylation in tissues isolated from germfree and conventionally-raised C57BL/6 mice. These experiments demonstrated that microbiota are required for energy homeostasis in the proximal colon to a greater extent than other segments of the GI tract that also harbor high densities of bacteria. This tissue-specific effect is consistent with colonocytes utilizing bacterially-produced butyrate as their primary energy source, whereas most other cell types utilize glucose. However, it was surprising that glucose did not compensate for butyrate deficiency. We measured a 3.5-fold increase in glucose uptake in germfree colonocytes. However, 13C-glucose metabolic-flux experiments and biochemical assays demonstrated that they shifted their glucose metabolism away from mitochondrial oxidation/CO2 production and toward increased glycolysis/lactate production, which does not yield enough ATPs to compensate. The mechanism responsible for this metabolic shift is diminished pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) levels and activity. Consistent with perturbed PDH function, the addition of butyrate, but not glucose, to germfree colonocytes ex vivo stimulated oxidative metabolism. As a result of this energetic defect, germfree colonocytes exhibited a partial block in the G1-to-S-phase transition that was rescued by a butyrate-fortified diet. These data reveal a mechanism by which microbiota regulate glucose utilization to influence energy homeostasis and cell-cycle progression of mammalian host cells. PMID:23029553

  8. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  9. Schwann cell mitochondria as key regulators in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons.

    PubMed

    Ino, Daisuke; Iino, Masamitsu

    2017-03-01

    Formation of myelin sheaths by Schwann cells (SCs) enables rapid and efficient transmission of action potentials in peripheral axons, and disruption of myelination results in disorders that involve decreased sensory and motor functions. Given that construction of SC myelin requires high levels of lipid and protein synthesis, mitochondria, which are pivotal in cellular metabolism, may be potential regulators of the formation and maintenance of SC myelin. Supporting this notion, abnormal mitochondria are found in SCs of neuropathic peripheral nerves in both human patients and the relevant animal models. However, evidence for the importance of SC mitochondria in myelination has been limited, until recently. Several studies have recently used genetic approaches that allow SC-specific ablation of mitochondrial metabolic activity in living animals to show the critical roles of SC mitochondria in the development and maintenance of peripheral nerve axons. Here, we review current knowledge about the involvement of SC mitochondria in the formation and dysfunction of myelinated axons in the peripheral nervous system.

  10. Peripheral tolerance can be modified by altering KLF2-regulated Treg migration

    PubMed Central

    Pabbisetty, Sudheer K.; Rabacal, Whitney; Volanakis, Emmanuel J.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid; Cendron, Delphine; Boyd, Kelli L.; Van Kaer, Luc; Sebzda, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Tregs are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, and thus targeting these cells may aid in the treatment of autoimmunity and cancer by enhancing or reducing suppressive functions, respectively. Before these cells can be harnessed for therapeutic purposes, it is necessary to understand how they maintain tolerance under physiologically relevant conditions. We now report that transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) controls naive Treg migration patterns via regulation of homeostatic and inflammatory homing receptors, and that in its absence KLF2-deficient Tregs are unable to migrate efficiently to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). Diminished Treg trafficking to SLOs is sufficient to initiate autoimmunity, indicating that SLOs are a primary site for maintaining peripheral tolerance under homeostatic conditions. Disease severity correlates with impaired Treg recruitment to SLOs and, conversely, promotion of Tregs into these tissues can ameliorate autoimmunity. Moreover, stabilizing KLF2 expression within the Treg compartment enhances peripheral tolerance by diverting these suppressive cells from tertiary tissues into SLOs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that peripheral tolerance is enhanced or diminished through modulation of Treg trafficking to SLOs, a process that can be controlled by adjusting KLF2 protein levels. PMID:27462110

  11. Imidazoline-like drugs improve insulin sensitivity through peripheral stimulation of adiponectin and AMPK pathways in a rat model of glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Maud; Bouchoucha, Soumaya; Aiad, Farouk; Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bousquet, Pascal; Greney, Hugues; Niederhoffer, Nathalie

    2015-07-15

    Altered adiponectin signaling and chronic sympathetic hyperactivity have both been proposed as key factors in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that activation of I1 imidazoline receptors (I1R) improves several symptoms of the metabolic syndrome through sympathoinhibition and increases adiponectin plasma levels in a rat model of metabolic syndrome (Fellmann L, Regnault V, Greney H, et al. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 346: 370-380, 2013). The present study was designed to explore the peripheral component of the beneficial actions of I1R ligands (i.e., sympathoinhibitory independent effects). Aged rats displaying insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were treated with LNP509, a peripherally acting I1R agonist. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and adiponectin signaling were assessed at the end of the treatment. Direct actions of the ligand on hepatocyte and adipocyte signaling were also studied. LNP509 reduced the area under the curve of the intravenous glucose tolerance test and enhanced insulin hypoglycemic action and intracellular signaling (Akt phosphorylation), indicating improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. LNP509 stimulated adiponectin secretion acting at I1R on adipocytes, resulting in increased plasma levels of adiponectin; it also enhanced AMPK phosphorylation in hepatic tissues. Additionally, I1R activation on hepatocytes directly enhanced AMPK phosphorylation. To conclude, I1R ligands can improve insulin sensitivity acting peripherally, independently of sympathoinhibition; stimulation of adiponectin and AMPK pathways at insulin target tissues may account for this effect. This may open a promising new way for the treatment of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. The α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol decreases glucose fluctuations and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in peripheral leukocytes of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Osonoi, Takeshi; Saito, Miyoko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Fukaya, Nanae; Muramatsu, Takeshi; Inoue, Seiya; Fuchigami, Masahiro; Goda, Toshinao

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of switching from acarbose or voglibose to miglitol in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients for 3 months on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines/cytokine-like factors in peripheral leukocytes and on glucose fluctuations. We enrolled 47 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged 26 to 81 years, with hemoglobin A(₁c) levels ranging from 6.5% to 7.9% and who were treated with the highest approved dose of acarbose (100 mg per meal) or voglibose (0.3 mg per meal) in combination with insulin or sulfonylurea. Their prior α-glucosidase inhibitors were switched to a medium dose of miglitol (50 mg per meal), and the new treatments were maintained for 3 months. Forty-three patients completed the 3-month study and were analyzed. The switch to miglitol for 3 months did not affect hemoglobin A(₁c), fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels, or adverse events other than hypoglycemia symptoms. Hypoglycemia symptoms and glucose fluctuations were significantly improved by the switch. The expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and S100a4/6/9/10/11/12 genes in peripheral leukocytes, and the serum tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels were suppressed by switching to miglitol. Miglitol reduces glucose fluctuations and gene expression of inflammatory cytokines/cytokine-like factors in peripheral leukocytes of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients more than other α-glucosidase inhibitors and with fewer adverse effects.

  13. ApoE isoform-specific regulation of regeneration in the peripheral nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Comley, Laura H.; Fuller, Heidi R.; Wishart, Thomas M.; Mutsaers, Chantal A.; Thomson, Derek; Wright, Ann K.; Ribchester, Richard R.; Morris, Glenn E.; Parson, Simon H.; Horsburgh, Karen; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a 34 kDa glycoprotein with three distinct isoforms in the human population (apoE2, apoE3 and apoE4) known to play a major role in differentially influencing risk to, as well as outcome from, disease and injury in the central nervous system. In general, the apoE4 allele is associated with poorer outcomes after disease or injury, whereas apoE3 is associated with better responses. The extent to which different apoE isoforms influence degenerative and regenerative events in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) is still to be established, and the mechanisms through which apoE exerts its isoform-specific effects remain unclear. Here, we have investigated isoform-specific effects of human apoE on the mouse PNS. Experiments in mice ubiquitously expressing human apoE3 or human apoE4 on a null mouse apoE background revealed that apoE4 expression significantly disrupted peripheral nerve regeneration and subsequent neuromuscular junction re-innervation following nerve injury compared with apoE3, with no observable effects on normal development, maturation or Wallerian degeneration. Proteomic isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) screens comparing healthy and regenerating peripheral nerves from mice expressing apoE3 or apoE4 revealed significant differences in networks of proteins regulating cellular outgrowth and regeneration (myosin/actin proteins), as well as differences in expression levels of proteins involved in regulating the blood–nerve barrier (including orosomucoid 1). Taken together, these findings have identified isoform-specific roles for apoE in determining the protein composition of peripheral nerve as well as regulating nerve regeneration pathways in vivo. PMID:21478199

  14. Central & peripheral glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling differentially regulate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Schurdak, Jennifer D; Seeley, Randy J; Benoit, Stephen C; Davis, Jon F

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent anorexigenic peptide released in response to nutrient intake, as a regulator for the reinforcing properties of food, alcohol and psychostimulants. While, both central and peripheral mechanisms mediate effects of GLP-1R signaling on food intake, the extent to which central or peripheral GLP-1R signaling regulates reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse is unknown. Here, we examined amphetamine reinforcement, alcohol intake and hedonic feeding following peripheral administration of EX-4 (a GLP-1 analog) in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) (GLP-1R selectively ablated from the central nervous system) mice (n=13/group). First, the effect of EX-4 pretreatment on the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (Amp-CPP) was examined in the FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Next, alcohol intake (10% v/v) was evaluated in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following saline or EX-4 injections. Finally, we assessed the effects of EX-4 pretreatment on hedonic feeding behavior. Results indicate that Amp-CPP was completely blocked in the FLOX mice, but not in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following EX-4 pretreatment. Ex-4 pretreatment selectively blocked alcohol consumption in the FLOX mice, but was ineffective in altering alcohol intake in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Notably, hedonic feeding was partially blocked in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice, whereas it was abolished in the FLOX mice. The present study provides critical insights regarding the nature by which GLP-1 signaling controls reinforced behaviors and underscores the importance of both peripheral and central GLP-1R signaling for the regulation of addictive disorders.

  15. Dynamic modeling of methylprednisolone effects on body weight and glucose regulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; DuBois, Debra C.; He, Yang; Almon, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Influences of methylprednisolone (MPL) and food consumption on body weight (BW), and the effects of MPL on glycemic control including food consumption and the dynamic interactions among glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids (FFA) were evaluated in normal male Wistar rats. Six groups of animals received either saline or MPL via subcutaneous infusions at the rate of 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h for different treatment periods. BW and food consumption were measured twice a week. Plasma concentrations of MPL and corticosterone (CST) were determined at animal sacrifice. Plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA were measured at various times after infusion. Plasma MPL concentrations were simulated by a two-compartment model and used as the driving force in the pharmacodynamic (PD) analysis. All data were modeled using ADAPT 5. The MPL treatments caused reduction of food consumption and body weights in all dosing groups. The steroid also caused changes in plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA concentrations. Hyper-insulinemia was achieved rapidly at the first sampling time of 6 h; significant elevations of FFA were observed in all drug treatment groups; whereas only modest increases in plasma glucose were observed in the low dosing groups (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg/h). Body weight changes were modeled by dual actions of MPL: inhibition of food consumption and stimulation of weight loss, with food consumption accounting for the input of energy for body weight. Dynamic models of glucose and insulin feedback interactions were extended to capture the major metabolic effects of FFA: stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose utilization. These models of body weight and glucose regulation adequately captured the experimental data and reflect significant physiological interactions among glucose, insulin, and FFA. These mechanism-based PD models provide further insights into the multi-factor control of this essential metabolic system. PMID:21394487

  16. Opposite effects of genistein on the regulation of insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Gao, X J; Zhao, W W; Zhao, W J; Jiang, C H; Huang, F; Kou, J P; Liu, B L; Liu, K

    2013-09-01

    Genistein is an isoflavone phytoestrogen found in a number of plants such as soybeans and there is accumulating evidence that it has beneficial effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein on glucose homeostasis and its underlying mechanisms in normal and insulin-resistant conditions. To induce insulin resistance, mice or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with macrophage-derived conditioned medium. A glucose tolerance test was used to investigate the effect of genistein. Insulin signalling activation, glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation and AMP-activated PK (AMPK) activation were detected by Western blot analysis or elisa. Genistein impaired glucose tolerance and attenuated insulin sensitivity in normal mice by inhibiting the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at tyrosine residues, leading to inhibition of insulin-mediated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes. Mac-CM, an inflammatory stimulus induced glucose intolerance accompanied by impaired insulin sensitivity; genistein reversed these changes by restoring the disturbed IRS1 function, leading to an improvement in GLUT4 translocation. In addition, genistein increased AMPK activity under both normal and inflammatory conditions; this was shown to contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of genistein, which leads to an improvement in insulin signalling and the amelioration of insulin resistance. Genistein showed opposite effects on insulin sensitivity under normal and inflammatory conditions in adipose tissue and this action was derived from its negative or positive regulation of IRS1 function. Its up-regulation of AMPK activity contributes to the inhibition of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Regulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression by glucose and insulin in adipocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, S.; Nishihira, J.; Hirokawa, J.; Yoshimura, H.; Honda, T.; Aoki, K.; Tagami, S.; Kawakami, Y.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been reported that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islet beta-cells in an autocrine manner, which suggests its pivotal role in the glucose metabolism. According to this finding, we evaluated MIF expression in cultured adipocytes and epididymal fat pads of obese and diabetic rats to investigate its role in adipose tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The murine adipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 was used to examine MIF mRNA expression and production of MIF protein in response to various concentrations of glucose and insulin. Epididymal fat pads of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) and Wistar fatty rats, animal models of obesity and diabetes, were subjected to Northern blot analysis to determine MIF mRNA levels. RESULTS: MIF mRNA of 3T3-L1 adipocytes was up-regulated by costimulation with glucose and insulin. Intracellular MIF content was significantly increased by stimulation, whereas its content in the culture medium was decreased. When the cells were treated with cytochalasin B, MIF secretion in the medium was increased. Pioglitazone significantly increased MIF content in the culture medium of 3T3-L1 cells. However, MIF mRNA expression of both epididymal fat pads of OLETF and Wistar fatty rats was down-regulated despite a high plasma glucose level. The plasma MIF level of Wistar fatty rats was significantly increased by treatment with pioglitazone. CONCLUSION: We show here that the intracellular glucose level is critical to determining the MIF mRNA level as well as its protein content in adipose tissue. MIF is known to play an important role in glucose metabolism as a positive regulator of insulin secretion. In this context, it is conceivable that MIF may affect the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:10415161

  18. Opposite effects of genistein on the regulation of insulin-mediated glucose homeostasis in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M; Gao, X J; Zhao, W W; Zhao, W J; Jiang, C H; Huang, F; Kou, J P; Liu, B L; Liu, K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genistein is an isoflavone phytoestrogen found in a number of plants such as soybeans and there is accumulating evidence that it has beneficial effects on the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In this study we evaluated the effect of genistein on glucose homeostasis and its underlying mechanisms in normal and insulin-resistant conditions. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH To induce insulin resistance, mice or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with macrophage-derived conditioned medium. A glucose tolerance test was used to investigate the effect of genistein. Insulin signalling activation, glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) translocation and AMP-activated PK (AMPK) activation were detected by Western blot analysis or elisa. KEY RESULTS Genistein impaired glucose tolerance and attenuated insulin sensitivity in normal mice by inhibiting the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) at tyrosine residues, leading to inhibition of insulin-mediated GLUT4 translocation in adipocytes. Mac-CM, an inflammatory stimulus induced glucose intolerance accompanied by impaired insulin sensitivity; genistein reversed these changes by restoring the disturbed IRS1 function, leading to an improvement in GLUT4 translocation. In addition, genistein increased AMPK activity under both normal and inflammatory conditions; this was shown to contribute to the anti-inflammatory effect of genistein, which leads to an improvement in insulin signalling and the amelioration of insulin resistance. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Genistein showed opposite effects on insulin sensitivity under normal and inflammatory conditions in adipose tissue and this action was derived from its negative or positive regulation of IRS1 function. Its up-regulation of AMPK activity contributes to the inhibition of inflammation implicated in insulin resistance. PMID:23763311

  19. Gluco-Incretins Regulate Beta-Cell Glucose Competence by Epigenetic Silencing of Fxyd3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vallois, David; Niederhäuser, Guy; Ibberson, Mark; Nagaray, Vini; Marselli, Lorella; Marchetti, Piero; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Thorens, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Gluco-incretin hormones increase the glucose competence of pancreatic beta-cells by incompletely characterized mechanisms. Methods We searched for genes that were differentially expressed in islets from control and Glp1r−/−; Gipr−/− (dKO) mice, which show reduced glucose competence. Overexpression and knockdown studies; insulin secretion analysis; analysis of gene expression in islets from control and diabetic mice and humans as well as gene methylation and transcriptional analysis were performed. Results Fxyd3 was the most up-regulated gene in glucose incompetent islets from dKO mice. When overexpressed in beta-cells Fxyd3 reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion by acting downstream of plasma membrane depolarization and Ca++ influx. Fxyd3 expression was not acutely regulated by cAMP raising agents in either control or dKO adult islets. Instead, expression of Fxyd3 was controlled by methylation of CpGs present in its proximal promoter region. Increased promoter methylation reduced Fxyd3 transcription as assessed by lower abundance of H3K4me3 at the transcriptional start site and in transcription reporter assays. This epigenetic imprinting was initiated perinatally and fully established in adult islets. Glucose incompetent islets from diabetic mice and humans showed increased expression of Fxyd3 and reduced promoter methylation. Conclusions/Interpretation Because gluco-incretin secretion depends on feeding the epigenetic regulation of Fxyd3 expression may link nutrition in early life to establishment of adult beta-cell glucose competence; this epigenetic control is, however, lost in diabetes possibly as a result of gluco-incretin resistance and/or de-differentiation of beta-cells that are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25058609

  20. A collaborative biomedical engineering undergraduate work: an automatic system for blood glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Minas, Graca; Soares, Filomena

    2009-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design of an automatic system to regulate blood glucose concentration. A model is developed to simulate the process. The model was based on approximating an electrochemical biosensor, for measuring the blood glucose concentration, to electrical circuits for readout, data processing and control. It was implemented using an electronics simulation software package: S-Edit and T-Spice from Tanner Tools EDA. The work was developed by a group of ten students from the fourth year of the integrated master of Biomedical Engineering course of the University of Minho in a collaborative way.

  1. Glucose Shortens the Lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans by Down-Regulating Aquaporin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Murphy, Coleen T.; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many studies have addressed the effect of dietary glycemic index on obesity and diabetes, but little is known about its effect on lifespan itself. We found that adding a small amount of glucose to the medium (0.1-2%) shortened the lifespan of C. elegans. Glucose shortened lifespan by inhibiting the activities of lifespan-extending transcription factors that are also inhibited by insulin signaling: the FOXO family member DAF-16 and the heat shock factor HSF-1. This effect involved the down-regulation of an aquaporin glycerol channel, aqp-1. We show that changes in glycerol metabolism are likely to underlie the lifespan-shortening effect of glucose, and that aqp-1 may act cell non-autonomously as a feedback regulator in the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Insulin down-regulates similar glycerol channels in mammals, suggesting that this glucose-responsive pathway might be conserved evolutionarily. Together these findings raise the possibility that a low-sugar diet might have beneficial effects on lifespan in higher organisms. PMID:19883616

  2. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fuse, Yuji; Tamaoki, Junya; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Muratani, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7) and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a) were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates. PMID:28116036

  3. DHHC7 Palmitoylates Glucose Transporter 4 (Glut4) and Regulates Glut4 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Du, Keyong; Murakami, Shoko; Sun, Yingmin; Kilpatrick, Casey L; Luscher, Bernhard

    2017-02-17

    Insulin-dependent translocation of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) to the plasma membrane plays a key role in the dynamic regulation of glucose homeostasis. We recently showed that this process is critically dependent on palmitoylation of Glut4 at Cys-223. To gain further insights into the regulation of Glut4 palmitoylation, we set out to identify the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) involved. Here we report that among 23 mammalian DHHC proteins, DHHC7 is the major Glut4 PAT, based on evidence that ectopic expression of DHHC7 increased Glut4 palmitoylation, whereas DHHC7 knockdown in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and DHHC7 KO in adipose tissue and muscle decreased Glut4 palmitoylation. Moreover, inactivation of DHHC7 suppressed insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary adipocytes. Finally, DHHC7 KO mice developed hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, thereby confirming that DHHC7 represents the principal PAT for Glut4 and that this mechanism is essential for insulin-regulated glucose homeostasis.

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Park, Sung-Min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  5. Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María J; González, C Ruth; Varela, Luis; Lage, Ricardo; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Williams, Lynda M; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the adipocyte-derived hormone resistin (RSTN) directly regulates both feeding and peripheral metabolism through, so far, undefined hypothalamic-mediated mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the anorectic effect of RSTN is associated with inappropriately decreased mRNA expression of orexigenic (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and increased mRNA expression of anorexigenic (cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript) neuropeptides in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Of interest, RSTN also exerts a profound nutrition-dependent inhibitory effect on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by increased phosphorylation levels of both AMP-activated protein kinase and its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, associated with decreased expression of fatty acid synthase in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, we also demonstrate that chronic central RSTN infusion results in decreased body weight and major changes in peripheral expression of lipogenic enzymes, in a tissue-specific and nutrition-dependent manner. Thus, in the fed state central RSTN is associated with induced expression of fatty acid synthesis enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines in liver, whereas its administration in the fasted state does so in white adipose tissue. Overall, our results indicate that RSTN controls feeding and peripheral lipid metabolism and suggest that hepatic RSTN-induced insulin resistance may be mediated by central activation of de novo lipogenesis in liver.

  6. The Histone Deacetylase SIRT6 Regulates Glucose Homeostasis via Hif1α

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei; D'Urso, Agustina; Toiber, Debra; Sebastian, Carlos; Henry, Ryan E.; Vadysirisack, Douangsone D.; Guimaraes, Alexander; Marinelli, Brett; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Nir, Tomer; Clish, Clary B.; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Iliopoulos, Othon; Kurland, Irwin; Dor, Yuval; Weissleder, Ralph; Shirihai, Orian S.; Ellisen, Leif W.; Espinosa, Joaquin M.; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Summary SIRT6 is a member of a highly conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases with various roles in metabolism, stress resistance and lifespan. SIRT6 deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life; however, the mechanism underlying this hypoglycemia remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT6 functions as a histone H3K9 deacetylase to control the expression of multiple glycolytic genes. Specifically, SIRT6 appears to function as a co-repressor of the transcription factor Hif1α, a critical regulator of nutrient stress responses. Consistent with this notion, SIRT6 deficient cells exhibit increased Hif1α activity and show increased glucose uptake with up-regulation of glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration. Our studies uncover a novel role for the chromatin factor SIRT6 as a master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and may provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches against metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. PMID:20141841

  7. Glucose and ethylene signalling pathways converge to regulate trans-differentiation of epidermal transfer cells in Vicia narbonensis cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Andriunas, Felicity A; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Weber, Hans; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2011-12-01

    Transfer cells are specialized transport cells containing invaginated wall ingrowths that provide an amplified plasma membrane surface area with high densities of transporter proteins. They trans-differentiate from differentiated cells at sites where enhanced rates of nutrient transport occur across apo/symplasmic boundaries. Despite their physiological importance, the signal(s) and signalling cascades responsible for initiating their trans-differentiation are poorly understood. In culture, adaxial epidermal cells of Vicia narbonensis cotyledons were induced to trans-differentiate to a transfer cell morphology. Manipulating their intracellular glucose concentrations by transgenic knock-down of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression and/or culture on a high-glucose medium demonstrated that glucose functioned as a negative regulator of wall ingrowth induction. In contrast, glucose had no detectable effect on wall ingrowth morphology. The effect on wall ingrowth induction of culture on media containing glucose analogues suggested that glucose acts through a hexokinase-dependent signalling pathway. Elevation of an epidermal cell-specific ethylene signal alone, or in combination with glucose analogues, countered the negative effect of glucose on wall ingrowth induction. Glucose modulated the amplitude of ethylene-stimulated wall ingrowth induction by down-regulating the expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes and an ethylene insensitive 3 (EIN3)-like gene (EIL) encoding a key transcription factor in the ethylene signalling cascade. A model is presented describing the interaction between glucose and ethylene signalling pathways regulating the induction of wall ingrowth formation in adaxial epidermal cells.

