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Sample records for regulates peripheral glucose

  1. Hypothalamic NUCKS regulates peripheral glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Beiying; Shi, Xiaohe; Zhou, Qiling; Chen, Hui Shan; Lim, Joy; Han, Weiping; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear ubiquitous casein and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate (NUCKS) is highly expressed in the brain and peripheral metabolic organs, and regulates transcription of a number of genes involved in insulin signalling. Whole-body depletion of NUCKS (NKO) in mice leads to obesity, glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, a tissue-specific contribution of NUCKS to the observed phenotypes remains unknown. Considering the pivotal roles of insulin signalling in the brain, especially in the hypothalamus, we examined the functions of hypothalamic NUCKS in the regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus was impaired in the NKO mice when insulin was delivered through intracerebroventricular injection. To validate the hypothalamic specificity, we crossed transgenic mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the Nkx2.1 promoter with floxed NUCKS mice to generate mice with hypothalamus-specific deletion of NUCKS (HNKO). We fed the HNKO and littermate control mice with a normal chow diet (NCD) and a high-fat diet (HFD), and assessed glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and metabolic parameters. HNKO mice showed mild glucose intolerance under an NCD, but exacerbated obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes under an HFD. In addition, NUCKS regulated levels of insulin receptor in the brain. Unlike HNKO mice, mice with immune-cell-specific deletion of NUCKS (VNKO) did not develop obesity or insulin-resistant phenotypes under an HFD. These studies indicate that hypothalamic NUCKS plays an essential role in regulating glucose homoeostasis and insulin signalling in vivo.

  2. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Zhecheng

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients.

  3. TNF-Alpha in Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ju; Liu, Na; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glucose regulation (IGR) is the prestate of diabetes; about 1/3 of IGR patients will develop to diabetes finally. In this study, we investigated the serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in peripheral neuropathy impaired patients with impaired glucose regulation (IGR). A total of 70 IGR patients received the conventional nerve conduction test, including 30 patients with peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 40 patients without peripheral neuropathy (NPN). The other 40 healthy individuals were recruited as controls. The serum TNF-α and IL-6 in IGR patients were higher than in control group, and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in IGR-PN group were higher than in IGR-NPN group (27.7 ± 17.8 versus 13.1 ± 6.7 pg/mL and 18.1 ± 17.7 versus 6.4 ± 3.7 pg/mL, resp., both p < 0.05). Multifactors logistic regression analysis showed that TNF-α (OR = 0.893; p = 0.009) was an independent factor affecting whether IGR could combine with peripheral neuropathy. TNF-α and IL-6 could aggregate peripheral neuropathy in impaired glucose regulation patients; TNF-α might be independent risk factor for peripheral neuropathy in glucose regulation impaired patients. PMID:28251164

  4. Hyperglycemic glucose concentrations up-regulate the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Relevance to alterations of peripheral nerves in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Muona, P.; Jaakkola, S.; Zhang, R. Z.; Pan, T. C.; Pelliniemi, L.; Risteli, L.; Chu, M. L.; Uitto, J.; Peltonen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy of peripheral nerves obtained from two diabetic patients revealed large deposits of microfibrils and the presence of Luse bodies in the vicinity of perineurial cells. Microfibrils were found to accumulate also in the sciatic nerves of diabetic BB rats; these microfibrillar deposits were shown to contain type VI collagen by immunoelectron microscopy. Connective tissue cells cultured from rat sciatic nerves were exposed to high glucose concentrations. High glucose concentrations up-regulated the mRNA steady-state levels of alpha 1(VI), alpha 2(VI), and alpha 3(VI) chains of type VI collagen and caused accumulation of type VI collagen-containing fibrils in the cultures. Immunostaining and in situ hybridizations demonstrated that perineurial cells, Schwann cells, and fibroblasts expressed type VI collagen at the mRNA and protein levels. The results suggest that the turnover and supramolecular assembly of type VI collagen are perturbed in diabetic nerves and that glucose per se increases the expression of type VI collagen in vitro. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8494053

  5. [Glucose homeostasis in children. I. Regulation of blood glucose].

    PubMed

    Otto Buczkowska, E; Szirer, G; Jarosz-Chobot, P

    2001-01-01

    The amount of glucose in the circulation depends on its absorption from the intestine, uptake by and release from the liver and uptake by peripheral tissues. Insulin and glucagon together control the metabolities required by peripheral tissues and both are involved in maintaining glucose homeostasis. Insulin is considered to be an anabolic hormone in that it promotes the synthesis of protein, lipid and glycogen. The key target tissues for insulin are liver, muscles and adipose tissue. Glucagon acts largely to increase catabolic processes. Between meals or during fast, the most tightly regulated process is the release of glucose from the liver. During fasting glucose is produced from glycogen and is formed by enzymes on the gluconeogenic pathway. Fetal metabolism is directed to ensure anabolism with formation of glycogen, fat and protein. Glucogen is stored in the liver and serves as the immediate source of new glucose during first few hours after birth. Glucose is the most important substrate for brain metabolism. Due to the large size of neonatal brain in relation to body weight cerebral glucose consumption is particularly high. Postnatal hormonal changes have a central role in regulating glucose mobilization through glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. The initial glucagon surge is the key adaptive change which triggers the switch to glucose production. The control of insulin and glucagon secretion is of fundamental importance during first hours after birth. Children have a decreased tolerance to starvation when compared with adults, they are more prone to develop hypoglycaemia after short fasting. The faster rate in the fall of blood glucose and gluconeogenic substrates and rapid rate of ketogenesis are characteristic features of fasting adaptation in children.

  6. Peripheral and Central Glucose Sensing In Hypoglycemic Detection

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycemia poses a serious threat to the integrity of the brain, owing to its reliance on blood glucose as a fuel. Protecting against hypoglycemia is an extended network of glucose sensors located within the brain and in the periphery that serve to mediate responses restoring euglycemia, i.e., counterregulatory responses. This review examines the various glucose sensory loci involved in hypoglycemic detection, with a particular emphasis on peripheral glucose sensory loci and their contribution to hypoglycemic counterregulation. PMID:25180261

  7. PERIPHERAL MECHANISMS IN APPETITE REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as demonstrated by the effects of bariatric surgery). PMID:25241326

  8. Breast Milk Hormones and Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Francesco; Liguori, Stefania Alfonsina; Sorrenti, Miriam; Fissore, Maria Francesca; Oggero, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that a complex relationship exists between the central nervous system and peripheral organs involved in energy homeostasis. It consists in the balance between food intake and energy expenditure and includes the regulation of nutrient levels in storage organs, as well as in blood, in particular blood glucose. Therefore, food intake, energy expenditure, and glucose homeostasis are strictly connected to each other. Several hormones, such as leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and ghrelin, are involved in this complex regulation. These hormones play a role in the regulation of glucose metabolism and are involved in the development of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Recently, their presence in breast milk has been detected, suggesting that they may be involved in the regulation of growth in early infancy and could influence the programming of energy balance later in life. This paper focuses on hormones present in breast milk and their role in glucose homeostasis. PMID:21760816

  9. Sex-specific effects of prenatal stress on glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Brunton, Paula J; Sullivan, Katie M; Kerrigan, David; Russell, John A; Seckl, Jonathan R; Drake, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoid overexposure during pregnancy programmes offspring physiology and predisposes to later disease. However, any impact of ethologically relevant maternal stress is less clear, yet of physiological importance. Here, we investigated in rats the short- and long-term effects in adult offspring of repeated social stress (exposure to an aggressive lactating female) during late pregnancy on glucose regulation following stress, glucose-insulin homoeostasis and peripheral expression of genes important in regulating glucose and lipid metabolism and glucocorticoid action. Prenatal stress (PNS) was associated with reduced birth weight in female, but not male, offspring. The increase in blood glucose with restraint was exaggerated in adult PNS males compared with controls, but not in females. Oral glucose tolerance testing showed no effects on plasma glucose or insulin concentrations in either sex at 3 months; however, at 6 months, PNS females were hyperinsulinaemic following an oral glucose load. In PNS males, plasma triglyceride concentrations were increased, with reduced hepatic mRNA expression of 5α-reductase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα (Ppara)) and a strong trend towards reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (Pgc1α (Ppargc1a)) and Pparγ (Pparg) expression, whereas only Pgc1α mRNA was affected in PNS females. Conversely, in subcutaneous fat, PNS reduced mRNA expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βhsd1), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck (Pck1)), adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and diglyceride acyltransferase 2 (Dgat2) in females, but only Pepck mRNA expression was reduced in PNS males. Thus, prenatal social stress differentially programmes glucose homoeostasis and peripheral metabolism in male and female offspring. These long-term alterations in physiology may increase susceptibility to metabolic disease.

  10. Exenatide Regulates Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Brain Areas Associated With Glucose Homeostasis and Reward System.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Giuseppe; Iozzo, Patricia; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; Lancaster, Jack; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Tripathy, Devjit; Triplitt, Curtis; Fox, Peter; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) have been found in the brain, but whether GLP-1R agonists (GLP-1RAs) influence brain glucose metabolism is currently unknown. The study aim was to evaluate the effects of a single injection of the GLP-1RA exenatide on cerebral and peripheral glucose metabolism in response to a glucose load. In 15 male subjects with HbA1c of 5.7 ± 0.1%, fasting glucose of 114 ± 3 mg/dL, and 2-h glucose of 177 ± 11 mg/dL, exenatide (5 μg) or placebo was injected in double-blind, randomized fashion subcutaneously 30 min before an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The cerebral glucose metabolic rate (CMRglu) was measured by positron emission tomography after an injection of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose before the OGTT, and the rate of glucose absorption (RaO) and disposal was assessed using stable isotope tracers. Exenatide reduced RaO0-60 min (4.6 ± 1.4 vs. 13.1 ± 1.7 μmol/min ⋅ kg) and decreased the rise in mean glucose0-60 min (107 ± 6 vs. 138 ± 8 mg/dL) and insulin0-60 min (17.3 ± 3.1 vs. 24.7 ± 3.8 mU/L). Exenatide increased CMRglu in areas of the brain related to glucose homeostasis, appetite, and food reward, despite lower plasma insulin concentrations, but reduced glucose uptake in the hypothalamus. Decreased RaO0-60 min after exenatide was inversely correlated to CMRglu. In conclusion, these results demonstrate, for the first time in man, a major effect of a GLP-1RA on regulation of brain glucose metabolism in the absorptive state.

  11. Acyl ghrelin acts in the brain to control liver function and peripheral glucose homeostasis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Lockie, Sarah H; Pracht, Corinna; Wu, Qunli; Tups, Alexander; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that peripheral ghrelin regulates glucose metabolism. Here, we designed experiments to examine how central acyl ghrelin infusion affects peripheral glucose metabolism under pair-fed or ad libitum feeding conditions. Mice received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF), ghrelin, and allowed to eat ad libitum (icv ghrelin ad lib) or ghrelin and pair-fed to the aCSF group (icv ghrelin pf). Minipumps delivered acyl ghrelin at a dose of 0.25 μg/h at 0.5 μL/h for 7 days. There was no difference in daily blood glucose, insulin, glucagon, triglycerides, or nonesterified fatty acids. Body weight gain and food intake was significantly higher in icv ghrelin ad lib mice. However, both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf groups exhibited heavier white adipose mass. Icv ghrelin pf mice exhibited better glucose tolerance than aCSF or icv ghrelin ad lib mice during a glucose tolerance test, although both icv ghrelin ad lib and icv ghrelin pf increased insulin release during the glucose tolerance test. Central acyl ghrelin infusion and pair feeding also increased breakdown of liver glycogen and triglyceride, and regulated genes involved in hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism. Icv ghrelin pf mice had an increase in plasma blood glucose during a pyruvate tolerance test relative to icv ghrelin ad lib or aCSF mice. Our results suggest that under conditions of negative energy (icv ghrelin pf), central acyl ghrelin engages a neural circuit that influences hepatic glucose function. Metabolic status affects the ability of central acyl ghrelin to regulate peripheral glucose homeostasis.

  12. Glucocorticoid regulation of the circadian clock modulates glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Y -L; Bernal, Teresita U; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Yamamoto, Keith R; Feldman, Brian J

    2009-10-13

    Circadian clock genes are regulated by glucocorticoids; however, whether this regulation is a direct or secondary effect and the physiological consequences of this regulation were unknown. Here, we identified glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) at multiple clock genes and showed that 3 were directly regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor. We determined that a GRE within the core clock gene Per2 was continuously occupied during rhythmic expression and essential for glucocorticoid regulation of that gene in vivo. We further demonstrated that mice with a genomic deletion spanning this GRE expressed elevated leptin levels and were protected from glucose intolerance and insulin resistance on glucocorticoid treatment but not from muscle wasting. We conclude that Per2 is an integral component of a particular glucocorticoid regulatory pathway and that glucocorticoid regulation of the peripheral clock is selectively required for some actions of glucocorticoids.

  13. Pancreatic regulation of glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Röder, Pia V; Wu, Bingbing; Liu, Yixian; Han, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In order to ensure normal body function, the human body is dependent on a tight control of its blood glucose levels. This is accomplished by a highly sophisticated network of various hormones and neuropeptides released mainly from the brain, pancreas, liver, intestine as well as adipose and muscle tissue. Within this network, the pancreas represents a key player by secreting the blood sugar-lowering hormone insulin and its opponent glucagon. However, disturbances in the interplay of the hormones and peptides involved may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) whose prevalence, comorbidities and medical costs take on a dramatic scale. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to uncover and understand the mechanisms underlying the various interactions to improve existing anti-diabetic therapies and drugs on the one hand and to develop new therapeutic approaches on the other. This review summarizes the interplay of the pancreas with various other organs and tissues that maintain glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, anti-diabetic drugs and their impact on signaling pathways underlying the network will be discussed. PMID:26964835

  14. MicroRNA 33 Regulates Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Goedeke, Leigh; Rotllan, Noemi; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Mattison, Julie A.; Suárez, Yajaira; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases are characterized by the failure of regulatory genes or proteins to effectively orchestrate specific pathways involved in the control of many biological processes. In addition to the classical regulators, recent discoveries have shown the remarkable role of small noncoding RNAs (microRNAs [miRNAs]) in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this regard, we have recently demonstrated that miR-33a and miR33b, intronic miRNAs located within the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) genes, regulate lipid metabolism in concert with their host genes. Here, we show that miR-33b also cooperates with SREBP1 in regulating glucose metabolism by targeting phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC), key regulatory enzymes of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overexpression of miR-33b in human hepatic cells inhibits PCK1 and G6PC expression, leading to a significant reduction of glucose production. Importantly, hepatic SREBP1c/miR-33b levels correlate inversely with the expression of PCK1 and G6PC upon glucose infusion in rhesus monkeys. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-33b works in concert with its host gene to ensure a fine-tuned regulation of lipid and glucose homeostasis, highlighting the clinical potential of miR-33a/b as novel therapeutic targets for a range of metabolic diseases. PMID:23716591

  15. Emerging role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Eun; Song, Do Kyeong; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence from genetic animal models suggests that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, has a key role in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. The brain integrates multiple metabolic inputs from the periphery through nutrients, gut-derived satiety signals and adiposity-related hormones. The brain modulates various aspects of metabolism, such as food intake, energy expenditure, insulin secretion, hepatic glucose production and glucose/fatty acid metabolism in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Highly coordinated interactions between the brain and peripheral metabolic organs are critical for the maintenance of energy and glucose homeostasis. Defective crosstalk between the brain and peripheral organs contributes to the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Here we comprehensively review the above topics, discussing the main findings related to the role of the brain in the homeostatic regulation of energy and glucose metabolism. PMID:26964832

  16. FOXN3 regulates hepatic glucose utilization

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Santhosh; Zinkhan, Erin K.; Hill, Jonathon T.; Yost, H. Joseph; Schlegel, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A SNP (rs8004664) in the first intron of the FOXN3 gene is associated with human fasting blood glucose. We find that carriers of the risk allele have higher hepatic expression of the transcriptional repressor FOXN3. Rat Foxn3 protein and zebrafish foxn3 transcripts are downregulated during fasting, a process recapitulated in human HepG2 hepatoma cells. Transgenic overexpression of zebrafish foxn3 or human FOXN3 increases zebrafish hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whole-larval free glucose, and adult fasting blood glucose, and also decreases expression of glycolytic genes. Hepatic FOXN3 overexpression suppresses expression of mycb, whose ortholog MYC is known to directly stimulate expression of glucose-utilization enzymes. Carriers of the rs8004664 risk allele have decreased MYC transcript abundance. Human FOXN3 binds DNA sequences in the human FOXN3 and zebrafish mycb loci. We conclude that the rs8004664 risk allele drives excessive expression of FOXN3 during fasting and that FOXN3 regulates fasting blood glucose. PMID:27292639

  17. Glucose oxidation positively regulates glucose uptake and improves cardiac function recovery after myocardial reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Xu, Jie; Qin, Xinghua; Hou, Zuoxu; Guo, Yongzheng; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianjiang; Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Xing; Gao, Feng

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial reperfusion decreases glucose oxidation and uncouples glucose oxidation from glycolysis. Therapies that increase glucose oxidation lessen myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the regulation of glucose uptake during reperfusion remains poorly understood. Here we found that glucose uptake was remarkably diminished in myocardium following reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats as detected by 18F-labeled and fluorescent-labeled glucose analogs, even though GLUT1 was upregulated by 3 folds and GLUT4 translocation remained unchanged compared with those of sham rats. The decreased glucose uptake was accompanied by suppressed glucose oxidation. Interestingly, stimulating glucose oxidation by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), a rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation, increased glucose uptake and alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. In vitro data in neonatal myocytes showed that PDK4 overexpression decreased glucose uptake, while its knockdown increased glucose uptake, suggesting a role of PDK4 in regulating glucose uptake. Moreover, inhibition of PDK4 increased myocardial glucose uptake with concomitant enhancement of cardiac insulin sensitivity following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. These results showed that the suppressed glucose oxidation mediated by PDK4 contributes to the reduced glucose uptake in myocardium following reperfusion, and enhancement of glucose uptake exerts cardioprotection. The findings suggest that stimulating glucose oxidation via PDK4 could be an efficient approach to improve recovery from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  18. Effect of Peripheral Electrical Stimulation (PES) on Nocturnal Blood Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Crossover Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Catalogna, Merav; Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Sagi, Roi; Abu-Hamad, Ramzia; Nevo, Uri; Efrati, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulation of hepatic glucose production has been a target for antidiabetic drug development, due to its major contribution to glucose homeostasis. Previous pre-clinical study demonstrated that peripheral electrical stimulation (PES) may stimulate glucose utilization and improve hepatic insulin sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate safety, tolerability, and the glucose-lowering effect of this approach in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods Twelve patients with T2DM were recruited for an open label, interventional, randomized trial. Eleven patients underwent, in a crossover design, an active, and a no-intervention control periods, separated with a two-week washout phase. During the active period, the patients received a daily lower extremity PES treatment (1.33Hz/16Hz burst mode), for 14 days. Study endpoints included changes in glucose levels, number of hypoglycemic episodes, and other potential side effects. Endpoints were analyzed based on continuous glucose meter readings, and laboratory evaluation. Results We found that during the active period, the most significant effect was on nocturnal glucose control (P < 0.0004), as well as on pre-meal mean glucose levels (P < 0.02). The mean daily glucose levels were also decreased although it did not reach clinical significance (P = 0.07). A reduction in serum cortisol (P < 0.01) but not in insulin was also detected after 2 weeks of treatment. No adverse events were recorded. Conclusions These results indicate that repeated PES treatment, even for a very short duration, can improve blood glucose control, possibly by suppressing hepatic glucose production. This effect may be mediated via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02727790 PMID:27997608

  19. Bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Naeije, M

    2001-12-01

    Bruxism is a controversial phenomenon. Both its definition and the diagnostic procedure contribute to the fact that the literature about the aetiology of this disorder is difficult to interpret. There is, however, consensus about the multifactorial nature of the aetiology. Besides peripheral (morphological) factors, central (pathophysiological and psychological) factors can be distinguished. In the past, morphological factors, like occlusal discrepancies and the anatomy of the bony structures of the orofacial region, have been considered the main causative factors for bruxism. Nowadays, these factors play only a small role, if any. Recent focus is more on the pathophysiological factors. For example, bruxism has been suggested to be part of a sleep arousal response. In addition, bruxism appears to be modulated by various neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. More specifically, disturbances in the central dopaminergic system have been linked to bruxism. Further, factors like smoking, alcohol, drugs, diseases and trauma may be involved in the bruxism aetiology. Psychological factors like stress and personality are frequently mentioned in relation to bruxism as well. However, research to these factors comes to equivocal results and needs further attention. Taken all evidence together, bruxism appears to be mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally.

  20. Regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R J; Youngren, J F

    1992-11-01

    The entry of glucose into muscle cells is achieved primarily via a carrier-mediated system consisting of protein transport molecules. GLUT-1 transporter isoform is normally found in the sarcolemmal (SL) membrane and is thought to be involved in glucose transport under basal conditions. With insulin stimulation, glucose transport is accelerated by translocating GLUT-4 transporters from an intracellular pool out to the T-tubule and SL membranes. Activation of transporters to increase the turnover number may also be involved, but the evidence is far from conclusive. When insulin binds to its receptor, it autophosphorylates tyrosine and serine residues on the beta-subunit of the receptor. The tyrosine residues are thought to activate tyrosine kinases, which in turn phosphorylate/activate as yet unknown second messengers. Insulin receptor antibodies, however, have been reported to increase glucose transport without increasing kinase activity. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major characteristic of obesity and diabetes mellitus, especially NIDDM. A decrease in the number of insulin receptors and the ability of insulin to activate receptor tyrosine kinase has been documented in muscle from NIDDM patients. Most studies report no change in the intracellular pool of GLUT-4 transporters available for translocation to the SL. Both the quality and quantity of food consumed can regulate insulin sensitivity. A high-fat, refined sugar diet, similar to the typical U.S. diet, causes insulin resistance when compared with a low-fat, complex-carbohydrate diet. On the other hand, exercise increases insulin sensitivity. After an acute bout of exercise, glucose transport in muscle increases to the same level as with maximum insulin stimulation. Although the number of GLUT-4 transporters in the sarcolemma increases with exercise, neither insulin or its receptor is involved. After an initial acute phase, which may involve calcium as the activator, a secondary phase of increased

  1. Regulation of Glucose Metabolism in Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Daddaoua, Abdelali; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2009-01-01

    In Pseudomonas putida, genes for the glucose phosphorylative pathway and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway are organized in two operons; one made up of the zwf, pgl, and eda genes and another consisting of the edd, glk, gltR2, and gltS genes. Divergently with respect to the edd gene is the gap-1 gene. Expression from Pzwf, Pedd, and Pgap is modulated by HexR in response to the availability of glucose in the medium. To study the regulatory process in greater detail we purified HexR and showed that it is a monomer in solution. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and isothermal titration calorimetry assays were done showing that HexR recognizes the Pedd, Pzwf, and Pgap-1 promoters with affinity in the nanomolar range. DNA footprinting assays identified the binding site between +30 and +1 at Pzwf, between +16 and +41 at Pedd, and between −6 and +18 at Pgap-1. Based on DNA sequence alignment of the target sites and isothermal titration calorimetry data, two monomers of HexR bind to a pseudopalindrome with a consensus sequence of 5′-TTGTN7–8ACAA-3′. Binding of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway intermediate 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate to HexR released the repressor from its target operators, whereas other chemicals such as glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, and 6-phosphogluconate did not induce complex dissociation. The phosphorylated effector is likely to be recognized by a sugar isomerase domain located at the C-terminal end of HexR, whereas the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of HexR exhibits high similarity to proteins of the RpiR family of regulators. PMID:19506074

  2. Feedback Regulation of Glucose Transporter Gene Transcription in Kluyveromyces lactis by Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Milkowski, C.; Krampe, S.; Weirich, J.; Hasse, V.; Boles, E.; Breunig, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    In the respirofermentative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, only a single genetic locus encodes glucose transporters that can support fermentative growth. This locus is polymorphic in wild-type isolates carrying either KHT1 and KHT2, two tandemly arranged HXT-like genes, or RAG1, a low-affinity transporter gene that arose by recombination between KHT1 and KHT2. Here we show that KHT1 is a glucose-induced gene encoding a low-affinity transporter very similar to Rag1p. Kht2p has a lower Km (3.7 mM) and a more complex regulation. Transcription is high in the absence of glucose, further induced by low glucose concentrations, and repressed at higher glucose concentrations. The response of KHT1 and KHT2 gene regulation to high but not to low concentrations of glucose depends on glucose transport. The function of either Kht1p or Kht2p is sufficient to mediate the characteristic response to high glucose, which is impaired in a kht1 kht2 deletion mutant. Thus, the KHT genes are subject to mutual feedback regulation. Moreover, glucose repression of the endogenous β-galactosidase (LAC4) promoter and glucose induction of pyruvate decarboxylase were abolished in the kht1 kht2 mutant. These phenotypes could be partially restored by HXT gene family members from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results indicate that the specific responses to high but not to low glucose concentrations require a high rate of glucose uptake. PMID:11514503

  3. [Role of peripheral serotonin in the insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Cortés, Víctor Antonio; Galgani, José Eduardo; Olmos, Pablo Roberto; Santos, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    The most studied roles of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) have been related to its action in the Central Nervous System (CNS). However, most of 5HT is produced outside the CNS, mainly in the enterochromaffin cells of the gut. Additionally, other tissues such as the endocrine pancreas, particularly β-cells, have its own serotonin system able to synthesize, secrete and respond to extracellular 5HT through cell surface receptors subtypes that have been grouped in 7 families (HTR1-7). Interestingly, 5HT is stored in granules and released together with insulin from β-cells and its biological significance is likely a combination of intra and extracellular actions. The expression of enzymes involved in 5HT synthesis and their receptors varied markedly in β-pancreatic cells during pregnancy, in parallel with an increase in their insulin secretion potential (probably through the action of Htr3a) and an increase in β-cell mass (through the action of Htr2b and Htr1d). In addition, it has been suggested that gut-derived 5HT may promote hepatic gluconeogenesis during prolonged fasting through Htr2b receptor. Taken together, these findings suggest that peripheral 5HT plays an important role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis through the differential expression and activation of 5-HT membrane receptors on the surface of hepatocytes, adipocytes and pancreatic β-cells.

  4. Lifestyle, glucose regulation and the cognitive effects of glucose load in middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Riby, Leigh M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Riby, Deborah M; Graham, Cheryl

    2008-11-01

    Interventions aimed at improving glucose regulatory mechanisms have been suggested as a possible source of cognitive enhancement in the elderly. In particular, previous research has identified episodic memory as a target for facilitation after either moderate increases in glycaemia (after a glucose drink) or after improvements in glucose regulation. The present study aimed to extend this research by examining the joint effects of glucose ingestion and glucose regulation on cognition. In addition, risk factors associated with the development of poor glucose regulation in middle-aged adults were considered. In a repeated measures design, thirty-three middle-aged adults (aged 35-55 years) performed a battery of memory and non-memory tasks after either 25 g or 50 g glucose or a sweetness matched placebo drink. To assess the impact of individual differences in glucose regulation, blood glucose measurements were taken on four occasions during testing. A lifestyle and diet questionnaire was also administered. Consistent with previous research, episodic memory ability benefited from glucose ingestion when task demands were high. Blood glucose concentration was also found to predict performance across a number of cognitive domains. Interestingly, the risk factors associated with poor glucose regulation were linked to dietary impacts traditionally associated with poor health, e.g. the consumption of high-sugar sweets and drinks. The research replicates earlier work suggesting that task demands are critical to the glucose facilitation effect. Importantly, the data demonstrate clear associations between elevated glycaemia and relatively poor cognitive performance, which may be partly due to the effect of dietary and lifestyle factors.

  5. Hormonal regulation of glucose clearance in lactating northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Fowler, Melinda A; Champagne, Cory D; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2008-09-01

    Northern elephant seals exhibit the rare strategy of fasting and lactating concomitantly. We investigated hormonal regulation of glucose clearance in northern elephant seals using glucose tolerance tests (GTT) performed early in lactation and again just prior to weaning. For comparison, identical measurements were made on separate females late in the molt fast. Serial blood samples were used to assess glucose clearance and hormone responses for 3 h post glucose injection. Plasma glucose remained elevated at the end of the sampling period in all groups. Glucose clearance rates were not significantly different among test groups. A significant insulin response was observed in early lactation, no significant response was observed late in lactation and an intermediate response was observed late in the molt fast. The insulin response to a glucose load decreased with adipose tissue proportions. Plasma glucagon decreased significantly following GTT in early and late lactation, although the magnitude of the depression was small in comparison to other species. Hypoinsulemia may be critical to facilitate net lipolysis late in lactation. Consistently low glucose clearance among test groups suggests insulin insensitivity within peripheral tissues. Glucagon suppression independent of insulin release suggests modification of the typical insulin-glucagon counter-regulation. These findings suggest that metabolic features of diabetic-like conditions may be adaptive in the context of long-term fasting.

  6. Peripheral circadian oscillators and their rhythmic regulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2003-05-01

    Most of the organisms living on earth show 24 hour (circadian) rhythms that are endogenously controlled by biological clocks. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by the circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. However, recent studies have demonstrated that circadian oscillators can be found in many organs and tissues, and it appears that the circadian oscillators in the periphery are not self-sustained, since, in vitro, the oscillation disappears after a few cycles. Although analysis of the clockwork mechanism indicates that the molecular composition of the clock in the SCN and in the peripheral tissues is very similar, the mechanism responsible for the damping of the circadian oscillation in the periphery is unknown. Recent studies have also indicated that the mammalian circadian system is hierarchically organized in that the SCN (i.e., the master circadian pacemaker) controls the peripheral oscillators in order to coordinate the physiological events in an entire body. The mechanisms by which the SCN controls peripheral oscillators are just starting to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on functioning of these extra-SCN oscillators and the mechanisms the SCN controls peripheral oscillators.

  7. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca2+ in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca2+ channels, K+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, and Na+/H+ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes. PMID:26784222

  8. Regulation of Intestinal Glucose Absorption by Ion Channels and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihong; Tuo, Biguang; Dong, Hui

    2016-01-14

    The absorption of glucose is electrogenic in the small intestinal epithelium. The major route for the transport of dietary glucose from intestinal lumen into enterocytes is the Na⁺/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1), although glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2) may also play a role. The membrane potential of small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) is important to regulate the activity of SGLT1. The maintenance of membrane potential mainly depends on the activities of cation channels and transporters. While the importance of SGLT1 in glucose absorption has been systemically studied in detail, little is currently known about the regulation of SGLT1 activity by cation channels and transporters. A growing line of evidence suggests that cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]cyt) can regulate the absorption of glucose by adjusting GLUT2 and SGLT1. Moreover, the absorption of glucose and homeostasis of Ca(2+) in IEC are regulated by cation channels and transporters, such as Ca(2+) channels, K⁺ channels, Na⁺/Ca(2+) exchangers, and Na⁺/H⁺ exchangers. In this review, we consider the involvement of these cation channels and transporters in the regulation of glucose uptake in the small intestine. Modulation of them may be a potential strategy for the management of obesity and diabetes.

  9. Rictor/mTORC2 facilitates central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kocalis, Heidi E.; Hagan, Scott L.; George, Leena; Turney, Maxine K.; Siuta, Michael A.; Laryea, Gloria N.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Muglia, Louis J.; Printz, Richard L.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Niswender, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) regulates energy balance and peripheral glucose homeostasis. Rictor is a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex and is required for hydrophobic motif site phosphorylation of Akt at serine 473. To examine the contribution of neuronal Rictor/mTORC2 signaling to CNS regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis, we utilized Cre-LoxP technology to generate mice lacking Rictor in all neurons, or in either POMC or AgRP expressing neurons. Rictor deletion in all neurons led to increased fat mass and adiposity, glucose intolerance and behavioral leptin resistance. Disrupting Rictor in POMC neurons also caused obesity and hyperphagia, fasting hyperglycemia and pronounced glucose intolerance. AgRP neuron specific deletion did not impact energy balance but led to mild glucose intolerance. Collectively, we show that Rictor/mTORC2 signaling, especially in POMC-expressing neurons, is important for central regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944899

  10. Impaired peripheral glucose sensing in F1 offspring of diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Maher A; Helmy, Madiha H; Hanafi, Mervat Y; Mahmoud, Shimaa A; Abo Elfetooh, Hanan

    2014-09-01

    Maternal diabetes can induce permanent changes in glucose homeostasis that can occur pre- and post-natal and leads to type 2 diabetes in adulthood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of maternal diabetes on the F1 offspring peripheral glucose sensing and mitochondrial biogenesis in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of diabetogenic programming. Two groups of female Wistar rats were used (diabetic and control); diabetes was neonatally induced by STZ injection to 5-day old rats. After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks, OGTT was constructed, and serum and tissues were obtained for the assessment of mTFA, mtDNA, UCP2, insulin receptor (IR), phospho-insulin receptor (phospho-IR), and GLUT4. The result indicated impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and insulin resistance in the offspring under control diet at the 15th week of age and thereafter while those offspring under HCD showed IGT at 10th week, and diabetes was evidenced at the 25th week of age. This defect in glucose metabolism was preceded by impairment in the phosphorylation of IR and decreased IR and Glut4 that cause impaired glucose sensing together with inhibited mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle and adipose tissues. This study indicated that maternal diabetes caused impaired glucose sensing and insulin resistance in the peripheral tissues and caused change in the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Post-natal feeding with HCD may accelerate these changes. Male F1 offspring appears to be more sensitive than females for fetal programming of T2D.

  11. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Karen L.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2011-01-01

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects. PMID:21664918

  12. Atypical antipsychotics and the neural regulation of food intake and peripheral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Kim, Sangwon F

    2011-09-26

    The atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) are associated with weight gain and an increased incidence of metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes mellitus. Epidemiological, cross-sectional and prospective studies suggest that two of the AAPs, olanzapine and clozapine, cause the most dramatic weight gain and metabolic impairments including increased fasting glucose, insulin and triglycerides. Relative to the other AAPs, both olanzapine and clozapine exhibit a particularly high antagonistic affinity for histamine and muscarinic receptors which have been hypothesized as mediators of the reported increase in weight and glucose abnormalities. In this article, we review the current evidence for the AAP associated weight gain and abnormal glucose metabolism. We postulate that the effects of the AAPs on food intake and peripheral metabolism are initially independently regulated but with increasing body adiposity, the early AAP-induced impairments in peripheral metabolism will be exacerbated, thereby establishing a vicious cycle such that the effects of the AAP are magnified by the known pathophysiological consequences of obesity. Furthermore, we examine how inhibition of the histaminergic pathway may mediate increases in food intake and the potential role of the vagus nerve in the reported peripheral metabolic effects.

  13. Regulation of glucose homoeostasis by brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Vivian; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has emerged as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. Activation of BAT in human beings could also have beneficial metabolic effects that might resolve common complications of obesity, such as type 2 diabetes, by ameliorating the glucolipotoxic pathological changes that underlie the development of peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion due to pancreatic β-cell failure. Evidence from rodent models suggests that BAT activation improves glucose homoeostasis through several mechanisms, which could point to new strategies to optimise stimulation of BAT in human beings and reverse insulin resistance in peripheral tissues.

  14. Mathematical model for glucose regulation in the whole-body system.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyuk; Han, Kyungreem; Choi, MooYoung

    2012-01-01

    The human body needs continuous and stable glucose supply for maintaining its biological functions. Stable glucose supply comes from the homeostatic regulation of the blood glucose level, which is controlled by various glucose consuming or producing organs. Therefore, it is important to understand the whole-body glucose regulation mechanism. In this article, we describe various mathematical models proposed for glucose regulation in the human body, and discuss the difficulty and limitation in reproducing real processes of glucose regulation.

  15. Regulation of glucose homeostasis by GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeostasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics.

  16. Regulation of Glucose Homeostasis by GLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Prashant; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.

    2014-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1(7–36)amide (GLP-1) is a secreted peptide that acts as a key determinant of blood glucose homeostasis by virtue of its abilities to slow gastric emptying, to enhance pancreatic insulin secretion, and to suppress pancreatic glucagon secretion. GLP-1 is secreted from L cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa in response to a meal, and the blood glucose-lowering action of GLP-1 is terminated due to its enzymatic degradation by dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). Released GLP-1 activates enteric and autonomic reflexes while also circulating as an incretin hormone to control endocrine pancreas function. The GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated directly or indirectly by blood glucose-lowering agents currently in use for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These therapeutic agents include GLP-1R agonists (exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide, albiglutide, dulaglutide, and langlenatide) and DPP-IV inhibitors (sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin). Investigational agents for use in the treatment of T2DM include GPR119 and GPR40 receptor agonists that stimulate the release of GLP-1 from L cells. Summarized here is the role of GLP-1 to control blood glucose homeo-stasis, with special emphasis on the advantages and limitations of GLP-1-based therapeutics. PMID:24373234

  17. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities.

    PubMed

    Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency.

  18. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V.; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency. PMID:25411385

  19. Glucose Regulates the Expression of the Apolipoprotein A5 Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchart, Jamila; Nowak, Maxime; Helleboid-Chapman, Audrey; Jakel, Heidelinde; Moitrot, Emmanuelle; Rommens, Corinne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Fruchart, Jean-Charles

    2008-04-07

    The apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) is a key player in determining triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. Since diabetes is often associated with hypertriglyceridemia, this study explores whether APOA5 gene expression is regulated by alteration in glucose homeostasis and the related pathways. D-glucose activates APOA5 gene expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner in hepatocytes, and the glycolytic pathway involved was determined using D-glucose analogs and metabolites. Together, transient transfections, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through an increase of USF1/2 binding to an E-box in the APOA5 promoter. We show that this phenomenon is not due to an increase of mRNA or protein expression levels of USF. Using protein phosphatases 1 and 2A inhibitor, we demonstrate that D-glucose regulates APOA5 gene via a dephosphorylation mechanism, thereby resulting in an enhanced USF1/2-promoter binding. Last, subsequent suppressions of USF1/2 and phosphatases mRNA through siRNA gene silencing abolished the regulation. We demonstrate that APOA5 gene is up regulated by D-glucose and USF through phosphatase activation. These findings may provide a new cross talk between glucose and lipid metabolism.

  20. Regulation of hypothalamic malonyl-CoA by central glucose and leptin

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Michael J.; Cha, Seung Hun; Sidhaye, Aniket; Chohnan, Shigeru; Cline, Gary; Shulman, Gerald I.; Lane, M. Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA has been shown to function in global energy homeostasis by modulating food intake and energy expenditure. Little is known, however, about the regulation of malonyl-CoA concentration in the central nervous system. To address this issue we investigated the response of putative intermediates in the malonyl-CoA pathway to metabolic and endocrine cues, notably those provoked by glucose and leptin. Hypothalamic malonyl-CoA rises in proportion to the carbohydrate content of the diet consumed after food deprivation. Malonyl-CoA concentration peaks 1 h after refeeding or after peripheral glucose administration. This response depends on the dose of glucose administered and is blocked by the i.c.v. administration of an inhibitor of glucose metabolism, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). The kinetics of change in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after glucose administration is coincident with the suppression of phosphorylation of AMP kinase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Blockade of glucose utilization in the CNS by i.c.v. 2-DG prevented the effects of glucose on 5′AMP-activated protein kinase, malonyl-CoA, hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and food intake. Finally, we showed that leptin can increase hypothalamic malonyl-CoA and that the increase is additive with glucose administration. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, however, showed no defect in the glucose- or refeeding-induced rise in hypothalamic malonyl-CoA after food deprivation, demonstrating that leptin was not required for this effect. These studies show that hypothalamic malonyl-CoA responds to the level of circulating glucose and leptin, both of which affect energy homeostasis. PMID:18032600

  1. Postprandial glucose regulation and diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Hanefeld, Markolf; Leiter, Lawrence; Monnier, Louis; Moses, Alan; Owens, David; Tajima, Naoko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    2004-10-25

    Atherosclerotic disease accounts for much of the increased mortality and morbidity associated with type 2 diabetes. Epidemiological studies support the potential of improved glycemic control to reduce cardiovascular complications. An association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) level and the risk for cardiovascular complications has frequently been reported. Most epidemiological data implicate postprandial hyperglycemia in the development of cardiovascular disease, whereas the link between fasting glycemia and diabetic complications is inconclusive. Moreover, in many studies, postprandial glycemia is a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HbA(1c) level. Postprandial glucose may have a direct toxic effect on the vascular endothelium, mediated by oxidative stress that is independent of other cardiovascular risk factors such as hyperlipidemia. Postprandial hyperglycemia also may exert its effects through its substantial contribution to total glycemic exposure. The present review examines the hypothesis that controlling postprandial glucose level is an important strategy in the prevention of cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes.

  2. SREBP-1c regulates glucose-stimulated hepatic clusterin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gukhan; Kim, Geun Hyang; Oh, Gyun-Sik; Yoon, Jin; Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Min-Seon; Kim, Seung-Whan

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first report to show nutrient-regulated clusterin expression. {yields} Clusterin expression in hepatocytes was increased by high glucose concentration. {yields} SREBP-1c is directly involved in the transcriptional activation of clusterin by glucose. {yields} This glucose-stimulated activation process is mediated through tandem E-box motifs. -- Abstract: Clusterin is a stress-response protein that is involved in diverse biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, tissue differentiation, inflammation, and lipid transport. Its expression is upregulated in a broad spectrum of diverse pathological states. Clusterin was recently reported to be associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and their sequelae. However, the regulation of clusterin expression by metabolic signals was not addressed. In this study we evaluated the effects of glucose on hepatic clusterin expression. Interestingly, high glucose concentrations significantly increased clusterin expression in primary hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines, but the conventional promoter region of the clusterin gene did not respond to glucose stimulation. In contrast, the first intronic region was transcriptionally activated by high glucose concentrations. We then defined a glucose response element (GlRE) of the clusterin gene, showing that it consists of two E-box motifs separated by five nucleotides and resembles carbohydrate response element (ChoRE). Unexpectedly, however, these E-box motifs were not activated by ChoRE binding protein (ChREBP), but were activated by sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). Furthermore, we found that glucose induced recruitment of SREBP-1c to the E-box of the clusterin gene intronic region. Taken together, these results suggest that clusterin expression is increased by glucose stimulation, and SREBP-1c plays a crucial role in the metabolic regulation of clusterin.

  3. p75 neurotrophin receptor regulates glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Raja, Bernat; Li, Pingping; Le Moan, Natacha; Sachs, Benjamin D.; Schachtrup, Christian; Davalos, Dimitrios; Vagena, Eirini; Bridges, Dave; Kim, Choel; Saltiel, Alan R.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Akassoglou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key factor in the etiology of type 2 diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is mediated by the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), which is expressed mainly in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Insulin-stimulated translocation of GLUT4 from its intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane is regulated by small guanosine triphosphate hydrolases (GTPases) and is essential for the maintenance of normal glucose homeostasis. Here we show that the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is a regulator of glucose uptake and insulin resistance. p75NTR knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity on normal chow diet, independent of changes in body weight. Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies demonstrate that deletion of the p75NTR gene increases the insulin-stimulated glucose disposal rate and suppression of hepatic glucose production. Genetic depletion or shRNA knockdown of p75NTR in adipocytes or myoblasts increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation. Conversely, overexpression of p75NTR in adipocytes decreases insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In adipocytes, p75NTR forms a complex with the Rab5 family GTPases Rab5 and Rab31 that regulate GLUT4 trafficking. Rab5 and Rab31 directly interact with p75NTR primarily via helix 4 of the p75NTR death domain. Adipocytes from p75NTR knockout mice show increased Rab5 and decreased Rab31 activities, and dominant negative Rab5 rescues the increase in glucose uptake seen in p75NTR knockout adipocytes. Our results identify p75NTR as a unique player in glucose metabolism and suggest that signaling from p75NTR to Rab5 family GTPases may represent a unique therapeutic target for insulin resistance and diabetes. PMID:22460790

  4. A novel ChREBP isoform in adipose tissue regulates systemic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Herman, Mark A; Peroni, Odile D; Villoria, Jorge; Schön, Michael R; Abumrad, Nada A; Blüher, Matthias; Klein, Samuel; Kahn, Barbara B

    2012-04-19

    The prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes is increasing worldwide and threatens to shorten lifespan. Impaired insulin action in peripheral tissues is a major pathogenic factor. Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in adipose tissue through the GLUT4 (also known as SLC2A4) glucose transporter, and alterations in adipose tissue GLUT4 expression or function regulate systemic insulin sensitivity. Downregulation of human and mouse adipose tissue GLUT4 occurs early in diabetes development. Here we report that adipose tissue GLUT4 regulates the expression of carbohydrate-responsive-element-binding protein (ChREBP; also known as MLXIPL), a transcriptional regulator of lipogenic and glycolytic genes. Furthermore, adipose ChREBP is a major determinant of adipose tissue fatty acid synthesis and systemic insulin sensitivity. We find a new mechanism for glucose regulation of ChREBP: glucose-mediated activation of the canonical ChREBP isoform (ChREBP-α) induces expression of a novel, potent isoform (ChREBP-β) that is transcribed from an alternative promoter. ChREBP-β expression in human adipose tissue predicts insulin sensitivity, indicating that it may be an effective target for treating diabetes.

  5. PAS kinase: a nutrient sensing regulator of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    DeMille, Desiree; Grose, Julianne H

    2013-11-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase (PASK, PASKIN, and PSK) is a member of the group of nutrient sensing protein kinases. These protein kinases sense the energy or nutrient status of the cell and regulate cellular metabolism appropriately. PAS kinase responds to glucose availability and regulates glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and man. Despite this pivotal role, the molecular mechanisms of PAS kinase regulation and function are largely unknown. This review focuses on what is known about PAS kinase, including its conservation from yeast to man, identified substrates, associated phenotypes and role in metabolic disease.

  6. Energy balance regulation by endocannabinoids at central and peripheral levels.

    PubMed

    Quarta, Carmelo; Mazza, Roberta; Obici, Silvana; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2011-09-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a universal and, perhaps, causative feature of obesity. Central nervous system (CNS) circuits that regulate food intake were initially believed to be the targets for dysregulation. However, it is increasingly evident that endocannabinoids affect food intake, energy expenditure and substrate metabolism by acting on peripheral sites. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1r) antagonists can effectively treat obesity and associated metabolic alterations but, unfortunately, cause and exacerbate mood disorders. Drugs restricted to act on peripheral CB1rs might be safer and more effective, retaining the anti-obesity effects but lacking the adverse neurodepressive reactions. This review summarizes the emerging roles of the ECS in energy balance and discusses future pharmacological approaches for developing peripherally restricted CB1r antagonists.

  7. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  8. Brain glucose sensing in homeostatic and hedonic regulation.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, Laura; Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Thorens, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Glucose homeostasis as well as homeostatic and hedonic control of feeding is regulated by hormonal, neuronal, and nutrient-related cues. Glucose, besides its role as a source of metabolic energy, is an important signal controlling hormone secretion and neuronal activity, hence contributing to whole-body metabolic integration in coordination with feeding control. Brain glucose sensing plays a key, but insufficiently explored, role in these metabolic and behavioral controls, which when deregulated may contribute to the development of obesity and diabetes. The recent introduction of innovative transgenic, pharmacogenetic, and optogenetic techniques allows unprecedented analysis of the complexity of central glucose sensing at the molecular, cellular, and neuronal circuit levels, which will lead to a new understanding of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases.

  9. AlphaB-crystallin regulates remyelination after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Erin-Mai F.; Nakanishi, Stan T.; Hoghooghi, Vahid; Eaton, Shane E. A.; Palmer, Alexandra L.; Frederick, Ariana; Stratton, Jo A.; Stykel, Morgan G.; Zochodne, Douglas W.; Biernaskie, Jeffrey; Ousman, Shalina S.

    2017-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin (αBC) is a small heat shock protein that is constitutively expressed by peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons and Schwann cells. To determine what role this crystallin plays after peripheral nerve damage, we found that loss of αBC impaired remyelination, which correlated with a reduced presence of myelinating Schwann cells and increased numbers of nonmyelinating Schwann cells. The heat shock protein also seems to regulate the cross-talk between Schwann cells and axons, because expected changes in neuregulin levels and ErbB2 receptor expression after PNS injury were disrupted in the absence of αBC. Such dysregulations led to defects in conduction velocity and motor and sensory functions that could be rescued with therapeutic application of the heat shock protein in vivo. Altogether, these findings show that αBC plays an important role in regulating Wallerian degeneration and remyelination after PNS injury. PMID:28137843

  10. Glucose regulates lipid metabolism in fasting king penguins.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Orvoine, Jord; Groscolas, René

    2003-08-01

    This study aims to determine whether glucose intervenes in the regulation of lipid metabolism in long-term fasting birds, using the king penguin as an animal model. Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo before, during, and after a 2-h glucose infusion under field conditions. All the birds were in the phase II fasting status (large fat stores, protein sparing) but differed by their metabolic and hormonal statuses, being either nonstressed (NSB; n = 5) or stressed (SB; n = 5). In both groups, glucose infusion at 5 mg.kg-1.min-1 induced a twofold increase in glycemia. In NSB, glucose had no effect on lipolysis (maintenance of plasma concentrations and rates of appearance of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids) and no effect on the plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols (TAG), glucagon, insulin, or corticosterone. However, it limited fatty acid (FA) oxidation, as indicated by a 25% decrease in the plasma level of beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB). In SB, glucose infusion induced an approximately 2.5-fold decrease in lipolytic fluxes and a large decrease in FA oxidation, as reflected by a 64% decrease in the plasma concentration of beta-OHB. There were also a 35% decrease in plasma TAG, a 6.5- and 2.8-fold decrease in plasma glucagon and corticosterone, respectively, and a threefold increase in insulinemia. These data show that in fasting king penguins, glucose regulates lipid metabolism (inhibition of lipolysis and/or of FA oxidation) and affects hormonal status differently in stressed vs. nonstressed individuals. The results also suggest that in birds, as in humans, the availability of glucose, not of FA, is an important determinant of the substrate mix (glucose vs. FA) that is oxidized for energy production.

  11. Pathways regulating modality-specific axonal regeneration in peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Wood, Matthew D; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Following peripheral nerve injury, the distal nerve is primed for regenerating axons by generating a permissive environment replete with glial cells, cytokines, and neurotrophic factors to encourage axonal growth. However, increasing evidence demonstrates that regenerating axons within peripheral nerves still encounter axonal-growth inhibitors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Given the generally poor clinical outcomes following peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction, the use of pharmacological therapies to augment axonal regeneration and overcome inhibitory signals has gained considerable interest. Joshi et al. (2014) have provided evidence for preferential or modality-specific (motor versus sensory) axonal growth and regeneration due to inhibitory signaling from Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway regulation. By providing inhibition to the ROCK signaling pathway through Y-27632, they demonstrate that motor neurons regenerating their axons are impacted to a greater extent compared to sensory neurons. In light of this evidence, we briefly review the literature regarding modality-specific axonal regeneration to provide context to their findings. We also describe potential and novel barriers, such as senescent Schwann cells, which provide additional axonal-growth inhibitory factors for future consideration following peripheral nerve injury.

  12. Peripheral effects of insulin dominate suppression of fasting hepatic glucose production

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N. )

    1990-06-01

    Insulin may suppress hepatic glucose production directly, or indirectly via suppression of release of gluconeogenic substrates from extrasplanchnic tissues. To compare these mechanisms, we performed insulin dose-response experiments in conscious dogs at euglycemia, during somatostatin infusion, and intraportal glucagon replacement. Insulin was sequentially infused either intraportally (0.05, 0.20, 0.40, 1.0, 1.4, and/or 3.0; protocol I) or systemically at half the intraportal rate (0.025, 0.10, 0.20, 0.50, 0.70, and/or 1.5 mU.min-1.kg-1; protocol II). Exogenous glucose infused during clamps was labeled with 3-(3H)glucose (2 microCi/g) to prevent a fall in plasma specific activity (P greater than 0.2) that may have contributed to previous underestimations of hepatic glucose output (HGO). Portal insulins were up to threefold higher during intraportal infusion, but peripheral insulin levels were not different between the intraportal and systemic protocols (7 +/- 5 vs. 9 +/- 1, 12 +/- 4 vs. 13 +/- 6, 16 +/- 3 vs. 27 +/- 5, 70 +/- 23 vs. 48 +/- 8, 83 +/- 3 vs. 86 +/- 21, and 128 vs. 120 +/- 14 microU/ml for paired insulin doses; P greater than 0.06 by analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Despite higher portal insulin levels in protocol I, HGO suppression was equivalent in the two protocols when systemic insulin was matched, from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to near-total suppression at 0.3 mg.min-1.kg-1 at the highest insulin infusion rate (3.0 mU.min-1.kg-1; P less than 0.0001) with intraportal insulin, from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to -0.8 +/- 0.2 mg.min-1.kg-1 in protocol II (P less than 0.001). Suppression of HGO was similar at matched systemic insulin, regardless of portal insulin, suggesting the primacy of insulin's action on the periphery in its restraint of hepatic glucose production.

  13. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingyu; Simcox, Judith; Mitchell, T. Creighton; Jones, Deborah; Cox, James; Luo, Bai; Cooksey, Robert C.; Boros, Laszlo G.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Excess iron is associated with hepatic damage and diabetes in humans, although the detailed molecular mechanisms are not known. To investigate how iron regulates glucose homeostasis, we fed C57BL/6J male mice with high-iron (HI) diets (2 or 20 g Fe/kg chow). Mice fed an HI diet exhibited elevated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and impaired insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and liver. Consistent with the increased AMPK activity, glucose uptake was enhanced in mice fed an HI diet. The effects of improved glucose tolerance induced by HI feeding were abolished in transgenic mice with expression of muscle specific dominant-negative AMPK. Glucose output was suppressed in the liver of wild-type mice fed an HI diet, due to decreased expression of gluconeogenic genes and decreased substrate (lactate) from peripheral glycolysis. Iron activated AMPK by increasing deacetylase and decreasing LKB1 acetylation, in turn stimulating the phosphorylation of LKB1 and AMPK. The effects of HI diet were abrogated by treatment of the mice with N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting a redox-dependent mechanism for increasing deacetylase activity. In addition, tissue from iron-fed mice exhibited an elevated AMP/ATP ratio, further contributing to AMPK activation. In summary, a diet high in iron improves glucose tolerance by activating AMPK through mechanisms that include deacetylation.—Huang J., Simcox, J., Mitchell, T. C., Jones, D., Cox, J., Luo, B., Cooksey, R. C., Boros, L. G., McClain, D. A. Iron regulates glucose homeostasis in liver and muscle via AMP-activated protein kinase in mice. PMID:23515442

  14. The Lin28/let-7 axis regulates glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hao; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar P.; Einhorn, William S.; Takeuchi, Ayumu; Engreitz, Jesse M.; Hagan, John P.; Kharas, Michael G; Urbach, Achia; Thornton, James E.; Triboulet, Robinson; Gregory, Richard I.; Altshuler, David; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The let-7 tumor suppressor microRNAs are known for their regulation of oncogenes, while the RNA-binding proteins Lin28a/b promote malignancy by blocking let-7 biogenesis. In studies of the Lin28/let-7 pathway, we discovered unexpected roles in regulating metabolism. When overexpressed in mice, both Lin28a and LIN28B promoted an insulin-sensitized state that resisted high fat diet-induced diabetes, whereas muscle-specific loss of Lin28a and overexpression of let-7 resulted in insulin resistance and impaired glucose tolerance. These phenomena occurred in part through let-7-mediated repression of multiple components of the insulin-PI3K-mTOR pathway, including IGF1R, INSR, and IRS2. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated the enhanced glucose uptake and insulin-sensitivity conferred by Lin28a in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we found that let-7 targets were enriched for genes that contain SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes and fasting glucose in human genome-wide association studies. These data establish the Lin28/let-7 pathway as a central regulator of mammalian glucose metabolism. PMID:21962509

  15. Zinc finger protein 407 (ZFP407) regulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Buchner, David A; Charrier, Alyssa; Srinivasan, Ethan; Wang, Li; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats; Bridges, Dave; Saltiel, Alan R

    2015-03-06

    The glucose transporter GLUT4 facilitates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in peripheral tissues including adipose, muscle, and heart. GLUT4 function is impaired in obesity and type 2 diabetes leading to hyperglycemia and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and neuropathy. To better understand the regulation of GLUT4 function, a targeted siRNA screen was performed and led to the discovery that ZFP407 regulates insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. The decrease in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake due to ZFP407 deficiency was attributed to a reduction in GLUT4 mRNA and protein levels. The decrease in GLUT4 was due to both decreased transcription of Glut4 mRNA and decreased efficiency of Glut4 pre-mRNA splicing. Interestingly, ZFP407 coordinately regulated this decrease in transcription with an increase in the stability of Glut4 mRNA, resulting in opposing effects on steady-state Glut4 mRNA levels. More broadly, transcriptome analysis revealed that ZFP407 regulates many peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ target genes beyond Glut4. ZFP407 was required for the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone to increase Glut4 expression, but was not sufficient to increase expression of a PPARγ target gene reporter construct. However, ZFP407 and PPARγ co-overexpression synergistically activated a PPARγ reporter construct beyond the level of PPARγ alone. Thus, ZFP407 may represent a new modulator of the PPARγ signaling pathway.

  16. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  17. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-03-30

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons.

  18. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  19. Regulation of Glucose Utilization by Estradiol in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    alcohols (100, 95, and 80% ethanol (v/v) in H2O) and cleared in xylene, and coverslips were attached with Permount (Fisher Scientific). Slides were...E2) to estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer patients increases glucose uptake by tumors. Accordingly, downstream metabolic regulators of E2...The goal of the proposal was to study a novel regulatory pathway for E2 induced metabolism via PFKFB3 in breast cancer cells. In the initial

  20. Effects of insulin on peripheral and splanchnic glucose metabolism in noninsulin-dependent (type II) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    DeFronzo, R A; Gunnarsson, R; Björkman, O; Olsson, M; Wahren, J

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and site(s) of the insulin resistance were examined in nine normal-weight noninsulin-dependent diabetic (NIDD) subjects. The euglycemic insulin clamp technique (insulin concentration approximately 100 microU/ml) was employed in combination with hepatic and femoral venous catheterization and measurement of endogenous glucose production using infusion of tritiated glucose. Total body glucose metabolism in the NIDD subjects (4.37 +/- 0.45 mg/kg per min) was 38% (P less than 0.01) lower than in controls (7.04 +/- 0.63 mg/kg per min). Quantitatively, the most important site of the insulin resistance was found to be in peripheral tissues. Leg glucose uptake in the diabetic group was reduced by 45% as compared with that in controls (6.0 +/- 0.2 vs. 11.0 +/- 0.1 mg/kg leg wt per min; P less than 0.01). A strong positive correlation was observed between leg and total body glucose uptake (r = 0.70, P less than 0.001). Assuming that muscle is the primary leg tissue responsible for glucose uptake, it could be estimated that 90 and 87% of the infused glucose was disposed of by peripheral tissues in the control and NIDD subjects, respectively. Net splanchnic glucose balance during insulin stimulation was slightly more positive in the control than in the diabetic subjects (0.31 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.05 +/- 0.19 mg/kg per min; P less than 0.07). The difference (0.26 mg/kg per min) in net splanchnic glucose balance in NIDD represented only 10% of the reduction (2.67 mg/kg per min) in total body glucose uptake in the NIDD group and thus contributed very little to the insulin resistance. The results emphasize the importance of the peripheral tissues in the disposal of infused glucose and indicate that muscle is the most important site of the insulin resistance in NIDD. PMID:3894418

  1. Endogenously released GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany; Schurr, Kathleen; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the L cell of the gut in response to oral nutrient delivery. To determine if endogenously released GLP-1 contributes to the incretin effect and postprandial glucose regulation, conscious dogs (n = 8) underwent an acclimation period (t = −60 to −20 min), followed by a basal sampling period (t = −20 to 0 min) and an experimental period (t = 0–320 min). At the beginning of the experimental period, t = 0 min, a peripheral infusion of either saline or GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist, exendin (9–39) (Ex-9, 500 pmol/kg/min), was started. At t = 30 min, animals consumed a liquid mixed meal, spiked with acetaminophen. All animals were studied twice (± Ex-9) in random fashion, and the experiments were separated by a 1–2-week washout period. Antagonism of the GLP-1R did not have an effect, as indicated by repeated-measures MANOVA analysis of the Δ AUC from t = 45–320 min of arterial plasma glucose, GLP-1, insulin, glucagon, and acetaminophen levels. Therefore, endogenous GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog. PMID:21547512

  2. Central insulin-mediated regulation of hepatic glucose production [Review].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Insulin controls hepatic glucose production (HGP) and maintains glucose homeostasis through the direct action of hepatic insulin receptors, as well as the indirect action of insulin receptors in the central nervous system. Insulin acts on insulin receptors in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner, induces hyperpolarization of the hypothalamic neurons, and regulates HGP via the vagus nerve. In the liver, central insulin action augments IL-6 expression in Kupffer cells and activates STAT3 transcription factors in hepatocytes. Activated STAT3 suppresses the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes, thereby reducing HGP. It has become evident that nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids act upon the hypothalamus together with insulin, affecting HGP. On the other hand, HGP control by central insulin action is impeded in obesity and impeded by insulin resistance due to disturbance of PI3K signaling and inflammation in the hypothalamus or inhibition of STAT3 signaling in the liver. Although the mechanism of control of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression by central insulin action is conserved across species, its importance in human glucose metabolism has not been made entirely clear and its elucidation is anticipated in the future.

