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Sample records for regulates phototropic signal

  1. Phototropism: at the crossroads of light-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anupama; Szarzynska, Bogna; Fankhauser, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Phototropism enables plants to orient growth towards the direction of light and thereby maximizes photosynthesis in low-light environments. In angiosperms, blue-light photoreceptors called phototropins are primarily involved in sensing the direction of light. Phytochromes and cryptochromes (sensing red/far-red and blue light, respectively) also modulate asymmetric hypocotyl growth, leading to phototropism. Interactions between different light-signaling pathways regulating phototropism occur in cryptogams and angiosperms. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the co-action between photosensory systems in the regulation of hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Recent studies have shown that phytochromes and cryptochromes enhance phototropism by controlling the expression of important regulators of phototropin signaling. In addition, phytochromes may also regulate growth towards light via direct interaction with the phototropins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear phytochrome A signaling promotes phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kami, Chitose; Hersch, Micha; Trevisan, Martine; Genoud, Thierry; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Phototropin photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) enable responses to directional light cues (e.g., positive phototropism in the hypocotyl). In Arabidopsis, phot1 is essential for phototropism in response to low light, a response that is also modulated by phytochrome A (phyA), representing a classical example of photoreceptor coaction. The molecular mechanisms underlying promotion of phototropism by phyA remain unclear. Most phyA responses require nuclear accumulation of the photoreceptor, but interestingly, it has been proposed that cytosolic phyA promotes phototropism. By comparing the kinetics of phototropism in seedlings with different subcellular localizations of phyA, we show that nuclear phyA accelerates the phototropic response, whereas in the fhy1 fhl mutant, in which phyA remains in the cytosol, phototropic bending is slower than in the wild type. Consistent with this data, we find that transcription factors needed for full phyA responses are needed for normal phototropism. Moreover, we show that phyA is the primary photoreceptor promoting the expression of phototropism regulators in low light (e.g., PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 [PKS1] and ROOT PHOTO TROPISM2 [RPT2]). Although phyA remains cytosolic in fhy1 fhl, induction of PKS1 and RPT2 expression still occurs in fhy1 fhl, indicating that a low level of nuclear phyA signaling is still present in fhy1 fhl.

  3. PINOID functions in root phototropism as a negative regulator.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The PINOID (PID) family, which belongs to AGCVIII kinases, is known to be involved in the regulation of auxin efflux transporter PIN-formed (PIN) proteins through changes in the phosphorylation status. Recently, we demonstrated that the PID family is necessary for phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and that the downregulation of PID expression by red-light pretreatment results in the promotion of the PIN-mediated auxin gradient during phototropic responses. However, whether PID participates in root phototropism in Arabidopsis seedlings has not been well studied. Here, we demonstrated that negative root phototropic responses are enhanced in the pid quadruple mutant and are severely impaired in transgenic plants expressing PID constitutively. The results indicate that the PID family functions in a negative root phototropism as a negative regulator. On the other hand, analysis with PID fused to a yellow fluorescent protein, VENUS, showed that unilateral blue-light irradiation causes a lower accumulation of PID proteins on the shaded side than on the irradiated side. This result suggests that the blue-light-mediated asymmetrical distribution of PID proteins may be one of the critical responses in phototropin-mediated signals during a negative root phototropism. Alternatively, such a transverse gradient of PID proteins may result from gravitropic stimulation produced by phototropic bending.

  4. PINOID functions in root phototropism as a negative regulator

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    The PINOID (PID) family, which belongs to AGCVIII kinases, is known to be involved in the regulation of auxin efflux transporter PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins through changes in the phosphorylation status. Recently, we demonstrated that the PID family is necessary for phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement in Arabidopsis hypocotyls and that the downregulation of PID expression by red-light pretreatment results in the promotion of the PIN-mediated auxin gradient during phototropic responses. However, whether PID participates in root phototropism in Arabidopsis seedlings has not been well studied. Here, we demonstrated that negative root phototropic responses are enhanced in the pid quadruple mutant and are severely impaired in transgenic plants expressing PID constitutively. The results indicate that the PID family functions in a negative root phototropism as a negative regulator. On the other hand, analysis with PID fused to a yellow fluorescent protein, VENUS, showed that unilateral blue-light irradiation causes a lower accumulation of PID proteins on the shaded side than on the irradiated side. This result suggests that the blue-light-mediated asymmetrical distribution of PID proteins may be one of the critical responses in phototropin-mediated signals during a negative root phototropism. Alternatively, such a transverse gradient of PID proteins may result from gravitropic stimulation produced by phototropic bending. PMID:26039488

  5. Role of the phytochrome and cryptochrome signaling pathways in hypocotyl phototropism.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida-Mayama, Tomoko; Sakai, Tatsuya; Hanada, Atsushi; Uehara, Yukiko; Asami, Tadao; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2010-05-01

    Unilateral blue-light irradiation activates phototropin (phot) photoreceptors, resulting in asymmetric distribution of the phytohormone auxin and induction of a phototropic response in higher plants. Other photoreceptors, including phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry), have been proposed as modulators of phototropic responses. We show here that either phy or cry is required for hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana under high fluence rates of blue light, and that constitutive expression of ROOT PHOTOTROPISM 2 (RPT2) and treatment with the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol partially and independently complement the non-phototropic hypocotyl phenotype of the phyA cry1 cry2 mutant under high fluence rates of blue light. Our results indicate that induction of RPT2 and reduction in the GA are crucial for hypocotyl phototropic regulation by phy and cry. We also show that GA suppresses hypocotyl bending via destabilization of DELLA transcriptional regulators under darkness, but does not suppress the phototropic response in the presence of either phyA or cryptochromes, suggesting that these photoreceptors control not only the GA content but also the GA sensing and/or signaling that affects hypocotyl phototropism. The metabolic and signaling regulation of not only auxin but also GA by photoreceptors therefore appears to determine the hypocotyl growth pattern, including phototropic and gravitropic responses and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, for adaptation to various light environments.

  6. Nuclear Phytochrome A Signaling Promotes Phototropism in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kami, Chitose; Hersch, Micha; Trevisan, Martine; Genoud, Thierry; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Phototropin photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) enable responses to directional light cues (e.g., positive phototropism in the hypocotyl). In Arabidopsis, phot1 is essential for phototropism in response to low light, a response that is also modulated by phytochrome A (phyA), representing a classical example of photoreceptor coaction. The molecular mechanisms underlying promotion of phototropism by phyA remain unclear. Most phyA responses require nuclear accumulation of the photoreceptor, but interestingly, it has been proposed that cytosolic phyA promotes phototropism. By comparing the kinetics of phototropism in seedlings with different subcellular localizations of phyA, we show that nuclear phyA accelerates the phototropic response, whereas in the fhy1 fhl mutant, in which phyA remains in the cytosol, phototropic bending is slower than in the wild type. Consistent with this data, we find that transcription factors needed for full phyA responses are needed for normal phototropism. Moreover, we show that phyA is the primary photoreceptor promoting the expression of phototropism regulators in low light (e.g., PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 [PKS1] and ROOT PHOTO TROPISM2 [RPT2]). Although phyA remains cytosolic in fhy1 fhl, induction of PKS1 and RPT2 expression still occurs in fhy1 fhl, indicating that a low level of nuclear phyA signaling is still present in fhy1 fhl. PMID:22374392

  7. Phototropin and light-signaling in phototropism.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi

    2006-10-01

    Blue-light-induced phototropism in higher plants is regulated by phototropin, which is a photoreceptor kinase that contains a flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Recently, it was found that this kinase is inhibited by the binding of the LOV2 (light-oxygen-voltage2) domain in the dark but that its activity is increased in the light by the release of the LOV2 domain. Phototropin-associated proteins have been identified, although the proteins that are phosphorylated by phototropin are still unknown. The asymmetrical auxin distribution caused by unilateral irradiation suggests that differential growth is induced by a difference in auxin-regulated gene expression between the shaded and illuminated sides of plant organs. Transcription-related factors, such as NPH4/ARF7, MSG2/IAA19 and SCF(TIR1), play key roles in this process.

  8. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 regulates root phototropism and gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Hernán E; De Simone, Silvia N; Bergmann-Honsberger, Ariane; Schepens, Isabelle; Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J

    2008-01-01

    Light promotes the expression of PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1) in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, but the function of PKS1 in this organ is unknown. Unilateral blue light induced a negative root phototropic response mediated by phototropin 1 in wild-type seedlings. This response was absent in pks1 mutants. In the wild type, unilateral blue light enhanced PKS1 expression in the subapical region of the root several hours before bending was detectable. The negative phototropism and the enhanced PKS1 expression in response to blue light required phytochrome A (phyA). In addition, the pks1 mutation enhanced the root gravitropic response when vertically oriented seedlings were placed horizontally. The negative regulation of gravitropism by PKS1 occurred even in dark-grown seedlings and did not require phyA. Blue light also failed to induce negative phototropism in pks1 under reduced gravitational stimulation, indicating that the effect of pks1 on phototropism is not simply the consequence of the counteracting effect of enhanced gravitropism. We propose a model where the background level of PKS1 reduces gravitropism. After a phyA-dependent increase in its expression, PKS1 positively affects root phototropism and both effects contribute to negative curvature in response to unilateral blue light.