  8. Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Function Partially Protects against Peripheral and Cardiac Glucose Metabolic Derangements During a Long-Term High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Ellen E.; Rendina-Ruedy, Elisabeth; Smith, Brenda J.; Lacombe, Veronique A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic inflammatory disease that carries a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological link between these disorders is not well known. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling mediates high fat diet (HFD)-induced peripheral and cardiac glucose metabolic derangements. Mice with a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4 (C3H/HeJ) and age-matched control (C57BL/6) mice were fed either a high-fat diet or normal diet for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance and plasma insulin were measured. Protein expression of glucose transporters (GLUT), AKT (phosphorylated and total), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and SOCS-3) were quantified in the heart using Western Blotting. Both groups fed a long-term HFD had increased body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared to mice fed a normal diet. TLR4-mutant mice were partially protected against long-term HFD-induced insulin resistance. In control mice, feeding a HFD decreased cardiac crude membrane GLUT4 protein content, which was partially rescued in TLR4-mutant mice. TLR4-mutant mice fed a HFD also had increased expression of GLUT8, a novel isoform, compared to mice fed a normal diet. GLUT8 content was positively correlated with SOCS-3 and IL-6 expression in the heart. No significant differences in cytokine expression were observed between groups, suggesting a lack of inflammation in the heart following a HFD. Loss of TLR4 function partially restored a healthy metabolic phenotype, suggesting that TLR4 signaling is a key mechanism in HFD-induced peripheral and cardiac insulin resistance. Our data further suggest that TLR4 exerts its detrimental metabolic effects in the myocardium through a cytokine-independent pathway. PMID:26539824

  9. Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Function Partially Protects against Peripheral and Cardiac Glucose Metabolic Derangements During a Long-Term High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ellen E; Rendina-Ruedy, Elisabeth; Smith, Brenda J; Lacombe, Veronique A

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic inflammatory disease that carries a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological link between these disorders is not well known. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling mediates high fat diet (HFD)-induced peripheral and cardiac glucose metabolic derangements. Mice with a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4 (C3H/HeJ) and age-matched control (C57BL/6) mice were fed either a high-fat diet or normal diet for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance and plasma insulin were measured. Protein expression of glucose transporters (GLUT), AKT (phosphorylated and total), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and SOCS-3) were quantified in the heart using Western Blotting. Both groups fed a long-term HFD had increased body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared to mice fed a normal diet. TLR4-mutant mice were partially protected against long-term HFD-induced insulin resistance. In control mice, feeding a HFD decreased cardiac crude membrane GLUT4 protein content, which was partially rescued in TLR4-mutant mice. TLR4-mutant mice fed a HFD also had increased expression of GLUT8, a novel isoform, compared to mice fed a normal diet. GLUT8 content was positively correlated with SOCS-3 and IL-6 expression in the heart. No significant differences in cytokine expression were observed between groups, suggesting a lack of inflammation in the heart following a HFD. Loss of TLR4 function partially restored a healthy metabolic phenotype, suggesting that TLR4 signaling is a key mechanism in HFD-induced peripheral and cardiac insulin resistance. Our data further suggest that TLR4 exerts its detrimental metabolic effects in the myocardium through a cytokine-independent pathway.

  10. Comparison of glucose concentrations in blood samples obtained with a marginal ear vein nick technique versus from a peripheral vein in healthy cats and cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Melanie D; Taylor, Susan M; Adams, Vicki J; Waldner, Cheryl L; Feldman, Edward C

    2002-08-01

    To compare blood glucose (BG) concentrations measured with a portable blood glucose meter in blood samples obtained with a marginal ear vein (MEV) nick technique, from a peripheral venous catheter, and by direct venipuncture in healthy cats and cats with diabetes mellitus. Prospective study. 1 0 healthy cats and 11 cats with diabetes mellitus. Procedure-On day 1, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and from a peripheral venous catheter. On day 2, blood samples were collected every hour for 10 hours by the MEV nick technique and by direct venipuncture of the medial saphenous vein. For all cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained from the peripheral venous catheter. For healthy cats, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was not significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture. For cats with diabetes mellitus, mean BG concentration for samples collected by the MEV nick technique was significantly different from mean concentration for samples obtained by direct venipuncture; however, for the range of concentrations examined, this difference was not clinically important. Results suggest that for the range of concentrations examined, the MEV nick technique is a reasonable alternative to venous blood collection for serial measurement of BG concentrations in cats.

  11. Neuronal changes resulting in up-regulation of alpha-1 adrenoceptors after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2014-07-15

    Under normal conditions, the sympathetic neurotransmitter noradrenaline inhibits the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, after peripheral nerve and tissue injury, pro-inflammatory cytokines appear to induce the expression of the alpha1A-adrenoceptor subtype on immune cells and perhaps also on other cells in the injured tissue. In turn, noradrenaline may act on up-regulated alpha1-adrenoceptors to increase the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. In addition, the release of inflammatory mediators and nerve growth factor from keratinocytes and other cells may augment the expression of alpha1-adrenoceptors on peripheral nerve fibers. Consequently, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, and inflammatory processes build. These mechanisms could contribute to the development of sympathetically maintained pain in conditions such as post-herpetic neuralgia, cutaneous neuromas, amputation stump pain and complex regional pain syndrome.

  12. Glucose-regulated and drug-perturbed phosphoproteome reveals molecular mechanisms controlling insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Humphrey, Sean J.; Cox, Jürgen; Mischnik, Marcel; Schulte, Anke; Klabunde, Thomas; Schäfer, Matthias; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-secreting beta cells play an essential role in maintaining physiological blood glucose levels, and their dysfunction leads to the development of diabetes. To elucidate the signalling events regulating insulin secretion, we applied a recently developed phosphoproteomics workflow. We quantified the time-resolved phosphoproteome of murine pancreatic cells following their exposure to glucose and in combination with small molecule compounds that promote insulin secretion. The quantitative phosphoproteome of 30,000 sites clustered into three main groups in concordance with the modulation of the three key kinases: PKA, PKC and CK2A. A high-resolution time course revealed key novel regulatory sites, revealing the importance of methyltransferase DNMT3A phosphorylation in the glucose response. Remarkably a significant proportion of these novel regulatory sites is significantly downregulated in diabetic islets. Control of insulin secretion is embedded in an unexpectedly broad and complex range of cellular functions, which are perturbed by drugs in multiple ways. PMID:27841257

  13. Central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors: similar regulation by stress and GABA receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Rägo, L; Kiivet, R A; Harro, J; Pŏld, M

    1989-04-01

    Central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine (BD) receptors were labelled either by 3H-flunitrazepam or 3H-Ro 5-4864 in vitro after stress and in vivo administration of GABAA and GABAB agonists. A significant increase in the density of cerebral cortex and kidney BD binding sites was observed in rats after forced swimming stress. Similar changes in both type of BD receptors were also followed when naive (stressed) and handling-habituated (unstressed) rats were used. Stress in both models was unable to change the affinity of BD receptors in cerebral cortex, but significantly lowered it in kidneys. Acute treatment of rats with muscimol (1.5 mg/kg) or (-)baclofen (5 mg/kg) resulted in marked increase in the affinity of BD binding not only in cerebral cortex but also in kidneys. After (-)baclofen treatment the number of BD binding sites was lowered in the structures studied. In a separate study mice selected according to their behavioral response to (-)baclofen (1 mg/kg) were studied. Two weeks after the selection it appeared that baclofen responders were behaviorally more "anxious" than baclofen nonresponders. The number of BD binding sites was reduced in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, heart and kidneys in baclofen responders as compared to baclofen nonresponders. In several cases the changes in peripheral BD binding sites were even more pronounced than those in central ones. The data presented here evidence that peripheral- and central-type BD receptors are regulated similarly by GABA and some models of stress. The physiological mechanisms involved in similar regulation of central- and peripheral-type BD receptors are yet unknown.

  14. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  15. Multiphasic Regulation of Systemic and Peripheral Organ Metabolic Responses to Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Liew, Chong Wee; Xu, Shanshan; Wang, Xuerong; McCann, Maximilian; Whang Kong, Hyerim; Carley, Andrew C; Pang, Jingbo; Fantuzzi, Giamila; O'Donnell, J Michael; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2017-04-01

    Reduced fat oxidation in hypertrophied hearts coincides with a shift of carnitine palmitoyl transferase I from muscle to increased liver isoforms. Acutely increased carnitine palmitoyl transferase I in normal rodent hearts has been shown to recapitulate the reduced fat oxidation and elevated atrial natriuretic peptide message of cardiac hypertrophy. Because of the potential for reduced fat oxidation to affect cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide, and thus, induce adipose lipolysis, we studied peripheral and systemic metabolism in male C57BL/6 mice model of transverse aortic constriction in which left ventricular hypertrophy occurred by 2 weeks without functional decline until 16 weeks (ejection fraction, -45.6%; fractional shortening, -22.6%). We report the first evidence for initially improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in response to 2 weeks transverse aortic constriction versus sham, linked to enhanced insulin signaling in liver and visceral adipose tissue (epididymal white adipose tissue [WAT]), reduced WAT inflammation, elevated adiponectin, mulitilocular subcutaneous adipose tissue (inguinal WAT) with upregulated oxidative/thermogenic gene expression, and downregulated lipolysis and lipogenesis genes in epididymal WAT. By 6 weeks transverse aortic constriction, the metabolic profile reversed with impaired insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, reduced insulin signaling in liver, epididymal WAT and heart, and downregulation of oxidative enzymes in brown adipose tissue and oxidative and lipogenic genes in inguinal WAT. Changes in insulin signaling, circulating natriuretic peptides and adipokines, and varied expression of adipose genes associated with altered insulin response/glucose handling and thermogenesis occurred prior to any functional decline in transverse aortic constriction hearts. The findings demonstrate multiphasic responses in extracardiac metabolism to pathogenic cardiac stress, with early iWAT browning providing potential

  16. Basal and insulin-regulated free fatty acid and glucose metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Shadid, Samyah; Kanaley, Jill A; Sheehan, Michael T; Jensen, Michael D

    2007-06-01

    These studies were done to examine the effects of body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), sex, and fitness on basal and insulin-regulated FFA and glucose metabolism. We performed 137 experiments in 101 nondiabetic, premenopausal women and men, ranging from low normal weight to class III obese (BMI 18.0-40.5 kg/m2). Glucose flux was measured using [6-(2)H2]glucose and FFA kinetics with [9,10-(3)H]oleate under either basal (74 experiments) or euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (1.0 mU.kg FFM(-1).min(-1)) clamp conditions (63 experiments). Consistent with our previous findings, REE and sex independently predicted basal FFA flux, whereas fat-free mass was the best predictor of basal glucose flux; in addition, percent body fat was independently and positively associated with basal glucose flux (total r2 = 0.52, P < 0.0001). Insulin-suppressed lipolysis remained significantly associated with REE (r = 0.25, P < 0.05), but percent body fat also contributed (total adjusted r2 = 0.36, P < 0.0001), whereas sex was not significantly related to insulin-suppressed FFA flux. Glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemia was independently associated with peak VO2, percent body fat, and FFA concentrations (total r2 = 0.63, P < 0.0001) but not with sex. We conclude that basal glucose production is independently related to both FFM and body fatness. In addition, hyperinsulinemia obscures the sex differences in FFA release relative to REE, but brings out the effects of fatness on lipolysis.

  17. Insulin-coated gold nanoparticles as a new concept for personalized and adjustable glucose regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilo, Malka; Berenstein, Peter; Dreifuss, Tamar; Nash, Yuval; Goldsmith, Guy; Kazimirsky, Gila; Motiei, Menachem; Frenkel, Dan; Brodie, Chaya; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by high blood glucose levels, affecting millions of people around the world. Currently, the main treatment for diabetes requires multiple daily injections of insulin and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels, which markedly affect patients' quality of life. In this study we present a novel strategy for controlled and prolonged glucose regulation, based on the administration of insulin-coated gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs). We show that both intravenous and subcutaneous injection of INS-GNPs into a mouse model of type 1 diabetes decreases blood glucose levels for periods over 3 times longer than free insulin. We further showed that conjugation of insulin to GNPs prevented its rapid degradation by the insulin-degrading-enzyme, and thus allows controlled and adjustable bio-activity. Moreover, we assessed different sizes and concentrations of INS-GNPs, and found that both parameters have a critical effect in vivo, enabling specific adjustment of blood glucose levels. These findings have the potential to improve patient compliance in diabetes mellitus.

  18. Cross-talk between light and glucose regulation controls toxin production and morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Atoui, A; Kastner, C; Larey, C M; Thokala, R; Etxebeste, O; Espeso, E A; Fischer, R; Calvo, A M

    2010-12-01

    Light is a major environmental stimulus that has a broad effect on organisms, triggering a cellular response that results in an optimal adaptation enhancing fitness and survival. In fungi, light affects growth, and causes diverse morphological changes such as those leading to reproduction. Light can also affect fungal metabolism, including the biosynthesis of natural products. In this study we show that in Aspergillus nidulans the effect of light on the production of the sterigmatocystin (ST) toxin depends on the glucose concentration. In cultures grown with 1% glucose and exposed to light, ST production was lower than when grown in the dark. This lower ST production coincided with an elevated rate of cellular damage with partial loss of nuclear integrity and vacuolated cytoplasm. However, in cultures grown with 2% glucose these effects were reversed and light enhanced ST production. Glucose abundance also affected the light-dependent subcellular localization of the VeA (velvet) protein, a key regulator necessary for normal light-dependent morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in Aspergilli and other fungal genera. The role of other VeA-associated proteins, particularly the blue-light-sensing proteins LreA and LreB (WC-1 and WC-2 orthologs), on conidiation could also be modified by the abundance of glucose. We also show that LreA and LreB, as well as the phytochrome FphA, modulate not only the synthesis of sterigmatocystin, but also the production of the antibiotic penicillin.

  19. Retinal proteins associated with redox regulation and protein folding play central roles in response to high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ssu-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy typically causes poor vision and blindness. A previous study revealed that a high blood glucose concentration induces glycoxidation and weakens the retinal capillaries. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose induced diabetic retinopathy remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we cultured the retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 in mannitol-balanced 5.5, 25, and 100 mM glucose media and investigated protein level alterations. Proteomic analysis revealed significant changes in 137 protein features, of which 124 demonstrated changes in a glucose concentration dependent manner. Several proteins functionally associated with redox regulation, protein folding, or the cytoskeleton are affected by increased glucose concentrations. Additional analyses also revealed that cellular oxidative stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, was significantly increased after treatment with high glucose concentrations. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival remained unchanged during treatment with high glucose concentrations. To summarize, in this study, we used a comprehensive retinal pigmented epithelial cell based proteomic approach for identifying changes in protein expression associated retinal markers induced by high glucose concentrations. Our results revealed that a high glucose condition can induce cellular oxidative stress and modulate the levels of proteins with functions in redox regulation, protein folding, and cytoskeleton regulation; however, cell viability and mitochondrial integrity are not significantly disturbed under these high glucose conditions.

  20. Neurotrimin is an estrogen-regulated determinant of peripheral sympathetic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Krizsan-Agbas, Dora; Pedchenko, Tetyana; Smith, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying axon degeneration in peripheral neuropathies and during normal remodeling are poorly understood. Because estrogen induces widespread sympathetic axon degeneration within female reproductive tract smooth muscle, we surveyed estrogen-regulated genes in rat myometrium. Microarray analysis revealed that the neural cell adhesion protein neurotrimin (Ntm) was markedly upregulated at 6h and down-regulated by 24h after injection of 17β-estradiol and real time RT-PCR confirmed this pattern of expression. Protein analysis by western blotting showed that uterine Ntm protein is also upregulated in vivo at 6−24h following estrogen injection, and that Ntm protein is increased selectively in the myometrium during the high-estrogen phase of the estrous cycle. Cultured myometrial smooth muscle cells display peri-nuclear accumulations of Ntm protein, and 17β-Estradiol also increases intracellular levels of Ntm and its secretion into the culture medium. To determine if neurotrimin is required for estrogen-induced sympathetic pruning, sympathetic neurons were co-cultured with uterine smooth muscle cells transfected with siRNA directed against Ntm. While estrogen inhibited neurite outgrowth in non-transfected co-cultures, estrogen's ability to reduce sympathetic outgrowth was impaired substantially following Ntm downregulation. This supports a role for neurotrimin in mediating estrogen-induced sympathetic pruning in some peripheral targets. Together with earlier studies, these findings support the idea that physiological sympathetic axon degeneration is a multifactorial process requiring dynamic regulation of multiple repellant proteins. PMID:18627025

  1. Tead1 regulates the expression of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 during Schwann cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Anido, Camila; Poitelon, Yannick; Gopinath, Chetna; Moran, John J.; Ma, Ki Hwan; Law, William D.; Antonellis, Anthony; Feltri, M. Laura; Svaren, John

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells are myelinating glia in the peripheral nervous system that form the myelin sheath. A major cause of peripheral neuropathy is a copy number variant involving the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (PMP22) gene, which is located within a 1.4-Mb duplication on chromosome 17 associated with the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1A). Rodent models of CMT1A have been used to show that reducing Pmp22 overexpression mitigates several aspects of a CMT1A-related phenotype. Mechanistic studies of Pmp22 regulation identified enhancers regulated by the Sox10 (SRY sex determining region Y-box 10) and Egr2/Krox20 (Early growth response protein 2) transcription factors in myelinated nerves. However, relatively little is known regarding how other transcription factors induce Pmp22 expression during Schwann cell development and myelination. Here, we examined Pmp22 enhancers as a function of cell type-specificity, nerve injury and development. While Pmp22 enhancers marked by active histone modifications were lost or remodeled after injury, we found that these enhancers were permissive in early development prior to Pmp22 upregulation. Pmp22 enhancers contain binding motifs for TEA domain (Tead) transcription factors of the Hippo signaling pathway. We discovered that Tead1 and co-activators Yap and Taz are required for Pmp22 expression, as well as for the expression of Egr2. Tead1 directly binds Pmp22 and Egr2 enhancers early in development and Tead1 binding is induced during myelination, correlating with Pmp22 expression. The data identify Tead1 as a novel regulator of Pmp22 expression during development in concert with Sox10 and Egr2. PMID:27288457

  2. Tead1 regulates the expression of Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 during Schwann cell development.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Anido, Camila; Poitelon, Yannick; Gopinath, Chetna; Moran, John J; Ma, Ki Hwan; Law, William D; Antonellis, Anthony; Feltri, M Laura; Svaren, John

    2016-07-15

    Schwann cells are myelinating glia in the peripheral nervous system that form the myelin sheath. A major cause of peripheral neuropathy is a copy number variant involving the Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 (PMP22) gene, which is located within a 1.4-Mb duplication on chromosome 17 associated with the most common form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT1A). Rodent models of CMT1A have been used to show that reducing Pmp22 overexpression mitigates several aspects of a CMT1A-related phenotype. Mechanistic studies of Pmp22 regulation identified enhancers regulated by the Sox10 (SRY sex determining region Y-box 10) and Egr2/Krox20 (Early growth response protein 2) transcription factors in myelinated nerves. However, relatively little is known regarding how other transcription factors induce Pmp22 expression during Schwann cell development and myelination. Here, we examined Pmp22 enhancers as a function of cell type-specificity, nerve injury and development. While Pmp22 enhancers marked by active histone modifications were lost or remodeled after injury, we found that these enhancers were permissive in early development prior to Pmp22 upregulation. Pmp22 enhancers contain binding motifs for TEA domain (Tead) transcription factors of the Hippo signaling pathway. We discovered that Tead1 and co-activators Yap and Taz are required for Pmp22 expression, as well as for the expression of Egr2 Tead1 directly binds Pmp22 and Egr2 enhancers early in development and Tead1 binding is induced during myelination, correlating with Pmp22 expression. The data identify Tead1 as a novel regulator of Pmp22 expression during development in concert with Sox10 and Egr2. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Sun, Cui-Yu; Sun, Guo-Peng; Ren, Gui-Ping; Ye, Xian-Long; Zhu, Sheng-Long; Wang, Wen-Fei; Xu, Peng-Fei; Li, Shu-Jie; Wu, Qiang; Niu, Ze-Shan; Sun, Tian; Liu, Ming-Yao; Li, De-Shan

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies proposed that the synergistic effect of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) and insulin may be due to the improvement of insulin sensitivity by FGF-21. However, there is no experimental evidence to support this. This study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism was demonstrated by investigating the glucose absorption rate by insulin resistance HepG2 cell model and the blood glucose chances in type 2 diabetic db/db mice after treatments with different concentrations of FGF-21 or/and insulin; The synergistic metabolism was revealed through detecting GLUT1 and GLUT4 transcription levels in the liver by real-time PCR method. The experimental results showed that FGF-21 and insulin have a synergistic effect on the regulation of glucose metabolism. The results of real-time PCR showed that the effective dose of FGF-21 could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT1 in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the transcription level of GLUT4. Insulin (4 u) alone could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT4, yet had no effect on that of GLUT1. Ineffective dose 0.1 mg kg(-1) FGF-21 alone could not change the transcription level of GLUT1 or GLUT4. However, when the ineffective dose 0.1 mg x kg(-1) FGF-21 was used in combination with insulin (4 u) significantly increased the transcription levels of both GLUT1 and GLUT4, the transcription level of GLUT1 was similar to that treated with 5 time concentration of FGF-21 alone; the transcription level of GLUT4 is higher than that treated with insulin (4 u) alone. In summary, in the presence of FGF-21, insulin increases the sensitivity of FGF-21 through enhancing GLUT1 transcription. Vice versa, FGF-21 increases the sensitivity of insulin by stimulating GLUT4 transcription in the presence of insulin. FGF-21 and insulin exert a synergistic

  4. Central and peripheral signaling mechanisms involved in endocannabinoid regulation of feeding: a perspective on the munchies.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Keith A; Pittman, Quentin J

    2005-03-29

    The endocannabinoid system is a critical regulator of energy homeostasis and food intake. Through cannabinoid (CB)(1) receptors in the brain and periphery, endocannabinoids exert powerful effects on the systems of the body that coordinate the balance between food intake, metabolism, and energy expenditure. These integrative systems control food intake both by modulating the inputs to various brain areas that monitor energy balance and by increasing the hedonic or reward value of the food consumed. Cannabinoids also alter metabolism, acting through both centrally located CB(1) receptors that drive neuronal pathways controlling metabolism and peripheral CB(1) receptors located in tissues throughout the body.

  5. Schwann cells and their transcriptional network: Evolution of key regulators of peripheral myelination.

    PubMed

    Stolt, C Claus; Wegner, Michael

    2016-06-15

    As derivatives of the neural crest, Schwann cells represent a vertebrate invention. Their development and differentiation is under control of a newly constructed, vertebrate-specific regulatory network that contains Sox10, Oct6 and Krox20 as cornerstones and central regulators of peripheral myelination. In this review, we discuss the function and relationship of these transcription factors among each other and in the context of their regulatory network, and present ideas of how neofunctionalization may have helped to recruit them to their novel task in Schwann cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution.

  6. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  7. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1α is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1α exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo.

  8. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, Annika; Clausen, Trine R.; Larsen, Sylvester; Ladefoged, Mette; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.; Larsen, Louise; Vang, Ole; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased by glucose in human and rat islets and INS-1E cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a increases proliferation of INS-1E beta-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forced expression of miR-29a decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of beta-cell miR-29a improves GSIS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a may be a mediator of glucose toxicity in beta-cells. -- Abstract: Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investigate the impact of glucose on miR-29a levels in INS-1E beta-cells and in human islets of Langerhans and furthermore to evaluate the impact of miR-29a on beta-cell function and proliferation. Increased glucose levels up-regulated miR-29a in beta-cells and human and rat islets of Langerhans. Glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion (GSIS) of INS-1E beta-cells was decreased by forced expression of miR-29a, while depletion of endogenous miR-29a improved GSIS. Over-expression of miR-29a increased INS-1E proliferation. Thus, miR-29a up-regulation is involved in glucose-induced proliferation of beta-cells. Furthermore, as depletion of miR-29a improves beta-cell function, miR-29a is a mediator of glucose-induced beta-cell dysfunction. Glucose-induced up-regulation of miR-29a in beta-cells could be implicated in progression from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes.

  9. Peripheral Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Precursor Regulates Pain as an Inflammatory Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cong; Zhong, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Fiona H.; Li, Jia-yi; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Jun-Mei; Song, Bo; Li, Chang-Qi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Dai, Ru-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), the unprocessed BDNF gene product, binds to its receptors and exerts the opposing biologic functions of mature BDNF. proBDNF is expressed in the peripheral tissues but the functions of peripheral proBDNF remain elusive. Here we showed that proBDNF and its predominant receptor, p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor were upregulated in the nerve fibers and inflammatory cells in the local tissue in inflammatory pain. Neutralization of proBDNF by polyclonal antibody attenuated pain in different models of inflammatory pain. Unilateral intra-plantar supplementation of proBDNF by injecting exogenous proBDNF or ectopic overexpression resulted in pain hypersensitivity and induced spinal phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Exogenous proBDNF injection induced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the activation of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that inflammatory reaction contributed to the pro-algesic effect of proBDNF. Finally, we generated monoclonal anti-proBDNF antibody that could biologically block proBDNF. Administration of monoclonal Ab-proBDNF attenuated various types of inflammatory pain and surgical pain. Thus, peripheral proBDNF is a potential pain mediator and anti-proBDNF pretreatment may alleviate the development of inflammatory pain. PMID:27251195

  10. Effects of Peripheral Neurotensin on Appetite Regulation and Its Role in Gastric Bypass Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Cecilia; Skov, Louise J; Raida, Zindy; Bächler, Thomas; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Le Foll, Christelle; Sivertsen, Bjørn; Dalbøge, Louise S; Hartmann, Bolette; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Madsen, Andreas N; Jelsing, Jacob; Holst, Jens J; Lutz, Thomas A; Andrews, Zane B; Holst, Birgitte

    2016-09-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a peptide expressed in the brain and in the gastrointestinal tract. Brain NT inhibits food intake, but the effects of peripheral NT are less investigated. In this study, peripheral NT decreased food intake in both mice and rats, which was abolished by a NT antagonist. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we found that peripheral NT activated brainstem and hypothalamic regions. The anorexigenic effect of NT was preserved in vagotomized mice but lasted shorter than in sham-operated mice. This in combination with a strong increase in c-Fos activation in area postrema after ip administration indicates that NT acts both through the blood circulation and the vagus. To improve the pharmacokinetics of NT, we developed a pegylated NT peptide, which presumably prolonged the half-life, and thus, the effect on feeding was extended compared with native NT. On a molecular level, the pegylated NT peptide increased proopiomelanocortin mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. We also investigated the importance of NT for the decreased food intake after gastric bypass surgery in a rat model of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). NT was increased in plasma and in the gastrointestinal tract in RYGB rats, and pharmacological antagonism of NT increased food intake transiently in RYGB rats. Taken together, our data suggest that NT is a metabolically active hormone, which contributes to the regulation of food intake.