  3. Standing balance and trunk position sense in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)-related peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Allon; Russell, James William; Alexander, Neil Burton

    2008-07-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and pre-diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) affect a large segment of the population. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is a common complication of T2DM, leading to sensory and motor deficits. While T2DM-related PN often results in balance- and mobility-related dysfunction which manifests as gait instability and falls, little is known about balance capabilities in patients who have evidence of PN related to IGT (IGT-PN). We evaluated patients with IGT-PN on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests as well as a new test of trunk position sense and balance impairment, trunk repositioning errors (TREs). Eight participants aged 50-72 years with IGT-PN, and eight age- and gender-matched controls underwent balance, mobility and trunk repositioning accuracy tests at a university neurology clinic and mobility research laboratory. Compared to controls, IGT-PN participants had as much as twice the magnitude of TREs and stood approximately half as long on the single leg balance test. People with IGT-PN exhibit deficits in standing balance and trunk position sense. Furthermore, there was a significant association between performance on commonly-used clinical balance and mobility tests, and electrophysiological and clinical measures of neuropathy in IGT-PN participants. Because IGT-related neuropathy represents the earliest stage of diabetic neuropathy, deficits in IGT-PN participants highlight the importance of early screening in the dysglycemic process for neuropathy and associated balance deficits.

  4. Associations of Mindfulness with Glucose Regulation and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Britton, Willoughby B.; Gutman, Roee; Eaton, Charles B.; Buka, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether dispositional mindfulness is associated with glucose regulation and type 2 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N = 399) were from the New England Family Study, a prospective birth cohort, with median age 47 years. Dispositional mindfulness was assessed using the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS). Type 2 diabetes and “normal plasma glucose” were defined using American Diabetes Association criteria. Results Multivariable-adjusted regression analyses demonstrated that participants with high versus low MAAS scores were significantly more likely to have normal plasma glucose levels (prevalence ratio = 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08,1.87)), and were not significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (prevalence ratio = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.38,1.79), adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes and childhood socioeconomic status. Mediation analyses provided evidence of mediation via obesity and sense of control, where indirect effects were prevalence ratios (95% CI) of 1.03 (1.00,1.10) and 1.08 (1.00,1.21), respectively. Conclusions Dispositional mindfulness may be associated with better glucose regulation, in part because of a lower likelihood of obesity and greater sense of control among participants with higher levels of mindfulness. These findings need to be replicated by prospective studies to establish causality and to evaluate potential implications for mindfulness-based interventions to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26931758

  5. Rpl13a small nucleolar RNAs regulate systemic glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiyeon; Harris, Alexis N.; Holley, Christopher L.; Mahadevan, Jana; Pyles, Kelly D.; Lavagnino, Zeno; Scherrer, David E.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sidhu, Rohini; Zhang, Jessie; Huang, Stanley Ching-Cheng; Piston, David W.; Remedi, Maria S.; Urano, Fumihiko; Ory, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that form ribonucleoproteins to guide covalent modifications of ribosomal and small nuclear RNAs in the nucleus. Recent studies have also uncovered additional non-canonical roles for snoRNAs. However, the physiological contributions of these small RNAs are largely unknown. Here, we selectively deleted four snoRNAs encoded within the introns of the ribosomal protein L13a (Rpl13a) locus in a mouse model. Loss of Rpl13a snoRNAs altered mitochondrial metabolism and lowered reactive oxygen species tone, leading to increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islets and enhanced systemic glucose tolerance. Islets from mice lacking Rpl13a snoRNAs demonstrated blunted oxidative stress responses. Furthermore, these mice were protected against diabetogenic stimuli that cause oxidative stress damage to islets. Our study illuminates a previously unrecognized role for snoRNAs in metabolic regulation. PMID:27820699

  6. Regulation of Blood Glucose by Hypothalamic Pyruvate Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Tony K. T.; Gutierrez-Juarez, Roger; Pocai, Alessandro; Rossetti, Luciano

    2005-08-01

    The brain keenly depends on glucose for energy, and mammalians have redundant systems to control glucose production. An increase in circulating glucose inhibits glucose production in the liver, but this negative feedback is impaired in type 2 diabetes. Here we report that a primary increase in hypothalamic glucose levels lowers blood glucose through inhibition of glucose production in rats. The effect of glucose requires its conversion to lactate followed by stimulation of pyruvate metabolism, which leads to activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels. Thus, interventions designed to enhance the hypothalamic sensing of glucose may improve glucose homeostasis in diabetes.

  7. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D

    2016-03-15

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals.

  8. Leptin signaling regulates glucose homeostasis, but not adipostasis, in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Maximilian; Page-McCaw, Patrick S.; Chen, Wenbiao; Cone, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is the primary adipostatic factor in mammals. Produced largely by adipocytes in proportion to total adipose mass, the hormone informs the brain regarding total energy stored as triglycerides in fat cells. The hormone acts on multiple circuits in the brain to regulate food intake, autonomic outflow, and endocrine function to maintain energy balance. In addition to regulating adipose mass, mammalian leptin also plays a role in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and as a gating factor in reproductive competence. Leptin-deficient mice and people exhibit early onset profound hyperphagia and obesity, diabetes, and infertility. Although leptin and the leptin receptor are found in fish, the hormone is not expressed in adipose tissue, but is found in liver and other tissues. Here, we show that adult zebrafish lacking a functional leptin receptor do not exhibit hyperphagia or increased adiposity, and exhibit normal fertility. However, leptin receptor-deficient larvae have increased numbers of β-cells and increased levels of insulin mRNA. Furthermore, larval zebrafish have been shown to exhibit β-cell hyperplasia in response to high fat feeding or peripheral insulin resistance, and we show here that leptin receptor is required for this response. Adult zebrafish also have increased levels of insulin mRNA and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Thus, a role for leptin in the regulation of β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis appears to be conserved across vertebrates, whereas its role as an adipostatic factor is likely to be a secondary role acquired during the evolution of mammals. PMID:26903647

  9. Adipocytes as regulators of energy balance and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Evan D.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Adipocytes have been studied with increasing intensity as a result of the emergence of obesity as a serious public health problem and the realization that adipose tissue serves as an integrator of various physiological pathways. In particular, their role in calorie storage makes adipocytes well suited to the regulation of energy balance. Adipose tissue also serves as a crucial integrator of glucose homeostasis. Knowledge of adipocyte biology is therefore crucial for understanding the pathophysiological basis of obesity and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the rational manipulation of adipose physiology is a promising avenue for therapy of these conditions. PMID:17167472

  10. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  11. Amantadine reduces glucagon and enhances insulin secretion throughout the oral glucose tolerance test: central plus peripheral nervous system mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Lechin, Marcel E; Baez, Scarlet

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the trial was to examine the effects of amantadine, a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) plus insulin, glucagon and neurotransmitters circulating levels. Previous findings showed that hyperinsulinism and type 2 diabetes are positively associated with neural sympathetic and adrenal sympathetic activities, respectively. These peripheral sympathetic branches depend on the pontine (A5-noradrenergic) and the rostral ventrolateral (C1-adrenergic) medullary nuclei. They are excited by glutamate axons which act at NMDA postsynaptic receptors. Research design and methods One OGTT plus placebo and one OGTT plus oral amantadine test were carried out two weeks apart in 15 caucasic normal voluntary humans. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, plasma-free serotonin, platelet serotonin, glucose, glucagon, and insulin were measured throughout the 180-minute testing period. Results Maximal reductions of plasma glucose and glucagon plus exacerbated insulin rises were significantly greater throughout the oral glucose plus amantadine test than those registered throughout the oral glucose plus placebo challenge. The above findings were paralleled by greater than normal noradrenaline/adrenaline plasma ratio increases. In addition, maximal reductions of the platelet serotonin and plasma serotonin circulating values contrasted with the normal rises of these parameters, always registered during the glucose load plus placebo challenge. Conclusion This study supports the theory that amantadine might be a powerful antidiabetic tool and could be added to the therapeutic arsenal against type 2 diabetes. PMID:21437134

  12. Chromogranin A Regulation of Obesity and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K.; Mahata, Sushil K.

    2017-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a prohormone and granulogenic factor in endocrine and neuroendocrine tissues, as well as in neurons, and has a regulated secretory pathway. The intracellular functions of CgA include the initiation and regulation of dense-core granule biogenesis and sequestration of hormones in neuroendocrine cells. This protein is co-stored and co-released with secreted hormones. The extracellular functions of CgA include the generation of bioactive peptides, such as pancreastatin (PST), vasostatin, WE14, catestatin (CST), and serpinin. CgA knockout mice (Chga-KO) display: (i) hypertension with increased plasma catecholamines, (ii) obesity, (iii) improved hepatic insulin sensitivity, and (iv) muscle insulin resistance. These findings suggest that individual CgA-derived peptides may regulate different physiological functions. Indeed, additional studies have revealed that the pro-inflammatory PST influences insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, whereas CST alleviates adiposity and hypertension. This review will focus on the different metabolic roles of PST and CST peptides in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant models, and their potential use as therapeutic targets. PMID:28228748

  13. Dynamin 2 regulates biphasic insulin secretion and plasma glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Ji, Chen; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H.; Lou, Xuelin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in insulin granule exocytosis and endocytosis are paramount to pancreatic β cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Here, using temporally controlled gene ablation specifically in β cells in mice, we identified an essential role of dynamin 2 GTPase in preserving normal biphasic insulin secretion and blood glucose homeostasis. Dynamin 2 deletion in β cells caused glucose intolerance and substantial reduction of the second phase of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS); however, mutant β cells still maintained abundant insulin granules, with no signs of cell surface expansion. Compared with control β cells, real-time capacitance measurements demonstrated that exocytosis-endocytosis coupling was less efficient but not abolished; clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) was severely impaired at the step of membrane fission, which resulted in accumulation of clathrin-coated endocytic intermediates on the plasma membrane. Moreover, dynamin 2 ablation in β cells led to striking reorganization and enhancement of actin filaments, and insulin granule recruitment and mobilization were impaired at the later stage of GSIS. Together, our results demonstrate that dynamin 2 regulates insulin secretory capacity and dynamics in vivo through a mechanism depending on CME and F-actin remodeling. Moreover, this study indicates a potential pathophysiological link between endocytosis and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26413867

  14. Daily rhythms in glucose metabolism: suprachiasmatic nucleus output to peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, S E

    2003-03-01

    The body has developed several control mechanisms to maintain plasma glucose concentrations within strict boundaries. Within those physiological boundaries, a clear daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations is present; this rhythm depends on the biological clock, which is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and is independent of the daily rhythm in food intake. Interestingly, there is also a daily rhythm in glucose uptake, which also depends on the SCN and follows the same pattern as the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations; both rise before the onset of activity. Thus, the SCN prepares the individual for the upcoming activity period in two different ways: by increasing plasma glucose concentrations and by facilitating tissue glucose uptake. In addition to this anticipation of glucose metabolism to expected glucose demands, the SCN also influences, depending on the time of the day, the responses of pancreas and liver to abrupt glucose changes (such as a glucose rise after a meal or hypoglycaemia). This review presents the view that the SCN uses different routes to (i) maintain daily glucose balance and (ii) set the level of the endocrine response to abrupt blood glucose changes.

  15. Regulation of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism by Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Won; Wei, Jie; Cohen, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP, a.k.a. StARD2) binds phosphatidylcholines and catalyzes their intermembrane transfer and exchange in vitro. The structure of PC-TP comprises a hydrophobic pocket and a well-defined head-group binding site, and its gene expression is regulated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α. Recent studies have revealed key regulatory roles for PC-TP in lipid and glucose metabolism. Notably, Pctp−/− mice are sensitized to insulin action and exhibit more efficient brown fat-mediated thermogenesis. PC-TP appears to limit access of fatty acids to mitochondria by stimulating the activity of thioesterase superfamily member 2, a newly characterized long-chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesterase. Because PC-TP discriminates among phosphatidylcholines within lipid bilayers, it may function as a sensor that links metabolic regulation to membrane composition. PMID:20338778

  16. Peripheral and spinal GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Reichl, Sylvia; Augustin, Mirjam; Zahn, Peter K; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of spinal GABAergic inhibition is demonstrated to contribute to pathologic chronic pain states. We investigated spinal and peripheral GABAergic regulation of incisional pain in rats. We found that intrathecal but not peripheral administration of muscimol (GABA-A receptor agonist) and baclofen (GABA-B receptor agonist) reduced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia after plantar incision in rats. Nonevoked pain behavior after incision was unaffected by these agonists. Similarly, nociception in unincised rats was not reduced by the same dose of agonists. Thus, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are involved in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia (but not nonevoked pain). Intrathecal and systemic application of L-838,417, a subtype-selective benzodiazepine site agonist (α2, α3, α5), reduced mechanical and heat hyperalgesia after incision, indicating a role of these subunits in mediating incision-induced hyperalgesia. Interestingly, the effects of all agonists were more intense and prolonged on the day after surgery than on the day of incision. Similarly, spinally administered GABA-A and GABA-B antagonists increased pain behavior, again with a greater effect 1 day after incision. One possible explanation for this finding might be that an incision modulates GABA-mediated inhibition 1 day after incision. However, expression of GABA-A receptor subunits α2 and α3 and GABA-B receptor subunits within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord were unchanged after incision, indicating that receptor expression cannot explain a possible modulation of GABAergic inhibition after incision. Thus, other mechanisms need to be considered. In conclusion, GABA-A and GABA-B receptors are promising targets for postoperative, incisional pain in humans.

  17. Loss of melatonin signalling and its impact on circadian rhythms in mouse organs regulating blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Gross, Elena; Labucay, Karin; Wolgast, Sabine; Peschke, Elmar

    2009-03-15

    The transmission of circadian rhythms is mediated by specific promoter sequences binding a particular circadian clock factor. The pineal hormone melatonin acts via G-protein-coupled receptors to synchronise these clock-generated circadian rhythms. The study was aimed to elucidate the possible role of melatonin as a zeitgeber for peripheral clocks in pancreas and liver. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) provided evidence of the simultaneous expression of the melatonin receptors MT(1) and MT(2) in mouse pancreas, liver and hypothalamus. Melatonin receptor knockout mice were analysed with respect to the clock gene- or clock-output transcripts PER1, DBP and RevErbalpha in pancreas and liver, and both the occurrence of phase shifts and amplitude changes were detected. Circadian PER1 protein expression was found to be retained in melatonin receptor double knockout mice with an increased amplitude as measured by semiquantitative Western blot analysis. Moreover, an impact of melatonin receptor deficiency on insulin transcripts, and altered regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis were monitored in the knockout animals. Insulin secretion from isolated islets of melatonin receptor MT(1), MT(2) or MT(1) and MT(2) double melatonin receptor-knockout animals was found to be increased relative to the wild type. These data support the idea that melatonin synchronises the functions of the major organs involved in blood glucose regulation and negatively acts on the insulin secretion.

  18. MKR mice have increased dynamic glucose disposal despite metabolic inflexibility, and hepatic and peripheral insulin insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Vaitheesvaran, B.; LeRoith, D.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Recent work has shown that there can be significant differences when glucose disposal is assessed for high-fat induced insulin resistance by static clamp methods vs dynamic assessment during a stable isotope i.p. glucose tolerance test. MKR mice, though lean, have severe insulin resistance and decreased muscle fatty acid oxidation. Our goal was to assess dynamic vs static glucose disposal in MKR mice, and to correlate glucose disposal and muscle–adipose–liver flux interactions with metabolic flexibility (indirect calorimetry) and muscle characteristics. Methods Stable isotope flux phenotyping was performed using [6,6-2H2]glucose, [U-13C6]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Muscle triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) content was assessed by thin layer chromatography, and histological determination of fibre type and cytochrome c activity performed. Metabolic flexibility was assessed by indirect calorimetry. Results Indirect calorimetry showed that MKR mice used more glucose than FVB/N mice during fasting (respiratory exchange ratio [RER] 0.88 vs 0.77, respectively). Compared with FVB/N mice, MKR mice had faster dynamic glucose disposal, despite increased whole-muscle DAG and TAG, and similar hepatic glucose production with higher fasting insulin and unchanged basal glucose. Fed MKR muscle had more glycogen, and increased levels of GLUT1 and GLUT4 than FVB/N muscle. Histology indicated that MKR soleus had mildly decreased cytochrome c activity overall and more type II (glycolytic) fibres compared with that in FVB/N mice. Conclusions/interpretation MKR muscle adapts to using glucose, with more type II fibres present in red muscle. Fasting RER is elevated and glucose disposal during an i.p. glucose tolerance test is accelerated despite increased muscle DAG and TAG. Metabolic inflexibility may result from the compensatory use of fuel that can be best utilised for energy requirements; static vs dynamic glucose disposal assessments may measure

  19. Sex-related differences in peripheral glucose metabolism in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Paula, F J; Pimenta, W P; Saad, M J; Paccola, G M; Piccinato, C E; Foss, M C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic response of muscle tissue to glucose ingestion was studied in 10 normal men (M) and women (F) by using the forearm balance technique and indirect calorimetry simultaneously. During the 3 hours after a 75 g--oral glucose load, glucose uptake per unit muscle mass was significantly higher in women than in men, F = 187.3 +/- 26.9 vs M = 116.7 +/- 9.5 mg/100 g forearm muscle (P less than 0.05). A significant difference in muscle glucose fate was also observed since the amount of glucose utilized through a nonoxidative pathway was significantly higher in women, F = 84.5 +/- 2.6% (161.8 +/- 27.3 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs M = 75.3 +/- 2.2% (87.2 +/- 8.6 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05), whereas the amount of glucose oxidized in relation to glucose uptake was significantly higher in men, M = 24.7 +/- 2.2% (28.2 +/- 3.2 mg/100 g forearm muscle) vs F = 15.5 +/- 2.6% (27.8 +/- 5.4 mg/100 g forearm muscle) (P less than 0.05). No significant differences in insulin response to glucose ingestion were detected between groups. The women showed greater suppression of serum free fatty acids (FFA) levels in relation to basal levels than men. We conclude that: 1) after ingesting 75 g glucose, normal women showed greater glucose uptake per unit muscle mass than normal men, 2) for 3 hours after the ingestion of 75 g glucose, the predominant tendency toward utilizing glucose by a nonoxidative pathway is more marked in normal women than in normal men, and 3) the higher glucose uptake per unit muscle mass in the female group in the presence of an insulin response not significantly different from that of the male group suggests that muscle insulin sensitivity is greater in normal women.

  20. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  1. Glucose Regulation and Cognitive Function after Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Galioto, Rachel; Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is associated with cognitive impairment and bariatric surgery has been shown to improve cognitive functioning. Rapid improvements in glycemic control are common after bariatric surgery and likely contribute to these cognitive gains. We examined whether improvements in glucose regulation are associated with better cognitive function following bariatric surgery. Method A total of 85 adult bariatric surgery patients underwent computerized cognitive testing and fasting blood draw for glucose, insulin, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at baseline and 12 month post-operatively. Results Significant improvements in both cognitive function and glycemic control were observed among patients. After controlling for and baseline factors, 12-month homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance HOMA-IR predicted 12-month digits backward (β = −.253, p < .05), switching of attention- A (β = .156, p < .05), and switching of attention-B (β = −.181, p < .05). Specifically, as HOMA-IR decreased over time, working memory, psychomotor speed, and cognitive flexibility improved. Decreases in HbA1c were not associated with post-operative cognitive improvements. After controlling for baseline cognitive test performance, changes in BMI were also not associated with 12-month cognitive function. Conclusions Small effects of improved glycemic control on improved aspects of attention and executive function were observed following bariatric surgery among severely obese individuals. Future research is needed to identify the underlying mechanisms for the neurocognitive benefits of these procedures. PMID:25875124

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the peripheral nervous system in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Joyce Tang, W; Chen, Jerry S; Zeller, Robert W

    2013-06-15

    The formation of the sensory organs and cells that make up the peripheral nervous system (PNS) relies on the activity of transcription factors encoded by proneural genes (PNGs). Although PNGs have been identified in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, the complexity of their interactions has complicated efforts to understand their function in the context of their underlying regulatory networks. To gain insight into the regulatory network of PNG activity in chordates, we investigated the roles played by PNG homologs in regulating PNS development of the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis. We discovered that in Ciona, MyT1, Pou4, Atonal, and NeuroD-like are expressed in a sequential regulatory cascade in the developing epidermal sensory neurons (ESNs) of the PNS and act downstream of Notch signaling, which negatively regulates these genes and the number of ESNs along the tail midlines. Transgenic embryos mis-expressing any of these proneural genes in the epidermis produced ectopic midline ESNs. In transgenic embryos mis-expressing Pou4, and MyT1 to a lesser extent, numerous ESNs were produced outside of the embryonic midlines. In addition we found that the microRNA miR-124, which inhibits Notch signaling in ESNs, is activated downstream of all the proneural factors we tested, suggesting that these genes operate collectively in a regulatory network. Interestingly, these factors are encoded by the same genes that have recently been demonstrated to convert fibroblasts into neurons. Our findings suggest the ascidian PNS can serve as an in vivo model to study the underlying regulatory mechanisms that enable the conversion of cells into sensory neurons.

  3. Diauxic Growth of Azotobacter vinelandii on Galactose and Glucose: Regulation of Glucose Transport by Another Hexose.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Y; Pei, H; Bancroft, K; Childers, G W

    1995-02-01

    The growth curve of Azotobacter vinelandii was biphasic when the organism was grown in a medium containing a mixture of galactose and glucose. Galactose was the primary carbon source; glucose was also consumed, but the rate at which it was consumed was lower than the rate at which galactose was consumed during the first phase of growth. Metabolic pathways for both sugars were induced. Cell cultures exhibited a second lag period as galactose was depleted. The length of this lag phase varied from 2 to 10 h depending on the pregrowth history of the cells. The second log growth phase occurred at the expense of the remaining glucose in the medium and was accompanied by induction of the high-maximum rate of metabolism glucose-induced glucose permease and increases in the levels of glucose metabolic enzymes. The second lag phase of diauxie may have been due to the time required for induction of the glucose-induced glucose permease.

  4. Dietary glucose regulates yeast consumption in adult Drosophila males

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Sébastien; Witzgall, Peter; Olsson, Marie; Becher, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The adjustment of feeding behavior in response to hunger and satiety contributes to homeostatic regulation in animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds on yeasts growing on overripe fruit, providing nutrients required for adult survival, reproduction and larval growth. Here, we present data on how the nutritional value of food affects subsequent yeast consumption in Drosophila adult males. After a period of starvation, flies showed intensive yeast consumption. In comparison, flies stopped feeding after having access to a nutritive cornmeal diet. Interestingly, dietary glucose was equally efficient as the complex cornmeal diet. In contrast, flies fed with sucralose, a non-metabolizable sweetener, behaved as if they were starved. The adipokinetic hormone and insulin-like peptides regulate metabolic processes in insects. We did not find any effect of the adipokinetic hormone pathway on this modulation. Instead, the insulin pathway was involved in these changes. Flies lacking the insulin receptor (InR) did not respond to nutrient deprivation by increasing yeast consumption. Together these results show the importance of insulin in the regulation of yeast consumption in response to starvation in adult D. melanogaster males. PMID:25566097

  5. A Set of Activators and Repressors Control Peripheral Glucose Pathways in Pseudomonas putida To Yield a Common Central Intermediate▿

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Teresa; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 channels glucose to the central Entner-Doudoroff intermediate 6-phosphogluconate through three convergent pathways. The genes for these convergent pathways are clustered in three independent regions on the host chromosome. A number of monocistronic units and operons coexist within each of these clusters, favoring coexpression of catabolic enzymes and transport systems. Expression of the three pathways is mediated by three transcriptional repressors, HexR, GnuR, and PtxS, and by a positive transcriptional regulator, GltR-2. In this study, we generated mutants in each of the regulators and carried out transcriptional assays using microarrays and transcriptional fusions. These studies revealed that HexR controls the genes that encode glucokinase/glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase that yield 6-phosphogluconate; the genes for the Entner-Doudoroff enzymes that yield glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate; and gap-1, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. GltR-2 is the transcriptional regulator that controls specific porins for the entry of glucose into the periplasmic space, as well as the gtsABCD operon for glucose transport through the inner membrane. GnuR is the repressor of gluconate transport and gluconokinase responsible for the conversion of gluconate into 6-phosphogluconate. PtxS, however, controls the enzymes for oxidation of gluconate to 2-ketogluconate, its transport and metabolism, and a set of genes unrelated to glucose metabolism. PMID:18245293

  6. Phase modulation of insulin pulses enhances glucose regulation and enables inter-islet synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Boah; Song, Taegeun; Lee, Kayoung; Kim, Jaeyoon; Han, Seungmin; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho; Jo, Junghyo

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is secreted in a pulsatile manner from multiple micro-organs called the islets of Langerhans. The amplitude and phase (shape) of insulin secretion are modulated by numerous factors including glucose. The role of phase modulation in glucose homeostasis is not well understood compared to the obvious contribution of amplitude modulation. In the present study, we measured Ca2+ oscillations in islets as a proxy for insulin pulses, and we observed their frequency and shape changes under constant/alternating glucose stimuli. Here we asked how the phase modulation of insulin pulses contributes to glucose regulation. To directly answer this question, we developed a phenomenological oscillator model that drastically simplifies insulin secretion, but precisely incorporates the observed phase modulation of insulin pulses in response to glucose stimuli. Then, we mathematically modeled how insulin pulses regulate the glucose concentration in the body. The model of insulin oscillation and glucose regulation describes the glucose-insulin feedback loop. The data-based model demonstrates that the existence of phase modulation narrows the range within which the glucose concentration is maintained through the suppression/enhancement of insulin secretion in conjunction with the amplitude modulation of this secretion. The phase modulation is the response of islets to glucose perturbations. When multiple islets are exposed to the same glucose stimuli, they can be entrained to generate synchronous insulin pulses. Thus, we conclude that the phase modulation of insulin pulses is essential for glucose regulation and inter-islet synchronization. PMID:28235104

  7. The Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Regulates Endogenous Glucose Production and Muscle Glucose Uptake Independent of Its Incretin Action

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Julio E.; Bracy, Deanna P.; James, Freyja D.; Julien, Brianna M.; Wasserman, David H.; Drucker, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) diminishes postmeal glucose excursions by enhancing insulin secretion via activation of the β-cell GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r). GLP-1 may also control glucose levels through mechanisms that are independent of this incretin effect. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin clamp) and exercise were used to examine the incretin-independent glucoregulatory properties of the Glp1r because both perturbations stimulate glucose flux independent of insulin secretion. Chow-fed mice with a functional disruption of the Glp1r (Glp1r−/−) were compared with wild-type littermates (Glp1r+/+). Studies were performed on 5-h-fasted mice implanted with arterial and venous catheters for sampling and infusions, respectively. During insulin clamps, [3-3H]glucose and 2[14C]deoxyglucose were used to determine whole-body glucose turnover and glucose metabolic index (Rg), an indicator of glucose uptake. Rg in sedentary and treadmill exercised mice was determined using 2[3H]deoxyglucose. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited increased glucose disappearance, muscle Rg, and muscle glycogen levels during insulin clamps. This was not associated with enhanced muscle insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice exhibited impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production and hepatic glycogen accumulation during insulin clamps. This was associated with impaired liver insulin signaling. Glp1r−/− mice became significantly hyperglycemic during exercise. Muscle Rg was normal in exercised Glp1r−/− mice, suggesting that hyperglycemia resulted from an added drive to stimulate glucose production. Muscle AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in exercised Glp1r−/− mice. This was associated with increased relative exercise intensity and decreased exercise endurance. In conclusion, these results show that the endogenous Glp1r regulates hepatic and muscle glucose flux independent of its ability to enhance insulin secretion. PMID:19008308

  8. Brain areas and pathways in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; Serlie, Mireille J; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is the most important source of fuel for the brain and its concentration must be kept within strict boundaries to ensure the organism's optimal fitness. To maintain glucose homeostasis, an optimal balance between glucose uptake and glucose output is required. Besides managing acute changes in plasma glucose concentrations, the brain controls a daily rhythm in glucose concentrations. The various nuclei within the hypothalamus that are involved in the control of both these processes are well known. However, novel studies indicate an additional role for brain areas that are originally appreciated in other processes than glucose metabolism. Therefore, besides the classic hypothalamic pathways, we will review cortico-limbic brain areas and their role in glucose metabolism.

  9. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-11-15

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed 'artificial sweeteners'. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake.

  10. Glucose utilization rates regulate intake levels of artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Han, Wenfei; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that animals including humans attribute greater reinforcing value to glucose-containing sugars compared to their non-caloric counterparts, generally termed ‘artificial sweeteners’. However, much remains to be determined regarding the physiological signals and brain systems mediating the attribution of greater reinforcing value to sweet solutions that contain glucose. Here we show that disruption of glucose utilization in mice produces an enduring inhibitory effect on artificial sweetener intake, an effect that did not depend on sweetness perception or aversion. Indeed, such an effect was not observed in mice presented with a less palatable, yet caloric, glucose solution. Consistently, hungry mice shifted their preferences away from artificial sweeteners and in favour of glucose after experiencing glucose in a hungry state. Glucose intake was found to produce significantly greater levels of dopamine efflux compared to artificial sweetener in dorsal striatum, whereas disrupting glucose oxidation suppressed dorsal striatum dopamine efflux. Conversely, inhibiting striatal dopamine receptor signalling during glucose intake in sweet-naïve animals resulted in reduced, artificial sweetener-like intake of glucose during subsequent gluco-deprivation. Our results demonstrate that glucose oxidation controls intake levels of sweet tastants by modulating extracellular dopamine levels in dorsal striatum, and suggest that glucose utilization is one critical physiological signal involved in the control of goal-directed sweetener intake. PMID:24060992

  11. Evolution of glucose utilization: Glucokinase and glucokinase regulator protein

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David M.; Tan, Huanran

    2014-01-01

    Glucose is an essential nutrient that must be distributed throughout the body to provide energy to sustain physiological functions. Glucose is delivered to distant tissues via be blood stream, and complex systems have evolved to maintain the levels of glucose within a narrow physiological range. Phosphorylation of glucose, by glucokinase, is an essential component of glucose homeostasis, both from the regulatory and metabolic point-of-view. Here we review the evolution of glucose utilization from the perspective of glucokinase. We discuss the origin of glucokinase, its evolution within the hexokinase gene family, and the evolution of its interacting regulatory partner, glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR). Evolution of the structure and sequence of both glucokinase and GCKR have been necessary to optimize glucokinase in its role in glucose metabolism. PMID:24075984

  12. UCP2 regulates mitochondrial fission and ventromedial nucleus control of glucose responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Chitoku; Kim, Jung Dae; Impellizzeri, Daniela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Diano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) plays a critical role in regulating systemic glucose homeostasis. How neurons in this brain area adapt to the changing metabolic environment to regulate circulating glucose levels is ill-defined. Here we show that glucose load results in mitochondrial fission and reduced reactive oxygen species in VMH neurons mediated by dynamin-related peptide 1 (DRP1) under the control of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2). Probed by genetic manipulations and chemical-genetic control of VMH neuronal circuitry, we unmasked that this mitochondrial adaptation determines the size of the pool of glucose-excited neurons in the VMH, and, that this process regulates systemic glucose homoeostasis. Thus, our data unmasked a critical cellular biological process controlled by mitochondrial dynamics in VMH regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26919426

  13. Endogenous Nutritive Support after Traumatic Brain Injury: Peripheral Lactate Production for Glucose Supply via Gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Neil A.; McArthur, David L.; Hovda, David A.; Vespa, Paul; Johnson, Matthew L.; Horning, Michael A.; Brooks, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the hypothesis that nutritive needs of injured brains are supported by large and coordinated increases in lactate shuttling throughout the body. To that end, we used dual isotope tracer ([6,6-2H2]glucose, i.e., D2-glucose, and [3-13C]lactate) techniques involving central venous tracer infusion along with cerebral (arterial [art] and jugular bulb [JB]) blood sampling. Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who had nonpenetrating head injuries (n=12, all male) were entered into the study after consent of patients' legal representatives. Written and informed consent was obtained from healthy controls (n=6, including one female). As in previous investigations, the cerebral metabolic rate (CMR) for glucose was suppressed after TBI. Near normal arterial glucose and lactate levels in patients studied 5.7±2.2 days (range of days 2–10) post-injury, however, belied a 71% increase in systemic lactate production, compared with control, that was largely cleared by greater (hepatic+renal) glucose production. After TBI, gluconeogenesis from lactate clearance accounted for 67.1% of glucose rate of appearance (Ra), which was compared with 15.2% in healthy controls. We conclude that elevations in blood glucose concentration after TBI result from a massive mobilization of lactate from corporeal glycogen reserves. This previously unrecognized mobilization of lactate subserves hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis. As such, a lactate shuttle mechanism indirectly makes substrate available for the body and its essential organs, including the brain, after trauma. In addition, when elevations in arterial lactate concentration occur after TBI, lactate shuttling may provide substrate directly to vital organs of the body, including the injured brain. PMID:25279664

  14. Effect of ghrelin on glucose regulation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvement of glucose metabolism after bariatric surgery appears to be from the composite effect of the alterations in multiple circulating gut hormone concentrations. However, their individual effect on glucose metabolism during different conditions is not clear. The objective of this study was to...

  15. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  16. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  17. Characterization of the developmentally regulated Bacillus subtilis glucose dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, K A; Uratani, B; Chaudhry, G R; Ramaley, R F; Rudikoff, S

    1986-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the structural gene for glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.47) of Bacillus subtilis was determined and comprises 780 base pairs. The subunit molecular weight of glucose dehydrogenase as deduced from the nucleotide sequence is 28,196, which agrees well with the subunit molecular weight of 31,500 as determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequence of the 49 amino acids at the NH2 terminus of glucose dehydrogenase purified from sporulating B. subtilis cells matched the amino acid sequence derived from the DNA sequence. Glucose dehydrogenase was purified from an Escherichia coli strain harboring pEF1, a plasmid that contains the B. subtilis gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase. This enzyme has the identical amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus as the B. subtilis enzyme. A putative ribosome-binding site, 5'-AGGAGG-3', which is complementary to the 3' end of the 16S rRNA of B. subtilis, was found 6 base pairs preceding the translational start codon of the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. No known promoterlike DNA sequences that are recognized by B. subtilis RNA polymerases were present immediately preceding the translational start site of the glucose dehydrogenase structural gene. The glucose dehydrogenase gene was found to be under sporulation control at the trancriptional level. A transcript of 1.6 kilobases hybridized to a DNA fragment within the structural gene of glucose dehydrogenase. This transcript was synthesized 3 h after the cessation of vegetative growth concomitant to the appearance of glucose dehydrogenase. Images PMID:3082854

  18. The laforin-malin complex negatively regulates glycogen synthesis by modulating cellular glucose uptake via glucose transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Sweta; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2012-02-01

    Lafora disease (LD), an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by increased cellular glycogen content and the formation of abnormally branched glycogen inclusions, called Lafora bodies, in the affected tissues, including neurons. Therefore, laforin phosphatase and malin ubiquitin E3 ligase, the two proteins that are defective in LD, are thought to regulate glycogen synthesis through an unknown mechanism, the defects in which are likely to underlie some of the symptoms of LD. We show here that laforin's subcellular localization is dependent on the cellular glycogen content and that the stability of laforin is determined by the cellular ATP level, the activity of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase, and the affinity of malin toward laforin. By using cell and animal models, we further show that the laforin-malin complex regulates cellular glucose uptake by modulating the subcellular localization of glucose transporters; loss of malin or laforin resulted in an increased abundance of glucose transporters in the plasma membrane and therefore excessive glucose uptake. Loss of laforin or malin, however, did not affect glycogen catabolism. Thus, the excessive cellular glucose level appears to be the primary trigger for the abnormally higher levels of cellular glycogen seen in LD.

  19. Blood glucose regulation mechanism in depressive disorder animal model during hyperglycemic states.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Min; Park, Soo-Hyun; Sharma, Naveen; Kim, Sung-Su; Lee, Jae-Ryeong; Jung, Jun-Sub; Suh, Hong-Won

    2016-06-01

    Depression is more common among diabetes people than in the general population. In the present study, blood glucose change in depression animal model was characterized by various types of hyperglycemia models such as d-glucose-fed-, immobilization stress-, and drug-induced hyperglycemia models. First, the ICR mice were enforced into chronic restraint stress for 2h daily for 2 weeks to produce depression animal model. The animals were fed with d-glucose (2g/kg), forced into restraint stress for 30min, or administered with clonidine (5μg/5μl) supraspinally or spinally to produce hyperglycemia. The blood glucose level in depression group was down-regulated compared to that observed in the normal group in d-glucose-fed-, restraint stress-, and clonidine-induced hyperglycemia models. The up-regulated corticosterone level induced by d-glucose feeding or restraint stress was reduced in the depression group while the up-regulation of plasma corticosterone level is further elevated after i.t. or i.c.v. clonidine administration in the depression group. The up-regulated insulin level induced by d-glucose feeding or restraint stress was reduced in the depression group. On the other hand, blood corticosterone level in depression group was up-regulated compared to the normal group after i.t. or i.c.v. clonidine administration. Whereas the insulin level in depression group was not altered when mice were administered clonidine i.t. or i.c.v. Our results suggest that the blood glucose level in depression group is down-regulated compared to the normal group during d-glucose-fed-, immobilization stress-, and clonidine-induced hyperglycemia in mice. The down-regulation of the blood glucose level might be one of the important pathophysiologic changes in depression.

  20. Pharmacodynamics of Glucose Regulation by Methylprednisolone. II. Normal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jin Y.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A physiologic pharmacodynamic model was developed to jointly describe the effects of methylprednisolone (MPL) on adrenal suppression and glycemic control in normal rats. Six groups of animals were given MPL intravenously at 0, 10 and 50 mg/kg, or by subcutaneous 7 day infusion at rates of 0, 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/h. Plasma concentrations of MPL, corticosterone (CST), glucose and insulin were determined at various times up to 72 h after injection and 336 h after infusion. The pharmacokinetics of MPL was described by a two-compartment model. A circadian rhythm for CST was found in untreated rats with a stress-altered baseline caused by handling, which was captured by a circadian harmonic secretion rate with an increasing mesor. All drug treatments caused CST suppression. Injection of MPL caused temporary increases in glucose over 4 h. Insulin secretion was thereby stimulated yielding a later peak around 6 h. In turn, insulin can normalize glucose. However, long-term dosing caused continuous hyperglycemia during and after infusion. Hyperinsulinemia was achieved during infusion, but diminished immediately after dosing despite the high glucose concentration. The effects of CST and MPL on glucose production were described with a competitive stimulation function. A disease progression model incorporating reduced endogenous glucose uptake/utilization was used to describe glucose metabolism under different treatments. The results exemplify the roles of endogenous and exogenous hormones in mediating glucose dynamics. The pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model is valuable for quantitating diabetogenic effects of corticosteroid treatments and provides mechanistic insights into the hormonal control of the metabolic system. PMID:19156669

  1. Glucose level regulation via integral high-order sliding modes.

    PubMed

    Dorel, Lela

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin, or does not properly respond to it. This causes the glucose level in blood to increase. An algorithm based on Integral High-Order Sliding Mode technique is proposed, which keeps the normal blood glucose level automatically releasing insulin into the blood. The system is highly insensitive to inevitable parametric and model uncertainties, measurement noises and small delays.

  2. Glucose regulates enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH in skeletal muscle cells; a novel role for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2010-07-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) is a functionally important metabolite required to support numerous cellular processes. However, despite the identification of numerous NADPH-producing enzymes, the mechanisms underlying how the organellar pools of NADPH are maintained remain elusive. Here, we have identified glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) as an important source of NADPH in mitochondria. Activity analysis, submitochondrial fractionation, fluorescence microscopy, and protease sensitivity assays revealed that G6PDH is localized to the mitochondrial matrix. 6-ANAM, a specific G6PDH inhibitor, depleted mitochondrial NADPH pools and increased oxidative stress revealing the importance of G6PDH in NADPH maintenance. We also show that glucose availability and differences in metabolic state modulate the enzymatic sources of NADPH in mitochondria. Indeed, cells cultured in high glucose (HG) not only adopted a glycolytic phenotype but also relied heavily on matrix-associated G6PDH as a source of NADPH. In contrast, cells exposed to low-glucose (LG) concentrations, which displayed increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial metabolic efficiency, and decreased glycolysis, relied predominantly on isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) as the principal NADPH-producing enzyme in the mitochondria. Culturing glycolytic cells in LG for 48 h decreased G6PDH and increased ICDH protein levels in the mitochondria, further pointing to the regulatory role of glucose. 2-Deoxyglucose treatment also prevented the increase of mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG. The role of glucose in regulating enzymatic sources of mitochondrial NADPH pool maintenance was confirmed using human myotubes from obese adults with a history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (post-T2DM). Myotubes from post-T2DM participants failed to increase mitochondrial G6PDH in response to HG in contrast to mitochondria in myotubes from control participants (non-T2DM). Hence, we not only identified a matrix

  3. A karyopherin alpha2 nuclear transport pathway is regulated by glucose in hepatic and pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Cassany, Aurélia; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Klein, Christophe; Dalet, Véronique; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Leturque, Armelle

    2004-01-01

    We studied the role of the karyopherin alpha2 nuclear import carrier (also known as importin alpha2) in glucose signaling. In mhAT3F hepatoma cells, GFP-karyopherin alpha2 accumulated massively in the cytoplasm within minutes of glucose extracellular addition and returned to the nucleus after glucose removal. In contrast, GFP-karyopherin alpha1 distribution was unaffected regardless of glucose concentration. Glucose increased GFP-karyopherin alpha2 nuclear efflux by a factor 80 and its shuttling by a factor 4. These glucose-induced movements were not due to glycolytic ATP production. The mechanism involved was leptomycin B-insensitive, but phosphatase- and energy-dependent. HepG2 and COS-7 cells displayed no glucose-induced GFP-karyopherin alpha2 movements. In pancreatic MIN-6 cells, the glucose-induced movements of karyopherin alpha2 and the stimulation of glucose-induced gene transcription were simultaneously lost between passages 28 and 33. Thus, extracellular glucose regulates a nuclear transport pathway by increasing the nuclear efflux and shuttling of karyopherin alpha2 in cells in which glucose can stimulate the transcription of sugar-responsive genes.

  4. Separate responses of karyopherins to glucose and amino acid availability regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsiao-Yun; Hopper, Anita K.

    2014-01-01

    The importin-β family members (karyopherins) mediate the majority of nucleocytoplasmic transport. Msn5 and Los1, members of the importin-β family, function in tRNA nuclear export. tRNAs move bidirectionally between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Nuclear tRNA accumulation occurs upon amino acid (aa) or glucose deprivation. To understand the mechanisms regulating tRNA subcellular trafficking, we investigated whether Msn5 and Los1 are regulated in response to nutrient availability. We provide evidence that tRNA subcellular trafficking is regulated by distinct aa-sensitive and glucose-sensitive mechanisms. Subcellular distributions of Msn5 and Los1 are altered upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Redistribution of tRNA exportins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm likely provides one mechanism for tRNA nuclear distribution upon glucose deprivation. We extended our studies to other members of the importin-β family and found that all tested karyopherins invert their subcellular distributions upon glucose deprivation but not aa deprivation. Glucose availability regulates the subcellular distributions of karyopherins likely due to alteration of the RanGTP gradient since glucose deprivation causes redistribution of Ran. Thus nuclear–cytoplasmic distribution of macromolecules is likely generally altered upon glucose deprivation due to collapse of the RanGTP gradient and redistribution of karyopherins between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. PMID:25057022

  5. Regulation of glucose transporters in LLC-PK1 cells: effects of D-glucose and monosaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, T; Isselbacher, K J; Rhoads, D B

    1990-01-01

    Regulation of D-glucose transport in the porcine kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 was examined. To identify the sodium-coupled glucose transporter (SGLT), we cloned and sequenced several partial cDNAs homologous to SGLT1 from rabbit small intestine (M. A. Hediger, M. J. Coady, T. S. Ikeda, and E. M. Wright, Nature (London) 330:379-381, 1987). The extensive homology of the two sequences leads us to suggest that the high-affinity SGLT expressed by LLC-PK1 cells is SGLT1. SGLT1 mRNA levels were highest when the D-glucose concentration in the culture medium was 5 to 10 mM. Addition of D-mannose or D-fructose, but not D-galactose, in the presence of 5 mM D-glucose suppressed SGLT1 mRNA levels. SGLT1 activity, measured by methyl alpha-D-glucopyranoside uptake, paralleled message levels except in cultures containing D-galactose. Therefore, SGLT1 gene expression may respond either to the cellular energy status or to the concentration of a hexose metabolite(s). By isolating several cDNAs homologous to rat GLUT-1, we identified the facilitated glucose transporter in LLC-PK1 cells as the erythroid/brain type GLUT-1. High-stringency hybridization of a single mRNA transcript to the rat GLUT-1 cDNA probe and failure to observe additional transcripts hybridizing either to GLUT-1 or to GLUT-2 probes at low stringency provide evidence that GLUT-1 is the major facilitated glucose transporter in this cell line. LLC-PK1 GLUT-1 mRNAs were highest at medium D-glucose concentrations of less than or equal to 2 mM. D-Fructose, D-mannose, and to a lesser extent D-galactose all suppressed GLUT-1 mRNA levels. Since the pattern of SGLT1 and GLUT-1 expression differed, particularly in low D-glucose or in the presence of D-galactose, we suggest that the two transporters are regulated independently. Images PMID:2247068

  6. Glucagon-like peptide 1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to regulate glucose metabolism and food intake through vagal afferent neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Ronveaux, Charlotte C; Tomé, Daniel; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-04-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested a possible physiologic role for peripheral glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in regulating glucose metabolism and food intake. The likely site of action of GLP-1 is on vagal afferent neurons (VANs). The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the central nervous system and influences feeding behavior. Peripheral GLP-1 acts on VANs to inhibit food intake. The mechanism of the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is unlike other gut-derived receptors; GLP-1Rs change their cellular localization according to feeding status rather than their protein concentrations. It is possible that several gut peptides are involved in mediating GLP-1R translocation. The mechanism of peripheral GLP-1R translocation still needs to be elucidated. We review data supporting the role of peripheral GLP-1 acting on VANs in influencing glucose homeostasis and feeding behavior. We highlight evidence demonstrating that GLP-1 interacts with ghrelin and leptin to induce satiation. Our aim was to understand the mechanism of peripheral GLP-1 in the development of noninvasive antiobesity treatments.

  7. Endospanin1 affects oppositely body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis by differentially regulating central leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vauthier, Virginie; Roujeau, Clara; Chen, Patty; Sarkis, Chamsy; Migrenne, Stéphanie; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Rouillé, Yves; Foretz, Marc; Mallet, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Magnan, Christophe; Jockers, Ralf; Dam, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is a major integration center for energy and glucose homeostasis that responds to leptin. Resistance to leptin in the ARC is an important component of the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Recently, we showed that Endospanin1 (Endo1) is a negative regulator of the leptin receptor (OBR) that interacts with OBR and retains the receptor inside the cell, leading to a decreased activation of the anorectic STAT3 pathway. Endo1 is up-regulated in the ARC of high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and its silencing in the ARC of lean and obese mice prevents and reverses the development of obesity.

  8. Role of multifaceted regulators in cancer glucose metabolism and their clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Luqing; Mao, Yitao; Zhao, Yuelong; Cao, Ya; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glucose metabolism, “aerobic glycolysis” or “Warburg effect”, is a hallmark of human cancers. There is a cluster of “multifaceted regulators”, which plays a pivotal role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. They can not only modulate the activities of specific enzymes, but also act as transcriptional activators to regulate the expression of metabolism related genes. Additionally, they can crosstalk with other key factors involved in glucose metabolism and work together to initiate multiple oncogenic processes. These “multifaceted regulators”, especially p53, HIF-1, TIGAR and microRNA, will be focused in this review. And we will comprehensively illustrate their regulatory effects on cancer glucose metabolism, and further elaborate on their clinical significance. In-depth elucidation the role of “multifaceted regulators” in cancer glucose metabolism will provide us novel insights in cancer research field and offer promising therapeutic targets for anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26934324

  9. Regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis: effect of glucose on activities of various glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, R L; Lewis, D F

    1984-01-01

    Catabolism of carbohydrates has been implicated in the regulation of aflatoxin synthesis. To characterize this effect further, the activities of various enzymes associated with glucose catabolism were determined in Aspergillus parasiticus organisms that were initially cultured in peptone-mineral salts medium and then transferred to glucose-mineral salts and peptone-mineral salts media. After an initial increase in activity, the levels of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, mannitol dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase were lowered in the presence of glucose. Phosphofructokinase activity was greater in the peptone-grown mycelium, but fructose diphosphatase was largely unaffected by carbon source. Likewise, carbon source had relatively little effect on the activities of pyruvate kinase, malic enzyme, isocitrate-NADP dehydrogenase, and isocitrate-NAD dehydrogenase. The results suggest that glucose may, in part, regulate aflatoxin synthesis via a carbon catabolite repression of NADPH-generating and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. PMID:6091545

  10. Glucose regulates diacylglycerol intracellular levels and protein kinase C activity by modulating diacylglycerol kinase subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Paturzo, Flora; Teperino, Raffaele; Sakane, Fumio; Fiory, Francesca; Oriente, Francesco; Ungaro, Paola; Valentino, Rossella; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2007-11-02

    Although chronic hyperglycemia reduces insulin sensitivity and leads to impaired glucose utilization, short term exposure to high glucose causes cellular responses positively regulating its own metabolism. We show that exposure of L6 myotubes overexpressing human insulin receptors to 25 mm glucose for 5 min decreased the intracellular levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). This was paralleled by transient activation of diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) and of insulin receptor signaling. Following 30-min exposure, however, both DAG levels and DGK activity returned close to basal levels. Moreover, the acute effect of glucose on DAG removal was inhibited by >85% by the DGK inhibitor R59949. DGK inhibition was also accompanied by increased protein kinase C-alpha (PKCalpha) activity, reduced glucose-induced insulin receptor activation, and GLUT4 translocation. Glucose exposure transiently redistributed DGK isoforms alpha and delta, from the prevalent cytosolic localization to the plasma membrane fraction. However, antisense silencing of DGKdelta, but not of DGKalpha expression, was sufficient to prevent the effect of high glucose on PKCalpha activity, insulin receptor signaling, and glucose uptake. Thus, the short term exposure of skeletal muscle cells to glucose causes a rapid induction of DGK, followed by a reduction of PKCalpha activity and transactivation of the insulin receptor signaling. The latter may mediate, at least in part, glucose induction of its own metabolism.

  11. Snf1-like protein kinase Ssp2 regulates glucose derepression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Fujita, Yasuko; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-02-01

    The function of two fission yeast genes, SPCC74.03c/ssp2(+) and SPAC23H4.02/ppk9(+), encoding an Snf1-like protein kinase were investigated. Deletion of ssp2(+) caused a partial defect in glucose derepression of inv1(+), fbp1(+), and gld1(+) and in assimilation of sucrose and glycerol, while a mutation in ppk9(+) had no apparent effect. Scr1, a transcription factor involved in glucose repression, localized to the nucleus under glucose-rich conditions and to the cytoplasm during glucose starvation in wild-type cells. In contrast, in the ssp2Δ mutant, Scr1 localized to the nucleus in cells grown in glucose-rich medium as well as in glucose-starved cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that Ssp2 is required for the phosphorylation of Scr1 upon glucose deprivation. Mutation of five putative Ssp2 recognition sites in Scr1 prevented glucose derepression of invertase in glucose-starved cells. These results indicate that Ssp2 regulates phosphorylation and subcellular localization of Scr1 in response to glucose.

  12. Adipocyte glucose transport regulation by eicosanoid precursors and inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Glucose uptake and free fatty acid release by adipocytes are increased by catecholamines. The mechanism of the stimulatory action of catecholamines on glucose uptake may be via eicosanoid production from release fatty acids. Rats were fed iso-nutrient diets with high or low safflower oil. After one month, 5 rats per diet group were fed diets with aspirin or without aspirin for 2 days. Isolated adipocytes from epididymal fat pads were incubated at 37/sup 0/C, gassed with 95% O/sub 2/-5% CO/sub 2/ in KRB buffer with 3% bovine serum albumin and with or without eicosanoid modifiers; a stimulator (10/sup -5/ M norepinephrine, N), or inhibitors (167 ..mu..l of antiserum to prostaglandin E (AntiE) per 1600 ..mu..l or 23mM Asp), or combinations of these. At 2-, 5-, and 10-min incubation, samples of incubation mixtures were taken to measure 2-deoxy glucose transport using /sup 3/H-2-deoxy glucose, /sup 14/C-inulin, and liquid scintillation counter.

  13. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  14. Yeast HXK2 gene reverts glucose regulation mutation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Edmundo A; Fernández, Francisco J; Fierro, Francisco; Mejía, Armando; Marcos, Ana T; Martín, Juan F; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mutant Penicillium chrysogenum strain dogR5, derived from strain AS-P-78, does not respond to glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, and is partially deficient in D-glucose phosphorilating activity. We have transformed strain dogR5 with the (hexokinase) hxk2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants recovered glucose control of penicillin biosynthesis in different degrees, and acquired a hexokinase (fructose phosphorylating) activity absent in strains AS- P-78 and dogR5. Interestingly, they also recovered glucose regulation of β-galactosidase. On the other hand, glucokinase activity was affected in different ways in the transformants; one of which showed a lower activity than the parental dogR5, but normal glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis. Our results show that Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 and dogR5 strains lack hexokinase, and suggest that an enzyme with glucokinase activity is involved in glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, thus signaling glucose in both primary and secondary metabolism; however, catalytic and signaling activities seem to be independent.

  15. Yeast HXK2 gene reverts glucose regulation mutation of penicillin biosynthesis in P. chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Edmundo A.; Fernández, Francisco J.; Fierro, Francisco; Mejía, Armando; Marcos, Ana T.; Martín, Juan F.; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mutant Penicillium chrysogenum strain dogR5, derived from strain AS-P-78, does not respond to glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, and is partially deficient in D-glucose phosphorilating activity. We have transformed strain dogR5 with the (hexokinase) hxk2 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants recovered glucose control of penicillin biosynthesis in different degrees, and acquired a hexokinase (fructose phosphorylating) activity absent in strains AS- P-78 and dogR5. Interestingly, they also recovered glucose regulation of β-galactosidase. On the other hand, glucokinase activity was affected in different ways in the transformants; one of which showed a lower activity than the parental dogR5, but normal glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis. Our results show that Penicillium chrysogenum AS-P-78 and dogR5 strains lack hexokinase, and suggest that an enzyme with glucokinase activity is involved in glucose regulation of penicillin biosynthesis and β-galactosidase, thus signaling glucose in both primary and secondary metabolism; however, catalytic and signaling activities seem to be independent. PMID:25477921

  16. Epigenomic Regulation of Schwann Cell Reprogramming in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ki H.; Hung, Holly A.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and dynamic transcriptional changes of Schwann cells in response to injury are critical to peripheral nerve repair, yet the epigenomic reprograming that leads to the induction of injury-activated genes has not been characterized. Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27me3), which produces a transcriptionally repressive chromatin environment. We find that many promoters and/or gene bodies of injury-activated genes of mature rat nerves are occupied with H3K27me3. In contrast, the majority of distal enhancers that gain H3K27 acetylation after injury are not repressed by H3K27 methylation before injury, which is normally observed in developmentally poised enhancers. Injury induces demethylation of H3K27 in many genes, such as Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which is silenced throughout Schwann cell development before injury. In addition, experiments using a Schwann cell-specific mouse knock-out of the Eed subunit of PRC2 indicate that demethylation is a rate-limiting step in the activation of such genes. We also show that some transcription start sites of H3K27me3-repressed injury genes of uninjured nerves are bound with a mark of active promoters H3K4me3, for example, Shh and Gdnf, and the reduction of H3K27me3 results in increased trimethylation of H3K4. Our findings identify reversal of polycomb repression as a key step in gene activation after injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Peripheral nerve regeneration after injury is dependent upon implementation of a novel genetic program in Schwann cells that supports axonal survival and regeneration. Identifying means to enhance Schwann cell reprogramming after nerve injury could be used to foster effective remyelination in the treatment of demyelinating disorders and in identifying pathways involved in regenerative process of myelination. Although recent progress has identified transcriptional determinants of successful reprogramming of the Schwann cell transcriptome

  17. Comparative study of different control techniques for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, Mohammed S

    2009-01-01

    Blood glucose regulation is of a great concern for insulin-dependant patients with excessive glucose in blood (hyperglycaemia), or low glucose profile (hypoglycaemia) due to excess insulin delivery. Both conditions can cause dangerous complications for diabetic patients, and hence glucose regulation in blood is of prime importance. Insulin pumps are used to deliver insulin in small quantities, allowing the glucose level to remain as close as possible to that of non-diabetics (near 100 mg dl(-1)). Different control techniques are used to maintain the glucose level and most of them depend on an exact mathematical or empirical model of insulin-glucose interaction. Recently, we have proposed different controllers that are based on fuzzy logic and so do not use mathematical modelling, which in general is nonlinear, complex and suffers from uncertainties. PI fuzzy controllers are physically related to classical PI and PID controllers, which are extremely popular. The parameter settings of classical and fuzzy logic controllers are based on deep common physical background. In this manuscript, a comparative study is proposed to evaluate the use of fuzzy logic controllers over other conventional controllers such as PI and PID controllers to maintain the blood glucose level within a normoglycaemic average especially when a diabetic patient is subjected to different conditions.