  9. PIF4 and PIF5 transcription factors link blue light and auxin to regulate the phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaqiang; Qi, Linlin; Li, Yanan; Zhai, Qingzhe; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-06-01

    Both blue light (BL) and auxin are essential for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanisms by which light is molecularly linked to auxin during phototropism remain elusive. Here, we report that phytochrome interacting factoR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 act downstream of the BL sensor phototropin1 (PHOT1) to negatively modulate phototropism in Arabidopsis. We also reveal that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate auxin signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PIF4 directly activates the expression of the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) genes IAA19 and IAA29 by binding to the G-box (CACGTG) motifs in their promoters. Our genetic assays demonstrate that IAA19 and IAA29, which physically interact with auxin response factor7 (ARF7), are sufficient for PIF4 to negatively regulate auxin signaling and phototropism. This study identifies a key step of phototropic signaling in Arabidopsis by showing that PIF4 and PIF5 link light and auxin.

  10. PIF4 and PIF5 Transcription Factors Link Blue Light and Auxin to Regulate the Phototropic Response in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaqiang; Qi, Linlin; Li, Yanan; Zhai, Qingzhe; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-01-01

    Both blue light (BL) and auxin are essential for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the mechanisms by which light is molecularly linked to auxin during phototropism remain elusive. Here, we report that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 act downstream of the BL sensor PHOTOTROPIN1 (PHOT1) to negatively modulate phototropism in Arabidopsis. We also reveal that PIF4 and PIF5 negatively regulate auxin signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PIF4 directly activates the expression of the AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (IAA) genes IAA19 and IAA29 by binding to the G-box (CACGTG) motifs in their promoters. Our genetic assays demonstrate that IAA19 and IAA29, which physically interact with AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7), are sufficient for PIF4 to negatively regulate auxin signaling and phototropism. This study identifies a key step of phototropic signaling in Arabidopsis by showing that PIF4 and PIF5 link light and auxin. PMID:23757399

  11. Clathrin regulates blue light-triggered lateral auxin distribution and hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Qinqin; Jiang, Nan; Yan, Xu; Wang, Chao; Wang, Qingmei; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Muyuan; Bednarek, Sebastian Y; Xu, Jian; Pan, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Phototropism is the process by which plants grow towards light in order to maximize the capture of light for photosynthesis, which is particularly important for germinating seedlings. In Arabidopsis, hypocotyl phototropism is predominantly triggered by blue light (BL), which has a profound effect on the establishment of asymmetric auxin distribution, essential for hypocotyl phototropism. Two auxin efflux transporters ATP-binding cassette B19 (ABCB19) and PIN-formed 3 (PIN3) are known to mediate the effect of BL on auxin distribution in the hypocotyl, but the details for how BL triggers PIN3 lateralization remain poorly understood. Here, we report a critical role for clathrin in BL-triggered, PIN3-mediated asymmetric auxin distribution in hypocotyl phototropism. We show that unilateral BL induces relocalization of clathrin in the hypocotyl. Loss of clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) and CLC3 affects endocytosis and lateral distribution of PIN3 thereby impairing BL-triggered establishment of asymmetric auxin distribution and consequently, phototropic bending. Conversely, auxin efflux inhibitors N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid affect BL-induced relocalization of clathrin, endocytosis and lateralization of PIN3 as well as asymmetric distribution of auxin. These results together demonstrate an important interplay between auxin and clathrin function that dynamically regulates BL-triggered hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Brassinosteroid-Hypersensitive Mutant of BAK1 Indicates That a Convergence of Photomorphogenic and Hormonal Signaling Modulates Phototropism1

    PubMed Central

    Whippo, Craig W.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2005-01-01

    The phototropic response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is induced by the phototropin photoreceptors and modulated by the cryptochrome and phytochrome photoreceptors. Downstream of these photoreceptors, asymmetric lateral redistribution of auxin underlies the differential growth, which results in phototropism. Historical physiological evidence and recent analysis of hormone-induced gene expression demonstrate that auxin and brassinosteroid signaling function interdependently. Similarly, in this study we report evidence that interactions between brassinosteroids and auxin signaling modulate phototropic responsiveness. We found that elongated, a previously identified photomorphogenesis mutant, enhances high-light phototropism and represents a unique allele of BAK1/SERK3, a receptor kinase implicated in brassinosteroid perception. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that phototropic responsiveness is modulated by inputs that influence control of auxin response factor-mediated transcription. PMID:16126860

  13. A brassinosteroid-hypersensitive mutant of BAK1 indicates that a convergence of photomorphogenic and hormonal signaling modulates phototropism.

    PubMed

    Whippo, Craig W; Hangarter, Roger P

    2005-09-01

    The phototropic response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is induced by the phototropin photoreceptors and modulated by the cryptochrome and phytochrome photoreceptors. Downstream of these photoreceptors, asymmetric lateral redistribution of auxin underlies the differential growth, which results in phototropism. Historical physiological evidence and recent analysis of hormone-induced gene expression demonstrate that auxin and brassinosteroid signaling function interdependently. Similarly, in this study we report evidence that interactions between brassinosteroids and auxin signaling modulate phototropic responsiveness. We found that elongated, a previously identified photomorphogenesis mutant, enhances high-light phototropism and represents a unique allele of BAK1/SERK3, a receptor kinase implicated in brassinosteroid perception. Altogether, our results support the hypothesis that phototropic responsiveness is modulated by inputs that influence control of auxin response factor-mediated transcription.

  14. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 Regulates Root Phototropism and Gravitropism1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Boccalandro, Hernán E.; De Simone, Silvia N.; Bergmann-Honsberger, Ariane; Schepens, Isabelle; Fankhauser, Christian; Casal, Jorge J.

    2008-01-01

    Light promotes the expression of PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1) in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, but the function of PKS1 in this organ is unknown. Unilateral blue light induced a negative root phototropic response mediated by phototropin 1 in wild-type seedlings. This response was absent in pks1 mutants. In the wild type, unilateral blue light enhanced PKS1 expression in the subapical region of the root several hours before bending was detectable. The negative phototropism and the enhanced PKS1 expression in response to blue light required phytochrome A (phyA). In addition, the pks1 mutation enhanced the root gravitropic response when vertically oriented seedlings were placed horizontally. The negative regulation of gravitropism by PKS1 occurred even in dark-grown seedlings and did not require phyA. Blue light also failed to induce negative phototropism in pks1 under reduced gravitational stimulation, indicating that the effect of pks1 on phototropism is not simply the consequence of the counteracting effect of enhanced gravitropism. We propose a model where the background level of PKS1 reduces gravitropism. After a phyA-dependent increase in its expression, PKS1 positively affects root phototropism and both effects contribute to negative curvature in response to unilateral blue light. PMID:18024556

  15. Plasma membrane H⁺ -ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth.

    PubMed

    Hohm, Tim; Demarsy, Emilie; Quan, Clément; Allenbach Petrolati, Laure; Preuten, Tobias; Vernoux, Teva; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-09-26

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic reorientation. To identify important regulators of auxin gradient formation, we developed an auxin flux model that enabled us to test in silico the impact of different morphological and biophysical parameters on gradient formation, including the contribution of the extracellular space (cell wall) or apoplast. Our model indicates that cell size, cell distributions, and apoplast thickness are all important factors affecting gradient formation. Among all tested variables, regulation of apoplastic pH was the most important to enable the formation of a lateral auxin gradient. To test this prediction, we interfered with the activity of plasma membrane H⁺ -ATPases that are required to control apoplastic pH. Our results show that H⁺ -ATPases are indeed important for the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient and phototropism. Moreover, we show that during phototropism, H⁺ -ATPase activity is regulated by the phototropin photoreceptors, providing a mechanism by which light influences apoplastic pH. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Plasma membrane H+-ATPase regulation is required for auxin gradient formation preceding phototropic growth

    PubMed Central

    Hohm, Tim; Demarsy, Emilie; Quan, Clément; Allenbach Petrolati, Laure; Preuten, Tobias; Vernoux, Teva; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Phototropism is a growth response allowing plants to align their photosynthetic organs toward incoming light and thereby to optimize photosynthetic activity. Formation of a lateral gradient of the phytohormone auxin is a key step to trigger asymmetric growth of the shoot leading to phototropic reorientation. To identify important regulators of auxin gradient formation, we developed an auxin flux model that enabled us to test in silico the impact of different morphological and biophysical parameters on gradient formation, including the contribution of the extracellular space (cell wall) or apoplast. Our model indicates that cell size, cell distributions, and apoplast thickness are all important factors affecting gradient formation. Among all tested variables, regulation of apoplastic pH was the most important to enable the formation of a lateral auxin gradient. To test this prediction, we interfered with the activity of plasma membrane H+-ATPases that are required to control apoplastic pH. Our results show that H+-ATPases are indeed important for the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient and phototropism. Moreover, we show that during phototropism, H+-ATPase activity is regulated by the phototropin photoreceptors, providing a mechanism by which light influences apoplastic pH. PMID:25261457

  17. Negative phototropism is seen in Arabidopsis inflorescences when auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level by an Aux/IAA dominant mutation, axr2

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsuko; Sasaki, Shu; Matsuzaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Kotaro T.