  11. Std1 and Mth1 Proteins Interact with the Glucose Sensors To Control Glucose-Regulated Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Martin C.; McCartney, Rhonda R.; Zhang, Xudong; Tillman, Tommy S.; Solimeo, Harry; Wölfl, Stefan; Almonte, Ciprian; Watkins, Simon C.

    1999-01-01

    The Std1 protein modulates the expression of glucose-regulated genes, but its exact molecular role in this process is unclear. A two-hybrid screen for Std1-interacting proteins identified the hydrophilic C-terminal domains of the glucose sensors, Snf3 and Rgt2. The homologue of Std1, Mth1, behaves differently from Std1 in this assay by interacting with Snf3 but not Rgt2. Genetic interactions between STD1, MTH1, SNF3, and RGT2 suggest that the glucose signaling is mediated, at least in part, through interactions of the products of these four genes. Mutations in MTH1 can suppress the raffinose growth defect of a snf3 mutant as well as the glucose fermentation defect present in cells lacking both glucose sensors (snf3 rgt2). Genetic suppression by mutations in MTH1 is likely to be due to the increased and unregulated expression of hexose transporter genes. In media lacking glucose or with low levels of glucose, the hexose transporter genes are subject to repression by a mechanism that requires the Std1 and Mth1 proteins. An additional mechanism for glucose sensing must exist since a strain lacking all four genes (snf3 rgt2 std1 mth1) is still able to regulate SUC2 gene expression in response to changes in glucose concentration. Finally, studies with green fluorescent protein fusions indicate that Std1 is localized to the cell periphery and the cell nucleus, supporting the idea that it may transduce signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. PMID:10373505

  12. Impact of sleep and sleep loss on glucose homeostasis and appetite regulation

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Kristen L

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Over the past 30 years there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, both of which can have serious consequences for longevity and quality of life. Sleep durations may have also decreased over this time period. This chapter reviews laboratory and epidemiologic evidence for an association between sleep loss and impairments in glucose metabolism and appetite regulation, which could increase the risk of diabetes or weight gain. PMID:18516218

  13. Characterization of the role of sphingomyelin synthase 2 in glucose metabolism in whole-body and peripheral tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Zhao, Songji; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Wakabayashi, Masato; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is a proposed potential therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. However, the contributions of SMS2 to glucose metabolism in tissues and its possible therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, to determine whole-body glucose utilization and the contributions of each insulin-targeted tissue to glucose uptake, we performed a glucose kinetics study, using the radiolabeled glucose analog (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG), in wild-type (WT) and SMS2 knockout (KO) mice. Insulin signaling was enhanced in the liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of SMS2 KO mice compared with those of WT mice. In addition, compared with in WT mice, blood clearance of (18)F-FDG was accelerated in SMS2 KO mice when they were fed either a normal or a high fat diet. (18)F-FDG uptake was also increased in insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle in the SMS2 KO mice. Whereas skeletal muscle sphingolipid content was not clearly affected, plasma levels of very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing ceramides were markedly increased in SMS2 KO mice, compared with in WT mice. We also generated liver-conditional SMS2 KO mice and performed glucose and insulin tolerance tests on mice with a high fat diet. However, no significant effect was observed. Thus, our study provided evidence that genetic inhibition of SMS2 elevated glucose clearance through activation of glucose uptake into insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle by a mechanism independent of hepatic SMS2. Our findings further indicate that this occurs, at least in part, via indirect mechanisms such as elevation of VLCFA-containing ceramides.

  14. Opuntia ficus-indica ingestion stimulates peripheral disposal of oral glucose before and after exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Ramaekers, Monique; Pischel, Ivo; Hespel, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) cladode and fruit-skin extract on blood glucose and plasma insulin increments due to high-dose carbohydrate ingestion, before and after exercise. Healthy, physically active men (n = 6; 21.0 ± 1.6 years, 78.1 ± 6.0 kg) participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study involving 2 experimental sessions. In each session, the subjects successively underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at rest (OGTT(R)), a 30-min cycling bout at ~75% VO(2max), and another OGTT after exercise (OGTT(EX)). They received capsules containing either 1,000 mg OFI or placebo (PL) 30 min before and immediately after the OGTT(R). Blood samples were collected before (t₀) and at 30-min intervals after ingestion of 75 g glucose for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. In OGTT(EX) an additional 75-g oral glucose bolus was administered at t₆₀. In OGTT(R), OFI administration reduced the area under the glucose curve (AUC(GLUC)) by 26%, mainly due to lower blood glucose levels at t₃₀ and t₆₀ (p < .05). Furthermore, a higher serum insulin concentration was noted after OFI intake at baseline and at t₃₀ (p < .05). In OGTT(EX), blood glucose at t₆₀ was ~10% lower in OFI than in PL, which resulted in a decreased AUC(GLUC) (-37%, p < .05). However, insulin values and AUC(INS) were not different between OFI and PL. In conclusion, the current study shows that OFI extract can increase plasma insulin and thereby facilitate the clearance of an oral glucose load from the circulation at rest and after endurance exercise in healthy men.

  15. Microtubule structures underlying the sarcoplasmic reticulum support peripheral coupling sites to regulate smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Harry A T; Gonzales, Albert L; Pires, Paulo W; Drumm, Bernard T; Ko, Eun A; Sanders, Kenton M; Hennig, Grant W; Earley, Scott

    2017-09-19

    Junctional membrane complexes facilitate excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells by forming subcellular invaginations that maintain close (≤20 nm) proximity of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) with voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. In fully differentiated smooth muscle cells, junctional membrane complexes occur as distributed sites of peripheral coupling. We investigated the role of the cytoskeleton in maintaining peripheral coupling and associated Ca(2+) signaling networks within native smooth muscle cells of mouse and rat cerebral arteries. Using live-cell confocal and superresolution microscopy, we found that the tight interactions between the SR and the plasma membrane in these cells relied on arching microtubule structures present at the periphery of smooth muscle cells and were independent of the actin cytoskeleton. Loss of peripheral coupling associated with microtubule depolymerization altered the spatiotemporal properties of localized Ca(2+) sparks generated by the release of Ca(2+) through type 2 RyRs (RyR2s) on the SR and decreased the number of sites of colocalization between RyR2s and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels. The reduced BK channel activity associated with the loss of SR-plasma membrane interactions was accompanied by increased pressure-induced constriction of cerebral resistance arteries. We conclude that microtubule structures maintain peripheral coupling in contractile smooth muscle cells, which is crucial for the regulation of contractility and cerebral vascular tone. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  16. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    PubMed Central

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  17. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-meng; Sun, Jian-guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-qiu; Ding, Jian-qing; Li, Dong-hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson’s disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasis via regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:28224045

  18. [Roles of SPK in Regulation of Hypoxia Induced Proliferation and Glucose Consume of Leukemia Cells].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin-Qin; Sun, Hui-Yan; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Shi, Xue-Feng; Li, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Hua; Wang, Li-Sheng; Ge, Ri-Li

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the roles of SPK pathway in the regulation of proliferation, survival and glucose consume of human erythroleukemia TF-1 cells. The interfering in SPK expression of TF-1 cells was performed using leutivirus vector-mediated shRNA, the interference efficacy of SPK in TF-1 cells was detected by RT-qPCR and Western blot, the viability of TF-1 cell proliferation was detected by using CCK-8 method, the apoptosis of TF-1 cells was determined by flow cytmetry with Annexin V staining. Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, and SPK in TF-1 cells. SPK treatment resulted in reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in TF-1 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of the SPK significantly reduced utilization and consumption of glucose. The SPK is key signalling molecule involved in regulation of hypoxia-induced proliferation and glucose metabolism in TF-1 cells, and plays an important rote in proliferation and energy metabolism of leukemia cells.

  19. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-Meng; Sun, Jian-Guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-Qiu; Ding, Jian-Qing; Li, Dong-Hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson's disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasisvia regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  20. Allosteric regulation of the glucose:H+ symporter of Lactobacillus brevis: cooperative binding of glucose and HPr(ser-P).

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Saier, M H

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis transports glucose and the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose via a proton symport mechanism that is allosterically inhibited by the seryl-phosphorylated derivative of HPr, the small phosphocarrier protein of the phosphotransferase system. We have demonstrate that S46DHPr, a mutant analog of HPr which conformationally resembles HPr(ser-P) but not free HPr, specifically binds to membranes derived from glucose-grown L. brevis cells if and only if a substrate of the glucose permease is also present. PMID:7896720

  1. [Life style interventions study on the effects of impaired glucose regulations in Shanghai urban communities].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    To access the effects of life style interventions on impaired glucose regulation (IGR) in Shanghai urban communities, China. Two communities were randomly cluster-sampled to be carried out epidemiological intervention trial. Totally, 232 subjects with IGR were randomly allocated into 4 groups: control group,sports intervention group, diet intervention group, and sports and diet intervention group with the physical examinations in the baseline and end of this study respectively. Tests for fasting blood glucose, OGTT, HbA1c, total cholesterol,etc. were done. Data statistical analysis was occupied in SPSS 16.0. Compared to subjects of control group,fasting blood glucose, OGTT, HbAlc,total cholesterol,BMI,waist hip ratio and blood pressures were significantly decreased among subjects with three interventions (P < 0.05). Triglyceride were significantly decreased among subjects with sports intervention and sports and diet intervention (P < 0.05). High density lipids was significantly increased among subjects with sports and diet intervention (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in 6 months cumulative incidence of diabetes mellitus between control group and interventions groups (8.6% vs. 0, Fisher' s exact P = 0.002), and the rate of transferring into normal blood glucose levels (fasting blood glucose < 5.6 mmol/L and 2 hours OGTT < 7.8 mmol/L) in control group was lower than those in three interventions group (3.4% vs. 8.6%, 14.0% and 16.9%, respectively) but only significant difference was observed between control group and sports and diet intervention group (OR = 5.74, 95% CI 1. 19-27. 64, P = 0.029). The life style interventions could decrease the risk of diabetes mellitus, help their transferring into normal blood glucose, and improve diabetic measures for the IGR population in Shanghai urban communities.

  2. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  3. The effects of long term fasting in Ramadan on glucose regulation in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Karatoprak, C; Yolbas, S; Cakirca, M; Cinar, A; Zorlu, M; Kiskac, M; Cikrikcioglu, M A; Erkoc, R; Tasan, E

    2013-09-01

    For Ramadan fasting, observing Muslims do not eat or drink between sunrise and sunset during Ramadan, Islam's holy month of the year according to the lunar calendar. In 2011, fasting patients with diabetes fasted for an average of 16.5 hours per day, having 2 meals between sunset and sunrise for a month. We aimed to evaluate the impact of extended fasting on glucose regulation and observe possible complications of extended fasting in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. We conducted a randomized, retrospective, observational study. Patients who presented at the Diabetes Clinic during the 15 days before and after Ramadan in August 2011 Istanbul, whose hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose, postprandial plasma glucose, weight and height value examinations and follow-up were completed were included in the study. Seventy-six diabetes patients who fasted during Ramadan (fasting group) and 71 patients with diabetes who did not fast (non-fasting group) were included in the study. These two groups with similar demographic characteristics were compared before and after Ramadan. HbA1c, fasting and postprandial plasma glucose, body mass index, weight and adverse events were evaluated. No statistically significant difference was observed among the fasting and the non-fasting groups. There was no difference between the pre and post-Ramadan values of the fasting group. We could not find any negative effects of extended fasting on glucose regulation of patients with diabetes who are using certain medications. No serious adverse event was observed. We failed to demonstrate benefits of increasing the number of meals in patients with diabetes.

  4. Differential regulation of protein synthesis by amino acids and insulin in peripheral and visceral tissues of neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Suryawan, Agus; O'Connor, Pamela M J; Bush, Jill A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Davis, Teresa A

    2009-05-01

    The high efficiency of protein deposition during the neonatal period is driven by high rates of protein synthesis, which are maximally stimulated after feeding. In the current study, we examined the individual roles of amino acids and insulin in the regulation of protein synthesis in peripheral and visceral tissues of the neonate by performing pancreatic glucose-amino acid clamps in overnight-fasted 7-day-old pigs. We infused pigs (n = 8-12/group) with insulin at 0, 10, 22, and 110 ng kg(-0.66) min(-1) to achieve approximately 0, 2, 6 and 30 muU ml(-1) insulin so as to simulate below fasting, fasting, intermediate, and fed insulin levels, respectively. At each insulin dose, amino acids were maintained at the fasting or fed level. In conjunction with the highest insulin dose, amino acids were also allowed to fall below the fasting level. Tissue protein synthesis was measured using a flooding dose of L: -[4-(3)H] phenylalanine. Both insulin and amino acids increased fractional rates of protein synthesis in longissimus dorsi, gastrocnemius, masseter, and diaphragm muscles. Insulin, but not amino acids, increased protein synthesis in the skin. Amino acids, but not insulin, increased protein synthesis in the liver, pancreas, spleen, and lung and tended to increase protein synthesis in the jejunum and kidney. Neither insulin nor amino acids altered protein synthesis in the stomach. The results suggest that the stimulation of protein synthesis by feeding in most tissues of the neonate is regulated by the post-prandial rise in amino acids. However, the feeding-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is independently mediated by insulin as well as amino acids.

  5. Blood glucose regulation in diabetics. A flatness based nonlinear control simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocha, Guillermo; Podestá, Melina; Mazzadi, Alejandro; Amorena, Carlos; D'Atellis, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Flat systems are a generalization of linear systems, but the techniques used for controlling flat systems are much different than many of the existing techniques for linear systems. In this paper we present the flatness-based control of blood glucose regulation in human system. A non-near model, he Bergman Minimal Model, is used o represent he dynamics of blood regulation in humans and because of the flatness property, he system variables can be expressed as functions of he at output and heir time derivatives and a control aw developed.

  6. Impaired glucose regulation predicted 1-year mortality of Chinese patients with ischemic stroke: data from abnormal glucose regulation in patients with acute stroke across China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qian; Liu, Gaifen; Zheng, Huaguang; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, Chunxue; Wang, Yilong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2014-05-01

    It remains uncertain if impaired glucose regulation (IGR) as a predictor for stroke outcomes. This study aimed at observing the effect of IGR on the 1-year outcomes in Chinese patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited consecutively in multihospitals across China. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed to identify IGR. Cox proportion hazard model was performed to investigate the effect of IGR on 1-year mortality or stroke recurrence in patients with ischemic stroke. The study recruited 2639 patients with ischemic stroke. IGR was shown as an independent risk factor for the mortality of patients with ischemic stroke (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 3.088 [1.386-6.884]; P=0.006). However, IGR showed no significant effects on the dependency or stroke recurrence of patients (P=0.540 and 0.618, respectively). IGR was an independent predictor for the mortality of patients with ischemic stroke. IGR should be highlighted and intervened actively in the patients with ischemic stroke.

  7. HNF-1alpha participates in glucose regulation of sucrase-isomaltase gene expression in epithelial intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ning; Adachi, Tetsuya; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Ishihara, Akihiko; Yasuda, Koichiro; Tsuda, Kinsuke

    2007-02-16

    Sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene expression is negatively regulated by glucose, but its molecular mechanism is not completely clear. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta contribute to glucose regulation of SI gene expression. To explore this question, we examined the association of gene expressions between SI and HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta in Caco-2 cells cultured in medium containing 2.0 and 16.7 mM glucose. We found that gene expression of HNF-1alpha but not HNF-1beta exhibits a positive correlation with that of SI regulated by glucose. Moreover, to elucidate whether glucose regulation of SI gene expression is changed when HNF-1alpha and HNF-1beta are inhibited, we produced three stable cell lines, in which dominant-negative mutant HNF-1alphaT539fsdelC, mutant HNF-1betaR177X, and empty vector (as a control), respectively, were stably expressed. We found that the glucose regulation of SI gene expression was significantly attenuated in HNF-1alphaT539fsdelC cells, but it was well maintained in empty vector and HNF-1betaR177X cells. These results suggest that HNF-1alpha participates in glucose regulation of SI gene expression.

  8. TAp63 is a master transcriptional regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaohua; Gi, Young Jin; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Chan, Io Long; Zhang, Aijun; Xia, Xuefeng; Tsai, Kenneth Y.; Flores, Elsa R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY TAp63 prevents premature aging suggesting a link to genes that regulate longevity. Further characterization of TAp63−/− mice revealed that these mice develop obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, similar to those seen in mice lacking two key metabolic regulators, Silent information regulator T1 (Sirt1) and AMPK. While the roles of Sirt1 and AMPK in metabolism have been well studied, their upstream regulators are not well understood. We found that TAp63 is important in regulating energy metabolism by accumulating in response to metabolic stress and transcriptionally activating Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 resulting in increased fatty acid synthesis and decreased fatty acid oxidation. Moreover, we found that TAp63 lowers blood glucose levels in response to metformin. Restoration of Sirt1, AMPKα2, and LKB1 in TAp63−/− mice rescued some of the metabolic defects of the TAp63−/− mice. Our study defines a role for TAp63 in metabolism and weight control. PMID:23040072

  9. The regulation of feeding: a cross talk between peripheral and central signalling.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, L; Di Nisio, C; Orlando, G; Ferrante, C; Vacca, M

    2005-01-01

    Feeding and energy expenditures are modulated by the interplay of hormones and neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS), where the hypothalamus plays a pivotal role in the transduction of peripheral afferents into satiety and feeding signals. Aminergic neurotransmitters such as dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) are historically considered to play a key role, but a number of peptides are involved in finely tuning feeding regulation. This review summarizes the current understanding of the CNS mechanisms of orexigenic peptides, such as neuropeptide Y, orexins, and ghrelin, as well as anorectic peptides, such as leptin, neurotensin (NT), cocaine- and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) peptide, thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), urocortin, amylin.

  10. Translocator protein (18 kDa) as a pharmacological target in adipocytes to regulate glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    As a major regulator in obesity and its associated metabolic complications, the proper functioning of adipocytes is crucial for health maintenance, thus serving as an important target for the development of anti-obese and anti-diabetic therapies. There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial malfunction is a pivotal event in disturbing adipocyte cell homeostasis. Among major mitochondrial structure components, the high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) has shown importance across a broad spectrum of mitochondrial functions. Recent studies demonstrated the presence of TSPO in white adipocyte mitochondria of mice, and administration of TSPO drug ligands to obese mice reduced weight gain and lowered glucose level. Therefore, it is of great interest to assess whether TSPO in adipocytes could serve as a drug target to regulate adipocyte activities with potential influence on weight control and glucose metabolism. Two structurally distinct TSPO drug ligands, PK 11195 and FGIN-1-27, improved the intracellular dynamics of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, such as the production and release of adipokines, glucose uptake, and adipogenesis. TSPO knockdown in either differentiated adipocytes or preadipocytes impaired these functions. Findings from 3T3-L1 cells were related to human primary cells, where TSPO expression was tightly associated with the metabolic state of primary adipocytes and the differentiation of primary preadipocytes. These results suggest that TSPO expression is essential to safeguard healthy adipocyte functions, and that TSPO activation in adipocytes improves their metabolic status in regulating glucose homeostasis. Adipocyte TSPO may serve as a pharmacologic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  11. Ethylene acts as a negative regulator of glucose induced lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, are more exposed to the hazards of constantly changing environmental conditions globally. During the lifetime of a plant, the root system encounters various challenges such as obstacles, pathogens, high salinity, water logging, nutrient scarcity etc. The developmental plasticity of the root system provides brilliant adaptability to plants to counter the changes exerted by both external as well as internal cues and achieve an optimized growth status. Phytohormones are one of the major intrinsic factors regulating all aspects of plant growth and development both independently as well as through complex signal integrations at multiple levels. We have previously shown that glucose (Glc) and brassinosteroid (BR) signalings interact extensively to regulate lateral root (LR) development in Arabidopsis. (1) Auxin efflux as well as influx and downstream signaling components are also involved in Glc-BR regulation of LR emergence. Here, we provide evidence for involvement of ethylene signaling machinery downstream to Glc and BR in regulation of LR emergence.

  12. Ethylene acts as a negative regulator of glucose induced lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, are more exposed to the hazards of constantly changing environmental conditions globally. During the lifetime of a plant, the root system encounters various challenges such as obstacles, pathogens, high salinity, water logging, nutrient scarcity etc. The developmental plasticity of the root system provides brilliant adaptability to plants to counter the changes exerted by both external as well as internal cues and achieve an optimized growth status. Phytohormones are one of the major intrinsic factors regulating all aspects of plant growth and development both independently as well as through complex signal integrations at multiple levels. We have previously shown that glucose (Glc) and brassinosteroid (BR) signalings interact extensively to regulate lateral root (LR) development in Arabidopsis.1 Auxin efflux as well as influx and downstream signaling components are also involved in Glc-BR regulation of LR emergence. Here, we provide evidence for involvement of ethylene signaling machinery downstream to Glc and BR in regulation of LR emergence. PMID:26236960

  13. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  14. Hypoglycemic Effect of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Is Due to Enhanced Peripheral Glucose Uptake through Activation of AMPK/p38 MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Gyou; Hahm, Young-Tae; Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten (OFS) has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses, including diabetes. However, detailed mechanisms underlying hypoglycemic effects remain unclear. In this study, the mechanism underlying the hypoglycemic activity of OFS was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo systems. OFS treatment inhibited α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption assessed by Na+-dependent glucose uptake using brush border membrane vesicles. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is widely recognized as an important regulator of glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been proposed to be a component of AMPK-mediated signaling. In the present study, OFS dose-dependently increased glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. The AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylations were stimulated by OFS, and inhibitors of AMPK (compound C) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) abolished the effects of OFS. Furthermore, OFS increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane. OFS administration (1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight) in db/db mice dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were also dose-dependently improved with OFS treatment. OFS administration improved pancreatic function through increased β-cell mass in db/db mice. These findings suggest that OFS acts by inhibiting glucose absorption from the intestine and enhancing glucose uptake from insulin-sensitive muscle cells through the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27941667

  15. Hypoglycemic Effect of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Is Due to Enhanced Peripheral Glucose Uptake through Activation of AMPK/p38 MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Leem, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Gyou; Hahm, Young-Tae; Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-12-09

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten (OFS) has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses, including diabetes. However, detailed mechanisms underlying hypoglycemic effects remain unclear. In this study, the mechanism underlying the hypoglycemic activity of OFS was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo systems. OFS treatment inhibited α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption assessed by Na⁺-dependent glucose uptake using brush border membrane vesicles. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is widely recognized as an important regulator of glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been proposed to be a component of AMPK-mediated signaling. In the present study, OFS dose-dependently increased glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. The AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylations were stimulated by OFS, and inhibitors of AMPK (compound C) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) abolished the effects of OFS. Furthermore, OFS increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane. OFS administration (1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight) in db/db mice dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were also dose-dependently improved with OFS treatment. OFS administration improved pancreatic function through increased β-cell mass in db/db mice. These findings suggest that OFS acts by inhibiting glucose absorption from the intestine and enhancing glucose uptake from insulin-sensitive muscle cells through the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  16. Drosophila glucome screening identifies Ck1alpha as a regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ugrankar, Rupali; Berglund, Eric; Akdemir, Fatih; Tran, Christopher; Kim, Min Soo; Noh, Jungsik; Schneider, Rebekka; Ebert, Benjamin; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating carbohydrates are an essential energy source, perturbations in which are pathognomonic of various diseases, diabetes being the most prevalent. Yet many of the genes underlying diabetes and its characteristic hyperglycaemia remain elusive. Here we use physiological and genetic interrogations in D. melanogaster to uncover the ‘glucome', the complete set of genes involved in glucose regulation in flies. Partial genomic screens of ∼1,000 genes yield ∼160 hyperglycaemia ‘flyabetes' candidates that we classify using fat body- and muscle-specific knockdown and biochemical assays. The results highlight the minor glucose fraction as a physiological indicator of metabolism in Drosophila. The hits uncovered in our screen may have conserved functions in mammalian glucose homeostasis, as heterozygous and homozygous mutants of Ck1alpha in the murine adipose lineage, develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that glucose has a role in fly biology and that genetic screenings carried out in flies may increase our understanding of mammalian pathophysiology. PMID:25994086

  17. Septin 7 forms a complex with CD2AP and nephrin and regulates glucose transporter trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Anita A; Polianskyte-Prause, Zydrune; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Shaw, Andrey S; Yates, John R; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2012-09-01

    Podocytes are insulin-sensitive and take up glucose in response to insulin. This requires nephrin, which interacts with vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) on GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) and facilitates their fusion with the plasma membrane. In this paper, we show that the filament-forming GTPase septin 7 is expressed in podocytes and associates with CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) and nephrin, both essential for glomerular ultrafiltration. In addition, septin 7 coimmunoprecipitates with VAMP2. Subcellular fractionation of cultured podocytes revealed that septin 7 is found in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions, and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that septin 7 is expressed in a filamentous pattern and is also found on vesicles and the plasma membrane. The filamentous localization of septin 7 depends on CD2AP and intact actin organization. A 2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake assay indicates that depletion of septin 7 by small interfering RNA or alteration of septin assembly by forchlorfenuron facilitates glucose uptake into cells and further, knockdown of septin 7 increased the interaction of VAMP2 with nephrin and syntaxin 4. The data indicate that septin 7 hinders GSV trafficking and further, the interaction of septin 7 with nephrin in glomeruli suggests that septin 7 may participate in the regulation of glucose transport in podocytes.