  18. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  19. High glucose concentrations induce TNF-α production through the down-regulation of CD33 in primary human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD33 is a membrane receptor containing a lectin domain and a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) that is able to inhibit cytokine production. CD33 is expressed by monocytes, and reduced expression of CD33 correlates with augmented production of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-8. However, the role of CD33 in the inflammation associated with hyperglycemia and diabetes is unknown. Therefore, we studied CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion in freshly isolated monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia, monocytes from healthy donors were cultured with different glucose concentrations (15-50 mmol/l D-glucose), and CD33 expression and inflammatory cytokine production were assessed. The expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein-3 (SOCS-3) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also evaluated to address the cellular mechanisms involved in the down-regulation of CD33. Results CD33 expression was significantly decreased in monocytes from patients with type 2 diabetes, and higher levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-12p70 were detected in the plasma of patients compared to healthy donors. Under high glucose conditions, CD33 protein and mRNA expression was significantly decreased, whereas spontaneous TNF-α secretion and SOCS-3 mRNA expression were increased in monocytes from healthy donors. Furthermore, the down-regulation of CD33 and increase in TNF-α production were prevented when monocytes were treated with the antioxidant α-tocopherol and cultured under high glucose conditions. Conclusion Our results suggest that hyperglycemia down-regulates CD33 expression and triggers the spontaneous secretion of TNF-α by peripheral monocytes. This phenomenon involves the generation of ROS and the up-regulation of SOCS-3. These observations support the importance of blood glucose control for maintaining innate immune function and suggest

  20. High Glucose Enhances Isoflurane-Induced Neurotoxicity by Regulating TRPC-Dependent Calcium Influx.

    PubMed

    Liu, ZhongJie; Ma, ChangQing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, QingGuo; Xu, Rui; Zhang, HongFei; Lei, HongYi; Xu, ShiYuan

    2017-01-06

    Isoflurane is a commonly used inhalational anesthetic that can induce neurotoxicity via elevating cytosolic calcium (Ca(2+)). High glucose regulates the expression of a family of non-selective cation channels termed transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels that may contribute to Ca(2+) influx. In the present study, we investigated whether high glucose enhances isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity by regulating TRPC-dependent Ca(2+) influx. First, we evaluated toxic damage in mice primary cultured hippocampal neurons and human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cells) after hyperglycemia and isoflurane exposure. Next, we investigated cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations, TRPC mRNA expression levels and tested the effect of the TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 on cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in cells treated with high glucose or/and isoflurane. Finally, we employed knocked down TRPC6 to demonstrate the role of TRPC in high glucose-mediated enhancement of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity. The results showed that high glucose could enhance isoflurane-induecd toxic damage in primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose enhanced the isoflurane-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) in SH-SY5Y cells. High glucose elevated TRPC mRNA expression, especially that of TRPC6. SKF96365 and knock down of TRPC6 were able to inhibit the high glucose-induced increase of cytosolic Ca(2+) and decrease isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells cultured with high glucose. Our findings indicate that high glucose could elevate TRPC expression, thus increasing Ca(2+) influx and enhancing isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. EndoU is a novel regulator of AICD during peripheral B cell selection

    PubMed Central

    Poe, Jonathan C.; Kountikov, Evgueni I.; Lykken, Jacquelyn M.; Natarajan, Abirami; Marchuk, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Balanced transmembrane signals maintain a competent peripheral B cell pool limited in self-reactive B cells that may produce pathogenic autoantibodies. To identify molecules regulating peripheral B cell survival and tolerance to self-antigens (Ags), a gene modifier screen was performed with B cells from CD22-deficient C57BL/6 (CD22−/−[B6]) mice that undergo activation-induced cell death (AICD) and fail to up-regulate c-Myc expression after B cell Ag receptor ligation. Likewise, lysozyme auto-Ag–specific B cells in IgTg hen egg lysozyme (HEL) transgenic mice inhabit the spleen but undergo AICD after auto-Ag encounter. This gene modifier screen identified EndoU, a single-stranded RNA-binding protein of ancient origin, as a major regulator of B cell survival in both models. EndoU gene disruption prevents AICD and normalizes c-Myc expression. These findings reveal that EndoU is a critical regulator of an unexpected and novel RNA-dependent pathway controlling peripheral B cell survival and Ag responsiveness that may contribute to peripheral B cell tolerance. PMID:24344237

  2. Glucokinase expression is regulated by glucose through O-GlcNAc glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Steffi F; Steenackers, Agata; Olivier-Van Stichelen, Stéphanie; Mir, Anne-Marie; Mortuaire, Marlène; Lefebvre, Tony; Guinez, Céline

    2016-09-16

    Blood glucose fluctuates with the fasting-feeding cycle. One of the liver's functions is to maintain blood glucose concentrations within a physiological range. Glucokinase (GCK) or hexokinase IV, is the main enzyme that regulates the flux and the use of glucose in the liver leading to a compensation of hyperglycemia. In hepatocytes, GCK catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose into glucose-6-phosphate. This critical enzymatic reaction is determinant for the metabolism of glucose in the liver which includes glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In liver, simultaneous increase of glucose and insulin enhances GCK activity and gene expression, changes its subcellular location and interaction with regulatory proteins. The post-translational O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) acts as a glucose-sensitive modification and is believed to take part in hepatic glucose sensing by modifying key regulatory proteins. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation in the liver of mice and investigated the role that this modification plays in regulating GCK protein expression. We demonstrated that endogenous GCK expression correlated with O-GlcNAc levels in the pathophysiological model ob/ob mice. More specifically, in response to the pharmacological inhibition of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) contents of GCK increased. Using the GlcNAc specific lectin succinylated-WGA and click chemistry labeling approaches, we demonstrated that GCK is modified by O-GlcNAcylation. Further, we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated Ogt knock-down not only decreases O-GlcNAc content but also GCK protein level. Altogether, our in vivo and in vitro results demonstrate that GCK expression is regulated by nutrient-sensing O-GlcNAc cycling in liver.

  3. PHLPP regulates hexokinase 2-dependent glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaopeng; Wen, Yang-An; Mitov, Mihail I; C Oaks, Mary; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Gao, Tianyan

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose metabolism is considered as one of the most important metabolic alterations adapted by cancer cells in order to generate energy as well as high levels of glycolytic intermediates to support rapid proliferation. PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) belongs to a novel family of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that function as tumor suppressors in various types of human cancer. Here we determined the role of PHLPP in regulating glucose metabolism in colon cancer cells. Knockdown of PHLPP increased the rate of glucose consumption and lactate production, whereas overexpression of PHLPP had the opposite effect. Bioenergetic analysis using Seahorse Extracelluar Flux Analyzer revealed that silencing PHLPP expression induced a glycolytic shift in colon cancer cells. Mechanistically, we found that PHLPP formed a complex with Akt and hexokinase 2 (HK2) in the mitochondrial fraction of colon cancer cells and knockdown of PHLPP enhanced Akt-mediated phosphorylation and mitochondrial localization of HK2. Depletion of HK2 expression or treating cells with Akt and HK2 inhibitors reversed PHLPP loss-induced increase in glycolysis. Furthermore, PHLPP knockdown cells became addicted to glucose as a major energy source in that glucose starvation significantly decreased cancer cell survival. As HK2 is the key enzyme that determines the direction and magnitude of glucose flux, our study identified PHLPP as a novel regulator of glucose metabolism by controlling HK2 activity in colon cancer cells. PMID:28179998

  4. Fasting regulates EGR1 and protects from glucose- and dexamethasone-dependent sensitization to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Rappa, Francesca; Wei, Min; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Cappello, Francesco; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Changhan; Longo, Valter D.

    2017-01-01

    Fasting reduces glucose levels and protects mice against chemotoxicity, yet drugs that promote hyperglycemia are widely used in cancer treatment. Here, we show that dexamethasone (Dexa) and rapamycin (Rapa), commonly administered to cancer patients, elevate glucose and sensitize cardiomyocytes and mice to the cancer drug doxorubicin (DXR). Such toxicity can be reversed by reducing circulating glucose levels by fasting or insulin. Furthermore, glucose injections alone reversed the fasting-dependent protection against DXR in mice, indicating that elevated glucose mediates, at least in part, the sensitizing effects of rapamycin and dexamethasone. In yeast, glucose activates protein kinase A (PKA) to accelerate aging by inhibiting transcription factors Msn2/4. Here, we show that fasting or glucose restriction (GR) regulate PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to protect against DXR in part by activating the mammalian Msn2/4 ortholog early growth response protein 1 (EGR1). Increased expression of the EGR1-regulated cardioprotective peptides atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in heart tissue may also contribute to DXR resistance. Our findings suggest the existence of a glucose–PKA pathway that inactivates conserved zinc finger stress-resistance transcription factors to sensitize cells to toxins conserved from yeast to mammals. Our findings also describe a toxic role for drugs widely used in cancer treatment that promote hyperglycemia and identify dietary interventions that reverse these effects. PMID:28358805

  5. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  6. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua P.; Zayasbazan Burgos, Delaine; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA. PMID:26786775

  7. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of Nigella sativa, normalizes insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells under glucose overload via regulation of malonyl-CoA.

    PubMed

    Gray, Joshua P; Burgos, Delaine Zayasbazan; Yuan, Tao; Seeram, Navindra; Rebar, Rebecca; Follmer, Rebecca; Heart, Emma A

    2016-03-15

    Thymoquinone (2-isopropyl-5-methylbenzo-1,4-quinone) is a major bioactive component of Nigella sativa, a plant used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of symptoms, including elevated blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetic patients. Normalization of elevated blood glucose depends on both glucose disposal by peripheral tissues and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. We employed clonal β-cells and rodent islets to investigate the effects of thymoquinone (TQ) and Nigella sativa extracts (NSEs) on GSIS and cataplerotic metabolic pathways implicated in the regulation of GSIS. TQ and NSE regulated NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratios via a quinone-dependent redox cycling mechanism. TQ content was positively correlated with the degree of redox cycling activity of NSE extracts, suggesting that TQ is a major component engaged in mediating NSE-dependent redox cycling. Both acute and chronic exposure to TQ and NSE enhanced GSIS and were associated with the ability of TQ and NSE to increase the ATP/ADP ratio. Furthermore, TQ ameliorated the impairment of GSIS following chronic exposure of β-cells to glucose overload. This protective action was associated with the TQ-dependent normalization of chronic accumulation of malonyl-CoA, elevation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase, and fatty acid-binding proteins following chronic glucose overload. Together, these data suggest that TQ modulates the β-cell redox circuitry and enhances the sensitivity of β-cell metabolic pathways to glucose and GSIS under normal conditions as well as under hyperglycemia. This action is associated with the ability of TQ to regulate carbohydrate-to-lipid flux via downregulation of ACC and malonyl-CoA.

  8. Peripheral and Central Effects of Melatonin on Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pechanova, Olga; Paulis, Ludovit; Simko, Fedor

    2014-01-01

    The pineal hormone, melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine), shows potent receptor-dependent and -independent actions, which participate in blood pressure regulation. The antihypertensive effect of melatonin was demonstrated in experimental and clinical hypertension. Receptor-dependent effects are mediated predominantly through MT1 and MT2 G-protein coupled receptors. The pleiotropic receptor-independent effects of melatonin with a possible impact on blood pressure involve the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging nature, activation and over-expression of several antioxidant enzymes or their protection from oxidative damage and the ability to increase the efficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Besides the interaction with the vascular system, this indolamine may exert part of its antihypertensive action through its interaction with the central nervous system (CNS). The imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic vegetative system is an important pathophysiological disorder and therapeutic target in hypertension. Melatonin is protective in CNS on several different levels: It reduces free radical burden, improves endothelial dysfunction, reduces inflammation and shifts the balance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic system in favor of the parasympathetic system. The increased level of serum melatonin observed in some types of hypertension may be a counter-regulatory adaptive mechanism against the sympathetic overstimulation. Since melatonin acts favorably on different levels of hypertension, including organ protection and with minimal side effects, it could become regularly involved in the struggle against this widespread cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25299692

  9. Glucose regulates RMI1 expression through the E2F pathways in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Akira; Yoshino, Masayasu; Kurama, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Aramori, Ichiro

    2011-08-01

    RecQ-mediated genome instability 1 (RMI1) has been identified as a novel energy homeostasis-related molecule. While recent studies have suggested that change in RMI1 expression levels in adipose tissue may affect the body's energy balance, no reports have identified the mechanism behind this expression regulation. In the present study, we found that RMI1 expression increased on differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts to adipocytes. In addition, glucose stimulation induced RMI1 expression to approximately eight times the baseline level. Further, knockdown of either E2F5 or E2F8 mRNA using siRNA suppressed this glucose-induced up-regulation of RMI1 expression. These results suggest that RMI1 expression may be regulated by glucose, at least in part, via E2F expression.

  10. TUSC5 regulates insulin-mediated adipose tissue glucose uptake by modulation of GLUT4 recycling

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Nigel; Rudigier, Carla; Moest, Hansjörg; Müller, Sebastian; Mrosek, Nadja; Röder, Eva; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Rülicke, Thomas; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara; Augustin, Robert; Neubauer, Heike; Wolfrum, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Failure to properly dispose of glucose in response to insulin is a serious health problem, occurring during obesity and is associated with type 2 diabetes development. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake is facilitated by the translocation and plasma membrane fusion of vesicles containing glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), the rate-limiting step of post-prandial glucose disposal. Methods We analyzed the role of Tusc5 in the regulation of insulin-stimulated Glut4-mediated glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we measured Tusc5 expression in two patient cohorts. Results Herein, we report that TUSC5 controls insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes, in vitro and in vivo. TUSC5 facilitates the proper recycling of GLUT4 and other key trafficking proteins during prolonged insulin stimulation, thereby enabling proper protein localization and complete vesicle formation, processes that ultimately enable insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Tusc5 knockout mice exhibit impaired glucose disposal and TUSC5 expression is predictive of glucose tolerance in obese individuals, independent of body weight. Furthermore, we show that TUSC5 is a PPARγ target and in its absence the anti-diabetic effects of TZDs are significantly blunted. Conclusions Collectively, these findings establish TUSC5 as an adipose tissue-specific protein that enables proper protein recycling, linking the ubiquitous vesicle traffic machinery with tissue-specific insulin-mediated glucose uptake into adipose tissue and the maintenance of a healthy metabolic phenotype in mice and humans. PMID:26629404

  11. Metabolic regulation of lateral hypothalamic glucose-inhibited orexin neurons may influence midbrain reward neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Santiago, Ammy M; Thomas, Mark P; Routh, Vanessa H

    2014-09-01

    Lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin neurons modulate reward-based feeding by activating ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. We hypothesize that signals of peripheral energy status influence reward-based feeding by modulating the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. This hypothesis was tested using electrophysiological recordings of LHA orexin-GI neurons in brain slices from 4 to 6week old male mice whose orexin neurons express green fluorescent protein (GFP) or putative VTA-DA neurons from C57Bl/6 mice. Low glucose directly activated ~60% of LHA orexin-GFP neurons in both whole cell and cell attached recordings. Leptin indirectly reduced and ghrelin directly enhanced the activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by glucose decreases from 2.5 to 0.1mM by 53±12% (n=16, P<0.001) and 41±24% (n=8, P<0.05), respectively. GABA or neurotensin receptor blockade prevented leptin's effect on glucose sensitivity. Fasting increased activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by decreased glucose, as would be predicted by these hormonal effects. We also evaluated putative VTA-DA neurons in a novel horizontal slice preparation containing the LHA and VTA. Decreased glucose increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs; 125 ± 40%, n=9, P<0.05) and action potentials (n=9; P<0.05) in 45% (9/20) of VTA DA neurons. sEPSCs were completely blocked by AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX 20 μM, n=4; APV 20μM, n=4; respectively), demonstrating that these sEPSCs were mediated by glutamatergic transmission onto VTA DA neurons. Orexin-1 but not 2 receptor antagonism with SB334867 (10μM; n=9) and TCS-OX2-29 (2μM; n=5), respectively, blocks the effects of decreased glucose on VTA DA neurons. Thus, decreased glucose increases orexin-dependent excitatory glutamate neurotransmission onto VTA DA neurons. These data suggest that the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin-GI neurons links metabolic state and reward

  12. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  13. Functional identification of a neurocircuit regulating blood glucose

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Thomas H.; Nelson, Jarrell T.; Matsen, Miles E.; Dorfman, Mauricio D.; Guyenet, Stephan J.; Damian, Vincent; Allison, Margaret B.; Scarlett, Jarrad M.; Nguyen, Hong T.; Thaler, Joshua P.; Olson, David P.; Myers, Martin G.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Morton, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies implicate the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMN) in glycemic control. Here, we report that selective inhibition of the subset of VMN neurons that express the transcription factor steroidogenic-factor 1 (VMNSF1 neurons) blocks recovery from insulin-induced hypoglycemia whereas, conversely, activation of VMNSF1 neurons causes diabetes-range hyperglycemia. Moreover, this hyperglycemic response is reproduced by selective activation of VMNSF1 fibers projecting to the anterior bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (aBNST), but not to other brain areas innervated by VMNSF1 neurons. We also report that neurons in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN), a brain area that is also implicated in the response to hypoglycemia, make synaptic connections with the specific subset of glucoregulatory VMNSF1 neurons that project to the aBNST. These results collectively establish a physiological role in glucose homeostasis for VMNSF1 neurons and suggest that these neurons are part of an ascending glucoregulatory LPBN→VMNSF1→aBNST neurocircuit. PMID:27001850

  14. Differential regulation of baicalin and scutellarin on AMPK and Akt in promoting adipose cell glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le-Le; Xiao, Na; Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Kang; Liu, Baolin; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Baicalin and scutellarin, two flavonoid glucuronic acids isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis, exhibit beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Baicalin and scutellarin are similar in structure except scutellarin has an additional hydroxyl at composition C-4'. In this work, we observed that baicalin and scutellarin promoted glucose disposal in mice and in adipocytes. Baicalin selectively increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), while scutellarin selectively enhanced Akt phosphorylation. Both of them increased AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in basal condition. AMPK inhibitor or knockdown of AMPK by siRNA blocked baicalin-induced AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake, but showed no effects on scutellarin. In contrast, Akt inhibitor and knockdown of Akt with siRNA decreased scutellarin-stimulated glucose uptake but had no effects on baicalin. The molecular dynamic simulations analysis showed that the binding energy of baicalin to AMPK (-34.30kcal/mol) was more favorable than scutellarin (-21.27kcal/mol), while the binding energy of scutellarin (-29.81kcal/mol) to Akt was much more favorable than baicalin (4.04kcal/mol). Interestingly, a combined treatment with baicalin and scutellarin acted synergistically to enhance glucose uptake in adipocytes (combination index: 0.94-0.046). In conclusion, baicalin and scutellarin, though structurally similar, promoted glucose disposal in adipocytes by differential regulation on AMPK and Akt activity. Our data provide insight that multicomponent herbal medicines may act synergistically on multiple targets.

  15. Mechanistic relationship between the vagal afferent pathway, central nervous system and peripheral organs in appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Hiroaki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2016-11-01

    The hypothalamus is a center of food intake and energy metabolism regulation. Information signals from peripheral organs are mediated through the circulation or the vagal afferent pathway and input into the hypothalamus, where signals are integrated to determine various behaviors, such as eating. Numerous appetite-regulating peptides are expressed in the central nervous system and the peripheral organs, and interact in a complex manner. Of such peptides, gut peptides are known to bind to receptors at the vagal afferent pathway terminal that extend into the mucosal layer of the digestive tract, modulate the electrical activity of the vagus nerve, and subsequently send signals to the solitary nucleus and furthermore to the hypothalamus. All peripheral peptides other than ghrelin suppress appetite, and they synergistically suppress appetite through the vagus nerve. In contrast, the appetite-enhancing peptide, ghrelin, antagonizes the actions of appetite-suppressing peptides through the vagus nerve, and appetite-suppressing peptides have attenuated effects in obesity as a result of inflammation in the vagus nerve. With greater understanding of the mechanism for food intake and energy metabolism regulation, medications that apply the effects of appetite-regulating peptides or implantable devices that electrically stimulate the vagus nerve are being investigated as novel treatments for obesity in basic and clinical studies.

  16. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet.

  17. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction is regulated by nitric oxide and ROS independently of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Steinberg, Gregory R; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, and there is evidence that they do so via interaction with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ROS and NO regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from mice that expressed a muscle-specific kinase dead AMPKalpha2 isoform (AMPK-KD) and wild-type litter mates (WT) were stimulated to contract, and glucose uptake was measured in the presence or absence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). Contraction increased AMPKalpha2 activity in WT but not AMPK-KD EDL muscles. However, contraction increased glucose uptake in the EDL and soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice to a similar extent. In EDL muscles, NAC and l-NMMA prevented contraction-stimulated increases in oxidant levels (dichloroflourescein fluorescence) and NOS activity, respectively, and attenuated contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in both genotypes to a similar extent. In soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice, NAC prevented contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and l-NMMA had no effect. This is likely attributed to the relative lack of neuronal NOS in the soleus muscles compared with EDL muscles. Contraction increased AMPKalpha Thr(172) phosphorylation in EDL and soleus muscles of WT but not AMPK-KD mice, and this was not affected by NAC or l-NMMA treatment. In conclusion, ROS and NO are involved in regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism.

  18. Regulation of expression of the arabinose and glucose transporter genes in the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Lubelska, Joanna M; Jonuscheit, Melanie; Schleper, Christa; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2006-10-01

    Sugar uptake in Sulfolobus solfataricus, a thermoacidophilic archaeon, occurs through high-affinity binding of protein-dependent ABC transporters. We have investigated the expression patterns of two sugar transport operons, that is, the glucose and arabinose transporters. Analysis of the araS promoter activity, and the mRNA and protein levels in S. solfataricus cells grown on different carbon sources showed that expression of the arabinose transporter gene cluster is highly regulated and dependent on the presence of arabinose in the medium. Glucose in the growth medium repressed the expression of the arabinose transport genes. By means of primer extension, the transcriptional start site for the arabinose operon was mapped. Interestingly, expression of the arabinose transporter is down-regulated by addition of a selective set of amino acids to the medium. Expression of the glucose transporter genes appeared constitutive. These data confirm the earlier observation of a catabolite repression-like system in S. solfataricus.

  19. The α-glucosidase inhibitor miglitol decreases glucose fluctuations and inflammatory cytokine gene expression in peripheral leukocytes of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Osonoi, Takeshi; Saito, Miyoko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Fukaya, Nanae; Muramatsu, Takeshi; Inoue, Seiya; Fuchigami, Masahiro; Goda, Toshinao

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of switching from acarbose or voglibose to miglitol in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients for 3 months on gene expression of inflammatory cytokines/cytokine-like factors in peripheral leukocytes and on glucose fluctuations. We enrolled 47 Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged 26 to 81 years, with hemoglobin A(₁c) levels ranging from 6.5% to 7.9% and who were treated with the highest approved dose of acarbose (100 mg per meal) or voglibose (0.3 mg per meal) in combination with insulin or sulfonylurea. Their prior α-glucosidase inhibitors were switched to a medium dose of miglitol (50 mg per meal), and the new treatments were maintained for 3 months. Forty-three patients completed the 3-month study and were analyzed. The switch to miglitol for 3 months did not affect hemoglobin A(₁c), fasting glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, or C-reactive protein levels, or adverse events other than hypoglycemia symptoms. Hypoglycemia symptoms and glucose fluctuations were significantly improved by the switch. The expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and S100a4/6/9/10/11/12 genes in peripheral leukocytes, and the serum tumor necrosis factor-α protein levels were suppressed by switching to miglitol. Miglitol reduces glucose fluctuations and gene expression of inflammatory cytokines/cytokine-like factors in peripheral leukocytes of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients more than other α-glucosidase inhibitors and with fewer adverse effects.

  20. MicroRNA-26a regulates insulin sensitivity and metabolism of glucose and lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xianghui; Dong, Bingning; Tian, Yan; Lefebvre, Philippe; Meng, Zhipeng; Wang, Xichun; Pattou, François; Han, Weidong; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Lou, Fang; Jove, Richard; Staels, Bart; Moore, David D.; Huang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is characterized by insulin resistance and increased hepatic glucose production, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying these abnormalities are poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRs) are a class of small, noncoding RNAs that have been implicated in the regulation of human diseases, including T2D. miR-26a is known to play a critical role in tumorigenesis; however, its function in cellular metabolism remains unknown. Here, we determined that miR-26a regulates insulin signaling and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Compared with lean individuals, overweight humans had decreased expression of miR-26a in the liver. Moreover, miR-26 was downregulated in 2 obese mouse models compared with control animals. Global or liver-specific overexpression of miR-26a in mice fed a high-fat diet improved insulin sensitivity, decreased hepatic glucose production, and decreased fatty acid synthesis, thereby preventing obesity-induced metabolic complications. Conversely, silencing of endogenous miR-26a in conventional diet–fed mice impaired insulin sensitivity, enhanced glucose production, and increased fatty acid synthesis. miR-26a targeted several key regulators of hepatic metabolism and insulin signaling. These findings reveal miR-26a as a regulator of liver metabolism and suggest miR-26a should be further explored as a potential target for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25961460

  1. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  2. Regulating Glucose and pH, and Monitoring Oxygen in a Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neat R.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.; Xu, Yuanhang; Gao, Frank

    2006-01-01

    A system that automatically regulates the concentration of glucose or pH in a liquid culture medium that is circulated through a rotating-wall perfused bioreactor is described. Another system monitors the concentration of oxygen in the culture medium.

  3. Glucose induction pathway regulates meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in part by controlling turnover of Ime2p meiotic kinase.

    PubMed

    Gray, Misa; Piccirillo, Sarah; Purnapatre, Kedar; Schneider, Brandt L; Honigberg, Saul M

    2008-08-01

    Several components of the glucose induction pathway, namely the Snf3p glucose sensor and the Rgt1p and Mth1p transcription factors, were shown to be involved in inhibition of sporulation by glucose. The glucose sensors had only a minor role in regulating transcript levels of the two key regulators of meiotic initiation, the Ime1p transcription factor and the Ime2p kinase, but a major role in regulating Ime2p stability. Interestingly, Rgt1p was involved in glucose inhibition of spore formation but not inhibition of Ime2p stability. Thus, the glucose induction pathway may regulate meiosis through both RGT1-dependent and RGT1-independent pathways.

  4. Relationships between glucose excursion and the activation of oxidative stress in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fenping; Lu, Weina; Jia, Chengfang; Li, Hong; Wang, Zhou; Jia, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    The effect of glucose excursions on oxidative stress is an important topic in diabetes research. We investigated this relationship by analyzing markers of oxidative stress and glycemic data from a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in 30 individuals with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 27 subjects with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), and 27 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We compared the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), mean postprandial glucose excursion (MPPGE), and mean postprandial incremental area under the curve (IAUC) with plasma levels of oxidative stress markers 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-OH-dG, and protein carbonyl content in the study subjects. Patients with T2DM or IGR had significantly higher glucose excursions and plasma levels of oxidative stress markers compared to normal controls (P < 0.01 or 0.05). Multiple linear regression analyses showed significant relationships between MAGE and plasma 8-iso-PGF2α, and between MPPGE and plasma 8-OH-dG in patients with IGR or T2DM (P < 0.01 or 0.05). Furthermore, 2h-postprandial glucose level and IAUC were related to plasma protein carbonyl content in the study cohort including T2DM and IGR (P < 0.01). We demonstrate that glucose excursions in subjects with IGR and T2DM trigger the activation of oxidative stress.

  5. Expression of high-affinity glucose transport protein Hxt2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is both repressed and induced by glucose and appears to be regulated posttranslationally.

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, D L; Bisson, L F

    1994-01-01

    Expression of putative high-affinity glucose transport protein Hxt2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was repressed 15- to 20-fold in high concentrations of glucose or fructose. S. cerevisiae with either the ssn6-delta 9 or the hxk2-delta 1::URA3 mutation, each of which relieves glucose repression, exhibited high Hxt2p expression in both 2.0% glucose (normally repressing) and 0.05% glucose (normally derepressing) while S. cerevisiae with the snf1-delta 10 mutation, which causes constitutive repression, did not detectably express Hxt2p in either glucose concentration. In addition to repressing at high concentrations, glucose or fructose is required for induction of Hxt2p expression. Hxt2p was not expressed by wild-type S. cerevisiae in media containing only ethanol or galactose as carbon and energy source but was expressed if glucose was added. An hxk2-delta 1::URA3 mutant did not detectably express Hxt2p in ethanol or galactose, but an ssn6-delta9 mutant did highly express Hxt2p in both carbon sources. Thus, simple relief of glucose repression as occurs with hxk2 null mutants is insufficient for high-level Hxt2p expression. Mutation of ssn6, a general transcriptional repressor, does lead to Hxt2p expression in the absence of glucose induction, suggesting relief of an additional negative regulatory system. High expression of Hxt2p does not always result in HXT2-dependent high-affinity transport, implying that Hxt2p activity is regulated posttranslationally. In the high glucose condition for the ssn6 mutant, high-affinity glucose transport is derepressed. Deletion of the HXT2 locus does not diminish this level of transport. However, high-affinity glucose transport is diminished in the ssn6-delta9 hxt2 delta1 double mutant compared with ssn6-delta9 alone in low glucose. Thus, while constitutively expressed in ssn6 mutants, Hxt2p only appears to be active as a transporter under low-glucose conditions. Similarly, Hxt2p was found to be expressed under low-glucose conditions

  6. Meta-Modeling of Methylprednisolone Effects on Glucose Regulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; Sukumaran, Siddharth; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2013-01-01

    A retrospective meta-modeling analysis was performed to integrate previously reported data of glucocorticoid (GC) effects on glucose regulation following a single intramuscular dose (50 mg/kg), single intravenous doses (10, 50 mg/kg), and intravenous infusions (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h) of methylprednisolone (MPL) in normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) male Wistar rats. A mechanistic pharmacodynamic (PD) model was developed based on the receptor/gene/protein-mediated GC effects on glucose regulation. Three major target organs (liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle) together with some selected intermediate controlling factors were designated as important regulators involved in the pathogenesis of GC-induced glucose dysregulation. Assessed were dynamic changes of food intake and systemic factors (plasma glucose, insulin, free fatty acids (FFA) and leptin) and tissue-specific biomarkers (cAMP, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) mRNA and enzyme activity, leptin mRNA, interleukin 6 receptor type 1 (IL6R1) mRNA and Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) mRNA) after acute and chronic dosing with MPL along with the GC receptor (GR) dynamics in each target organ. Upon binding to GR in liver, MPL dosing caused increased glucose production by stimulating hepatic cAMP and PEPCK activity. In adipose tissue, the rise in leptin mRNA and plasma leptin caused reduction of food intake, the exogenous source of glucose input. Down-regulation of IRS-1 mRNA expression in skeletal muscle inhibited the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose utilization further contributing to hyperglycemia. The nuclear drug-receptor complex served as the driving force for stimulation or inhibition of downstream target gene expression within different tissues. Incorporating information such as receptor dynamics, as well as the gene and protein induction, allowed us to describe the receptor-mediated effects of MPL on glucose regulation in each important tissue. This advanced mechanistic

  7. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (creCD motif), that is, ‘RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW’. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target creCD sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  8. Insulin regulates GLUT1-mediated glucose transport in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Manuel; García, Maria A; Arrabal, Pilar M; Martínez, Fernando; Yañez, María J; Jara, Nery; Weil, Bernardo; Domínguez, Dolores; Medina, Rodolfo A; Nualart, Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of malignant bone cancer, accounting for 35% of primary bone malignancies. Because cancer cells utilize glucose as their primary energy substrate, the expression and regulation of glucose transporters (GLUT) may be important in tumor development and progression. GLUT expression has not been studied previously in human osteosarcoma cell lines. Furthermore, although insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) play an important role in cell proliferation and tumor progression, the role of these hormones on GLUT expression and glucose uptake, and their possible relation to osteosarcoma, have also not been studied. We determined the effect of insulin and IGF-I on GLUT expression and glucose transport in three well-characterized human osteosarcoma cell lines (MG-63, SaOs-2, and U2-Os) using immunocytochemical, RT-PCR and functional kinetic analyses. Furthermore we also studied GLUT isoform expression in osteosarcoma primary tumors and metastases by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses. RT-PCR and immunostaining show that GLUT1 is the main isoform expressed in the cell lines and tissues studied, respectively. Immunocytochemical analysis shows that although insulin does not affect levels of GLUT1 expression it does induce a translocation of the transporter to the plasma membrane. This translocation is associated with increased transport of glucose into the cell. GLUT1 is the main glucose transporter expressed in osteosarcoma, furthermore, this transporter is regulated by insulin in human MG-63 cells. One possible mechanism through which insulin is involved in cancer progression is by increasing the amount of glucose available to the cancer cell.

  9. Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Function Partially Protects against Peripheral and Cardiac Glucose Metabolic Derangements During a Long-Term High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Ellen E.; Rendina-Ruedy, Elisabeth; Smith, Brenda J.; Lacombe, Veronique A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic inflammatory disease that carries a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological link between these disorders is not well known. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling mediates high fat diet (HFD)-induced peripheral and cardiac glucose metabolic derangements. Mice with a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4 (C3H/HeJ) and age-matched control (C57BL/6) mice were fed either a high-fat diet or normal diet for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance and plasma insulin were measured. Protein expression of glucose transporters (GLUT), AKT (phosphorylated and total), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and SOCS-3) were quantified in the heart using Western Blotting. Both groups fed a long-term HFD had increased body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared to mice fed a normal diet. TLR4-mutant mice were partially protected against long-term HFD-induced insulin resistance. In control mice, feeding a HFD decreased cardiac crude membrane GLUT4 protein content, which was partially rescued in TLR4-mutant mice. TLR4-mutant mice fed a HFD also had increased expression of GLUT8, a novel isoform, compared to mice fed a normal diet. GLUT8 content was positively correlated with SOCS-3 and IL-6 expression in the heart. No significant differences in cytokine expression were observed between groups, suggesting a lack of inflammation in the heart following a HFD. Loss of TLR4 function partially restored a healthy metabolic phenotype, suggesting that TLR4 signaling is a key mechanism in HFD-induced peripheral and cardiac insulin resistance. Our data further suggest that TLR4 exerts its detrimental metabolic effects in the myocardium through a cytokine-independent pathway. PMID:26539824

  10. Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Function Partially Protects against Peripheral and Cardiac Glucose Metabolic Derangements During a Long-Term High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Ellen E; Rendina-Ruedy, Elisabeth; Smith, Brenda J; Lacombe, Veronique A

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic inflammatory disease that carries a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological link between these disorders is not well known. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling mediates high fat diet (HFD)-induced peripheral and cardiac glucose metabolic derangements. Mice with a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4 (C3H/HeJ) and age-matched control (C57BL/6) mice were fed either a high-fat diet or normal diet for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance and plasma insulin were measured. Protein expression of glucose transporters (GLUT), AKT (phosphorylated and total), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and SOCS-3) were quantified in the heart using Western Blotting. Both groups fed a long-term HFD had increased body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared to mice fed a normal diet. TLR4-mutant mice were partially protected against long-term HFD-induced insulin resistance. In control mice, feeding a HFD decreased cardiac crude membrane GLUT4 protein content, which was partially rescued in TLR4-mutant mice. TLR4-mutant mice fed a HFD also had increased expression of GLUT8, a novel isoform, compared to mice fed a normal diet. GLUT8 content was positively correlated with SOCS-3 and IL-6 expression in the heart. No significant differences in cytokine expression were observed between groups, suggesting a lack of inflammation in the heart following a HFD. Loss of TLR4 function partially restored a healthy metabolic phenotype, suggesting that TLR4 signaling is a key mechanism in HFD-induced peripheral and cardiac insulin resistance. Our data further suggest that TLR4 exerts its detrimental metabolic effects in the myocardium through a cytokine-independent pathway.

  11. Effects of glucose, ethanol and acetic acid on regulation of ADH2 gene from Lachancea fermentati

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Norhayati; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Abdul Rahman, Nor Aini

    2016-01-01

    Background. Not all yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 2 (ADH2) are repressed by glucose, as reported in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia stipitis ADH2 is regulated by oxygen instead of glucose, whereas Kluyveromyces marxianus ADH2 is regulated by neither glucose nor ethanol. For this reason, ADH2 regulation of yeasts may be species dependent, leading to a different type of expression and fermentation efficiency. Lachancea fermentati is a highly efficient ethanol producer, fast-growing cells and adapted to fermentation-related stresses such as ethanol and organic acid, but the metabolic information regarding the regulation of glucose and ethanol production is still lacking. Methods. Our investigation started with the stimulation of ADH2 activity from S. cerevisiae and L. fermentati by glucose and ethanol induction in a glucose-repressed medium. The study also embarked on the retrospective analysis of ADH2 genomic and protein level through direct sequencing and sites identification. Based on the sequence generated, we demonstrated ADH2 gene expression highlighting the conserved NAD(P)-binding domain in the context of glucose fermentation and ethanol production. Results. An increase of ADH2 activity was observed in starved L. fermentati (LfeADH2) and S. cerevisiae (SceADH2) in response to 2% (w/v) glucose induction. These suggest that in the presence of glucose, ADH2 activity was activated instead of being repressed. An induction of 0.5% (v/v) ethanol also increased LfeADH2 activity, promoting ethanol resistance, whereas accumulating acetic acid at a later stage of fermentation stimulated ADH2 activity and enhanced glucose consumption rates. The lack in upper stream activating sequence (UAS) and TATA elements hindered the possibility of Adr1 binding to LfeADH2. Transcription factors such as SP1 and RAP1 observed in LfeADH2 sequence have been implicated in the regulation of many genes including ADH2. In glucose fermentation, L. fermentati exhibited a bell-shaped ADH2

  12. Dynamic modeling of methylprednisolone effects on body weight and glucose regulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jing; DuBois, Debra C.; He, Yang; Almon, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Influences of methylprednisolone (MPL) and food consumption on body weight (BW), and the effects of MPL on glycemic control including food consumption and the dynamic interactions among glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids (FFA) were evaluated in normal male Wistar rats. Six groups of animals received either saline or MPL via subcutaneous infusions at the rate of 0.03, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mg/kg/h for different treatment periods. BW and food consumption were measured twice a week. Plasma concentrations of MPL and corticosterone (CST) were determined at animal sacrifice. Plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA were measured at various times after infusion. Plasma MPL concentrations were simulated by a two-compartment model and used as the driving force in the pharmacodynamic (PD) analysis. All data were modeled using ADAPT 5. The MPL treatments caused reduction of food consumption and body weights in all dosing groups. The steroid also caused changes in plasma glucose, insulin, and FFA concentrations. Hyper-insulinemia was achieved rapidly at the first sampling time of 6 h; significant elevations of FFA were observed in all drug treatment groups; whereas only modest increases in plasma glucose were observed in the low dosing groups (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg/h). Body weight changes were modeled by dual actions of MPL: inhibition of food consumption and stimulation of weight loss, with food consumption accounting for the input of energy for body weight. Dynamic models of glucose and insulin feedback interactions were extended to capture the major metabolic effects of FFA: stimulation of insulin secretion and inhibition of insulin-stimulated glucose utilization. These models of body weight and glucose regulation adequately captured the experimental data and reflect significant physiological interactions among glucose, insulin, and FFA. These mechanism-based PD models provide further insights into the multi-factor control of this essential metabolic system. PMID:21394487

  13. Gluco-Incretins Regulate Beta-Cell Glucose Competence by Epigenetic Silencing of Fxyd3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vallois, David; Niederhäuser, Guy; Ibberson, Mark; Nagaray, Vini; Marselli, Lorella; Marchetti, Piero; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Thorens, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Gluco-incretin hormones increase the glucose competence of pancreatic beta-cells by incompletely characterized mechanisms. Methods We searched for genes that were differentially expressed in islets from control and Glp1r−/−; Gipr−/− (dKO) mice, which show reduced glucose competence. Overexpression and knockdown studies; insulin secretion analysis; analysis of gene expression in islets from control and diabetic mice and humans as well as gene methylation and transcriptional analysis were performed. Results Fxyd3 was the most up-regulated gene in glucose incompetent islets from dKO mice. When overexpressed in beta-cells Fxyd3 reduced glucose-induced insulin secretion by acting downstream of plasma membrane depolarization and Ca++ influx. Fxyd3 expression was not acutely regulated by cAMP raising agents in either control or dKO adult islets. Instead, expression of Fxyd3 was controlled by methylation of CpGs present in its proximal promoter region. Increased promoter methylation reduced Fxyd3 transcription as assessed by lower abundance of H3K4me3 at the transcriptional start site and in transcription reporter assays. This epigenetic imprinting was initiated perinatally and fully established in adult islets. Glucose incompetent islets from diabetic mice and humans showed increased expression of Fxyd3 and reduced promoter methylation. Conclusions/Interpretation Because gluco-incretin secretion depends on feeding the epigenetic regulation of Fxyd3 expression may link nutrition in early life to establishment of adult beta-cell glucose competence; this epigenetic control is, however, lost in diabetes possibly as a result of gluco-incretin resistance and/or de-differentiation of beta-cells that are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25058609

  14. Regulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression by glucose and insulin in adipocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, S.; Nishihira, J.; Hirokawa, J.; Yoshimura, H.; Honda, T.; Aoki, K.; Tagami, S.; Kawakami, Y.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been reported that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic islet beta-cells in an autocrine manner, which suggests its pivotal role in the glucose metabolism. According to this finding, we evaluated MIF expression in cultured adipocytes and epididymal fat pads of obese and diabetic rats to investigate its role in adipose tissue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The murine adipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 was used to examine MIF mRNA expression and production of MIF protein in response to various concentrations of glucose and insulin. Epididymal fat pads of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) and Wistar fatty rats, animal models of obesity and diabetes, were subjected to Northern blot analysis to determine MIF mRNA levels. RESULTS: MIF mRNA of 3T3-L1 adipocytes was up-regulated by costimulation with glucose and insulin. Intracellular MIF content was significantly increased by stimulation, whereas its content in the culture medium was decreased. When the cells were treated with cytochalasin B, MIF secretion in the medium was increased. Pioglitazone significantly increased MIF content in the culture medium of 3T3-L1 cells. However, MIF mRNA expression of both epididymal fat pads of OLETF and Wistar fatty rats was down-regulated despite a high plasma glucose level. The plasma MIF level of Wistar fatty rats was significantly increased by treatment with pioglitazone. CONCLUSION: We show here that the intracellular glucose level is critical to determining the MIF mRNA level as well as its protein content in adipose tissue. MIF is known to play an important role in glucose metabolism as a positive regulator of insulin secretion. In this context, it is conceivable that MIF may affect the pathophysiology of obesity and diabetes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:10415161

  15. Central & peripheral glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling differentially regulate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Schurdak, Jennifer D; Seeley, Randy J; Benoit, Stephen C; Davis, Jon F

    2016-07-01

    Recent data implicate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent anorexigenic peptide released in response to nutrient intake, as a regulator for the reinforcing properties of food, alcohol and psychostimulants. While, both central and peripheral mechanisms mediate effects of GLP-1R signaling on food intake, the extent to which central or peripheral GLP-1R signaling regulates reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse is unknown. Here, we examined amphetamine reinforcement, alcohol intake and hedonic feeding following peripheral administration of EX-4 (a GLP-1 analog) in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) (GLP-1R selectively ablated from the central nervous system) mice (n=13/group). First, the effect of EX-4 pretreatment on the expression of amphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (Amp-CPP) was examined in the FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Next, alcohol intake (10% v/v) was evaluated in FLOX and GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following saline or EX-4 injections. Finally, we assessed the effects of EX-4 pretreatment on hedonic feeding behavior. Results indicate that Amp-CPP was completely blocked in the FLOX mice, but not in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice following EX-4 pretreatment. Ex-4 pretreatment selectively blocked alcohol consumption in the FLOX mice, but was ineffective in altering alcohol intake in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice. Notably, hedonic feeding was partially blocked in the GLP-1R KD(Nestin) mice, whereas it was abolished in the FLOX mice. The present study provides critical insights regarding the nature by which GLP-1 signaling controls reinforced behaviors and underscores the importance of both peripheral and central GLP-1R signaling for the regulation of addictive disorders.

  16. A collaborative biomedical engineering undergraduate work: an automatic system for blood glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Minas, Graca; Soares, Filomena

    2009-01-01

    This paper is focused on the design of an automatic system to regulate blood glucose concentration. A model is developed to simulate the process. The model was based on approximating an electrochemical biosensor, for measuring the blood glucose concentration, to electrical circuits for readout, data processing and control. It was implemented using an electronics simulation software package: S-Edit and T-Spice from Tanner Tools EDA. The work was developed by a group of ten students from the fourth year of the integrated master of Biomedical Engineering course of the University of Minho in a collaborative way.

  17. Glucose and ethylene signalling pathways converge to regulate trans-differentiation of epidermal transfer cells in Vicia narbonensis cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Andriunas, Felicity A; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Weber, Hans; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2011-12-01

    Transfer cells are specialized transport cells containing invaginated wall ingrowths that provide an amplified plasma membrane surface area with high densities of transporter proteins. They trans-differentiate from differentiated cells at sites where enhanced rates of nutrient transport occur across apo/symplasmic boundaries. Despite their physiological importance, the signal(s) and signalling cascades responsible for initiating their trans-differentiation are poorly understood. In culture, adaxial epidermal cells of Vicia narbonensis cotyledons were induced to trans-differentiate to a transfer cell morphology. Manipulating their intracellular glucose concentrations by transgenic knock-down of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression and/or culture on a high-glucose medium demonstrated that glucose functioned as a negative regulator of wall ingrowth induction. In contrast, glucose had no detectable effect on wall ingrowth morphology. The effect on wall ingrowth induction of culture on media containing glucose analogues suggested that glucose acts through a hexokinase-dependent signalling pathway. Elevation of an epidermal cell-specific ethylene signal alone, or in combination with glucose analogues, countered the negative effect of glucose on wall ingrowth induction. Glucose modulated the amplitude of ethylene-stimulated wall ingrowth induction by down-regulating the expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes and an ethylene insensitive 3 (EIN3)-like gene (EIL) encoding a key transcription factor in the ethylene signalling cascade. A model is presented describing the interaction between glucose and ethylene signalling pathways regulating the induction of wall ingrowth formation in adaxial epidermal cells.

  18. DHHC7 Palmitoylates Glucose Transporter 4 (Glut4) and Regulates Glut4 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Du, Keyong; Murakami, Shoko; Sun, Yingmin; Kilpatrick, Casey L; Luscher, Bernhard

    2017-02-17

    Insulin-dependent translocation of glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) to the plasma membrane plays a key role in the dynamic regulation of glucose homeostasis. We recently showed that this process is critically dependent on palmitoylation of Glut4 at Cys-223. To gain further insights into the regulation of Glut4 palmitoylation, we set out to identify the palmitoyl acyltransferase (PAT) involved. Here we report that among 23 mammalian DHHC proteins, DHHC7 is the major Glut4 PAT, based on evidence that ectopic expression of DHHC7 increased Glut4 palmitoylation, whereas DHHC7 knockdown in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and DHHC7 KO in adipose tissue and muscle decreased Glut4 palmitoylation. Moreover, inactivation of DHHC7 suppressed insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and primary adipocytes. Finally, DHHC7 KO mice developed hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, thereby confirming that DHHC7 represents the principal PAT for Glut4 and that this mechanism is essential for insulin-regulated glucose homeostasis.

  19. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fuse, Yuji; Tamaoki, Junya; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Muratani, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7) and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a) were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates. PMID:28116036

  20. The Histone Deacetylase SIRT6 Regulates Glucose Homeostasis via Hif1α

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei; D'Urso, Agustina; Toiber, Debra; Sebastian, Carlos; Henry, Ryan E.; Vadysirisack, Douangsone D.; Guimaraes, Alexander; Marinelli, Brett; Wikstrom, Jakob D.; Nir, Tomer; Clish, Clary B.; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Iliopoulos, Othon; Kurland, Irwin; Dor, Yuval; Weissleder, Ralph; Shirihai, Orian S.; Ellisen, Leif W.; Espinosa, Joaquin M.; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Summary SIRT6 is a member of a highly conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacetylases with various roles in metabolism, stress resistance and lifespan. SIRT6 deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life; however, the mechanism underlying this hypoglycemia remained unclear. Here, we demonstrate that SIRT6 functions as a histone H3K9 deacetylase to control the expression of multiple glycolytic genes. Specifically, SIRT6 appears to function as a co-repressor of the transcription factor Hif1α, a critical regulator of nutrient stress responses. Consistent with this notion, SIRT6 deficient cells exhibit increased Hif1α activity and show increased glucose uptake with up-regulation of glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration. Our studies uncover a novel role for the chromatin factor SIRT6 as a master regulator of glucose homeostasis, and may provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches against metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. PMID:20141841

  1. Central resistin regulates hypothalamic and peripheral lipid metabolism in a nutritional-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María J; González, C Ruth; Varela, Luis; Lage, Ricardo; Tovar, Sulay; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Williams, Lynda M; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Evidence suggests that the adipocyte-derived hormone resistin (RSTN) directly regulates both feeding and peripheral metabolism through, so far, undefined hypothalamic-mediated mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the anorectic effect of RSTN is associated with inappropriately decreased mRNA expression of orexigenic (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and increased mRNA expression of anorexigenic (cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript) neuropeptides in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Of interest, RSTN also exerts a profound nutrition-dependent inhibitory effect on hypothalamic fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by increased phosphorylation levels of both AMP-activated protein kinase and its downstream target acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, associated with decreased expression of fatty acid synthase in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, we also demonstrate that chronic central RSTN infusion results in decreased body weight and major changes in peripheral expression of lipogenic enzymes, in a tissue-specific and nutrition-dependent manner. Thus, in the fed state central RSTN is associated with induced expression of fatty acid synthesis enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines in liver, whereas its administration in the fasted state does so in white adipose tissue. Overall, our results indicate that RSTN controls feeding and peripheral lipid metabolism and suggest that hepatic RSTN-induced insulin resistance may be mediated by central activation of de novo lipogenesis in liver.

  2. Glucose-regulated and drug-perturbed phosphoproteome reveals molecular mechanisms controlling insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Humphrey, Sean J.; Cox, Jürgen; Mischnik, Marcel; Schulte, Anke; Klabunde, Thomas; Schäfer, Matthias; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-secreting beta cells play an essential role in maintaining physiological blood glucose levels, and their dysfunction leads to the development of diabetes. To elucidate the signalling events regulating insulin secretion, we applied a recently developed phosphoproteomics workflow. We quantified the time-resolved phosphoproteome of murine pancreatic cells following their exposure to glucose and in combination with small molecule compounds that promote insulin secretion. The quantitative phosphoproteome of 30,000 sites clustered into three main groups in concordance with the modulation of the three key kinases: PKA, PKC and CK2A. A high-resolution time course revealed key novel regulatory sites, revealing the importance of methyltransferase DNMT3A phosphorylation in the glucose response. Remarkably a significant proportion of these novel regulatory sites is significantly downregulated in diabetic islets. Control of insulin secretion is embedded in an unexpectedly broad and complex range of cellular functions, which are perturbed by drugs in multiple ways. PMID:27841257

  3. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Cole; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Sheidy, Daniel; Shively, Christian A; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Andrews, Philip C; Kumar, Anuj

    2014-03-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  4. Basal and insulin-regulated free fatty acid and glucose metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Shadid, Samyah; Kanaley, Jill A; Sheehan, Michael T; Jensen, Michael D

    2007-06-01

    These studies were done to examine the effects of body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), sex, and fitness on basal and insulin-regulated FFA and glucose metabolism. We performed 137 experiments in 101 nondiabetic, premenopausal women and men, ranging from low normal weight to class III obese (BMI 18.0-40.5 kg/m2). Glucose flux was measured using [6-(2)H2]glucose and FFA kinetics with [9,10-(3)H]oleate under either basal (74 experiments) or euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (1.0 mU.kg FFM(-1).min(-1)) clamp conditions (63 experiments). Consistent with our previous findings, REE and sex independently predicted basal FFA flux, whereas fat-free mass was the best predictor of basal glucose flux; in addition, percent body fat was independently and positively associated with basal glucose flux (total r2 = 0.52, P < 0.0001). Insulin-suppressed lipolysis remained significantly associated with REE (r = 0.25, P < 0.05), but percent body fat also contributed (total adjusted r2 = 0.36, P < 0.0001), whereas sex was not significantly related to insulin-suppressed FFA flux. Glucose disposal during hyperinsulinemia was independently associated with peak VO2, percent body fat, and FFA concentrations (total r2 = 0.63, P < 0.0001) but not with sex. We conclude that basal glucose production is independently related to both FFM and body fatness. In addition, hyperinsulinemia obscures the sex differences in FFA release relative to REE, but brings out the effects of fatness on lipolysis.

  5. Central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors: similar regulation by stress and GABA receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Rägo, L; Kiivet, R A; Harro, J; Pŏld, M

    1989-04-01

    Central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine (BD) receptors were labelled either by 3H-flunitrazepam or 3H-Ro 5-4864 in vitro after stress and in vivo administration of GABAA and GABAB agonists. A significant increase in the density of cerebral cortex and kidney BD binding sites was observed in rats after forced swimming stress. Similar changes in both type of BD receptors were also followed when naive (stressed) and handling-habituated (unstressed) rats were used. Stress in both models was unable to change the affinity of BD receptors in cerebral cortex, but significantly lowered it in kidneys. Acute treatment of rats with muscimol (1.5 mg/kg) or (-)baclofen (5 mg/kg) resulted in marked increase in the affinity of BD binding not only in cerebral cortex but also in kidneys. After (-)baclofen treatment the number of BD binding sites was lowered in the structures studied. In a separate study mice selected according to their behavioral response to (-)baclofen (1 mg/kg) were studied. Two weeks after the selection it appeared that baclofen responders were behaviorally more "anxious" than baclofen nonresponders. The number of BD binding sites was reduced in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, heart and kidneys in baclofen responders as compared to baclofen nonresponders. In several cases the changes in peripheral BD binding sites were even more pronounced than those in central ones. The data presented here evidence that peripheral- and central-type BD receptors are regulated similarly by GABA and some models of stress. The physiological mechanisms involved in similar regulation of central- and peripheral-type BD receptors are yet unknown.

  6. Cross-talk between light and glucose regulation controls toxin production and morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Atoui, A; Kastner, C; Larey, C M; Thokala, R; Etxebeste, O; Espeso, E A; Fischer, R; Calvo, A M

    2010-12-01

    Light is a major environmental stimulus that has a broad effect on organisms, triggering a cellular response that results in an optimal adaptation enhancing fitness and survival. In fungi, light affects growth, and causes diverse morphological changes such as those leading to reproduction. Light can also affect fungal metabolism, including the biosynthesis of natural products. In this study we show that in Aspergillus nidulans the effect of light on the production of the sterigmatocystin (ST) toxin depends on the glucose concentration. In cultures grown with 1% glucose and exposed to light, ST production was lower than when grown in the dark. This lower ST production coincided with an elevated rate of cellular damage with partial loss of nuclear integrity and vacuolated cytoplasm. However, in cultures grown with 2% glucose these effects were reversed and light enhanced ST production. Glucose abundance also affected the light-dependent subcellular localization of the VeA (velvet) protein, a key regulator necessary for normal light-dependent morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in Aspergilli and other fungal genera. The role of other VeA-associated proteins, particularly the blue-light-sensing proteins LreA and LreB (WC-1 and WC-2 orthologs), on conidiation could also be modified by the abundance of glucose. We also show that LreA and LreB, as well as the phytochrome FphA, modulate not only the synthesis of sterigmatocystin, but also the production of the antibiotic penicillin.

  7. Insulin-coated gold nanoparticles as a new concept for personalized and adjustable glucose regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilo, Malka; Berenstein, Peter; Dreifuss, Tamar; Nash, Yuval; Goldsmith, Guy; Kazimirsky, Gila; Motiei, Menachem; Frenkel, Dan; Brodie, Chaya; Popovtzer, Rachela

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by high blood glucose levels, affecting millions of people around the world. Currently, the main treatment for diabetes requires multiple daily injections of insulin and self-monitoring of blood glucose levels, which markedly affect patients' quality of life. In this study we present a novel strategy for controlled and prolonged glucose regulation, based on the administration of insulin-coated gold nanoparticles (INS-GNPs). We show that both intravenous and subcutaneous injection of INS-GNPs into a mouse model of type 1 diabetes decreases blood glucose levels for periods over 3 times longer than free insulin. We further showed that conjugation of insulin to GNPs prevented its rapid degradation by the insulin-degrading-enzyme, and thus allows controlled and adjustable bio-activity. Moreover, we assessed different sizes and concentrations of INS-GNPs, and found that both parameters have a critical effect in vivo, enabling specific adjustment of blood glucose levels. These findings have the potential to improve patient compliance in diabetes mellitus.

  8. Retinal proteins associated with redox regulation and protein folding play central roles in response to high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ssu-Han; Lee, Wen-Chi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy typically causes poor vision and blindness. A previous study revealed that a high blood glucose concentration induces glycoxidation and weakens the retinal capillaries. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose induced diabetic retinopathy remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we cultured the retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19 in mannitol-balanced 5.5, 25, and 100 mM glucose media and investigated protein level alterations. Proteomic analysis revealed significant changes in 137 protein features, of which 124 demonstrated changes in a glucose concentration dependent manner. Several proteins functionally associated with redox regulation, protein folding, or the cytoskeleton are affected by increased glucose concentrations. Additional analyses also revealed that cellular oxidative stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, was significantly increased after treatment with high glucose concentrations. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential and cell survival remained unchanged during treatment with high glucose concentrations. To summarize, in this study, we used a comprehensive retinal pigmented epithelial cell based proteomic approach for identifying changes in protein expression associated retinal markers induced by high glucose concentrations. Our results revealed that a high glucose condition can induce cellular oxidative stress and modulate the levels of proteins with functions in redox regulation, protein folding, and cytoskeleton regulation; however, cell viability and mitochondrial integrity are not significantly disturbed under these high glucose conditions.

  9. Characterization of the role of sphingomyelin synthase 2 in glucose metabolism in whole-body and peripheral tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Zhao, Songji; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Wakabayashi, Masato; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is a proposed potential therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. However, the contributions of SMS2 to glucose metabolism in tissues and its possible therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, to determine whole-body glucose utilization and the contributions of each insulin-targeted tissue to glucose uptake, we performed a glucose kinetics study, using the radiolabeled glucose analog (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG), in wild-type (WT) and SMS2 knockout (KO) mice. Insulin signaling was enhanced in the liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of SMS2 KO mice compared with those of WT mice. In addition, compared with in WT mice, blood clearance of (18)F-FDG was accelerated in SMS2 KO mice when they were fed either a normal or a high fat diet. (18)F-FDG uptake was also increased in insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle in the SMS2 KO mice. Whereas skeletal muscle sphingolipid content was not clearly affected, plasma levels of very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing ceramides were markedly increased in SMS2 KO mice, compared with in WT mice. We also generated liver-conditional SMS2 KO mice and performed glucose and insulin tolerance tests on mice with a high fat diet. However, no significant effect was observed. Thus, our study provided evidence that genetic inhibition of SMS2 elevated glucose clearance through activation of glucose uptake into insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle by a mechanism independent of hepatic SMS2. Our findings further indicate that this occurs, at least in part, via indirect mechanisms such as elevation of VLCFA-containing ceramides.

  10. Opuntia ficus-indica ingestion stimulates peripheral disposal of oral glucose before and after exercise in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Van Proeyen, Karen; Ramaekers, Monique; Pischel, Ivo; Hespel, Peter

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) cladode and fruit-skin extract on blood glucose and plasma insulin increments due to high-dose carbohydrate ingestion, before and after exercise. Healthy, physically active men (n = 6; 21.0 ± 1.6 years, 78.1 ± 6.0 kg) participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study involving 2 experimental sessions. In each session, the subjects successively underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at rest (OGTT(R)), a 30-min cycling bout at ~75% VO(2max), and another OGTT after exercise (OGTT(EX)). They received capsules containing either 1,000 mg OFI or placebo (PL) 30 min before and immediately after the OGTT(R). Blood samples were collected before (t₀) and at 30-min intervals after ingestion of 75 g glucose for determination of blood glucose and serum insulin. In OGTT(EX) an additional 75-g oral glucose bolus was administered at t₆₀. In OGTT(R), OFI administration reduced the area under the glucose curve (AUC(GLUC)) by 26%, mainly due to lower blood glucose levels at t₃₀ and t₆₀ (p < .05). Furthermore, a higher serum insulin concentration was noted after OFI intake at baseline and at t₃₀ (p < .05). In OGTT(EX), blood glucose at t₆₀ was ~10% lower in OFI than in PL, which resulted in a decreased AUC(GLUC) (-37%, p < .05). However, insulin values and AUC(INS) were not different between OFI and PL. In conclusion, the current study shows that OFI extract can increase plasma insulin and thereby facilitate the clearance of an oral glucose load from the circulation at rest and after endurance exercise in healthy men.

  11. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, Annika; Clausen, Trine R.; Larsen, Sylvester; Ladefoged, Mette; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.; Larsen, Louise; Vang, Ole; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased by glucose in human and rat islets and INS-1E cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a increases proliferation of INS-1E beta-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forced expression of miR-29a decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of beta-cell miR-29a improves GSIS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a may be a mediator of glucose toxicity in beta-cells. -- Abstract: Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investigate the impact of glucose on miR-29a levels in INS-1E beta-cells and in human islets of Langerhans and furthermore to evaluate the impact of miR-29a on beta-cell function and proliferation. Increased glucose levels up-regulated miR-29a in beta-cells and human and rat islets of Langerhans. Glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion (GSIS) of INS-1E beta-cells was decreased by forced expression of miR-29a, while depletion of endogenous miR-29a improved GSIS. Over-expression of miR-29a increased INS-1E proliferation. Thus, miR-29a up-regulation is involved in glucose-induced proliferation of beta-cells. Furthermore, as depletion of miR-29a improves beta-cell function, miR-29a is a mediator of glucose-induced beta-cell dysfunction. Glucose-induced up-regulation of miR-29a in beta-cells could be implicated in progression from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes.