    2015-01-01

    Inflorescences of a dominant mutant of Arabidopsis Aux/IAA7, axr2, showed negative phototropism with a similar fluence response curve to the positive phototropism of wild-type stems. Application of a synthetic auxin, NAA, and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport, NPA, increased and decreased respectively the magnitude of the phototropic response in the wild type, while in axr2 application of NAA reduced the negative phototropic response and NPA had no effect. Decapitation of the apex induced a small negative phototropism in wild-type stems, and had no effect in axr2 plants. Inflorescences of the double mutants of auxin transporters, pgp1 pgp19, showed no phototropic response, while decapitation resulted in a negative phototropic response. These results suggest that negative phototropism can occur when the level of auxin or of auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level, and that in plant axial organs the default phototropic response to unilateral blue light may be negative. Expression of axr2 protein by an endodermis-specific promoter resulted in agravitropism of inflorescences in a similar way to that of axr2, but phototropism was normal, confirming that the endodermis does not play a critical role in phototropism. PMID:25738325

  18. Negative phototropism is seen in Arabidopsis inflorescences when auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level by an Aux/IAA dominant mutation, axr2.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuko; Sasaki, Shu; Matsuzaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2015-01-01

    Inflorescences of a dominant mutant of Arabidopsis Aux/IAA7, axr2, showed negative phototropism with a similar fluence response curve to the positive phototropism of wild-type stems. Application of a synthetic auxin, NAA, and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport, NPA, increased and decreased respectively the magnitude of the phototropic response in the wild type, while in axr2 application of NAA reduced the negative phototropic response and NPA had no effect. Decapitation of the apex induced a small negative phototropism in wild-type stems, and had no effect in axr2 plants. Inflorescences of the double mutants of auxin transporters, pgp1 pgp19, showed no phototropic response, while decapitation resulted in a negative phototropic response. These results suggest that negative phototropism can occur when the level of auxin or of auxin signaling is reduced to a minimal level, and that in plant axial organs the default phototropic response to unilateral blue light may be negative. Expression of axr2 protein by an endodermis-specific promoter resulted in agravitropism of inflorescences in a similar way to that of axr2, but phototropism was normal, confirming that the endodermis does not play a critical role in phototropism.

  19. Light-induced phosphorylation of a membrane protein plays an early role in signal transduction for phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reymond, P.; Short, T. W.; Briggs, W. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light is known to cause rapid phosphorylation of a membrane protein in etiolated seedlings of several plant species, a protein that, at least in etiolated pea seedlings and maize coleoptiles, has been shown to be associated with the plasma membrane. The light-driven phosphorylation has been proposed on the basis of correlative evidence to be an early step in the signal transduction chain for phototropism. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant JK224, the sensitivity to blue light for induction of first positive phototropism is known to be 20- to 30-fold lower than in wild type, whereas second positive curvature appears to be normal. While light-induced phosphorylation can be demonstrated in crude membrane preparations from shoots of the mutant, the level of phosphorylation is dramatically lower than in wild type, as is the sensitivity to blue light. Another A. thaliana mutant, JK218, that completely lacks any phototropic responses to up to 2 h of irradiation, shows a normal level of light-induced phosphorylation at saturation. Since its gravitropic sensitivity is normal, it is presumably blocked in some step between photoreception and the confluence of the signal transduction pathways for phototropism and gravitropism. We conclude from mutant JK224 that light-induced phosphorylation plays an early role in the signal transduction chain for phototropism in higher plants.

  20. Reduced phototropism in pks mutants may be due to altered auxin-regulated gene expression or reduced lateral auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Kami, Chitose; Allenbach, Laure; Zourelidou, Melina; Ljung, Karin; Schütz, Frédéric; Isono, Erika; Watahiki, Masaaki K; Yamamoto, Kotaro T; Schwechheimer, Claus; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Phototropism allows plants to orient their photosynthetic organs towards the light. In Arabidopsis, phototropins 1 and 2 sense directional blue light such that phot1 triggers phototropism in response to low fluence rates, while both phot1 and phot2 mediate this response under higher light conditions. Phototropism results from asymmetric growth in the hypocotyl elongation zone that depends on an auxin gradient across the embryonic stem. How phototropin activation leads to this growth response is still poorly understood. Members of the phytochrome kinase substrate (PKS) family may act early in this pathway, because PKS1, PKS2 and PKS4 are needed for a normal phototropic response and they associate with phot1 in vivo. Here we show that PKS proteins are needed both for phot1- and phot2-mediated phototropism. The phototropic response is conditioned by the developmental asymmetry of dicotyledonous seedlings, such that there is a faster growth reorientation when cotyledons face away from the light compared with seedlings whose cotyledons face the light. The molecular basis for this developmental effect on phototropism is unknown; here we show that PKS proteins play a role at the interface between development and phototropism. Moreover, we present evidence for a role of PKS genes in hypocotyl gravi-reorientation that is independent of photoreceptors. pks mutants have normal levels of auxin and normal polar auxin transport, however they show altered expression patterns of auxin marker genes. This situation suggests that PKS proteins are involved in auxin signaling and/or lateral auxin redistribution. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The phototropic response is locally regulated within the topmost light-responsive region of the Arabidopsis thaliana seedling.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Tomomi; Aihara, Yusuke; Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya; Nagatani, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Phototropism is caused by differential cell elongation between the irradiated and shaded sides of plant organs, such as the stem. It is widely accepted that an uneven auxin distribution between the two sides crucially participates in this response. Plant-specific blue-light photoreceptors, phototropins (phot1 and phot2), mediate this response. In grass coleoptiles, the sites of light perception and phototropic bending are spatially separated. However, these sites are less clearly distinguished in dicots. Furthermore, the exact placement of the action of each phototropic signaling factor remains unknown. Here, we investigated the spatial aspects of phototropism using spotlight irradiation with etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings. The results demonstrated that the topmost part of about 1.1 mm of the hypocotyl constituted the light-responsive region in which both light perception and actual bending occurred. In addition, cotyledons and the shoot apex were dispensable for the response. Hence, the response was more region autonomous in dicots than in monocots. We next examined the elongation rates, the levels of phot1 and the auxin-reporter gene expression along the hypocotyl during the phototropic response. The light-responsive region was more active than the non-responsive region with respect to all of those parameters.

  2. GNOM regulates root hydrotropism and phototropism independently of PIN-mediated auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Teppei; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Fujii, Nobuharu; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2014-02-01

    Plant roots exhibit tropisms in response to gravity, unilateral light and moisture gradients. During gravitropism, an auxin gradient is established by PIN auxin transporters, leading to asymmetric growth. GNOM, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of ARF GTPase (ARF-GEF), regulates PIN localization by regulating subcellular trafficking of PINs. Therefore, GNOM is important for gravitropism. We previously isolated mizu-kussei2 (miz2), which lacks hydrotropic responses; MIZ2 is allelic to GNOM. Since PIN proteins are not required for root hydrotropism in Arabidopsis, the role of GNOM in root hydrotropism should differ from that in gravitropism. To examine this possibility, we conducted genetic analysis of gnom(miz2) and gnom trans-heterozygotes. The mutant gnom(miz2), which lacks hydrotropic responses, was partially recovered by gnom(emb30-1), which lacks GEF activity, but not by gnom(B4049), which lacks heterotypic domain interactions. Furthermore, the phototropic response of gnom trans-heterozygotes differed from that of the pin2 mutant allele eir1-1. Moreover, defects in the polarities of PIN2 and auxin distribution in a severe gnom mutant were recovered by gnom(miz2). Therefore, an unknown GNOM-mediated vesicle trafficking system may mediate root hydrotropism and phototropism independently of PIN trafficking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Haga, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Plant life is strongly dependent on the environment, and plants regulate their growth and development in response to many different environmental stimuli. One of the regulatory mechanisms involved in these responses is phototropism, which allows plants to change their growth direction in response to the location of the light source. Since the study of phototropism by Darwin, many physiological studies of this phenomenon have been published. Recently, molecular genetic analyses of Arabidopsis have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this response system, including phototropin blue light photoreceptors, phototropin signaling components, auxin transporters, auxin action mechanisms and others. This review highlights some of the recent progress that has been made in further elucidating the phototropic response, with particular emphasis on mutant phenotypes.