  18. Septin 7 forms a complex with CD2AP and nephrin and regulates glucose transporter trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wasik, Anita A.; Polianskyte-Prause, Zydrune; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Shaw, Andrey S.; Yates, John R.; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2012-01-01

    Podocytes are insulin-sensitive and take up glucose in response to insulin. This requires nephrin, which interacts with vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) on GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) and facilitates their fusion with the plasma membrane. In this paper, we show that the filament-forming GTPase septin 7 is expressed in podocytes and associates with CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) and nephrin, both essential for glomerular ultrafiltration. In addition, septin 7 coimmunoprecipitates with VAMP2. Subcellular fractionation of cultured podocytes revealed that septin 7 is found in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions, and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that septin 7 is expressed in a filamentous pattern and is also found on vesicles and the plasma membrane. The filamentous localization of septin 7 depends on CD2AP and intact actin organization. A 2-deoxy-d-glucose uptake assay indicates that depletion of septin 7 by small interfering RNA or alteration of septin assembly by forchlorfenuron facilitates glucose uptake into cells and further, knockdown of septin 7 increased the interaction of VAMP2 with nephrin and syntaxin 4. The data indicate that septin 7 hinders GSV trafficking and further, the interaction of septin 7 with nephrin in glomeruli suggests that septin 7 may participate in the regulation of glucose transport in podocytes. PMID:22809625

  19. Wiener sliding-mode control for artificial pancreas: a new nonlinear approach to glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rmileh, Amjad; Garcia-Gabin, Winston

    2012-08-01

    Type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to keep their blood glucose close to normal. In this paper an attempt is made to show how nonlinear control-oriented model may be used to improve the performance of closed-loop control of blood glucose in diabetic patients. The nonlinear Wiener model is used as a novel modeling approach to be applied to the glucose control problem. The identified Wiener model is used in the design of a robust nonlinear sliding mode control strategy. Two configurations of the nonlinear controller are tested and compared to a controller designed with a linear model. The controllers are designed in a Smith predictor structure to reduce the effect of system time delay. To improve the meal compensation features, the controllers are provided with a simple feedforward controller to inject an insulin bolus at meal time. Different simulation scenarios have been used to evaluate the proposed controllers. The obtained results show that the new approach outperforms the linear control scheme, and regulates the glucose level within safe limits in the presence of measurement and modeling errors, meal uncertainty and patient variations.

  20. Lipocalin-13 regulates glucose metabolism by both insulin-dependent and insulin-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kae Won; Zhou, Yingjiang; Sheng, Liang; Rui, Liangyou

    2011-02-01

    Insulin sensitivity is impaired in obesity, and insulin resistance is the primary risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Here we show that lipocalin-13 (LCN13), a lipocalin superfamily member, is a novel insulin sensitizer. LCN13 was secreted by multiple cell types. Circulating LCN13 was markedly reduced in mice with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Three distinct approaches were used to increase LCN13 levels: LCN13 transgenic mice, LCN13 adenoviral infection, and recombinant LCN13 administration. Restoration of LCN13 significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance in mice with obesity. LCN13 enhanced insulin signaling not only in animals but also in cultured adipocytes. Recombinant LCN13 increased the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake in adipocytes and to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in primary hepatocyte cultures. Additionally, LCN13 alone was able to suppress HGP, whereas neutralization of LCN13 increased HGP in primary hepatocyte cultures. These data suggest that LCN13 regulates glucose metabolism by both insulin-dependent and insulin-independent mechanisms. LCN13 and LCN13-related molecules may be used to treat insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  1. Serotonin 2C receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Eric D; Liu, Chen; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Liu, Tiemin; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Charlotte E; Vianna, Claudia R; Williams, Kevin W; Xu, Yong; Elmquist, Joel K

    2013-12-01

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor agonists on energy and glucose homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking serotonin 2C receptors (Htr2c) specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons had normal body weight but developed glucoregulatory defects including hyperinsulinemia, hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Moreover, these mice did not show anorectic responses to serotonergic agents that suppress appetite and developed hyperphagia and obesity when they were fed a high-fat/high-sugar diet. A requirement of serotonin 2C receptors in POMC neurons for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis was further demonstrated when Htr2c loss was induced in POMC neurons in adult mice using a tamoxifen-inducible POMC-cre system. These data demonstrate that serotonin 2C receptor-expressing POMC neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis and implicate POMC neurons as the target for the effect of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on weight-loss induction and improved glycemic control.

  2. Serotonin 2C receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Eric D.; Liu, Chen; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Liu, Tiemin; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Charlotte E.; Vianna, Claudia R.; Williams, Kevin W.; Xu, Yong; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2013-01-01

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor–expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor agonists on energy and glucose homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking serotonin 2C receptors (Htr2c) specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons had normal body weight but developed glucoregulatory defects including hyperinsulinemia, hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Moreover, these mice did not show anorectic responses to serotonergic agents that suppress appetite and developed hyperphagia and obesity when they were fed a high-fat/high-sugar diet. A requirement of serotonin 2C receptors in POMC neurons for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis was further demonstrated when Htr2c loss was induced in POMC neurons in adult mice using a tamoxifen-inducible POMC-cre system. These data demonstrate that serotonin 2C receptor–expressing POMC neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis and implicate POMC neurons as the target for the effect of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on weight-loss induction and improved glycemic control. PMID:24177424

  3. Developmental role for endocannabinoid signaling in regulating glucose metabolism and growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiying; Schmidt, Sarah F; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of ob/ob (obese) mice with a cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) antagonist reduces food intake, suggesting a role for endocannabinoid signaling in leptin action. We further evaluated the role of endocannabinoid signaling by analyzing the phenotype of Cnr1 knockout ob/ob mice. Double mutant animals show a more severe growth retardation than ob/ob mice with similar levels of adiposity and reduced IGF-I levels without alterations of growth hormone (GH) levels. The double mutant mice are also significantly more glucose intolerant than ob/ob mice. This is in contrast to treatment of ob/ob mice with a Cnr1 antagonist that had no effect on glucose metabolism, suggesting a possible requirement for endocannabinoid signaling during development for normal glucose homeostasis. Double mutant animals also showed similar leptin sensitivity as ob/ob mice, suggesting that there are developmental changes that compensate for the loss of Cnr1 signaling. These data establish a role for Cnr1 during development and suggest that compensatory changes during development may mitigate the requirement for Cnr1 in mediating the effects of leptin. The data also suggest a developmental role for Cnr1 to promote growth, regulate the GH/IGF-I axis, and improve β-cell function and glucose homeostasis in the setting of leptin deficiency.

  4. Delphinol® standardized maqui berry extract reduces postprandial blood glucose increase in individuals with impaired glucose regulation by novel mechanism of sodium glucose cotransporter inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, J; Flores, C; Hidalgo, M A; Perez, M; Yañez, A; Quiñones, L; Caceres, D D; Burgos, R A

    2014-06-01

    The impetus of our study was to investigate the effects of a nutritional supplement Delphinol®, an extract of maqui berries (Aristotelia chilensis) standardised to ≥25% delphinidins and ≥35% total anthocyanins, on postprandial blood glucose and insulin levels and identify the physiologic mechanism involved. Postprandial blood glucose and insulin were investigated in double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over fashion in ten volunteers with moderate glucose intolerance. Longer term effects on blood sugar levels were investigated in streptozotocin-diabetic rats over a four months period. Effects of maqui berry delphinidins on sodium-glucose symport were examined in rodent jejenum of the small intestine. Delphinol® intake prior to rice consumption statistical significantly lowered post prandial blood glucose and insulin as compared to placebo. We identified an inhibition of Na+-dependant glucose transport by delphinidin, the principal polyphenol to which Delphinol® is standardised. In a diabetic rat model the daily oral application of Delphinol® over a period of four months significantly lowered fasting blood glucose levels and reached values indistinguishable from healthy non-diabetic rats. Our results suggest a potential use of Delphinol® for naturally controlling post-prandial blood glucose owed to inhibition of sodium glucose co-transporter in small intestine.

  5. Chronic central leptin infusion modulates the glycemia response to insulin administration in male rats through regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Frühbeck, Gema; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-11-05

    Leptin and insulin use overlapping signaling mechanisms to modify hepatic glucose metabolism, which is critical in maintaining normal glycemia. We examined the effect of an increase in central leptin and insulin on hepatic glucose metabolism and its influence on serum glucose levels. Chronic leptin infusion increased serum leptin and reduced hepatic SH-phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1, the association of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 to the insulin receptor in liver and the rise in glycemia induced by central insulin. Leptin also decreased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase levels and increased insulin's ability to phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt and glycogen synthase kinase on Ser9 and to stimulate glucose transporter 2 and glycogen levels. Peripheral leptin treatment reproduced some of these changes, but to a lesser extent. Our data indicate that leptin increases the hepatic response to a rise in insulin, suggesting that pharmacological manipulation of leptin targets may be of interest for controlling glycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Regulation of Glucose and Lipid Homeostasis by Adiponectin: Effects on Hepatocytes, Pancreatic β Cells and Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Caroline; Sifuentes, Angelica; Holland, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin has received considerable attention for its potential anti-diabetic actions. The adipokine exerts control of glucose and lipid homeostasis via critical effects within the liver, adipose, and pancreas. By stimulating adipogenesis, opposing inflammation, and influencing rates of lipid oxidation and lipolysis, adiponectin critically governs lipid spillover into non-adipose tissues. Ceramide, a cytotoxic and insulin desensitizing lipid metabolite formed when peripheral tissues are exposed to excessive lipid deposition, is potently opposed by adiponectin. Via adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, adiponectin stimulates the deacylation of ceramide- yielding sphingosine for conversion to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) by sphingosine kinase. The resulting conversion from ceramide to S1P promotes survival of functional beta cell mass, allowing for insulin production to meet insulin demands. Alleviation of ceramide burden on the liver allows for improvements in hepatic insulin action. Here, we summarize how adiponectin-induced changes in these tissues lead to improvements in glucose metabolism, highlighting the sphingolipid signaling mechanisms linking adiponectin to each action. PMID:24417945

  7. Differential regulation of glucose transporter expression by estrogen and progesterone in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Medina, Rodolfo A; Meneses, Ana Maria; Vera, Juan Carlos; Gúzman, Catherine; Nualart, Francisco; Rodriguez, Federico; de los Angeles Garcia, Maria; Kato, Sumie; Espinoza, Natalia; Monsó, Carolina; Carvajal, Andres; Pinto, Mauricio; Owen, Gareth I

    2004-09-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy and other unopposed estrogen treatments increase the incidence of endometrial abnormalities, including cancer. However, this effect is counteracted by the co-administration of progesterone. In the endometrium, glucose transporter (GLUT) expression and glucose transport are known to fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle. Here, we determined the effect of estrogen and progesterone on the expression of GLUT1-4 and on the transport of deoxyglucose in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells. Cells were incubated with estrogen, progesterone or combined estrogen and progesterone for 24 h and the effect on the expression of GLUT1-4 and on deoxyglucose transport was determined. We show that GLUT1 expression is upregulated by estrogen and progesterone individually, but that combined estrogen and progesterone treatment reverses this increase. Hormonal treatments do not affect GLUT2, GLUT3 or GLUT4 expression. Transport studies demonstrate that estrogen increases deoxyglucose transport at Michaelis-Menten constants (Kms) corresponding to GLUT1/4, an effect which disappears when progesterone is added concomitantly. These data demonstrate that different hormonal treatments differentially regulate GLUT expression and glucose transport in this endometrial cancer cell line. This regulation mirrors the role played by estrogen and progesterone on the incidence of cancer in this tissue and suggests that GLUT1 may be utilized by endometrial cancer cells to fuel their demand for increased energy requirement.

  8. Indirect Regulation of Endogenous Glucose Production by Insulin: The Single Gateway Hypothesis Revisited.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Richard N; Iyer, Malini S

    2017-07-01

    On the basis of studies that investigated the intraportal versus systemic insulin infusion and transendothelial transport of insulin, we proposed the "single gateway hypothesis," which supposes an indirect regulation of hepatic glucose production by insulin; the rate-limiting transport of insulin across the adipose tissue capillaries is responsible for the slow suppression of free fatty acids (FFAs), which in turn is responsible for delayed suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production (EGP) during insulin infusion. Preventing the fall in plasma FFAs during insulin infusion either by administering intralipids or by inhibiting adipose tissue lipolysis led to failure in EGP suppression, thus supporting our hypothesis. More recently, mice lacking hepatic Foxo1 in addition to Akt1 and Akt2 (L-AktFoxo1TKO), all required for insulin signaling, surprisingly showed normal glycemia. Inhibiting the fall of plasma FFAs in these mice prevented the suppression of EGP during a clamp, reaffirming that the site of insulin action to control EGP is extrahepatic. Measuring whole-body turnover rates of glucose and FFAs in L-AktFoxo1TKO mice also confirmed that hepatic EGP was regulated by insulin-mediated control of FFAs. The knockout mouse model in combination with sophisticated molecular techniques confirmed our physiological findings and the single gateway hypothesis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  10. Gene expression of GLUT3 glucose transporter regulated by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro in neuronal cell cultures from rat embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, S; Sawa, H; Inoue, N; Nakamichi, Y; Takeshima, H; Hoshino, T

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether glucose regulates the gene expression of glucose transporter GLUT3 in neurons. We examined the regulation of GLUT3 mRNA by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro by using neuronal cultures from rat embryos. Hypoglycaemia (< 30 mg/dl), produced by 72 h of starvation, increased GLUT3 mRNA in mouse brain by 2-fold. Hybridization studies in situ demonstrated that hypoglycaemia-induced increases in GLUT3 mRNA expression were observed selectively in brain regions including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex and piriform cortex, but not the cerebellum. Primary neuronal cultures from rat embryos deprived of glucose for 48 h also showed an increase (4-fold over control) in GLUT3 mRNA, indicating that glucose can directly regulate expression of GLUT3 mRNA. In contrast with hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia produced by streptozotocin did not alter the expression of GLUT3 mRNA. We also confirmed previous findings that hypoglycaemia increases GLUT1 mRNA expression in brain. The increase in GLUT1 expression was probably limited to the blood-brain barrier in vivo, since GLUT1 mRNA could not be detected in neurons of the mouse cerebrum. Thus we conclude that up-regulation of neuronal GLUT3 in response to glucose starvation represents a protective mechanism against energy depletion in neurons. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8198523

  11. Glucose Sensor O-GlcNAcylation Coordinates with Phosphorylation to Regulate Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Kaasik, Krista; Kivimäe, Saul; Allen, Jasmina J.; Chalkley, Robert J.; Huang, Yong; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Burlingame, Alma. L.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-translational modifications play central roles in myriad biological pathways including circadian regulation. We employed a circadian proteomic approach to demonstrate that circadian timing of phosphorylation is a critical factor in regulating complex GSK3β dependent pathways and identified O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) as a substrate of GSK3β. Interestingly, OGT activity is regulated by GSK3β, hence OGT and GSK3β exhibit reciprocal regulation. Modulating OGlcNAcylation levels alter circadian period length in both mice and Drosophila, and conversely protein O-GlcNAcylation is circadianly regulated. Central clock proteins, Clock and Period, are reversibly modified by O-GlcNAcylation to regulate their transcriptional activities. In addition, O-GlcNAcylation of a region in PER2 known to regulate human sleep phase (S662–S674) competes with phosphorylation of this region, and this interplay is at least partly mediated by glucose levels. Together, these results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation serves as a metabolic sensor for clock regulation and works coordinately with phosphorylation to fine tune circadian clock. PMID:23395175

  12. REGULATION OF GLUCOSE AND INSULIN RELEASE FOLLOWING ACUTE AND REPEATED TREATMENT WITH THE SYNTHETIC GALANIN ANALOG NAX-5055

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; White, H. Steve

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However there is limited understanding of how individual galanin receptor (GalR1, 2, and 3) subtypes mediate the physiological activity of galanin in vivo. To address this issue we utilized NAX-5055 a systemically available, metabolically stable galanin analog. NAX-5055 displays a preference for GalR1 receptors and possesses potent anticonvulsant activity in vivo, suggesting that NAX-5055 engages central galanin receptors. To determine if NAX-5055 also modulates the activity of peripheral galanin receptors, we evaluated the effect of NAX-5055 on blood glucose and insulin levels in mice. Acute and repeated (once daily for four days) systemic administration of NAX-5055 (4 mg/kg) significantly increased blood glucose levels compared to vehicle treated mice. However, a hyperglycemic response was not observed following systemic administration of NAX-805-1 a scrambled analog of NAX-5055, with critical receptor binding residues, Trp2 and Tyr9, reversed. These results suggest chemical modifications independent of the galanin backbone of NAX-5055 are not responsible for the hyperglycemic response. The effect of NAX-5055 on glucose homeostasis was further evaluated with a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Mice administered either acute or repeated (once daily for four days) injections of NAX-5055 (4mg/kg) displayed impaired glucose handling and reduced insulin response to an acute glucose (1g/kg) challenge. Here we have shown that systemic administration of a centrally active GalR1-preferring galanin analog produces acute hyperglycemia and an inhibition of insulin release in vivo and that these effects are not attenuated with repeated administration. NAX-5055 thus provides a new pharmacological tool to further the understanding of function of both central and peripheral GalR1 receptors in vivo. PMID:25690510

  13. Thyroid hormone regulation of the Na+/glucose cotransporter SGLT1 in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matosin-Matekalo, M; Mesonero, J E; Delezay, O; Poiree, J C; Ilundain, A A; Brot-Laroche, E

    1998-01-01

    The expression of the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) in response to thyroid hormone [3,5,3'-tri-iodo-l-thyronine (T3)] was investigated in the enterocytic model cell line Caco-2/TC7. In differentiated cells, T3 treatment induces an average 10-fold increase in glucose consumption as well as a T3 dose-dependent increase in SGLT1 mRNA abundance. Only cells grown on glucose-containing media, but not on the non-metabolizable glucose analogue alpha-methylglucose (AMG), could respond to T3-treatment. The Vmax parameter of AMG transport was enhanced 6-fold by T3 treatment, whereas the protein abundance of SGLT1 was unchanged. The role of Na+ recycling in the T3-related activation of SGLT1 activity was suggested by both the large increase in Na+/K+ATPase protein abundance and the inhibition, down to control levels, of AMG uptake in ouabain-treated cells. Further investigations aimed at identifying the presence of a second cotransporter that could be expressed erroneously in the colon cancer cell line were unsuccessful: T3-treatment did not modify the sugar-specificity profile of AMG transport and did not induce the expression of SGLT2 as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR. Our results show that T3 can stimulate the SGLT1 cotransport activity in Caco-2 cells. Both transcriptional and translational levels of regulation are involved. Finally, glucose metabolism is required for SGLT1 expression, a result that contrasts with the in vivo situation and may be related to the fetal phenotype of the cells. PMID:9729472

  14. MicroRNA-21 regulates hepatic glucose metabolism by targeting FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ailing; Yan, Haibo; Liang, Jichao; Du, Chunyuan; Zhao, Xuemei; Sun, Lijuan; Chen, Yong

    2017-09-05

    Abnormal activation of hepatic gluconeogenesis is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes; however, the potential role of microRNAs in gluconeogenesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that hepatic expression levels of microRNA-21 (miR-21) were decreased in db/db and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced diabetic mice. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of miR-21 decreased the expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and inhibited glucose production in primary mouse hepatocytes. Silencing of miR-21 reversed this effect. Overexpression of miR-21 in the livers of db/db and HFD-induced mice was able to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis, subsequently decreasing blood glucose levels and improving glucose and insulin intolerance. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-21 in primary mouse hepatocytes and mouse livers decreased the protein levels of FOXO1 and increased hepatic insulin sensitivity. By contrast, silencing of miR-21 increased the protein levels of FOXO1, subsequently leading to a decrease in insulin sensitivity and impaired glucose intolerance in C57BL/6 mice fed with high-fat diet for 4weeks. Finally, we confirmed that FOXO1 was a potential target of miR-21. These results suggest that miR-21 is a critical regulator in hepatic gluconeogenesis and may provide a novel therapeutic target for treating insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Glucose regulated protein 78: a critical link between tumor microenvironment and cancer hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Li, Zhuoyu

    2012-08-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has long been recognized as a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and can be induced by the ER stress response. Besides its location in the ER, GRP78 has been found to be present in cell plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus as well as cellular secretions. GRP78 is implicated in tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis resistance, immune escape, metastasis and angiogenesis, and its elevated expression usually correlates with a variety of tumor microenvironmental stresses, including hypoxia, glucose deprivation, lactic acidosis and inflammatory response. GRP78 protein acts as a centrally located sensor of stress, which feels and adapts to the alteration in the tumor microenvironment. This article reviews the potential contributions of GRP78 to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks based on intervening in stress responses caused by tumor niche alterations. The paper also introduces several potential GRP78 relevant targeted therapies.

  16. Regulation of Energy Stores and Feeding by Neuronal and Peripheral CREB Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Koichi; Zhao, LiJuan; Shenton, Christopher; Iijima-Ando, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    The cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB functions in adipose tissue and liver to regulate glycogen and lipid metabolism in mammals. While Drosophila has a homolog of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, its role in energy metabolism is not fully understood. Using tissue-specific expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (DN-CREB), we have examined the effect of blocking CREB activity in neurons and in the fat body, the primary energy storage depot with functions of adipose tissue and the liver in flies, on energy balance, stress resistance and feeding behavior. We found that disruption of CREB function in neurons reduced glycogen and lipid stores and increased sensitivity to starvation. Expression of DN-CREB in the fat body also reduced glycogen levels, while it did not affect starvation sensitivity, presumably due to increased lipid levels in these flies. Interestingly, blocking CREB activity in the fat body increased food intake. These flies did not show a significant change in overall body size, suggesting that disruption of CREB activity in the fat body caused an obese-like phenotype. Using a transgenic CRE-luciferase reporter, we further demonstrated that disruption of the adipokinetic hormone receptor, which is functionally related to mammalian glucagon and β-adrenergic signaling, in the fat body reduced CRE-mediated transcription in flies. This study demonstrates that CREB activity in either neuronal or peripheral tissues regulates energy balance in Drosophila, and that the key signaling pathway regulating CREB activity in peripheral tissue is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:20041126

  17. Regulation of NGF and NT-3 protein expression in peripheral targets by sympathetic input.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Chris L; Bierl, Michael A; Isaacson, Lori G

    2007-05-04

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are target-derived proteins that regulate innervating sympathetic neurons. Here, we used western blot analysis to investigate changes in NGF and NT-3 protein in several peripheral tissues following loss of sympathetic input. Following removal of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), large molecular weight (MW) NGF species, including proNGF-A, were increased in distal intracranial SCG targets, such as pineal gland and extracerebral blood vessels (bv). Mature NGF was a minor species in these tissues and unchanged following sympathectomy. Large MW NGF species also were increased when sympathectomy was followed by in vivo NGF administration. Mature NT-3, which was abundant in controls, was significantly decreased in these targets following sympathetic denervation. The decrease in mature NT-3 was enhanced following NGF administration. The trigeminal ganglion, which provides sensory input to these targets, showed increased NGF, but decreased NT-3, in these treatments, demonstrating that decreased NT-3 at the targets did not result from enhanced NT-3 uptake. Unlike pineal gland and extracerebral bv, the external carotid artery, an extracranial proximal SCG target, showed no change in NGF following denervation, and mature NT-3 was significantly increased. Following NGF administration, NT-3 was significantly decreased. We provide evidence for sympathetic regulation of NGF and NT-3 in peripheral targets and that elevated NGF can depress NT-3. The differential response in distal and proximal adult targets is consistent with the idea that neurons innervating proximal and distal targets may serve different roles in regulating neurotrophin protein. In addition, we conclude that previous ELISA results showing increased NGF protein following sympathetic denervation may have resulted from increases in large MW species, rather than an increase in mature NGF.

  18. Regulation of NGF and NT-3 protein expression in peripheral targets by sympathetic input

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Chris L.; Bierl, Michael A.; Isaacson, Lori G.

    2007-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are target-derived proteins that regulate innervating sympathetic neurons. Here, we used western blot analysis to investigate changes in NGF and NT-3 protein in several peripheral tissues following loss of sympathetic input. Following removal of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), large molecular weight (MW) NGF species, including proNGF-A, were increased in distal intracranial SCG targets, such as pineal gland and extracerebral blood vessels (bv). Mature NGF was a minor species in these tissues and unchanged following sympathectomy. Large MW NGF species also were increased when sympathectomy was followed by in vivo NGF administration. Mature NT-3, which was abundant in controls, was significantly decreased in these targets following sympathetic denervation. The decrease in mature NT-3 was enhanced following NGF administration. The trigeminal ganglion, which provides sensory input to these targets, showed increased NGF, but decreased NT-3, in these treatments, demonstrating that decreased NT-3 at the targets did not result from enhanced NT-3 uptake. Unlike pineal gland and extracerebral bv, the external carotid artery, an extracranial proximal SCG target, showed no change in NGF following denervation, and mature NT-3 was significantly increased. Following NGF administration, NT-3 was significantly decreased. We provide evidence for sympathetic regulation of NGF and NT-3 in peripheral targets and that elevated NGF can depress NT-3. The differential response in distal and proximal adult targets is consistent with the idea that neurons innervating proximal and distal targets may serve different roles in regulating neurotrophin protein. In addition, we conclude that previous ELISA results showing increased NGF protein following sympathetic denervation may have resulted from increases in large MW species, rather than an increase in mature NGF. PMID:17331480

  19. High-fat/low-carbohydrate diets regulate glucose metabolism via a long-term transcriptional loop.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Lauren M; Xie, Hui; Koza, Robert A; Mynatt, Randall; Bray, George A; Smith, Steven R

    2006-11-01

    Insulin sensitivity is characterized by insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that carbohydrate metabolism and storage might be under transcriptional control. To test this hypothesis, we fed insulin-sensitive males (glucose disposal rate, 14.7 +/- 4.1 mg/kg fat-free mass [FFM] per minute) an isoenergetic high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet (HF/LCD) for 3 days with muscle biopsies before and after intervention. Oligonucleotide microarrays revealed a total of 369 genes of 18861 genes on the arrays were differentially regulated in response to diet (Bonferonni adjusted P < .01). A similar experiment was conducted in mice with a 3-week intervention using a control group and an HF/LCD group to offset the lack of a control group within the human cohort. As part of an analysis of results previously published from this data set, 7 genes in the carbohydrate metabolism pathway changed in response to the HF/LCD, and 3 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction: fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isoenzyme 4 (PDK4), and glycogen synthase 1 (muscle). In a separate experiment, we fed C57Bl/6J mice an HF/LCD for 3 weeks and found that the same glucose metabolism genes were changed by approximately 70% on average. Fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isoenzyme 4 increased and glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) decreased. Combined, these results suggest a mechanism whereby HF/LCD regulates the genes necessary for glucose utilization and storage vis-á-vis transcriptional control.