  12. [The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Sun, Cui-Yu; Sun, Guo-Peng; Ren, Gui-Ping; Ye, Xian-Long; Zhu, Sheng-Long; Wang, Wen-Fei; Xu, Peng-Fei; Li, Shu-Jie; Wu, Qiang; Niu, Ze-Shan; Sun, Tian; Liu, Ming-Yao; Li, De-Shan

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies proposed that the synergistic effect of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF-21) and insulin may be due to the improvement of insulin sensitivity by FGF-21. However, there is no experimental evidence to support this. This study was designed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin in the regulation of glucose metabolism. The synergistic effect of FGF-21 and insulin on regulating glucose metabolism was demonstrated by investigating the glucose absorption rate by insulin resistance HepG2 cell model and the blood glucose chances in type 2 diabetic db/db mice after treatments with different concentrations of FGF-21 or/and insulin; The synergistic metabolism was revealed through detecting GLUT1 and GLUT4 transcription levels in the liver by real-time PCR method. The experimental results showed that FGF-21 and insulin have a synergistic effect on the regulation of glucose metabolism. The results of real-time PCR showed that the effective dose of FGF-21 could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT1 in a dose-dependent manner, but had no effect on the transcription level of GLUT4. Insulin (4 u) alone could up-regulate the transcription level of GLUT4, yet had no effect on that of GLUT1. Ineffective dose 0.1 mg kg(-1) FGF-21 alone could not change the transcription level of GLUT1 or GLUT4. However, when the ineffective dose 0.1 mg x kg(-1) FGF-21 was used in combination with insulin (4 u) significantly increased the transcription levels of both GLUT1 and GLUT4, the transcription level of GLUT1 was similar to that treated with 5 time concentration of FGF-21 alone; the transcription level of GLUT4 is higher than that treated with insulin (4 u) alone. In summary, in the presence of FGF-21, insulin increases the sensitivity of FGF-21 through enhancing GLUT1 transcription. Vice versa, FGF-21 increases the sensitivity of insulin by stimulating GLUT4 transcription in the presence of insulin. FGF-21 and insulin exert a synergistic

  13. Down-regulation of lipoprotein lipase increases glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Veronica; Saraff, Kumuda; Medh, Jheem D.

    2009-11-06

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are synthetic hypoglycemic agents used to treat type 2 diabetes. TZDs target the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) and improve systemic insulin sensitivity. The contributions of specific tissues to TZD action, or the downstream effects of PPAR-{gamma} activation, are not very clear. We have used a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6 cells) to demonstrate that TZDs directly target PPAR-{gamma} in muscle cells. TZD treatment resulted in a significant repression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) expression in L6 cells. This repression correlated with an increase in glucose uptake. Down-regulation of LPL message and protein levels using siRNA resulted in a similar increase in insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Thus, LPL down-regulation improved insulin sensitivity independent of TZDs. This finding provides a novel method for the management of insulin resistance.

  14. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1α is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1α exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo.

  15. Neurotrimin is an estrogen-regulated determinant of peripheral sympathetic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Krizsan-Agbas, Dora; Pedchenko, Tetyana; Smith, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying axon degeneration in peripheral neuropathies and during normal remodeling are poorly understood. Because estrogen induces widespread sympathetic axon degeneration within female reproductive tract smooth muscle, we surveyed estrogen-regulated genes in rat myometrium. Microarray analysis revealed that the neural cell adhesion protein neurotrimin (Ntm) was markedly upregulated at 6h and down-regulated by 24h after injection of 17β-estradiol and real time RT-PCR confirmed this pattern of expression. Protein analysis by western blotting showed that uterine Ntm protein is also upregulated in vivo at 6−24h following estrogen injection, and that Ntm protein is increased selectively in the myometrium during the high-estrogen phase of the estrous cycle. Cultured myometrial smooth muscle cells display peri-nuclear accumulations of Ntm protein, and 17β-Estradiol also increases intracellular levels of Ntm and its secretion into the culture medium. To determine if neurotrimin is required for estrogen-induced sympathetic pruning, sympathetic neurons were co-cultured with uterine smooth muscle cells transfected with siRNA directed against Ntm. While estrogen inhibited neurite outgrowth in non-transfected co-cultures, estrogen's ability to reduce sympathetic outgrowth was impaired substantially following Ntm downregulation. This supports a role for neurotrimin in mediating estrogen-induced sympathetic pruning in some peripheral targets. Together with earlier studies, these findings support the idea that physiological sympathetic axon degeneration is a multifactorial process requiring dynamic regulation of multiple repellant proteins. PMID:18627025

  16. Schwann cells and their transcriptional network: Evolution of key regulators of peripheral myelination.

    PubMed

    Stolt, C Claus; Wegner, Michael

    2016-06-15

    As derivatives of the neural crest, Schwann cells represent a vertebrate invention. Their development and differentiation is under control of a newly constructed, vertebrate-specific regulatory network that contains Sox10, Oct6 and Krox20 as cornerstones and central regulators of peripheral myelination. In this review, we discuss the function and relationship of these transcription factors among each other and in the context of their regulatory network, and present ideas of how neofunctionalization may have helped to recruit them to their novel task in Schwann cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Myelin Evolution.

  17. Peripheral Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Precursor Regulates Pain as an Inflammatory Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cong; Zhong, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Fiona H.; Li, Jia-yi; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Jun-Mei; Song, Bo; Li, Chang-Qi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Dai, Ru-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), the unprocessed BDNF gene product, binds to its receptors and exerts the opposing biologic functions of mature BDNF. proBDNF is expressed in the peripheral tissues but the functions of peripheral proBDNF remain elusive. Here we showed that proBDNF and its predominant receptor, p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor were upregulated in the nerve fibers and inflammatory cells in the local tissue in inflammatory pain. Neutralization of proBDNF by polyclonal antibody attenuated pain in different models of inflammatory pain. Unilateral intra-plantar supplementation of proBDNF by injecting exogenous proBDNF or ectopic overexpression resulted in pain hypersensitivity and induced spinal phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Exogenous proBDNF injection induced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the activation of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that inflammatory reaction contributed to the pro-algesic effect of proBDNF. Finally, we generated monoclonal anti-proBDNF antibody that could biologically block proBDNF. Administration of monoclonal Ab-proBDNF attenuated various types of inflammatory pain and surgical pain. Thus, peripheral proBDNF is a potential pain mediator and anti-proBDNF pretreatment may alleviate the development of inflammatory pain. PMID:27251195

  18. Impact of sleep and sleep loss on glucose homeostasis and appetite regulation

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Kristen L

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Over the past 30 years there has been an increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, both of which can have serious consequences for longevity and quality of life. Sleep durations may have also decreased over this time period. This chapter reviews laboratory and epidemiologic evidence for an association between sleep loss and impairments in glucose metabolism and appetite regulation, which could increase the risk of diabetes or weight gain. PMID:18516218

  19. Allosteric regulation of the glucose:H+ symporter of Lactobacillus brevis: cooperative binding of glucose and HPr(ser-P).

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Saier, M H

    1995-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis transports glucose and the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose via a proton symport mechanism that is allosterically inhibited by the seryl-phosphorylated derivative of HPr, the small phosphocarrier protein of the phosphotransferase system. We have demonstrate that S46DHPr, a mutant analog of HPr which conformationally resembles HPr(ser-P) but not free HPr, specifically binds to membranes derived from glucose-grown L. brevis cells if and only if a substrate of the glucose permease is also present. PMID:7896720

  20. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-meng; Sun, Jian-guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-qiu; Ding, Jian-qing; Li, Dong-hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson’s disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasis via regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:28224045

  1. DJ-1 maintains energy and glucose homeostasis by regulating the function of brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Liu, Xiao-Meng; Sun, Jian-Guang; Chen, Hong; Ma, Jun; Dong, Meng; Peng, Shengyi; Wang, Ji-Qiu; Ding, Jian-Qing; Li, Dong-Hao; Speakman, John R; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-01-01

    DJ-1 protein is involved in multiple physiological processes, including Parkinson's disease. However, the role of DJ-1 in the metabolism is largely unknown. Here we found that DJ-1 maintained energy balance and glucose homeostasisvia regulating brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity. DJ-1-deficient mice reduced body mass, increased energy expenditure and improved insulin sensitivity. DJ-1 deletion also resisted high-fat-diet (HFD) induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, DJ-1 transgene triggered autonomous obesity and glucose intolerance. Further BAT transplantation experiments clarified DJ-1 regulates energy and glucose homeostasis by modulating BAT function. Mechanistically, we found that DJ-1 promoted PTEN proteasomal degradation via an E3 ligase, mind bomb-2 (Mib2), which led to Akt activation and inhibited FoxO1-dependent Ucp1 (Uncoupling protein-1) expression in BAT. Consistently, ablation of Akt1 mitigated the obesity and BAT dysfunction induced by DJ-1 transgene. These findings define a new biological role of DJ-1 protein in regulating BAT function, with an implication of the therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  2. High prevalence of abnormal circadian blood pressure regulation and impaired glucose tolerance in adults with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowska, K; Schnack, C; Mittermayer, F; Kopp, H P; Hofer, M; Kann, T; Schernthaner, G

    2005-09-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have an increased mortality from cardiovascular events. Reduced nocturnal blood pressure decline (non-dipping) and impaired glucose tolerance are considered as cardiovascular risk factors. To evaluate the role of these risk factors in patients with hypopituitarism we determined the 24-hour blood pressure regulation and glucose tolerance status in hypopituitary patients with and without growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Sixty-one hypopituitary subjects 5 +/- 3 years after brain surgery because of macroadenoma, 61 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and 20 healthy controls were included. Forty-four hypopituitary patients were GH deficient and 28 of these on GH treatment. Non-dipping was observed in 41 % (n = 7) of hypopituitary subjects with normal GH release, in 46 % (n = 13) of patients on GH therapy, and in 69 % (n = 11) of untreated GH deficient patients. Untreated GH deficient patients had a higher systolic night/day ratio (1.00 +/- 0.03) compared to non GH deficient (0.92 +/- 0.02; p < 0.02) and GH treated hypopituitary patients (0.93 +/- 0.01; p < 0.02). The rate of non-dipping in hypopituitarism was comparable to that in T2DM. Pathologic glucose tolerance was diagnosed in 30 % of the hypopituitary patients. The prevalence of non-dipping was independent of glucose metabolism in hypopituitary patients. All controls had normal night time blood pressure fall and glucose metabolism. The high prevalence of nocturnal non-dipping and glucose intolerance detected in this cohort might contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk of hypopituitary patients.

  3. Hypoglycemic Effect of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Is Due to Enhanced Peripheral Glucose Uptake through Activation of AMPK/p38 MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Leem, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Gyou; Hahm, Young-Tae; Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-12-09

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten (OFS) has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses, including diabetes. However, detailed mechanisms underlying hypoglycemic effects remain unclear. In this study, the mechanism underlying the hypoglycemic activity of OFS was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo systems. OFS treatment inhibited α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption assessed by Na⁺-dependent glucose uptake using brush border membrane vesicles. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is widely recognized as an important regulator of glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been proposed to be a component of AMPK-mediated signaling. In the present study, OFS dose-dependently increased glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. The AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylations were stimulated by OFS, and inhibitors of AMPK (compound C) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) abolished the effects of OFS. Furthermore, OFS increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane. OFS administration (1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight) in db/db mice dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were also dose-dependently improved with OFS treatment. OFS administration improved pancreatic function through increased β-cell mass in db/db mice. These findings suggest that OFS acts by inhibiting glucose absorption from the intestine and enhancing glucose uptake from insulin-sensitive muscle cells through the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  4. Hypoglycemic Effect of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten Is Due to Enhanced Peripheral Glucose Uptake through Activation of AMPK/p38 MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Gyou; Hahm, Young-Tae; Kim, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten (OFS) has been used in traditional medicine for centuries to treat several illnesses, including diabetes. However, detailed mechanisms underlying hypoglycemic effects remain unclear. In this study, the mechanism underlying the hypoglycemic activity of OFS was evaluated using in vitro and in vivo systems. OFS treatment inhibited α-glucosidase activity and intestinal glucose absorption assessed by Na+-dependent glucose uptake using brush border membrane vesicles. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is widely recognized as an important regulator of glucose transport in skeletal muscle, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has been proposed to be a component of AMPK-mediated signaling. In the present study, OFS dose-dependently increased glucose uptake in L6 muscle cells. The AMPK and p38 MAPK phosphorylations were stimulated by OFS, and inhibitors of AMPK (compound C) and p38 MAPK (SB203580) abolished the effects of OFS. Furthermore, OFS increased glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane. OFS administration (1 g/kg and 2 g/kg body weight) in db/db mice dose-dependently ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose tolerance. Insulin resistance assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index were also dose-dependently improved with OFS treatment. OFS administration improved pancreatic function through increased β-cell mass in db/db mice. These findings suggest that OFS acts by inhibiting glucose absorption from the intestine and enhancing glucose uptake from insulin-sensitive muscle cells through the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27941667

  5. Blood glucose regulation in diabetics. A flatness based nonlinear control simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocha, Guillermo; Podestá, Melina; Mazzadi, Alejandro; Amorena, Carlos; D'Atellis, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Flat systems are a generalization of linear systems, but the techniques used for controlling flat systems are much different than many of the existing techniques for linear systems. In this paper we present the flatness-based control of blood glucose regulation in human system. A non-near model, he Bergman Minimal Model, is used o represent he dynamics of blood regulation in humans and because of the flatness property, he system variables can be expressed as functions of he at output and heir time derivatives and a control aw developed.

  6. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  7. Chronic central leptin infusion modulates the glycemia response to insulin administration in male rats through regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Frühbeck, Gema; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-11-05

    Leptin and insulin use overlapping signaling mechanisms to modify hepatic glucose metabolism, which is critical in maintaining normal glycemia. We examined the effect of an increase in central leptin and insulin on hepatic glucose metabolism and its influence on serum glucose levels. Chronic leptin infusion increased serum leptin and reduced hepatic SH-phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1, the association of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 to the insulin receptor in liver and the rise in glycemia induced by central insulin. Leptin also decreased hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase levels and increased insulin's ability to phosphorylate insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt and glycogen synthase kinase on Ser9 and to stimulate glucose transporter 2 and glycogen levels. Peripheral leptin treatment reproduced some of these changes, but to a lesser extent. Our data indicate that leptin increases the hepatic response to a rise in insulin, suggesting that pharmacological manipulation of leptin targets may be of interest for controlling glycemia.

  8. Translocator protein (18 kDa) as a pharmacological target in adipocytes to regulate glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-09-01

    As a major regulator in obesity and its associated metabolic complications, the proper functioning of adipocytes is crucial for health maintenance, thus serving as an important target for the development of anti-obese and anti-diabetic therapies. There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial malfunction is a pivotal event in disturbing adipocyte cell homeostasis. Among major mitochondrial structure components, the high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18 kDa; TSPO) has shown importance across a broad spectrum of mitochondrial functions. Recent studies demonstrated the presence of TSPO in white adipocyte mitochondria of mice, and administration of TSPO drug ligands to obese mice reduced weight gain and lowered glucose level. Therefore, it is of great interest to assess whether TSPO in adipocytes could serve as a drug target to regulate adipocyte activities with potential influence on weight control and glucose metabolism. Two structurally distinct TSPO drug ligands, PK 11195 and FGIN-1-27, improved the intracellular dynamics of 3T3-L1 adipocytes, such as the production and release of adipokines, glucose uptake, and adipogenesis. TSPO knockdown in either differentiated adipocytes or preadipocytes impaired these functions. Findings from 3T3-L1 cells were related to human primary cells, where TSPO expression was tightly associated with the metabolic state of primary adipocytes and the differentiation of primary preadipocytes. These results suggest that TSPO expression is essential to safeguard healthy adipocyte functions, and that TSPO activation in adipocytes improves their metabolic status in regulating glucose homeostasis. Adipocyte TSPO may serve as a pharmacologic target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  9. Serotonin 2C receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Eric D; Liu, Chen; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Liu, Tiemin; Kim, Mi Hwa; Lee, Charlotte E; Vianna, Claudia R; Williams, Kevin W; Xu, Yong; Elmquist, Joel K

    2013-12-01

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor agonists on energy and glucose homeostasis are unknown. Here, we show that mice lacking serotonin 2C receptors (Htr2c) specifically in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons had normal body weight but developed glucoregulatory defects including hyperinsulinemia, hyperglucagonemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. Moreover, these mice did not show anorectic responses to serotonergic agents that suppress appetite and developed hyperphagia and obesity when they were fed a high-fat/high-sugar diet. A requirement of serotonin 2C receptors in POMC neurons for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis was further demonstrated when Htr2c loss was induced in POMC neurons in adult mice using a tamoxifen-inducible POMC-cre system. These data demonstrate that serotonin 2C receptor-expressing POMC neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis and implicate POMC neurons as the target for the effect of serotonin 2C receptor agonists on weight-loss induction and improved glycemic control.

  10. Developmental role for endocannabinoid signaling in regulating glucose metabolism and growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiying; Schmidt, Sarah F; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    Treatment of ob/ob (obese) mice with a cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cnr1) antagonist reduces food intake, suggesting a role for endocannabinoid signaling in leptin action. We further evaluated the role of endocannabinoid signaling by analyzing the phenotype of Cnr1 knockout ob/ob mice. Double mutant animals show a more severe growth retardation than ob/ob mice with similar levels of adiposity and reduced IGF-I levels without alterations of growth hormone (GH) levels. The double mutant mice are also significantly more glucose intolerant than ob/ob mice. This is in contrast to treatment of ob/ob mice with a Cnr1 antagonist that had no effect on glucose metabolism, suggesting a possible requirement for endocannabinoid signaling during development for normal glucose homeostasis. Double mutant animals also showed similar leptin sensitivity as ob/ob mice, suggesting that there are developmental changes that compensate for the loss of Cnr1 signaling. These data establish a role for Cnr1 during development and suggest that compensatory changes during development may mitigate the requirement for Cnr1 in mediating the effects of leptin. The data also suggest a developmental role for Cnr1 to promote growth, regulate the GH/IGF-I axis, and improve β-cell function and glucose homeostasis in the setting of leptin deficiency.

  11. Wiener sliding-mode control for artificial pancreas: a new nonlinear approach to glucose regulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Rmileh, Amjad; Garcia-Gabin, Winston

    2012-08-01

    Type 1 diabetic patients need insulin therapy to keep their blood glucose close to normal. In this paper an attempt is made to show how nonlinear control-oriented model may be used to improve the performance of closed-loop control of blood glucose in diabetic patients. The nonlinear Wiener model is used as a novel modeling approach to be applied to the glucose control problem. The identified Wiener model is used in the design of a robust nonlinear sliding mode control strategy. Two configurations of the nonlinear controller are tested and compared to a controller designed with a linear model. The controllers are designed in a Smith predictor structure to reduce the effect of system time delay. To improve the meal compensation features, the controllers are provided with a simple feedforward controller to inject an insulin bolus at meal time. Different simulation scenarios have been used to evaluate the proposed controllers. The obtained results show that the new approach outperforms the linear control scheme, and regulates the glucose level within safe limits in the presence of measurement and modeling errors, meal uncertainty and patient variations.

  12. Ethylene acts as a negative regulator of glucose induced lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, are more exposed to the hazards of constantly changing environmental conditions globally. During the lifetime of a plant, the root system encounters various challenges such as obstacles, pathogens, high salinity, water logging, nutrient scarcity etc. The developmental plasticity of the root system provides brilliant adaptability to plants to counter the changes exerted by both external as well as internal cues and achieve an optimized growth status. Phytohormones are one of the major intrinsic factors regulating all aspects of plant growth and development both independently as well as through complex signal integrations at multiple levels. We have previously shown that glucose (Glc) and brassinosteroid (BR) signalings interact extensively to regulate lateral root (LR) development in Arabidopsis. (1) Auxin efflux as well as influx and downstream signaling components are also involved in Glc-BR regulation of LR emergence. Here, we provide evidence for involvement of ethylene signaling machinery downstream to Glc and BR in regulation of LR emergence.

  13. Ethylene acts as a negative regulator of glucose induced lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, are more exposed to the hazards of constantly changing environmental conditions globally. During the lifetime of a plant, the root system encounters various challenges such as obstacles, pathogens, high salinity, water logging, nutrient scarcity etc. The developmental plasticity of the root system provides brilliant adaptability to plants to counter the changes exerted by both external as well as internal cues and achieve an optimized growth status. Phytohormones are one of the major intrinsic factors regulating all aspects of plant growth and development both independently as well as through complex signal integrations at multiple levels. We have previously shown that glucose (Glc) and brassinosteroid (BR) signalings interact extensively to regulate lateral root (LR) development in Arabidopsis.1 Auxin efflux as well as influx and downstream signaling components are also involved in Glc-BR regulation of LR emergence. Here, we provide evidence for involvement of ethylene signaling machinery downstream to Glc and BR in regulation of LR emergence. PMID:26236960

  14. Gene expression of GLUT3 glucose transporter regulated by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro in neuronal cell cultures from rat embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, S; Sawa, H; Inoue, N; Nakamichi, Y; Takeshima, H; Hoshino, T

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether glucose regulates the gene expression of glucose transporter GLUT3 in neurons. We examined the regulation of GLUT3 mRNA by glucose in vivo in mouse brain and in vitro by using neuronal cultures from rat embryos. Hypoglycaemia (< 30 mg/dl), produced by 72 h of starvation, increased GLUT3 mRNA in mouse brain by 2-fold. Hybridization studies in situ demonstrated that hypoglycaemia-induced increases in GLUT3 mRNA expression were observed selectively in brain regions including the hippocampus, dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex and piriform cortex, but not the cerebellum. Primary neuronal cultures from rat embryos deprived of glucose for 48 h also showed an increase (4-fold over control) in GLUT3 mRNA, indicating that glucose can directly regulate expression of GLUT3 mRNA. In contrast with hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia produced by streptozotocin did not alter the expression of GLUT3 mRNA. We also confirmed previous findings that hypoglycaemia increases GLUT1 mRNA expression in brain. The increase in GLUT1 expression was probably limited to the blood-brain barrier in vivo, since GLUT1 mRNA could not be detected in neurons of the mouse cerebrum. Thus we conclude that up-regulation of neuronal GLUT3 in response to glucose starvation represents a protective mechanism against energy depletion in neurons. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8198523

  15. Insulin regulates glucose consumption and lactate production through reactive oxygen species and pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Liu, Xue; Yin, Yu; Zheng, Ji-Tai; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Wang, Jing; Shen, Hua; Li, Chong-Yong; Wang, Min; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Jiang, Bing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Although insulin is known to regulate glucose metabolism and closely associate with liver cancer, the molecular mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. In this study, we attempt to understand the mechanism of insulin in promotion of liver cancer metabolism. We found that insulin increased pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) expression through reactive oxygen species (ROS) for regulating glucose consumption and lactate production, key process of glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Interestingly, insulin-induced ROS was found responsible for the suppression of miR-145 and miR-128, and forced expression of either miR-145 or miR-128 was sufficient to abolish insulin-induced PKM2 expression. Furthermore, the knockdown of PKM2 expression also inhibited cancer cell growth and insulin-induced glucose consumption and lactate production, suggesting that PKM2 is a functional downstream effecter of insulin. Taken together, this study would provide a new insight into the mechanism of insulin-induced glycolysis.

  16. REGULATION OF GLUCOSE AND INSULIN RELEASE FOLLOWING ACUTE AND REPEATED TREATMENT WITH THE SYNTHETIC GALANIN ANALOG NAX-5055

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Sean P.; White, H. Steve

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin is widely expressed in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However there is limited understanding of how individual galanin receptor (GalR1, 2, and 3) subtypes mediate the physiological activity of galanin in vivo. To address this issue we utilized NAX-5055 a systemically available, metabolically stable galanin analog. NAX-5055 displays a preference for GalR1 receptors and possesses potent anticonvulsant activity in vivo, suggesting that NAX-5055 engages central galanin receptors. To determine if NAX-5055 also modulates the activity of peripheral galanin receptors, we evaluated the effect of NAX-5055 on blood glucose and insulin levels in mice. Acute and repeated (once daily for four days) systemic administration of NAX-5055 (4 mg/kg) significantly increased blood glucose levels compared to vehicle treated mice. However, a hyperglycemic response was not observed following systemic administration of NAX-805-1 a scrambled analog of NAX-5055, with critical receptor binding residues, Trp2 and Tyr9, reversed. These results suggest chemical modifications independent of the galanin backbone of NAX-5055 are not responsible for the hyperglycemic response. The effect of NAX-5055 on glucose homeostasis was further evaluated with a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Mice administered either acute or repeated (once daily for four days) injections of NAX-5055 (4mg/kg) displayed impaired glucose handling and reduced insulin response to an acute glucose (1g/kg) challenge. Here we have shown that systemic administration of a centrally active GalR1-preferring galanin analog produces acute hyperglycemia and an inhibition of insulin release in vivo and that these effects are not attenuated with repeated administration. NAX-5055 thus provides a new pharmacological tool to further the understanding of function of both central and peripheral GalR1 receptors in vivo. PMID:25690510

  17. Glucose regulated protein 78: a critical link between tumor microenvironment and cancer hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Li, Zhuoyu

    2012-08-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has long been recognized as a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and can be induced by the ER stress response. Besides its location in the ER, GRP78 has been found to be present in cell plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus as well as cellular secretions. GRP78 is implicated in tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis resistance, immune escape, metastasis and angiogenesis, and its elevated expression usually correlates with a variety of tumor microenvironmental stresses, including hypoxia, glucose deprivation, lactic acidosis and inflammatory response. GRP78 protein acts as a centrally located sensor of stress, which feels and adapts to the alteration in the tumor microenvironment. This article reviews the potential contributions of GRP78 to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks based on intervening in stress responses caused by tumor niche alterations. The paper also introduces several potential GRP78 relevant targeted therapies.

  18. Dissociation between exercise-induced reduction in liver fat and changes in hepatic and peripheral glucose homoeostasis in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Richardson, Paul; Kemp, Graham J; Barrett, Mark; Jackson, Nicola C; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Umpleby, A Margot

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multi-organ (hepatic, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) insulin resistance (IR). Exercise is an effective treatment for lowering liver fat but its effect on IR in NAFLD is unknown. We aimed to determine whether supervised exercise in NAFLD would reduce liver fat and improve hepatic and peripheral (skeletal muscle and adipose tissue) insulin sensitivity. Sixty nine NAFLD patients were randomized to 16 weeks exercise supervision (n=38) or counselling (n=31) without dietary modification. All participants underwent MRI/spectroscopy to assess changes in body fat and in liver and skeletal muscle triglyceride, before and following exercise/counselling. To quantify changes in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, a pre-determined subset (n=12 per group) underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp pre- and post-intervention. Results are shown as mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Fifty participants (30 exercise, 20 counselling), 51 years (IQR 40, 56), body mass index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2) (IQR 29, 35) with baseline liver fat/water % of 18.8% (IQR 10.7, 34.6) completed the study (12/12 exercise and 7/12 counselling completed the clamp studies). Supervised exercise mediated a greater reduction in liver fat/water percentage than counselling [Δ mean change 4.7% (0.01, 9.4); P<0.05], which correlated with the change in cardiorespiratory fitness (r=-0.34, P=0.0173). With exercise, peripheral insulin sensitivity significantly increased (following high-dose insulin) despite no significant change in hepatic glucose production (HGP; following low-dose insulin); no changes were observed in the control group. Although supervised exercise effectively reduced liver fat, improving peripheral IR in NAFLD, the reduction in liver fat was insufficient to improve hepatic IR.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 by β-hydroxybutyrate underlies preferential glucose supply to the brain of fasted mice.

    PubMed

    Tanegashima, Kosuke; Sato-Miyata, Yukiko; Funakoshi, Masabumi; Nishito, Yasumasa; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hara, Takahiko

    2017-01-01

    We carried out liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of metabolites in mice. Those metabolome data showed that hepatic glucose content is reduced, but that brain glucose content is unaffected, during fasting, consistent with the priority given to brain glucose consumption during fasting. The molecular mechanisms for this preferential glucose supply to the brain are not fully understood. We also showed that the fasting-induced production of the ketone body β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB) enhances expression of the glucose transporter gene Slc2a1 (Glut1) via histone modification. Upon β-OHB treatment, Slc2a1 expression was up-regulated, with a concomitant increase in H3K9 acetylation at the critical cis-regulatory region of the Slc2a1 gene in brain microvascular endothelial cells and NB2a neuronal cells, shown by quantitative PCR analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of the Hdac2 gene increased Slc2a1 expression, suggesting that it is one of the responsible histone deacetylases (HDACs). These results confirm that β-OHB is a HDAC inhibitor and show that β-OHB plays an important role in fasting-induced epigenetic activation of a glucose transporter gene in the brain.

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein regulates hepatic glucose homeostasis via activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Jun; Park, Young-Ho; Kim, Sun-Uk; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Park, Do Sim; Han, Ying-Hao; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Dong-Seok; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Minhye; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Su Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2011-08-26

    Dysregulation of liver functions leads to insulin resistance causing type 2 diabetes mellitus and is often found in chronic liver diseases. However, the mechanisms of hepatic dysfunction leading to hepatic metabolic disorder are still poorly understood in chronic liver diseases. The current work investigated the role of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in regulating glucose metabolism. We studied HBx-overexpressing (HBxTg) mice and HBxTg mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Here we show that gene expressions of the key gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly increased in HepG2 cells expressing HBx (HepG2-HBx) and in non-tumor liver tissues of hepatitis B virus patients with high levels of HBx expression. In the liver of HBxTg mice, the expressions of gluconeogenic genes were also elevated, leading to hyperglycemia by increasing hepatic glucose production. However, this effect was insufficient to cause systemic insulin resistance. Importantly, the actions of HBx on hepatic glucose metabolism are thought to be mediated via iNOS signaling, as evidenced by the fact that deficiency of iNOS restored HBx-induced hyperglycemia by suppressing the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes. Treatment of HepG2-HBx cells with nitric oxide (NO) caused a significant increase in the expression of gluconeogenic genes, but JNK1 inhibition was completely normalized. Furthermore, hyperactivation of JNK1 in the liver of HBxTg mice was also suppressed in the absence of iNOS, indicating the critical role for JNK in the mutual regulation of HBx- and iNOS-mediated glucose metabolism. These findings establish a novel mechanism of HBx-driven hepatic metabolic disorder that is modulated by iNOS-mediated activation of JNK.

  1. High-fat/low-carbohydrate diets regulate glucose metabolism via a long-term transcriptional loop.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Lauren M; Xie, Hui; Koza, Robert A; Mynatt, Randall; Bray, George A; Smith, Steven R

    2006-11-01

    Insulin sensitivity is characterized by insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that carbohydrate metabolism and storage might be under transcriptional control. To test this hypothesis, we fed insulin-sensitive males (glucose disposal rate, 14.7 +/- 4.1 mg/kg fat-free mass [FFM] per minute) an isoenergetic high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet (HF/LCD) for 3 days with muscle biopsies before and after intervention. Oligonucleotide microarrays revealed a total of 369 genes of 18861 genes on the arrays were differentially regulated in response to diet (Bonferonni adjusted P < .01). A similar experiment was conducted in mice with a 3-week intervention using a control group and an HF/LCD group to offset the lack of a control group within the human cohort. As part of an analysis of results previously published from this data set, 7 genes in the carbohydrate metabolism pathway changed in response to the HF/LCD, and 3 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction: fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isoenzyme 4 (PDK4), and glycogen synthase 1 (muscle). In a separate experiment, we fed C57Bl/6J mice an HF/LCD for 3 weeks and found that the same glucose metabolism genes were changed by approximately 70% on average. Fructose-2,6-biphosphatase 3 and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, isoenzyme 4 increased and glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) decreased. Combined, these results suggest a mechanism whereby HF/LCD regulates the genes necessary for glucose utilization and storage vis-á-vis transcriptional control.

  2. Molecular mechanisms for the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by small guanosine triphosphatases in skeletal muscle and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takaya

    2014-10-16

    Insulin is a hormone that regulates the blood glucose level by stimulating various physiological responses in its target tissues. In skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, insulin promotes membrane trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4 from GLUT4 storage vesicles to the plasma membrane, thereby facilitating the uptake of glucose from the circulation. Detailed mechanisms underlying insulin-dependent intracellular signal transduction for glucose uptake remain largely unknown. In this article, I give an overview on the recently identified signaling network involving Rab, Ras, and Rho family small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) that regulates glucose uptake in insulin-responsive tissues. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms for these small GTPases and the cross-talk between protein kinase and small GTPase cascades are highlighted.

  3. Regulation of NGF and NT-3 protein expression in peripheral targets by sympathetic input.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Chris L; Bierl, Michael A; Isaacson, Lori G

    2007-05-04

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are target-derived proteins that regulate innervating sympathetic neurons. Here, we used western blot analysis to investigate changes in NGF and NT-3 protein in several peripheral tissues following loss of sympathetic input. Following removal of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), large molecular weight (MW) NGF species, including proNGF-A, were increased in distal intracranial SCG targets, such as pineal gland and extracerebral blood vessels (bv). Mature NGF was a minor species in these tissues and unchanged following sympathectomy. Large MW NGF species also were increased when sympathectomy was followed by in vivo NGF administration. Mature NT-3, which was abundant in controls, was significantly decreased in these targets following sympathetic denervation. The decrease in mature NT-3 was enhanced following NGF administration. The trigeminal ganglion, which provides sensory input to these targets, showed increased NGF, but decreased NT-3, in these treatments, demonstrating that decreased NT-3 at the targets did not result from enhanced NT-3 uptake. Unlike pineal gland and extracerebral bv, the external carotid artery, an extracranial proximal SCG target, showed no change in NGF following denervation, and mature NT-3 was significantly increased. Following NGF administration, NT-3 was significantly decreased. We provide evidence for sympathetic regulation of NGF and NT-3 in peripheral targets and that elevated NGF can depress NT-3. The differential response in distal and proximal adult targets is consistent with the idea that neurons innervating proximal and distal targets may serve different roles in regulating neurotrophin protein. In addition, we conclude that previous ELISA results showing increased NGF protein following sympathetic denervation may have resulted from increases in large MW species, rather than an increase in mature NGF.

  4. Regulation of NGF and NT-3 protein expression in peripheral targets by sympathetic input

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Chris L.; Bierl, Michael A.; Isaacson, Lori G.

    2007-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are target-derived proteins that regulate innervating sympathetic neurons. Here, we used western blot analysis to investigate changes in NGF and NT-3 protein in several peripheral tissues following loss of sympathetic input. Following removal of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), large molecular weight (MW) NGF species, including proNGF-A, were increased in distal intracranial SCG targets, such as pineal gland and extracerebral blood vessels (bv). Mature NGF was a minor species in these tissues and unchanged following sympathectomy. Large MW NGF species also were increased when sympathectomy was followed by in vivo NGF administration. Mature NT-3, which was abundant in controls, was significantly decreased in these targets following sympathetic denervation. The decrease in mature NT-3 was enhanced following NGF administration. The trigeminal ganglion, which provides sensory input to these targets, showed increased NGF, but decreased NT-3, in these treatments, demonstrating that decreased NT-3 at the targets did not result from enhanced NT-3 uptake. Unlike pineal gland and extracerebral bv, the external carotid artery, an extracranial proximal SCG target, showed no change in NGF following denervation, and mature NT-3 was significantly increased. Following NGF administration, NT-3 was significantly decreased. We provide evidence for sympathetic regulation of NGF and NT-3 in peripheral targets and that elevated NGF can depress NT-3. The differential response in distal and proximal adult targets is consistent with the idea that neurons innervating proximal and distal targets may serve different roles in regulating neurotrophin protein. In addition, we conclude that previous ELISA results showing increased NGF protein following sympathetic denervation may have resulted from increases in large MW species, rather than an increase in mature NGF. PMID:17331480

  5. Regulation of Energy Stores and Feeding by Neuronal and Peripheral CREB Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Koichi; Zhao, LiJuan; Shenton, Christopher; Iijima-Ando, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    The cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB functions in adipose tissue and liver to regulate glycogen and lipid metabolism in mammals. While Drosophila has a homolog of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, its role in energy metabolism is not fully understood. Using tissue-specific expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (DN-CREB), we have examined the effect of blocking CREB activity in neurons and in the fat body, the primary energy storage depot with functions of adipose tissue and the liver in flies, on energy balance, stress resistance and feeding behavior. We found that disruption of CREB function in neurons reduced glycogen and lipid stores and increased sensitivity to starvation. Expression of DN-CREB in the fat body also reduced glycogen levels, while it did not affect starvation sensitivity, presumably due to increased lipid levels in these flies. Interestingly, blocking CREB activity in the fat body increased food intake. These flies did not show a significant change in overall body size, suggesting that disruption of CREB activity in the fat body caused an obese-like phenotype. Using a transgenic CRE-luciferase reporter, we further demonstrated that disruption of the adipokinetic hormone receptor, which is functionally related to mammalian glucagon and β-adrenergic signaling, in the fat body reduced CRE-mediated transcription in flies. This study demonstrates that CREB activity in either neuronal or peripheral tissues regulates energy balance in Drosophila, and that the key signaling pathway regulating CREB activity in peripheral tissue is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:20041126

  6. Analysis of kinetic, stoichiometry and regulation of glucose and glutamine metabolism in hybridoma batch cultures using logistic equations

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, María Lourdes; Sánchez, Asterio; García, Francisco; Molina, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Batch cultures were carried out to study the kinetic, stoichiometry, and regulation of glucose and glutamine metabolism of a murine hybridoma line. Asymmetric logistic equations (ALEs) were used to fit total and viable cell density, and nutrient and metabolite/product concentrations. Since these equations were analytically differentiable, specific rates and yield coefficients were readily calculated. Asymmetric logistic equations described satisfactorily uncontrolled batch cultures, including death phase. Specific growth rate showed a Monod-type dependence on initial glucose and glutamine concentrations. Yield coefficients of cell and lactate from glucose, and cell and ammonium from glutamine were all found to change dramatically at low residual glucose and glutamine concentrations. Under stoichiometric glucose limitation, the glucose-to-cell yield increased and glucose-to-lactate yield decreased, indicating a metabolic shift. Under stoichiometric glutamine limitation the glutamine-to-cell and glutamine-to-ammonium yields increased, but also glucose-to-cell yield increased and the glucose-to-lactate yield decreased. Monoclonal antibody production was mainly non-growth associated, independently of glucose and glutamine levels. PMID:19003011

  7. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  8. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  9. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump is a major regulator of glucose transport in the healthy and diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Hayes, Summer; Periasamy, Muthu; Lacombe, Véronique A

    2015-05-01

    Despite intensive research, the pathways that mediate calcium (Ca(2+))-stimulated glucose transport in striated muscle remain elusive. Since the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) pump tightly regulates cytosolic [Ca(2+)], we investigated whether the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport. We used healthy and insulin-deficient diabetic transgenic (TG) mice expressing SERCA1a in the heart. Active cell surface glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 was measured by a biotinylated photolabeled assay in the intact perfused myocardium and isolated myocytes. In healthy TG mice, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression increased active cell-surface GLUT4 and glucose uptake in the myocardium, as well as whole body glucose tolerance. Diabetes reduced active cell-surface GLUT4 content and glucose uptake in the heart of wild type mice, all of which were preserved in diabetic TG mice. Decreased basal AS160 and increased proportion of calmodulin-bound AS160 paralleled the increase in cell surface GLUT4 content in the heart of TG mice, suggesting that AS160 regulates GLUT trafficking by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent pathway. In addition, cardiac-specific SERCA1a expression partially rescues hyperglycemia during diabetes. Collectively, these data suggested that the SERCA pump is a major regulator of cardiac glucose transport by an AS160 dependent mechanism during healthy and insulin-deficient state. Our data further indicated that cardiac-specific SERCA overexpression rescues diabetes induced-alterations in cardiac glucose transport and improves whole body glucose homeostasis. Therefore, findings from this study provide novel mechanistic insights linking upregulation of the SERCA pump in the heart as a potential therapeutic target to improve glucose metabolism during diabetes.

  10. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  11. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  12. Kv7.2 regulates the function of peripheral sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    King, Chih H.; Lancaster, Eric; Salomon, Daniela; Peles, Elior; Scherer, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    The Kv7 (KCNQ) family of voltage-gated K+ channels regulates cellular excitability. The functional role of Kv7.2 has been hampered by the lack of a viable Kcnq2-null animal model. In this study, we generated homozygous Kcnq2-null sensory neurons using the Cre-Lox system; in these mice, Kv7.2 expression is absent in the peripheral sensory neurons, whereas the expression of other molecular components of nodes (including Kv7.3), paranodes, and juxtaparanodes is not altered. The conditional Kcnq2-null animals exhibit normal motor performance, but have increased thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Whole cell patch recording technique demonstrates that Kcnq2-null sensory neurons have increased excitability and reduced spike frequency adaptation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of Kv7.2 activity increases the excitability of primary sensory neurons. PMID:24687876

  13. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  14. BNIP3 regulates AT101 [(-)-gossypol] induced death in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Niroop; Kohli, Latika; Graham, Christopher D; Klocke, Barbara J; Carroll, Steven L; Roth, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive Schwann cell-derived sarcomas and are the leading cause of mortality in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Current treatment modalities have been largely ineffective, resulting in a high rate of MPNST recurrence and poor five-year patient survival. This necessitates the exploration of alternative chemotherapeutic options for MPNST patients. This study sought to assess the cytotoxic effect of the BH3-mimetic AT101 [(-)-gossypol] on MPNST cells in vitro and to identify key regulators of AT101-induced MPNST cell death. We found that AT101 caused caspase-independent, non-apoptotic MPNST cell death, which was accompanied by autophagy and was mediated through HIF-1α induced expression of the atypical BH3-only protein BNIP3. These effects were mediated by intracellular iron chelation, a previously unreported mechanism of AT101 cytotoxicity.

  15. "Glucose and ethanol-dependent transcriptional regulation of the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous is one of the most promising and economically attractive natural sources of astaxanthin. The biosynthesis of this valuable carotenoid is a complex process for which the regulatory mechanisms remain mostly unknown. Several studies have shown a strong correlation between the carbon source present in the medium and the amount of pigments synthesized. Carotenoid production is especially low when high glucose concentrations are used in the medium, while a significant increase is observed with non-fermentable carbon sources. However, the molecular basis of this phenomenon has not been established. Results In this work, we showed that glucose caused transcriptional repression of the three genes involved in the synthesis of astaxanthin from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in X. dendrorhous, which correlates with a complete inhibition of pigment synthesis. Strikingly, this regulatory response was completely altered in mutant strains that are incapable of synthesizing astaxanthin. However, we found that addition of ethanol caused the induction of crtYB and crtS gene expression and promoted de novo synthesis of carotenoids. The induction of carotenogenesis was noticeable as early as 24 h after ethanol addition. Conclusion For the first time, we demonstrated that carbon source-dependent regulation of astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous involves changes at the transcriptional level. Such regulatory mechanism provides an explanation for the strong and early inhibitory effect of glucose on the biosynthesis of this carotenoid. PMID:21861883

  16. Regulation of c-jun expression during hypoxic and low-glucose stress.

    PubMed Central

    Ausserer, W A; Bourrat-Floeck, B; Green, C J; Laderoute, K R; Sutherland, R M

    1994-01-01

    Hypoxic stress in tumor cells has been implicated in malignant progression and in the development of therapeutic resistance. We have investigated the effects of acute hypoxic exposure on regulation of the proto-oncogene c-jun in SiHa cells, a human squamous carcinoma cell line. Hypoxic exposure produced increased levels of c-jun mRNA resulting from both message stabilization and transcriptional activation. A superinduction of c-jun message resulted during simultaneous oxygen and glucose deprivation, with several characteristics of an induction mediated by oxidative-stress pathways. This superinduction was blocked by preincubation of cells with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine or with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, which indicates redox control of c-jun expression and probable involvement of protein kinase C. By gel retardation assay, no increase in AP-1 DNA binding activity was found to be concomitant with the transcriptional activation of c-jun. A lack of increased DNA binding was observed for the consensus AP-1 sequence and for the two AP-1 sequence variants found within the c-Jun promoter. Additionally, hypoxic and low-glucose stress produced no activation of stably transfected AP-1 reporter sequences. Taken together, these results indicate that the transcriptional activation of c-jun during hypoxic and low-glucose stress involves redox control and is unlikely to be mediated by AP-1 recognition elements within the c-jun promoter. Images PMID:8035787

  17. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Fu; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Yin-Yi; Sun, Ya-Meng; Chen, Wen-Qi; Shi, Nan; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kang-Yong; Sun, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695) cell models of cerebral ischemia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer) or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor) on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduction of autophagy.

  18. Embryonic liver fordin is involved in glucose glycolysis of hepatic stellate cell by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wei; Ye, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of embryonic liver fordin (ELF) in liver fibrosis by regulating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) glucose glycolysis. METHODS The expression of ELF and the glucose glycolysis-related proteins were evaluated in activated HSCs. siRNA was used to silence ELF expression in activated HSCs in vitro and the subsequent changes in PI3K/Akt signaling and glucose glycolysis-related proteins were observed. RESULTS The expression of ELF increased remarkably in HSCs of the fibrosis mouse model and HSCs that were cultured for 3 wk in vitro. Glucose glycolysis-related proteins showed an obvious increase in the activated HSCs, such as phosphofructokinase, platelet and glucose transporter 1. ELF-siRNA, which perfectly silenced the expression of ELF in activated HSCs, led to the induction of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Moreover, pAkt, which is an important downstream factor in PI3K/Akt signaling, showed a significant change in response to the ELF silencing. The expression of glucose glycolysis-related proteins and ECM components decreased remarkably when the PI3K/Akt signaling was blocked by Ly294002 in the activated HSCs. CONCLUSION ELF is involved in HSC glucose glycolysis by regulating PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:27784964

  19. Reciprocal regulation of nuclear factor kappa B and its inhibitor ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lai-Chu; Goettl, Virginia M; Madiai, Francesca; Hackshaw, Kevin V; Hussain, Syed-Rehan A

    2006-01-01

    Background NF-κB binds to the κB motif to regulate transcription of genes involved in growth, immunity and inflammation, and plays a pivotal role in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines after nerve injuries. The zinc finger protein ZAS3 also binds to the κB or similar motif. In addition to competition for common DNA sites, in vitro experiments have shown that ZAS3 can inhibit NF-κB via the association with TRAF2 to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. However, the physiological significance of the ZAS3-mediated inhibition of NF-κB has not been demonstrated. The purpose of this study is to characterize ZAS3 proteins in nervous tissues and to use spinal nerve ligation, a neuropathic pain model, to demonstrate a functional relationship between ZAS3 and NF-κB. Results Immunohistochemical experiments show that ZAS3 is expressed in specific regions of the central and peripheral nervous system. Abundant ZAS3 expression is found in the trigeminal ganglion, hippocampal formation, dorsal root ganglia, and motoneurons. Low levels of ZAS3 expressions are also found in the cerebral cortex and in the grey matter of the spinal cord. In those nervous tissues, ZAS3 is expressed mainly in the cell bodies of neurons and astrocytes. Together with results of Western blot analyses, the data suggest that ZAS3 protein isoforms with differential cellular distribution are produced in a cell-specific manner. Further, neuropathic pain confirmed by persistent mechanical allodynia was manifested in rats seven days after L5 and L6 lumbar spinal nerve ligation. Changes in gene expression, including a decrease in ZAS3 and an increase in the p65 subunit of NF-κB were observed in dorsal root ganglion ipsilateral to the ligation when compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion ZAS3 is expressed in nervous tissues involved in cognitive function and pain modulation. The down-regulation of ZAS3 after peripheral nerve injury may lead to activation of NF-κB, allowing Wallerian

  20. Association between extraversion personality and abnormal glucose regulation in young Korean women.

    PubMed

    Shim, Unjin; Oh, Jee-Young; Lee, Hyejin; Sung, Yeon-Ah; Kim, Han-Na; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2014-01-01

    Depression and psychological distress are known to be associated with diabetes development as well as the disease progression including glycemic control and chronic complication, but relationship of personality with diabetes is controversial. We examined whether personality trait and the presence of abnormal glucose regulation (AGR; diabetes and pre-diabetes) are associated in young women. A total of 1,617 young women aged 19-39 years without previously diagnosed diabetes were participated voluntarily. Personality trait was assessed by self-reported questionnaire using the five-factor model (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness) consisting of five-point scale ranging from 'strongly disagreeable' to 'strongly agreeable.' Glucose tolerance status was assessed by standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. One hundred and eleven women were newly diagnosed with AGR (6.9 %). Among five factors, only extraversion trait was significantly associated with AGR. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant negative association between extraversion trait and 2-h post-load glucose after adjustment for age, BMI, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and family history of diabetes (β = -0.16, P = 0.026). Multiple logistic regression showed extraversion trait having a significant association with the presence of AGR after adjustment for the same covariates (OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.95-0.99, P = 0.011). The frequency of AGR was significantly increased according to the decrease in extraversion score (P for trend with exact test = 0.047). In conclusion, extraversion may be an important personality trait having a beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of AGR.

  1. Regression From Pre-Diabetes to Normal Glucose Regulation in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Leigh; Kahn, Steven E.; Christophi, Costas A.; Knowler, William C.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Participants in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) randomized to intensive lifestyle modification (ILS) or metformin had a significantly reduced incidence of diabetes compared with those randomized to placebo, yet most were still at risk because they had pre-diabetes. We explored the effect of baseline characteristics, weight change, ILS, and metformin on regression from pre-diabetes to the lowest-risk state of normal glucose regulation (NGR) defined by American Diabetes Association criteria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The DPP was a prospective randomized trial. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of regression from pre-diabetes to NGR over 3 years of follow-up. RESULTS Lower baseline fasting (hazard ratio 1.52, P < 0.01) and 2-h (1.24, P < 0.01) glucose predicted regression to NGR, as did younger age (1.07, P < 0.01) and greater insulin secretion (1.09, P = 0.04). ILS (2.05, P < 0.01) and weight loss (1.34, P < 0.01) had significant and independent effects on regression. A nonsignificant trend for regression was also observed for metformin (1.25, P = 0.06), male sex (1.17, P = 0.08), and insulin sensitivity (1.07, P = 0.09). In those entering the study with both impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), male sex and insulin sensitivity predicted regression to isolated IFG, whereas ILS, metformin, female sex, and greater insulin secretion predicted regression to isolated IGT. CONCLUSIONS Insulin secretion, and other biologic processes retained with younger age, are key in restoring NGR in people with pre-diabetes. However, NGR may also be attained through weight loss and additional aspects of ILS. PMID:19587364

  2. UCP2 transports C4 metabolites out of mitochondria, regulating glucose and glutamine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; De Leonardis, Francesco; Lasorsa, Francesco M.; Castegna, Alessandra; Amorese, Daniela; Marmo, Raffaele; Calcagnile, Valeria M.; Palmieri, Luigi; Ricquier, Daniel; Paradies, Eleonora; Scarcia, Pasquale; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Fiermonte, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is involved in various physiological and pathological processes such as insulin secretion, stem cell differentiation, cancer, and aging. However, its biochemical and physiological function is still under debate. Here we show that UCP2 is a metabolite transporter that regulates substrate oxidation in mitochondria. To shed light on its biochemical role, we first studied the effects of its silencing on the mitochondrial oxidation of glucose and glutamine. Compared with wild-type, UCP2-silenced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, grown in the presence of glucose, showed a higher inner mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP:ADP ratio associated with a lower lactate release. Opposite results were obtained in the presence of glutamine instead of glucose. UCP2 reconstituted in lipid vesicles catalyzed the exchange of malate, oxaloacetate, and aspartate for phosphate plus a proton from opposite sides of the membrane. The higher levels of citric acid cycle intermediates found in the mitochondria of siUCP2-HepG2 cells compared with those found in wild-type cells in addition to the transport data indicate that, by exporting C4 compounds out of mitochondria, UCP2 limits the oxidation of acetyl-CoA–producing substrates such as glucose and enhances glutaminolysis, preventing the mitochondrial accumulation of C4 metabolites derived from glutamine. Our work reveals a unique regulatory mechanism in cell bioenergetics and provokes a substantial reconsideration of the physiological and pathological functions ascribed to UCP2 based on its purported uncoupling properties. PMID:24395786

  3. Adr1 and Cat8 Mediate Coactivator Recruitment and Chromatin Remodeling at Glucose-Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Biddick, Rhiannon K.; Law, G. Lynn; Young, Elton T.

    2008-01-01

    Background Adr1 and Cat8 co-regulate numerous glucose-repressed genes in S. cerevisiae, presenting a unique opportunity to explore their individual roles in coactivator recruitment, chromatin remodeling, and transcription. Methodology/Principal Findings We determined the individual contributions of Cat8 and Adr1 on the expression of a cohort of glucose-repressed genes and found three broad categories: genes that need both activators for full derepression, genes that rely mostly on Cat8 and genes that require only Adr1. Through combined expression and recruitment data, along with analysis of chromatin remodeling at two of these genes, ADH2 and FBP1, we clarified how these activators achieve this wide range of co-regulation. We find that Adr1 and Cat8 are not intrinsically different in their abilities to recruit coactivators but rather, promoter context appears to dictate which activator is responsible for recruitment to specific genes. These promoter-specific contributions are also apparent in the chromatin remodeling that accompanies derepression: ADH2 requires both Adr1 and Cat8, whereas, at FBP1, significant remodeling occurs with Cat8 alone. Although over-expression of Adr1 can compensate for loss of Cat8 at many genes in terms of both activation and chromatin remodeling, this over-expression cannot complement all of the cat8Δ phenotypes. Conclusions/Significance Thus, at many of the glucose-repressed genes, Cat8 and Adr1 appear to have interchangeable roles and promoter architecture may dictate the roles of these activators. PMID:18197247

  4. Role of sleep duration in the regulation of glucose metabolism and appetite

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa; Leproult, Rachel; Balbo, Marcella

    2010-01-01

    Sleep curtailment has become a common behavior in modern society. This review summarizes the current laboratory evidence indicating that sleep loss may contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and obesity. Experimentally-induced sleep loss in healthy volunteers decreases insulin sensitivity without adequate compensation in beta-cell function, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance and increased diabetes risk. Lack of sleep also down-regulates the satiety hormone leptin, up-regulates the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, and increases hunger and food intake. Taken together with the epidemiologic evidence for an association between short sleep and the prevalence or incidence of diabetes mellitus and/or obesity, these results support a role for reduced sleep duration in the current epidemic of these metabolic disorders. Screening for habitual sleep patterns in patients with “diabesity” is therefore of great importance. Studies are warranted to investigate the putative therapeutic impact of extending sleep in habitual short sleepers with metabolic disorders. PMID:21112019

  5. Role of sleep duration in the regulation of glucose metabolism and appetite.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Lisa; Leproult, Rachel; Balbo, Marcella; Spiegel, Karine

    2010-10-01

    Sleep curtailment has become a common behavior in modern society. This review summarizes the current laboratory evidence indicating that sleep loss may contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and obesity. Experimentally induced sleep loss in healthy volunteers decreases insulin sensitivity without adequate compensation in beta-cell function, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance and increased diabetes risk. Lack of sleep also down-regulates the satiety hormone leptin, up-regulates the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin, and increases hunger and food intake. Taken together with the epidemiologic evidence for an association between short sleep and the prevalence or incidence of diabetes mellitus and/or obesity, these results support a role for reduced sleep duration in the current epidemic of these metabolic disorders. Screening for habitual sleep patterns in patients with "diabesity" is therefore of great importance. Studies are warranted to investigate the putative therapeutic impact of extending sleep in habitual short sleepers with metabolic disorders.

  6. Localization and regulation of GLUTx1 glucose transporter in the hippocampus of streptozotocin diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Lawrence P.; Gorovits, Naira; Hoskin, Elena K.; Alves, Stephen E.; Katz, Ellen B.; Grillo, Claudia A.; Piroli, Gerardo G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Charron, Maureen J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the localization of the recently identified glucose transporter GLUTx1 and the regulation of GLUTx1 in the hippocampus of diabetic and control rats. GLUTx1 mRNA and protein exhibit a unique distribution when compared with other glucose transporter isoforms expressed in the rat hippocampus. In particular, GLUTx1 mRNA was detected in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and granule neurons of the dentate gyrus as well as in nonprincipal neurons. With immunohistochemistry, GLUTx1 protein expression is limited to neuronal cell bodies and the most proximal dendrites, unlike GLUT3 expression that is observed throughout the neuropil. Immunoblot analysis of hippocampal membrane fractions revealed that GLUTx1 protein expression is primarily localized to the intracellular compartment and exhibits limited association with the plasma membrane. In streptozotocin diabetic rats compared with vehicle-treated controls, quantitative autoradiography showed increased GLUTx1 mRNA levels in pyramidal neurons and granule neurons; up-regulation of GLUTx1 mRNA also was found in nonprincipal cells, as shown by single-cell emulsion autoradiography. In contrast, diabetic and control rats expressed similar levels of hippocampal GLUTx1 protein. These results indicate that GLUTx1 mRNA and protein have a unique expression pattern in rat hippocampus and suggest that streptozotocin diabetes increases steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of concomitant increases in GLUTx1 protein expression. PMID:11226324

  7. Schisandra polysaccharide increased glucose consumption by up-regulating the expression of GLUT-4.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dun; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Wei-Wei; Mao, Guang-Hua; Zou, Ye; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wang, Xin-Tong; Yang, Liu-Qing; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2016-06-01

    In our previous study, a polysaccharide was extracted from Schisandra Chinensis (Trucz.) Baill and found with anti-diabetic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-diabetic effects of the low weight molecular polysaccharide (SCPP11) purified from crude Schisandra polysaccharide and illustrate the underlying mechanism in buffalo rat liver cells. The insulin resistance model of BRL cells was established by incubating with insulin solution for 24h. The effects of SCPP11 on regulating related protein and mRNA expression in an insulin and AMPK signal pathway were investigated by western blot and RT-PCR analysis. SCPP11 showed no cytotoxicity to BRL cells and could improve the glucose consumption in BRL cells. SCPP11 increased the protein expression of Akt, p-AMPK and GLUT-4 in BRL cells. Moreover, SCPP11 could enhance the mRNA expression levels of IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GLUT-4, AMPKα and PPAR-γ in BRL cells at the same time. In conclusion, SCPP11 possessed effects in improving glucose consumption by up-regulating the expression of GLUT-4 which might occur via insulin and AMPK signal pathway and could be a potential functional food to prevent and mitigate the insulin resistance condition.

  8. Hexim1, a Novel Regulator of Leptin Function, Modulates Obesity and Glucose Disposal

    PubMed Central

    Dhar-Mascareno, Manya; Ramirez, Susan N.; Rozenberg, Inna; Rouille, Yves; Kral, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin triggers signaling events with significant transcriptional responses that are essential to metabolic processes affecting obesity and glucose disposal. We asked whether hexamethylene bis-acetamide inducible-1 (Hexim1), an inhibitor of RNA II polymerase-dependent transcription elongation, regulates leptin-Janus kinase 2 signaling axis in the hypothalamus. We subjected C57BL6 Hexim1 heterozygous (HT) mice to high-fat diet and when compared with wild type, HT mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain and remain insulin sensitive. HT mice exhibited increased leptin-pY705Stat3 signaling in the hypothalamus, with normal adipocyte size, increased type I oxidative muscle fiber density, and enhanced glucose transporter 4 expression. We also observed that normal Hexim1 protein level is required to facilitate the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs) required for adipogenesis and inducible suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS) expression. Further support on the role of Hexim1 regulating C/EBPs during adipocyte differentiation was shown when HT 3T3L1 fibroblasts failed to undergo adipogenesis. Hexim1 selectively modulates leptin-mediated signal transduction pathways in the hypothalamus, the expression of C/EBPs and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR γ) in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during the adaptation to metabolic stress. We postulate that Hexim1 might be a novel factor involved in maintaining whole-body energy balance. PMID:26859361

  9. Adiponectin regulates expression of hepatic genes critical for glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingqing; Yuan, Bingbing; Lo, Kinyui Alice; Patterson, Heide Christine; Sun, Yutong; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-09-04

    The effects of adiponectin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism at transcriptional level are largely unknown. We profiled hepatic gene expression in adiponectin knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice by RNA sequencing. Compared with WT mice, adiponectin KO mice fed a chow diet exhibited decreased mRNA expression of rate-limiting enzymes in several important glucose and lipid metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, fatty-acid activation and synthesis, triglyceride synthesis, and cholesterol synthesis. In addition, binding of the transcription factor Hnf4a to DNAs encoding several key metabolic enzymes was reduced in KO mice, suggesting that adiponectin might regulate hepatic gene expression via Hnf4a. Phenotypically, adiponectin KO mice possessed smaller epididymal fat pads and showed reduced body weight compared with WT mice. When fed a high-fat diet, adiponectin KO mice showed significantly reduced lipid accumulation in the liver. These lipogenic defects are consistent with the down-regulation of lipogenic genes in the KO mice.