  4. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Haga, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant life is strongly dependent on the environment, and plants regulate their growth and development in response to many different environmental stimuli. One of the regulatory mechanisms involved in these responses is phototropism, which allows plants to change their growth direction in response to the location of the light source. Since the study of phototropism by Darwin, many physiological studies of this phenomenon have been published. Recently, molecular genetic analyses of Arabidopsis have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this response system, including phototropin blue light photoreceptors, phototropin signaling components, auxin transporters, auxin action mechanisms and others. This review highlights some of the recent progress that has been made in further elucidating the phototropic response, with particular emphasis on mutant phenotypes. PMID:22864452

  5. Phytochromes A and B Mediate Red-Light-Induced Positive Phototropism in Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30° to 40°, compared with 5° to 10° without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants. PMID:12644690

  6. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  7. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  8. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Mullen, Jack L.; Correll, Melanie J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  9. Plant phototropic growth.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Christian; Christie, John M

    2015-05-04

    Plants are photoautotrophic sessile organisms that use environmental cues to optimize multiple facets of growth and development. A classic example is phototropism - in shoots this is typically positive, leading to growth towards the light, while roots frequently show negative phototropism triggering growth away from the light. Shoot phototropism optimizes light capture of leaves in low light environments and hence increases photosynthetic productivity. Phototropins are plasma-membrane-associated UV-A/blue-light activated kinases that trigger phototropic growth. Light perception liberates their protein kinase domain from the inhibitory action of the amino-terminal photosensory portion of the photoreceptor. Following a series of still poorly understood events, phototropin activation leads to the formation of a gradient of the growth hormone auxin across the photo-stimulated stem. The greater auxin concentration on the shaded compared with the lit side of the stem enables growth reorientation towards the light. In this Minireview, we briefly summarize the signaling steps starting from photoreceptor activation until the establishment of a lateral auxin gradient, ultimately leading to phototropic growth in shoots. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Twilight, a Novel Circadian-Regulated Gene, Integrates Phototropism with Nutrient and Redox Homeostasis during Fungal Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi Zhen; Qu, Ziwei; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2015-06-01

    Phototropic regulation of circadian clock is important for environmental adaptation, organismal growth and differentiation. Light plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. However, it is unclear what governs the intracellular metabolic response to such dark-light rhythms in fungi. Here, we describe a novel circadian-regulated Twilight (TWL) function essential for phototropic induction of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The TWL transcript oscillates during circadian cycles and peaks at subjective twilight. GFP-Twl remains acetylated and cytosolic in the dark, whereas light-induced phosphorylation (by the carbon sensor Snf1 kinase) drives it into the nucleus. The mRNA level of the transcription/repair factor TFB5, was significantly down regulated in the twl∆ mutant. Overexpression of TFB5 significantly suppressed the conidiation defects in the twl∆ mutant. Furthermore, Tfb5-GFP translocates to the nucleus during the phototropic response and under redox stress, while it failed to do so in the twl∆ mutant. Thus, we provide mechanistic insight into Twl-based regulation of nutrient and redox homeostasis in response to light during pathogen adaptation to the host milieu in the rice blast pathosystem.

  11. Twilight, a Novel Circadian-Regulated Gene, Integrates Phototropism with Nutrient and Redox Homeostasis during Fungal Development

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Naweed I.

    2015-01-01

    Phototropic regulation of circadian clock is important for environmental adaptation, organismal growth and differentiation. Light plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. However, it is unclear what governs the intracellular metabolic response to such dark-light rhythms in fungi. Here, we describe a novel circadian-regulated Twilight (TWL) function essential for phototropic induction of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The TWL transcript oscillates during circadian cycles and peaks at subjective twilight. GFP-Twl remains acetylated and cytosolic in the dark, whereas light-induced phosphorylation (by the carbon sensor Snf1 kinase) drives it into the nucleus. The mRNA level of the transcription/repair factor TFB5, was significantly down regulated in the twl∆ mutant. Overexpression of TFB5 significantly suppressed the conidiation defects in the twl∆ mutant. Furthermore, Tfb5-GFP translocates to the nucleus during the phototropic response and under redox stress, while it failed to do so in the twl∆ mutant. Thus, we provide mechanistic insight into Twl-based regulation of nutrient and redox homeostasis in response to light during pathogen adaptation to the host milieu in the rice blast pathosystem. PMID:26102503

  12. Chemistry and biology of phototropism-regulating substances in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, S; Hasegawa, K

    2001-01-01

    Most people are familiar with the sight of a young seedling bending towards a window or the brightest source of light to which it is exposed. This directional growth response is known as phototropism, which is caused by a lateral growth-promoting auxin in the bending organ (Cholodny-Went theory, cited in high school textbook). Recently, however, Bruinsma et al., Weiler et al., and Hasegawa et al. independently found that the shaded half did not contain more auxin than the illuminated one. Instead it was found that the even distribution of auxin was accompanied by a lateral gradient of growth inhibiting substances during phototropic curvature (Bruinsma-Hasegawa theory). We have isolated some photo-induced growth inhibitory substances related to phototropism, benzoxazolinones from light-grown maize shoots (Zea mays L.), raphanusanins from radish hypocotyl (Raphanus sativus var. hortensis f. gigantissimus M.), indolyacetonitrile from light-grown shoots (Brassica oleacea L.), 8-epixanthatin from sunflower hypocotyl (Helianthus annus L.), and quite recently uridine from oat coleoptile (Avena sativa L.). Chemical analyses have shown phototropic stimulations to cause curvature by inducing a local unequal distribution of growth-inhibiting substances that antagonize auxin in its cell-elongating activity. Finally, a model is presented for further studies on phototropism. Copyright 2001 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Genetic separation of phototropism and blue light inhibition of stem elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscum, E.; Young, J. C.; Poff, K. L.; Hangarter, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light-induced regulation of cell elongation is a component of the signal response pathway for both phototropic curvature and inhibition of stem elongation in higher plants. To determine if blue light regulates cell elongation in these responses through shared or discrete pathways, phototropism and hypocotyl elongation were investigated in several blue light response mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, the blu mutants that lack blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation were found to exhibit a normal phototropic response. In contrast, a phototropic null mutant (JK218) and a mutant that has a 20- to 30-fold shift in the fluence dependence for first positive phototropism (JK224) showed normal inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in blue light. F1 progeny of crosses between the blu mutants and JK218 showed normal phototropism and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and approximately 1 in 16 F2 progeny were double mutants lacking both responses. Thus, blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and phototropism operate through at least some genetically distinct components.

  14. Genetic separation of phototropism and blue light inhibition of stem elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscum, E.; Young, J. C.; Poff, K. L.; Hangarter, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Blue light-induced regulation of cell elongation is a component of the signal response pathway for both phototropic curvature and inhibition of stem elongation in higher plants. To determine if blue light regulates cell elongation in these responses through shared or discrete pathways, phototropism and hypocotyl elongation were investigated in several blue light response mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, the blu mutants that lack blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation were found to exhibit a normal phototropic response. In contrast, a phototropic null mutant (JK218) and a mutant that has a 20- to 30-fold shift in the fluence dependence for first positive phototropism (JK224) showed normal inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in blue light. F1 progeny of crosses between the blu mutants and JK218 showed normal phototropism and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and approximately 1 in 16 F2 progeny were double mutants lacking both responses. Thus, blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and phototropism operate through at least some genetically distinct components.