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein regulates hepatic glucose homeostasis via activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Jun; Park, Young-Ho; Kim, Sun-Uk; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Park, Do Sim; Han, Ying-Hao; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Dong-Seok; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Minhye; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Su Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2011-08-26

    Dysregulation of liver functions leads to insulin resistance causing type 2 diabetes mellitus and is often found in chronic liver diseases. However, the mechanisms of hepatic dysfunction leading to hepatic metabolic disorder are still poorly understood in chronic liver diseases. The current work investigated the role of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in regulating glucose metabolism. We studied HBx-overexpressing (HBxTg) mice and HBxTg mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Here we show that gene expressions of the key gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly increased in HepG2 cells expressing HBx (HepG2-HBx) and in non-tumor liver tissues of hepatitis B virus patients with high levels of HBx expression. In the liver of HBxTg mice, the expressions of gluconeogenic genes were also elevated, leading to hyperglycemia by increasing hepatic glucose production. However, this effect was insufficient to cause systemic insulin resistance. Importantly, the actions of HBx on hepatic glucose metabolism are thought to be mediated via iNOS signaling, as evidenced by the fact that deficiency of iNOS restored HBx-induced hyperglycemia by suppressing the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes. Treatment of HepG2-HBx cells with nitric oxide (NO) caused a significant increase in the expression of gluconeogenic genes, but JNK1 inhibition was completely normalized. Furthermore, hyperactivation of JNK1 in the liver of HBxTg mice was also suppressed in the absence of iNOS, indicating the critical role for JNK in the mutual regulation of HBx- and iNOS-mediated glucose metabolism. These findings establish a novel mechanism of HBx-driven hepatic metabolic disorder that is modulated by iNOS-mediated activation of JNK.

  1. Fructose improves the ability of hyperglycemia per se to regulate glucose production in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Meredith; Gabriely, Ilan; Wozniak, Robert; Vilcu, Cristian; Shamoon, Harry; Rossetti, Luciano

    2002-03-01

    The ability of hyperglycemia per se to suppress endogenous glucose production (GP) is blunted in type 2 diabetes. This could be due in part to decreased glucose-induced flux through glucokinase (GK). Because fructose activates hepatic GK, we examined whether catalytic amounts of fructose could restore inhibition of GP by hyperglycemia in humans with type 2 diabetes. Glucose fluxes ([3-(3)H]glucose) were measured during euglycemia (5 mmol/l) and after abrupt onset of hyperglycemia (10 mmol/l; variable dextrose infusion) under fixed hormonal conditions (somatostatin infusion for 6 h with basal insulin/glucagon/growth hormone replacement). A total of 10 subjects with moderately controlled type 2 diabetes and 7 age- and BMI-matched nondiabetic subjects were studied on up to three separate occasions under the following conditions: without fructose (F(-)) or with infusion of fructose at two dosages: 0.6 mg/kg center dot min (low F) and 1.8 mg/kg center dot min (high F). Although GP failed to decrease in response to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, the coinfusion of both doses of fructose was associated with comparable decreases in GP in response to hyperglycemia (low F = -27%, high F = -33%; P < 0.01 vs. F(-) at both dosages), which approached the 44% decline in GP observed without fructose in the nondiabetic subjects. GP responses to hyperglycemia were not altered by the addition of fructose in the nondiabetic group (low F = -47%, high F = -42%; P > 0.05 vs. F(-)). Thus, the administration of small amounts of fructose to type 2 diabetic subjects partially corrected the regulation of GP by hyperglycemia per se, yet did not affect this regulation in the nondiabetic subjects. This suggests that the liver's inability to respond to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, likely caused by impaired GK activity, contributes substantially to the increased GP in these individuals.

  2. Association of IL-18 genotype with impaired glucose regulation in Korean women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Won; Lee, Min Ho; Park, Ji Eun; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik; Shim, Sung Han

    2012-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder among women of reproductive age. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, is associated with metabolic syndrome, and elevated serum IL-18 levels are related to obesity and insulin resistance in PCOS patients. However, the role of IL-18 in the PCOS remains unclear. So we examined whether or not two functional polymorphisms in the IL-18 gene, -137G>C and +183A>G, are associated with PCOS itself or glucose intolerance in Korean women with PCOS. The IL-18 genotypes of 126 women with PCOS and 113 controls were determined and their serum levels of lipid and hormone profiles measured. The insulin resistance index was calculated from the glucose and insulin concentrations obtained by oral glucose tolerance tests. There were no statistically significant differences in the distribution of -137 G>C polymorphisms among the women classified according to presence or absence of PCOS and obesity. However, the -137G/G allele was more frequent in the PCOS+impaired glucose regulation (IGR) group than PCOS+normal glucose tolerance group (X(2)=7.637, p(Bonf)=0.022). The PCOS group with only the -137G allele had a significantly increased risk of IGR compared to the PCOS group with the -137C allele (92 vs. 8%, odds ratio=6.325, 95% confidence interval=1.403-28.519). In the PCOS patients, the mean fasting and 2-h post-prandial plasma glucose level of patients with only the -137G allele was significantly higher than those of the patients with the -137C allele (88.87 ± 9.49 vs. 84.37 ± 6.19, p=0.002 and 120.07 ± 34.53 vs. 107.54 ± 27.13, p=0.038). Only one woman was heterozygous for the +183A>G polymorphism and the other 224 subjects were homozygous for the polymorphism (A/A). The IL-18 -137G allele could play a role in the predisposition to glucose intolerance in Korean women with PCOS, and the +183G allele of IL-18 is not associated with the Korean population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  3. JC virus T-antigen regulates glucose metabolic pathways in brain tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Noch, Evan; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Gordon, Jennifer; Khalili, Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the detection of the human neurotropic virus, JCV, in a significant population of brain tumors, including medulloblastomas. Accordingly, expression of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, which has transforming activity in cell culture and in transgenic mice, results in the development of a broad range of tumors of neural crest and glial origin. Evidently, the association of T-antigen with a range of tumor-suppressor proteins, including p53 and pRb, and signaling molecules, such as β-catenin and IRS-1, plays a role in the oncogenic function of JCV T-antigen. We demonstrate that T-antigen expression is suppressed by glucose deprivation in medulloblastoma cells and in glioblastoma xenografts that both endogenously express T-antigen. Mechanistic studies indicate that glucose deprivation-mediated suppression of T-antigen is partly influenced by 5'-activated AMP kinase (AMPK), an important sensor of the AMP/ATP ratio in cells. In addition, glucose deprivation-induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase is blocked with AMPK inhibition, which also prevents T-antigen downregulation. Furthermore, T-antigen prevents G1 arrest and sustains cells in the G2 phase during glucose deprivation. On a functional level, T-antigen downregulation is partially dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during glucose deprivation, and T-antigen prevents ROS induction, loss of ATP production, and cytotoxicity induced by glucose deprivation. Additionally, we have found that T-antigen is downregulated by the glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), and the pentose phosphate inhibitors, 6-aminonicotinamide and oxythiamine, and that T-antigen modulates expression of the glycolytic enzyme, hexokinase 2 (HK2), and the pentose phosphate enzyme, transaldolase-1 (TALDO1), indicating a potential link between T-antigen and metabolic regulation. These studies point to the possible involvement of JCV T-antigen in medulloblastoma proliferation and the metabolic

  4. [Quercetin regulates cell cycle-related gene expression in a model of glucose-oxygen deprivation in astrocytes].

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang; Zhang, Lanlan; Yuan, Zhaohu; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Bingyi

    2013-09-01

    To study the effect of quercetin on gene expression in astrocytes after glucose-oxygen deprivation and the underlying mechanism. The primary cultured astrocytes were randomly divided into glucose-oxygen deprivation group (only treated with glucose-oxygen deprivation for 4 hours) and glucose-oxygen deprivation combined with quercetin-treated group (glucose-oxygen deprivation for 4 hours combined with quercetin treatment for 24 hours). Their mRNA expressions were analyzed by the large-scale oligo microarray. The differential genes obtained were further confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR). Compared with the glucose-oxygen deprivation group, the glucose-oxygen deprivation combined with quercetin-treated group presented the changes in the expressions of 31 genes that were related to cell cycle, of which 5 genes were up-regulated and 26 were down-regulated. Six of those differential genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR and the result of their differential expressions was consistent with that by large-scale oligo microarray. Quercetin can regulate some of cell cycle-related genes in astrocytes after glucose-oxygen deprivation.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 by β-hydroxybutyrate underlies preferential glucose supply to the brain of fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Nishito, Yasumasa; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    We carried out liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of metabolites in mice. Those metabolome data showed that hepatic glucose content is reduced, but that brain glucose content is unaffected, during fasting, consistent with the priority given to brain glucose consumption during fasting. The molecular mechanisms for this preferential glucose supply to the brain are not fully understood. We also showed that the fasting-induced production of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) enhances expression of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 (Glut1) via histone modification. Upon β-OHB treatment, Slc2a1 expression was up-regulated, with a concomitant increase in H3K9 acetylation at the critical cis-regulatory region of the Slc2a1 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells and NB2a neuronal cells, shown by quantitative PCR analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the Hdac2 gene increased Slc2a1 expression, suggesting that it is one of the responsible histone deacetylases (HDACs). These results confirm that β-OHB is a HDAC inhibitor and show that β-OHB plays an important role in fasting-induced epigenetic activation of a glucose transporter gene in the brain.

  6. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by small guanosine triphosphatases in skeletal muscle and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-10-16

    Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood glucose level by stimulating various physiological responses in its target tissues. In skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, insulin promotes membrane trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from GLUT4 storage vesicles to the plasma membrane, thereby facilitating the uptake of glucose from the circulation. Detailed mechanisms underlying insulin-dependent intracellular signal transduction for glucose uptake remain largely unknown. In this article, I give an overview on the recently identified signaling network involving Rab, Ras, and Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) that regulates glucose uptake in insulin-responsive tissues. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms for these small GTPases and the cross-talk between protein kinase and small GTPase cascades are highlighted.

  7. Remote regulation of glucose homeostasis in mice using genetically encoded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sarah A; Sauer, Jeremy; Kane, Ravi S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating underlying physiological processes and would have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a genetically encoded system for remote regulation of gene expression by low-frequency radio waves (RFs) or a magnetic field. Iron oxide nanoparticles are synthesized intracellularly as a GFP-tagged ferritin heavy and light chain fusion. The ferritin nanoparticles associate with a camelid anti-GFP-transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 fusion protein, αGFP-TRPV1, and can transduce noninvasive RF or magnetic fields into channel activation, also showing that TRPV1 can transduce a mechanical stimulus. This, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. In mice with stem cell or viral expression of these genetically encoded components, remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression with RF or a magnet lowers blood glucose. This robust, repeatable method for remote regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, technology and therapeutics.

  8. Analysis of kinetic, stoichiometry and regulation of glucose and glutamine metabolism in hybridoma batch cultures using logistic equations

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, María Lourdes; Sánchez, Asterio; García, Francisco; Molina, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Batch cultures were carried out to study the kinetic, stoichiometry, and regulation of glucose and glutamine metabolism of a murine hybridoma line. Asymmetric logistic equations (ALEs) were used to fit total and viable cell density, and nutrient and metabolite/product concentrations. Since these equations were analytically differentiable, specific rates and yield coefficients were readily calculated. Asymmetric logistic equations described satisfactorily uncontrolled batch cultures, including death phase. Specific growth rate showed a Monod-type dependence on initial glucose and glutamine concentrations. Yield coefficients of cell and lactate from glucose, and cell and ammonium from glutamine were all found to change dramatically at low residual glucose and glutamine concentrations. Under stoichiometric glucose limitation, the glucose-to-cell yield increased and glucose-to-lactate yield decreased, indicating a metabolic shift. Under stoichiometric glutamine limitation the glutamine-to-cell and glutamine-to-ammonium yields increased, but also glucose-to-cell yield increased and the glucose-to-lactate yield decreased. Monoclonal antibody production was mainly non-growth associated, independently of glucose and glutamine levels. PMID:19003011

  9. Distinct Akt phosphorylation states are required for insulin regulated Glut4 and Glut1-mediated glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Beg, Muheeb; Abdullah, Nazish; Thowfeik, Fathima Shazna; Altorki, Nasser K; McGraw, Timothy E

    2017-06-07

    Insulin, downstream of Akt activation, promotes glucose uptake into fat and muscle cells to lower postprandial blood glucose, an enforced change in cellular metabolism to maintain glucose homeostasis. This effect is mediated by the Glut4 glucose transporter. Growth factors also enhance glucose uptake to fuel an anabolic metabolism required for tissue growth and repair. This activity is predominantly mediated by the Glut1. Akt is activated by phosphorylation of its kinase and hydrophobic motif (HM) domains. We show that insulin-stimulated Glut4-mediated glucose uptake requires PDPK1 phosphorylation of the kinase domain but not mTORC2 phosphorylation of the HM domain. Nonetheless, an intact HM domain is required for Glut4-mediated glucose uptake. Whereas, Glut1-mediated glucose uptake also requires mTORC2 phosphorylation of the HM domain, demonstrating both phosphorylation-dependent and independent roles of the HM domain in regulating glucose uptake. Thus, mTORC2 links Akt to the distinct physiologic programs related to Glut4 and Glut1-mediated glucose uptake.

  10. Pheromone-sensing neurons regulate peripheral lipid metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Jon; Locke, Tiffany T.; Zhang, Ying K.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2017-01-01

    It is now established that the central nervous system plays an important role in regulating whole body metabolism and energy balance. However, the extent to which sensory systems relay environmental information to modulate metabolic events in peripheral tissues has remained poorly understood. In addition, it has been challenging to map the molecular mechanisms underlying discrete sensory modalities with respect to their role in lipid metabolism. In previous work our lab has identified instructive roles for serotonin signaling as a surrogate for food availability, as well as oxygen sensing, in the control of whole body metabolism. In this study, we now identify a role for a pair of pheromone-sensing neurons in regulating fat metabolism in C. elegans, which has emerged as a tractable and highly informative model to study the neurobiology of metabolism. A genetic screen revealed that GPA-3, a member of the Gα family of G proteins, regulates body fat content in the intestine, the major metabolic organ for C. elegans. Genetic and reconstitution studies revealed that the potent body fat phenotype of gpa-3 null mutants is controlled from a pair of neurons called ADL(L/R). We show that cAMP functions as the second messenger in the ADL neurons, and regulates body fat stores via the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, from downstream neurons. We find that the pheromone ascr#3, which is detected by the ADL neurons, regulates body fat stores in a GPA-3-dependent manner. We define here a third sensory modality, pheromone sensing, as a major regulator of body fat metabolism. The pheromone ascr#3 is an indicator of population density, thus we hypothesize that pheromone sensing provides a salient 'denominator' to evaluate the amount of food available within a population and to accordingly adjust metabolic rate and body fat levels. PMID:28545126

  11. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  12. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  13. Cytokine Stimulation Promotes Glucose Uptake via Phosphatidylinositol-3 Kinase/Akt Regulation of Glut1 Activity and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wieman, Heather L.; Wofford, Jessica A.

    2007-01-01

    Cells require growth factors to support glucose metabolism for survival and growth. It is unclear, however, how noninsulin growth factors may regulate glucose uptake and glucose transporters. We show that the hematopoietic growth factor interleukin (IL)3, maintained the glucose transporter Glut1 on the cell surface and promoted Rab11a-dependent recycling of intracellular Glut1. IL3 required phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase activity to regulate Glut1 trafficking, and activated Akt was sufficient to maintain glucose uptake and surface Glut1 in the absence of IL3. To determine how Akt may regulate Glut1, we analyzed the role of Akt activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/regulatory associated protein of mTOR (RAPTOR) and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3. Although Akt did not require mTOR/RAPTOR to maintain surface Glut1 levels, inhibition of mTOR/RAPTOR by rapamycin greatly diminished glucose uptake, suggesting Akt-stimulated mTOR/RAPTOR may promote Glut1 transporter activity. In contrast, inhibition of GSK3 did not affect Glut1 internalization but nevertheless maintained surface Glut1 levels in IL3-deprived cells, possibly via enhanced recycling of internalized Glut1. In addition, Akt attenuated Glut1 internalization through a GSK3-independent mechanism. These data demonstrate that intracellular trafficking of Glut1 is a regulated component of growth factor-stimulated glucose uptake and that Akt can promote Glut1 activity and recycling as well as prevent Glut1 internalization. PMID:17301289

  14. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  15. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump is a major regulator of glucose transport in the healthy and diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Hayes, Summer; Periasamy, Muthu; Lacombe, Véronique A

    2015-05-01

    Despite intensive research, the pathways that mediate calcium (Ca(2+))-stimulated glucose transport in striated muscle remain elusive. Since the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump tightly regulates cytosolic [Ca(2+)], we investigated whether the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport. We used healthy and insulin-deficient diabetic transgenic (TG) mice expressing SERCA1a in the heart. Active cell surface glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 was measured by a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the intact perfused myocardium and isolated myocytes. In healthy TG mice, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression increased active cell-surface GLUT4 and glucose uptake in the myocardium, as well as whole body glucose tolerance. Diabetes reduced active cell-surface GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in the heart of wild type mice, all of which were preserved in diabetic TG mice. Decreased basal AS160 and increased proportion of calmodulin-bound AS160 paralleled the increase in cell surface GLUT4 content in the heart of TG mice, suggesting that AS160 regulates GLUT trafficking by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent pathway. In addition, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression partially rescues hyperglycemia during diabetes. Collectively, these data suggested that the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport by an AS160 dependent mechanism during healthy and insulin-deficient state. Our data further indicated that cardiac-specific SERCA overexpression rescues diabetes induced-alterations in cardiac glucose transport and improves whole body glucose homeostasis. Therefore, findings from this study provide novel mechanistic insights linking upregulation of the SERCA pump in the heart as a potential therapeutic target to improve glucose metabolism during diabetes.

  16. Dissociation between exercise-induced reduction in liver fat and changes in hepatic and peripheral glucose homoeostasis in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Richardson, Paul; Kemp, Graham J; Barrett, Mark; Jackson, Nicola C; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Umpleby, A Margot

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multi-organ (hepatic, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) insulin resistance (IR). Exercise is an effective treatment for lowering liver fat but its effect on IR in NAFLD is unknown. We aimed to determine whether supervised exercise in NAFLD would reduce liver fat and improve hepatic and peripheral (skeletal muscle and adipose tissue) insulin sensitivity. Sixty nine NAFLD patients were randomized to 16 weeks exercise supervision (n=38) or counselling (n=31) without dietary modification. All participants underwent MRI/spectroscopy to assess changes in body fat and in liver and skeletal muscle triglyceride, before and following exercise/counselling. To quantify changes in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, a pre-determined subset (n=12 per group) underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp pre- and post-intervention. Results are shown as mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Fifty participants (30 exercise, 20 counselling), 51 years (IQR 40, 56), body mass index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2) (IQR 29, 35) with baseline liver fat/water % of 18.8% (IQR 10.7, 34.6) completed the study (12/12 exercise and 7/12 counselling completed the clamp studies). Supervised exercise mediated a greater reduction in liver fat/water percentage than counselling [Δ mean change 4.7% (0.01, 9.4); P<0.05], which correlated with the change in cardiorespiratory fitness (r=-0.34, P=0.0173). With exercise, peripheral insulin sensitivity significantly increased (following high-dose insulin) despite no significant change in hepatic glucose production (HGP; following low-dose insulin); no changes were observed in the control group. Although supervised exercise effectively reduced liver fat, improving peripheral IR in NAFLD, the reduction in liver fat was insufficient to improve hepatic IR.

  17. Glucose Transporter 8 (GLUT8) Regulates Enterocyte Fructose Transport and Global Mammalian Fructose Utilization

    PubMed Central

    DeBosch, Brian J.; Chi, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    Enterocyte fructose absorption is a tightly regulated process that precedes the deleterious effects of excess dietary fructose in mammals. Glucose transporter (GLUT)8 is a glucose/fructose transporter previously shown to be expressed in murine intestine. The in vivo function of GLUT8, however, remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate enhanced fructose-induced fructose transport in both in vitro and in vivo models of enterocyte GLUT8 deficiency. Fructose exposure stimulated [14C]-fructose uptake and decreased GLUT8 protein abundance in Caco2 colonocytes, whereas direct short hairpin RNA-mediated GLUT8 knockdown also stimulated fructose uptake. To assess GLUT8 function in vivo, we generated GLUT8-deficient (GLUT8KO) mice. GLUT8KO mice exhibited significantly greater jejunal fructose uptake at baseline and after high-fructose diet (HFrD) feeding vs. wild-type mice. Strikingly, long-term HFrD feeding in GLUT8KO mice exacerbated fructose-induced increases in blood pressure, serum insulin, low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol vs. wild-type controls. Enhanced fructose uptake paralleled with increased abundance of the fructose and glucose transporter, GLUT12, in HFrD-fed GLUT8KO mouse enterocytes and in Caco2 cultures exposed to high-fructose medium. We conclude that GLUT8 regulates enterocyte fructose transport by regulating GLUT12, and that disrupted GLUT8 function has deleterious long-term metabolic sequelae. GLUT8 may thus represent a modifiable target in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition or the metabolic syndrome. PMID:22822162

  18. Glucose transporter 8 (GLUT8) regulates enterocyte fructose transport and global mammalian fructose utilization.

    PubMed

    DeBosch, Brian J; Chi, Maggie; Moley, Kelle H

    2012-09-01

    Enterocyte fructose absorption is a tightly regulated process that precedes the deleterious effects of excess dietary fructose in mammals. Glucose transporter (GLUT)8 is a glucose/fructose transporter previously shown to be expressed in murine intestine. The in vivo function of GLUT8, however, remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate enhanced fructose-induced fructose transport in both in vitro and in vivo models of enterocyte GLUT8 deficiency. Fructose exposure stimulated [(14)C]-fructose uptake and decreased GLUT8 protein abundance in Caco2 colonocytes, whereas direct short hairpin RNA-mediated GLUT8 knockdown also stimulated fructose uptake. To assess GLUT8 function in vivo, we generated GLUT8-deficient (GLUT8KO) mice. GLUT8KO mice exhibited significantly greater jejunal fructose uptake at baseline and after high-fructose diet (HFrD) feeding vs. wild-type mice. Strikingly, long-term HFrD feeding in GLUT8KO mice exacerbated fructose-induced increases in blood pressure, serum insulin, low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol vs. wild-type controls. Enhanced fructose uptake paralleled with increased abundance of the fructose and glucose transporter, GLUT12, in HFrD-fed GLUT8KO mouse enterocytes and in Caco2 cultures exposed to high-fructose medium. We conclude that GLUT8 regulates enterocyte fructose transport by regulating GLUT12, and that disrupted GLUT8 function has deleterious long-term metabolic sequelae. GLUT8 may thus represent a modifiable target in the prevention and treatment of malnutrition or the metabolic syndrome.

  19. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  20. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  1. BNIP3 regulates AT101 [(-)-gossypol] induced death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Niroop; Kohli, Latika; Graham, Christopher D; Klocke, Barbara J; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive Schwann cell-derived sarcomas and are the leading cause of mortality in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Current treatment modalities have been largely ineffective, resulting in a high rate of MPNST recurrence and poor five-year patient survival. This necessitates the exploration of alternative chemotherapeutic options for MPNST patients. This study sought to assess the cytotoxic effect of the BH3-mimetic AT101 [(-)-gossypol] on MPNST cells in vitro and to identify key regulators of AT101-induced MPNST cell death. We found that AT101 caused caspase-independent, non-apoptotic MPNST cell death, which was accompanied by autophagy and was mediated through HIF-1α induced expression of the atypical BH3-only protein BNIP3. These effects were mediated by intracellular iron chelation, a previously unreported mechanism of AT101 cytotoxicity.