  10. Calcitriol prevents peripheral RSC96 Schwann neural cells from high glucose & methylglyoxal-induced injury through restoration of CBS/H2S expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhuang, Xiao-dong; Meng, Fu-hui; Chen, Li; Dong, Xiao-bian; Liu, Guo-Hui; Li, Jian-hua; Dong, Qi; Xu, Ji-de; Yang, Chun-tao

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis has suggested that vitamin D deficiency is involved in diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and the levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are also decreased in type 2 diabetes. The injection of vitamin D induces cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) expression and H2S generation. However, it remains unclear whether the supplementation of vitamin D prevents DPN through improvement of CBS/H2S expression. In the present study, RSC96 cells, a rat Schwann cell line, were exposed to high glucose and methylglyoxal (HG&MG) to simulate diabetic peripheral nerve injury in vivo. Before the exposure to HG&MG, the cells were preconditioned with calcitriol (CCT), an active form of vitamin D, and then CCT-mediated neuroprotection was investigated in respect of cellular viability, superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation, inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS)/NO expression, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), as well as CBS expression and activity. It was found that both high glucose and MGO decreased cell viability and co-treatment with the two induced a more serious injury in RSC96 cells. Therefore, the exposure to HG&MG was used in the present study. The exposure to HG&MG markedly induced iNOS expression, NO and O2(-) generation, as well as MMP loss. In addition, the exposure to HG&MG depressed CBS expression and activity in RSC96 cells. However, the preconditioning with CCT significantly antagonized HG&MG-induced cell injury including the decreased viability, iNOS overexpression, NO and O2(-) accumulation, as well as MMP loss. CCT also partially restored the decreased CBS expression and activity triggered by HG&MG, while the inhibition of CBS with hydroxylamine attenuated CCT-mediated neuroprotection. Moreover, the exogenous donation of H2S produced similar cellular protective effects to CCT. The data indicate that the supplementation of vitamin D prevents HG&MG-induced peripheral nerve injury involving the restoration of endogenous H2S system, which may provide a

  11. Seasonal variations in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations after glucose loading in the edible dormouse (Glis glis L.).

    PubMed

    Castex, C; Donnio, R; Sutter, B C

    1979-01-01

    Glucose tolerance tests made in the Edible dormouse showed annual variations in B cell secretory capacity, associated with glucose tolerance changes. 1. During autumn and winter, the B cell is sensitive to glucose, and insulin regulates the high peripheral consumption of this hexose. 2. At the beginning of spring, insulin secretion decreases and glucose tolerance is impaired. In June, the B cell response si low or absent and a poor tolerance to glucose still persists. 3. The variations in B cell activity can be related to changing energy requirements during the year.

  12. Endothelial interleukin-21 receptor up-regulation in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cunningham, Alexis; Houston, Kevin; Sharma, Aditya M; Chen, Lingdan; Dokun, Ayotunde O; Lye, R John; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J; Annex, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    In most patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), severe stenosis in or occlusion of the major blood vessels that supply the legs make the amount of distal blood flow dependent on the capacity to induce angiogenesis and collateral vessel formation. Currently, there are no medications that improve perfusion to the ischemic limb, and thus directly treat the primary problem of PAD. A recent report from our group in a pre-clinical mouse PAD model showed that interleukin-21 receptor (IL-21R) is up-regulated in the endothelial cells from ischemic hindlimb muscle. We further showed that loss of IL-21R resulted in impaired perfusion recovery in this model. In our study, we sought to determine whether IL-21R is present in the endothelium from ischemic muscle of patients with PAD. Using human gastrocnemius muscle biopsies, we found increased levels of IL-21R in the skeletal muscle endothelial cells of patients with PAD compared to control individuals. Interestingly, PAD patients had approximately 1.7-fold higher levels of circulating IL-21. These data provide direct evidence that the IL-21R pathway is indeed up-regulated in patients with PAD. This pathway may serve as a therapeutic target for modulation. PMID:26705256

  13. Health technology assessment review: Computerized glucose regulation in the intensive care unit--how to create artificial control.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Miriam; Vogelzang, Mathijs; Verbitskiy, Evgeny; Nijsten, Maarten W N

    2009-01-01

    Current care guidelines recommend glucose control (GC) in critically ill patients. To achieve GC, many ICUs have implemented a (nurse-based) protocol on paper. However, such protocols are often complex, time-consuming, and can cause iatrogenic hypoglycemia. Computerized glucose regulation protocols may improve patient safety, efficiency, and nurse compliance. Such computerized clinical decision support systems (Cuss) use more complex logic to provide an insulin infusion rate based on previous blood glucose levels and other parameters. A computerized CDSS for glucose control has the potential to reduce overall workload, reduce the chance of human cognitive failure, and improve glucose control. Several computer-assisted glucose regulation programs have been published recently. In order of increasing complexity, the three main types of algorithms used are computerized flowcharts, Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID), and Model Predictive Control (MPC). PID is essentially a closed-loop feedback system, whereas MPC models the behavior of glucose and insulin in ICU patients. Although the best approach has not yet been determined, it should be noted that PID controllers are generally thought to be more robust than MPC systems. The computerized Cuss that are most likely to emerge are those that are fully a part of the routine workflow, use patient-specific characteristics and apply variable sampling intervals.

  14. Glucose and Insulin Stimulate Lipogenesis in Porcine Adipocytes: Dissimilar and Identical Regulation Pathway for Key Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Zhang Guo; Xiong, Lu Jian; Yan, Chen; Wei, Dai Hong; YingPai, ZhaXi; Qing, Zhao Yong; Lin, Qiao Zi; Fei, Feng Ruo; Ling, Wang Ya; Ren, Ma Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Lipogenesis is under the concerted action of ChREBP, SREBP-1c and other transcription factors in response to glucose and insulin. The isolated porcine preadipocytes were differentiated into mature adipocytes to investigate the roles and interrelation of these transcription factors in the context of glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis in pigs. In ChREBP-silenced adipocytes, glucose-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~70%, however insulin-induced lipogenesis was unaffected. Moreover, insulin had no effect on ChREBP expression of unperturbed adipocytes irrespective of glucose concentration, suggesting ChREBP mediate glucose-induced lipogenesis. Insulin stimulated SREBP-1c expression and when SREBP-1c activation was blocked, and the insulin-induced lipogenesis decreased by ~55%, suggesting SREBP-1c is a key transcription factor mediating insulin-induced lipogenesis. LXRα activation promoted lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression. In ChREBP-silenced or SREBP-1c activation blocked adipocytes, LXRα activation facilitated lipogenesis and SREBP-1c expression, but had no effect on ChREBP expression. Therefore, LXRα might mediate lipogenesis via SREBP-1c rather than ChREBP. When ChREBP expression was silenced and SREBP-1c activation blocked simultaneously, glucose and insulin were still able to stimulated lipogenesis and lipogenic genes expression, and LXRα activation enhanced these effects, suggesting LXRα mediated directly glucose- and insulin-induced lipogenesis. In summary, glucose and insulin stimulated lipogenesis through both dissimilar and identical regulation pathway in porcine adipocytes. PMID:27871177

  15. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  16. Defective autoimmune regulator-dependent central tolerance to myelin protein zero is linked to autoimmune peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Su, Maureen A; Davini, Dan; Cheng, Philip; Giang, Karen; Fan, Una; DeVoss, Jason J; Johannes, Kellsey P A; Taylor, Lorelei; Shum, Anthony K; Valenzise, Mariella; Meloni, Antonella; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Anderson, Mark S

    2012-05-15

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating autoimmune disease characterized by peripheral nerve demyelination and dysfunction. How the autoimmune response is initiated, identity of provoking Ags, and pathogenic effector mechanisms are not well defined. The autoimmune regulator (Aire) plays a critical role in central tolerance by promoting thymic expression of self-Ags and deletion of self-reactive T cells. In this study, we used mice with hypomorphic Aire function and two patients with Aire mutations to define how Aire deficiency results in spontaneous autoimmune peripheral neuropathy. Autoimmunity against peripheral nerves in both mice and humans targets myelin protein zero, an Ag for which expression is Aire-regulated in the thymus. Consistent with a defect in thymic tolerance, CD4(+) T cells are sufficient to transfer disease in mice and produce IFN-γ in infiltrated peripheral nerves. Our findings suggest that defective Aire-mediated central tolerance to myelin protein zero initiates an autoimmune Th1 effector response toward peripheral nerves.

  17. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  18. A PI-fuzzy logic controller for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ibbini, M

    2006-01-01

    This manuscript investigates different fuzzy logic controllers for the regulation of blood glucose level in diabetic patients. While fuzzy logic control is still intuitive and at a very early stage, it has already been implemented in many industrial plants and reported results are very promising. A fuzzy logic control (FLC) scheme was recently proposed for maintaining blood glucose level in diabetics within acceptable limits, and was shown to be more effective with better transient characteristics than conventional techniques. In fact, FLC is based on human expertise and on desired output characteristics, and hence does not require precise mathematical models. This observation makes fuzzy rule-based technique very suitable for biomedical systems where models are, in general, either very complicated or over-simplistic. Another attractive feature of fuzzy techniques is their insensitivity to system parameter variations, as numerical values of physiological parameters are often not precise and usually vary from patient to another. PI and PID controllers are very popular and are efficiently used in many industrial plants. Fuzzy PI and PID controllers behave in a similar fashion to those classical controllers with the obvious advantage that the controller parameters are time dependant on the range of the control variables and consequently, result in a better performance. In this manuscript, a fuzzy PI controller is designed using a simplified design scheme and then subjected to simulations of the two common diabetes disturbances--sudden glucose meal and system parameter variations. The performance of the proposed fuzzy PI controller is compared to that of the conventional PID and optimal techniques and is shown to be superior. Moreover, the proposed fuzzy PI controller is shown to be more effective than the previously proposed FLC, especially with respect to the overshoot and settling time.

  19. Topology mapping of insulin-regulated glucose transporter GLUT4 using computational biology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Maulik, Ujjwal; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2013-01-01

    The type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly around the globe. The primary cause for this is insulin resistance due to the disruption of the insulin signal transduction mechanism. Insulin signal transduction stimulates glucose transport through the glucose transporter GLUT4, by promoting the exocytosis process. Understanding the structural topology of GLUT4 mechanism will increase our understanding of the dynamic activities about glucose transport and its regulation in the membrane environment. However, little is known about the topology of GLUT4. In this article, we have determined the amino acid composition, disulfide topology, structure conformation pattern of GLUT4. The amino acid composition portrays that leucine composition is the highest contributing to 15.5% among all other amino acids. Three cysteine residues such as Cys223, Cys361, and Cys363 were observed and the last two were associated with one disulfide bond formation. We have generated surface cavities to know the clefts/pockets on the surface of this protein that showed few irregular cavities placed mostly in the transmembrane-helical part. Besides, topology mapping of 12 transmembrane-helixes was done to predict N- and O-glycosylation sites and to show the highly glycosylated GLUT4 that includes both N- and O-glycosylation sites. Furthermore, hydrophobic segment and molecular charge distribution were analyzed. This article shows that bioinformatics tools can provide a rapid methodology to predict the topology of GLUT4. It also provides insights into the structural details and structural functioning relationships in the human GLUT4. The results can be of great help to advance future drug development research using GLUT4 as a target protein.

  20. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide regulates dipeptide absorption in mouse jejunum.

    PubMed

    Coon, Steven D; Schwartz, John H; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K

    2013-11-15

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secreted from jejunal mucosal K cells augments insulin secretion and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In recent studies, we have shown GIP directly activates Na-glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) and enhances glucose absorption in mouse jejunum. It is not known whether GIP would also regulate other intestinal nutrient absorptive processes. The present study investigated the effect of GIP on proton-peptide cotransporter-1 (PepT1) that mediates di- and tripeptide absorption as well as peptidomimetic drugs. Immunohistochemistry studies localized both GIP receptor (GIPR) and PepT1 proteins on the basolateral and apical membranes of normal mouse jejunum, respectively. Anti-GIPR antibody detected 50-, 55-, 65-, and 70-kDa proteins, whereas anti-PepT1 detected a 70-kDa proteins in mucosal homogenates of mouse jejunum. RT-PCR analyses established the expression of GIPR- and PepT1-specific mRNA in mucosal cells of mouse jejunum. Absorption of Gly-Sar (a nondigestible dipeptide) measured under voltage-clamp conditions revealed that the imposed mucosal H(+) gradient-enhanced Gly-Sar absorption as an evidence for the presence of PepT1-mediated H(+):Gly-Sar cotransport on the apical membranes of mouse jejunum. H(+):Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by cephalexin (a competitive inhibitor of PepT1) and was activated by GIP. The GIP-activated Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by RP-cAMP (a cAMP antagonist). In contrast to GIP, the ileal L cell secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) did not affect the H(+):Gly-Sar absorption in mouse jejunum. We conclude from these observations that GIP, but not GLP-1, directly activates PepT1 activity by a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in jejunum.

  1. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D’Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A.; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a “leaky” RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis. PMID:25844899

  2. Calcium release channel RyR2 regulates insulin release and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Santulli, Gaetano; Pagano, Gennaro; Sardu, Celestino; Xie, Wenjun; Reiken, Steven; D'Ascia, Salvatore Luca; Cannone, Michele; Marziliano, Nicola; Trimarco, Bruno; Guise, Theresa A; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2015-05-01

    The type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) is a Ca2+ release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of several types of cells, including cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β cells. In cardiomyocytes, RyR2-dependent Ca2+ release is critical for excitation-contraction coupling; however, a functional role for RyR2 in β cell insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus remains controversial. Here, we took advantage of rare RyR2 mutations that were identified in patients with a genetic form of exercise-induced sudden death (catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia [CPVT]). As these mutations result in a "leaky" RyR2 channel, we exploited them to assess RyR2 channel function in β cell dynamics. We discovered that CPVT patients with mutant leaky RyR2 present with glucose intolerance, which was heretofore unappreciated. In mice, transgenic expression of CPVT-associated RyR2 resulted in impaired glucose homeostasis, and an in-depth evaluation of pancreatic islets and β cells from these animals revealed intracellular Ca2+ leak via oxidized and nitrosylated RyR2 channels, activated ER stress response, mitochondrial dysfunction, and decreased fuel-stimulated insulin release. Additionally, we verified the effects of the pharmacological inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ leak in CPVT-associated RyR2-expressing mice, in human islets from diabetic patients, and in an established murine model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Taken together, our data indicate that RyR2 channels play a crucial role in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis.

  3. Post-Translational Regulation of the Glucose-6-Phosphatase Complex by Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Is a Crucial Determinant of Endogenous Glucose Production and Is Controlled by the Glucose-6-Phosphate Transporter.

    PubMed

    Soty, Maud; Chilloux, Julien; Delalande, François; Zitoun, Carine; Bertile, Fabrice; Mithieux, Gilles; Gautier-Stein, Amandine

    2016-04-01

    The excessive endogenous glucose production (EGP) induced by glucagon participates in the development of type 2 diabetes. To further understand this hormonal control, we studied the short-term regulation by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) enzyme, which catalyzes the last reaction of EGP. In gluconeogenic cell models, a 1-h treatment by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin increased G6Pase activity and glucose production independently of any change in enzyme protein amount or G6P content. Using specific inhibitors or protein overexpression, we showed that the stimulation of G6Pase activity involved the protein kinase A (PKA). Results of site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry analyses, and in vitro phosphorylation experiments suggested that the PKA stimulation of G6Pase activity did not depend on a direct phosphorylation of the enzyme. However, the temperature-dependent induction of both G6Pase activity and glucose release suggested a membrane-based mechanism. G6Pase is composed of a G6P transporter (G6PT) and a catalytic unit (G6PC). Surprisingly, we demonstrated that the increase in G6PT activity was required for the stimulation of G6Pase activity by forskolin. Our data demonstrate the existence of a post-translational mechanism that regulates G6Pase activity and reveal the key role of G6PT in the hormonal regulation of G6Pase activity and of EGP.

  4. (p)ppGpp, a Small Nucleotide Regulator, Directs the Metabolic Fate of Glucose in Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Raskin, David M.; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2015-01-01

    When V. cholerae encounters nutritional stress, it activates (p)ppGpp-mediated stringent response. The genes relA and relV are involved in the production of (p)ppGpp, whereas the spoT gene encodes an enzyme that hydrolyzes it. Herein, we show that the bacterial capability to produce (p)ppGpp plays an essential role in glucose metabolism. The V. cholerae mutants defective in (p)ppGpp production (i.e. ΔrelAΔrelV and ΔrelAΔrelVΔspoT mutants) lost their viability because of uncontrolled production of organic acids, when grown with extra glucose. In contrast, the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, a (p)ppGpp overproducer strain, exhibited better growth in the presence of the same glucose concentration. An RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that transcriptions of genes consisting of an operon for acetoin biosynthesis were markedly elevated in N16961, a seventh pandemic O1 strain, but not in its (p)ppGpp0 mutant during glucose-stimulated growth. Transposon insertion in acetoin biosynthesis gene cluster resulted in glucose-induced loss of viability of the ΔrelAΔspoT mutant, further suggesting the crucial role of acetoin production in balanced growth under glucose-rich environments. Additional deletion of the aphA gene, encoding a negative regulator for acetoin production, failed to rescue the (p)ppGpp0 mutant from the defective glucose-mediated growth, suggesting that (p)ppGpp-mediated acetoin production occurs independent of the presence of AphA. Overall, our results reveal that (p)ppGpp, in addition to its well known role as a stringent response mediator, positively regulates acetoin production that contributes to the successful glucose metabolism and consequently the proliferation of V. cholerae cells under a glucose-rich environment, a condition that may mimic the human intestine. PMID:25882848

  5. Evidence for an indirect transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression by liver X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Grempler, Rolf . E-mail: rolfgrempler@yahoo.de; Guenther, Susanne; Steffensen, Knut R.; Nilsson, Maria; Barthel, Andreas; Schmoll, Dieter

    2005-12-16

    Liver X receptor (LXR) paralogues {alpha} and {beta} (LXR{alpha} and LXR{beta}) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor family and have oxysterols as endogenous ligands. LXR activation reduces hepatic glucose production in vivo through the inhibition of transcription of the key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of G6Pase gene expression by LXR. Both T0901317, a synthetic LXR agonist, and the adenoviral overexpression of either LXR{alpha} or LXR{beta} suppressed G6Pase gene expression in H4IIE hepatoma cells. However, compared to the suppression of G6Pase expression seen by insulin, the decrease of G6Pase mRNA by LXR activation was delayed and was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These observations, together with the absence of a conserved LXR-binding element within the G6Pase promoter, suggest an indirect inhibition of G6Pase gene expression by liver X receptors.

  6. Peroxisome function regulates growth on glucose in the basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Idnurm, Alexander; Giles, Steven S; Perfect, John R; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    ; however, Hxk2 fused to fluorescent proteins was not localized to peroxisomes. Thus, we hypothesize that glucose or glycolytic metabolites are utilized in the peroxisome by an as yet unidentified enzyme or regulate a pathway required by the fungus in the absence of peroxisomes.

  7. Peroxisome Function Regulates Growth on Glucose in the Basidiomycete Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans▿

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Giles, Steven S.; Perfect, John R.; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    ; however, Hxk2 fused to fluorescent proteins was not localized to peroxisomes. Thus, we hypothesize that glucose or glycolytic metabolites are utilized in the peroxisome by an as yet unidentified enzyme or regulate a pathway required by the fungus in the absence of peroxisomes. PMID:17041184

  8. Role of FGF19 induced FGFR4 activation in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2009-12-09

    FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 form a unique subfamily of fibroblast growth factors. Because they contain intra-molecular disulfide bonds and show reduced affinity toward heparan sulfate located in the extracellular space, it is thought that, in contrast to other FGFs, they function as endocrine hormones. FGF23 and its co-receptor alphaKlotho are involved in the control of aging, but it is not known if the same holds true for FGF19, which can also signal through alphaKlotho. However, considerable evidence supports a role for FGF19 in controlling various aspects of metabolism. We have recently fully characterized FGF19/FGFR/co-factor interactions and signaling, and in the current manuscript discuss the contribution of the FGF19/FGFR4 axis to bile acid and glucose regulation.

  9. Regulators of Glucose Metabolism in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Clovis S; Hussain, Tabinda; Duette, Gabriel; Weller, Thomas J; Ostrowski, Matias; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2016-11-01

    Much like cancer cells, activated T cells undergo various metabolic changes that allow them to grow and proliferate rapidly. By adopting aerobic glycolysis upon activation, T cells effectively prioritize efficiency in biosynthesis over energy generation. There are distinct differences in the way CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells process activation signals. CD8(+) effector T cells are less dependent on Glut1 and oxygen levels compared to their CD4(+) counterparts. Similarly the downstream signaling by TCR also differs in both effector T cell types. Recent studies have explored PI3K/Akt, mTORC, HIF1α, p70S6K and Bcl-6 signaling in depth providing definition of the crucial roles of these regulators in glucose metabolism. These new insights may allow improved therapeutic manipulation against inflammatory conditions that are associated with dysfunctional T-cell metabolism such as autoimmune disorders, metabolic syndrome, HIV, and cancers.

  10. Molecular characterization of the glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) gene in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Xue; Chen, Guang-Wen; Shi, Chang-Ying; Cheng, Fang-Fang; Dou, He; Feng, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, De-Zeng

    2014-05-01

    GRP78 (78 kDa glucose-regulated protein) has ubiquitously existed in nearly all organisms from yeast to humans, reflecting the central roles it plays in cell survival. In this report, we isolated and sequenced the full-length cDNA of GRP78 (designated DjGRP78) from the planarian Dugesia japonica. The cDNA is 2121 bp, including an open reading frame (ORF) of 1983 bp encoding a polypeptide of 660 amino acids with three HSP70 family signatures. DjGRP78 contains signal peptides at the N-terminus and a KTEL peptide motif at the C-terminus, which suggests that it localizes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Fluorescent real time RT-PCR was employed to detect the expression pattern of Djgrp78 in response to different stressors. Our results show that heat shock and heavy metals (Hg(2+) and Pb(2+)) induce Djgrp78 expression, but starvation does not. Interestingly, we found that Djgrp78 was up-regulated in planarians with septic tissues, and also verified that it was up-regulated in response to bacterial challenge. Our data indicate that Djgrp78 may be a multifunctional gene, and play important roles in physiological and pathological stress in planarians.

  11. Sucrose regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunit genes transcript levels in leaves and fruits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiangyang; Xing, Jinpeng; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Janes, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase, EC2.7.7.27) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. The enzyme is a heterotetramer with two S and two B subunits. In tomato, there are three multiple forms of the S subunit gene. Agp S1, S2 and B are highly expressed in fruit from 10 to 25 days after anthesis. Agp S3 is only weakly expressed in fruit. Sucrose significantly elevates expression of Agp S1, S2 and B in both leaves and fruits. Agp S1 exhibits the highest degree of regulation by sucrose. In fact, sucrose may be required for Agp S1 expression. For excised leaves incubated in water, no transcripts for Agp S1 could be detected in the absence of sucrose, whereas it took up to 16 h in water before transcripts were no longer detectable for Agp S2 and B. Neither Agp S3 nor the tubulin gene is affected by sucrose, demonstrating that this response is specifically regulated by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and is not due to a general increase in metabolism caused by sucrose treatment. Truncated versions of the promoter for Agp S1 indicate that a specific region 1.3-3.0 kb upstream from the transcription site is responsible for sucrose sensitivity. This region of the S1 promoter contains several cis-acting elements present in the promoters of other genes that are also regulated by sucrose. c2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of glucose metabolism by p62/SQSTM1 through HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke; Zeng, Jin; Xiao, Haibing; Huang, Chunhua; Hu, Junhui; Yao, Weimin; Yu, Gan; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Hua; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The signaling adaptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62 is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of tumorigenesis. Although great progress has been made, biological roles of p62 and relevant molecular mechanisms responsible for its pro-tumor activity remain largely unknown. Here, we show that p62 knockdown reduces cell growth and the expression of glycolytic genes in a manner that depends on HIF1α activity in renal cancer cells. Knockdown of p62 decreases HIF1α levels and transcriptional activity by regulating mTORC1 activity and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, p62 interacts directly with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) E3 ligase complex to modulate the stability of HIF1α. Mechanistically, p62 binds to the VHL complex and competes with HIF1α. Expression of p62 inhibits the interaction of DCNL1 (also known as DCUN1D1) with CUL2 and attenuates the neddylation of CUL2, and thus downregulates the VHL E3 ligase complex activity. Functionally, HIF1α expression is required for p62-induced glucose uptake, lactate production and soft agar colony growth. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that p62 is a crucial positive regulator of HIF1α, which is a facilitating factor in p62-enhanced tumorigenesis. PMID:26743088

  13. High glucose induces dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier through down-regulation of connexin 43.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Juan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Xiao, Qian; Lü, Yang; Xia, Li

    2016-03-01

    The airway epithelium is a barrier to the inhaled antigens and pathogens. Connexin 43 (Cx43) has been found to play critical role in maintaining the function of airway epithelial barrier and be involved in the pathogenesis of the diabetic retinal vasculature, diabetes nephropathy and diabetes skin. Hyperglycemia has been shown to be an independent risk factor for respiratory infections. We hypothesize that the down-regulation of Cx43 induced by HG alters the expression of tight junctions (zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin) and contributes to dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier, and Cx43 plays a critical role in the process in human airway epithelial cells (16 HBE). We show that high glucose (HG) decreased the expression of ZO-1 and occludin, disassociated interaction between Cx43 and tight junctions, and then increased airway epithelial transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and permeability by down-regulation of Cx43 in human airway epithelial cells. These observations demonstrate an important role for Cx43 in regulating HG-induced dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier. These findings may bring new insights into the molecular pathogenesis of pulmonary infection related to diabetes mellitus and lead to novel therapeutic intervention for the dysfunction of airway epithelial barrier in chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  14. Neural clocks and Neuropeptide F/Y regulate circadian gene expression in a peripheral metabolic tissue.

    PubMed

    Erion, Renske; King, Anna N; Wu, Gang; Hogenesch, John B; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-04-14

    Metabolic homeostasis requires coordination between circadian clocks in different tissues. Also, systemic signals appear to be required for some transcriptional rhythms in the mammalian liver and the Drosophila fat body. Here we show that free-running oscillations of the fat body clock require clock function in the PDF-positive cells of the fly brain. Interestingly, rhythmic expression of the cytochrome P450 transcripts, sex-specific enzyme 1 (sxe1) and Cyp6a21, which cycle in the fat body independently of the local clock, depends upon clocks in neurons expressing neuropeptide F (NPF). NPF signaling itself is required to drive cycling of sxe1 and Cyp6a21 in the fat body, and its mammalian ortholog, Npy, functions similarly to regulate cycling of cytochrome P450 genes in the mouse liver. These data highlight the importance of neuronal clocks for peripheral rhythms, particularly in a specific detoxification pathway, and identify a novel and conserved role for NPF/Npy in circadian rhythms.

  15. Glucose metabolism and hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Dario; Ceriello, Antonio; Esposito, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Islet dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance are both present in type 2 diabetes and are both necessary for the development of hyperglycemia. In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, large, prospective clinical studies have shown a strong relation between time-averaged mean values of glycemia, measured as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular diabetic complications. These studies are the basis for the American Diabetes Association's current recommended treatment goal that HbA1c should be <7%. The measurement of the HbA1c concentration is considered the gold standard for assessing long-term glycemia; however, it does not reveal any information on the extent or frequency of blood glucose excursions, but provides an overall mean value only. Postprandial hyperglycemia occurs frequently in patients with diabetes receiving active treatment and can occur even when metabolic control is apparently good. Interventional studies indicate that reducing postmeal glucose excursions is as important as controlling fasting plasma glucose in persons with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. Evidence exists for a causal relation between postmeal glucose increases and microvascular and macrovascular outcomes; therefore, it is not surprising that treatment with different compounds that have specific effects on postprandial glucose regulation is accompanied by a significant improvement of many pathways supposed to be involved in diabetic complications, including oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and nuclear factor-kappaB activation. The goal of therapy should be to achieve glycemic status as near to normal as safely possible in all 3 components of glycemic control: HbA1c, fasting glucose, and postmeal glucose peak.

  16. Proteoglycans regulate the chemotaxis of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which play an essential role in the immune system. The transition from immature DC (iDCs) to mature DCs (mDCs) requires appropriate maturation stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines or pathogen-derived components. Proteoglycans (PGs), which are composed of core proteins and the glycosaminoglycans that bind to them, are one of the main components of the extracellular matrix around pathogens such as bacteria. This study investigated the effects of PG extracted from the nasal septum cartilage of whale (W-PG) on the maturation of DCs derived from human peripheral blood monocytes. iDCs were prepared from human monocytes using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The iDCs were stimulated by W-PG alone. In another type of experiment, the iDCs were stimulated by MIX (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))) or a combination of MIX plus W-PG. The stimulation of W-PG alone did not induce the phenotypic maturation from iDCs. However, W-PG promoted the up-regulation of chemokine receptor CCR7-surface expression and the chemotactic responsiveness to CCR7 ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3beta on MIX-stimulated mDCs although W-PG did not influence matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity which is an important factor in DC migration through the extracellular matrix. The findings that W-PG can selectively regulate the chemotactic activity of DCs in vitro under inflammatory conditions therefore indicate that the interaction of PGs with immune cells including DCs plays an important role in the immune response under the milieu of innate immunity.

  17. Impaired glucose regulation in a Sherpa indigenous population living in the Everest region of Nepal and in Kathmandu Valley.

    PubMed

    Lhamo, Sherpa Y; Supamai, Soonthornpun; Virasakdi, Chongsuvivatwong

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impaired glucose regulation status in Sherpa adults living in the Everest area and in Kathmandu valley. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Chaurikharka village (Everest area) and Kathmandu city on 119 and 121 randomly selected individuals, aged 30-70 years. They were assessed on conventional risk factors for diabetes, and an oral glucose tolerance test was performed. Based on the 2003 American Diabetes Association criteria, the prevalence in the Kathmandu city and Everest region of any impaired glucose regulation (IGR), isolated impaired fasting plasma glucose (isolated IFG), isolated impaired glucose tolerance (isolated IGT), and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT were 55.4% vs. 23.5%, 42.1% vs. 14.3%, 1.7% vs. 0.8%, 11.6 vs. 8.4%, respectively. Using the subjects with normal glucose tolerance as the referent group and after adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, calories, and waist circumference, the odds ratios for isolated IFG and combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT of living in the highland region were 0.19 (0.08-0.44) and 0.33 (0.09-1.18), respectively. Isolated IFG was more common among the lowland Sherpas. Unlike combined isolated IFG and isolated IGT, this isolated IFG difference could not be explained by the difference of conventional diabetes mellitus risk factors.

  18. High activity enables life on a high-sugar diet: blood glucose regulation in nectar-feeding bats.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Detlev H; Simon, Ralph; Kuhlow, Doreen; Voigt, Christian C; Ristow, Michael

    2011-12-07

    High blood glucose levels caused by excessive sugar consumption are detrimental to mammalian health and life expectancy. Despite consuming vast quantities of sugar-rich floral nectar, nectar-feeding bats are long-lived, provoking the question of how they regulate blood glucose. We investigated blood glucose levels in nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina) in experiments in which we varied the amount of dietary sugar or flight time. Blood glucose levels increased with the quantity of glucose ingested and exceeded 25 mmol l(-1) blood in resting bats, which is among the highest values ever recorded in mammals fed sugar quantities similar to their natural diet. During normal feeding, blood glucose values decreased with increasing flight time, but only fell to expected values when bats spent 75 per cent of their time airborne. Either nectar-feeding bats have evolved mechanisms to avoid negative health effects of hyperglycaemia, or high activity is key to balancing blood glucose levels during foraging. We suggest that the coevolutionary specialization of bats towards a nectar diet was supported by the high activity and elevated metabolic rates of these bats. High activity may have conferred benefits to the bats in terms of behavioural interactions and foraging success, and is simultaneously likely to have increased their efficiency as plant pollinators.

  19. PED/PEA-15 regulates glucose-induced insulin secretion by restraining potassium channel expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Miele, Claudia; Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Cassese, Angela; Romano, Chiara; Giacco, Ferdinando; Oriente, Francesco; Paturzo, Flora; Andreozzi, Francesco; Zabatta, Assunta; Troncone, Giancarlo; Bosch, Fatima; Pujol, Anna; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco

    2007-03-01

    The phosphoprotein enriched in diabetes/phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes (ped/pea-15) gene is overexpressed in human diabetes and causes this abnormality in mice. Transgenic mice with beta-cell-specific overexpression of ped/pea-15 (beta-tg) exhibited decreased glucose tolerance but were not insulin resistant. However, they showed impaired insulin response to hyperglycemia. Islets from the beta-tg also exhibited little response to glucose. mRNAs encoding the Sur1 and Kir6.2 potassium channel subunits and their upstream regulator Foxa2 were specifically reduced in these islets. Overexpression of PED/PEA-15 inhibited the induction of the atypical protein kinase C (PKC)-zeta by glucose in mouse islets and in beta-cells of the MIN-6 and INS-1 lines. Rescue of PKC-zeta activity elicited recovery of the expression of the Sur1, Kir6.2, and Foxa2 genes and of glucose-induced insulin secretion in PED/PEA-15-overexpressing beta-cells. Islets from ped/pea-15-null mice exhibited a twofold increased activation of PKC-zeta by glucose; increased abundance of the Sur1, Kir6.2, and Foxa2 mRNAs; and enhanced glucose effect on insulin secretion. In conclusion, PED/PEA-15 is an endogenous regulator of glucose-induced insulin secretion, which restrains potassium channel expression in pancreatic beta-cells. Overexpression of PED/PEA-15 dysregulates beta-cell function and is sufficient to impair glucose tolerance in mice.

  20. Effects of nutrient restriction of bovine dams during early gestation on postnatal growth and regulation of plasma glucose.

    PubMed

    Long, N M; Prado-Cooper, M J; Krehbiel, C R; Wettemann, R P

    2010-10-01

    Angus x Hereford heifers (15 mo and AI to a single sire) were used to evaluate the effect of prenatal nutritional restriction on postnatal growth and regulation of glucose in plasma. Dams (d 32 of gestation) were stratified by BW and BCS and allotted to low [LN, 55% of NRC (1996) requirements, n = 7] or moderate nutrition [MN, 100% of NRC (1996) requirements, n = 7]. After 83 d of feeding, dams were commingled and received a diet in excess of requirements. Dams were allowed to calve naturally, and bull calves were castrated at birth. Dams and calves were maintained as a group until weaning, and calves were maintained as a group after weaning. Calves (15 mo of age) were adapted to a similar diet during 2 wk; catheters were placed in both jugular veins; and calves were confined in stalls. Two days later, calves were subjected to an intravenous glucose challenge and the next day to an insulin challenge. Dams had similar (P = 0.31) BW at the beginning of the experiment. At the end of restriction, LN dams weighed less (P ≤ 0.01) and had less BCS (P < 0.001) compared with MN dams. Length of gestation was not affected by prenatal nutritional treatment. Nutrient restriction during gestation did not influence birth weight or postnatal growth. Concentrations of glucose (P = 0.49) and insulin (P = 0.29) were not different in plasma of LN and MN calves before glucose infusion. Plasma concentrations of glucose, after intravenous administration of glucose, decreased more rapidly (P = 0.05) in LN compared with MN calves. Concentrations of glucose (P = 0.68) and insulin (P = 0.55) in plasma of LN and MN calves were similar after infusion of insulin. Nutritional restriction of dams during early gestation did not influence postnatal growth, but altered clearance of glucose after a bolus infusion of glucose.

  1. Significant decrease of broth viscosity and glucose consumption in erythromycin fermentation by dynamic regulation of ammonium sulfate and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Wang, Zejian; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang; Yu, Xiaoguang

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of nitrogen sources on broth viscosity and glucose consumption in erythromycin fermentation were investigated. By controlling ammonium sulfate concentration, broth viscosity and glucose consumption were decreased by 18.2% and 61.6%, respectively, whereas erythromycin biosynthesis was little affected. Furthermore, erythromycin A production was increased by 8.7% still with characteristics of low broth viscosity and glucose consumption through the rational regulations of phosphate salt, soybean meal and ammonium sulfate. It was found that ammonium sulfate could effectively control proteinase activity, which was correlated with the utilization of soybean meal as well as cell growth. The pollets formation contributed much to the decrease of broth viscosity. The accumulation of extracellular propionate and succinate under the new regulation strategy indicated that higher propanol consumption might increase the concentration of methylmalonyl-CoA and propionyl-CoA and thus could increase the flux leading to erythromycin A.

  2. Glucose metabolism activation by SHIP2 inhibitors via up-regulation of GLUT1 gene in L6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Akira; Kurama, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Sawada, Akihiko; Shimokawa, Teruhiko; Aramori, Ichiro

    2010-09-10

    Lipid phosphatase SH2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) plays an important role in the regulation of insulin signaling. In this report, we identified AS1938909, a novel small-molecule SHIP2 inhibitor. AS1938909 showed potent inhibition of SHIP2 (Ki=0.44 microuM) and significant selectivity over other related phosphatases. Further, AS1938909 increased Akt phosphorylation, glucose consumption, and glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. Treatment of L6 myotubes with SHIP2 inhibitors for 48 h significantly induced expression of GLUT1 mRNA, but not that of GLUT4. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibition of SHIP2 activates glucose metabolism due, at least in part, to up-regulation of GLUT1 gene expression.

  3. The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase complex mediates glucose regulation of gene expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ye, Tian; Bendrioua, Loubna; Carmena, David; García-Salcedo, Raúl; Dahl, Peter; Carling, David; Hohmann, Stefan

    2014-06-05

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) controls energy homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Here we expressed hetero-trimeric mammalian AMPK complexes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking all five genes encoding yeast AMPK/SNF1 components. Certain mammalian complexes complemented the growth defect of the yeast mutant on non-fermentable carbon sources. Phosphorylation of the AMPK α1-subunit was glucose-regulated, albeit not by the Glc7-Reg1/2 phosphatase, which performs this function on yeast AMPK/SNF1. AMPK could take over SNF1 function in glucose derepression. While indirectly acting anti-diabetic drugs had no effect on AMPK in yeast, compound 991 stimulated α1-subunit phosphorylation. Our results demonstrate a remarkable functional conservation of AMPK and that glucose regulation of AMPK may not be mediated by regulatory features of a specific phosphatase.

  4. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM Kinase Regulates Mitochondrial Function, Glucose Uptake and the Carbon Starvation Response

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  5. The Aspergillus nidulans ATM kinase regulates mitochondrial function, glucose uptake and the carbon starvation response.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Nadia Graciele; Brown, Neil Andrew; Colabardini, Ana Cristina; Reis, Thaila; Savoldi, Marcela; Dinamarco, Taísa Magnani; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2014-01-10

    Mitochondria supply cellular energy and also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress. In mammals, the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase acts as a redox sensor controlling mitochondrial function. Subsequently, transcriptomic and genetic studies were utilized to elucidate the role played by a fungal ATM homolog during carbon starvation. In Aspergillus nidulans, AtmA was shown to control mitochondrial function and glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses that are regulated by target of rapamycin (TOR) were shown to be AtmA-dependent, including autophagy and hydrolytic enzyme secretion. AtmA also regulated a p53-like transcription factor, XprG, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Thus, AtmA possibly represents a direct or indirect link between mitochondrial stress, metabolism, and growth through the influence of TOR and XprG function. The coordination of cell growth and division with nutrient availability is crucial for all microorganisms to successfully proliferate in a heterogeneous environment. Mitochondria supply cellular energy but also perform a role in the adaptation to metabolic stress and the cross-talk between prosurvival and prodeath pathways. The present study of Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated that AtmA also controlled mitochondrial mass, function, and oxidative phosphorylation, which directly or indirectly influenced glucose uptake. Carbon starvation responses, including autophagy, shifting metabolism to the glyoxylate cycle, and the secretion of carbon scavenging enzymes were AtmA-dependent. Transcriptomic profiling of the carbon starvation response demonstrated how TOR signaling and the retrograde response, which signals mitochondrial dysfunction, were directly or indirectly influenced by AtmA. The AtmA kinase was also shown to influence a p53-like transcription factor, inhibiting starvation-induced XprG-dependent protease secretion and cell death. Therefore, in response to metabolic

  6. Neuroimmune Interaction in the Regulation of Peripheral Opioid-Mediated Analgesia in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral immune cell-mediated analgesia in inflammation is an important endogenous mechanism of pain control. Opioid receptors localized on peripheral sensory nerve terminals are activated by endogenous opioid peptides released from immune cells to produce significant analgesia. Following transendothelial migration of opioid-containing leukocytes into peripheral sites of inflammation, opioid peptides are released into a harsh milieu associated with an increase in temperature, low pH, and high proteolytic activity. Together, this microenvironment has been suggested to increase the activity of opioid peptide metabolism. Therefore, the proximity of immune cells and nerve fibers may be essential to produce adequate analgesic effects. Close associations between opioid-containing immune cells and peripheral nerve terminals have been observed. However, it is not yet determined whether these immune cells actually form synaptic-like contacts with peripheral sensory terminals and/or whether they secrete opioids in a paracrine manner. This review will provide novel insight into the peripheral mechanisms of immune-derived analgesia in inflammation, in particular, the importance of direct interactions between immune cells and the peripheral nervous system. PMID:27532001

  7. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-01-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the ‘Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism. PMID:25012504

  8. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-11-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the 'Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism.

  9. Dissection of the transcriptional regulation of grape ASR and response to glucose and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Saumonneau, Amélie; Laloi, Maryse; Lallemand, Magali; Rabot, Amélie; Atanassova, Rossitza

    2012-02-01

    Despite the fact that the precise physiological function of ASRs [abscisic acid (ABA), stress, ripening] remains unknown, they have been suggested to play a dual role in the plant response to environmental cues, as highly hydrophilic proteins for direct protection, as well as transcription factors involved in the regulation of gene expression. To investigate further the biological positioning of grape ASR in the hormonal and metabolic signal network, three promoters corresponding to its cDNA were isolated and submited to a detailed in silico and functional analysis. The results obtained provided evidence for the allelic polymorphism of the grape ASR gene, the organ-preferential expression conferred on the GUS reporter gene, and the specific phloem tissue localization revealed by in situ hybridization. The study of glucose and ABA signalling in its transcriptional control, by transfection of grape protoplasts using the dual luciferase system, revealed the complexity of ASR gene expression regulation. A model was proposed allowing a discussion of the place of ASR in the fine tuning of hormonal and metabolic signalling involved in the integration of environmental cues by the plant organism.

  10. Tctex1d2 Is a Negative Regulator of GLUT4 Translocation and Glucose Uptake.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Okada, Shuichi; Yamada, Eijiro; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Yamada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    Tctex1d2 (Tctex1 domain containing 2) is an open reading frame that encodes for a functionally unknown protein that contains a Tctex1 domain found in dynein light chain family members. Examination of gene expression during adipogenesis demonstrated a marked increase in Tctex1d2 protein expression that was essentially undetectable in preadipocytes and markedly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Tctex1d2 overexpression significantly inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. In contrast, Tctex1d2 knockdown significantly increased insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation and 2-deoxyglucose uptake. However, acute insulin stimulation (up to 30 min) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes with overexpression or knockdown of Tctex1d2 had no effect on Akt phosphorylation, a critical signal transduction target required for GLUT4 translocation. Although overexpression of Tctex1d2 had no significant effect on GLUT4 internalization, Tctex1d2 was found to associate with syntaxin 4 in an insulin-dependent manner and inhibit Doc2b binding to syntaxin 4. In addition, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide rescued the Tctex1d2 inhibition of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation by suppressing the Tctex1d2-syntaxin 4 interaction and increasing Doc2b-Synatxin4 interactions. Taking these results together, we hypothesized that Tctex1d2 is a novel syntaxin 4 binding protein that functions as a negative regulator of GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation through inhibition of the Doc2b-syntaxin 4 interaction.

  11. The Association between Impaired Glucose Regulation and Prognosis of Chinese Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Guo, Li; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at observing the influence of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) on 1-year outcomes in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients hospitalized for ICH from 2008 to 2009 were recruited consecutively at 35 centres across China. A standard oral glucose tolerance test at day 14 ± 3 after stroke onset or before discharge was performed to identify IGR. The outcomes were death (modified Rankin scale [mRS] score of 6), dependency (mRS score of 2 to 5) and poor outcome (mRS score of 2 to 6) at 1 year. Cox proportion hazard model for death and logistic regression model for dependency and poor outcome were performed to investigate the influence of IGR on 1-year outcomes. A total of 288 non-diabetic ICH patients were included in this analysis, among which 150 (52.1%) were IGR. IGR was associated with 1-year dependency (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19–3.99; P = 0.01) and poor outcome (adjusted OR 2.17; 95% CI, 1.24–3.80; P = 0.007) of patients with ICH. However, IGR showed no significant association with 1-year death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49, 95% CI, 0.60–3.67; P = 0.39). IGR was independently associated with 1-year poor outcome of ICH in Chinese patients, with more important influence on dependency than death. PMID:27796374

  12. Global expression profiling of glucose-regulated genes in pancreatic islets of spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanaat-Pour, Hamedeh; Huang, Zhen; Lehtihet, Mikael; Sjöholm, Ake

    2007-08-01

    The spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat is frequently used as a model for human type 2 diabetes. Selective loss of glucose-sensitive insulin secretion is an early pathogenetic event in human type 2 diabetes, and such a defect also typifies islets from the GK rat. We investigated whether expression of specific glucose-regulated genes is disturbed in islets from GK rats when compared with Wistar rats. Large-scale gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays and qRT-PCR measurements of mRNA species from normal and diabetic islets were performed after 48 h of culture at 3 or 20 mM glucose. Of the 2020 transcripts differentially regulated in diabetic GK islets when compared with controls, 1033 were up-regulated and 987 were down-regulated. We identified significant changes in islet mRNAs involved in glucose sensing, phosphorylation, incretin action, glucocorticoid handling, ion transport, mitogenesis, and apoptosis that clearly distinguish diabetic animals from controls. Such markers may provide clues to the pathogenesis of human type 2 diabetes and may be of predictive and therapeutical value in clinical settings in efforts aiming at conferring beta-cell protection against apoptosis, impaired regenerative capacity and functional suppression occurring in diabetes.

  13. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  14. Characterization of the avian GLUT1 glucose transporter: differential regulation of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, P; Kang, H Y; Mylott, D; Robbins, P J; White, M K

    1995-01-01

    Vertebrate cells that are transformed by oncogenes such as v-src or are stimulated by mitogens have increased rates of glucose uptake. In rodent cells, the mechanisms whereby glucose transport is up-regulated are well understood. Stimulation of glucose transport involves an elevation in mRNA encoding the GLUT1 glucose transporter that is controlled at the levels of both transcription and mRNA stability. Cloning and sequencing of chicken GLUT1 cDNA showed that it shares 95% amino acid sequence similarity to mammalian GLUT1s. Nevertheless, unlike mammalian GLUT1 mRNA, it was not induced by v-src, serum addition, or treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Rather, the induction of glucose transport in chicken embryo fibroblasts by v-src, serum, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate was associated with induction of GLUT3 mRNA level and GLUT3 transcription. Rat fibroblasts were also found to express both GLUT1 and GLUT3 isoforms, but v-src induced GLUT1 and not GLUT3. This suggests that animal cells require both a basal and an upregulatable glucose transporter and that these functions have been subsumed by different GLUT isoforms in avian and mammalian cells. Images PMID:8589457

  15. Chronic stress, inflammation, and glucose regulation in U.S. Hispanics from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    McCurley, Jessica L; Mills, Paul J; Roesch, Scott C; Carnethon, Mercedes; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Isasi, Carmen R; Teng, Yanping; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Llabre, Maria M; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil; Gallo, Linda C

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes prevalence is rising rapidly, and diabetes disproportionately affects Hispanics and other underserved groups. Chronic stress may contribute to diabetes risk, but few studies have examined this relationship in U.S. Hispanics. We examined associations of chronic stress with fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Hispanics without diabetes, and also assessed indirect effects of stress through inflammation (CRP). Participants were 3,923 men and women, aged 18-74, without diabetes, from the four U.S. field centers (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; San Diego, CA) of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary study. Participants completed a measure of chronic life stress and a physical exam with oral glucose tolerance test. In a multivariate regression analysis with adjustment for demographic and health covariates, higher chronic stress was related to higher fasting glucose (standardized regression coefficient: β = .09, p < .01), postload glucose (β = .07, p < .05), and HbA1c levels (β = .08, p < .01). However, there was no indirect effect of stress through inflammation. Findings suggest that higher chronic stress is associated with poorer glucose regulation in Hispanics, prior to the onset of a clinical diabetes diagnosis.

  16. Resistin impairs glucose permeability in EA.hy926 cells by down-regulating GLUT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Cai, Yuxi; Huang, Jing; Yu, Xiaolan; Sun, Jun; Yang, Zaiqing; Zhou, Lei

    2016-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic disease which is now affecting the health of more and more people in the world. Resistin, discovered in 2001, is considered to be closely related to metabolic dysfunction and obesity. Previous study showed that hyperglycemia is always accompanied by a high serum resistin concentration. We therefore investigated whether resistin can mediate glucose transfer across the blood-tissue barrier. Here, we employed a transwell system to analyze glucose permeability in EA.hy926 human endothelial cells treated without or with human resistin. In EA.hy926 cells treated with resistin, the permeability to glucose was heavily impaired. This was due to the down-regulation of GLUT1 expression as a result of the treatment, rather than regulation of tight junctions. In addition, overexpression of GLUT1 in EA.hy926 cells was able to recover the blocking effect of resistin on glucose permeability. We further found that resistin could inhibit the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and consequently impede the transcription of GLUT1. The results of the present study suggested that resistin could cause glucose retention in serum and thus result in hyperglycemia. This provides a novel explanation for hyperglycemia and a potential new way of treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Involvement of AMPK in regulating the degradation of MAD2B under high glucose in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfang; Chu, Guangpin; Ye, Chen; Tang, Hui; Qiu, Ping; Hu, Yue; Li, Man; Zhang, Chun

    2016-12-13

    Although our recent study has demonstrated that mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint protein (MAD2B) mediates high glucose-induced neuronal apoptosis, the mechanisms for MAD2B degradation under hyperglycaemia have not yet been elucidated. In this study, we first found that the activation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was decreased in neurons, accompanied with the increased expression of MAD2B. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that activation of AMPK with its activators such as AICAR and metformin decreased the expression of MAD2B, indicating a role of AMPK in regulating the expression of MAD2B. Moreover, activation of AMPK prevented neuronal cells from high glucose-induced injury as demonstrated by the reduced expression of cyclin B1 and percentage of apoptosis as detected by TUNEL. We further found that when total protein synthesis was suppressed by chlorhexidine, the degradation of MAD2B was slower in high glucose-treated neurons and was mainly dependent on the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Finally, it was indicated that high glucose inhibited the ubiquitination of MAD2B, which could be reversed by activation of AMPK. Collectively, this study demonstrates that AMPK acts as a key regulator of MAD2B expression, suggesting that activation of AMPK signalling might be crucial for the treatment of high glucose-induced neuronal injury.

  18. Glucose-dependent cell size is regulated by a G protein-coupled receptor system in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hisanori; Yun, Cheol-Won; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Tsuzuki, Takahiro; Takagi, Yukinobu; Shinozaki, Makiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2005-03-01

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell size is affected by the kind of carbon source in the medium. Here, we present evidence that the Gpr1 receptor and Gpa2 Galpha subunit are required for both maintenance and modulation of cell size in response to glucose. In the presence of glucose, mutants lacking GPR1 or GPA2 gene showed smaller cells than the wild-type strain. Physiological studies revealed that protein synthesis rate was reduced in the mutant strains indicating that reduced growth rate, while the level of mRNAs for CLN1, 2 and 3 was not affected in all strains. Gene chip analysis also revealed a down-regulation in the expression of genes related to biosynthesis of not only protein but also other cellular component in the mutant strains. We also show that GPR1 and GPA2 are required for a rapid increase in cell size in response to glucose. Wild-type cells grown in ethanol quickly increased in size by addition of glucose, while little change was observed in the mutant strains, in which glucose-dependent cell cycle arrest caused by CLN1 repression was somewhat alleviated. Our study indicates that the yeast G-protein coupled receptor system consisting of Gpr1 and Gpa2 regulates cell size by affecting both growth rate and cell division.

  19. Associations of lipid profiles with insulin resistance and β cell function in adults with normal glucose tolerance and different categories of impaired glucose regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xingxing; Han, Tingting; Chen, Yawen; Qiu, Huiying; Wu, Peihong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yaomin

    2017-01-01

    Aims To investigate the associations of dyslipidemia with insulin resistance and β cell function in individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and different categories of impaired glucose regulation (IGR). Methods 544 subjects (365 with dyslipidemia and/or IGR and 179 with normal lipid and glucose tolerance) were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). HOMA-IR was used to evaluate insulin sensitivity. Disposition index (DI) was used to evaluate β cell function. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess correlations among lipid profiles, insulin resistance and β cell function. Results Among subjects with NGT, those with dyslipidemia had higher level of HOMA-IR but lower level of DI. While among subjects with different categories of IGR, those with dyslipidemia and CGI had significantly decreased DI. No obvious differences of insulin resistance or β cell function were found in IFG or IGT subjects with or without dyslipidemia. TG and HDL-C were correlated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.79, p <0.001; β = -0.38, p = 0.027, respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups). Moreover, TG and TC were negatively correlated with DI (β = -2.17, p = 0.013; β = -2.01, p = 0.034 respectively, compared with subjects in the low level groups) after adjusting for confounding parameters. Conclusions Dyslipidemia induces insulin resistance and impaired β cell response to insulin resistance in individuals with NGT. Furthermore, dyslipidemia diminishes β cell function in subjects with CGI. TG and HDL-C were correlated with insulin resistance, and TG, TC were negatively correlated with β cell response to insulin resistance in non-diabetic individuals. PMID:28199386

  20. Role of reactive oxygen species in regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle during exercise.

    PubMed

    Katz, Abram

    2016-06-01

    Glucose derived from extracellular sources serves as an energy source in virtually all eukaryotic cells, including skeletal muscle. Its contribution to energy turnover increases with exercise intensity up to moderately heavy workloads. However, at very high workloads, the contribution of extracellular glucose to energy turnover is negligible, despite the high rate of glucose transport. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the stimulation of glucose transport in isolated skeletal muscle preparations during intense repeated contractions. Consistent with this observation, heavy exercise is associated with significant production of ROS. However, during more mild to moderate stimulation or exercise conditions (in vitro, in situ and in vivo) antioxidants do not affect glucose transport. It is noteworthy that the production of ROS is limited or not observed under these conditions and that the concentration of the antioxidant used was extremely low. The results to date suggest that ROS involvement in activation of glucose transport occurs primarily during intense short-term exercise and that other mechanisms are involved during mild to moderate exercise. What remains puzzling is why ROS-mediated activation of glucose transport would occur under conditions where glucose transport is highest and utilization (i.e. phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase) is low. Possibly ROS production is involved in priming glucose transport during heavy exercise to accelerate glycogen biogenesis during the initial recovery period after exercise, as well as altering other aspects of intracellular metabolism.

  1. (Pro)renin receptor regulates autophagy and apoptosis in podocytes exposed to high glucose

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caixia

    2015-01-01

    High glucose reduces autophagy and enhances apoptosis of podocytes. Previously, we reported that high glucose induced podocyte injury through upregulation of the (pro)renin receptor (PRR). We hypothesized that increasing PRR reduces autophagy and increases apoptosis of mouse podocytes exposed to high glucose via activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Mouse podocytes were cultured in normal (5 mmol/l) or high (25 mmol/l) d-glucose for 48 h. High glucose significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of PRR, phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR, and p62. In contrast, high glucose decreased activation of UNC-51-like kinase-1 (ULK1) by phosphorylating Ser757 and protein levels of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3B (LC3B)-II and Lamp-2. Bafilomycin A1 increased LC3BII and p62 accumulation in high-glucose-treated cells. High glucose reduced the autophagic flux. Confocal microscopy studies showed significant reduction in the protein level of LC3B in response to high glucose. Cyto-ID autophagy staining showed a significant decrease in autophagosome formation with high glucose. In the absence of PRR, activation of Akt with sc-79 or mTOR with MHY-1485 increased p62 accumulation. Caspase-3/7 activity and apoptosis monitored by TUNEL assay were significantly increased in podocytes treated with high glucose. PRR siRNA significantly reversed the effects of high glucose. Based on these data, we conclude that high glucose decreases autophagy and increases apoptosis in mouse podocytes through the PRR/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:26081285

  2. Regulation of the glucose:H+ symporter by metabolite-activated ATP-dependent phosphorylation of HPr in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, J J; Neal, J W; Cui, X; Reizer, J; Saier, M H

    1994-01-01

    Lactobacillus brevis takes up glucose and the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), as well as lactose and the nonmetabolizable lactose analoge thiomethyl beta-galactoside (TMG), via proton symport. Our earlier studies showed that TMG, previously accumulated in L. brevis cells via the lactose:H+ symporter, rapidly effluxes from L. brevis cells or vesicles upon addition of glucose and that glucose inhibits further accumulation of TMG. This regulation was shown to be mediated by a metabolite-activated protein kinase that phosphorylase serine 46 in the HPr protein. We have now analyzed the regulation of 2DG uptake and efflux and compared it with that of TMG. Uptake of 2DG was dependent on an energy source, effectively provided by intravesicular ATP or by extravesicular arginine which provides ATP via an ATP-generating system involving the arginine deiminase pathway. 2DG uptake into these vesicles was not inhibited, and preaccumulated 2DG did not efflux from them upon electroporation of fructose 1,6-diphosphate or gluconate 6-phosphate into the vesicles. Intravesicular but not extravesicular wild-type or H15A mutant HPr of Bacillus subtilis promoted inhibition (53 and 46%, respectively) of the permease in the presence of these metabolites. Counterflow experiments indicated that inhibition of 2DG uptake is due to the partial uncoupling of proton symport from sugar transport. Intravesicular S46A mutant HPr could not promote regulation of glucose permease activity when electroporated into the vesicles with or without the phosphorylated metabolites, but the S46D mutant protein promoted regulation, even in the absence of a metabolite. The Vmax but not the Km values for both TMG and 2DG uptake were affected. Uptake of the natural, metabolizable substrates of the lactose, glucose, mannose, and ribose permeases was inhibited by wild-type HPr in the presence of fructose 1,6-diphosphate or by S46D mutant HPr. These results establish that HPr serine

  3. Oxygen-glucose deprivation regulates BACE1 expression through induction of autophagy in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong-fu; Zhang, Ting; Sun, Yin-yi; Sun, Ya-meng; Chen, Wen-qi; Shi, Nan; Shen, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Kang-yong; Sun, Xiao-jiang

    2015-01-01

    Our previous findings have demonstrated that autophagy regulation can alleviate the decline of learning and memory by eliminating deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in the brain after stroke, but the exact mechanism is unclear. It is presumed that the regulation of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the rate-limiting enzyme in metabolism of Aβ, would be a key site. Neuro-2a/amyloid precursor protein 695 (APP695) cell models of cerebral ischemia were established by oxygen-glucose deprivation to investigate the effects of Rapamycin (an autophagy inducer) or 3-methyladenine (an autophagy inhibitor) on the expression of BACE1. Either oxygen-glucose deprivation or Rapamycin down-regulated the expression of BACE1 while 3-methyladenine up-regulated BACE1 expression. These results confirm that oxygen-glucose deprivation down-regulates BACE1 expression in Neuro-2a/APP695 cells through the introduction of autophagy. PMID:26604904

  4. Regulation of a plant SNF1-related protein kinase by glucose-6-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Toroser, D.; Plaut, Z.; Huber, S.C.