  15. Genetic separation of phototropism and blue light inhibition of stem elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Liscum, E; Young, J C; Poff, K L; Hangarter, R P

    1992-01-01

    Blue light-induced regulation of cell elongation is a component of the signal response pathway for both phototropic curvature and inhibition of stem elongation in higher plants. To determine if blue light regulates cell elongation in these responses through shared or discrete pathways, phototropism and hypocotyl elongation were investigated in several blue light response mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, the blu mutants that lack blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation were found to exhibit a normal phototropic response. In contrast, a phototropic null mutant (JK218) and a mutant that has a 20- to 30-fold shift in the fluence dependence for first positive phototropism (JK224) showed normal inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in blue light. F1 progeny of crosses between the blu mutants and JK218 showed normal phototropism and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation, and approximately 1 in 16 F2 progeny were double mutants lacking both responses. Thus, blue light-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and phototropism operate through at least some genetically distinct components. Images Figure 1 PMID:11538049

  16. Arabidopsis ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 Contributes to the Adaptation to High-Intensity Light in Phototropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Tsuchida-Mayama, Tomoko; Yamada, Mizuki; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Living organisms adapt to changing light environments via mechanisms that enhance photosensitivity under darkness and attenuate photosensitivity under bright light conditions. In hypocotyl phototropism, phototropin1 (phot1) blue light photoreceptors mediate both the pulse light-induced, first positive phototropism and the continuous light-induced, second positive phototropism, suggesting the existence of a mechanism that alters their photosensitivity. Here, we show that light induction of ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 (RPT2) underlies photosensory adaptation in hypocotyl phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana. rpt2 loss-of-function mutants exhibited increased photosensitivity to very low fluence blue light but were insensitive to low fluence blue light. Expression of RPT2 prior to phototropic stimulation in etiolated seedlings reduced photosensitivity during first positive phototropism and accelerated second positive phototropism. Our microscopy and biochemical analyses indicated that blue light irradiation causes dephosphorylation of NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3) proteins and mediates their release from the plasma membrane. These phenomena correlate closely with the desensitization of phot1 signaling during the transition period from first positive phototropism to second positive phototropism. RPT2 modulated the phosphorylation of NPH3 and promoted reconstruction of the phot1-NPH3 complex on the plasma membrane. We conclude that photosensitivity is increased in the absence of RPT2 and that this results in the desensitization of phot1. Light-mediated induction of RPT2 then reduces the photosensitivity of phot1, which is required for second positive phototropism under bright light conditions. PMID:25873385

  17. Arabidopsis ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 Contributes to the Adaptation to High-Intensity Light in Phototropic Responses.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Tsuchida-Mayama, Tomoko; Yamada, Mizuki; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Living organisms adapt to changing light environments via mechanisms that enhance photosensitivity under darkness and attenuate photosensitivity under bright light conditions. In hypocotyl phototropism, phototropin1 (phot1) blue light photoreceptors mediate both the pulse light-induced, first positive phototropism and the continuous light-induced, second positive phototropism, suggesting the existence of a mechanism that alters their photosensitivity. Here, we show that light induction of ROOT PHOTOTROPISM2 (RPT2) underlies photosensory adaptation in hypocotyl phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana. rpt2 loss-of-function mutants exhibited increased photosensitivity to very low fluence blue light but were insensitive to low fluence blue light. Expression of RPT2 prior to phototropic stimulation in etiolated seedlings reduced photosensitivity during first positive phototropism and accelerated second positive phototropism. Our microscopy and biochemical analyses indicated that blue light irradiation causes dephosphorylation of NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3) proteins and mediates their release from the plasma membrane. These phenomena correlate closely with the desensitization of phot1 signaling during the transition period from first positive phototropism to second positive phototropism. RPT2 modulated the phosphorylation of NPH3 and promoted reconstruction of the phot1-NPH3 complex on the plasma membrane. We conclude that photosensitivity is increased in the absence of RPT2 and that this results in the desensitization of phot1. Light-mediated induction of RPT2 then reduces the photosensitivity of phot1, which is required for second positive phototropism under bright light conditions. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  18. PINOID AGC kinases are necessary for phytochrome-mediated enhancement of hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2014-11-01

    Several members of the AGCVIII kinase subfamily, which includes PINOID (PID), PID2, and WAVY ROOT GROWTH (WAG) proteins, have previously been shown to phosphorylate PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transporters and control the auxin flow in plants. PID has been proposed as a key component of the phototropin signaling pathway that induces phototropic responses, although the responses were not significantly impaired in the pid single and pid wag1 wag2 triple mutants. This raises questions about the functional roles of the PID family in phototropic responses. Here, we investigated hypocotyl phototropism in the pid pid2 wag1 wag2 quadruple mutant in detail to clarify the roles of the PID family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The pid quadruple mutants exhibited moderate responses in continuous light-induced phototropism with a decrease in growth rates of hypocotyls and normal responses in pulse-induced phototropism. However, they showed serious defects in enhancements of pulse-induced phototropic curvatures and lateral fluorescent auxin transport by red light pretreatment. Red light pretreatment significantly reduced the expression level of PID, and the constitutive expression of PID prevented pulse-induced phototropism, irrespective of red light pretreatment. This suggests that the PID family plays a significant role in phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement but not the phototropin signaling pathway. Red light treatment enhanced the intracellular accumulation of PIN proteins in response to the vesicle-trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A in addition to increasing their expression levels. Taken together, these results suggest that red light preirradiation enhances phototropic curvatures by up-regulation of PIN proteins, which are not being phosphorylated by the PID family. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Phototropism: Growing towards an Understanding of Plant Movement[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liscum, Emmanuel; Askinosie, Scott K.; Leuchtman, Daniel L.; Morrow, Johanna; Willenburg, Kyle T.; Coats, Diana Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Phototropism, or the differential cell elongation exhibited by a plant organ in response to directional blue light, provides the plant with a means to optimize photosynthetic light capture in the aerial portion and water and nutrient acquisition in the roots. Tremendous advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and cellular bases of phototropism in recent years. Six photoreceptors and their associated signaling pathways have been linked to phototropic responses under various conditions. Primary detection of directional light occurs at the plasma membrane, whereas secondary modulatory photoreception occurs in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Intracellular responses to light cues are processed to regulate cell-to-cell movement of auxin to allow establishment of a trans-organ gradient of the hormone. Photosignaling also impinges on the transcriptional regulation response established as a result of changes in local auxin concentrations. Three additional phytohormone signaling pathways have also been shown to influence phototropic responsiveness, and these pathways are influenced by the photoreceptor signaling as well. Here, we will discuss this complex dance of intra- and intercellular responses that are regulated by these many systems to give rise to a rapid and robust adaptation response observed as organ bending. PMID:24481074

  20. Phototropism: growing towards an understanding of plant movement.

    PubMed

    Liscum, Emmanuel; Askinosie, Scott K; Leuchtman, Daniel L; Morrow, Johanna; Willenburg, Kyle T; Coats, Diana Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Phototropism, or the differential cell elongation exhibited by a plant organ in response to directional blue light, provides the plant with a means to optimize photosynthetic light capture in the aerial portion and water and nutrient acquisition in the roots. Tremendous advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and cellular bases of phototropism in recent years. Six photoreceptors and their associated signaling pathways have been linked to phototropic responses under various conditions. Primary detection of directional light occurs at the plasma membrane, whereas secondary modulatory photoreception occurs in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Intracellular responses to light cues are processed to regulate cell-to-cell movement of auxin to allow establishment of a trans-organ gradient of the hormone. Photosignaling also impinges on the transcriptional regulation response established as a result of changes in local auxin concentrations. Three additional phytohormone signaling pathways have also been shown to influence phototropic responsiveness, and these pathways are influenced by the photoreceptor signaling as well. Here, we will discuss this complex dance of intra- and intercellular responses that are regulated by these many systems to give rise to a rapid and robust adaptation response observed as organ bending.

  1. PINOID AGC Kinases Are Necessary for Phytochrome-Mediated Enhancement of Hypocotyl Phototropism in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Several members of the AGCVIII kinase subfamily, which includes PINOID (PID), PID2, and WAVY ROOT GROWTH (WAG) proteins, have previously been shown to phosphorylate PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin transporters and control the auxin flow in plants. PID has been proposed as a key component of the phototropin signaling pathway that induces phototropic responses, although the responses were not significantly impaired in the pid single and pid wag1 wag2 triple mutants. This raises questions about the functional roles of the PID family in phototropic responses. Here, we investigated hypocotyl phototropism in the pid pid2 wag1 wag2 quadruple mutant in detail to clarify the roles of the PID family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The pid quadruple mutants exhibited moderate responses in continuous light-induced phototropism with a decrease in growth rates of hypocotyls and normal responses in pulse-induced phototropism. However, they showed serious defects in enhancements of pulse-induced phototropic curvatures and lateral fluorescent auxin transport by red light pretreatment. Red light pretreatment significantly reduced the expression level of PID, and the constitutive expression of PID prevented pulse-induced phototropism, irrespective of red light pretreatment. This suggests that the PID family plays a significant role in phytochrome-mediated phototropic enhancement but not the phototropin signaling pathway. Red light treatment enhanced the intracellular accumulation of PIN proteins in response to the vesicle-trafficking inhibitor brefeldin A in addition to increasing their expression levels. Taken together, these results suggest that red light preirradiation enhances phototropic curvatures by up-regulation of PIN proteins, which are not being phosphorylated by the PID family. PMID:25281709

  2. The signal transducer NPH3 integrates the phototropin1 photosensor with PIN2-based polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis root phototropism.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yinglang; Jasik, Jan; Wang, Li; Hao, Huaiqing; Volkmann, Dieter; Menzel, Diedrik; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-02-01

    Under blue light (BL) illumination, Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow away from the light source, showing a negative phototropic response. However, the mechanism of root phototropism is still unclear. Using a noninvasive microelectrode system, we showed that the BL sensor phototropin1 (phot1), the signal transducer NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3), and the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 were essential for BL-induced auxin flux in the root apex transition zone. We also found that PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to vacuole-like compartments (VLCs) in dark-grown root epidermal and cortical cells, and phot1/NPH3 mediated a BL-initiated pathway that caused PIN2 redistribution to the plasma membrane. When dark-grown roots were exposed to brefeldin A (BFA), PIN2-GFP remained in VLCs in darkness, and BL caused PIN2-GFP disappearance from VLCs and induced PIN2-GFP-FM4-64 colocalization within enlarged compartments. In the nph3 mutant, both dark and BL BFA treatments caused the disappearance of PIN2-GFP from VLCs. However, in the phot1 mutant, PIN2-GFP remained within VLCs under both dark and BL BFA treatments, suggesting that phot1 and NPH3 play different roles in PIN2 localization. In conclusion, BL-induced root phototropism is based on the phot1/NPH3 signaling pathway, which stimulates the shootward auxin flux by modifying the subcellular targeting of PIN2 in the root apex transition zone.