  2. Effects of flaxseed oil on anti-oxidative system and membrane deformation of human peripheral blood erythrocytes in high glucose level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The erythrocyte membrane lesion is a serious diabetic complication. A number of studies suggested that n-3 fatty acid could reduce lipid peroxidation and elevate α- or γ-tocopherol contents in membrane of erythrocytes. However, evidence regarding the protective effects of flaxseed oil, a natural product rich in n-3 fatty acid, on lipid peroxidation, antioxidative capacity and membrane deformation of erythrocytes exposed to high glucose is limited. Methods Human peripheral blood erythrocytes were isolated and treated with 50 mM glucose to mimic hyperglycemia in the absence or presence of three different doses of flaxseed oil (50, 100 or 200 μM) in the culture medium for 24 h. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and L-glutathione (GSH) were measured by HPLC and LC/MS respectively. The phospholipids symmetry and membrane fatty acid composition of human erythrocytes were detected by flow cytometry and gas chromatograph (GC). The morphology of human erythrocyte was illuminated by ultra scanning electron microscopy. Results Flaxseed oil attenuated hyperglycemia-induced increase of MDA and decrease of GSH in human erythrocytes. Human erythrocytes treated with flaxseed oil contained higher C22:5 and C22:6 than those in the 50 mM glucose control group, indicating that flaxseed oil could reduce lipid asymmetric distribution and membrane perturbation. The ultra scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometer have also indicated that flaxseed oil could protect the membrane of human erythrocytes from deformation at high glucose level. Conclusion The flaxseed oil supplementation may prevent lipid peroxidation and membrane dysfunction of human erythrocytes in hyperglycemia. PMID:22768971

  3. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  4. Insulin regulation of glucose uptake: a complex interplay of intracellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Khan, A H; Pessin, J E

    2002-11-01

    Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipose tissue and striated muscle is critical for reducing post-prandial blood glucose concentrations and the dysregulation of this process is one hallmark of Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. It has been well established that the insulin-stimulated redistribution of the insulin responsive glucose transporter, GLUT-4, from intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane depends on the production of phosphoinositide 3,4,5 trisphosphate by the Class IA Phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase. Recent discoveries however, have shown the presence of a second insulin signalling pathway leading to GLUT-4 translocation, a pathway dependent on insulin receptor signalling emanating from caveolae or lipid rafts at the plasma membrane. This pathway begins with the phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Cbl by the insulin receptor, and results in the activation of a small GTP binding protein, TC10, a member of the Rho family. TC10 is able to modulate actin structure in 3T3L1 adipocytes, and its overexpression inhibits insulin-stimulated GLUT-4 translocation, an inhibition completely dependent on localization of TC10 to the caveolae or lipid rafts. The spatial compartmentalization of insulin signalling from caveolae or lipid rafts provides a novel signalling pathway that functions in concert with general signalling mechanisms in the control of actin dynamics regulating insulin-dependent GLUT-4 translocation.

  5. "Glucose and ethanol-dependent transcriptional regulation of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the most promising and economically attractive natural sources of astaxanthin. The biosynthesis of this valuable carotenoid is a complex process for which the regulatory mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between the carbon source present in the medium and the amount of pigments synthesized. Carotenoid production is especially low when high glucose concentrations are used in the medium, while a significant increase is observed with non-fermentable carbon sources. However, the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not been established. Results In this work, we showed that glucose caused transcriptional repression of the three genes involved in the synthesis of astaxanthin from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in X. dendrorhous, which correlates with a complete inhibition of pigment synthesis. Strikingly, this regulatory response was completely altered in mutant strains that are incapable of synthesizing astaxanthin. However, we found that addition of ethanol caused the induction of crtYB and crtS gene expression and promoted de novo synthesis of carotenoids. The induction of carotenogenesis was noticeable as early as 24 h after ethanol addition. Conclusion For the first time, we demonstrated that carbon source-dependent regulation of astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous involves changes at the transcriptional level. Such regulatory mechanism provides an explanation for the strong and early inhibitory effect of glucose on the biosynthesis of this carotenoid. PMID:21861883

  6. Regulation of c-jun expression during hypoxic and low-glucose stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ausserer, W A; Bourrat-Floeck, B; Green, C J; Laderoute, K R; Sutherland, R M

    1994-01-01

    Hypoxic stress in tumor cells has been implicated in malignant progression and in the development of therapeutic resistance. We have investigated the effects of acute hypoxic exposure on regulation of the proto-oncogene c-jun in SiHa cells, a human squamous carcinoma cell line. Hypoxic exposure produced increased levels of c-jun mRNA resulting from both message stabilization and transcriptional activation. A superinduction of c-jun message resulted during simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation, with several characteristics of an induction mediated by oxidative-stress pathways. This superinduction was blocked by preincubation of cells with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which indicates redox control of c-jun expression and probable involvement of protein kinase C. By gel retardation assay, no increase in AP-1 DNA binding activity was found to be concomitant with the transcriptional activation of c-jun. A lack of increased DNA binding was observed for the consensus AP-1 sequence and for the two AP-1 sequence variants found within the c-Jun promoter. Additionally, hypoxic and low-glucose stress produced no activation of stably transfected AP-1 reporter sequences. Taken together, these results indicate that the transcriptional activation of c-jun during hypoxic and low-glucose stress involves redox control and is unlikely to be mediated by AP-1 recognition elements within the c-jun promoter. Images PMID:8035787

  7. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Fu; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Yin-Yi; Sun, Ya-Meng; Chen, Wen-Qi; Shi, Nan; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kang-Yong; Sun, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695) cell models of cerebral ischemia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer) or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor) on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduction of autophagy.

  8. Reciprocal regulation of nuclear factor kappa B and its inhibitor ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lai-Chu; Goettl, Virginia M; Madiai, Francesca; Hackshaw, Kevin V; Hussain, Syed-Rehan A

    2006-01-01

    Background NF-κB binds to the κB motif to regulate transcription of genes involved in growth, immunity and inflammation, and plays a pivotal role in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after nerve injuries. The zinc finger protein ZAS3 also binds to the κB or similar motif. In addition to competition for common DNA sites, in vitro experiments have shown that ZAS3 can inhibit NF-κB via the association with TRAF2 to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. However, the physiological significance of the ZAS3-mediated inhibition of NF-κB has not been demonstrated. The purpose of this study is to characterize ZAS3 proteins in nervous tissues and to use spinal nerve ligation, a neuropathic pain model, to demonstrate a functional relationship between ZAS3 and NF-κB. Results Immunohistochemical experiments show that ZAS3 is expressed in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Abundant ZAS3 expression is found in the trigeminal ganglion, hippocampal formation, dorsal root ganglia, and motoneurons. Low levels of ZAS3 expressions are also found in the cerebral cortex and in the grey matter of the spinal cord. In those nervous tissues, ZAS3 is expressed mainly in the cell bodies of neurons and astrocytes. Together with results of Western blot analyses, the data suggest that ZAS3 protein isoforms with differential cellular distribution are produced in a cell-specific manner. Further, neuropathic pain confirmed by persistent mechanical allodynia was manifested in rats seven days after L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerve ligation. Changes in gene expression, including a decrease in ZAS3 and an increase in the p65 subunit of NF-κB were observed in dorsal root ganglion ipsilateral to the ligation when compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion ZAS3 is expressed in nervous tissues involved in cognitive function and pain modulation. The down-regulation of ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury may lead to activation of NF-κB, allowing Wallerian

  9. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-10-14

    To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro. Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling.

  10. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. METHODS The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. RESULTS The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro. Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. CONCLUSION ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:27784964

  11. Peripheral Myelin Protein 22 is Regulated Post-Transcriptionally by miRNA-29a

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Lau, Pierre; Hudson, Lynn; Murashov, Alexander K.; Renne, Rolf; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a dose-sensitive, disease-associated protein primarily expressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Either reduction or overproduction of PMP22 can result in hereditary neuropathy, suggesting a requirement for correct protein expression for peripheral nerve biology. PMP22 is post-transcriptionally regulated and the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) of the gene exerts a negative effect on translation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory molecules that function at a post-transcriptional level by targeting the 3′UTR in a reverse complementary manner. We used cultured Schwann cells to demonstrate that alterations in the miRNA biogenesis pathway affect PMP22 levels, and endogenous PMP22 is subjected to miRNA regulation. GW-body formation, the proposed cytoplasmic site for miRNA-mediated repression, and Dicer expression, an RNase III family ribonuclease involved in miRNA biogenesis, are co-regulated with the differentiation state of Schwann cells. Furthermore, the levels of Dicer inversely correlate with PMP22, while the inhibition of Dicer leads to elevated PMP22. Microarray analysis of actively-proliferating and differentiated Schwann cells, in conjunction with bioinformatics programs, identified several candidate PMP22-targeting miRNAs. Here we demonstrate that miR-29a binds and inhibits PMP22 reporter expression through a specific miRNA seed binding region. Over-expression of miR-29a enhances the association of PMP22 RNA with Argonaute 2, a protein involved in miRNA function, and reduces the steady-state levels of PMP22. In contrast, inhibition of endogenous miR-29a relieves the miRNA-mediated repression of PMP22. Correlation analyses of miR-29 and PMP22 in sciatic nerves reveal an inverse relationship, both developmentally and in post-crush injury. These results identify PMP22 as a target of miRNAs and suggest that myelin gene expression by Schwann cells is regulated by miRNAs. PMID:19170179

  12. Regression From Pre-Diabetes to Normal Glucose Regulation in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Leigh; Kahn, Steven E.; Christophi, Costas A.; Knowler, William C.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) randomized to intensive lifestyle modification (ILS) or metformin had a significantly reduced incidence of diabetes compared with those randomized to placebo, yet most were still at risk because they had pre-diabetes. We explored the effect of baseline characteristics, weight change, ILS, and metformin on regression from pre-diabetes to the lowest-risk state of normal glucose regulation (NGR) defined by American Diabetes Association criteria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The DPP was a prospective randomized trial. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of regression from pre-diabetes to NGR over 3 years of follow-up. RESULTS Lower baseline fasting (hazard ratio 1.52, P < 0.01) and 2-h (1.24, P < 0.01) glucose predicted regression to NGR, as did younger age (1.07, P < 0.01) and greater insulin secretion (1.09, P = 0.04). ILS (2.05, P < 0.01) and weight loss (1.34, P < 0.01) had significant and independent effects on regression. A nonsignificant trend for regression was also observed for metformin (1.25, P = 0.06), male sex (1.17, P = 0.08), and insulin sensitivity (1.07, P = 0.09). In those entering the study with both impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), male sex and insulin sensitivity predicted regression to isolated IFG, whereas ILS, metformin, female sex, and greater insulin secretion predicted regression to isolated IGT. CONCLUSIONS Insulin secretion, and other biologic processes retained with younger age, are key in restoring NGR in people with pre-diabetes. However, NGR may also be attained through weight loss and additional aspects of ILS. PMID:19587364

  13. Different regulation of insulin on glucose and lipid metabolism in 2 strains of gibel carp.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junyan; Zhu, Xiaoming; Han, Dong; Yang, Yunxia; Liu, Haokun; Xie, Shouqi

    2017-05-15

    To test the hypothesis that response to insulin by regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in gibel carp A strain may be different from that in DT strain, bovine insulin was injected into both strains of gibel carp after previous fasting for 48h. The results showed that insulin induced hypoglycemia at 3h in 2 strains, and that this was coupled with increased expression of glucose transporters (GLUT2 in the liver and GLUT1, GLUT4 in the muscle) and glycolytic enzyme (HK2 in the muscle) in both strains. Insulin induced increased glycolysis (GK) and fatty acid oxidation (ACO3 in the liver and CPT1a, ACO3 in the muscle) in the DT strain. Conversely, very strong lipogenic capacity, as indicated by higher mRNA levels of transcription factor of fatty acid anabolism (SREBP1) and lipogenic enzymes (ACC, ACLY, and FAS) and decrease lipolytic capacity as indicated by lower mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation enzymes in the liver (ACO3) and muscle (CPT1a and ACO3) detected in the A strain after insulin injection. Higher plasma insulin levels and decreased plasma free fatty acid levels were detected at 8h post insulin injection in A strain induced hypoglycemia. However, plasma glucose levels returned to baseline and no effect on fatty acid levels in the DT strain was observed in response to insulin treatment at the same point in time. These insulin-strain interactions demonstrated that insulin induced different changes in glucose and lipid metabolism in these 2 strains as expected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. UCP2 transports C4 metabolites out of mitochondria, regulating glucose and glutamine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; De Leonardis, Francesco; Lasorsa, Francesco M.; Castegna, Alessandra; Amorese, Daniela; Marmo, Raffaele; Calcagnile, Valeria M.; Palmieri, Luigi; Ricquier, Daniel; Paradies, Eleonora; Scarcia, Pasquale; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Fiermonte, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is involved in various physiological and pathological processes such as insulin secretion, stem cell differentiation, cancer, and aging. However, its biochemical and physiological function is still under debate. Here we show that UCP2 is a metabolite transporter that regulates substrate oxidation in mitochondria. To shed light on its biochemical role, we first studied the effects of its silencing on the mitochondrial oxidation of glucose and glutamine. Compared with wild-type, UCP2-silenced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, grown in the presence of glucose, showed a higher inner mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP:ADP ratio associated with a lower lactate release. Opposite results were obtained in the presence of glutamine instead of glucose. UCP2 reconstituted in lipid vesicles catalyzed the exchange of malate, oxaloacetate, and aspartate for phosphate plus a proton from opposite sides of the membrane. The higher levels of citric acid cycle intermediates found in the mitochondria of siUCP2-HepG2 cells compared with those found in wild-type cells in addition to the transport data indicate that, by exporting C4 compounds out of mitochondria, UCP2 limits the oxidation of acetyl-CoA–producing substrates such as glucose and enhances glutaminolysis, preventing the mitochondrial accumulation of C4 metabolites derived from glutamine. Our work reveals a unique regulatory mechanism in cell bioenergetics and provokes a substantial reconsideration of the physiological and pathological functions ascribed to UCP2 based on its purported uncoupling properties. PMID:24395786

  15. Association between extraversion personality and abnormal glucose regulation in young Korean women.

    PubMed

    Shim, Unjin; Oh, Jee-Young; Lee, Hyejin; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Kim, Han-Na; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2014-01-01

    Depression and psychological distress are known to be associated with diabetes development as well as the disease progression including glycemic control and chronic complication, but relationship of personality with diabetes is controversial. We examined whether personality trait and the presence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR; diabetes and pre-diabetes) are associated in young women. A total of 1,617 young women aged 19-39 years without previously diagnosed diabetes were participated voluntarily. Personality trait was assessed by self-reported questionnaire using the five-factor model (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness) consisting of five-point scale ranging from 'strongly disagreeable' to 'strongly agreeable.' Glucose tolerance status was assessed by standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. One hundred and eleven women were newly diagnosed with AGR (6.9 %). Among five factors, only extraversion trait was significantly associated with AGR. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant negative association between extraversion trait and 2-h post-load glucose after adjustment for age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and family history of diabetes (β = -0.16, P = 0.026). Multiple logistic regression showed extraversion trait having a significant association with the presence of AGR after adjustment for the same covariates (OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.95-0.99, P = 0.011). The frequency of AGR was significantly increased according to the decrease in extraversion score (P for trend with exact test = 0.047). In conclusion, extraversion may be an important personality trait having a beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of AGR.

  16. Ptpmt1 induced by HIF-2α regulates the proliferation and glucose metabolism in erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Qin-Qin; Xiao, Feng-Jun; Sun, Hui-Yan; Shi, Xue-Feng; Wang, Hua; Yang, Yue-Feng; Li, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Li-Sheng; Ge, Ri-Li

    2016-03-18

    Hypoxia provokes metabolism misbalance, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in both human and animal cells. However, the mechanisms which hypoxia causes mitochondrial dysfunction and energy metabolism misbalance still remain unclear. In this study, we presented evidence that mitochondrial phosphatase Ptpmt1 is a hypoxia response molecule that regulates cell proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism in human erythroleukemia TF-1 cells. Exposure to hypoxia or DFO treatment results in upregulation of HIF1-α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1. Only inhibition of HIF-2α by shRNA transduction reduces Ptpmt1 expression in TF-1 cells under hypoxia. Ptpmt1 inhibitor suppresses the growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Ptpmt1 inhibition reduces the Glut1 and Glut3 expression and decreases the glucose consumption in TF-1 cells. In additional, Ptpmt1 knockdown also results in the mitochondrial dysfunction determined by JC1 staining. These results delineate a key role for HIF-2α-induced Ptpmt1 upregulation in proliferation, survival and glucose metabolism of erythroleukemia cells. It is indicated that Ptpmt1 plays important roles in hypoxia-induced cell metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces upregulation of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and Ptpmt1; HIF-2a induces Ptpmt1 upregulation in TF-1 cells. • PTPMT-1 inhibition reduces growth and induces apoptosis of TF-1 cells. • PTPMT1 inhibition downregulates Glut-1, Glut-3 expression and reduces glucose consumption.

  17. Critical role of Egr transcription factors in regulating insulin biosynthesis, blood glucose homeostasis, and islet size.

    PubMed

    Müller, Isabelle; Rössler, Oliver G; Wittig, Christine; Menger, Michael D; Thiel, Gerald

    2012-07-01

    Expression of early growth response protein (Egr)-1, a protein of the Egr family of zinc finger transcription factors, is stimulated in glucose-treated pancreatic β-cells and insulinoma cells. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of Egr transcription factors in pancreatic β-cells in vivo. To overcome the problem associated with redundancy of functions between Egr proteins, conditional transgenic mice were generated expressing a dominant-negative mutant of Egr-1 in pancreatic β-cells. The Egr-1 mutant interferes with DNA binding of all Egr proteins and thus impairs the biological functions of the entire Egr family. Expression of the Egr-1 mutant reduced expression of TGFβ and basic fibroblast growth factor, known target genes of Egr-1, whereas the expression of Egr-1, Egr-3, Ets-like gene-1 (Elk-1), and specificity protein-3 was not changed in the presence of the Egr-1 mutant. Expression of the homeobox protein pancreas duodenum homeobox-1, a major regulator of insulin biosynthesis, was reduced in islets expressing the Egr-1 mutant. Accordingly, insulin mRNA and protein levels were reduced by 75 or 25%, respectively, whereas expression of glucagon and somatostatin was not altered after expression of the Egr-1 mutant in β-cells. Glucose tolerance tests revealed that transgenic mice expressing the Egr-1 mutant in pancreatic β-cells displayed impaired glucose tolerance. In addition, increased caspase-3/7 activity was detected as a result of transgene expression, leading to a 20% decrease of the size of the islets. These results show that Egr proteins play an important role in controlling insulin biosynthesis, glucose homeostasis, and islet size of pancreatic β-cells in vivo.

  18. Regulation of glucose transport by ROCK1 differs from that of ROCK2 and is controlled by actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Araki, Kazushi; Jee, Yuna; Lee, Dae-Ho; Oh, Byung-Chul; Huang, Hu; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Sam W; Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum

    2012-04-01

    A role of Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK)1 in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis has been reported. However, cell-autonomous effects of ROCK1 on insulin-dependent glucose transport in adipocytes and muscle cells have not been elucidated. To determine the specific role of ROCK1 in glucose transport directly, ROCK1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myoblasts was biologically modulated. Here, we show that small interfering RNA-mediated ROCK1 depletion decreased insulin-induced glucose transport in adipocytes and myoblasts, whereas adenovirus-mediated ROCK1 expression increased this in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that ROCK1 is permissive for glucose transport. Inhibition of ROCK1 also impaired glucose transporter 4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Importantly, the ED₅₀ of insulin for adipocyte glucose transport was reduced when ROCK1 was expressed, leading to hypersensitivity to insulin. These effects are dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling, because inhibitors of actin polymerization significantly decreased ROCK1's effect to promote insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Unlike ROCK2, ROCK1 binding to insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 was not detected by immunoprecipitation, although cell fractionation demonstrated both ROCK isoforms localize with IRS-1 in low-density microsomes. Moreover, insulin's ability to increase IRS-1 tyrosine 612 and serine 632/635 phosphorylation was attenuated by ROCK1 suppression. Replacing IRS-1 serine 632/635 with alanine reduced insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, indicating that phosphorylation of these serine residues of IRS-1, which are substrates of the ROCK2 isoform in vitro, are crucial for maximal stimulation of glucose transport by insulin. Our studies identify ROCK1 as an important positive regulator of insulin action on glucose transport in adipocytes and muscle cells.

  19. Regulation of Glucose Transport by ROCK1 Differs from That of ROCK2 and Is Controlled by Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Araki, Kazushi; Jee, Yuna; Lee, Dae-Ho; Oh, Byung-Chul; Huang, Hu; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Sam W.; Zabolotny, Janice M.

    2012-01-01

    A role of Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK)1 in regulating whole-body glucose homeostasis has been reported. However, cell-autonomous effects of ROCK1 on insulin-dependent glucose transport in adipocytes and muscle cells have not been elucidated. To determine the specific role of ROCK1 in glucose transport directly, ROCK1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myoblasts was biologically modulated. Here, we show that small interfering RNA-mediated ROCK1 depletion decreased insulin-induced glucose transport in adipocytes and myoblasts, whereas adenovirus-mediated ROCK1 expression increased this in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that ROCK1 is permissive for glucose transport. Inhibition of ROCK1 also impaired glucose transporter 4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Importantly, the ED50 of insulin for adipocyte glucose transport was reduced when ROCK1 was expressed, leading to hypersensitivity to insulin. These effects are dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling, because inhibitors of actin polymerization significantly decreased ROCK1's effect to promote insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Unlike ROCK2, ROCK1 binding to insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 was not detected by immunoprecipitation, although cell fractionation demonstrated both ROCK isoforms localize with IRS-1 in low-density microsomes. Moreover, insulin's ability to increase IRS-1 tyrosine 612 and serine 632/635 phosphorylation was attenuated by ROCK1 suppression. Replacing IRS-1 serine 632/635 with alanine reduced insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation and glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, indicating that phosphorylation of these serine residues of IRS-1, which are substrates of the ROCK2 isoform in vitro, are crucial for maximal stimulation of glucose transport by insulin. Our studies identify ROCK1 as an important positive regulator of insulin action on glucose transport in adipocytes and muscle cells. PMID:22355071

  20. Cytosolic pH is a second messenger for glucose and regulates the PKA pathway through V-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Dechant, Reinhard; Binda, Matteo; Lee, Sung Sik; Pelet, Serge; Winderickx, Joris; Peter, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Glucose is the preferred carbon source for most cell types and a major determinant of cell growth. In yeast and certain mammalian cells, glucose activates the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), but the mechanisms of PKA activation remain unknown. Here, we identify cytosolic pH as a second messenger for glucose that mediates activation of the PKA pathway in yeast. We find that cytosolic pH is rapidly and reversibly regulated by glucose metabolism and identify the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a proton pump required for the acidification of vacuoles, as a sensor of cytosolic pH. V-ATPase assembly is regulated by cytosolic pH and is required for full activation of the PKA pathway in response to glucose, suggesting that it mediates, at least in part, the pH signal to PKA. Finally, V-ATPase is also regulated by glucose in the Min6 β-cell line and contributes to PKA activation and insulin secretion. Thus, these data suggest a novel and potentially conserved glucose-sensing pathway and identify a mechanism how cytosolic pH can act as a signal to promote cell growth. PMID:20581803

  1. EsGLUT4 and CHHBP are involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in the crustacean Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Tian, Jin-Ze; Wang, Mo-Ran; Zhu, Li-Na; Sun, Jin-Sheng

    2017-09-15

    Glucose is an essential energy source for both vertebrates and invertebrates. In mammals, glucose uptake is mediated primarily by glucose transporters (GLUTs), members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of passive transporters. Among the GLUTs, GLUT4 is the main glucose transporter in muscles and adipocytes. In skeletal muscle cells, GLUT4 interacts with the lipid raft protein flotillin to transport glucose upon stimulation by insulin. Although several studies have examined GLUT4 function in mammals, few have been performed in crustaceans, which also use glucose as their main energy source. Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is a multifunctional neurohormone found only in arthropods, and one of its roles is to regulate glucose homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanism that underlies CHH regulation and whether GLUT4 is involved in its regulation in crustaceans remain unclear. In the present study, we identified a full-length GLUT4 cDNA sequence (defined herein as EsGLUT4) from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis and analyzed its tissue distribution and cellular localization. By the ForteBio Octet system, two large hydrophilic regions within EsGLUT4 were found to interact with the CHH binding protein (CHHBP), an E. sinensis flotillin-like protein. Interestingly, live-cell imaging indicated that EsGLUT4 and CHHBP responded simultaneously upon stimulation by CHH, resulting in glucose release. In contrast to insulin-dependent GLUT4, however, EsGLUT4 and CHHBP were present within cytoplasmic vesicles, both translocating to the plasma membrane upon CHH stimulation. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence for the involvement of EsGLUT4 and CHHBP in the regulation of glucose homeostasis in crustacean carbohydrate metabolism. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Two-component signal transduction system SaeRS positively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lou, Qiang; Qi, Yijun; Ma, Yuanfang; Qu, Di

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  3. Role of sleep duration in the regulation of glucose metabolism and appetite.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Lisa; Leproult, Rachel; Balbo, Marcella; Spiegel, Karine

    2010-10-01

    Sleep curtailment has become a common behavior in modern society. This review summarizes the current laboratory evidence indicating that sleep loss may contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and obesity. Experimentally induced sleep loss in healthy volunteers decreases insulin sensitivity without adequate compensation in beta-cell function, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance and increased diabetes risk. Lack of sleep also down-regulates the satiety hormone leptin, up-regulates the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, and increases hunger and food intake. Taken together with the epidemiologic evidence for an association between short sleep and the prevalence or incidence of diabetes mellitus and/or obesity, these results support a role for reduced sleep duration in the current epidemic of these metabolic disorders. Screening for habitual sleep patterns in patients with "diabesity" is therefore of great importance. Studies are warranted to investigate the putative therapeutic impact of extending sleep in habitual short sleepers with metabolic disorders.