    2000-05-01

    One of the major protein kinases (PK{sub III}) that phosphorylates serine-158 of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), which is responsible for light/dark modulation of activity, is known to be a member of the SNF1-related family of protein kinases. In the present study, the authors have developed a fluorescence-based continuous assay for measurement of PK{sub III} activity. Using the continuous assay, along with the fixed-time-point {sup 32}P-incorporation assay, they demonstrate that PK{sub III} activity is inhibited by glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). Relative inhibition by Glc-6-P was increased by decreasing pH from 8.5 to 5.5 and by reducing the concentration of Mg{sup 2+} in the assay from 10 to 2 nM. Under likely physiological conditions (PH 7.0 and 2 mM Mg{sup 2+}), 10 nM Glc-6-P inhibited kinase activity approximately 70%. Inhibition by Glc-6-P could not be ascribed to contaminants in the commercial preparations. Other metabolites inhibited PK{sub III} in the following order: Glc-6-P > mannose-6-P, fructose-1,6P{sub 2} > ribose-5-P, 3-PGA, fructose-6-P. Inorganic phosphate, Glc, and AMP were not inhibitory, and free Glc did not reverse the inhibition by Glc-6-P. Because SNF1-related protein kinases are thought to function broadly in the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression, Glc-6-P inhibition of PK{sub III} activity potentially provides a mechanism for metabolic regulation of the reactions catalyzed by these important protein kinases.

  5. Testosterone modulates gene expression pathways regulating nutrient accumulation, glucose metabolism and protein turnover in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Haren, M T; Siddiqui, A M; Armbrecht, H J; Kevorkian, R T; Kim, M J; Haas, M J; Mazza, A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Green, M; Banks, W A; Morley, J E

    2011-02-01

    Testosterone regulates energy metabolism and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. This study investigated the response of skeletal muscle to castration and testosterone replacement in 8-week-old male mice. Using microarray analyses of mRNA levels in gastrocnemius muscle, 91 genes were found to be negatively regulated by testosterone and 68 genes were positively regulated. The mRNA levels of the insulin signalling suppressor molecule Grb10 and the glycogen synthesis inhibitors, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 and phosphorylase kinase-γ, were negatively regulated by testosterone. The insulin-sensitive glucose and amino acid transporters, Glut3 and SAT2, the lipodystrophy gene, Lpin1 and protein targeting to glycogen were positively regulated. These changes would be expected to increase nutrient availability and sensing within skeletal muscle, increase metabolic rate and carbohydrate utilization and promote glycogen accumulation. The observed positive regulation of atrogin-1 (Fbxo32) by testosterone could be explained by the phosphorylation of Akt and Foxo3a, as determined by Western blotting. Testosterone prevented the castration-induced increase in interleukin-1α, the decrease in interferon-γ and the atrophy of the levator ani muscle, which were all correlated with testosterone-regulated gene expression. These findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone may regulate skeletal muscle glucose and protein metabolism.

  6. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of alternative peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene transcripts by two promoters

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P.I.; Schoener-Scott, R.; Lupski, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations affecting the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene have been shown to be associated with inherited peripheral neuropathies. We have cloned and characterized the human PMP22 gene which spans approximately 40 kilobases and contains four coding exons. Towards developing gene therapy regimens for the associated peripheral neuropathies, we have initiated detailed analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the PMP22 gene and identified two alternatively transcribed, but untranslated exons. Mapping of separate PMP22 mRNA transcription initiation sites to each of these exons indicates that PMP22 expression is regulated by two alternatively used promoters. Both putative promoter sequences demonstrated the ability to drive expression of reporter genes in transfection experiments. Furthermore, the structure of the 5{prime} portion of the PMP22 gene appears to be identical in rat and human, supporting the biological significance of the observed arrangement of regulatory regions. The relative expression of the alternative PMP22 transcripts is tissue-specific and high levels of the exon 1A-containing transcript are tightly coupled to myelin formation. In contrast, exon 1B-containing transcripts are predominant in non-neural tissues and in growth-arrested primary fibroblasts. The observed regulation of the PMP22 by a complex molecular mechanism is consistent with the proposed dual role of PMP22 in neural and non-neural tissue.

  7. The chemokine CCL5 regulates glucose uptake and AMP kinase signaling in activated T cells to facilitate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Olivia; Burke, J Daniel; Gao, Darrin F; Fish, Eleanor N

    2012-08-24

    Recruitment of effector T cells to sites of infection or inflammation is essential for an effective adaptive immune response. The chemokine CCL5 (RANTES) activates its cognate receptor, CCR5, to initiate cellular functions, including chemotaxis. In earlier studies, we reported that CCL5-induced CCR5 signaling activates the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway to directly modulate mRNA translation. Specifically, CCL5-mediated mTOR activation contributes to T cell chemotaxis by initiating the synthesis of chemotaxis-related proteins. Up-regulation of chemotaxis-related proteins may prime T cells for efficient migration. It is now clear that mTOR is also a central regulator of nutrient sensing and glycolysis. Herein we describe a role for CCL5-mediated glucose uptake and ATP accumulation to meet the energy demands of chemotaxis in activated T cells. We provide evidence that CCL5 is able to induce glucose uptake in an mTOR-dependent manner. CCL5 treatment of ex vivo activated human CD3(+) T cells also induced the activation of the nutrient-sensing kinase AMPK and downstream substrates ACC-1, PFKFB-2, and GSK-3β. Using 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glucose uptake, and compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, experimental data are presented that demonstrate that CCL5-mediated T cell chemotaxis is dependent on glucose, as these inhibitors inhibit CCL5-mediated chemotaxis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings suggest that both glycolysis and AMPK signaling are required for efficient T cell migration in response to CCL5. These studies extend the role of CCL5 mediated CCR5 signaling beyond lymphocyte chemotaxis and demonstrate a role for chemokines in promoting glucose uptake and ATP production to match energy demands of migration.

  8. Glucose and angiotensin II-derived endothelial extracellular vesicles regulate endothelial dysfunction via ERK1/2 activation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kumiko; Hida, Mari; Narimatsu, Haruka; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2017-02-01

    In various diseases, including diabetes, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been detected in circulation and tissues. EVs are small membrane vesicles released from various cell types under varying conditions. Recently, endothelial cell-derived EVs (EEVs) were identified as a marker of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes, but the ensuing mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we dissected the ensuing pathways with respect to nitric oxide (NO) production under the condition of type 2 diabetes. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated with glucose alone and with glucose in combination with angiotensin II (Ang II) for 48 h. In supernatants from glucose + Ang II-stimulated HUVECs, release of EEVs was assessed using Western blotting with an anti-CD144 antibody. EEV release was significantly increased after stimulation of HUVECs, and high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs impaired ACh-induced vascular relaxation responses and NO production in mice aortic rings. Furthermore, high glucose + Ang II-derived EEVs induced ERK1/2 signalling and decreased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) protein expression in mice aortas. Furthermore, in the presence of the MEK/ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059, high glucose plus Ang II treatment stimulated EEVs in HUVECs and those EEVs prevented the impairments of ACh-induced relaxation and NO production in mice aortas. These data strongly indicate that high glucose and Ang II directly affect endothelial cells and the production of EEVs; the resultant EEVs aggravate endothelial dysfunction by regulating eNOS protein levels and ERK1/2 signalling in mice aortas.

  9. MyD88 regulates physical inactivity-induced skeletal muscle inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Tanner, Ruth E; Barrows, Katherine M; Runtsch, Marah; Symons, J David; Jalili, Thunder; Bikman, Benjamin T; McClain, Donald A; O'Connell, Ryan M; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-07-01

    Physical inactivity in older adults is a risk factor for developing glucose intolerance and impaired skeletal muscle function. Elevated inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis have been implicated in metabolic disruption and are linked to Toll-like receptor (TLR)/myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) signaling. We hypothesize that a physical inactivity stimulus, capable of inducing glucose intolerance, would increase skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis signaling and that this response would be regulated by the TLR/MyD88 pathway. Therefore, we subjected wild-type (WT) and MyD88(-/-) mice to hindlimb unloading (HU) for 14 days or an ambulatory control period. We observed impaired glucose uptake, muscle insulin signaling (p-Akt), and increased markers of NF-κB signaling (p-IκBα), inflammation (p-JNK, IL-6), TLR4, and the rate-limiting enzyme of ceramide biosynthesis, SPT2, with HU WT (P < 0.05), but not in HU MyD88(-/-) mice. Concurrently, we found that 5 days of bed rest in older adults resulted in whole body glucose dysregulation, impaired skeletal muscle insulin signaling, and upregulation of muscle IL-6 and SPT2 (P < 0.05). Post-bed rest TLR4 abundance was tightly correlated with impaired postprandial insulin and glucose levels. In conclusion, MyD88 signaling is necessary for the increased inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and compromised metabolic function that accompanies physical inactivity.

  10. MyD88 regulates physical inactivity-induced skeletal muscle inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Sung; Tanner, Ruth E.; Barrows, Katherine M.; Runtsch, Marah; Symons, J. David; Jalili, Thunder; Bikman, Benjamin T.; McClain, Donald A.; O'Connell, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity in older adults is a risk factor for developing glucose intolerance and impaired skeletal muscle function. Elevated inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis have been implicated in metabolic disruption and are linked to Toll-like receptor (TLR)/myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88) signaling. We hypothesize that a physical inactivity stimulus, capable of inducing glucose intolerance, would increase skeletal muscle inflammation and ceramide biosynthesis signaling and that this response would be regulated by the TLR/MyD88 pathway. Therefore, we subjected wild-type (WT) and MyD88−/− mice to hindlimb unloading (HU) for 14 days or an ambulatory control period. We observed impaired glucose uptake, muscle insulin signaling (p-Akt), and increased markers of NF-κB signaling (p-IκBα), inflammation (p-JNK, IL-6), TLR4, and the rate-limiting enzyme of ceramide biosynthesis, SPT2, with HU WT (P < 0.05), but not in HU MyD88−/− mice. Concurrently, we found that 5 days of bed rest in older adults resulted in whole body glucose dysregulation, impaired skeletal muscle insulin signaling, and upregulation of muscle IL-6 and SPT2 (P < 0.05). Post-bed rest TLR4 abundance was tightly correlated with impaired postprandial insulin and glucose levels. In conclusion, MyD88 signaling is necessary for the increased inflammation, ceramide biosynthesis signaling, and compromised metabolic function that accompanies physical inactivity. PMID:25968578

  11. Self-Regulated Glucose-Sensitive Neoglycoenzyme-Capped Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Insulin Delivery.

    PubMed

    Oroval, Mar; Díez, Paula; Aznar, Elena; Coll, Carmen; Marcos, María Dolores; Sancenón, Félix; Villalonga, Reynaldo; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2017-01-26

    We describe herein the preparation of glucose-sensitive capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for insulin delivery. The new material consists of an expanded-pore nanometric silica support grafted with 1-propyl-1-H-benzimidazole groups, loaded with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled insulin (FITC-Ins) and capped by the formation of inclusion complexes between cyclodextrin-modified glucose oxidase (CD-GOx) and the benzimidazole groups grafted on the mesoporous support. Insulin delivery from the gated material in simulated blood plasma was assessed upon addition of glucose. Glucose is transformed by GOx into gluconic acid, which promoted the dethreading of the benzimidazole-CD-GOx inclusion complexes, allowing cargo release. Small quantities of this support would be needed to release the amount of insulin necessary to decrease diabetic blood glucose concentrations to regular levels.

  12. Performance Analysis of Fuzzy-PID Controller for Blood Glucose Regulation in Type-1 Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jyoti; Rani, Asha; Singh, Vijander

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents Fuzzy-PID (FPID) control scheme for a blood glucose control of type 1 diabetic subjects. A new metaheuristic Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA) is utilized to optimize the gains of FPID controller. CSA provides fast convergence and is capable of handling global optimization of continuous nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is an amalgamation of fuzzy logic and optimization which may provide an efficient solution for complex problems like blood glucose control. The task is to maintain normal glucose levels in the shortest possible time with minimum insulin dose. The glucose control is achieved by tuning the PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) and FPID controller with the help of Genetic Algorithm and CSA for comparative analysis. The designed controllers are tested on Bergman minimal model to control the blood glucose level in the facets of parameter uncertainties, meal disturbances and sensor noise. The results reveal that the performance of CSA-FPID controller is superior as compared to other designed controllers.

  13. Glucose and Palmitate Differentially Regulate PFKFB3/iPFK2 and Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Botchlett, Rachel; Li, Honggui; Guo, Xin; Qi, Ting; Zhao, JiaJia; Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Pei, Ya; Liu, Mengyang; Hu, Xiang; Chen, Guang; Guo, Ting; Yang, Sijun; Li, Qifu; Xiao, Xiaoqiu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2016-01-01

    The gene PFKFB3 encodes for inducible 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase, a glycolysis-regulatory enzyme that protects against diet-induced intestine inflammation. However, it is unclear how nutrient overload regulates PFKFB3 expression and inflammatory responses in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). In the present study, primary IECs were isolated from small intestine of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Additionally, CMT-93 cells, a cell line for IECs, were cultured in low glucose (LG, 5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG, 27.5 mmol/L) medium and treated with palmitate (50 μmol/L) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) for 24 hr. These cells were analyzed for PFKFB3 and inflammatory markers. Compared with LFD, HFD feeding decreased IEC PFKFB3 expression and increased IEC proinflammatory responses. In CMT-93 cells, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 expression and proinflammatory responses compared with LG. Interestingly, palmitate decreased PFKFB3 expression and increased proinflammatory responses compared with BSA, regardless of glucose concentrations. Furthermore, HG significantly increased PFKFB3 promoter transcription activity compared with LG. Upon PFKFB3 overexpression, proinflammatory responses in CMT-93 cells were decreased. Taken together, these results indicate that in IECs glucose stimulates PFKFB3 expression and palmitate contributes to increased proinflammatory responses. Therefore, PFKFB3 regulates IEC inflammatory status in response to macronutrients. PMID:27387960

  14. Post-transcriptional regulation of interleukin-10 in peripheral B cells of airway allergy patients

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiang-Qian; Yang, Shao-Bo; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Xie, Rui-Di; Yang, Li-Tao; Ke, Yu-Xing; Zhao, Hong-Xia; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Da-Bo; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The dysfunction of peripheral immune tolerance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Recent reports indicate that micro RNA (miR)-98 is associated with the process of aberrant immune responses. This study aims to test a hypothesis that miR-98 is associated with the pathogenesis of airway allergy via interfering with the development of regulatory B cells (Breg). In this study, patients with airway allergy were recruited into this study. The frequency of Bregs was assessed by flow cytometry. The levels of miR-98 in peripheral B cells were determined by RT-qPCR. A cell-culture model of B cells was developed to test the role of miR-98 in the repressing of interleukin (IL)-10 in B cells. The results showed that the levels of IL-10 in peripheral B cells were significantly lower in patients with airway allergy as compared with healthy subjects. High levels of miR-98 (one of the miR-98 members) were detected in peripheral B cells of patients with airway allergy, which was mimicked by stimulating B cells with IL-4. Histone acetyltransferase p300 was involved in the IL-4-induced miR-98 expression. miR-98 mediated the IL-4-inhibited IL-10 expression in B cells. In conclusion, miR-98 affects the expression of IL-10 in B cells and may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28078048

  15. Neuroscience of glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    La Fleur, S E; Fliers, E; Kalsbeek, A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentrations are homeostatically regulated and maintained within strict boundaries. Several mechanisms are in place to increase glucose output when glucose levels in the circulation drop as a result of glucose utilization, or to decrease glucose output and increase tissue glucose uptake to prevent hyperglycemia. Although the term homeostasis mostly refers to stable levels, the blood glucose concentrations fluctuate over the day/night cycle, with the highest concentrations occurring just prior to the activity period in anticipation of increased caloric need. In this chapter we describe how the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, is involved in both the daily rhythm of plasma glucose concentrations and acute glucose challenges.

  16. Leptin regulates peripheral lipid metabolism primarily through central effects on food intake

    PubMed Central

    Prieur, Xavier; Tung, Y. C. Loraine; Griffin, Julian L; Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Coll, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic effects of leptin may involve both centrally and peripherally mediated actions with a component of the central actions potentially independent of alterations in food intake. Ob/ob mice have significant abnormalities in lipid metabolism, correctable by leptin administration. We used ob/ob mice to study the relative importance of the subtypes of actions of leptin (central vs peripheral; food intake dependent vs independent) on lipid metabolism. Mice were treated for 3 days with leptin, either centrally (ICV) or peripherally (IP), and compared with mice pair-fed to the leptin-treated mice (PF) and with ad libitum fed controls (C). All treatment groups (ICV, IP, PF) showed indistinguishable changes in liver weight, hepatic steatosis, hepatic lipidomic profile and circulating free fatty acids, triglycerides and cholesterol lipoprotein profile. Changes in the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation in liver, muscle and white fat were broadly similar in IP, ICV and PF groups. Leptin (both ICV and IP) stimulated expression of both mitochondrial and peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase (liver) and PPARα (skeletal muscle) to an extent not replicated by pair feeding. Leptin had profound effects on peripheral lipid metabolism but the majority were explained by its effects on food intake. Leptin had additional centrally mediated effects to increase the expression of a limited number of genes concerned with fatty acid oxidation. While we cannot exclude direct peripheral effects of leptin on certain aspects of lipid metabolism we were unable to detect any such effects on the parameters measured in this study. PMID:18635658

  17. The insulin-like growth factor I receptor regulates glucose transport by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Garzón, Edwin; Fernandez, Ana M; Perez-Alvarez, Alberto; Genis, Laura; Bascuñana, Pablo; Fernandez de la Rosa, Ruben; Delgado, Mercedes; Angel Pozo, Miguel; Moreno, Estefania; McCormick, Peter J; Santi, Andrea; Trueba-Saiz, Angel; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Tschöp, Matthias H; Araque, Alfonso; Martin, Eduardo D; Torres Aleman, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    Previous findings indicate that reducing brain insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) activity promotes ample neuroprotection. We now examined a possible action of IGF-IR on brain glucose transport to explain its wide protective activity, as energy availability is crucial for healthy tissue function. Using (18) FGlucose PET we found that shRNA interference of IGF-IR in mouse somatosensory cortex significantly increased glucose uptake upon sensory stimulation. In vivo microscopy using astrocyte specific staining showed that after IGF-IR shRNA injection in somatosensory cortex, astrocytes displayed greater increases in glucose uptake as compared to astrocytes in the scramble-injected side. Further, mice with the IGF-IR knock down in astrocytes showed increased glucose uptake in somatosensory cortex upon sensory stimulation. Analysis of underlying mechanisms indicated that IGF-IR interacts with glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), the main facilitative glucose transporter in astrocytes, through a mechanism involving interactions with the scaffolding protein GIPC and the multicargo transporter LRP1 to retain GLUT1 inside the cell. These findings identify IGF-IR as a key modulator of brain glucose metabolism through its inhibitory action on astrocytic GLUT1 activity. GLIA 2016;64:1962-1971.

  18. Genetic analysis of glucose regulation in saccharomyces cerevisiae: control of transcription versus mRNA turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cereghino, G P; Scheffler, I E

    1996-01-01

    A major determinant of the steady-state level of the mRNA encoding the iron protein (Ip) subunit of succinate dehydrogenase of yeast is its rate of turnover. This mRNA is significantly more stable in glycerol than in glucose media. Many other genes, for example, SUC2, that are repressed in the presence of glucose are believed to be controlled at the level of transcription. The present study elucidates differences in the regulatory mechanisms by which glucose controls the transcription and turnover of the SUC2 and Ip mRNAs. The signaling pathway for glucose repression at the transcriptional level has been associated with a number of gene products linking glucose uptake with nuclear events. We have investigated whether the same genes are involved in the control of Ip mRNA stability. Phosphorylation of glucose or fructose is critical in triggering the transcript's degradation, but any hexokinase will do. Of the other known genes examined, most, with the exception of REG1, are not involved in determining the differential stability of the Ip transcript. Finally, our results indicate that differential stability on different carbon sources also plays a role in determining the steady-state level of the SUC2 mRNA. Thus, glucose repression includes both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Images PMID:8617211

  19. Regulation of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase Activity in the Model Rhizosphere-Dwelling Bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil-dwelling microbes solubilize mineral phosphates by secreting gluconic acid, which is produced from glucose by a periplasmic glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) that requires pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a redox coenzyme. While GDH-dependent phosphate solubilization has been observed in numerous bacteria, little is known concerning the mechanism by which this process is regulated. Here we use the model rhizosphere-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to explore GDH activity and PQQ synthesis, as well as gene expression of the GDH-encoding gene (gcd) and PQQ biosynthesis genes (pqq operon) while under different growth conditions. We also use reverse transcription-PCR to identify transcripts from the pqq operon to more accurately map the operon structure. GDH specific activity and PQQ levels vary according to growth condition, with the highest levels of both occurring when glucose is used as the sole carbon source and under conditions of low soluble phosphate. Under these conditions, however, PQQ levels limit in vitro phosphate solubilization. GDH specific activity data correlate well with gcd gene expression data, and the levels of expression of the pqqF and pqqB genes mirror the levels of PQQ synthesized, suggesting that one or both of these genes may serve to modulate PQQ levels according to the growth conditions. The pqq gene cluster (pqqFABCDEG) encodes at least two independent transcripts, and expression of the pqqF gene appears to be under the control of an independent promoter and terminator. IMPORTANCE Plant growth promotion can be enhanced by soil- and rhizosphere-dwelling bacteria by a number of different methods. One method is by promoting nutrient acquisition from soil. Phosphorus is an essential nutrient that plants obtain through soil, but in many cases it is locked up in forms that are not available for plant uptake. Bacteria such as the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can solubilize insoluble soil phosphates by secreting

  20. Up-regulation of sucrose synthase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase impacts plant growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Ellis, Dave D; Gilbert, Margarita; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the overexpression of sucrose synthase (SuSy) and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) on plant growth and metabolism were evaluated in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi). T(1) transgenic plants expressing either gene under the control of a tandem repeat cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (2x35S) or a xylem-localized 4CL promoter (4-coumarate:CoA ligase; 4CL) were generated, and reciprocally crossed to generate plants expressing both genes. Transcript levels, enzyme activity, growth parameters, fibre properties and carbohydrate content of stem tissue were quantified. The expression profiles of both genes confirmed the expression pattern of the promoters: 2x35S expressed more strongly in leaves, while 4CL expression was highest in stem tissue. In-depth plant characterization revealed that the single-transgene lines showed significant increases in the height growth compared with corresponding control lines. The double-transgene plants demonstrated an additive effect, proving to be even taller than the single-transgene parents. Several of these lines had associated increases in soluble sugar content. Although partitioning of storage carbohydrates into starch or cellulose was not observed, the increased height growth and increases in soluble carbohydrates suggest a role for SuSy as a marker in sink strength and lend credit to the function of UGPase in a similar role. The up-regulation of these two genes, although not increasing the percentage cellulose content, was effective in increasing the total biomass, and thus the overall cellulose yield, from a given plant.

  1. Gallic acid regulates body weight and glucose homeostasis through AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Doan, Khanh V; Ko, Chang Mann; Kinyua, Ann W; Yang, Dong Joo; Choi, Yun-Hee; Oh, In Young; Nguyen, Nguyen Minh; Ko, Ara; Choi, Jae Won; Jeong, Yangsik; Jung, Min Ho; Cho, Won Gil; Xu, Shanhua; Park, Kyu Sang; Park, Woo Jin; Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Hyoung Shik; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ki Woo

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid [3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (GA)], a natural phytochemical, is known to have a variety of cellular functions including beneficial effects on metabolic syndromes. However, the molecular mechanism by which GA exerts its beneficial effects is not known. Here we report that GA plays its role through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and by regulating mitochondrial function via the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator1α (PGC1α). Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) knockdown significantly blunted GA's effect on PGC1α activation and downstream genes, suggesting a critical role of the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway in GA's action. Moreover, diet-induced obese mice treated with GA showed significantly improved glucose and insulin homeostasis. In addition, the administration of GA protected diet-induced body weight gain without a change in food intake. Biochemical analyses revealed a marked activation of AMPK in the liver, muscle, and interscapular brown adipose tissue of the GA-treated mice. Moreover, uncoupling protein 1 together with other genes related to energy expenditure was significantly elevated in the interscapular brown adipose tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that GA plays its beneficial metabolic roles by activating the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway and by changing the interscapular brown adipose tissue genes related to thermogenesis. Our study points out that targeting the activation of the AMPK/Sirt1/PGC1α pathway by GA or its derivatives might be a potential therapeutic intervention for insulin resistance in metabolic diseases.

  2. Autophagic flux regulates microglial phenotype according to the time of oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cong-Yuan; Zhang, Shuai; Chu, Shi-Feng; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Song, Xiu-Yun; Zuo, Wei; Gao, Yan; Yang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Microglial phenotype alternation is a potential novel pathogenic mechanism for cerebral ischemia. Cerebral ischemia induced autophagy aggravates inflammation and neural injury. However, the effect of autophagy in the modulation of microglial phenotype is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of autophagic flux in the alternation of microglial phenotype following oxygen glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) in BV-2 cells. Inhibition of autophagic flux by NH4Cl exposure significantly increased the level of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II and p62 in control and OGD/R (12h, 24h and 48h) groups, but did not change their expression in OGD/R 72h group, indicating that autophagic flux was inhibited at OGD/R 72h. Once autophagic flux was inhibited at OGD/R 72h or at OGD/R 24h (with NH4Cl), BV-2 cells mainly showed M1 phenotype with increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and decreased M2 markers including interleukin-10 (IL-10), Arginase 1 (Arg-1), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Further study indicated that inhibition of autophagic flux activated NF-κB pathway and decreased the activity of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), which contributed to the alternation of microglial phenotype. Therefore, inhibition of autophagic flux regulated the alternation of microglial phenotype by modulating the balance between NF-κB and CREB.

  3. Exercise and type 2 diabetes: molecular mechanisms regulating glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial function, increases mitochondrial biogenesis, and increases the expression of glucose transporter proteins and numerous metabolic genes. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. PMID:25434013

  4. Antiobesity efficacy of GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide is associated with peripheral tissue-specific modulation of lipid metabolic regulators.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan; Arrabal, Sergio; Beiroa, Daniel; Rivera, Patricia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Ballesteros, Joan; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-11-12

    To investigate the role of glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in peripheral lipid metabolism. Both lean and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity (DIO) rats were used to compare the peripheral effects of the subcutaneous and repeated administration of the GLP-1R agonist liraglutide on the expression of key regulators involved in lipid metabolism, β-oxidation and thermogenesis in liver, abdominal muscle, and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT). We observed that liraglutide reduced caloric intake, body weight, and plasma levels of triglycerides and VLDL in a diet-independent manner. However, changes in liver fat content and the expression of lipid metabolism regulators were produced in a diet and tissue-dependent manner. In lean rats, liraglutide increased the gene/protein expression of elements involved in lipogenesis (ChREBP, Acaca/ACC, Fasn/FAS, Scd1/SCD1, PPARα/γ), β-oxidation (CPT1b), and thermogenesis (Cox4i1, Ucp1/UCP1) in eWAT and muscle, which suggest an increase in fatty-acid flux and utilization to activate energy expenditure. Regarding DIO rats, the specific reduction of liver lipid content by liraglutide was associated with a decreased expression of main elements involved in lipogenesis (phospho-ACC), peroxisomal β-oxidation (ACOX1), and lipid flux/storage (Pparγ/PPARγ) in liver, which suggest a recovery of lipid homeostasis. Interestingly, the muscle of DIO rats treated with liraglutide showed a decreased expression of PPARγ and the thermogenic factor UCP1. These results help us to better understand the peripheral mechanisms regulating lipid metabolism that underlay the effectiveness of GLP-1 analogues for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):600-611, 2016.

  5. FLOURY ENDOSPERM7 encodes a regulator of starch synthesis and amyloplast development essential for peripheral endosperm development in rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Long; Ren, Yulong; Lu, Bingyue; Yang, Chunyan; Feng, Zhiming; Liu, Zhou; Chen, Jun; Ma, Weiwei; Wang, Ying; Yu, Xiaowen; Wang, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenwei; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Shijia; Wu, Fuqing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Bao, Yiqun; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    In cereal crops, starch synthesis and storage depend mainly on a specialized class of plastids, termed amyloplasts. Despite the importance of starch, the molecular machinery regulating starch synthesis and amyloplast development remains largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of the rice (Oryza sativa) floury endosperm7 (flo7) mutant, which develops a floury-white endosperm only in the periphery and not in the inner portion. Consistent with the phenotypic alternation in flo7 endosperm, the flo7 mutant had reduced amylose content and seriously disrupted amylopectin structure only in the peripheral endosperm. Notably, flo7 peripheral endosperm cells showed obvious defects in compound starch grain development. Map-based cloning of FLO7 revealed that it encodes a protein of unknown function. FLO7 harbors an N-terminal transit peptide capable of targeting functional FLO7 fused to green fluorescent protein to amyloplast stroma in developing endosperm cells, and a domain of unknown function 1338 (DUF1338) that is highly conserved in green plants. Furthermore, our combined β-glucuronidase activity and RNA in situ hybridization assays showed that the FLO7 gene was expressed ubiquitously but exhibited a specific expression in the endosperm periphery. Moreover, a set of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the missing 32 aa in the flo7 mutant protein are essential for the stable accumulation of FLO7 in the endosperm. Together, our findings identify FLO7 as a unique plant regulator required for starch synthesis and amyloplast development within the peripheral endosperm and provide new insights into the spatial regulation of endosperm development in rice. PMID:26608643

  6. FLOURY ENDOSPERM7 encodes a regulator of starch synthesis and amyloplast development essential for peripheral endosperm development in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Ren, Yulong; Lu, Bingyue; Yang, Chunyan; Feng, Zhiming; Liu, Zhou; Chen, Jun; Ma, Weiwei; Wang, Ying; Yu, Xiaowen; Wang, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenwei; Wang, Yihua; Liu, Shijia; Wu, Fuqing; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Bao, Yiqun; Jiang, Ling; Wan, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    In cereal crops, starch synthesis and storage depend mainly on a specialized class of plastids, termed amyloplasts. Despite the importance of starch, the molecular machinery regulating starch synthesis and amyloplast development remains largely unknown. Here, we report the characterization of the rice (Oryza sativa) floury endosperm7 (flo7) mutant, which develops a floury-white endosperm only in the periphery and not in the inner portion. Consistent with the phenotypic alternation in flo7 endosperm, the flo7 mutant had reduced amylose content and seriously disrupted amylopectin structure only in the peripheral endosperm. Notably, flo7 peripheral endosperm cells showed obvious defects in compound starch grain development. Map-based cloning of FLO7 revealed that it encodes a protein of unknown function. FLO7 harbors an N-terminal transit peptide capable of targeting functional FLO7 fused to green fluorescent protein to amyloplast stroma in developing endosperm cells, and a domain of unknown function 1338 (DUF1338) that is highly conserved in green plants. Furthermore, our combined β-glucuronidase activity and RNA in situ hybridization assays showed that the FLO7 gene was expressed ubiquitously but exhibited a specific expression in the endosperm periphery. Moreover, a set of in vivo experiments demonstrated that the missing 32 aa in the flo7 mutant protein are essential for the stable accumulation of FLO7 in the endosperm. Together, our findings identify FLO7 as a unique plant regulator required for starch synthesis and amyloplast development within the peripheral endosperm and provide new insights into the spatial regulation of endosperm development in rice.

  7. Effects of either glucose or fructose and metabolic regulators on bovine embryo development and lipid accumulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barceló-Fimbres, M; Seidel, G E

    2007-11-01

    Our objective was to determine if replacing glucose with fructose would decrease cytoplasmic lipid accumulation during culture of embryos with or without regulators of metabolism. In vitro-produced bovine zygotes were cultured 60 hr in chemically defined medium-1 (CDM-1) plus 0.5% BSA and 0.5 mM fructose or glucose in Experiment 1, and glucose in Experiment 2. In both experiments, 8-cell embryos were next cultured 135 hr in CDM-2 plus 2 mM fructose or glucose in factorial combination with five treatments: (Experiment 1: control, 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), 0.3 microM phenazine ethosulfate (PES), 30 microM dinitrophenol (DNP), and PES + DNP), and (Experiment 2: control, PES, PES + DNP, and 1 and 3 microg/ml cerulenin (C1 and C3)). Day 7.5 blastocysts were stained with Sudan Black B to quantify cytoplasmic lipid droplets as small (SD, <2 microm), medium (MD, 2-6 microm), or large (LD, >6 microm). Blastocyst rates per oocyte were 22% (Experiment 1) and 15% (Experiment 2) higher (P < 0.05) for fructose than glucose. For Experiment 1, numbers of MD were lower for PES, DNP, and PES + DNP than control and FCS (P < 0.05). LD were lower for PES and DNP than control, and higher for FCS than all other treatments (P < 0.05). For Experiment 2, MD were lower (P < 0.05) for PES, and PES + DNP than C1, C3, and control. For LD, PES was lower (P < 0.05) than control, C1, and C3, but not different from PES + DNP. The only effect of hexose on lipids was that fructose resulted in fewer MD (P < 0.01) in Experiment 2. In conclusion, fructose produced more blastocysts than glucose, and PES reduced lipid accumulation.

  8. Roles of Chlorogenic Acid on Regulating Glucose and Lipids Metabolism: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Shengxi; Cao, Jianmei; Feng, Qin; Peng, Jinghua; Hu, Yiyang

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular glucose and lipid metabolic homeostasis is vital for maintaining basic life activities of a cell or an organism. Glucose and lipid metabolic disorders are closely related with the occurrence and progression of diabetes, obesity, hepatic steatosis, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), one of the most abundant polyphenol compounds in the human diet, is a group of phenolic secondary metabolites produced by certain plant species and is an important component of coffee. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that CGA exerts many biological properties, including antibacterial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic activities. Recently, the roles and applications of CGA, particularly in relation to glucose and lipid metabolism, have been highlighted. This review addresses current studies investigating the roles of CGA in glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:24062792

  9. ChREBP regulates fructose-induced glucose production independently of insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Sung; Krawczyk, Sarah A.; Doridot, Ludivine; Fowler, Alan J.; Wang, Jennifer X.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Noh, Hye-Lim; Kang, Hee Joon; Meissen, John K.; Blatnik, Matthew; Kim, Jason K.; Lai, Michelle; Herman, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Obese, insulin-resistant states are characterized by a paradoxical pathogenic condition in which the liver appears to be selectively insulin resistant. Specifically, insulin fails to suppress glucose production, yet successfully stimulates de novo lipogenesis. The mechanisms underlying this dysregulation remain controversial. Here, we hypothesized that carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP), a transcriptional activator of glycolytic and lipogenic genes, plays a central role in this paradox. Administration of fructose increased hepatic hexose-phosphate levels, activated ChREBP, and caused glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hepatic steatosis in mice. Activation of ChREBP was required for the increased expression of glycolytic and lipogenic genes as well as glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) that was associated with the effects of fructose administration. We found that fructose-induced G6PC activity is a major determinant of hepatic glucose production and reduces hepatic glucose-6-phosphate levels to complete a homeostatic loop. Moreover, fructose activated ChREBP and induced G6pc in the absence of Foxo1a, indicating that carbohydrate-induced activation of ChREBP and G6PC dominates over the suppressive effects of insulin to enhance glucose production. This ChREBP/G6PC signaling axis is conserved in humans. Together, these findings support a carbohydrate-mediated, ChREBP-driven mechanism that contributes to hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:27669460

  10. Nonvisual Opsins and the Regulation of Peripheral Clocks by Light and Hormones.

    PubMed

    Poletini, Maristela O; Ramos, Bruno C; Moraes, Maria Nathalia; Castrucci, Ana Maria L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock machinery is conserved throughout evolution. However, how environmental cues are perceived has evolved in such a way that peripheral clocks in mammals require a variety of signals, including hormones. On the other hand, in nonmammalian cells able to directly detect light, light seems to play a major role in the synchronization of the clock. The interaction between perception of circadian light by nonvisual opsins and hormones will be discussed under the perspective of clock synchronization at the molecular level.

  11. Developmentally regulated impediments to skin reinnervation by injured peripheral sensory axon terminals.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Georgeann S; Martin, Seanna M; Söllner, Christian; Wright, Gavin J; Becker, Catherina G; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos; Sagasti, Alvaro

    2009-12-29

    The structural plasticity of neurites in the central nervous system (CNS) diminishes dramatically after initial development, but the peripheral nervous system (PNS) retains substantial plasticity into adulthood. Nevertheless, functional reinnervation by injured peripheral sensory neurons is often incomplete [1-6]. To investigate the developmental control of skin reinnervation, we imaged the regeneration of trigeminal sensory axon terminals in live zebrafish larvae following laser axotomy. When axons were injured during early stages of outgrowth, regenerating and uninjured axons grew into denervated skin and competed with one another for territory. At later stages, after the establishment of peripheral arbor territories, the ability of uninjured neighbors to sprout diminished severely, and although injured axons reinitiated growth, they were repelled by denervated skin. Regenerating axons were repelled specifically by their former territories, suggesting that local inhibitory factors persist in these regions. Antagonizing the function of several members of the Nogo receptor (NgR)/RhoA pathway improved the capacity of injured axons to grow into denervated skin. Thus, as in the CNS, impediments to reinnervation in the PNS arise after initial establishment of axon arbor structure.

  12. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  13. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) binds directly to PIP3 phosphatase SKIP and determines its localization.

    PubMed

    Ijuin, Takeshi; Hatano, Naoya; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2016-05-01

    Skeletal muscle and kidney-enriched inositol polyphosphate phosphatase (SKIP), a PIP3 phosphatase, has been implicated in the regulation of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. SKIP interacts with Pak1 and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), both of which are necessary for the regulation of insulin signaling. In this study, we showed that GRP78 directly binds to the SKIP C-terminal homology (SKICH) domain of SKIP and that this binding is necessary for the localization of SKIP at the ER. In addition, in vitro binding analysis showed that GRP78 and Pak1 competitively bind to SKIP. Taken together, these findings suggest a model by which GRP78 regulates intracellular localization of SKIP and how SKIP binds to Pak1 on insulin stimulation.

  14. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  15. Glucose regulates insulin mitogenic effect by modulating SHP-2 activation and localization in JAr cells.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, Giuseppe; Di Carlo, Costantino; Caruso, Matilde; Oriente, Francesco; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Formisano, Pietro; Beguinot, Francesco; Nappi, Carmine

    2002-07-05

    The glucose effect on cell growth has been investigated in the JAr human choriocarcinoma cells. When JAr cells were cultured in the presence of 6 mm glucose (LG), proliferation and thymidine incorporation were induced by serum, epidermal growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor 1 but not by insulin. In contrast, at 25 mm glucose (HG), proliferation and thymidine incorporation were stimulated by insulin, serum, epidermal growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor 1 to a comparable extent, whereas basal levels were 25% lower than those in LG. HG culturing also enhanced insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) tyrosine phosphorylations while decreasing basal phosphorylations. These actions of glucose were accompanied by an increase in cellular tyrosine phosphatase activity. The activity of SHP-2 in HG-treated JAr cells was 400% of that measured in LG-treated cells. SHP-2 co-precipitation with IRS1 was also increased in HG-treated cells. SHP-2 was mainly cytosolic in LG-treated cells. However, HG culturing largely redistributed SHP-2 to the internal membrane compartment, where tyrosine-phosphorylated IRS1 predominantly localizes. Further exposure to insulin rescued SHP-2 cytosolic localization, thereby preventing its interaction with IRS1. Antisense inhibition of SHP-2 reverted the effect of HG on basal and insulin-stimulated insulin receptor and IRS1 phosphorylation as well as that on thymidine incorporation. Thus, in JAr cells, glucose modulates insulin mitogenic action by modulating SHP-2 activity and intracellular localization.

  16. The role of hepatic mitochondria in the regulation of glucose metabolism in BHE rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M.J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The interacting effects of dietary fat source and thyroxine treatment on the hepatic mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism were studied. In the first study, three different sources of dietary fatty acids and thyroxine treatment were used to investigate the hepatic mitochondrial thermotropic behavior in two strains of rat. The NIDDM BHE and Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Feeding coconut oil increased serum T{sub 4} levels and T{sub 4} treatment increased serum T{sub 3} levels in the BHE rats. In the mitochondria from BHE rats fed coconut oil and treated with T{sub 4}, the transition temperature disappeared due to a decoupling of succinate supported respiration. This was not observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the second study, two different sources of dietary fat and T{sub 4} treatment were used to investigate hepatic mitochondrial function. Coconut oil feeding increased Ca{sup ++}Mg{sup ++}ATPase and Mg{sup ++}ATPase. T{sub 4} treatment had potentiated this effect. T{sub 4} increased the malate-aspartate shuttle and {alpha}-glycerophosphate shuttle activities. In the third study, the glucose turnover rate from D-({sup 14}C-U)/(6-{sup 3}H)-glucose and gluconeogeneis from L-({sup 14}C-U)-alanine was examined. Dietary fat or T{sub 4} did not affect the glucose mass. T{sub 4} increased the irreversible fractional glucose turnover rate.

  17. Diet specialization in an extreme omnivore: nutritional regulation in glucose-averse German cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Shik, J Z; Schal, C; Silverman, J

    2014-10-01

    Organisms have diverse adaptations for balancing dietary nutrients, but often face trade-offs between ingesting nutrients and toxins in food. While extremely omnivorous cockroaches would seem excluded from such dietary trade-offs, German cockroaches (Blattella germanica) in multiple populations have rapidly evolved a unique dietary specialization - an aversion to glucose, the phagostimulant in toxic baits used for pest control. We used factorial feeding experiments within the geometric framework to test whether glucose-averse (GA) cockroaches with limited access to this critical metabolic fuel have compensatory behavioural and physiological strategies for meeting nutritional requirements. GA cockroaches had severely constrained intake, fat and N mass, and performance on glucose-based diets relative to wild-type (WT) cockroaches and did not appear to exhibit digestive strategies for retaining undereaten nutrients. However, a GA × WT 'hybrid' had lower glucose aversion than GA and greater access to macronutrients within glucose-based diets - while still having lower intake and survival than WT. Given these intermediate foraging constraints, hybrids may be a reservoir for this maladaptive trait in the absence of positive selection and may account for the rapid evolution of this trait following bait application.

  18. Selective peripheral regulation of noradrenaline and adrenaline release by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Elayan, Hamzeh H; Kennedy, Brian P; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-07-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) has complex effects on the sympathoadrenal and cardiovascular systems and may act at both central and peripheral loci. Nitric oxide appears to act directly on blood vessels and indirectly by modulating the sympathoadrenal system. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of catecholamine release from peripheral vascular and adrenal sympathetic nerves to the cardiovascular effects of the NO synthesis inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mg/kg). Our experiments were performed in pithed vagotomized rats to remove the influence of central and baroreflex pathways. 2. Spinal cord stimulations for 30 s periods at 1, 2, 5 and 10 Hz using pulses of 1 msec at 10 V caused marked increases in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester did not alter resting plasma catecholamine concentrations. However, L-NAME generally more than doubled stimulation-evoked release of adrenaline while reducing the extent of noradrenaline release relative to vehicle (saline)-treated controls. 3. N(G)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester significantly enhanced the vasopressor responses to spinal cord stimulation. The alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (0.2 mg/kg) reduced the pressor responses of electrically stimulated L-NAME-treated rats to levels below those of vehicle-treated control rats. 4. In the absence of electrical stimulation, L-NAME raised the blood pressure of pithed rats without altering plasma catecholamines and the pressor effect was briefly attenuated by L-arginine, but was unaffected by prazosin. 5. We conclude that the augmented pressor response to sympathetic stimulation in L-NAME-treated pithed rats is due largely to enhanced adrenal adrenaline release mediated by a peripheral mechanism. Stimulation of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors plays a major role in the pressor response to electrical stimulation of L-NAME-treated rats, but this is not due to L-NAME augmentation of noradrenaline release from vascular

  19. Investigation of stability in a two-delay model of the ultradian oscillations in glucose-insulin regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huard, B.; Easton, J. F.; Angelova, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a two-delay model for the ultradian oscillatory behaviour of the glucose-insulin regulation system is studied. Hill functions are introduced to model nonlinear physiological interactions within this system and ranges on parameters reproducing biological oscillations are determined on the basis of analytical and numerical considerations. Local and global stability are investigated and delay-dependent conditions are obtained through the construction of Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals. The effect of Hill parameters on these conditions, as well as the boundary of the stability region in the delay domain, are established for the first time. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the model with Hill functions represents well the oscillatory behaviour of the system with the advantage of incorporating new meaningful parameters. The influence of the time delays on the period of oscillations and the sensitivity of the latter to model parameters, in particular glucose infusion, are investigated. The model can contribute to the better understanding and treatment of diabetes.

  20. The regulation of glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lily; Jiang, Li; Ding, Xiang-dong; Liu, Jian-feng; Zhang, Qin

    2015-09-11

    Glucose as one of the nutrition factors plays a vital role in the regulation of milk fat synthesis. Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a vital proteolytic pathway in all eukaryotic cells through timely marking, recognizing and degrading the poly-ubiquitinated protein substrates. Previous studies indicated that UPS plays a considerable role in controlling the triglyceride (TG) synthesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to confirm the link between high-glucose and UPS and its regulation mechanism on milk fat synthesis in BMEC (bovine mammary epithelial cells). We incubated BMEC with normal (17.5 mm/L) and high-glucose (25 mm/L) with and without proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin and found that, compared with the control (normal glucose and without proteasome inhibitor), both high-glucose concentration and proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin could increase the accumulation of TG and poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and reduce significantly three proteasome activities (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like). In addition, high-glucose concentration combined with proteasome inhibitor further enhanced the increase of the poly-ubiquitinated protein level and the decrease of proteasome activities. Our results suggest that the regulation of high-glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by UPS in BMEC, and high-glucose exposure could lead to a hypersensitization of BMEC to UPS inhibition which in turn results in increased milk fat synthesis.

  1. Insulin regulates lipid and glucose metabolism similarly in two lines of rainbow trout divergently selected for muscle fat content.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junyan; Panserat, Stéphane; Kamalam, Biju Sam; Aguirre, Peyo; Véron, Vincent; Médale, Françoise

    2014-08-01

    Two experimental rainbow trout lines were developed through divergent selection for low (Lean 'L' line) or high (Fat 'F' line) muscle fat content. Previous nutritional studies suggested that these lines differed in their regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Since insulin acts as an anabolic hormone by regulating lipid and glucose metabolism, we put forward the hypothesis that F line might have a stronger sensitivity to insulin than L line. In order to test this hypothesis, bovine insulin was injected into rainbow trout of the two lines fasted for 48 h. As expected, insulin induced hypoglycemia and activated Akt-TOR signaling both in the liver and muscle of the two lines. We demonstrate that this was coupled with increased expression of insulin dependent glucose transporter (GLUT4) and transcription factors of fatty acid anabolism (LXR and SREBP1c) in the muscle and liver, respectively, and lower mRNA levels of fatty acid oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b and HOAD) in the white muscle of both lines. Regarding the genotype effect, TOR signaling response to insulin was stronger in F line as reflected by the higher phosphorylation of S6 protein and elevated mRNA levels of lipogenic enzyme (FAS) in the liver of F line. This observation was concordant with the higher plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and triglycerides in F line. Moreover, mRNA levels of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes (G6Pase2, FBPase and PEPCK) and muscle fatty acid oxidation enzymes (CPT1a, CPT1b, HOAD and ACO) were higher in the F line. However, very few insulin-genotype interactions were detected, indicating that insulin induced similar changes in lipid and glucose metabolism in both lines.

  2. Regulation of MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation by GSK-3β involves epigenetic modifications under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chanchal; Kaur, Jasmine; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2014-05-15

    Hyperglycemia is a critical risk factor for development and progression of breast cancer. We have recently reported that high glucose induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser 10 as well as de-phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser 9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Here, we elucidate the mechanism underlying hyperglycemia-induced proliferation in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We provide evidence that hyperglycemia led to increased DNA methylation and DNMT1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. High glucose condition led to significant increase in the expression of PCNA, cyclin D1 and decrease in the expression of PTPN 12, p21 and PTEN. It also induced hypermethylation of DNA at the promoter region of PTPN 12, whereas hypomethylation at Vimentin and Snail. Silencing of GSK-3β by siRNA prevented histone H3 phosphorylation and reduced DNMT1 expression. We show that chromatin obtained after immunoprecipitation with phospho-histone H3 was hypermethylated under high glucose condition, which indicates a cross-talk between DNA methylation and histone H3 phosphorylation. ChIP-qPCR analysis revealed up-regulation of DNMT1 and metastatic genes viz. Vimentin, Snail and MMP-7 by phospho-histone H3, which were down-regulated upon GSK-3β silencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that interplay between GSK-3β activation, histone H3 phosphorylation and DNA methylation directs proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • High glucose induces phosphorylation of histone H3 and dephosphorylation of GSK-3β. • Moreover, hyperglycemia also leads to increased DNA methylation in MDA-MB-231 cells. • Inhibition of GSK-3β prevented histone H3 phosphorylation and reduced DNMT1 levels. • Interplay exists between GSK-3β, histone H3 phosphorylation and DNA methylation.

  3. Brain processing of duodenal and portal glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Boubaker, J; Val-Laillet, D; Guérin, S; Malbert, C-H

    2012-08-01

    Peripheral and central glucose sensing play a major role in the regulation of food intake. Peripheral sensing occurs at duodenal and portal levels, although the importance of these sensing sites is still controversial. The present study aimed to compare the respective influence of these sensing pathways on the eating patterns; plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1); and brain activity in juvenile pigs. In Experiment 1, we characterised the changes in the microstructure as a result of a 30-min meal in eight conscious animals after duodenal or portal glucose infusion in comparison with saline infusion. In Experiment 2, glucose, insulin and GLP-1 plasma concentrations were measured during 2 h after duodenal or portal glucose infusions in four anaesthetised animals. In Experiment 3, single photon emission computed tomography brain imaging was performed in five anaesthetised animals receiving duodenal or portal glucose or saline infusions. Both duodenal and portal glucose decreased the amount of food consumed, as well as the ingestion speed, although this effect appeared earlier with the portal infusion. Significant differences of glucose and GLP-1 plasma concentrations between treatments were found at the moment of brain imaging. Both duodenal and portal glucose infusions activated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and primary somatosensory cortex. Only duodenal glucose infusion was able to induce activation of the prepyriform area, orbitofrontal cortex, caudate and putamen, as well as deactivation of the anterior prefrontal cortex and anterior entorhinal cortex, whereas only portal glucose infusion induced a significant activation of the insular cortex. We demonstrated that duodenal and portal glucose infusions led to the modulation of brain areas that are known to regulate eating behaviour, which probably explains the decrease of food intake after both stimulations. These stimulation pathways induced specific systemic and

  4. Serotonin regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Kim, Hail; Yoshida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Tomonori; Aoyagi, Kyota; Toyofuku, Yukiko; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Okamura, Tadashi; Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Fujitani, Yoshio; Akagawa, Kimio; Kakei, Masafumi; Watada, Hirotaka; German, Michael S.; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for the metabolic demands of pregnancy, β cells in the maternal pancreatic islets increase both in number and in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) per cell. Mechanisms have been proposed for the increased β cell mass, but not for the increased GSIS. Because serotonin production increases dramatically during pregnancy, we tested whether flux through the ionotropic 5-HT3 receptor (Htr3) affects GSIS during pregnancy. Pregnant Htr3a−/− mice exhibited impaired glucose tolerance despite normally increased β cell mass, and their islets lacked the increase in GSIS seen in islets from pregnant wild-type mice. Electrophysiological studies showed that activation of Htr3 decreased the resting membrane potential in β cells, which increased Ca2+ uptake and insulin exocytosis in response to glucose. Thus, our data indicate that serotonin, acting in a paracrine/autocrine manner through Htr3, lowers the β cell threshold for glucose and plays an essential role in the increased GSIS of pregnancy. PMID:24218571

  5. Superoxide dismutase functional regulation in neonatal hypoxia: effect of glucose, oxygen and epinephrine.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Babu, Athira; Paulose, C S

    2009-04-01

    Hypoxia is one of the major causes of damage to the fetal and neonatal brain and cardiac functions. In earlier studies, we have reported the brain damage caused by hypoxia and resuscitation with oxygen and epinephrine and have found that glucose treatment to hypoxic rats and hypoxic rats treated with oxygen shows a reversal of brain damage. The neonatal rats are shown to be deficient in free radical scavenging system, which offers a high risk of oxidative stress. In the present study, we induced hypoxia in neonatal Wistar rats and resuscitated with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Heart tissue and cerebral cortex were used to study the kinetics of superoxide dismutase activity in experimental groups of rats to assess the free radical status. Results showed that glucose supplementation in hypoxia (Hx + G) and hypoxic + oxygen (Hx + O) had an efficient free radical scavenging capability, compared to all other experimental groups. The observation was ascertained by studying the activity of catalase, another antioxidant enzyme in the body. Our results suggested that in neonatal rats during hypoxic condition, damage to heart and brain was more prominent in all groups, except when supplemented with glucose. These findings may have clinical significance in the proper management of heart and brain function.

  6. Regulation of Brain Glucose Metabolic Patterns by Protein Phosphorlyation and Drug Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-30

    either nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) or ribose. Both pathways are anaerobic, yet unlike glycolysis the pentose pathway shunt does...molecule of glucose to two molecules of pyruvate, generate two molecules of ATP, and reduce two molecules of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH...dichloroactetate; LDH, lactate dehydrogenase; PDC, pyruvate dehydrogenase complex; NAD(P)H, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate); pyruvate dehydrogenase

  7. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  8. Quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate promote glucose disposal in adipocytes with regulation of AMP-activated kinase and/or sirtuin 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Na; Mei, Fan; Sun, Yan; Pan, Guojun; Liu, Baolin; Liu, Kang

    2014-08-01

    Quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate are flavonoids abundant in edible and medicinal plants with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. This study explored the action of these flavonoids on glucose disposal in adipocytes. Quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate enhanced glucose consumption with the positive regulation of AMP-activated kinase phosphorylation, and the AMP-activated kinase inhibitor compound C abolished their effects on glucose consumption. Luteolin and epigallocatechin gallate, but not quercetin, increased sirtuin 1 abundance, and their regulation of glucose consumption was also attenuated by co-treatment with sirtuin 1 inhibitor nicotinamide. Quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation by inhibition of p65 phosphorylation with beneficial regulation of adipokine expression, whereas these actions were diminished by coincubation with compound C. The sirtuin 1 inhibitor nicotinamide attenuated the effects of luteolin and EGCG on p65 phosphorylation and adipokine expression without any influence on the activity of quercetin. Results of Western blot and fluorescence microscopy also showed that quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate increased Akt substrate of 160 kDa phosphorylation and promoted 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake by adipocytes under basal and inflammatory conditions. These findings suggested that quercetin, luteolin, and epigallocatechin gallate inhibited inflammation and promoted glucose disposal in adipocytes with the regulation of AMP-activated kinase and/or sirtuin 1.

  9. Regulation of glucose control in people with type 2 diabetes: a review and consensus.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jeong-Taek; Park, Kyung Soo; Byun, Dong-Won; Ko, Kyung Soo; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Doo Man; Park, Tae Sun; Cha, Bong Soo; Lee, In Kyu; Park, Joong Yeol; Son, Hyun Shik; Lee, Moon-Kyu; Kim, Kwang Won; Son, Ho Young

    2010-02-01

    A conference was convened by the Korean Diabetes Association and the Korean Endocrine Society on September 7, 2009 to discuss and organize the results of research on intensive glucose control for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Professor Kyung Soo Park led the conference, and Professors Kwang Won Kim and Ho Young Son acted as chairmen. Professors Doo Man Kim, Tae Sun Park, and Bong Soo Cha reported on intensive glucose control and diabetic complications, including the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) research results, the recently published Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD), Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE), and Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial (VADT) research, as well as meta-analyses. Professor Jeong-Taek Woo reported on the manuscript written by the committee for the Korean Diabetes Association which dealt with the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Professors Kyung Soo Ko, Joong Yeol Park, Hyun Shik Son, Moon-Kyu Lee, Dong-Won Byun, and Yoon-Sok Chung participated in the discussion and collected information for the manuscript from all of the participants. The aim of the debate was to determine how to establish target goals for intensive glucose control and how to individualize those goals. The participants concluded that there was no need to modify the recommendation of maintaining an HbA1c under 6.5%, the current blood glucose treatment goal that is recommended by the Korean Diabetes Association. In addition, individual target goals for glucose control were recommended depending on the situation of each patient. We report on the consensus statement from the meeting.

  10. Integration of Peripheral and Glandular Regulation of Triiodothyronine Production by Thyrotropin in Untreated and Thyroxine-Treated Subjects.

    PubMed

    Hoermann, R; Midgley, J E M; Larisch, R; Dietrich, J W

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the roles of central and peripheral T3 regulation. In a prospective study involving 1,796 patients, the equilibria between FT3 and TSH were compared in untreated and L-T4-treated patients with varying functional states, residual thyroid secretory capacities and magnitudes of TSH stimulation. T3 concentrations were stable over wide variations in TSH levels (from 0.2 to 7 mU/l) and endogenous T4 production in untreated patients, but unbalanced in L-T4-treated athyreotic patients where T3 correlated with exogenous T4 supply. T3 stability was related to TSH-stimulated deiodinase activity by clinical observation, as predicted by theoretical modelling. Deiodinase activity in treated patients was reduced due to both diminished responsiveness to TSH and lack of thyroidal capacity. Deiodinase activity was increased in high thyroid volume, compared to lower volumes in euthyroid patients (<5 ml, p<0.001). While deiodinase differed between euthyroid and subclinically hypothyroid patients in high volume, 26.7 nmol/s (23.6, 29.2), n=214 vs. 28.9 nmol/s (26.7, 31.5), n=20, p=0.02, it was equivalent between the 2 functional groups in low volume, 23.3 nmol/s (21.3, 26.1), n=117 vs. 24.6 nmol/s (22.2, 27.5), n=38, p=0.22. These findings suggest that the thyroid gland and peripheral tissues are integrated in the physiological process of T3 homeostasis in humans via a feed-forward TSH motif, which coordinates peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms. Regulatory and capacity deficiencies collectively impair T3 homeostasis in L-T4-treated patients.

  11. Fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity regulates central and peripheral coding of joint angles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ning; He, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive afferents from muscle spindles encode information about peripheral joint movements for the central nervous system (CNS). The sensitivity of muscle spindle is nonlinearly dependent on the activation of gamma (γ) motoneurons in the spinal cord that receives inputs from the motor cortex. How fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity affects proprioceptive coding of joint position is not clear. Furthermore, what information is carried in the fusimotor signal from the motor cortex to the muscle spindle is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the issue of communication between the central and peripheral sensorimotor systems using a computational approach based on the virtual arm (VA) model. In simulation experiments within the operational range of joint movements, the gamma static commands (γ(s)) to the spindles of both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles were hypothesized (1) to remain constant, (2) to be modulated with joint angles linearly, and (3) to be modulated with joint angles nonlinearly. Simulation results revealed a nonlinear landscape of Ia afferent with respect to both γ(s) activation and joint angle. Among the three hypotheses, the constant and linear strategies did not yield Ia responses that matched the experimental data, and therefore, were rejected as plausible strategies of spindle sensitivity control. However, if γ(s) commands were quadratically modulated with joint angles, a robust linear relation between Ia afferents and joint angles could be obtained in both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles. With the quadratic strategy of spindle sensitivity control, γ(s) commands may serve as the CNS outputs that inform the periphery of central coding of joint angles. The results suggest that the information of joint angles may be communicated between the CNS and muscles via the descending γ(s) efferent and Ia afferent signals.

  12. Regulation of myosin IIA and filamentous actin during insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Stall, Richard; Ramos, Joseph; Kent Fulcher, F.; Patel, Yashomati M.