  3. The Signal Transducer NPH3 Integrates the Phototropin1 Photosensor with PIN2-Based Polar Auxin Transport in Arabidopsis Root Phototropism[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yinglang; Jasik, Jan; Wang, Li; Hao, Huaiqing; Volkmann, Dieter; Menzel, Diedrik; Mancuso, Stefano; Baluška, František; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-01-01

    Under blue light (BL) illumination, Arabidopsis thaliana roots grow away from the light source, showing a negative phototropic response. However, the mechanism of root phototropism is still unclear. Using a noninvasive microelectrode system, we showed that the BL sensor phototropin1 (phot1), the signal transducer NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3), and the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 were essential for BL-induced auxin flux in the root apex transition zone. We also found that PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) localized to vacuole-like compartments (VLCs) in dark-grown root epidermal and cortical cells, and phot1/NPH3 mediated a BL-initiated pathway that caused PIN2 redistribution to the plasma membrane. When dark-grown roots were exposed to brefeldin A (BFA), PIN2-GFP remained in VLCs in darkness, and BL caused PIN2-GFP disappearance from VLCs and induced PIN2-GFP-FM4-64 colocalization within enlarged compartments. In the nph3 mutant, both dark and BL BFA treatments caused the disappearance of PIN2-GFP from VLCs. However, in the phot1 mutant, PIN2-GFP remained within VLCs under both dark and BL BFA treatments, suggesting that phot1 and NPH3 play different roles in PIN2 localization. In conclusion, BL-induced root phototropism is based on the phot1/NPH3 signaling pathway, which stimulates the shootward auxin flux by modifying the subcellular targeting of PIN2 in the root apex transition zone. PMID:22374399

  4. Phytochrome-controlled phototropism of protonemata of the moss ceratodon purpureus: physiology of the wild type and class 2 ptr-mutants

    PubMed

    Esch; Hartmann; Cove; Wada; Lamparter

    1999-09-01

    Phototropism and polarotropism in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are controlled by the photoreceptor phytochrome. One class of phototropism mutants is characterised by growing randomly when kept for a prolonged time (5 d or longer) in unilateral red light. It was found that a subclass of these mutants grows faster than the wild type, the rate of cell division and the length of the cells being increased. This difference is found for light-grown and dark-grown filaments. It is therefore suggested that the mutant phenotype neither results from a defect in phytochrome photoconversion nor from a defect in phytochrome-gradient formation. Instead, it is possible that a factor which is involved in both signal transduction of phototropism and regulation of cell size and cell division is deregulated. If dark-grown mutant filaments are phototropically stimulated for 24 h, they show a weak phototropic response. Phototropism and polarotropism fluence-rate effect curves for mutants were flattened and shifted to higher fluence rates compared with those for the wild type. With wild-type filaments, a previously unreported response was observed. At a low fluence rate, half of the filaments grew positively phototropically, while the other half grew negatively phototropically. It seems that under these conditions, a phytochrome gradient with two maxima for the far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome (Pfr) within the cross-section of the cell is displayed by the response of the filaments. At higher fluence rates, all filaments of the wild type grew towards the light. These data and results from microbeam irradiation experiments and from phototropism studies with filaments growing within agar, indicate that light refraction plays an important role in the formation of the Pfr gradient in phototropism of Ceratodon.

  5. Blue-light regulation of ZmPHOT1 and ZmPHOT2 gene expression and the possible involvement of Zmphot1 in phototropism in maize coleoptiles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromi; Okamoto, Ai; Kojima, Akane; Nishimura, Takeshi; Takano, Makoto; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kadota, Akeo; Kanegae, Takeshi; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2014-08-01

    ZmPHOT1 and ZmPHOT2 are expressed differentially in maize coleoptiles and leaves, with Zmphot1 possibly involved in first-positive phototropic curvature of red-light-adapted maize coleoptiles exposed to pulsed low-fluence blue light. Unilateral blue-light perception by phototropin(s) is the first event of phototropism, with the subsequent signal causing lateral transport of auxin at the coleoptile tip region of monocots. In this study, we analyzed the behavior of two maize phototropin genes: ZmPHOT1 and ZmPHOT2, the latter identified from the maize genome database and newly characterized. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that ZmPHOT1 was abundantly expressed in etiolated coleoptiles, while lower expressions of both ZmPHOT1 and ZmPHOT2 were observed in young leaves. Interestingly, these genes were not specifically expressed in the coleoptile tip region, a key position for photoperception in phototropism. Exposure to pulsed low-fluence blue light (LBL) (0.33 µmol m(-2) s(-1) × 8 s) and continuous high-fluence blue light (HBL) (10 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) rapidly decreased ZmPHOT1 gene expression in coleoptiles, with levels of ZmPHOT2 not significantly altered in that tissue. In young leaves, no drastic expression changes were induced in either ZmPHOT1 or ZmPHOT2 by LBL or HBL irradiation. The Zmphot1 protein was investigated by Western blot analysis with anti-Osphot1 antibodies. Zmphot1 was detected in microsomal fractions, with higher levels in coleoptiles than in leaves. HBL caused rapid phosphorylation of the protein, whereas no phot1 phosphorylation was induced by LBL. The involvement of Zmphot1 in LBL-induced phototropic curvature of maize coleoptiles is discussed.

  6. Second Positive Phototropism Results from Coordinated Co-Action of the Phototropins and Cryptochromes1

    PubMed Central

    Whippo, Craig W.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism and hypocotyl growth inhibition are modulated by the coaction of different blue-light photoreceptors and their signaling pathways. How seedlings integrate the activities of the different blue-light photoreceptors to coordinate these hypocotyl growth responses is still unclear. We have used time-lapse imaging and a nontraditional mathematical approach to conduct a detailed examination of phototropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and various blue-light photoreceptor mutants. Our results indicate that high fluence rates of blue light (100 μmol m–2 s–1) attenuate phototropism through the coaction of the phototropin and cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors. In contrast, we also demonstrate that phototropins and cryptochromes function together to enhance phototropism under low fluence rates (<1.0 μmol m–2 s–1) of blue light. Based on our results, we hypothesize that phototropins and cryptochromes regulate phototropism by coordinating the balance between stimulation and inhibition of growth of the hypocotyl depending on the fluence rate of blue light. PMID:12857830

  7. Second positive phototropism results from coordinated co-action of the phototropins and cryptochromes.

    PubMed

    Whippo, Craig W; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-07-01

    Phototropism and hypocotyl growth inhibition are modulated by the coaction of different blue-light photoreceptors and their signaling pathways. How seedlings integrate the activities of the different blue-light photoreceptors to coordinate these hypocotyl growth responses is still unclear. We have used time-lapse imaging and a nontraditional mathematical approach to conduct a detailed examination of phototropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and various blue-light photoreceptor mutants. Our results indicate that high fluence rates of blue light (100 micro mol m(-)(2) s(-)(1)) attenuate phototropism through the coaction of the phototropin and cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors. In contrast, we also demonstrate that phototropins and cryptochromes function together to enhance phototropism under low fluence rates (<1.0 micro mol m(-)(2) s(-)(1)) of blue light. Based on our results, we hypothesize that phototropins and cryptochromes regulate phototropism by coordinating the balance between stimulation and inhibition of growth of the hypocotyl depending on the fluence rate of blue light.