  4. Adr1 and Cat8 Mediate Coactivator Recruitment and Chromatin Remodeling at Glucose-Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Biddick, Rhiannon K.; Law, G. Lynn; Young, Elton T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adr1 and Cat8 co-regulate numerous glucose-repressed genes in S. cerevisiae, presenting a unique opportunity to explore their individual roles in coactivator recruitment, chromatin remodeling, and transcription. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the individual contributions of Cat8 and Adr1 on the expression of a cohort of glucose-repressed genes and found three broad categories: genes that need both activators for full derepression, genes that rely mostly on Cat8 and genes that require only Adr1. Through combined expression and recruitment data, along with analysis of chromatin remodeling at two of these genes, ADH2 and FBP1, we clarified how these activators achieve this wide range of co-regulation. We find that Adr1 and Cat8 are not intrinsically different in their abilities to recruit coactivators but rather, promoter context appears to dictate which activator is responsible for recruitment to specific genes. These promoter-specific contributions are also apparent in the chromatin remodeling that accompanies derepression: ADH2 requires both Adr1 and Cat8, whereas, at FBP1, significant remodeling occurs with Cat8 alone. Although over-expression of Adr1 can compensate for loss of Cat8 at many genes in terms of both activation and chromatin remodeling, this over-expression cannot complement all of the cat8Δ phenotypes. Conclusions/Significance Thus, at many of the glucose-repressed genes, Cat8 and Adr1 appear to have interchangeable roles and promoter architecture may dictate the roles of these activators. PMID:18197247

  5. Hexim1, a Novel Regulator of Leptin Function, Modulates Obesity and Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Ramirez, Susan N.; Rozenberg, Inna; Rouille, Yves; Kral, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin triggers signaling events with significant transcriptional responses that are essential to metabolic processes affecting obesity and glucose disposal. We asked whether hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (Hexim1), an inhibitor of RNA II polymerase-dependent transcription elongation, regulates leptin-Janus kinase 2 signaling axis in the hypothalamus. We subjected C57BL6 Hexim1 heterozygous (HT) mice to high-fat diet and when compared with wild type, HT mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain and remain insulin sensitive. HT mice exhibited increased leptin-pY705Stat3 signaling in the hypothalamus, with normal adipocyte size, increased type I oxidative muscle fiber density, and enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression. We also observed that normal Hexim1 protein level is required to facilitate the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) required for adipogenesis and inducible suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS) expression. Further support on the role of Hexim1 regulating C/EBPs during adipocyte differentiation was shown when HT 3T3L1 fibroblasts failed to undergo adipogenesis. Hexim1 selectively modulates leptin-mediated signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus, the expression of C/EBPs and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR γ) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during the adaptation to metabolic stress. We postulate that Hexim1 might be a novel factor involved in maintaining whole-body energy balance. PMID:26859361

  6. Hexim1, a Novel Regulator of Leptin Function, Modulates Obesity and Glucose Disposal.

    PubMed

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Ramirez, Susan N; Rozenberg, Inna; Rouille, Yves; Kral, John G; Mascareno, Eduardo J

    2016-03-01

    Leptin triggers signaling events with significant transcriptional responses that are essential to metabolic processes affecting obesity and glucose disposal. We asked whether hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (Hexim1), an inhibitor of RNA II polymerase-dependent transcription elongation, regulates leptin-Janus kinase 2 signaling axis in the hypothalamus. We subjected C57BL6 Hexim1 heterozygous (HT) mice to high-fat diet and when compared with wild type, HT mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain and remain insulin sensitive. HT mice exhibited increased leptin-pY(705)Stat3 signaling in the hypothalamus, with normal adipocyte size, increased type I oxidative muscle fiber density, and enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression. We also observed that normal Hexim1 protein level is required to facilitate the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) required for adipogenesis and inducible suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS) expression. Further support on the role of Hexim1 regulating C/EBPs during adipocyte differentiation was shown when HT 3T3L1 fibroblasts failed to undergo adipogenesis. Hexim1 selectively modulates leptin-mediated signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus, the expression of C/EBPs and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR γ) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during the adaptation to metabolic stress. We postulate that Hexim1 might be a novel factor involved in maintaining whole-body energy balance.

  7. Momordica charantia and its novel polypeptide regulate glucose homeostasis in mice via binding to insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Ho, Tin-Yun; Lin, Chingju; Li, Chia-Cheng; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2013-03-13

    Momordica charantia (MC) has been used as an alternative therapy for diabetes mellitus. This study analyzed and elucidated therapeutic targets contributing to the hypoglycemic effect of aqueous extract of MC seeds (MCSE) by transcriptomic analysis. Protein ingredients aimed at the hypoglycemic target were further identified by proteomic, docking, and receptor-binding assays. The data showed that MSCE (1 g/kg) significantly lowered the blood glucose level in normal and diabetic mice. Moreover, MCSE primarily regulated the insulin signaling pathway in muscles and adipose tissues, suggesting that MCSE might target insulin receptor (IR), stimulate the IR-downstream pathway, and subsequently display hypoglycemic activity in mice. It was further revealed that inhibitor against trypsin (TI) of MC directly docked into IR and activated the kinase activity of IR in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the findings suggested that MCSE regulated glucose metabolism mainly via the insulin signaling pathway. Moreover, TI was newly identified as a novel IR-binding protein of MC that triggered the insulin signaling pathway via binding to IR.

  8. Localization and regulation of GLUTx1 glucose transporter in the hippocampus of streptozotocin diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Lawrence P.; Gorovits, Naira; Hoskin, Elena K.; Alves, Stephen E.; Katz, Ellen B.; Grillo, Claudia A.; Piroli, Gerardo G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Charron, Maureen J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the localization of the recently identified glucose transporter GLUTx1 and the regulation of GLUTx1 in the hippocampus of diabetic and control rats. GLUTx1 mRNA and protein exhibit a unique distribution when compared with other glucose transporter isoforms expressed in the rat hippocampus. In particular, GLUTx1 mRNA was detected in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and granule neurons of the dentate gyrus as well as in nonprincipal neurons. With immunohistochemistry, GLUTx1 protein expression is limited to neuronal cell bodies and the most proximal dendrites, unlike GLUT3 expression that is observed throughout the neuropil. Immunoblot analysis of hippocampal membrane fractions revealed that GLUTx1 protein expression is primarily localized to the intracellular compartment and exhibits limited association with the plasma membrane. In streptozotocin diabetic rats compared with vehicle-treated controls, quantitative autoradiography showed increased GLUTx1 mRNA levels in pyramidal neurons and granule neurons; up-regulation of GLUTx1 mRNA also was found in nonprincipal cells, as shown by single-cell emulsion autoradiography. In contrast, diabetic and control rats expressed similar levels of hippocampal GLUTx1 protein. These results indicate that GLUTx1 mRNA and protein have a unique expression pattern in rat hippocampus and suggest that streptozotocin diabetes increases steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of concomitant increases in GLUTx1 protein expression. PMID:11226324

  9. Schisandra polysaccharide increased glucose consumption by up-regulating the expression of GLUT-4.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dun; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Wei-Wei; Mao, Guang-Hua; Zou, Ye; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wang, Xin-Tong; Yang, Liu-Qing; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2016-06-01

    In our previous study, a polysaccharide was extracted from Schisandra Chinensis (Trucz.) Baill and found with anti-diabetic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of the low weight molecular polysaccharide (SCPP11) purified from crude Schisandra polysaccharide and illustrate the underlying mechanism in buffalo rat liver cells. The insulin resistance model of BRL cells was established by incubating with insulin solution for 24h. The effects of SCPP11 on regulating related protein and mRNA expression in an insulin and AMPK signal pathway were investigated by western blot and RT-PCR analysis. SCPP11 showed no cytotoxicity to BRL cells and could improve the glucose consumption in BRL cells. SCPP11 increased the protein expression of Akt, p-AMPK and GLUT-4 in BRL cells. Moreover, SCPP11 could enhance the mRNA expression levels of IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GLUT-4, AMPKα and PPAR-γ in BRL cells at the same time. In conclusion, SCPP11 possessed effects in improving glucose consumption by up-regulating the expression of GLUT-4 which might occur via insulin and AMPK signal pathway and could be a potential functional food to prevent and mitigate the insulin resistance condition.

  10. Adiponectin regulates expression of hepatic genes critical for glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Patterson, Heide Christine; Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-04

    The effects of adiponectin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism at transcriptional level are largely unknown. We profiled hepatic gene expression in adiponectin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice by RNA sequencing. Compared with WT mice, adiponectin KO mice fed a chow diet exhibited decreased mRNA expression of rate-limiting enzymes in several important glucose and lipid metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty-acid activation and synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, and cholesterol synthesis. In addition, binding of the transcription factor Hnf4a to DNAs encoding several key metabolic enzymes was reduced in KO mice, suggesting that adiponectin might regulate hepatic gene expression via Hnf4a. Phenotypically, adiponectin KO mice possessed smaller epididymal fat pads and showed reduced body weight compared with WT mice. When fed a high-fat diet, adiponectin KO mice showed significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. These lipogenic defects are consistent with the down-regulation of lipogenic genes in the KO mice.

  11. FOXM1 regulates glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma by transactivating glucose transporter 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Shang, Runze; Pu, Meng; Li, Yu; Wang, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    The Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor plays crucial roles in the initiation and progression of various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism by which FOXM1 regulates cancer metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches were used to investigate the role of FOXM1 in the regulation of glycolysis in vitro. Luciferase reporter assays were used to explore the transcriptional regulation of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) promoter by FOXM1. Then, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine the expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 in 100 paired HCC and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association between FOXM1 and GLUT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Our data showed that FOXM1 promoted glycolysis in the HCC cells. FOXM1 knockdown significantly reduced the expression of GLUT1 among key glycolysis-related molecules in the different HCC cell lines. Glucose uptake and lactate production assay showed that FOXM1 positively regulated glycolysis based on GLUT1 expression. Moreover, FOXM1 overexpression increased and knockdown decreased GLUT1 expression. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the -206 to -199 bp region of the GLUT1 promoter is important for FOXM1 to enhance GLUT1 promoter activity. The results of the IHC analysis showed that the protein expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 was closely related to the tumor histological grade and TNM stage. In addition, GLUT1 expression was also related to microvascular invasion. In conclusion, overexpression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 may play critical roles in HCC. FOXM1 promotes HCC glycolysis by transactivating GLUT1 expression.

  12. Endothelial interleukin-21 receptor up-regulation in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cunningham, Alexis; Houston, Kevin; Sharma, Aditya M; Chen, Lingdan; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Lye, R John; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J; Annex, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    In most patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), severe stenosis in or occlusion of the major blood vessels that supply the legs make the amount of distal blood flow dependent on the capacity to induce angiogenesis and collateral vessel formation. Currently, there are no medications that improve perfusion to the ischemic limb, and thus directly treat the primary problem of PAD. A recent report from our group in a pre-clinical mouse PAD model showed that interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) is up-regulated in the endothelial cells from ischemic hindlimb muscle. We further showed that loss of IL-21R resulted in impaired perfusion recovery in this model. In our study, we sought to determine whether IL-21R is present in the endothelium from ischemic muscle of patients with PAD. Using human gastrocnemius muscle biopsies, we found increased levels of IL-21R in the skeletal muscle endothelial cells of patients with PAD compared to control individuals. Interestingly, PAD patients had approximately 1.7-fold higher levels of circulating IL-21. These data provide direct evidence that the IL-21R pathway is indeed up-regulated in patients with PAD. This pathway may serve as a therapeutic target for modulation. PMID:26705256

  13. Transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit promoter by insulin and glucose in the carnivorous fish, Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Salgado, M C; Metón, I; Egea, M; Baanante, I V

    2004-12-01

    Increase in glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6Pase, G6pc) transcription enhances hepatic glucose production in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The fact that carnivorous fish is an alternative model to study NIDDM led us to clone and characterise the first G6pc promoter region reported for fish and non-mammalian animals. The 5'-flanking region of G6pc from gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) was isolated by chromosome walking. With SMART RACE-PCR, the transcription start site was located 106 base pairs (bp) upstream of the translational start. Transfection analysis in HepG2 cells located a functional promoter in the 850 bp 5'-flanking isolated fragment (positions -770 to +80 relative to the transcription start). Sequential 5'-deletion analysis of the promoter fragment revealed that a core functional promoter for basal transcription is comprised within the 190 bp upstream of the transcription start site. In vivo, glucose and insulin reduced G6Pase mRNA levels in the fish liver. Transfection experiments in HepG2 cells showed that insulin repressed S. aurata G6pc under high-glucose conditions. Synergistic activation of piscine G6pc promoter was induced by cotransfection with expression plasmids for hepatocyte nuclear factor-4alpha (HNF-4alpha) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1alpha). No direct relationship was found between PGC-1alpha coactivation of HNF-4alpha transactivation and the repressive effect of insulin. Interestingly, insulin hardly affected G6pc promoter activity in the absence of glucose, suggesting that a reduced capacity of insulin-dependent repression of piscine G6pc may lead to insulin resistance in carnivorous fish.

  14. Comparison of the effects of central and peripheral aluminum administration on regional 2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Tolchard, S. )

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) Injection of aluminum tartrate (ALT 205.7 mcg) in the rat induces a progressive encephalopathy characterized by neurobehavioral derangements. The condition is associated with a reduced ability of cerebral synaptosomes to incorporate radiolabeled 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) in vitro. The present study surveyed and compared the in vivo regional cerebral glucose uptake (rCGlu) capacity of rats injected with ALT 7 or 14 days previously either by the ICV or intraperitoneal routes. ICV injection produces transient rCGlu depression in caudate-putamen, geniculate bodies and periaquaeductal gray, resolving by day 14. Thalamic nuclei exhibit depressed rCGlu by the 7th day undergoing further depression by day 14. The rCGlu of occipitoparietal cortices, normal at day 7, was increased by day 14. In contrast, peripheral aluminum administration produced transient rCGlu depression in olfactory bulbs, frontal and occipitoparietal cortices, nucleus accumbens and cerebellum, and transiently increased rCGlu in the geniculate nuclei. These effects, present by day 7, had resolved by day 14 when rCGlu has increased in the previously normal pontine nuclei and decreased in the previously normal hippocampus.

  15. Fruit extracts of Momordica charantia potentiate glucose uptake and up-regulate Glut-4, PPAR gamma and PI3K.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramadhar; Balaji, S; Uma, T S; Sehgal, P K

    2009-12-10

    Momordica charantia fruit is a widely used traditional medicinal herb as, anti-diabetic, anti-HIV, anti-ulcer, anti-inflammatory, anti-leukemic, anti-microbial, and anti-tumor. The present study is undertaken to investigate the possible mode of action of fruit extracts derived from Momordica charantia (MC) and study its pharmacological effects for controlling diabetic mellitus. Effects of aqueous and chloroform extracts of Momordica charantia fruit on glucose uptake and up-regulation of glucose transporter (Glut-4), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), were investigated to show its efficacy as a hypoglycaemic agent. Dose dependent glucose uptake assay was performed on L6 myotubes using 2-deoxy-D-[1-(3)H] glucose. Up-regulatory effects of the extracts on the mRNA expression level of Glut-4, PPAR gamma and PI3K have been studied. The association of Momordica charantia with the aqueous and chloroform extracts of Momordica charantia fruit at 6 microg/ml has shown significant up-regulatory effect, respectively, by 3.6-, 2.8- and 3.8-fold on the battery of targets Glut-4, PPAR gamma and PI3K involved in glucose transport. The up-regulation of glucose uptake was comparable with insulin and rosiglitazone which was approximately 2-fold over the control. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of the cyclohexamide on Momordica charantia fruit extract mediated glucose uptake suggested the requirement of new protein synthesis for the enhanced glucose uptake. This study demonstrated the significance of Glut-4, PPAR gamma and PI3K up-regulation by Momordica charantia in augmenting the glucose uptake and homeostasis.

  16. Health technology assessment review: Computerized glucose regulation in the intensive care unit - how to create artificial control

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Current care guidelines recommend glucose control (GC) in critically ill patients. To achieve GC, many ICUs have implemented a (nurse-based) protocol on paper. However, such protocols are often complex, time-consuming, and can cause iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Computerized glucose regulation protocols may improve patient safety, efficiency, and nurse compliance. Such computerized clinical decision support systems (Cuss) use more complex logic to provide an insulin infusion rate based on previous blood glucose levels and other parameters. A computerized CDSS for glucose control has the potential to reduce overall workload, reduce the chance of human cognitive failure, and improve glucose control. Several computer-assisted glucose regulation programs have been published recently. In order of increasing complexity, the three main types of algorithms used are computerized flowcharts, Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID), and Model Predictive Control (MPC). PID is essentially a closed-loop feedback system, whereas MPC models the behavior of glucose and insulin in ICU patients. Although the best approach has not yet been determined, it should be noted that PID controllers are generally thought to be more robust than MPC systems. The computerized Cuss that are most likely to emerge are those that are fully a part of the routine workflow, use patient-specific characteristics and apply variable sampling intervals. PMID:19849827

  17. Calcitriol prevents peripheral RSC96 Schwann neural cells from high glucose & methylglyoxal-induced injury through restoration of CBS/H2S expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Meng, Fu-hui; Chen, Li; Dong, Xiao-bian; Liu, Guo-Hui; Li, Jian-hua; Dong, Qi; Xu, Ji-de; Yang, Chun-tao

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis has suggested that vitamin D deficiency is involved in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and the levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are also decreased in type 2 diabetes. The injection of vitamin D induces cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) expression and H2S generation. However, it remains unclear whether the supplementation of vitamin D prevents DPN through improvement of CBS/H2S expression. In the present study, RSC96 cells, a rat Schwann cell line, were exposed to high glucose and methylglyoxal (HG&MG) to simulate diabetic peripheral nerve injury in vivo. Before the exposure to HG&MG, the cells were preconditioned with calcitriol (CCT), an active form of vitamin D, and then CCT-mediated neuroprotection was investigated in respect of cellular viability, superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation, inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS)/NO expression, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), as well as CBS expression and activity. It was found that both high glucose and MGO decreased cell viability and co-treatment with the two induced a more serious injury in RSC96 cells. Therefore, the exposure to HG&MG was used in the present study. The exposure to HG&MG markedly induced iNOS expression, NO and O2(-) generation, as well as MMP loss. In addition, the exposure to HG&MG depressed CBS expression and activity in RSC96 cells. However, the preconditioning with CCT significantly antagonized HG&MG-induced cell injury including the decreased viability, iNOS overexpression, NO and O2(-) accumulation, as well as MMP loss. CCT also partially restored the decreased CBS expression and activity triggered by HG&MG, while the inhibition of CBS with hydroxylamine attenuated CCT-mediated neuroprotection. Moreover, the exogenous donation of H2S produced similar cellular protective effects to CCT. The data indicate that the supplementation of vitamin D prevents HG&MG-induced peripheral nerve injury involving the restoration of endogenous H2S system, which may provide a

  18. Defective autoimmune regulator-dependent central tolerance to myelin protein zero is linked to autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Maureen A; Davini, Dan; Cheng, Philip; Giang, Karen; Fan, Una; DeVoss, Jason J; Johannes, Kellsey P A; Taylor, Lorelei; Shum, Anthony K; Valenzise, Mariella; Meloni, Antonella; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Anderson, Mark S

    2012-05-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by peripheral nerve demyelination and dysfunction. How the autoimmune response is initiated, identity of provoking Ags, and pathogenic effector mechanisms are not well defined. The autoimmune regulator (Aire) plays a critical role in central tolerance by promoting thymic expression of self-Ags and deletion of self-reactive T cells. In this study, we used mice with hypomorphic Aire function and two patients with Aire mutations to define how Aire deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Autoimmunity against peripheral nerves in both mice and humans targets myelin protein zero, an Ag for which expression is Aire-regulated in the thymus. Consistent with a defect in thymic tolerance, CD4(+) T cells are sufficient to transfer disease in mice and produce IFN-γ in infiltrated peripheral nerves. Our findings suggest that defective Aire-mediated central tolerance to myelin protein zero initiates an autoimmune Th1 effector response toward peripheral nerves.

  19. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  20. Interaction between glucose and brassinosteroid during the regulation of lateral root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Singh, Manjul; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-05-01

    Glucose (Glc) plays a fundamental role in regulating lateral root (LR) development as well as LR emergence. In this study, we show that brassinosteroid (BR) signaling works downstream of Glc in controlling LR production/emergence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. Glc and BR can promote LR emergence at lower concentrations, while at higher concentrations, both have an inhibitory effect. The BR biosynthesis and perception mutants showed highly reduced numbers of emerged LRs at all the Glc concentrations tested. BR signaling works downstream of Glc signaling in regulating LR production, as in the glucose insensitive2-1brassinosteroid insensitive1 double mutant, Glc-induced LR production/emergence was severely reduced. Differential auxin distribution via the influx carriers AUXIN RESISTANT1/LIKE AUXIN RESISTANT1-3 and the efflux carrier PIN-FORMED2 plays a central role in controlling LR production in response to Glc and BR. Auxin signaling components AUXIN RESISTANT2,3 and SOLITARY ROOT act downstream of Glc and BR. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7/19 work farther downstream and control LR production by regulating the expression of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES-DOMAIN29 and EXPANSIN17 genes. Increasing light flux could also mimic the Glc effect on LR production/emergence. However, increased light flux could not affect LR production in those BR and auxin signaling mutants that were defective for Glc-induced LR production. Altogether, our study suggests that, under natural environmental conditions, modulation of endogenous sugar levels can manipulate root architecture for optimized development by altering its nutrient/water uptake as well as its anchorage capacity. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Interaction between Glucose and Brassinosteroid during the Regulation of Lateral Root Development in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Glucose (Glc) plays a fundamental role in regulating lateral root (LR) development as well as LR emergence. In this study, we show that brassinosteroid (BR) signaling works downstream of Glc in controlling LR production/emergence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. Glc and BR can promote LR emergence at lower concentrations, while at higher concentrations, both have an inhibitory effect. The BR biosynthesis and perception mutants showed highly reduced numbers of emerged LRs at all the Glc concentrations tested. BR signaling works downstream of Glc signaling in regulating LR production, as in the glucose insensitive2-1brassinosteroid insensitive1 double mutant, Glc-induced LR production/emergence was severely reduced. Differential auxin distribution via the influx carriers AUXIN RESISTANT1/LIKE AUXIN RESISTANT1-3 and the efflux carrier PIN-FORMED2 plays a central role in controlling LR production in response to Glc and BR. Auxin signaling components AUXIN RESISTANT2,3 and SOLITARY ROOT act downstream of Glc and BR. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7/19 work farther downstream and control LR production by regulating the expression of LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES-DOMAIN29 and EXPANSIN17 genes. Increasing light flux could also mimic the Glc effect on LR production/emergence. However, increased light flux could not affect LR production in those BR and auxin signaling mutants that were defective for Glc-induced LR production. Altogether, our study suggests that, under natural environmental conditions, modulation of endogenous sugar levels can manipulate root architecture for optimized development by altering its nutrient/water uptake as well as its anchorage capacity. PMID:25810094

  2. Glucose and Insulin Stimulate Lipogenesis in Porcine Adipocytes: Dissimilar and Identical Regulation Pathway for Key Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhang Guo; Xiong, Lu Jian; Yan, Chen; Wei, Dai Hong; YingPai, ZhaXi; Qing, Zhao Yong; Lin, Qiao Zi; Fei, Feng Ruo; Ling, Wang Ya; Ren, Ma Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Lipogenesis is under the concerted action of ChREBP, SREBP-1c and other transcription factors in response to glucose and insulin. The isolated porcine preadipocytes were differentiated into mature adipocytes to investigate the roles and interrelation of these transcription factors in the context of glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis in pigs. In ChREBP-silenced adipocytes, glucose-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~70%, however insulin-induced lipogenesis was unaffected. Moreover, insulin had no effect on ChREBP expression of unperturbed adipocytes irrespective of glucose concentration, suggesting ChREBP mediate glucose-induced lipogenesis. Insulin stimulated SREBP-1c expression and when SREBP-1c activation was blocked, and the insulin-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~55%, suggesting SREBP-1c is a key transcription factor mediating insulin-induced lipogenesis. LXRα activation promoted lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression. In ChREBP-silenced or SREBP-1c activation blocked adipocytes, LXRα activation facilitated lipogenesis and SREBP-1c expression, but had no effect on ChREBP expression. Therefore, LXRα might mediate lipogenesis via SREBP-1c rather than ChREBP. When ChREBP expression was silenced and SREBP-1c activation blocked simultaneously, glucose and insulin were still able to stimulated lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression, and LXRα activation enhanced these effects, suggesting LXRα mediated directly glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis. In summary, glucose and insulin stimulated lipogenesis through both dissimilar and identical regulation pathway in porcine adipocytes. PMID:27871177

  3. The role of α1-adrenergic receptors in regulating metabolism: increased glucose tolerance, leptin secretion and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Papay, Robert S; Perez, Dianne M

    2017-04-01

    The role of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) and their subtypes in metabolism is not well known. Most previous studies were performed before the advent of transgenic mouse models and utilized transformed cell lines and poorly selective antagonists. We have now studied the metabolic regulation of the α1A- and α1B-AR subtypes in vivo using knock-out (KO) and transgenic mice that express a constitutively active mutant (CAM) form of the receptor, assessing subtype-selective functions. CAM mice increased glucose tolerance while KO mice display impaired glucose tolerance. CAM mice increased while KO decreased glucose uptake into white fat tissue and skeletal muscle with the CAM α1A-AR showing selective glucose uptake into the heart. Using indirect calorimetry, both CAM mice demonstrated increased whole body fatty acid oxidation, while KO mice preferentially oxidized carbohydrate. CAM α1A-AR mice displayed significantly decreased fasting plasma triglycerides and glucose levels while α1A-AR KO displayed increased levels of triglycerides and glucose. Both CAM mice displayed increased plasma levels of leptin while KO mice decreased leptin levels. Most metabolic effects were more efficacious with the α1A-AR subtype. Our results suggest that stimulation of α1-ARs results in a favorable metabolic profile of increased glucose tolerance, cardiac glucose uptake, leptin secretion and increased whole body lipid metabolism that may contribute to its previously recognized cardioprotective and neuroprotective benefits.