    2014-03-10

    Insulin stimulated glucose uptake requires the colocalization of myosin IIA (MyoIIA) and the insulin-responsive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane for proper GLUT4 fusion. MyoIIA facilitates filamentous actin (F-actin) reorganization in various cell types. In adipocytes F-actin reorganization is required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. What is not known is whether MyoIIA interacts with F-actin to regulate insulin-induced GLUT4 fusion at the plasma membrane. To elucidate the relationship between MyoIIA and F-actin, we examined the colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation as well as the regulation of this interaction. Our findings demonstrated that MyoIIA and F-actin colocalized at the site of GLUT4 fusion with the plasma membrane upon insulin stimulation. Furthermore, inhibition of MyoII with blebbistatin impaired F-actin localization at the plasma membrane. Next we examined the regulatory role of calcium in MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization. Reduced calcium or calmodulin levels decreased colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the plasma membrane. While calcium alone can translocate MyoIIA it did not stimulate F-actin accumulation at the plasma membrane. Taken together, we established that while MyoIIA activity is required for F-actin localization at the plasma membrane, it alone is insufficient to localize F-actin to the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Insulin induces colocalization of MyoIIA and F-actin at the cortex in adipocytes. • MyoIIA is necessary but not sufficient to localize F-actin at the cell cortex. • MyoIIA-F-actin colocalization is regulated by calcium and calmodulin.

  13. Evidence for dual control mechanism regulating hepatic glucose output in nondiabetic men

    SciTech Connect

    Clore, J.N.; Glickman, P.S.; Helm, S.T.; Nestler, J.E.; Blackard, W.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors previously reported a fall in hepatic glucose output (HGO) during sleep accompanied by reductions in glucose utilization (Rd) and free fatty acids (FFAs). This study was undertaken to determine the potential role of changes in Rd and FFA on HGO in nondiabetic men. To determine if the fall in HGO during sleep could be reversed by FFA elevation, seven nondiabetic men underwent (3-3H)glucose infusions from 2200 to 0800, with heparin (90 mU.kg-1.min-1) added at 0200. Glucose appearance (Ra) fell from 11.7 {plus minus} 1.1 at 2430 to 8.9 {plus minus} 0.8 mumol.kg-1.min-1 (P less than 0.05) at 0200. The fall in Ra was associated with decreases in FFA (0.57 {plus minus} 0.10 to 0.48 {plus minus} 0.07 mM) and glycerol (0.08 {plus minus} 0.01 to 0.06 {plus minus} 0.01 mM). Infusion of heparin significantly increased FFA and glycerol (1.09 {plus minus} 0.21 and 0.11 {plus minus} 0.01 mM, respectively, P less than 0.01) and resulted in a significant fall in plasma alanine, suggesting that gluconeogenesis had been increased. However, rates of glucose turnover were indistinguishable from overnight studies without heparin. In additional studies (n = 6), intralipid and heparin-induced FFA elevation (from 0.61 {plus minus} 0.07 to 0.95 {plus minus} 0.05 mM, P less than 0.01) stimulated gluconeogenesis ((U-14C)alanine to glucose) twofold (188 {plus minus} 22% increase compared to 114 {plus minus} 6% in saline control studies, P less than 0.01). However, despite increasing gluconeogenesis, overall HGO did not change (10.6 {plus minus} 0.5 vs. 10.7 {plus minus} 0.6 mumol.kg-1.min-1) during lipid infusion.

  14. Effect of antibiotics on gut microbiota, glucose metabolism and body weight regulation: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, K H; Allin, K H; Knop, F K

    2016-05-01

    Gut bacteria are involved in a number of host metabolic processes and have been implicated in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. The use of antibiotics changes the composition of the gut microbiota and there is accumulating evidence from observational studies for an association between exposure to antibiotics and development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In the present paper, we review human studies examining the effects of antibiotics on body weight regulation and glucose metabolism and discuss whether the observed findings may relate to alterations in the composition and function of the gut microbiota.

  15. The regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase by autophagy in low-glycolytic hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Yong; Lee, Hyangkyu; Park, Jeayeo; Lee, Misu; Park, Sae Whan; Kim, Ji Sook; Lee, Milim; Cho, Byoungchul; Kim, Kyungsup; Choi, Augustine M K; Kim, Chun K; Yun, Mijin

    2015-07-31

    The glycolytic phenotype is a dominant metabolic phenomenon in cancer and is reflected in becoming aggressive. Certain hepatocellular carcinoma lack increased glycolysis and prefer to uptake acetate than glucose for metabolism. Autophagy plays a role in preserving energies and nutrients when there is limited external nutrient supply and maintains glucose level of blood though supporting gluconeogenesis in the liver. As the role of autophagy and gluconeogenesis in HCC following the glycolic activity was not clear, we cultured HCC cells with different glycolytic levels in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) to induce autophagy and conducted the activity of gluconeogenesis. Both autophagy and gluconeogenesis were induced in low glycolytic HCC cells (HepG2). In glycolytic Hep3B cells, only autophagy without gluconeogenesis was induced upon starvation. When autophagy was blocked, the level of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) was reduced in HepG2 cells and not in Hep3B. Altogether, we investigated contribution of hepatic gluconeogenesis to the metabolic phenotype of HCC cells and the role of autophagy as a potential mechanism regulating gluconeogenesis in low glycolytic HCC.

  16. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  17. Endoproteolytic cleavage of TUG protein regulates GLUT4 glucose transporter translocation.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Jonathan S; Rubin, Bradley R; Yu, Chenfei; Löffler, Michael G; Orme, Charisse M; Belman, Jonathan P; McNally, Leah J; Hao, Mingming; Cresswell, James A

    2012-07-06

    To promote glucose uptake into fat and muscle cells, insulin causes the translocation of GLUT4 glucose transporters from intracellular vesicles to the cell surface. Previous data support a model in which TUG traps GLUT4-containing vesicles and tethers them intracellularly in unstimulated cells and in which insulin mobilizes this pool of vesicles by releasing this tether. Here we show that TUG undergoes site-specific endoproteolytic cleavage, which separates a GLUT4-binding, N-terminal region of TUG from a C-terminal region previously suggested to bind an intracellular anchor. Cleavage is accelerated by insulin stimulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and is highly dependent upon adipocyte differentiation. The N-terminal TUG cleavage product has properties of a novel 18-kDa ubiquitin-like modifier, which we call TUGUL. The C-terminal product is observed at the expected size of 42 kDa and also as a 54-kDa form that is released from membranes into the cytosol. In transfected cells, intact TUG links GLUT4 to PIST and also binds Golgin-160 through its C-terminal region. PIST is an effector of TC10α, a GTPase previously shown to transmit an insulin signal required for GLUT4 translocation, and we show using RNAi that TC10α is required for TUG proteolytic processing. Finally, we demonstrate that a cleavage-resistant form of TUG does not support highly insulin-responsive GLUT4 translocation or glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Together with previous results, these data support a model whereby insulin stimulates TUG cleavage to liberate GLUT4 storage vesicles from the Golgi matrix, which promotes GLUT4 translocation to the cell surface and enhances glucose uptake.

  18. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    PubMed

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  19. Uncoupling protein 2 negatively regulates glucose-induced glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjie; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiangying; Luo, Yun; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2012-04-01

    It is known that endogenous levels of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) can be enhanced by various secretagogues, but the mechanism underlying GLP1 secretion is still not fully understood. We assessed the possible effect of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) on GLP1 secretion in mouse intestinal tract and NCI-H716 cells, a well-characterized human enteroendocrine L cell model. Localization of UCP2 and GLP1 in the gastrointestinal tract was assessed by immunofluorescence staining. Ucp2 mRNA levels in gut were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Human NCI-H716 cells were transiently transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. The plasma and ileum tissue levels of GLP1 (7-36) amide were measured using an ELISA kit. UCP2 was primarily expressed in the mucosal layer and colocalized with GLP1 in gastrointestinal mucosa. L cells secreting GLP1 also expressed UCP2. After glucose administration, UCP2-deficient mice showed increased glucose-induced GLP1 secretion compared with wild-type littermates. GLP1 secretion increased after NCI-H716 cells were transfected with siRNAs targeting UCP2. UCP2 was markedly upregulated in ileum tissue from ob/ob mice, and GLP1 secretion decreased compared with normal mice. Furthermore, GLP1 secretion increased after administration of genipin by oral gavage. Taken together, these results reveal an inhibitory role of UCP2 in glucose-induced GLP1 secretion.

  20. Regulation of peripheral blood flow in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: clinical implication for symptomatic relief and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Groeneweg, George; Huygen, Frank JPM; Coderre, Terence J; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2009-01-01

    Background During the chronic stage of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), impaired microcirculation is related to increased vasoconstriction, tissue hypoxia, and metabolic tissue acidosis in the affected limb. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the ischemia and pain in chronic cold CPRS. Discussion The diminished blood flow may be caused by either sympathetic dysfunction, hypersensitivity to circulating catecholamines, or endothelial dysfunction. The pain may be of neuropathic, inflammatory, nociceptive, or functional nature, or of mixed origin. Summary The origin of the pain should be the basis of the symptomatic therapy. Since the difference in temperature between both hands fluctuates over time in cold CRPS, when in doubt, the clinician should prioritize the patient's report of a persistent cold extremity over clinical tests that show no difference. Future research should focus on developing easily applied methods for clinical use to differentiate between central and peripheral blood flow regulation disorders in individual patients. PMID:19775468

  1. Apigenin and naringenin regulate glucose and lipid metabolism, and ameliorate vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Qin, Weiwei; Wu, Feihua; Wang, Shanshan; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Liying; Zeng, Biao; Ma, Shiping; Liang, Jingyu

    2016-02-15

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial step of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the amelioration of apigenin and naringenin in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin and explored the underlying mechanism. Apigenin or naringenin was intragastrically administered at 50 or 100mg/kg once a day for 6 weeks. Biochemical parameters including blood glucose, glycated serum protein, serum lipid, insulin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured. Vascular reactivity in isolated thoracic aortic rings was examined. Pathological features of the thoracic aorta were further observed through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Lastly, we evaluated their effects on insulin resistance of palmitic acid (PA)-induced endothelial cells. Compared with diabetic control group, apigenin and naringenin significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, serum lipid, malonaldehyde, ICAM-1 and insulin resistance index, increased SOD activity and improved impaired glucose tolerance. Apigenin and naringenin restored phenylephrine-mediated contractions and acetylcholine or insulin-induced relaxations in aortic tissues. Furthermore, pathological damage in the thoracic aorta of apigenin and naringenin groups was more remissive than diabetic control group. In vitro, apigenin and naringenin inhibited NF-κB activation and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in PA-treated endothelial cells and improved nitric oxide production in the presence of insulin. In conclusion, both apigenin and naringenin can ameliorate glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as endothelial dysfunction in T2D rats at least in part by down-regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. In general, apigenin showed greater potency than naringenin equivalent.

  2. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis.

  3. Regulation of the Axillary Osmidrosis-Associated ABCC11 Protein Stability by N-Linked Glycosylation: Effect of Glucose Condition

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Yu; Takada, Tappei; Miyata, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette C11 (ABCC11) is a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of a variety of lipophilic anions. ABCC11 wild-type is responsible for the high-secretion phenotypes in human apocrine glands, such as that of wet-type ear wax, and the risk of axillary osmidrosis. We have previously reported that mature ABCC11 is a glycoprotein containing two N-linked glycans at Asn838 and Asn844. However, little is known about the role of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of ABCC11 protein. In the current study, we investigated the effects of N-linked glycosylation on the protein level and localization of ABCC11 using polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. When the N-linked glycosylation in ABCC11-expressing cells was chemically inhibited by tunicamycin treatment, the maturation of ABCC11 was suppressed and its protein level was significantly decreased. Immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that the protein level of the N-linked glycosylation-deficient mutant (N838Q and N844Q: Q838/844) was about half of the ABCC11 wild-type level. Further biochemical studies with the Q838/844 mutant showed that this glycosylation-deficient ABCC11 was degraded faster than wild-type probably due to the enhancement of the MG132-sensitive protein degradation pathway. Moreover, the incubation of ABCC11 wild-type-expressing cells in a low-glucose condition decreased mature, glycosylated ABCC11, compared with the high-glucose condition. On the other hand, the protein level of the Q838/844 mutant was not affected by glucose condition. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation is important for the protein stability of ABCC11, and physiological alteration in glucose may affect the ABCC11 protein level and ABCC11-related phenotypes in humans, such as axillary osmidrosis. PMID:27281343

  4. Negative regulation of natural killer cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anupam; Banerjee, Arunabha; Saikia, Nabajyoti; Phookan, Jyotirmoy; Baruah, Munindra Narayan; Baruah, Shashi

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the key lymphocytes in solid tumors. Its activity is regulated by both germline encoded receptors and cytokine microenvironment. We conducted a case-control study to investigate the activation status of NK cell in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). NK cell activation was assessed in context of NK cell cytotoxicity and transcript expression of NK cell receptors (NKp46 and KIRs) and NK cell associated cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β). The results revealed possible mechanisms involved in reduced NK cell activation in peripheral circulation: quantitative deficiency of NK cell number and lowered cytotoxicity together with qualitative NK impairments caused by--(1) decreased expression of NK activating receptor NKp46, (2) increased expression of NK suppressive cytokines--IL-10 and TGF-β and (3) induction of FOXP3(+)CTLA4(+) suppressor cells. On the other hand, in the tumor tissue, escape of NK immune surveillance appeared to be modulated by upregulation of TGF-β and IL-10 together with downregulation of NK cell activating cytokines (IL-2, IL-12β, IL-15, IL-18, IL-21 and IFN-γ) and NK receptors (NKp46 and KIRs). In addition, our study supported the earlier contention that TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels may be used as markers of malignant transformation in oral leukoplakia. In conclusion, the study provided an insight into the negative regulation of NK cell in tumor tissue and peripheral blood of OSCC patients, which can be exploited to boost the current NK cell and cytokine based immunotherapy for the treatment of oral cancer.

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase activity contributes to the regulation of peripheral vascular tone in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, J W; Dover, A R; Chia, S; Cruden, N L M; Hayes, P C; Newby, D E

    2006-01-01

    Background Overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increased nitric oxide generation may be associated with the hyperdynamic circulation of patients with cirrhosis. We have, for the first time, used the highly selective iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, to determine whether iNOS activity contributes to the regulation of vascular tone in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. Methods Bilateral forearm blood flow was measured using strain gauge plethysmography in eight patients with cirrhosis and ascites, and eight matched healthy volunteers during intrabrachial infusion of 1400W (0.1–1 μmol/min), NG‐monomethyl‐L‐arginine (L‐NMMA, a non‐selective NOS inhibitor; 2–8 μmol), and norepinephrine (a control vasoconstrictor; 60–480 pmol/min). Results In patients with cirrhosis, 1400W, L‐NMMA, and norepinephrine caused dose dependent reductions in forearm blood flow: peak reductions of 11 (5)%, 37 (4)%, and 48 (5)%, respectively (p<0.05 for all). In contrast, 1400W had no effect on blood flow (+4 (8)%; NS) in healthy controls despite similar reductions in blood flow with L‐NMMA and norepinephrine (39 (5)% and 49 (5)%, respectively; p<0.05 for both). Conclusions We have, for the first time, demonstrated that 1400W causes peripheral vasoconstriction in patients with cirrhosis but not healthy matched controls. This suggests that iNOS contributes to the regulation of peripheral vascular tone in patients with cirrhosis and ascites, and may contribute towards the hyperdynamic circulation associated with this condition. PMID:16299035

  6. Multiple mechanisms of GW-9508, a selective G protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist, in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng-Yih; Wu, Hung-Tsung; Hung, Hao-Chang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Wu, Jin-Shang; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2013-03-15

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) by agonists increases insulin release in isolated islets, whereas it is inconclusive whether GPR40 antagonists decrease blood glucose and increase insulin sensitivity. Although some clinical trials indicated that administration of a GPR40 agonist shows benefits in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis, the pharmacological mechanisms of this receptor in the improvement of glycemic control remain unclear. Therefore, we used a selective GPR40 agonist, GW-9508, to clarify the role of GPR40 in the regulation of blood glucose. Bolus intraperitoneal injection of GW-9508 in mice showed a slight decrease in blood glucose, with an increase in plasma insulin levels under glucose stimuli. However, long-term treatment with low doses of GW-9508 in high-fat diet-induced (HFD) diabetic mice decreased blood glucose with decreased plasma insulin significantly and improved glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Using small interfering ribonucleic acid to delete GPR40 in HepG2 cells, we demonstrated that GW-9508 reversed palmitate-induced insulin signaling impairment through a GPR40-dependent pathway. We also found that GW-9508 activates the Akt/GSK-3β pathway to increase glycogen levels in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, administration of GW-9508 decreased the hepatic expression of fetuin-A in HFD mice significantly and regulated high-glucose- or palmitate-induced fetuin-A expression to increase insulin sensitivity through a GPR40/PLC/PKC pathway in HepG2 cells. Taken together, GW-9508 exerts a partial agonist effect to regulate blood glucose through multiple mechanisms. Investigation of chemicals that act on GPR40 might be a new strategy for the treatment of diabetes.

  7. SIP30 Is Regulated by ERK in Peripheral Nerve Injury-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Guangdun; Han, Mei; Du, Yimin; Lin, Anning; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Yuqiu; Jing, Naihe

    2009-01-01

    ERK plays an important role in chronic neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that in chronic constriction injury-treated rat spinal cords, up-regulation of SIP30 (SNAP25-interacting protein 30), which is involved in the development and maintenance of chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain, correlates with ERK activation and that the up-regulation of SIP30 is suppressed by intrathecal delivery of the MEK inhibitor U0126. In PC12 cells, up-regulation of SIP30 by nerve growth factor is also dependent on ERK activation. We found that there is an ERK-responsive region in the rat sip30 promoter. Activation of ERK promotes the recruitment of the transcription factor cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein to the sip30 gene promoter. Taken together, our results provide a potential downstream target of ERK activation-mediated neuropathic pain. PMID:19723624

  8. Regulation of PTEN inhibition by the pleckstrin homology domain of P-REX2 during insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hodakoski, Cindy; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Barrows, Douglas; Mense, Sarah M.; Keniry, Megan; Anderson, Karen E.; Kern, Philip A.; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Stephens, Len R.; Parsons, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Insulin activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling regulates glucose homeostasis through the production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). The dual-specificity phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) blocks PI3K signaling by dephosphorylating PIP3, and is inhibited through its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (P-REX2). The mechanism of inhibition and its physiological significance are not known. Here, we report that P-REX2 interacts with PTEN via two interfaces. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of P-REX2 inhibits PTEN by interacting with the catalytic region of PTEN, and the inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase domain of P-REX2 provides high-affinity binding to the postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1-binding domain of PTEN. P-REX2 inhibition of PTEN requires C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN to release the P-REX2 PH domain from its neighboring diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain. Consistent with its function as a PTEN inhibitor, deletion of Prex2 in fibroblasts and mice results in increased Pten activity and decreased insulin signaling in liver and adipose tissue. Prex2 deletion also leads to reduced glucose uptake and insulin resistance. In human adipose tissue, P-REX2 protein expression is decreased and PTEN activity is increased in insulin-resistant human subjects. Taken together, these results indicate a functional role for P-REX2 PH-domain–mediated inhibition of PTEN in regulating insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis and suggest that loss of P-REX2 expression may cause insulin resistance. PMID:24367090

  9. Regulation of PTEN inhibition by the pleckstrin homology domain of P-REX2 during insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hodakoski, Cindy; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Barrows, Douglas; Mense, Sarah M; Keniry, Megan; Anderson, Karen E; Kern, Philip A; Hawkins, Phillip T; Stephens, Len R; Parsons, Ramon

    2014-01-07

    Insulin activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling regulates glucose homeostasis through the production of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). The dual-specificity phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) blocks PI3K signaling by dephosphorylating PIP3, and is inhibited through its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (P-REX2). The mechanism of inhibition and its physiological significance are not known. Here, we report that P-REX2 interacts with PTEN via two interfaces. The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of P-REX2 inhibits PTEN by interacting with the catalytic region of PTEN, and the inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase domain of P-REX2 provides high-affinity binding to the postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1-binding domain of PTEN. P-REX2 inhibition of PTEN requires C-terminal phosphorylation of PTEN to release the P-REX2 PH domain from its neighboring diffuse B-cell lymphoma homology domain. Consistent with its function as a PTEN inhibitor, deletion of Prex2 in fibroblasts and mice results in increased Pten activity and decreased insulin signaling in liver and adipose tissue. Prex2 deletion also leads to reduced glucose uptake and insulin resistance. In human adipose tissue, P-REX2 protein expression is decreased and PTEN activity is increased in insulin-resistant human subjects. Taken together, these results indicate a functional role for P-REX2 PH-domain-mediated inhibition of PTEN in regulating insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis and suggest that loss of P-REX2 expression may cause insulin resistance.

  10. PNPLA3 is regulated by glucose in human hepatocytes, and its I148M mutant slows down triglyceride hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Perttilä, Julia; Huaman-Samanez, Carolina; Caron, Sandrine; Tanhuanpää, Kimmo; Staels, Bart; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2012-05-15

    Liver fat is increased in carriers of the minor G allele in rs738409 (I148M amino acid substitution) in patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3)/adiponutrin. We studied transcriptional regulation of PNPLA3 in immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) and human hepatoma cells (HuH7) and the impact of PNPLA3 I148M mutant on hepatocyte triglyceride metabolism. Studies in IHH showed that silencing of the carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) abolished induction of PNPLA3 mRNA by glucose. Glucose-dependent binding of ChREBP to a newly identified carbohydrate response element in the PNPLA3 promoter was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Adenoviral overexpression of mouse ChREBP in IHH failed to induce PNPLA3 mRNA. [(3)H]acetate or [(3)H]oleate incorporation with 1-h pulse labeling or 18-h [(3)H]oleate labeling in HuH7 cells showed no effect of PNPLA3 I148M on triglyceride (TG) synthesis in the absence of free fatty acid (FFA) loading. Increased [(3)H]oleate accumulation into triglycerides in I148M-expressing cells was observed after 18 h of labeling in the presence of 200 μM FFA-albumin complexes. This was accompanied by increased PNPLA3 protein levels. The rate of hydrolysis of [(3)H]TG during lipid depletion was decreased significantly by PNPLA3 I148M. Our results suggest that PNPLA3 is regulated in human hepatocytes by glucose via ChREBP. PNPLA3 I148M enhances cellular accumulation of [(3)H]TG in the presence of excess FFA, which is known to stabilize PNPLA3 protein. These data do not exclude an effect of PNPLA3 I148M on hepatocyte lipogenesis but show that the mutant increases the stability of triglycerides.

  11. Metabolic regulation of fatty acid esterification and effects of conjugated linoleic acid on glucose homeostasis in pig hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Conde-Aguilera, J A; Lachica, M; Nieto, R; Fernández-Fígares, I

    2012-02-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) are geometric and positional isomers of linoleic acid (LA) that promote growth, alter glucose metabolism and decrease body fat in growing animals, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. A study was conducted to elucidate the effects of CLA on glucose metabolism, triglyceride (TG) synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis in primary culture of porcine hepatocytes. In addition, hormonal regulation of TG and IGF-1 synthesis was addressed. Hepatocytes were isolated from piglets (n = 5, 16.0 ± 1.98 kg average body weight) by collagenase perfusion and seeded into collagen-coated T-25 flasks. Hepatocytes were cultured in William's E containing dexamethasone (10-8 and 10-7 M), insulin (10 and 100 ng/ml), glucagon (0 and 100 ng/ml) and CLA (1 : 1 mixture of cis-9, trans-11 and trans-10, cis-12 CLA, 0.05 and 0.10 mM) or LA (0.05 and 0.10 mM). Addition of CLA decreased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.05), whereas glycogen synthesis and degradation, TG synthesis and IGF-1 synthesis were not affected compared with LA. Increased concentration of fatty acids in the media decreased IGF-1 production (P < 0.001) and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.01), and increased gluconeogenesis (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis (P < 0.001). IGF-1 synthesis increased (P < 0.001) and TG synthesis decreased (P < 0.001) as dexamethasone concentration in the media rose. High insulin/glucagon increased TG synthesis. These results indicate that TG synthesis in porcine hepatocytes is hormonally regulated so that dexamethasone decreases and insulin/glucagon increases it. In addition, CLA decreases hepatic glucose production through decreased gluconeogenesis.

  12. Arcuate Na+,K+-ATPase senses systemic energy states and regulates feeding behavior through glucose-inhibited neurons.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hideharu; Xu, Kai Y; Maejima, Yuko; Nakata, Masanori; Dezaki, Katsuya; Santoso, Putra; Yang, Yifei; Arai, Takeshi; Gantulga, Darambazar; Muroya, Shinji; Lefor, Alan K; Kakei, Masafumi; Watanabe, Eiju; Yada, Toshihiko

    2015-08-15

    Feeding is regulated by perception in the hypothalamus, particularly the first-order arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, of the body's energy state. However, the cellular device for converting energy states to the activity of critical neurons in ARC is less defined. We here show that Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (NKA) in ARC senses energy states to regulate feeding. Fasting-induced systemic ghrelin rise and glucose lowering reduced ATP-hydrolyzing activity of NKA and its substrate ATP level, respectively, preferentially in ARC. Lowering glucose concentration (LG), which mimics fasting, decreased intracellular NAD(P)H and increased Na(+) concentration in single ARC neurons that subsequently exhibited [Ca(2+)]i responses to LG, showing that they were glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. Third ventricular injection of the NKA inhibitor ouabain induced c-Fos expression in agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ARC and evoked neuropeptide Y (NPY)-dependent feeding. When injected focally into ARC, ouabain stimulated feeding and mRNA expressions for NPY and AgRP. Ouabain increased [Ca(2+)]i in single NPY/AgRP neurons with greater amplitude than in proopiomelanocortin neurons in ARC. Conversely, the specific NKA activator SSA412 suppressed fasting-induced feeding and LG-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in ARC GI neurons. NPY/AgRP neurons highly expressed NKAα3, whose knockdown impaired feeding behavior. These results demonstrate that fasting, via ghrelin rise and LG, suppresses NKA enzyme/pump activity in ARC and thereby promotes the activation of GI neurons and NPY/AgRP-dependent feeding. This study identifies ARC NKA as a hypothalamic sensor and converter of metabolic states to key neuronal activity and feeding behaviour, providing a new target to treat hyperphagic obesity and diabetes.

  13. Reviewing the Effects of L-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, João A B; Zampieri, Thais T; Donato, Jose

    2015-05-22

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss.

  14. Reviewing the Effects of l-Leucine Supplementation in the Regulation of Food Intake, Energy Balance, and Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, João A.B.; Zampieri, Thais T.; Donato, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Leucine is a well-known activator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because mTOR signaling regulates several aspects of metabolism, the potential of leucine as a dietary supplement for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus has been investigated. The objective of the present review was to summarize and discuss the available evidence regarding the mechanisms and the effects of leucine supplementation on the regulation of food intake, energy balance, and glucose homeostasis. Based on the available evidence, we conclude that although central leucine injection decreases food intake, this effect is not well reproduced when leucine is provided as a dietary supplement. Consequently, no robust evidence indicates that oral leucine supplementation significantly affects food intake, although several studies have shown that leucine supplementation may help to decrease body adiposity in specific conditions. However, more studies are necessary to assess the effects of leucine supplementation in already-obese subjects. Finally, although several studies have found that leucine supplementation improves glucose homeostasis, the underlying mechanisms involved in these potential beneficial effects remain unknown and may be partially dependent on weight loss. PMID:26007339

  15. Expression of Glucose-Regulated Protein 78 and miR-199a in Rat Brain After Fatal Ligature Strangulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xueying; Zhang, Dongchuan; Gong, Qingjin; Zhang, Zhiyong; Quan, Li

    2017-03-01

    The roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and microRNA in the brain tissue after fatal mechanical asphyxia have not been clearly elucidated. We examined the expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), the key regulator of unfolded protein response, and miR-199a in the brain tissues of rats subjected to fatal ligature strangulation to understand the roles of ER stress and microRNA in ligature strangulation. The expressions of GRP78 and miR-199a in rat cortex, hippocampi, and midbrain were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis in a rat model of ligature strangulation. Furthermore, the levels of miR-199a-3p and miR-199a-5p were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Glucose-regulated protein 78 was highly expressed in the cortex and midbrain in the ligature strangulation group (P < 0.01) when compared with the control group. The expression of GRP78 in the hippocampi showed no significant difference between the 2 groups. miR-199a-3p in the cortex and midbrain was significantly down-regulated in the ligature strangulation group (P < 0.01). However, miR-199a-5p in each brain region showed no significant difference between the 2 groups. In conclusion, ER stress was involved in the physiological and pathological processes of ligature strangulation. Furthermore, upstream miR-199a may play an important regulatory role in mechanical asphyxia.

  16. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    PubMed

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers.

  17. Antidepressant Medication as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Katharine; Peveler, Robert C.; Holt, Richard I.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antidepressant use has risen sharply over recent years. Recent concerns that antidepressants may adversely affect glucose metabolism require investigation. Our aim was to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with antidepressants through a systematic review. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, American Diabetes Association, and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, U.K. Clinical Research Network, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved articles, and contact with relevant experts. Relevant studies of antidepressant effects were included. Key outcomes were diabetes incidence and change in blood glucose (fasting and random). RESULTS Three systemic reviews and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Research designs included 1 case series and 21 observational studies comprising 4 cross-sectional, 5 case-control, and 12 cohort studies. There was evidence that antidepressant use is associated with type 2 diabetes. Causality is not established, but rather, the picture is confused, with some antidepressants linked to worsening glucose control, particularly with higher doses and longer duration, others linked with improved control, and yet more with mixed results. The more recent, larger studies, however, suggest a modest effect. Study quality was variable. CONCLUSIONS Although evidence exists that antidepressant use may be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, long-term prospective studies of the effects of individual antidepressants rather than class effects are required. Heightened alertness to potential risks is necessary until these are complete. PMID:24065841

  18. The Role of Gut–brain Axis in Regulating Glucose Metabolism After Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Murphy, Rinki; Cutfield, Richard; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes has become an epidemic in developed and developing countries alike, with an increased demand for new efficacious treatments. A large body of pre-clinical evidence suggests that the gut–brain axis may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for defective glucose homeostasis. This clinical study aimed to investigate a comprehensive panel of glucoregulatory peptides, released by both the gut and brain, in individuals after acute pancreatitis. Methods: Fasting levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glicentin, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and secretin were studied. Modified Poisson and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Pre-determined concentration ranges were used to categorize each peptide into quartiles. Results: A total of 83 individuals were included, of who 30 (36%) developed abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) after acute pancreatitis. In individuals with AGM, the highest quartile of oxyntomodulin differed most significantly from the lowest quartile with a prevalence ratio (PR; 95% confidence interval) of 0.50 (0.21, 1.20; P=0.005); of glicentin with a PR of 0.26 (0.13, 0.54; P<0.001); and of VIP with a PR of 0.34 (0.13, 0.89; P=0.043). Peptide YY, GLP-1, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, and secretin were not significantly associated with AGM. Conclusions: Fasting circulating oxyntomodulin, glicentin, and VIP levels are significantly decreased in patients with defective glucose homeostasis after acute pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin appears to be a promising therapeutic target for future clinical studies on diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:28055028

  19. Regulation of Glucose Transport in Quiescent, Lactating, and Neoplastic Mammary Epithelia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    family(Burant, et al., 1992, Mueckler, 1994). These are designated GLUT1- GLUT4 , and GLUT7, in the order in which they were cloned. (GLUT5 is actually a...gland has not been rigorously excluded. The simplest way to do so is to attempt to detect the mRNA for the other known transporters, GLUT2, GLUT3, GLUT4 ...regulatable glucose transporter ( GLUT4 ) is isoform specific and independent of cell type. J. Cell Biol. 114:689-699. Haney, P. M., M. A. Levy, M. S. Strube and

  20. Kinin B1 Receptor in Adipocytes Regulates Glucose Tolerance and Predisposition to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Fabiana Louise; Fonseca, Raphael Gomes; Alenina, Natalia; Guadagnini, Dioze; Schadock, Ines; Silva, Elton Dias; Torres, Hugo A. M.; dos Santos, Edson Lucas; Castro, Charlles Heldan; D’Almeida, Vânia; Andreotti, Sandra; Campaña, Amanda Baron; Sertié, Rogério A. L.; Saad, Mario J. A.; Lima, Fabio Bessa; Bader, Michael; Pesquero, João Bosco

    2012-01-01

    Background Kinins participate in the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes by mechanisms which are not fully understood. Kinin B1 receptor knockout mice (B1−/−) are leaner and exhibit improved insulin sensitivity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that kinin B1 receptors in adipocytes play a role in controlling whole body insulin action and glucose homeostasis. Adipocytes isolated from mouse white adipose tissue (WAT) constitutively express kinin B1 receptors. In these cells, treatment with the B1 receptor agonist des-Arg9-bradykinin improved insulin signaling, GLUT4 translocation, and glucose uptake. Adipocytes from B1−/− mice showed reduced GLUT4 expression and impaired glucose uptake at both basal and insulin-stimulated states. To investigate the consequences of these phenomena to whole body metabolism, we generated mice where the expression of the kinin B1 receptor was limited to cells of the adipose tissue (aP2-B1/B1−/−). Similarly to B1−/− mice, aP2-B1/B1−/− mice were leaner than wild type controls. However, exclusive expression of the kinin B1 receptor in adipose tissue completely rescued the improved systemic insulin sensitivity phenotype of B1−/− mice. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis also revealed that genes involved in insulin signaling were significantly affected by the presence of the kinin B1 receptor in adipose tissue. In agreement, GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake were increased in fat tissue of aP2-B1/B1−/− when compared to B1−/− mice. When subjected to high fat diet, aP2-B1/B1−/− mice gained more weight than B1−/− littermates, becoming as obese as the wild types. Conclusions/Significance Thus, kinin B1 receptor participates in the modulation of insulin action in adipocytes, contributing to systemic insulin sensitivity and predisposition to obesity. PMID:23024762

  1. Neural regulation of cardiovascular response to exercise: role of central command and peripheral afferents.

    PubMed

    Nobrega, Antonio C L; O'Leary, Donal; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Piepoli, Massimo F; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, mechanisms controlling the cardiovascular apparatus operate to provide adequate oxygen to fulfill metabolic demand of exercising muscles and to guarantee metabolic end-products washout. Moreover, arterial blood pressure is regulated to maintain adequate perfusion of the vital organs without excessive pressure variations. The autonomic nervous system adjustments are characterized by a parasympathetic withdrawal and a sympathetic activation. In this review, we briefly summarize neural reflexes operating during dynamic exercise. The main focus of the present review will be on the central command, the arterial baroreflex and chemoreflex, and the exercise pressure reflex. The regulation and integration of these reflexes operating during dynamic exercise and their possible role in the pathophysiology of some cardiovascular diseases are also discussed.

  2. The Regulation of Immunological Processes by Peripheral Neurons in Homeostasis and Disease.

    PubMed

    Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Huang, Siyi; Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Barreiro, Olga; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2015-10-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are the principal sensory interfaces between the internal and external environment. They are responsible for recognizing, integrating, and responding to varied stimuli, and have the capacity to form memories of these encounters leading to learned or 'adaptive' future responses. We review current understanding of the cross-regulation between these systems. The autonomic and somatosensory nervous systems regulate both the development and deployment of immune cells, with broad functions that impact on hematopoiesis as well as on priming, migration, and cytokine production. In turn, specific immune cell subsets contribute to homeostatic neural circuits such as those controlling metabolism, hypertension, and the inflammatory reflex. We examine the contribution of the somatosensory system to autoimmune, autoinflammatory, allergic, and infectious processes in barrier tissues and, in this context, discuss opportunities for therapeutic manipulation of neuro-immune interactions.

  3. The Regulation of Immunological Processes by Peripheral Neurons in Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ordovas-Montanes, Jose; Rakoff-Nahoum, Seth; Huang, Siyi; Riol-Blanco, Lorena; Barreiro, Olga; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system and the immune system are the principal sensory interfaces between the internal and external environment. They are responsible for recognizing, integrating, and responding to varied stimuli, and have the capacity to form memories of these encounters leading to learned or ‘adaptive’ future responses. Here, we review the current understanding of the cross-regulation between these systems. The autonomic and somatosensory nervous systems regulate both the development and deployment of immune cells, with broad functions that impact hematopoiesis as well as priming, migration and cytokine production. In turn, specific immune cell subsets contribute to homeostatic neural circuits such as those controlling metabolism, hypertension and the inflammatory reflex. We examine the contribution of the somatosensory system to autoimmune, autoinflammatory, allergic, and infectious processes in barrier tissues and in this context, discuss opportunities for therapeutic manipulation of neuro-immune interactions. PMID:26431937

  4. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 up-regulation in proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Won Seok; Chang, Jai Won; Han, Nam Jeong; Lee, Sang Koo; Park, Su-Kil

    2012-09-10

    The role of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in high glucose-induced intracellular signal transduction has yet to be elucidated. We investigated whether Syk is implicated in high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) up-regulation in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cell). High glucose increased TGF-{beta}1 gene expression through Syk, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. High glucose-induced AP-1 DNA binding activity was decreased by Syk inhibitors and U0126 (an ERK inhibitor). Syk inhibitors suppressed high glucose-induced ERK activation, whereas U0126 had no effect on Syk activation. High glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity was also decreased by Syk inhibitors. High glucose increased nuclear translocation of p65 without serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and without degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, but with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} that may account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Both Syk inhibitors and Syk-siRNA attenuated high glucose-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} tyrosine phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Depletion of p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2) by transfection of Pak2-siRNA abolished high glucose-induced Syk activation. In summary, high glucose-induced TGF-{beta}1 gene transcription occurred through Pak2, Syk and subsequent ERK/AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B pathways. This suggests that Syk might be implicated in the diabetic kidney disease.

  5. Central ghrelin regulates peripheral lipid metabolism in a growth hormone-independent fashion.

    PubMed

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Vázquez, María J; Varela, Luis; Nogueiras, Rubén; Saha, Asish K; Cordido, Fernando; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    GH plays a major role in the regulation of lipid metabolism and alterations in GH axis elicit major changes in fat distribution and mobilization. For example, in patients with GH deficiency (GHD) or in mice lacking the GH receptor, the percentage of fat is increased. In addition to the direct actions of GH on lipid metabolism, current evidence indicates that ghrelin, a stomach-derived peptide hormone with potent GH secretagogue action, increases lipogenesis in white adipose tissue (WAT) through a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism. Still, the mechanism by which GH tone modulates ghrelin actions on WAT remains unclear. Here we investigated the effect of central ghrelin administration on lipid metabolism in lipogenic tissues (liver and WAT) in the absence of GH, by using a model for the study of GHD, namely the spontaneous dwarf rat, which shows increased body fat. Our data demonstrate that central chronic ghrelin administration regulates adipose lipid metabolism, mainly in a GH-independent fashion, as a result of increased mRNA, protein expression, and activity levels of fatty acid metabolism enzymes. On the contrary, central ghrelin regulates hepatic lipogenesis de novo in a GH-independent fashion but lipid mobilization in a GH-dependent fashion because carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 was decreased only in wild-type Lewis rats. These findings suggest the existence of a new central nervous system-based neuroendocrine circuit, regulating metabolic homeostasis of adipose tissue. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the interplay between GH and ghrelin and their effects on lipid metabolism will provide new strategies for the design and development of suitable drugs for the treatment of GHD, obesity, and its comorbidities.

  6. Regulation of product formation during glucose or lactose limitation in nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Fordyce, A M; Crow, V L; Thomas, T D

    1984-08-01

    Nongrowing cells of Streptococcus lactis in a pH-stat were dosed with sugar to allow fermentation at the maximum rate or were fed a continuous supply of sugar at rates less than the maximum. Under anaerobic conditions, rapid fermentation of either glucose or lactose was essentially homolactic. However, with strain ML3, limiting the fermentation rate diverted approximately half of the pyruvate to formate, acetate, and ethanol. At limiting glucose fermentation rates, cells contained lower concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase activator (fructose 1,6-diphosphate) and pyruvate formate-lyase inhibitors (triose phosphates). As a result, pyruvate formate-lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase play a greater role in pyruvate metabolism. In contrast to strain ML3, strain ML8 did not give the same diversion of products under anaerobic conditions, and cells retained higher concentrations of the above effector compounds. Lactose metabolism under aerobic conditions resulted in pyruvate excretion by both S. lactis ML3 and ML8. At 7% of the maximum utilization rate, pyruvate accounted for 69 and 35% of the lactose metabolized by ML3 and ML8, respectively. Acetate was also a major product, especially with ML8. The data suggest that NADH oxidase is involved in coenzyme recycling in the presence of oxygen and that pyruvate formate-lyase is inactivated, but the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex still functions.

  7. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  8. Regulation of the inner membrane mitochondrial permeability transition by the outer membrane translocator protein (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor).

    PubMed

    Sileikyte, Justina; Petronilli, Valeria; Zulian, Alessandra; Dabbeni-Sala, Federica; Tognon, Giuseppe; Nikolov, Peter; Bernardi, Paolo; Ricchelli, Fernanda

    2011-01-14

    We studied the properties of the permeability transition pore (PTP) in rat liver mitochondria and in mitoplasts retaining inner membrane ultrastructure and energy-linked functions. Like mitochondria, mitoplasts readily underwent a permeability transition following Ca(2+) uptake in a process that maintained sensitivity to cyclosporin A. On the other hand, major differences between mitochondria and mitoplasts emerged in PTP regulation by ligands of the outer membrane translocator protein of 18 kDa, TSPO, formerly known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. Indeed, (i) in mitoplasts, the PTP could not be activated by photo-oxidation after treatment with dicarboxylic porphyrins endowed with protoporphyrin IX configuration, which bind TSPO in intact mitochondria; and (ii) mitoplasts became resistant to the PTP-inducing effects of N,N-dihexyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)indole-3-acetamide and of other selective ligands of TSPO. Thus, the permeability transition is an inner membrane event that is regulated by the outer membrane through specific interactions with TSPO.

  9. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Keil, Kimberly P; Vezina, Chad M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2014-01-01

    Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood) into the ductal lumen (milk). Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT) is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1), which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2) and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1) membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2). Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2) are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  10. Acrolein contributes to TRPA1 up-regulation in peripheral and central sensory hypersensitivity following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Acosta, Glen; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Chen, Zhe; Muratori, Breanne; Cao, Peng; Shi, Riyi

    2015-12-01

    Acrolein, an endogenous aldehyde, has been shown to be involved in sensory hypersensitivity after rat spinal cord injury (SCI), for which the pathogenesis is unclear. Acrolein can directly activate a pro-algesic transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel that exists in sensory neurons. Both acrolein and TRPA1 mRNA are elevated post SCI, which contributes to the activation of TRPA1 by acrolein and consequently, neuropathic pain. In the current study, we further showed that, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA exists not only in dorsal root ganglias but also in both peripheral (paw skin) and central endings of primary afferent nerves (dorsal horn of spinal cord). This is the first indication that pain signaling can be over-amplified in the peripheral skin by elevated expressions of TRPA1 following SCI, in addition over-amplification previously seen in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. Furthermore, we show that acrolein alone, in the absence of physical trauma, could lead to the elevation of TRPA1 mRNA at various locations when injected to the spinal cord. In addition, post-SCI elevation of TRPA1 mRNA could be mitigated using acrolein scavengers. Both of these attributes support the critical role of acrolein in elevating TRPA1 expression through gene regulation. Taken together, these data indicate that acrolein is likely a critical causal factor in heightening pain sensation post-SCI, through both the direct binding of TRPA1 receptor, and also by boosting the expression of TRPA1. Finally, our data also further support the notion that acrolein scavenging may be an effective therapeutic approach to alleviate neuropathic pain after SCI. We propose that the trauma-mediated elevation of acrolein causes neuropathic pain through at least two mechanisms: acrolein stimulates the production of transient receptor protein ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in both central and peripheral locations, and it activates TRPA1 channels directly. Therefore, acrolein appears to be a critical

  11. Mechanisms of expression and translocation of major fission yeast glucose transporters regulated by CaMKK/phosphatases, nuclear shuttling, and TOR.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Shigeaki; Mori, Ayaka; Uehara, Lisa; Masuda, Fumie; Soejima, Saeko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-15

    Hexose transporters are required for cellular glucose uptake; thus they play a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Using fission yeast, we explored hexose transporter regulation in response to extracellular glucose concentrations. The high-affinity transporter Ght5 is regulated with regard to transcription and localization, much like the human GLUT transporters, which are implicated in diabetes. When restricted to a glucose concentration equivalent to that of human blood, the fission yeast transcriptional regulator Scr1, which represses Ght5 transcription in the presence of high glucose, is displaced from the nucleus. Its displacement is dependent on Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase, Ssp1, and Sds23 inhibition of PP2A/PP6-like protein phosphatases. Newly synthesized Ght5 locates preferentially at the cell tips with the aid of the target of rapamycin (TOR) complex 2 signaling. These results clarify the evolutionarily conserved molecular mechanisms underlying glucose homeostasis, which are essential for preventing hyperglycemia in humans.

  12. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance.

  13. The Fruiting Bodies, Submerged Culture Biomass, and Acidic Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannan of Yellow Brain Mushroom Tremella mesenterica Modulate the Immunity of Peripheral Blood Leukocytes and Splenocytes in Rats with Impaired Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tai-Hao; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Fang-Yi; Wasser, Solomon P.; Lo, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), a chronic disease with hyperglycemia and impaired immune function, is increasing worldwide. Progression from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 DM has recently become a target for early intervention. The fruiting bodies (FB) and submerged culture mycelium (CM) of Tremella mesenterica, an edible and medicinal mushroom, have been demonstrated to have antihyperglycemic and immunomodulatory activities in type 1 DM rats. Herein, we investigated the effects of acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GX) extracted from CM on the immunocyte responses. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) plus nicotinamide (200 mg/kg) for the induction of IGT, and gavaged daily with vehicle, FB, CM, or GX (1 g/kg/day). Rats injected with saline and gavaged vehicle were used as controls. Two weeks later, peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) and splenocytes were collected. Ingestion of FB, CM, and GX significantly decreased blood glucose levels in the postprandial period and in oral glucose tolerance test, and partially reversed T-splenocytic proliferation in IGT rats. CM significantly decreased T-helper lymphocytes in the PBLs and B-splenocytes. In addition, FB, CM, and GX significantly reversed the IGT-induced decreases in tumor necrosis factor-α production; GX significantly increased interleukin-6 production in T-lymphocytes in the PBLs and splenocytes; and CM and GX significantly reversed IGT-induced decrease in interferon-γ production in T-lymphocytes in the spleen. In conclusion, FB, CM, and acidic polysaccharide GX of T. mesenterica may increase T-cell immunity via the elevation of proinflammatory and T-helper cytokine production in rats with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:24872934

  14. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Simpson, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  15. Changes in glucose fermentation pathways by an enriched bacterial culture in response to regulated dissolved H2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hang; Zeng, Raymond J; Duke, Mikel C; O'Sullivan, Cathryn A; Clarke, William P

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that metabolic pathways in the fermentation of organic waste are primarily controlled by dissolved H2 concentrations, but there is no reported study that compares observed and predicted shifts in fermentation pathways induced by manipulating the dissolved H2 concentration. A perfusion system is presented that was developed to control dissolved H2 concentrations in the continuous fermentation of glucose by a culture highly enriched towards Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum (86 ± 9% relative abundance) from an originally diverse consortia in the leachate of a laboratory digester fed with municipal solid waste. Media from a 2.5 L CSTR was drawn through sintered steel membrane filters to retain biomass, allowing vigorous sparging in a separate chamber without cellular disruption. Through a combination of sparging and variations in glucose feeding rate from 0.8 to 0.2 g/L/d, a range of steady state fermentations were performed with dissolved H2 concentrations as low as an equivalent equilibrated H2 partial pressure of 3 kPa. Trends in product formation rates were simulated using a H2 regulation partitioning model. The model correctly predicted the direction of products redistribution in response to H2 concentration changes and the acetate and butyrate formation rates when H2 concentrations were less than 6 kPa. However, the model over-estimated acetate, ethanol and butanol productions at the expense of butyrate production at higher H2 concentrations. The H2 yield at the lowest dissolved H2 concentration was 2.67 ± 0.08 mol H2 /mol glucose, over 300% higher than the yield achieved in a CSTR operated without sparging.

  16. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2016-04-08

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 10⁶ cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0-20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  17. Direct costs in impaired glucose regulation: results from the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, C; Claessen, H; Andrich, S; Brüne, M; Dintsios, C M; Slomiany, U; Roggenbuck, U; Jöckel, K H; Moebus, S; Icks, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective For the first time, this population-based study sought to analyze healthcare utilization and associated costs in people with normal fasting glycemia (NFG), impaired fasting glycemia (IFG), as well as previously undetected diabetes and previously diagnosed diabetes linking data from the prospective German Heinz Nixdorf Recall (HNR) study with individual claims data from German statutory health insurances. Research design and methods A total of 1709 participants of the HNR 5-year follow-up (mean age (SD) 64.9 (7.5) years, 44.5% men) were included in the study. Age-standardized and sex-standardized healthcare utilization and associated costs (reported as € for the year 2008, perspective of the statutory health insurance) were stratified by diabetes stage defined by the participants' self-report and fasting plasma glucose values. Cost ratios (CRs) were estimated using two-part regression models, adjusting for age, sex, sociodemographic variables and comorbidity. Results The mean total direct healthcare costs for previously diagnosed diabetes, previously undetected diabetes, IFG, and NFG were €2761 (95% CI 2378 to 3268), €2210 (1483 to 4279), €2035 (1732 to 2486) and €1810 (1634 to 2035), respectively. Corresponding age-adjusted and sex-adjusted CRs were 1.53 (1.30 to 1.80), 1.16 (0.91 to 1.47), and 1.09 (0.95 to 1.25) (reference: NFG). Inpatient, outpatient and medication costs varied in order between people with IFG and those with previously undetected diabetes. Conclusions The study provides claims-based detailed cost data in well-defined glucose metabolism subgroups. CRs of individuals with IFG and previously undetected diabetes were surprisingly low. Data are important for the model-based evaluation of screening programs and interventions that are aimed either to prevent diabetes onset or to improve diabetes therapy as well. PMID:27252871

  18. Regulation of feeding and metabolism by neuronal and peripheral clocks in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kanyan; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sehgal, Amita

    2008-10-01

    Studies in mammals have indicated a connection between circadian clocks and feeding behavior, but the nature of the interaction and its relationship to nutrient metabolism are not understood. In Drosophila, clock proteins are expressed in many metabolically important tissues but have not been linked to metabolic processes. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila feeding behavior displays a 24 hr circadian rhythm that is regulated by clocks in digestive/metabolic tissues. Flies lacking clocks in these tissues, in particular in the fat body, also display increased food consumption but have decreased levels of glycogen and a higher sensitivity to starvation. Interestingly, glycogen levels and starvation sensitivity are also affected by clocks in neuronal cells, but the effects of neuronal clocks generally oppose those of the fat body. We propose that the input of neuronal clocks and clocks in metabolic tissues is coordinated to provide effective energy homeostasis.

  19. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  20. Lysine acetyltransferase NuA4 and acetyl-CoA regulate glucose-deprived stress granule formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Sylvain; Morettin, Alan; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Côté, Jocelyn

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells form stress granules under a variety of stresses, however the signaling pathways regulating their formation remain largely unknown. We have determined that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae lysine acetyltransferase complex NuA4 is required for stress granule formation upon glucose deprivation but not heat stress. Further, the Tip60 complex, the human homolog of the NuA4 complex, is required for stress granule formation in cancer cell lines. Surprisingly, the impact of NuA4 on glucose-deprived stress granule formation is partially mediated through regulation of acetyl-CoA levels, which are elevated in NuA4 mutants. While elevated acetyl-CoA levels suppress the formation of glucose-deprived stress granules, decreased acetyl-CoA levels enhance stress granule formation upon glucose deprivation. Further our work suggests that NuA4 regulates acetyl-CoA levels through the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase Acc1. Altogether this work establishes both NuA4 and the metabolite acetyl-CoA as critical signaling pathways regulating the formation of glucose-deprived stress granules. PMID:28231279

  1. Coordinate regulation of glucose transporter function, number, and gene expression by insulin and sulfonylureas in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, P H; Moller, D; Flier, J S; Nayak, R C; Smith, R J

    1989-01-01

    The extrapancreatic actions of sulfonylureas on the glucose transport system were studied in the L6 line of cultured rat skeletal muscle cells. Insulin (10(-7) M) increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake in differentiated L6 myotubes by 30-40% after 8 h of incubation. The sulfonylurea tolazamide (0.6 mg/ml, 22 h) had no effect on glucose uptake in the absence of insulin, but increased insulin-stimulated 2-deoxyglucose uptake twofold. The total cellular content of glucose transporters was assessed with a monoclonal anti-transporter antibody by a solid-phase ELISA method. Insulin (8 h) increased the quantity of glucose transporters, with a maximal twofold increase at 10(-7) M and a dose-response curve similar to that for insulin stimulation of glucose uptake. In spite of its lack of effect on glucose uptake, tolazamide alone (0.6 mg/ml) increased the cellular content of transporters by 70%. The effects of insulin and tolazamide on transporter gene expression were studied with probes derived from Hep G2 glucose transporter cDNA. Insulin increased the transporter mRNA level 1.7-fold, tolazamide increased it 1.5-fold, and the combination of insulin and tolazamide increased transporter mRNA 3-fold. It is concluded that sulfonylureas, together with insulin, enhance glucose uptake in L6 skeletal muscle cells by increasing the number of functioning glucose transport molecules. The long-term regulation of the glucose transport system in skeletal muscle by insulin and sulfonylureas in vivo may involve similar changes in transporter function, number, and gene expression. Images PMID:2661591

  2. Circadian rhythms of gastrointestinal function are regulated by both central and peripheral oscillators.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Jaclyn N; Paulose, Jiffin K; Li, Ye; Cassone, Vincent M

    2012-08-15

    Circadian clocks are responsible for daily rhythms in a wide array of processes, including gastrointestinal (GI) function. These are vital for normal digestive rhythms and overall health. Previous studies demonstrated circadian clocks within the cells of GI tissue. The present study examines the roles played by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), master circadian pacemaker for overt circadian rhythms, and the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of circadian GI rhythms in the mouse Mus musculus. Surgical ablation of the SCN abolishes circadian locomotor, feeding, and stool output rhythms when animals are presented with food ad libitum, while restricted feeding reestablishes these rhythms temporarily. In intact mice, chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine has no effect on feeding and locomotor rhythmicity in light-dark cycles or constant darkness but attenuates stool weight and stool number rhythms. Again, however, restricted feeding reestablishes rhythms in locomotor activity, feeding, and stool output rhythms. Ex vivo, intestinal tissue from PER2::LUC transgenic mice expresses circadian rhythms of luciferase bioluminescence. Chemical sympathectomy has little effect on these rhythms, but timed administration of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol causes a phase-dependent shift in PERIOD2 expression rhythms. Collectively, the data suggest that the SCN are required to maintain feeding, locomotor, and stool output rhythms during ad libitum conditions, acting at least in part through daily activation of sympathetic activity. Even so, this input is not necessary for entrainment to timed feeding, which may be the province of oscillators within the intestines themselves or other components of the GI system.

  3. Circadian rhythms of gastrointestinal function are regulated by both central and peripheral oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Jaclyn N.; Paulose, Jiffin K.; Li, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks are responsible for daily rhythms in a wide array of processes, including gastrointestinal (GI) function. These are vital for normal digestive rhythms and overall health. Previous studies demonstrated circadian clocks within the cells of GI tissue. The present study examines the roles played by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), master circadian pacemaker for overt circadian rhythms, and the sympathetic nervous system in regulation of circadian GI rhythms in the mouse Mus musculus. Surgical ablation of the SCN abolishes circadian locomotor, feeding, and stool output rhythms when animals are presented with food ad libitum, while restricted feeding reestablishes these rhythms temporarily. In intact mice, chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine has no effect on feeding and locomotor rhythmicity in light-dark cycles or constant darkness but attenuates stool weight and stool number rhythms. Again, however, restricted feeding reestablishes rhythms in locomotor activity, feeding, and stool output rhythms. Ex vivo, intestinal tissue from PER2::LUC transgenic mice expresses circadian rhythms of luciferase bioluminescence. Chemical sympathectomy has little effect on these rhythms, but timed administration of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol causes a phase-dependent shift in PERIOD2 expression rhythms. Collectively, the data suggest that the SCN are required to maintain feeding, locomotor, and stool output rhythms during ad libitum conditions, acting at least in part through daily activation of sympathetic activity. Even so, this input is not necessary for entrainment to timed feeding, which may be the province of oscillators within the intestines themselves or other components of the GI system. PMID:22723262

  4. A neuroimmune regulation at peripheral level on the steroidogenesis of polycystic ovary in rats.

    PubMed

    Forneris, M L; Aguado, L I; Oliveros, L B

    2003-09-01

    It is known that noradrenergic sympathetic nerve fibers connect the ovary and the spleen from the celiac ganglion. The modulation of the ovarian steroidogenesis in rats with polycystic ovary (PCO) by secretions of culture splenocytes from control (non PCO), PCO and PCO rats with superior ovarian nerve transection (PCO+SON-t) is investigated. Splenocytes from PCO rats increased progesterone (P) and decreasing estradiol (E) and androstenedione (A) release, a steroidogenic response different from that obtained with splenocytes of control rats. PCO also decreased the number of splenocyte beta-adrenergic receptors (betaR). SON transection reverted the effect of PCO on splenocytes betaR numbers and secretions of these splenocytes also reverted the stimulatory effect of PCO on P release, while norepinephrine (NE) treatment to PCO+SON-t splenocytes decreased their betaR number and their secretions restored the stimulation on progesterone release. Inversely, PCO+SON-t splenocyte secretions intensified the inhibition in estradiol with no effect on A. Treatment of PCO+SON-t splenocytes with NE or neuropeptide Y partially reverted the effects of PCO and SON-t The P and E-A response of PCO ovary might be differentially regulated by the splenocyte secretions through the neural connection involving ovary, SON, celiac ganglion and spleen and the neurotransmitter NE.

  5. TFEB-mediated increase in peripheral lysosomes regulates store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Sbano, Luigi; Bonora, Massimo; Marchi, Saverio; Baldassari, Federica; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles mainly involved in catabolic processes. In addition, lysosomes can expel their contents outside of the cell via lysosomal exocytosis. Some of the key steps involved in these important cellular processes, such as vesicular fusion and trafficking, require calcium (Ca2+) signaling. Recent data show that lysosomal functions are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factor EB (TFEB) through the induction of genes involved in lysosomal biogenesis and exocytosis. Given these observations, we investigated the roles of TFEB and lysosomes in intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. We studied the effect of transient modulation of TFEB expression in HeLa cells by measuring the cytosolic Ca2+ response after capacitative Ca2+ entry activation and Ca2+ dynamics in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and directly in lysosomes. Our observations show that transient TFEB overexpression significantly reduces cytosolic Ca2+ levels under a capacitative influx model and ER re-uptake of calcium, increasing the lysosomal Ca2+ buffering capacity. Moreover, lysosomal destruction or damage abolishes these TFEB-dependent effects in both the cytosol and ER. These results suggest a possible Ca2+ buffering role for lysosomes and shed new light on lysosomal functions during intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:28084445

  6. Glucose regulated proteins 78 and 75 bind to the receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility in interphase microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, Hiroko . E-mail: pa2020@art.osaka-med.ac.jp; Yoneda, Masahiko; Hayasaki, Hana; Nakamura, Toshiya; Mori, Hiroshi

    2006-01-20

    The receptor for hyaluronan mediated motility (RHAMM), which is a hyaluronan-binding protein, is a centrosomal and microtubal protein. Here, we have identified two RHAMM-binding proteins, glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 and GRP75, using co-immunoprecipitation analysis. These two proteins directly bound to glutathione-S-transferase-RHAMM fusion proteins. By double immunostaining, GRP78 and GRP75 colocalized with RHAMM in interphase microtubules, but were separated in mitotic spindles. Prevention of microtubule polymerization by TN-16 and vincristine sulfate induced RHAMM overexpression without a significant change in GRP78/75. Taken together, GRP78/75 and RHAMM complexes may stabilize microtubules in the interphase, associated with a downregulation of RHAMM. These results reveal a new biochemical activity of RHAMM.

  7. Quantum-like model for the adaptive dynamics of the genetic regulation of E. coli's metabolism of glucose/lactose.

    PubMed

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    2012-06-01

    We developed a quantum-like model describing the gene regulation of glucose/lactose metabolism in a bacterium, Escherichia coli. Our quantum-like model can be considered as a kind of the operational formalism for microbiology and genetics. Instead of trying to describe processes in a cell in the very detail, we propose a formal operator description. Such a description may be very useful in situation in which the detailed description of processes is impossible or extremely complicated. We analyze statistical data obtained from experiments, and we compute the degree of E. coli's preference within adaptive dynamics. It is known that there are several types of E. coli characterized by the metabolic system. We demonstrate that the same type of E. coli can be described by the well determined operators; we find invariant operator quantities characterizing each type. Such invariant quantities can be calculated from the obtained statistical data.