  8. Flavonols Mediate Root Phototropism and Growth through Regulation of Proliferation-to-Differentiation Transition.

    PubMed

    Silva-Navas, Javier; Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A; Manzano, Concepción; Téllez-Robledo, Bárbara; Navarro-Neila, Sara; Carrasco, Víctor; Pollmann, Stephan; Gallego, F Javier; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Roots normally grow in darkness, but they may be exposed to light. After perceiving light, roots bend to escape from light (root light avoidance) and reduce their growth. How root light avoidance responses are regulated is not well understood. Here, we show that illumination induces the accumulation of flavonols in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. During root illumination, flavonols rapidly accumulate at the side closer to light in the transition zone. This accumulation promotes asymmetrical cell elongation and causes differential growth between the two sides, leading to root bending. Furthermore, roots illuminated for a long period of time accumulate high levels of flavonols. This high flavonol content decreases both auxin signaling and PLETHORA gradient as well as superoxide radical content, resulting in reduction of cell proliferation. In addition, cytokinin and hydrogen peroxide, which promote root differentiation, induce flavonol accumulation in the root transition zone. As an outcome of prolonged light exposure and flavonol accumulation, root growth is reduced and a different root developmental zonation is established. Finally, we observed that these differentiation-related pathways are required for root light avoidance. We propose that flavonols function as positional signals, integrating hormonal and reactive oxygen species pathways to regulate root growth direction and rate in response to light. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  9. REPRESSOR OF ULTRAVIOLET-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS function allows efficient phototropin mediated ultraviolet-B phototropism in etiolated seedlings.

    PubMed

    Vanhaelewyn, Lucas; Schumacher, Paolo; Poelman, Dirk; Fankhauser, Christian; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Vandenbussche, Filip

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) light is a part of the solar radiation which has significant effects on plant morphology, even at low doses. In Arabidopsis, many of these morphological changes have been attributed to a specific UV-B receptor, UV resistance locus 8 (UVR8). Recent findings showed that next to phototropin regulated phototropism, UVR8 mediated signaling is able of inducing directional bending towards UV-B light in etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis, in a phototropin independent manner. In this study, kinetic analysis of phototropic bending was used to evaluate the relative contribution of each of these pathways in UV-B mediated phototropism. Diminishing UV-B light intensity favors the importance of phototropins. Molecular and genetic analyses suggest that UV-B is capable of inducing phototropin signaling relying on phototropin kinase activity and regulation of NPH3. Moreover, enhanced UVR8 responses in the UV-B hypersensitive rup1rup2 mutants interferes with the fast phototropin mediated phototropism. Together the data suggest that phototropins are the most important receptors for UV-B induced phototropism in etiolated seedlings, and a RUP mediated negative feedback pathway prevents UVR8 signaling to interfere with the phototropin dependent response.

  10. A new theory of phototropism - its regulation by a light-induced gradient of auxin-inhibiting substances.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, J; Hasegawa, K

    1990-08-01

    Against the wholly indirect evidence of a lateral gradient of auxin as an explanation of phototropic curvature according to the Cholodny-Went theory, direct measurement of free. extractable or diffusable indoleacetic acid from phototropically curving hypocotyls and coleoptiles invariably shows an even distribution of auxin. On the contrary, growth inhibitors extracted or diffused from these organs turn out to be accumulated at the irradiated side, as proposed already by A. H. Blaauw (Z. Bot. 7: 465. 1915). the classical experiment by F. W. Went (Rec. Trav. Bot. Neerl. 25:1, 1928) has to be interpreted as evidence for a lateral gradient of substance(s) inhibiting auxin activity Phototropic curvature is thus a matter of differential auxin sensitivity across the unilaterally irradiated organ.

  11. Phototropism in gametophytic shoots of the moss Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Liang; Yamamoto, Kotaro T; Fujita, Tomomichi

    2015-01-01

    Shoot phototropism enables plants to position their photosynthetic organs in favorable light conditions and thus benefits growth and metabolism in land plants. To understand the evolution of this response, we established an experimental system to study phototropism in gametophores of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The phototropic response of gametophores occurs slowly; a clear response takes place more than 24 hours after the onset of unilateral light irradiation, likely due to the slow growth rate of gametophores. We also found that red and far-red light can induce phototropism, with blue light being less effective. These results suggest that plants used a broad range of light wavelengths as phototropic signals during the early evolution of land plants. PMID:25848889

  12. Phototropism in gametophytic shoots of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang; Yamamoto, Kotaro T; Fujita, Tomomichi

    2015-01-01

    Shoot phototropism enables plants to position their photosynthetic organs in favorable light conditions and thus benefits growth and metabolism in land plants. To understand the evolution of this response, we established an experimental system to study phototropism in gametophores of the moss Physcomitrella patens. The phototropic response of gametophores occurs slowly; a clear response takes place more than 24 hours after the onset of unilateral light irradiation, likely due to the slow growth rate of gametophores. We also found that red and far-red light can induce phototropism, with blue light being less effective. These results suggest that plants used a broad range of light wavelengths as phototropic signals during the early evolution of land plants.

  13. Phototropism: Mechanism and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pedmale, Ullas V.; Celaya, R. Brandon; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Plants have evolved a wide variety of responses that allow them to adapt to the variable environmental conditions in which they find themselves growing. One such response is the phototropic response - the bending of a plant organ toward (stems and leaves) or away from (roots) a directional blue light source. Phototropism is one of several photoresponses of plants that afford mechanisms to alter their growth and development to changes in light intensity, quality and direction. Over recent decades much has been learned about the genetic, molecular and cell biological components involved in sensing and responding to phototropic stimuli. Many of these advances have been made through the utilization of Arabidopsis as a model for phototropic studies. Here we discuss such advances, as well as studies in other plant species where appropriate to the discussion of work in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303252

  14. D6PK AGCVIII kinases are required for auxin transport and phototropic hypocotyl bending in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Willige, Björn C; Ahlers, Siv; Zourelidou, Melina; Barbosa, Inês C R; Demarsy, Emilie; Trevisan, Martine; Davis, Philip A; Roelfsema, M Rob G; Hangarter, Roger; Fankhauser, Christian; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2013-05-01

    Phototropic hypocotyl bending in response to blue light excitation is an important adaptive process that helps plants to optimize their exposure to light. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropic hypocotyl bending is initiated by the blue light receptors and protein kinases phototropin1 (phot1) and phot2. Phototropic responses also require auxin transport and were shown to be partially compromised in mutants of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux facilitators. We previously described the D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) subfamily of AGCVIII kinases, which we proposed to directly regulate PIN-mediated auxin transport. Here, we show that phototropic hypocotyl bending is strongly dependent on the activity of D6PKs and the PIN proteins PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7. While early blue light and phot-dependent signaling events are not affected by the loss of D6PKs, we detect a gradual loss of PIN3 phosphorylation in d6pk mutants of increasing complexity that is most severe in the d6pk d6pkl1 d6pkl2 d6pkl3 quadruple mutant. This is accompanied by a reduction of basipetal auxin transport in the hypocotyls of d6pk as well as in pin mutants. Based on our data, we propose that D6PK-dependent PIN regulation promotes auxin transport and that auxin transport in the hypocotyl is a prerequisite for phot1-dependent hypocotyl bending.

  15. Physiological Analysis of Phototropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Plants utilize light as sole energy source. To maximize light capture they are able to detect the light direction and orient themselves towards the light source. This phototropic response is mediated by the plant blue light photoreceptors phototropin1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2). Although fully differentiated plants also exhibit this response it can be best observed in etiolated seedlings. Differences in light between the illuminated and shaded site of a seedling stem lead to changes in the auxin-distribution, resulting in cell elongation on the shaded site. Since phototropism connects light perception, signaling, and auxin transport, it is of great interest to analyze this response with a fast and simple method.Here we describe a method to analyze the phototropic response of Arabidopsis seedlings. With numerous mutants available, its fast germination and its small size Arabidopsis is well suited for this analysis. Different genotypes can be simultaneously probed in less than a week.

  16. Genetic separation of phototropism from blue light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation on Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Liscum, E.; Young, J.C.; Hangarter, R.P. ); Poff, K.L. )

    1991-05-01

    Phototropism and inhibition of stem elongation occur in response to blue light-induced inhibition of cell elongation. However, phototropism is a low fluence response and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation is a high irradiance response. The authors have isolated several mutant lines of Arabidopsis which lack blue light-induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation but retain normal phototropic functions. In addition, a mutant line which completely lacks the phototropic response retains normal blue light-induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. F1 progeny of crosses between these two mutant classes exhibited wild-type phototropism and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation in response to blue light stimuli. In the F2 generation, one in sixteen seedlings were double mutants lacking both phototropism and blue light-induced hypocotyl growth inhibition. These studies conclusively show that blue light-induced phototropism and hypocotyl growth inhibition function through genetically distinct signal transduction or response systems.