  4. Protein Kinase N2 Regulates AMP-Kinase Signaling and Insulin Responsiveness of Glucose Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Riedl, Isabelle; Massart, Julie; Åhlin, Marcus; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-07-18

    Insulin resistance is central to the development of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. As skeletal muscle is responsible for the majority of whole body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, regulation of glucose metabolism in this tissue is of particular importance. While Rho GTPases and many of their affecters influence skeletal muscle metabolism, there is a paucity of information on the protein kinase N (PKN) family of serine/threonine protein kinases. We investigated the impact of PKN2 on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in primary human skeletal muscle cells in vitro and mouse tibialis anterior muscle in vivo. PKN2 knockdown in vitro decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, incorporation into glycogen, and oxidation. PKN2 siRNA increased 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, while stimulating fatty acid oxidation and incorporation into triglycerides, and decreasing protein synthesis. At the transcriptional level, PKN2 knockdown increased expression of PGC1α and SREBP1c and their target genes. In mature skeletal muscle, in vivo PKN2 knockdown decreased glucose uptake and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Thus, PKN2 alters key signaling pathways and transcriptional networks to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Identification of PKN2 as a novel regulator of insulin and AMPK signaling may provide an avenue for manipulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

  5. Seasonal variations in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose loading in the edible dormouse (Glis glis L.).

    PubMed

    Castex, C; Donnio, R; Sutter, B C

    1979-01-01

    Glucose tolerance tests made in the Edible dormouse showed annual variations in B cell secretory capacity, associated with glucose tolerance changes. 1. During autumn and winter, the B cell is sensitive to glucose, and insulin regulates the high peripheral consumption of this hexose. 2. At the beginning of spring, insulin secretion decreases and glucose tolerance is impaired. In June, the B cell response si low or absent and a poor tolerance to glucose still persists. 3. The variations in B cell activity can be related to changing energy requirements during the year.

  6. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide regulates dipeptide absorption in mouse jejunum.

    PubMed

    Coon, Steven D; Schwartz, John H; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K

    2013-11-15

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secreted from jejunal mucosal K cells augments insulin secretion and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In recent studies, we have shown GIP directly activates Na-glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) and enhances glucose absorption in mouse jejunum. It is not known whether GIP would also regulate other intestinal nutrient absorptive processes. The present study investigated the effect of GIP on proton-peptide cotransporter-1 (PepT1) that mediates di- and tripeptide absorption as well as peptidomimetic drugs. Immunohistochemistry studies localized both GIP receptor (GIPR) and PepT1 proteins on the basolateral and apical membranes of normal mouse jejunum, respectively. Anti-GIPR antibody detected 50-, 55-, 65-, and 70-kDa proteins, whereas anti-PepT1 detected a 70-kDa proteins in mucosal homogenates of mouse jejunum. RT-PCR analyses established the expression of GIPR- and PepT1-specific mRNA in mucosal cells of mouse jejunum. Absorption of Gly-Sar (a nondigestible dipeptide) measured under voltage-clamp conditions revealed that the imposed mucosal H(+) gradient-enhanced Gly-Sar absorption as an evidence for the presence of PepT1-mediated H(+):Gly-Sar cotransport on the apical membranes of mouse jejunum. H(+):Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by cephalexin (a competitive inhibitor of PepT1) and was activated by GIP. The GIP-activated Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by RP-cAMP (a cAMP antagonist). In contrast to GIP, the ileal L cell secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) did not affect the H(+):Gly-Sar absorption in mouse jejunum. We conclude from these observations that GIP, but not GLP-1, directly activates PepT1 activity by a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in jejunum.

  7. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D'Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-05-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a "leaky" RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

  8. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide regulates dipeptide absorption in mouse jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, John H.; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M.; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secreted from jejunal mucosal K cells augments insulin secretion and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In recent studies, we have shown GIP directly activates Na-glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) and enhances glucose absorption in mouse jejunum. It is not known whether GIP would also regulate other intestinal nutrient absorptive processes. The present study investigated the effect of GIP on proton-peptide cotransporter-1 (PepT1) that mediates di- and tripeptide absorption as well as peptidomimetic drugs. Immunohistochemistry studies localized both GIP receptor (GIPR) and PepT1 proteins on the basolateral and apical membranes of normal mouse jejunum, respectively. Anti-GIPR antibody detected 50-, 55-, 65-, and 70-kDa proteins, whereas anti-PepT1 detected a 70-kDa proteins in mucosal homogenates of mouse jejunum. RT-PCR analyses established the expression of GIPR- and PepT1-specific mRNA in mucosal cells of mouse jejunum. Absorption of Gly-Sar (a nondigestible dipeptide) measured under voltage-clamp conditions revealed that the imposed mucosal H+ gradient-enhanced Gly-Sar absorption as an evidence for the presence of PepT1-mediated H+:Gly-Sar cotransport on the apical membranes of mouse jejunum. H+:Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by cephalexin (a competitive inhibitor of PepT1) and was activated by GIP. The GIP-activated Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by RP-cAMP (a cAMP antagonist). In contrast to GIP, the ileal L cell secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) did not affect the H+:Gly-Sar absorption in mouse jejunum. We conclude from these observations that GIP, but not GLP-1, directly activates PepT1 activity by a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in jejunum. PMID:24072682

  9. A PI-fuzzy logic controller for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, M

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript investigates different fuzzy logic controllers for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients. While fuzzy logic control is still intuitive and at a very early stage, it has already been implemented in many industrial plants and reported results are very promising. A fuzzy logic control (FLC) scheme was recently proposed for maintaining blood glucose level in diabetics within acceptable limits, and was shown to be more effective with better transient characteristics than conventional techniques. In fact, FLC is based on human expertise and on desired output characteristics, and hence does not require precise mathematical models. This observation makes fuzzy rule-based technique very suitable for biomedical systems where models are, in general, either very complicated or over-simplistic. Another attractive feature of fuzzy techniques is their insensitivity to system parameter variations, as numerical values of physiological parameters are often not precise and usually vary from patient to another. PI and PID controllers are very popular and are efficiently used in many industrial plants. Fuzzy PI and PID controllers behave in a similar fashion to those classical controllers with the obvious advantage that the controller parameters are time dependant on the range of the control variables and consequently, result in a better performance. In this manuscript, a fuzzy PI controller is designed using a simplified design scheme and then subjected to simulations of the two common diabetes disturbances--sudden glucose meal and system parameter variations. The performance of the proposed fuzzy PI controller is compared to that of the conventional PID and optimal techniques and is shown to be superior. Moreover, the proposed fuzzy PI controller is shown to be more effective than the previously proposed FLC, especially with respect to the overshoot and settling time.

  10. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a “leaky” RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25844899

  11. Topology mapping of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4 using computational biology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Maulik, Ujjwal; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2013-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly around the globe. The primary cause for this is insulin resistance due to the disruption of the insulin signal transduction mechanism. Insulin signal transduction stimulates glucose transport through the glucose transporter GLUT4, by promoting the exocytosis process. Understanding the structural topology of GLUT4 mechanism will increase our understanding of the dynamic activities about glucose transport and its regulation in the membrane environment. However, little is known about the topology of GLUT4. In this article, we have determined the amino acid composition, disulfide topology, structure conformation pattern of GLUT4. The amino acid composition portrays that leucine composition is the highest contributing to 15.5% among all other amino acids. Three cysteine residues such as Cys223, Cys361, and Cys363 were observed and the last two were associated with one disulfide bond formation. We have generated surface cavities to know the clefts/pockets on the surface of this protein that showed few irregular cavities placed mostly in the transmembrane-helical part. Besides, topology mapping of 12 transmembrane-helixes was done to predict N- and O-glycosylation sites and to show the highly glycosylated GLUT4 that includes both N- and O-glycosylation sites. Furthermore, hydrophobic segment and molecular charge distribution were analyzed. This article shows that bioinformatics tools can provide a rapid methodology to predict the topology of GLUT4. It also provides insights into the structural details and structural functioning relationships in the human GLUT4. The results can be of great help to advance future drug development research using GLUT4 as a target protein.

  12. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  13. Post-Translational Regulation of the Glucose-6-Phosphatase Complex by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Is a Crucial Determinant of Endogenous Glucose Production and Is Controlled by the Glucose-6-Phosphate Transporter.

    PubMed

    Soty, Maud; Chilloux, Julien; Delalande, François; Zitoun, Carine; Bertile, Fabrice; Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2016-04-01

    The excessive endogenous glucose production (EGP) induced by glucagon participates in the development of type 2 diabetes. To further understand this hormonal control, we studied the short-term regulation by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzyme, which catalyzes the last reaction of EGP. In gluconeogenic cell models, a 1-h treatment by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin increased G6Pase activity and glucose production independently of any change in enzyme protein amount or G6P content. Using specific inhibitors or protein overexpression, we showed that the stimulation of G6Pase activity involved the protein kinase A (PKA). Results of site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry analyses, and in vitro phosphorylation experiments suggested that the PKA stimulation of G6Pase activity did not depend on a direct phosphorylation of the enzyme. However, the temperature-dependent induction of both G6Pase activity and glucose release suggested a membrane-based mechanism. G6Pase is composed of a G6P transporter (G6PT) and a catalytic unit (G6PC). Surprisingly, we demonstrated that the increase in G6PT activity was required for the stimulation of G6Pase activity by forskolin. Our data demonstrate the existence of a post-translational mechanism that regulates G6Pase activity and reveal the key role of G6PT in the hormonal regulation of G6Pase activity and of EGP.

  14. Bacillus subtilis citB gene is regulated synergistically by glucose and glutamine.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkrantz, M S; Dingman, D W; Sonenshein, A L

    1985-01-01

    The activity of aconitase in Bacillus subtilis is greatly reduced in cells cultured in media containing rapidly metabolized carbon sources (e.g., glucose). Thus, expression of this enzyme appears to be subject to a form of catabolite repression. Since the product of the citB gene of B. subtilis is required for aconitase activity, we cloned the wild-type allele of this gene and used this DNA as a probe for transcription of citB in cells grown in various media. The steady-state level of RNA that hybridized to this probe was about 10-fold higher in B. subtilis cells grown in citrate-glutamine medium than in cells grown in glucose-glutamine medium. This result correlates well with the steady-state levels of aconitase activity. Two transcripts were shown to initiate within the cloned DNA; the steady-state level of one of these transcripts varied in the same way as did aconitase activity when cells were grown in media containing different carbon sources. This is the first demonstration of regulation by the carbon source of the level of a vegatative-cell transcript in B. subtilis. Images PMID:2413006

  15. Evidence for an indirect transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression by liver X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Grempler, Rolf . E-mail: rolfgrempler@yahoo.de; Guenther, Susanne; Steffensen, Knut R.; Nilsson, Maria; Barthel, Andreas; Schmoll, Dieter

    2005-12-16

    Liver X receptor (LXR) paralogues {alpha} and {beta} (LXR{alpha} and LXR{beta}) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor family and have oxysterols as endogenous ligands. LXR activation reduces hepatic glucose production in vivo through the inhibition of transcription of the key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of G6Pase gene expression by LXR. Both T0901317, a synthetic LXR agonist, and the adenoviral overexpression of either LXR{alpha} or LXR{beta} suppressed G6Pase gene expression in H4IIE hepatoma cells. However, compared to the suppression of G6Pase expression seen by insulin, the decrease of G6Pase mRNA by LXR activation was delayed and was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These observations, together with the absence of a conserved LXR-binding element within the G6Pase promoter, suggest an indirect inhibition of G6Pase gene expression by liver X receptors.

  16. (p)ppGpp, a Small Nucleotide Regulator, Directs the Metabolic Fate of Glucose in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Raskin, David M.; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2015-01-01

    When V. cholerae encounters nutritional stress, it activates (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response. The genes relA and relV are involved in the production of (p)ppGpp, whereas the spoT gene encodes an enzyme that hydrolyzes it. Herein, we show that the bacterial capability to produce (p)ppGpp plays an essential role in glucose metabolism. The V. cholerae mutants defective in (p)ppGpp production (i.e. ΔrelAΔrelV and ΔrelAΔrelVΔspoT mutants) lost their viability because of uncontrolled production of organic acids, when grown with extra glucose. In contrast, the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, a (p)ppGpp overproducer strain, exhibited better growth in the presence of the same glucose concentration. An RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that transcriptions of genes consisting of an operon for acetoin biosynthesis were markedly elevated in N16961, a seventh pandemic O1 strain, but not in its (p)ppGpp0 mutant during glucose-stimulated growth. Transposon insertion in acetoin biosynthesis gene cluster resulted in glucose-induced loss of viability of the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, further suggesting the crucial role of acetoin production in balanced growth under glucose-rich environments. Additional deletion of the aphA gene, encoding a negative regulator for acetoin production, failed to rescue the (p)ppGpp0 mutant from the defective glucose-mediated growth, suggesting that (p)ppGpp-mediated acetoin production occurs independent of the presence of AphA. Overall, our results reveal that (p)ppGpp, in addition to its well known role as a stringent response mediator, positively regulates acetoin production that contributes to the successful glucose metabolism and consequently the proliferation of V. cholerae cells under a glucose-rich environment, a condition that may mimic the human intestine. PMID:25882848

  17. Regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in rat white adipose tissue upon chronic central leptin infusion: effects on adiposity.

    PubMed

    Bonzón-Kulichenko, Elena; Fernández-Agulló, Teresa; Moltó, Eduardo; Serrano, Rosario; Fernández, Alejandro; Ros, Manuel; Carrascosa, José M; Arribas, Carmen; Martínez, Carmen; Andrés, Antonio; Gallardo, Nilda

    2011-04-01

    Leptin enhances the glucose utilization in most insulin target tissues and paradoxically decreases it in white adipose tissue (WAT), but knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effect of central leptin on the insulin-dependent glucose uptake in WAT is limited. After 7 d intracerebroventricular leptin treatment (0.2 μg/d) of rats, the overall insulin sensitivity and the responsiveness of WAT after acute in vivo insulin administration were analyzed. We also performed unilateral WAT denervation to clarify the role of the autonomic nervous system in leptin effects on the insulin-stimulated [(3)H]-2-deoxyglucose transport in WAT. Central leptin improved the overall insulin sensitivity but decreased the in vivo insulin action in WAT, including insulin receptor autophosphorylation, insulin receptor substrate-1 tyrosine-phosphorylation, and Akt activation. In this tissue, insulin receptor substrate-1 and glucose transporter 4 mRNA and protein levels were down-regulated after central leptin treatment. Additionally, a remarkable up-regulation of resistin, together with an augmented expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 in WAT, was also observed in leptin-treated rats. As a result, the insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 insertion at the plasma membrane and the glucose uptake in WAT were impaired in leptin-treated rats. Finally, denervation of WAT abolished the inhibitory effect of central leptin on glucose transport and decreased suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and resistin levels in this tissue, suggesting that resistin, in an autocrine/paracrine manner, might be a mediator of central leptin antagonism of insulin action in WAT. We conclude that central leptin, inhibiting the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in WAT, may regulate glucose availability for triacylglyceride formation and accumulation in this tissue, thereby contributing to the control of adiposity.

  18. Neural clocks and Neuropeptide F/Y regulate circadian gene expression in a peripheral metabolic tissue.

    PubMed

    Erion, Renske; King, Anna N; Wu, Gang; Hogenesch, John B; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-14

    Metabolic homeostasis requires coordination between circadian clocks in different tissues. Also, systemic signals appear to be required for some transcriptional rhythms in the mammalian liver and the Drosophila fat body. Here we show that free-running oscillations of the fat body clock require clock function in the PDF-positive cells of the fly brain. Interestingly, rhythmic expression of the cytochrome P450 transcripts, sex-specific enzyme 1 (sxe1) and Cyp6a21, which cycle in the fat body independently of the local clock, depends upon clocks in neurons expressing neuropeptide F (NPF). NPF signaling itself is required to drive cycling of sxe1 and Cyp6a21 in the fat body, and its mammalian ortholog, Npy, functions similarly to regulate cycling of cytochrome P450 genes in the mouse liver. These data highlight the importance of neuronal clocks for peripheral rhythms, particularly in a specific detoxification pathway, and identify a novel and conserved role for NPF/Npy in circadian rhythms.

  19. Eosinophils Regulate Peripheral B Cell Numbers in Both Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tina W.; Doyle, Alfred D.; Lee, James J.; Jelinek, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    The view of eosinophils (Eos) as solely effector cells involved in host parasite defense and in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases has been challenged in recent years. In fact, there is a growing realization that these cells interact with other components of innate and adaptive immunity. For example, mouse Eos were recently demonstrated to promote plasma cell retention in the bone marrow. However, it remains unknown whether Eos influence the biology of normal B lymphocytes. In this study, we specifically assessed the effect of Eos on B cell survival, proliferation, and immunoglobulin secretion. Our data first revealed that the genetic deletion of Eos from NJ1638 IL-5 transgenic hypereosinophilic mice (previously shown to display profound B cell expansion) resulted in the near abolishment of the B cell lymphocytosis. In vitro studies using human tissues demonstrated Eos’ proximity to B cell follicles and their ability to promote B cell survival, proliferation, and immunoglobulin secretion via a contact-independent mechanism(s). Additionally, this ability of Eos to enhance B cell responsiveness was observed in both T-independent and T-dependent B cell activation and appears to be independent of the Eos’ activation state. Finally, a retrospective clinical study of hypereosinophilic patients revealed for the first time a direct correlation between peripheral blood eosinophil levels and B cell numbers. Taken together, our study identifies a novel role for Eos in the regulation of humoral immunity via their impact on B cell homeostasis and proliferation upon activation. PMID:24616476

  20. Radio-wave heating of iron oxide nanoparticles can regulate plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sarah A; Gagner, Jennifer E; Damanpour, Shadi; Yoshida, Mitsukuni; Dordick, Jonathan S; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-05-04

    Medical applications of nanotechnology typically focus on drug delivery and biosensors. Here, we combine nanotechnology and bioengineering to demonstrate that nanoparticles can be used to remotely regulate protein production in vivo. We decorated a modified temperature-sensitive channel, TRPV1, with antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles that are heated in a low-frequency magnetic field. When local temperature rises, TRPV1 gates calcium to stimulate synthesis and release of bioengineered insulin driven by a Ca(2+)-sensitive promoter. Studying tumor xenografts expressing the bioengineered insulin gene, we show that exposure to radio waves stimulates insulin release from the tumors and lowers blood glucose in mice. We further show that cells can be engineered to synthesize genetically encoded ferritin nanoparticles and inducibly release insulin. These approaches provide a platform for using nanotechnology to activate cells.

  1. Role of FGF19 induced FGFR4 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2009-12-09

    FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 form a unique subfamily of fibroblast growth factors. Because they contain intra-molecular disulfide bonds and show reduced affinity toward heparan sulfate located in the extracellular space, it is thought that, in contrast to other FGFs, they function as endocrine hormones. FGF23 and its co-receptor alphaKlotho are involved in the control of aging, but it is not known if the same holds true for FGF19, which can also signal through alphaKlotho. However, considerable evidence supports a role for FGF19 in controlling various aspects of metabolism. We have recently fully characterized FGF19/FGFR/co-factor interactions and signaling, and in the current manuscript discuss the contribution of the FGF19/FGFR4 axis to bile acid and glucose regulation.

  2. Regulators of Glucose Metabolism in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Hussain, Tabinda; Duette, Gabriel; Weller, Thomas J; Ostrowski, Matias; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-11-01

    Much like cancer cells, activated T cells undergo various metabolic changes that allow them to grow and proliferate rapidly. By adopting aerobic glycolysis upon activation, T cells effectively prioritize efficiency in biosynthesis over energy generation. There are distinct differences in the way CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells process activation signals. CD8(+) effector T cells are less dependent on Glut1 and oxygen levels compared to their CD4(+) counterparts. Similarly the downstream signaling by TCR also differs in both effector T cell types. Recent studies have explored PI3K/Akt, mTORC, HIF1α, p70S6K and Bcl-6 signaling in depth providing definition of the crucial roles of these regulators in glucose metabolism. These new insights may allow improved therapeutic manipulation against inflammatory conditions that are associated with dysfunctional T-cell metabolism such as autoimmune disorders, metabolic syndrome, HIV, and cancers.

  3. Heat shock response regulates insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis: pathophysiological impact and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Koga, Saori; Matsuyama, Rina; Miyagawa, Katsutoshi; Goto, Rieko; Kai, Hirofumi; Araki, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    A large and increasing number of people in all over the world suffer from obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Attenuation of the heat shock response (HSR), which was originally identified as a cellular defense mechanism, is one of the key factors involved in the deterioration of metabolic abnormalities. On the other hand, activating the HSR increases heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) expression and improves insulin resistance and glucose homeostasis in rodents and humans, possibly by inhibiting the activation of stress kinases such as c-jun terminal kinase (JNK) and inhibitor of kappa B kinase β (IKKβ). These approaches may also reduce inflammatory cytokine production and prevent the onset of atherogenic complications. This review focuses on the physiological effects of HSR in regulating insulin sensitivity and hyperglycemia, and the potential to target the HSR system for the treatment of MS and T2DM, as well as other cellular stress-related diseases.

  4. Peroxisome function regulates growth on glucose in the basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Idnurm, Alexander; Giles, Steven S; Perfect, John R; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    ; however, Hxk2 fused to fluorescent proteins was not localized to peroxisomes. Thus, we hypothesize that glucose or glycolytic metabolites are utilized in the peroxisome by an as yet unidentified enzyme or regulate a pathway required by the fungus in the absence of peroxisomes.

  5. Peroxisome Function Regulates Growth on Glucose in the Basidiomycete Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans▿

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Giles, Steven S.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    ; however, Hxk2 fused to fluorescent proteins was not localized to peroxisomes. Thus, we hypothesize that glucose or glycolytic metabolites are utilized in the peroxisome by an as yet unidentified enzyme or regulate a pathway required by the fungus in the absence of peroxisomes. PMID:17041184

  6. Regulation of glucose metabolism by p62/SQSTM1 through HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Zeng, Jin; Xiao, Haibing; Huang, Chunhua; Hu, Junhui; Yao, Weimin; Yu, Gan; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The signaling adaptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62 is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of tumorigenesis. Although great progress has been made, biological roles of p62 and relevant molecular mechanisms responsible for its pro-tumor activity remain largely unknown. Here, we show that p62 knockdown reduces cell growth and the expression of glycolytic genes in a manner that depends on HIF1α activity in renal cancer cells. Knockdown of p62 decreases HIF1α levels and transcriptional activity by regulating mTORC1 activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, p62 interacts directly with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) E3 ligase complex to modulate the stability of HIF1α. Mechanistically, p62 binds to the VHL complex and competes with HIF1α. Expression of p62 inhibits the interaction of DCNL1 (also known as DCUN1D1) with CUL2 and attenuates the neddylation of CUL2, and thus downregulates the VHL E3 ligase complex activity. Functionally, HIF1α expression is required for p62-induced glucose uptake, lactate production and soft agar colony growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that p62 is a crucial positive regulator of HIF1α, which is a facilitating factor in p62-enhanced tumorigenesis. PMID:26743088

  7. Molecular characterization of the glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) gene in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Xue; Chen, Guang-Wen; Shi, Chang-Ying; Cheng, Fang-Fang; Dou, He; Feng, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, De-Zeng

    2014-05-01

    GRP78 (78 kDa glucose-regulated protein) has ubiquitously existed in nearly all organisms from yeast to humans, reflecting the central roles it plays in cell survival. In this report, we isolated and sequenced the full-length cDNA of GRP78 (designated DjGRP78) from the planarian Dugesia japonica. The cDNA is 2121 bp, including an open reading frame (ORF) of 1983 bp encoding a polypeptide of 660 amino acids with three HSP70 family signatures. DjGRP78 contains signal peptides at the N-terminus and a KTEL peptide motif at the C-terminus, which suggests that it localizes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Fluorescent real time RT-PCR was employed to detect the expression pattern of Djgrp78 in response to different stressors. Our results show that heat shock and heavy metals (Hg(2+) and Pb(2+)) induce Djgrp78 expression, but starvation does not. Interestingly, we found that Djgrp78 was up-regulated in planarians with septic tissues, and also verified that it was up-regulated in response to bacterial challenge. Our data indicate that Djgrp78 may be a multifunctional gene, and play important roles in physiological and pathological stress in planarians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. EVOLUTIONARY CONSERVATION OF GLUCOSE-DEPENDENT INSULINOTROPIC POLYPEPTIDE (GIP) GENE REGULATION AND THE ENTEROINSULAR AXIS

    PubMed Central

    Musson, Michelle C.; Jepeal, Lisa I.; Sharifnia, Torfay; Wolfe, M. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), an important component of the enteroinsular axis, is a potent stimulator of insulin secretion, functioning to maintain nutrient efficiency. Although well-characterized in mammals, little is known regarding GIP transcriptional regulation in Danio rerio (Dr). We previously demonstrated that DrGIP is expressed in the intestine and the pancreas, and we therefore cloned the Dr promoter to compare GIP transcriptional regulation in Dr and mammals. Although no significant homology was indentified between the highly conserved mammalian promoter and the DrGIP promoter, 1072-bp of the DrGIP promoter conferred tissue-specific expression in mammalian cell lines. Deletional analysis of the DrGIP promoter identified two regions that, when deleted, reduced transcription by 75% and 95%, respectively. Mutational analysis of the upstream region suggested involvement of an Nkx binding site, although we were unable to identify the factor binding to this site. The cis element in the downstream region was found to be a GATA binding site. Lastly, overexpression and shRNA experiments identified PAX4 as a potential repressor of DrGIP expression. These findings provide evidence that despite the identification of species-spe