  8. Blood borne hormones in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure, the role of circumventricular organs.

    PubMed

    Ufnal, Marcin; Skrzypecki, Janusz

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that blood borne hormones modulate brain mechanisms regulating blood pressure. This appears to be mediated by the circumventricular organs which are located in the walls of the brain ventricular system and lack the blood-brain barrier. Recent evidence shows that neurons of the circumventricular organs express receptors for the majority of cardiovascular hormones. Intracerebroventricular infusions of hormones and their antagonists is one approach to evaluate the influence of blood borne hormones on the neural mechanisms regulating arterial blood pressure. Interestingly, there is no clear correlation between peripheral and central effects of cardiovascular hormones. For example, angiotensin II increases blood pressure acting peripherally and centrally, whereas peripherally acting pressor catecholamines decrease blood pressure when infused intracerebroventricularly. The physiological role of such dual hemodynamic responses has not yet been clarified. In the paper we review studies on hemodynamic effects of catecholamines, neuropeptide Y, angiotensin II, aldosterone, natriuretic peptides, endothelins, histamine and bradykinin in the context of their role in a cross-talk between peripheral and brain mechanisms involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure.

  9. PGC-1α integrates glucose metabolism and angiogenesis in multiple myeloma cells by regulating VEGF and GLUT-4.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dedong; Zhou, Hao; Zhao, Jikai; Jin, Lu; Yu, Wen; Yan, Han; Hu, Yu; Guo, Tao

    2014-03-01

    Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a key coactivator in the regulation of gene transcriptional activity in normal tissues. However, it is not clear whether it is involved in the angiogenesis and metabolism of multiple myeloma (MM). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of PGC-1α in MM. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to inhibit PGC-1α expression in RPMI-8226 cells. An endothelial cell migration assay was performed using transwell chambers and the expression of PGC-1α, estrogen-related receptor-α (ERR-α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) was tested by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein expression of PGC-1α, ERR-α and GLUT-4 was assayed by western blot analysis. Lastly, RPMI-8226 cell proliferation was evaluated using CCK-8 assay. VEGF and GLUT-4 mRNA levels were decreased in cells treated with siRNA targeting PGC-1α, as was the level of GLUT-4 protein. Endothelial cell migration was significantly reduced when these cells were cultured with culture medium from RPMI-8226 cells treated with siPGC-1α. The proliferation rates at 24 and 48 h were suppressed by PGC-1α inhibition. Our results showed that inhibition of PGC-1α suppresses cell proliferation probably by downregulation of VEGF and GLUT-4. The present study suggests that PGC-1α integrates angiogenesis and glucose metabolism in myeloma through regulation of VEGF and GLUT-4.

  10. Role of FAT/CD36 in fatty acid sensing, energy, and glucose homeostasis regulation in DIO and DR rats.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Christelle; Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Levin, Barry E

    2015-02-01

    Hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) sensing neurons alter their activity utilizing the FA translocator/receptor, FAT/CD36. Depletion of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) CD36 with adeno-associated viral vector expressing CD36 shRNA (AAV CD36 shRNA) leads to redistribution of adipose stores and insulin resistance in outbred rats. This study assessed the requirement of VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing for the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis in postnatal day 5 (P5) and P21 selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) and diet-resistant (DR) rats using VMH AAV CD36 shRNA injections. P5 CD36 depletion altered VMH neuronal FA sensing predominantly in DIO rats. After 10 wk on a 45% fat diet, DIO rats injected with VMH AAV CD36 shRNA at P21 ate more and gained more weight than DIO AAV controls, while DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats gained less weight than DR AAV controls. VMH CD36 depletion increased inguinal fat pad weights and leptin levels in DIO and DR rats. Although DR AAV CD36 shRNA-injected rats became as obese as DIO AAV controls, only DIO control and CD36 depleted rats became insulin-resistant on a 45% fat diet. VMH CD36 depletion stunted linear growth in DIO and DR rats. DIO rats injected with AAV CD36 shRNA at P5 had increased fat mass, mostly due to a 45% increase in subcutaneous fat. They were also insulin-resistant with an associated 71% increase of liver triglycerides. These results demonstrate that VMH CD36-mediated FA sensing is a critical factor in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis and fat deposition in DIO and DR rats.

  11. Sigma-1 receptors regulate activity-induced spinal sensitization and neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Beatriz; Nadal, Xavier; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Sánchez-Arroyos, Ricard; Ovalle, Sergio; Palacios, Gabriel; Muro, Asunción; Romero, Luz; Entrena, José Manuel; Baeyens, José Manuel; López-García, José Antonio; Maldonado, Rafael; Zamanillo, Daniel; Vela, José Miguel

    2009-10-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (sigma(1)R) is expressed in key CNS areas involved in nociceptive processing but only limited information is available about its functional role. In the present study we investigated the relevance of sigma(1)R in modulating nerve injury-evoked pain. For this purpose, wild-type mice and mice lacking the sigma(1)R gene were exposed to partial sciatic nerve ligation and neuropathic pain-related behaviors were investigated. To explore underlying mechanisms, spinal processing of repetitive nociceptive stimulation and expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were also investigated. Sensitivity to noxious heat of homozygous sigma(1)R knockout mice did not differ from wild-type mice. Baseline values obtained in sigma(1)R knockout mice before nerve injury in the plantar, cold-plate and von Frey tests were also indistinguishable from those obtained in wild-type mice. However, cold and mechanical allodynia did not develop in sigma(1)R null mice exposed to partial sciatic nerve injury. Using isolated spinal cords we found that mice lacking sigma(1)R showed reduced wind-up responses respect to wild-type mice, as evidenced by a reduced number of action potentials induced by trains of C-fiber intensity stimuli. In addition, in contrast to wild-type mice, sigma(1)R knockout mice did not show increased phosphorylation of ERK in the spinal cord after sciatic nerve injury. Both wind-up and ERK activation have been related to mechanisms of spinal cord sensitization. Our findings identify sigma(1)R as a constituent of the mechanisms modulating activity-induced sensitization in pain pathways and point to sigma(1)R as a new potential target for drugs designed to alleviate neuropathic pain.

  12. Glucose and lipid metabolism in the pancreas of rainbow trout is regulated at the molecular level by nutritional status and carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine; Kaushik, Sadasivam; Seiliez, Iban; Soengas, Jose Luis; Panserat, Stephane

    2012-05-01

    Glucose and lipid metabolism in pancreatic islet organs is poorly characterized. In the present study, using as a model the carnivorous rainbow trout, a glucose-intolerant fish, we assessed mRNA expression levels of several genes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism (including ATP-citrate lyase; carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 isoforms, CPT; the mitochondrial isoform of the phosphoenolpyrutave carboxykinase, mPEPCK and pyruvate kinase, PK) and glucosensing (glucose transporter type 2, Glut2; glucokinase, GK and the potassium channel, K(ATP)) in Brockmann bodies. We evaluated the response of these parameters to changes in feeding status (food deprived vs. fed fish) as well as to changes in the amount of carbohydrate (dextrin) in the diet. A general inhibition of the glycolytic (including the glucosensing marker GK) and β-oxidation pathways was found when comparing fed versus food-deprived fish. When comparing fish feeding on either low- or high-carbohydrate diets, we found that some genes related to lipid metabolism were more controlled by the feeding status than by the carbohydrate content (fatty acid synthase, CPTs). Findings are discussed in the context of pancreatic regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism in fish, and show that while trout pancreatic metabolism can partially adapt to a high-carbohydrate diet, some of the molecular actors studied seem to be poorly regulated (K(ATP)) and may contribute to the glucose intolerance observed in this species when fed high-carbohydrate diets.

  13. Anti-diabetic effects of lemon balm ( Melissa officinalis) essential oil on glucose- and lipid-regulating enzymes in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Cho, Sung-Yun; Bhuiyan, Muhammad Javidul Haque; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2010-07-01

    The antioxidant activity of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) essential oil (LBEO) on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals and its hypoglycaemic effect in db/db mice were investigated. LBEO scavenged 97 % of DPPH radicals at a 270-fold dilution. Mice administered LBEO (0.015 mg/d) for 6 weeks showed significantly reduced blood glucose (65 %; P < 0.05) and TAG concentrations, improved glucose tolerance, as assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, and significantly higher serum insulin levels, compared with the control group. The hypoglycaemic mechanism of LBEO was further explored via gene and protein expression analyses using RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Among all glucose metabolism-related genes studied, hepatic glucokinase and GLUT4, as well as adipocyte GLUT4, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-alpha and SREBP-1c expression, were significantly up-regulated, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression was down-regulated in the livers of the LBEO group. The results further suggest that LBEO administered at low concentrations is an efficient hypoglycaemic agent, probably due to enhanced glucose uptake and metabolism in the liver and adipose tissue and the inhibition of gluconeogenesis in the liver.

  14. Histidine phosphocarrier protein regulates pyruvate kinase A activity in response to glucose in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hey-Min; Park, Young-Ha; Yoon, Chang-Kyu; Seok, Yeong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) consists of two general energy-coupling proteins [enzyme I and histidine phosphocarrier protein (HPr)] and several sugar-specific enzyme IIs. Although, in addition to the phosphorylation-coupled transport of sugars, various regulatory roles of PTS components have been identified in Escherichia coli, much less is known about the PTS in the opportunistic human pathogen Vibrio vulnificus. In this study, we have identified pyruvate kinase A (PykA) as a binding partner of HPr in V. vulnificus. The interaction between HPr and PykA was strictly dependent on the presence of inorganic phosphate, and only dephosphorylated HPr interacted with PykA. Experiments involving domain swapping between the PykAs of V. vulnificus and E. coli revealed the requirement for the C-terminal domain of V. vulnificus PykA for a specific interaction with V. vulnificus HPr. Dephosphorylated HPr decreased the Km of PykA for phosphoenolpyruvate by approximately fourfold without affecting Vmax . Taken together, these findings indicate that the V. vulnificus PTS catalyzing the first step of glycolysis stimulates the final step of glycolysis in the presence of glucose through the direct interaction of dephospho-HPr with the C-terminal domain of PykA.

  15. Methanolic extract of Momordica cymbalaria enhances glucose uptake in L6 myotubes in vitro by up-regulating PPAR-γ and GLUT-4.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puttanarasaiah Mahesh; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Manjunath, Kirangadur; Viswanatha, Gollapalle L; Ashok, Godavarthi

    2014-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of the methanolic fruit extract of Momordica cymbalaria (MFMC) on PPARγ (Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor gamma) and GLUT-4 (Glucose transporter-4) with respect to glucose transport. Various concentrations of MFMC ranging from 62.5 to 500 μg·mL(-1) were evaluated for glucose uptake activity in vitro using L6 myotubes, rosiglitazone was used as a reference standard. The MFMC showed significant and dose-dependent increase in glucose uptake at the tested concentrations, further, the glucose uptake activity of MFMC (500 μg·mL(-1)) was comparable with rosigilitazone. Furthermore, MFMC has shown up-regulation of GLUT-4 and PPARγ gene expressions in L6 myotubes. In addition, the MFMC when incubated along with cycloheximide (CHX), which is a protein synthesis inhibitor, has shown complete blockade of glucose uptake. This indicates that new protein synthesis is required for increased GLUT-4 translocation. In conclusion, these findings suggest that MFMC is enhancing the glucose uptake significantly and dose dependently through the enhanced expression of PPARγ and GLUT-4 in vitro.

  16. Schwann cell phenotype is regulated by axon modality and central-peripheral location, and persists in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brushart, T M; Aspalter, M; Griffin, J W; Redett, R; Hameed, H; Zhou, C; Wright, M; Vyas, A; Höke, A

    2013-09-01

    Myelinating Schwann cells express distinct sensory and motor phenotypes as defined by their differing patterns of growth factor production (Hoke et al., 2006). The heterogeneous growth factor requirements of sensory and motor neurons, however, suggest that Schwann cell phenotype might vary across a broad spectrum. To explore this possibility, we selectively denervated six discrete Schwann cell populations: dorsal root, cutaneous nerve, cutaneous unmyelinated axons, muscle nerve afferents, muscle nerve efferents, and ventral root. Real-time RT-PCR for 11 growth factors was performed on the 6 target Schwann cell populations 5, 15, and 30 days after their denervation, and on normal cutaneous nerve, muscle nerve, ventral root, and dorsal root to establish baseline expression levels. Within the denervated axon populations, IGF-1 and VEGF were expressed most prominently in cutaneous nerve, HGF, NGF, and BDNF in cutaneous nerve and dorsal root, GDNF in dorsal root and ventral root, PTN in the ventral root and muscle nerve efferents, and IGF-2 in both afferents and efferents within muscle nerve; expression of CNTF, FGF-2 and NT-3 was not modality or location specific. ELISA for NGF, BDNF, and GDNF confirmed that gene expression correlated with protein concentration. These findings demonstrate that growth factor expression by denervated Schwann cells is not only subject to further regulation within the previously-defined sensory and motor groups, but also varies along a central-peripheral axis. The traditional view of myelinating Schwann cells as a homogenous population is modified by the realization that complex regulation produces a wide variety of Schwann cell phenotypes. Additionally, we found that Schwann cell phenotype is maintained for 2 weeks in vitro, demonstrating that it may survive several cell divisions without instructive cues from either axons or basal lamina.

  17. The dual functions of Fas ligand in the regulation of peripheral CD8+ and CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ivy; Fink, Pamela J.

    2000-01-01

    Although Fas ligand (FasL) is well characterized for its capacity to deliver a death signal through its receptor Fas, recent work demonstrates that FasL also can receive signals facilitating antigen (Ag)-specific proliferation of CD8+ T cells. The fact that the gld mutation differentially influences the proliferative capacity of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells presented the intriguing possibility that a single molecule may play opposing roles in these two subpopulations. The present study focuses on how these positive and negative regulatory roles are balanced. We show that naive CD4+ T cells are responsive to FasL-mediated costimulation on encounter with Ag when Fas-mediated death is prevented. Thus, the machinery responsible for transducing the FasL positive reverse signal operates in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Instead, differential control of FasL expression distinguishes the role of FasL in these two T cell subpopulations. FasL costimulation occurs immediately on T cell receptor ligation and correlates with the up-regulation of FasL expression on CD8+ and naive CD4+ T cells, both of which are sensitive to the FasL costimulatory signal. Conversely, FasL-initiated death occurs late in an immune response when high levels of FasL expression are maintained on CD4+ T cells that are sensitive to Fas-mediated death, but not on CD8+ T cells that are relatively insensitive to this signal. This careful orchestration of FasL expression during times of susceptibility to costimulation and conversely, to death, endows FasL with the capacity to both positively and negatively regulate the peripheral T cell compartment. PMID:10677522

  18. Glucose and hypothalamic astrocytes: More than a fueling role?

    PubMed

    Leloup, C; Allard, C; Carneiro, L; Fioramonti, X; Collins, S; Pénicaud, L

    2016-05-26

    Brain plays a central role in energy homeostasis continuously integrating numerous peripheral signals such as circulating nutrients, and in particular blood glucose level, a variable that must be highly regulated. Then, the brain orchestrates adaptive responses to modulate food intake and peripheral organs activity in order to achieve the fine tuning of glycemia. More than fifty years ago, the presence of glucose-sensitive neurons was discovered in the hypothalamus, but what makes them specific and identifiable still remains disconnected from their electrophysiological signature. On the other hand, astrocytes represent the major class of macroglial cells and are now recognized to support an increasing number of neuronal functions. One of these functions consists in the regulation of energy homeostasis through neuronal fueling and nutrient sensing. Twenty years ago, we discovered that the glucose transporter GLUT2, the canonical "glucosensor" of the pancreatic beta-cell together with the glucokinase, was also present in astrocytes and participated in hypothalamic glucose sensing. Since then, many studies have identified other actors and emphasized the astroglial participation in this mechanism. Growing evidence suggest that astrocytes form a complex network and have to be considered as spatially coordinated and regulated metabolic units. In this review we aim to provide an updated view of the molecular and respective cellular pathways involved in hypothalamic glucose sensing, and their relevance in physiological and pathological states.

  19. Transcriptional regulator PrqR plays a negative role in glucose metabolism and oxidative stress acclimation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rezaul Islam; Wang, Yushu; Afrin, Shajia; Wang, Bing; Liu, Yumin; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen; He, Lin; Ma, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Plant and cyanobacteria can perceive signals from soluble sugar and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and then coordinate gene expression under stress acclimation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we found that the transcriptional factor PrqR (Slr0895) in Synechocystis can perceive signals from ROS generated after shifting from prolonged darkness with glucose into high-light. The deletion mutant (DprqR) showed increased growth rate and decreased ROS content, whereas the complementary strain (CprqR) restored the growth characteristics, phenotypes and ROS status of WT, thereby establishing PrqR as a negative regulator of ROS.LC/GC-MS-based metabolic profiling also showed active ROS mitigation in DprqR mutant. Further study by qRT-PCR, ChIP-PCR and deletion of both prqR and prqA (DprqR-DprqA mutant) revealed that PrqR exerts this negative regulation of ROS removal by controlling the expression of sodB and prqA (slr0896). Furthermore, PrqR also found to control glucose metabolism by regulating a positive regulator of glucose metabolism, sigE, and its regulons. Results suggest that PrqR was involved in perceiving signals from ROS under physiological condition, as well as in regulating stress removal and glucose metabolism. PMID:27582046

  20. SH2B1 regulation of energy balance, body weight, and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rui, Liangyou

    2014-08-15

    The Src homology 2B (SH2B) family members (SH2B1, SH2B2 and SH2B3) are adaptor signaling proteins containing characteristic SH2 and PH domains. SH2B1 (also called SH2-B and PSM) and SH2B2 (also called APS) are able to form homo- or hetero-dimers via their N-terminal dimerization domains. Their C-terminal SH2 domains bind to tyrosyl phosphorylated proteins, including Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), TrkA, insulin receptors, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1), and IRS2. SH2B1 enhances leptin signaling by both stimulating JAK2 activity and assembling a JAK2/IRS1/2 signaling complex. SH2B1 promotes insulin signaling by both enhancing insulin receptor catalytic activity and protecting against dephosphorylation of IRS proteins. Accordingly, genetic deletion of SH2B1 results in severe leptin resistance, insulin resistance, hyperphagia, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in mice. Neuron-specific overexpression of SH2B1β transgenes protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. SH2B1 in pancreatic β cells promotes β cell expansion and insulin secretion to counteract insulin resistance in obesity. Moreover, numerous SH2B1 mutations are genetically linked to leptin resistance, insulin resistance, obesity, and type 2 diabetes in humans. Unlike SH2B1, SH2B2 and SH2B3 are not required for the maintenance of normal energy and glucose homeostasis. The metabolic function of the SH2B family is conserved from insects to humans.

  1. Down-regulation of PPARα in the spinal cord contributes to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhao, L; Li, D; Fu, Z; Liang, L

    2014-10-10

    Obesity is associated with augmented peripheral inflammation and pain sensitivity in response to inflammatory stimulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Emerging evidence has shown that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the central nervous system controls peripheral inflammation and pain. We hypothesized that obesity might down-regulate PPARα in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HF) for 12weeks developed metabolic disorder and displayed significantly decreased spinal PPARα expression and activity. Interestingly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the PPARα activator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in HF-fed rats for 2weeks normalized spinal PPARα expression and activity without altering metabolic parameters. HF-fed rats were more sensitive to stimulation of the inflamed paw, and exhibited more severe paw edema following carrageenan injection, whereas HF-fed rats receiving ICV PEA had similar pain sensitivity and paw edema to LF-fed rats. No difference in the expression of inflammatory mediators or nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was observed at baseline among groups. Carrageenan induced decreased PPARα expression and activity, increased spinal cord inflammatory mediator expression and NF-κB activity in both LF-and HF-fed rats. However, the increase was more pronounced in HF-fed rats and corrected by PEA. Intrathecal injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PPARα in HF-fed rats completely abolished PEA effects on peripheral pain sensitivity and paw edema. These findings suggest that diet-induced obesity causes down-regulation of spinal PPARα, which facilitates the susceptibility to peripheral inflammatory challenge by increasing inflammatory response in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity.

  2. Identification of glucose-6-phosphate transporter as a key regulator functioning at the autophagy initiation step.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hye-Hyun; Oh, Yumin; Lee, Huikyong; Lee, WonJae; Chang, Jae-Woong; Pyo, Ha-Kyung; Nah, Do hyung; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2015-07-22

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving autophagosome formation via lysosome. However, the initiation step of autophagy is largely unknown. We found an interaction between ULK1 and ATG9 in mammalian cells and utilized the interaction to identify novel regulators of autophagy upstream of ULK1. We established a cell-based screening assay employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. By performing gain-of-function screening, we identified G6PT as an autophagy activator. G6PT enhanced the interaction between N-terminal Venus-tagged ULK1 and C-terminal Venus-tagged ATG9, and increased autophagic flux independent of its transport activity. G6PT negatively regulated mTORC1 activity, demonstrating that G6PT functions upstream of mTORC1 in stimulating autophagy.

  3. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuropathy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also ...

  4. Effect of chronic intracerebroventricular insulin administration in rats on the peripheral glucose metabolism and synaptic plasticity of CA1 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Amer; Ramakers, Geert M J; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2012-01-30

    In this study we examined the effects of sustained intracerebroventricular insulin infusion on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in rats. Insulin was infused intracerebroventricularly in male Wistar rats (n=12) for 3 months using osmotic minipumps. A control group (n=12) received a sham operation. Insulin infusion led to an initial reduction in food intake and body weight gain, but these differences attenuated over 12 weeks. Insulin infusion did not affect fasting or non-fasting blood glucose levels. Field synaptic potentials recording from the hippocampus demonstrated a defect in the expression of long-term potentiation. Sharp electrode current-clamp recording showed that CA1 pyramidal cells fire action potentials in response to prolonged depolarizing current injection and those action potentials showed progressive broadening. The action potential broadening in the insulin-perfused animals were significantly longer than the control. The amplitude of slow after hyperpolarization (sAHP) was measured after manually "clamping" the cells at -65 mV and injecting currents to evoke a train of four APs. The sAHP amplitude was significantly longer than in the control animals. We conclude that local insulin infusion into the brain of rats had significant effects on synaptic plasticity in the absence of marked effects on systemic glucose levels. These results indicate that long-term elevation of insulin levels can have adverse effects directly on the brain.

  5. 2-Deoxy glucose regulate MMP-9 in a SIRT-1 dependent and NFkB independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Edatt, Lincy; Haritha, K; Sruthi, T V; Aswini, P; Sameer Kumar, V B

    2016-12-01

    MMP9 is a member of the family of zinc-containing endopeptidases which degrade various components of the extracellular matrix, thereby regulating matrix remodeling. Since matrix remodeling plays an important role during growth and progression of cancer and considering the fact that, tumor cells switch to aerobic glycolysis as its major energy source, this study was designed to analyze if partial inhibition of glycolysis (the major energy pathway during hypoxia) can be used as a means to control matrix remodeling in terms of MMP9 activity and expression. For this, human epithelial carcinoma cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxy glucose (2DG) at sub-lethal concentrations followed by analysis of the expression and activity of MMP2 and MMP9. The experimental findings demonstrate that exposure of cancer cells to glycolytic inhibitor at concentration that does not induce ER stress, downregulates the activity and expression of MMP9 without affecting the expression levels and activity of MMP2. Further mechanistic analysis revealed that the regulation of MMP9 was mediated in a SIRT-1 dependent mechanism and did not alter the NFkB signaling pathway. The overall results presented here, therefore suggest that the use of glycolytic inhibitor, 2DG at concentration that do not affect cell viability or induce ER stress can be an effective strategy to control matrix remodeling.

  6. FGF19 regulates cell proliferation, glucose and bile acid metabolism via FGFR4-dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ai-Luen; Coulter, Sally; Liddle, Christopher; Wong, Anne; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; French, Dorothy M; Peterson, Andrew S; Sonoda, Junichiro

    2011-03-18

    Fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) is a hormone-like protein that regulates carbohydrate, lipid and bile acid metabolism. At supra-physiological doses, FGF19 also increases hepatocyte proliferation and induces hepatocellular carcinogenesis in mice. Much of FGF19 activity is attributed to the activation of the liver enriched FGF Receptor 4 (FGFR4), although FGF19 can activate other FGFRs in vitro in the presence of the coreceptor βKlotho (KLB). In this report, we investigate the role of FGFR4 in mediating FGF19 activity by using Fgfr4 deficient mice as well as a variant of FGF19 protein (FGF19v) which is specifically impaired in activating FGFR4. Our results demonstrate that FGFR4 activation mediates the induction of hepatocyte proliferation and the suppression of bile acid biosynthesis by FGF19, but is not essential for FGF19 to improve glucose and lipid metabolism in high fat diet fed mice as well as in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Thus, FGF19 acts through multiple receptor pathways to elicit pleiotropic effects in regulating nutrient metabolism and cell proliferation.

  7. Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 by isoflurane preconditioning during tolerance against neuronal injury induced by oxygen glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifang; Zhu, Yesen; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Heping

    2008-09-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to produce bile pigments and carbon monoxide. The HO-1 isozyme is induced by a variety of factors such as heat, heme, ischemia, and hydrogen peroxide. In recent years, mounting findings have suggested that HO-1 has a neuroprotective activity against ischemic injury. The neuroprotective role of isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, has been well documented, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms involved. Recently, isoflurane has been shown to up-regulate HO-1 in the liver. In this study, we show that isoflurane preconditioning promotes the survival of cultured ischemic hippocampal neurons by increasing the number of surviving neurons and their viability. Further study by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis showed that isoflurane preconditioning significantly increases HO-1 expression in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal injury. Furthermore, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin partially abolishes isoflurane preconditioning's protective effect as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release in OGD neurons. These findings indicated that the neuroprotective role of isoflurane preconditioning against OGD-induced injury might be associated with its role in up-regulating HO-1 in ischemic neurons.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid protein and glucose examinations and tuberculosis:
Will laboratory safety regulations force a change of practice?

    PubMed

    Tormey, William P; O'Hagan, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and glucose examinations are usually performed in chemical pathology departments on autoanalysers. Tuberculosis (TB) is a group 3 biological agent under Directive 2000/54/EC of the European Parliament but in the biochemistry laboratory, no extra precautions are taken in its analysis in possible TB cases. The issue of laboratory practice and safety in the biochemical analyses of CSF specimens, when tuberculosis infection is in question is addressed in the context of ambiguity in the implementation of current national and international health and safety regulations. Additional protective measures for laboratory staff during the analysis of CSF TB samples should force a change in current laboratory practice and become a regulatory issue under ISO 15189. Annual Mantoux skin test or an interferon-γ release assay for TB should be mandatory for relevant staff. This manuscript addresses the issue of biochemistry laboratory practice and safety in the biochemical analyses of CSF specimens when tuberculosis infection is in question in the context of the ambiguity of statutory health and safety regulations.

  9. MicroRNA-29 regulates high-glucose-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells through PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Danning; Yun, Lixia; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Xiaohai; Chai, Qinghe; Li, Langen

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia or high-glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a characteristic process in diabetic retinopathy. In our study, we examined whether microRNA-29 (miR-29) may regulate HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Human RPE cell line, ARPE-19 cells, was treated with various high concentration of glucose in vitro. HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and miR-29 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). miR-29 was then downregulated in RPE cells, and its effect on HG-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay and western blot assay on caspase-7 protein. Association of miR-29 on its downstream target, PTEN, in HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was evaluated by dual-luciferase assay and qRT-PCR. PTEN was silenced in RPE cells. The effects of PTEN downregulation on miR-29-mediated HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis were also examined by TUNEL and western blot assays. HG induced significant apoptosis in RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-29 was upregulated by HG in RPE cells. miR-29 downregulation protected HG-induced apoptosis and reduced the production of caspase-7 protein in RPE cells. PTEN was shown to be directly downregulated by HG and then upregulated by miR-29 downregulation in RPE cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated PTEN downregulation reversed the protective effect of miR-29 downregulation on HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-29, through inverse association of PTEN, plays an important role in the process of HG-induced apoptosis in RPE cells.

  10. Emodin improves lipid and glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obese mice through regulating SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinmei; Ding, Lili; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Qiming; Tang, Xiaowen; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-05

    Currently, obesity has become a worldwide epidemic associated with Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and chronic metabolic diseases. Emodin is one of the active anthraquinone derivatives from Rheum palmatum and some other Chinese herbs with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we investigated the anti-obesity effects of emodin in obese mice and explore its potential pharmacological mechanisms. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet for 12 weeks to induce obesity. Then the obese mice were divided into four groups randomly, HFD or emodin (40mg/kg/day and 80mg/kg/day) or lovastatin (30mg/kg/ day) for another 6 weeks. Body weight and food intake were recorded every week. At the end of the treatment, the fasting blood glucose, glucose and insulin tolerance test, serum and hepatic lipid levels were assayed. The gene expressions of liver and adipose tissues were analyzed with a quantitative PCR assay. Here, we found that emodin inhibited sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) transactivity in huh7 cell line. Furthermore, emodin (80mg/kg/day) treatment blocked body weight gain, decreased blood lipids, hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride content, ameliorated insulin sensitivity, and reduced the size of white and brown adipocytes. Consistently, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in the liver and adipose tissue after emodin treatment. These data demonstrated that emodin could improve high-fat diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic disturbances. The underlying mechanism is probably associated with regulating SREBP pathway.

  11. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  12. Novel Genes Critical for Hypoxic Preconditioning in Zebrafish Are Regulators of Insulin and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Manchenkov, Tania; Pasillas, Martina P.; Haddad, Gabriel G.; Imam, Farhad B.

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypoxia is a common cause of major brain, heart, and kidney injury in adults, children, and newborns. However, mild hypoxia can be protective against later, more severe hypoxia exposure via “hypoxic preconditioning,” a phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Accordingly, we have established and optimized an embryonic zebrafish model to study hypoxic preconditioning. Using a functional genomic approach, we used this zebrafish model to identify and validate five novel hypoxia-protective genes, including irs2, crtc3, and camk2g2, which have been previously implicated in metabolic regulation. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms of hypoxic preconditioning and affirm the discovery potential of this novel vertebrate hypoxic stress model. PMID:25840431

  13. Influence of pH Regulation Mode in Glucose Fermentation on Product Selection and Process Stability

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Zaki, Zuhaida; Bastidas-Oyanedel, Juan R.; Lu, Yang; Hoelzle, Robert; Pratt, Steven; Slater, Fran R.; Batstone, Damien J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed culture anaerobic fermentation generates a wide range of products from simple sugars, and is potentially an effective process for producing renewable commodity chemicals. However it is difficult to predict product spectrum, and to control the process. One of the key control handles is pH, but the response is commonly dependent on culture history. In this work, we assess the impact of pH regulation mode on the product spectrum. Two regulation modes were applied: in the first, pH was adjusted from 4.5 to 8.5 in progressive steps of 0.5 and in the second, covered the same pH range, but the pH was reset to 5.5 before each change. Acetate, butyrate, and ethanol were produced throughout all pH ranges, but there was a shift from butyrate at pH < 6.5 to ethanol at pH > 6.5, as well as a strong and consistent shift from hydrogen to formate as pH increased. Microbial analysis indicated that progressive pH resulted in dominance by Klebsiella, while reset pH resulted in a bias towards Clostridium spp., particularly at low pH, with higher variance in community between different pH levels. Reset pH was more responsive to changes in pH, and analysis of Gibbs free energy indicated that the reset pH experiments operated closer to thermodynamic equilibrium, particularly with respect to the formate/hydrogen balance. This may indicate that periodically resetting pH conforms better to thermodynamic expectations. PMID:27681895

  14. High glucose stimulates adipogenic and inhibits osteogenic differentiation in MG-63 cells through cAMP/protein kinase A/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zheng, Jiaqiang; Yang, Jianhong

    2010-05-01

    Patients with diabetes tend to have an increased incidence of osteoporosis that may be related to hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of high glucose on differentiation of human osteoblastic MG-63 cells and involved intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we showed that high glucose suppressed the cell growth, mineralization, and expression of osteogenic markers including Runx2, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteonectin, but inversely promoted expression of adipogenic markers including PPARgamma, aP2, resistin, and adipsin. Moreover, high glucose significantly increased the intracellular cAMP level in a time-dependent manner and induced ERK1/2 activation. Meanwhile, supplementation of H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA, and PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAPK/ERK kinase, reversed the cell growth inhibition, the down-regulation of osteogenic markers and the up-regulation of adipogenic markers as well as the activation of ERK under high glucose. These results indicate that high glucose can increase adipogenic and inhibit osteogenic differentiation by activating cAMP/PKA/ERK pathway in MG-63 cells, thereby providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of diabetic osteoporosis.

  15. Regulation of Blood Glucose Concentration in Type 1 Diabetics Using Single Order Sliding Mode Control Combined with Fuzzy On-line Tunable Gain, a Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Dinani, Soudabeh Taghian; Zekri, Maryam; Kamali, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered as a global affecting disease with an increasing contribution to both mortality rate and cost damage in the society. Therefore, tight control of blood glucose levels has gained significant attention over the decades. This paper proposes a method for blood glucose level regulation in type 1 diabetics. The control strategy is based on combining the fuzzy logic theory and single order sliding mode control (SOSMC) to improve the properties of sliding mode control method and to alleviate its drawbacks. The aim of the proposed controller that is called SOSMC combined with fuzzy on-line tunable gain is to tune the gain of the controller adaptively. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. As a result, this method can decline the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating blood glucose level in diabetics caused by a low blood glucose level. Moreover, it attenuates the chattering observed in SOSMC significantly. It is worth noting that in this approach, a mathematical model called minimal model is applied instead of the intravenously infused insulin–blood glucose dynamics. The simulation results demonstrate a good performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. In addition, this method is compared to fuzzy high-order sliding mode control (FHOSMC) and the superiority of the new method compared to FHOSMC is shown in the results. PMID:26284169

  16. Regulation of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase expression by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in adipocytes: functional consequences on glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Nathalie; Moldes, Marthe; El Hadri, Khadija; Fève, Bruno

    2003-03-01

    Membrane-associated semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) is mainly present in the media of aorta and in adipose tissue. Recent works have reported that SSAO activation can stimulate glucose transport of fat cells and promote adipose conversion. In this study, the murine 3T3-L1 preadipose cell line was used to investigate SSAO regulation by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine that is synthesized in fat cells and known to be involved in obesity-linked insulin resistance. SSAO mRNA and protein levels, and enzyme activity were decreased by TNF-alpha in a dose- and time-dependent manner, without any change of SSAO affinity for substrates or inhibitors. SSAO inhibition caused by TNF-alpha was spontaneously reversed along the time after TNF-alpha removal. The decrease in SSAO expression also occurred in white adipose tissue of C57BL/6 mice treated with mTNF-alpha. Overall, we demonstrated that reduction in SSAO expression induced by the cytokine had marked repercussions on amine-stimulated glucose transport, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This effect was more pronounced than the inhibiting effect of TNF-alpha on insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Moreover, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists thiazolidinediones did not reverse either TNF-alpha effect on amine-sensitive glucose transport or the inhibition of SSAO activity, whereas they antagonized TNF-alpha effects on insulin-sensitive glucose transport. These results demonstrate that TNF-alpha can strongly down-regulate SSAO expression and activity, and through this mechanism can dramatically reduce amine-stimulated glucose transport. This suggests a potential role of this regulatory process in the pathogenesis of glucose homeostasis dysregulations observed during diseases accompanied by TNF-alpha overproduction, such as cachexia or obesity.

  17. N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 expression is associated with glucose transport and correlated with prognosis in breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a novel tumour suppressor and cell stress-related gene, is involved in many cell metabolic processes, such as hormone, ion and fluid metabolism. We investigated whether NDRG2 is involved in any glucose-dependent energy metabolism, as well as the nature of its correlation with breast carcinoma. Methods The correlations between NDRG2 expression and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) expression in clinical breast carcinoma tissues were analysed. The effects of NDRG2 on glucose uptake were assessed in breast cancer cells and xenograft tumours. The consequences of NDRG2-induced regulation of GLUT1 at the transcription and translation levels and the interaction between NDRG2 and GLUT1 were examined. Results Data derived from clinical breast carcinoma specimens revealed that (1) patients with high NDRG2 expression had better disease-free survival and overall survival than those with low NDRG2 expression and (2) NDRG2 expression was negatively correlated with GLUT1 expression in these breast carcinoma tissues. NDRG2 inhibited glucose uptake by promoting GLUT1 protein degradation without affecting GLUT1 transcription in both breast cancer cells and xenograft tumours. In addition, NDRG2 protein interacted and partly colocalised with GLUT1 protein in cell cytoplasm areas. Conclusions The results of our study support the notion that NDRG2 plays an important role in tumour glucose metabolism, in which GLUT1 is a likely candidate contributor to glucose uptake suppression and tumour growth. Targeting the actions of NDRG2 in cell glucose-dependent energy delivery may provide an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in human breast carcinoma. PMID:24636131

  18. Hypothalamic glucose-sensing: role of Glia-to-neuron signaling.

    PubMed

    Tonon, M C; Lanfray, D; Castel, H; Vaudry, H; Morin, F

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus senses hormones and nutrients in order to regulate energy balance. In particular, detection of hypothalamic glucose levels has been shown to regulate both feeding behavior and peripheral glucose homeostasis, and impairment of this regulatory system is believed to be involved in the development of obesity and diabetes. Several data clearly demonstrate that glial cells are key elements in the perception of glucose, constituting with neurons a "glucose-sensing unit". Characterization of this interplay between glia and neurons represents an exciting challenge, and will undoubtedly contribute to identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current data that stress the importance of glia in central glucose-sensing. The nature of the glia-to-neuron signaling is discussed, with a special focus on the endozepine ODN, a potent anorexigenic peptide that is highly expressed in hypothalamic glia.

  19. CNS Control of Glucose Metabolism: Response to Environmental Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Sandoval, Darleen A.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases. PMID:23550218

  20. CNS control of glucose metabolism: response to environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna M; Sandoval, Darleen A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, considerable work has accumulated to support the role of the CNS in regulating postprandial glucose levels. As discussed in the first section of this review, the CNS receives and integrates information from afferent neurons, circulating hormones, and postprandially generated nutrients to subsequently direct changes in glucose output by the liver and glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The second major component of this review focuses on the effects of external pressures, including high fat diet and changes to the light:dark cycle on CNS-regulating glucose homeostasis. We also discuss the interaction between these different pressures and how they contribute to the multifaceted mechanisms that we hypothesize contribute to the dysregulation of glucose in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We argue that while current peripheral therapies serve to delay the progression of T2DM, generating combined obesity and T2DM therapies targeted at the CNS, the primary site of dysfunction for both diseases, would lead to a more profound impact on the progression of both diseases.

  1. Molecular cloning of the yeast mitochondrial aconitase gene (ACO1) and evidence of a synergistic regulation of expression by glucose plus glutamate.

    PubMed Central

    Gangloff, S P; Marguet, D; Lauquin, G J

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated genomic clones complementing the aconitase-deficient strain (glu1-1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Identification of the aconitase gene was established by enzymatic assays and molecular analyses. The corresponding mRNA has been characterized, and its direction of transcription has been determined. The complete nucleotide sequence revealed strong amino acid homologies with the sequences of some peptides isolated from the mammalian protein. Disruption of the gene by deletion-insertion led to glutamate auxotrophy. Expression of the aconitase gene was sensitive to glucose repression and was synergistically down regulated by glucose and glutamate. Images PMID:1972545

  2. Effects of the Non-Nutritive Sweeteners on Glucose Metabolism and Appetite Regulating Hormones: Systematic Review of Observational Prospective Studies and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Romo-Romo, Alonso; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Brito-Córdova, Griselda X.; Gómez Díaz, Rita A.; Vilchis Valentín, David

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) on glucose metabolism and appetite regulating hormones are not clear. There is an ongoing debate concerning NNS use and deleterious changes in metabolism. Objectives The aim of this review is to analyze the scientific available evidence regarding the effects of NNS on glucose metabolism and appetite regulating hormones. Data Sources and Study Eligibility Criteria We identified human observational studies evaluating the relation between NNS consumption and obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, in addition to clinical trials evaluating the effects of NNS in glucose metabolism and appetite regulating hormones. Results Fourteen observational studies evaluating the association between NNS consumption and the development of metabolic diseases and twenty-eight clinical trials studying the effects of NNS on metabolism were included. Finally, two meta-analyses evaluating the association between the consumption of NNS-containing beverages and the development of type 2 diabetes were identified. Conclusions Some observational studies suggest an association between NNS consumption and development of metabolic diseases; however, adiposity is a confounder frequently found in observational studies. The effects of the NNS on glucose metabolism are not clear. The results of the identified clinical trials are contradictory and are not comparable because of the major existing differences between them. Studies evaluating specific NNS, with an adequate sample size, including a homogeneous study group, identifying significant comorbidities, with an appropriate control group, with an appropriate exposure time, and considering adjustment for confounder variables such as adiposity are needed. PMID:27537496

  3. Pyruvate kinase isoenzyme M2 is a glycolytic sensor differentially regulating cell proliferation, cell size and apoptotic cell death dependent on glucose supply

    SciTech Connect

    Spoden, Gilles A.; Rostek, Ursula; Lechner, Stefan; Mitterberger, Maria; Mazurek, Sybille; Zwerschke, Werner

    2009-10-01

    The glycolytic key regulator pyruvate kinase M2 (M2-PK or PKM2) can switch between a highly active tetrameric and an inactive dimeric form. The transition between the two conformations regulates the glycolytic flux in tumor cells. We developed specific M2-PK-binding peptide aptamers which inhibit M2-PK, but not the 96% homologous M1-PK isoenzyme. In this study we demonstrate that, at normal blood glucose concentrations, peptide aptamer-mediated inhibition of M2-PK induces a significant decrease of the population doubling (PDL rate) and cell proliferation rate as well as an increase in cell size, whereas under glucose restriction an increase in PDL and cell proliferation rates but a decrease in cell size was observed. Moreover, M2-PK inhibition rescues cells from glucose starvation-induced apoptotic cell death by increasing the metabolic activity. These findings suggest that M2-PK is a metabolic sensor which regulates cell proliferation, cell growth and apoptotic cell death in a glucose supply-dependent manner.

  4. Springing into Action: Reg2 Negatively Regulates Snf1 Protein Kinase and Facilitates Recovery from Prolonged Glucose Starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, Marcin; Shevade, Aishwarya; Barrett, LaKisha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glucose is the preferred carbon source for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose limitation activates Snf1 protein kinase, a key regulator of energy homeostasis that promotes utilization of alternative carbon sources and enforces energy conservation. Snf1 activation requires phosphorylation of its T-loop threonine (Thr210) by upstream kinases. When glucose is abundant, Snf1 is inhibited by Thr210 dephosphorylation. This involves the function of the type 1 protein phosphatase Glc7, which is targeted to Snf1 by a regulatory subunit, Reg1. The reg1 mutation causes increased Snf1 activity and mimics various aspects of glucose limitation, including slower growth. Reg2 is another Glc7 regulatory subunit encoded by a paralogous gene, REG2. Previous evidence indicated that the reg2 mutation exacerbates the Snf1-dependent slow-growth phenotype caused by reg1, suggesting a link between Reg2 and Snf1. Here, we explore this link in more detail and present evidence that Reg2 contributes to Snf1 Thr210 dephosphorylation. Consistent with this role, Reg2 interacts with wild-type Snf1 but not with nonphosphorylatable Snf1-T210A. Reg2 accumulation increases in a Snf1-dependent manner during prolonged glucose deprivation, and glucose-starved cells lacking Reg2 exhibit delayed Snf1 Thr210 dephosphorylation and slower growth recovery upon glucose replenishment. Accordingly, cells lacking Reg2 are outcompeted by wild-type cells in the course of several glucose starvation/replenishment cycles. Collectively, our results support a model in which Reg2-Glc7 contributes to the negative control of Snf1 in response to glucose refeeding after prolonged starvation. The competitive growth advantage provided by Reg2 underscores the evolutionary significance of this paralog for S. cerevisiae. IMPORTANCE The ability of microorganisms to respond to stress is essential for their survival. However, rapid recovery from stress could be equally crucial in competitive environments. Therefore

  5. SH2B1 in β-cells regulates glucose metabolism by promoting β-cell survival and islet expansion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Morris, David L; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Yong; Rui, Liangyou

    2014-02-01

    IGF-1 and insulin promote β-cell expansion by inhibiting β-cell death and stimulating β-cell proliferation, and the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase/Akt pathway mediates insulin and IGF-1 action. Impaired β-cell expansion is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Here, we identified SH2B1, which is highly expressed in β-cells, as a novel regulator of β-cell expansion. Silencing of SH2B1 in INS-1 832/13 β-cells attenuated insulin- and IGF-1-stimulated activation of the PI 3-kinase/Akt pathway and increased streptozotocin (STZ)-induced apoptosis; conversely, overexpression of SH2B1 had the opposite effects. Activation of the PI 3-kinase/Akt pathway in β-cells was impaired in pancreas-specific SH2B1 knockout (PKO) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). HFD-fed PKO mice also had increased β-cell apoptosis, decreased β-cell proliferation, decreased β-cell mass, decreased pancreatic insulin content, impaired insulin secretion, and exacerbated glucose intolerance. Furthermore, PKO mice were more susceptible to STZ-induced β-cell destruction, insulin deficiency, and hyperglycemia. These data indicate that SH2B1 in β-cells is an important prosurvival and proproliferative protein and promotes compensatory β-cell expansion in the insulin-resistant state and in response to β-cell stress.

  6. Investment choice and perceived mating intentions regulated by external resource cues and internal fluctuation in blood glucose levels

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Li-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Shu

    2015-01-01

    We examined resource allocation priorities in the framework of an updated Maslow hierarchy of fundamental human needs. In Experiment 1, the participants in the food abundance priming condition viewing photos of high-calorie food allocated more money to savings than to spending. However, the participants preferred spending to savings under the condition of mating availability priming with romantic photographs. In Experiment 2, before and after drinking either water or a sugary beverage, fasting participants rated photos of a conversation between a man and a woman. Water drinking lowered the rating scores of mating intentions as well as blood glucose (BG) levels. The sugary drink buffered this decline in sexual perceptivity. Overall, the change in BG levels was positively associated with changes in the ratings of mating intentions but was not associated with other likelihood ratings. These results suggest that both external cues of food and mating resources and internal BG fluctuation regulate the cognitive priority of physiological needs vs. mate acquisition and retention. PMID:25610412

  7. Enhanced expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 correlates with malondialdehyde levels during the formation of liver cirrhosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUN; ZHANG, HUIYING; ZHAO, ZHONGFU; LV, MINLI; JIA, JIANTAO; ZHANG, LILI; TIAN, XIAOXIA; CHEN, YUNXIA; LI, BAOHONG; LIU, MINGSHE; HAN, DEWU; JI, CHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) in the development of liver cirrhosis promoted by intestinal endotoxemia in rats. Fifty-one male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the liver cirrhosis 4-week, 6-week and 8-week groups and the normal control group at each time point. Liver cirrhosis was induced by employing multiple pathogenic factors in the rats. Blood and liver tissues were collected. The levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), homocysteine, endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the plasma, and TNF-α, malondialdehyde (MDA) and procollagen type III peptide (PIIIP) in the liver tissues were determined. The mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 in the liver were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Morphological changes were observed through hematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson staining of the liver. Liver cirrhosis caused marked histopathological changes to the livers of the rats. Following significant increases in the levels of ALT, homocysteine, endotoxin and TNF-α in the plasma, and TNF-α, MDA and PIIIP in the liver tissues of all experimental groups with the progression of liver cirrhosis, the mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 also gradually increased. In addition, correlation analysis indicated that the enhanced expression of GRP78 correlated with the MDA levels of the rats during the formation of liver cirrhosis. PMID:26668603

  8. Regulation of Enzyme Activities in Drosophila: Genetic Variation Affecting Induction of Glucose 6-Phosphate and 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenases in Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Bruce J.; Lucchesi, John C.; Laurie-Ahlberg, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The genetic basis of modulation by dietary sucrose of the enzyme activities glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) activities in third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated, using isogenic lines derived from wild populations. Considerable genetically determined variation in response was detected among lines that differed only in their third chromosome constitution. Comparison of crossreacting material between a responding and a nonresponding line showed that the G6PD activity variation is due to changes in G6PD protein level. These differences in responses are localized in the fat body, with 300 m m sucrose in the diet resulting in a sixfold stimulation of G6PD activity and a fourfold one of 6PGD in the line showing the strongest response. In this tissue, the responses of the two enzymes are closely correlated with one another. Using recombinant lines, we obtained data that suggested the existence of more than one gene on chromosome III involved in the regulation of G6PD in the fat body, and at least one of these genes affects the level of 6PGD as well. PMID:6416921

  9. Glucose-Regulated Protein 78-Induced Myeloid Antigen-Presenting Cells Maintained Tolerogenic Signature upon LPS Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Muyang; Zhang, Fan; Qin, Kai; Wu, Min; Li, Heli; Zhu, Huifen; Ning, Qin; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    The 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (Grp78) is stress-inducible chaperone that mostly reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Grp78 has been described to be released at times of cellular stress and as having extracellular properties that are anti-inflammatory or favor the resolution of inflammation. As antigen-presenting cells (APCs) play a critical role in both the priming of adaptive immune responses and the induction of self-tolerance, herein, we investigated the effect of Grp78 on the maturation of murine myeloid APCs (CD11c+ cells). Results showed that CD11c+ cells could be bound by AF488-labeled Grp78 and that Grp78 treatment induced a tolerogenic phenotype comparable to immature cells. Furthermore, when exposed to lipopolysaccharide, Grp78-treated CD11c+ cells (DCGrp78) did not adopt a mature dendritic cell phenotype. DCGrp78-primed T cells exhibited reduced proliferation along with a concomitant expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells in pancreaticoduodenal lymph nodes and induction of T cell apoptosis in vitro and ex vivo. The above work suggests that Grp78 is an immunomodulatory molecule that could aid resolution of inflammation. It may thus contribute to induce durable tolerance to be of potential therapeutic benefit in transplanted allogeneic grafts and autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes. PMID:27990144

  10. Development of a lifestyle intervention using the MRC framework for diabetes prevention in people with impaired glucose regulation

    PubMed Central

    Troughton, Jacqui; Chatterjee, Sudesna; Hill, Siân E.; Daly, Heather; Martin Stacey, Lorraine; Stone, Margaret A.; Patel, Naina; Khunti, Kamlesh; Yates, Thomas; Gray, Laura J.; Davies, Melanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background We report development of a group-based lifestyle intervention, Let's Prevent, using the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) framework, and delivered by structured education to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR) in a UK multi-ethnic population. Methods Diabetes Education and Self-Management for Ongoing and Newly Diagnosed (DESMOND) is the first national T2DM programme that meets National Institute for Health and Care Excellence criteria and formed the basis for Let's Prevent. An iterative cycle of initial development, piloting, collecting and collating qualitative and quantitative data, and reflection and modification, was used to inform and refine lifestyle intervention until it was fit for evaluation in a definitive randomized controlled trial (RCT). The programme encouraged IGR self-management using simple, non-technical language and visual aids. Results Qualitative and quantitative data suggested that intervention resulted in beneficial short-term behaviour change such as healthier eating patterns, improved health beliefs and greater participant motivation and empowerment. We also demonstrated that recruitment strategy and data collection methods were feasible for RCT implementation. Conclusions Let's Prevent was developed following successful application of MRC framework criteria and the subsequent RCT will determine whether it is feasible, reliable and transferable from research into a real-world NHS primary healthcare setting. Trial Registration ISRCTN80605705. PMID:26311822

  11. Identification and functional characterization of a glucose regulated protein 94 gene in Litopenaeus vannamei and its responsiveness in WSSV infection.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Yuan, Kai; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In the current study, a cDNA of glucose regulated protein 94 (LvGRP94) was cloned from Litopenaeus vannamei. Subcellular localization assay revealed that LvGRP94 expressed in endoplasmic reticulum (ER). And results of reported gene assays demonstrated that the promoter of LvGRP94 was activated by L. vannamei leucine zipper domain transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (LvXBP1) or heat shock treatment. Furthermore, LvGRP94 was found to highly express in hemocytes as well as in epidermis by real-time RT-PCR. In addition, it was shown that LvGRP94 inhibited by LvXBP1 knocked-down in the hemocytes, was induced by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, or unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway activation. Importantly, decreasing LvGRP94 reduced the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected shrimps and WSSV copies in shrimp muscle. These results suggested that LvGRP94 might involve in shrimp UPR pathway as well as WSSV infection.

  12. The role of the pancreatic endocannabinoid system in glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco J; Suárez Pérez, Juan; Nadal, Angel; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis, and this fact led to the identification of a new group of therapeutic agents for complicated obesity and diabetes. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists are now realities in clinical practice. The use of such antagonists for reducing body weight gain, lowering cholesterol and improving glucose homeostasis is based on the ability of the endocannabinoids to coordinately regulate energy homeostasis by interacting with central and peripheral targets, including adipose tissue, muscle, liver and endocrine pancreas. In this review we will analyse the presence of this system in the main cell types of the islets of Langerhans, as well as the physiological relevance of the endocannabinoids and parent acylethanolamides in hormone secretion and glucose homeostasis. We will also analyse the impact that these findings may have in clinical practice and the potential outcome of new therapeutic strategies for modulating glucose homeostasis and insulin/glucagon secretion.

  13. Regulation of glucose metabolism via hepatic forkhead transcription factor 1 (FoxO1) by Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Pratibha V; Nishioka, Adrienne; Eck, Philip O; Johns, Lisa M; Volper, Esther; Nerurkar, Vivek R

    2012-07-01

    Renewed interest in alternative medicine among diabetic individuals prompted us to investigate anti-diabetic effects of Morinda citrifolia (noni) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Type 2 diabetes is associated with increased glucose production due to the inability of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and promote glycolysis. Insulin inhibits gluconeogenesis by modulating transcription factors such as forkhead box O (FoxO1). Based on microarray analysis data, we tested the hypothesis that fermented noni fruit juice (fNJ) improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 phosphorylation. C57BL/6 male mice were fed a HFD and fNJ for 12 weeks. Body weights and food intake were monitored daily. FoxO1 expression was analysed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Specificity of fNJ-associated FoxO1 regulation of gluconeogenesis was confirmed by small interfering RNA (siRNA) studies using human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Supplementation with fNJ inhibited weight gain and improved glucose and insulin tolerance and fasting glucose in HFD-fed mice. Hypoglycaemic properties of fNJ were associated with the inhibition of hepatic FoxO1 mRNA expression, with a concomitant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation and nuclear expulsion of the proteins. Gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate C kinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), were significantly inhibited in mice fed a HFD+fNJ. HepG2 cells demonstrated more than 80 % inhibition of PEPCK and G6P mRNA expression in cells treated with FoxO1 siRNA and fNJ. These data suggest that fNJ improves glucose metabolism via FoxO1 regulation in HFD-fed mice.

  14. Influence of diabetes surgery on a gut-brain-liver axis regulating food intake and internal glucose production.

    PubMed

    Mithieux, G

    2013-03-01

    It has long been known that the brain, especially the hypothalamus, can modulate both insulin secretion and hepatic glucose fluxes, via the modulation of the sympathetic system (promoting glycogen breakdown) and the parasympathetic system (stimulating glycogen deposition). Central insulin signalling or hypothalamic long-chain fatty acid oxidation can also control insulin's suppression of endogenous glucose production. Interestingly, intestinal gluconeogenesis can initiate a portal glucose signal, transmitted to the hypothalamus via the gastrointestinal nervous system. This signal may modulate the sensation of hunger and satiety and insulin sensitivity of hepatic glucose fluxes as well. The rapid improvements of glucose control taking place after gastric bypass surgery in obese diabetics has long been mysterious. Actually, the specificity of gastric bypass in obese diabetic mice relates to major changes in the sensations of hunger and to rapid improvement in insulin sensitivity of endogenous glucose production. We have shown that an induction of intestinal gluconeogenesis plays a major role in these phenomena. In addition, the restoration of the secretion of glucagon like peptide 1 and consequently of insulin plays a key additional role to improve postprandial glucose tolerance. Therefore, a synergy between incretin effects and intestinal gluconeogenesis might be a key feature explaining the rapid improvement of glucose control in obese diabetics after bypass surgery.

  15. Pheromone responsiveness is regulated by components of the Gpr1p-mediated glucose sensing pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Willhite, D Grant; Brigati, Jennifer R; Selcer, Katie E; Denny, Joshua E; Duck, Zachary A; Wright, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Many fungi have evolved mechanisms to assess environmental nutrient availability prior to the energy-intensive process of mating. In this study, we examined one such system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, involving a glucose-sensing pathway mediated by Gpr1p and the pheromone-induced mating pathway. Initially we observed that the mating pathway in MATa cells is sensitive to environmental glucose depletion. This phenomenon can be partially reversed with a high glucose spike, but not with the addition of low levels of glucose. Deletion of the low-affinity glucose receptor, Gpr1p, eliminated this glucose-induced recovery of pheromone responsiveness. We then determined the impact of GPR1 deletion on the mating pathway and observed that, in all end points studied, the mating pathway response to pheromone is reduced in the absence of Gpr1p. Similarly, elimination of the Gα for Gpr1p, Gpa2p, resulted in reduction in pheromone sensitivity in all assays studied. The negative effect of removing Gpr1p on mating pathway activation could be recovered by overexpressing the mating receptor, Ste2p. Furthermore, Ste2p levels are reduced in the absence of glucose and GPR1. These data suggest that activity of the GPCR-mediated mating pathway in S. cerevisiae is modulated by extracellular glucose concentrations through the only other GPCR in MATa cells, Gpr1p.

  16. A distal Schwann cell-specific enhancer mediates axonal regulation of the Oct-6 transcription factor during peripheral nerve development and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mandemakers, Wim; Zwart, Ronald; Jaegle, Martine; Walbeehm, Erik; Visser, Pim; Grosveld, Frank; Meijer, Dies

    2000-01-01

    The POU domain transcription factor Oct-6 is a major regulator of Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. During nerve development and regeneration, expression of Oct-6 is under the control of axonal signals. Identification of the cis-acting elements necessary for Oct-6 gene regulation is an important step in deciphering the complex signalling between Schwann cells and axons governing myelination. Here we show that a fragment distal to the Oct-6 gene, containing two DNase I-hypersensitive sites, acts as the Oct-6 Schwann cell-specific enhancer (SCE). The SCE is sufficient to drive spatially and temporally correct expression, during both normal peripheral nerve development and regeneration. We further demonstrate that a tagged version of Oct-6, driven by the SCE, rescues the peripheral nerve phenotype of Oct-6-deficient mice. Thus, our isolation and characterization of the Oct-6 SCE provides the first description of a cis-acting genetic element that responds to converging signalling pathways to drive myelination in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:10856243

  17. The expression of insulin and insulin receptor mRNAs is regulated by nutritional state and glucose in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Caruso, Michael A; Sheridan, Mark A

    2012-01-15

    Many species of fish, including rainbow trout, possess multiple INS- and IR-encoding mRNAs. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used as a model to study the regulation of INS (INS1, INS2) and IR (IR1, IR2, IR3, and IR4) mRNA expression by nutritional state and glucose. In the nutritional state study, fish were either fed continuously, fasted (4 or 6 weeks), or fasted 4 weeks, then refed for 2 weeks. Nutritional state regulated INS and IR mRNA expression in a subtype- and tissue-specific manner. A 4-week fast reduced INS1 expression in endocrine pancreas (Brockmann body) and of INS1 and INS2 in brain, whereas a 6-week fast reduced the expression of both INS1 and INS2 in pancreas but only of INS1 in brain. Refeeding only restored INS2 levels in pancreas. In adipose tissue, by contrast, a 4-week fast increased INS1 expression, and a 6-week fast increased the expression of both INS1 and INS2. Nutritional state also modulated the pattern of IR mRNA expression. Fasting for 4 weeks resulted in no significant change in IR expression. Prolonged fasting (6 weeks) increased the expression of IR4 mRNA in the pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill; however, fasting decreased expression of IR3 mRNA in liver. Refeeding restored fasting-associated increases in IR4 expression in pancreas, adipose tissue, cardiac muscle, and gill, but had no effect on the fasting-associated de