  17. Phototropins function in high-intensity blue light-induced hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis by altering cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Yan-Liang; Qiao, Xin-Rong; Wang, Jin; Wang, Lin-Dan; Xu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-07-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), the blue light receptors in plants, regulate hypocotyl phototropism in a fluence-dependent manner. Especially under high fluence rates of blue light (HBL), the redundant function mediated by both phot1 and phot2 drastically restricts the understanding of the roles of phot2. Here, systematic analysis of phototropin-related mutants and overexpression transgenic lines revealed that HBL specifically induced a transient increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls and that the increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt was primarily attributed to phot2. Pharmacological and genetic experiments illustrated that HBL-induced Ca(2+) increases were modulated differently by phot1 and phot2. Phot2 mediated the HBL-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt mainly by an inner store-dependent Ca(2+)-release pathway, not by activating plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels. Further analysis showed that the increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt was possibly responsible for HBL-induced hypocotyl phototropism. An inhibitor of auxin efflux carrier exhibited significant inhibitions of both phototropism and increases in [Ca(2+)]cyt, which indicates that polar auxin transport is possibly involved in HBL-induced responses. Moreover, PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1), the phototropin-related signaling element identified, interacted physically with phototropins, auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 and calcium-binding protein CALMODULIN4, in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and HBL-induced phototropism was impaired in pks multiple mutants, indicating the role of the PKS family in HBL-induced phototropism. Together, these results provide new insights into the functions of phototropins and highlight a potential integration point through which Ca(2+) signaling-related HBL modulates hypocotyl phototropic responses.

  18. Phytochrome mediates red-light-based positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, M.; Mullen, J.; Hangarter, R.; Kiss, J.

    Plants rely on sophisticated mechanisms to interpret the constant bombardment of incoming signals so they can adjust their growth accordingly. The environmental cues of gravity and light are particularly important for plant growth and development. While gravitropism has been extensively studied in roots, there has been increased emphasis on understanding the cellular and molecular basis of root phototropism. In addition to the blue-light-based negative phototropism, roots also exhibit a recently discovered positive phototropism in response to red light. In this paper, we characterize this red-light-based phototropism in roots of Arabidopsis.

  19. Shoot phototropism in higher plants: new light through old concepts.

    PubMed

    Christie, John M; Murphy, Angus S

    2013-01-01

    Light is a key environmental factor that drives many aspects of plant growth and development. Phototropism, the reorientation of growth toward or away from light, represents one of these important adaptive processes. Modern studies of phototropism began with experiments conducted by Charles Darwin demonstrating that light perception at the shoot apex of grass coleoptiles induces differential elongation in the lower epidermal cells. This led to the discovery of the plant growth hormone auxin and the Cholodny-Went hypothesis attributing differential tropic bending to lateral auxin relocalization. In the past two decades, molecular-genetic analyses in the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana has identified the principal photoreceptors for phototropism and their mechanism of activation. In addition, several protein families of auxin transporters have been identified. Despite extensive efforts, however, it still remains unclear as to how photoreceptor activation regulates lateral auxin transport to establish phototropic growth. This review aims to summarize major developments from over the last century and how these advances shape our current understanding of higher plant phototropism. Recent progress in phototropism research and the way in which this research is shedding new light on old concepts, including the Cholodny-Went hypothesis, is also highlighted.

  20. PIN auxin efflux carriers are necessary for pulse-induced but not continuous light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2012-10-01

    Auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are thought to have central roles in regulating asymmetrical auxin translocation during tropic responses, including gravitropism and phototropism, in plants. Although PIN3 is known to be involved in phototropism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), no severe defects of phototropism in any of the pin mutants have been reported. We show here that the pulse-induced, first positive phototropism is impaired partially in pin1, pin3, and pin7 single mutants, and severely in triple mutants. In contrast, such impairment was not observed in continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism. Analysis with an auxin-reporter gene demonstrated that PIN3-mediated auxin gradients participate in pulse-induced phototropism but not in continuous-light-induced phototropism. Similar functional separation was also applicable to PINOID, a regulator of PIN localization. Our results strongly suggest the existence of functionally distinct mechanisms i.e. a PIN-dependent mechanism in which transient stimulation is sufficient to induce phototropism, and a PIN-independent mechanism that requires continuous stimulation and does not operate in the former phototropism process. Although a previous study has proposed that blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins, control PIN localization through the transcriptional down-regulation of PINOID, we could not detect this blue-light-dependent down-regulation event, suggesting that other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved in phototropin-mediated phototropic responses.

  1. The Phycomyces madA gene encodes a blue-light photoreceptor for phototropism and other light responses.

    PubMed

    Idnurm, Alexander; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Corrochano, Luis M; Sanz, Catalina; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Eslava, Arturo P; Heitman, Joseph

    2006-03-21

    Phycomyces blakesleeanus is a filamentous zygomycete fungus that produces striking elongated single cells that extend up to 10 cm into the air, with each such sporangiophore supporting a sphere containing the spores for dispersal. This organism has served as a model for the detection of environmental signals as diverse as light, chemicals, touch, wind, gravity, and adjacent objects. In particular, sporangiophore growth is regulated by light, and it exhibits phototropism by bending toward near-UV and blue wavelengths and away from far-UV wavelengths in a manner that is physiologically similar to plant phototropic responses. The Phycomyces madA mutants were first isolated more than 40 years ago, and they exhibit reduced sensitivity to light. Here, we identify two (duplicated) homologs in the White Collar 1 family of blue-light photoreceptors in Phycomyces. We describe that the madA mutant strains contain point mutations in one of these genes and that these mutations cosegregate with a defect in phototropism after genetic crosses. Thus, the phototropic responses of fungi through madA and plants through phototropin rely on diverse proteins; however, these proteins share a conserved flavin-binding domain for photon detection.

  2. The Phycomyces madA gene encodes a blue-light photoreceptor for phototropism and other light responses

    PubMed Central

    Idnurm, Alexander; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Corrochano, Luis M.; Sanz, Catalina; Iturriaga, Enrique A.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Heitman, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Phycomyces blakesleeanus is a filamentous zygomycete fungus that produces striking elongated single cells that extend up to 10 cm into the air, with each such sporangiophore supporting a sphere containing the spores for dispersal. This organism has served as a model for the detection of environmental signals as diverse as light, chemicals, touch, wind, gravity, and adjacent objects. In particular, sporangiophore growth is regulated by light, and it exhibits phototropism by bending toward near-UV and blue wavelengths and away from far-UV wavelengths in a manner that is physiologically similar to plant phototropic responses. The Phycomyces madA mutants were first isolated more than 40 years ago, and they exhibit reduced sensitivity to light. Here, we identify two (duplicated) homologs in the White Collar 1 family of blue-light photoreceptors in Phycomyces. We describe that the madA mutant strains contain point mutations in one of these genes and that these mutations cosegregate with a defect in phototropism after genetic crosses. Thus, the phototropic responses of fungi through madA and plants through phototropin rely on diverse proteins; however, these proteins share a conserved flavin-binding domain for photon detection. PMID:16537433

  3. The Rice COLEOPTILE PHOTOTROPISM1 gene encoding an ortholog of Arabidopsis NPH3 is required for phototropism of coleoptiles and lateral translocation of auxin.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Takano, Makoto; Neumann, Ralf; Iino, Moritoshi

    2005-01-01

    We isolated a mutant, named coleoptile phototropism1 (cpt1), from gamma-ray-mutagenized japonica-type rice (Oryza sativa). This mutant showed no coleoptile phototropism and severely reduced root phototropism after continuous stimulation. A map-based cloning strategy and transgenic complementation test were applied to demonstrate that a NPH3-like gene deleted in the mutant corresponds to CPT1. Phylogenetic analysis of putative CPT1 homologs of rice and related proteins indicated that CPT1 has an orthologous relationship with Arabidopsis thaliana NPH3. These results, along with those for Arabidopsis, demonstrate that NPH3/CPT1 is a key signal transduction component of higher plant phototropism. In an extended study with the cpt1 mutant, it was found that phototropic differential growth is accompanied by a CPT1-independent inhibition of net growth. Kinetic investigation further indicated that a small phototropism occurs in cpt1 coleoptiles. This response, induced only transiently, was thought to be caused by the CPT1-independent growth inhibition. The 3H-indole-3-acetic acid applied to the coleoptile tip was asymmetrically distributed between the two sides of phototropically responding coleoptiles. However, no asymmetry was induced in cpt1 coleoptiles, indicating that lateral translocation of auxin occurs downstream of CPT1. It is concluded that the CPT1-dependent major phototropism of coleoptiles is achieved by lateral auxin translocation and subsequent growth redistribution.

  4. The Rice COLEOPTILE PHOTOTROPISM1 Gene Encoding an Ortholog of Arabidopsis NPH3 Is Required for Phototropism of Coleoptiles and Lateral Translocation of AuxinW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Takano, Makoto; Neumann, Ralf; Iino, Moritoshi

    2005-01-01

    We isolated a mutant, named coleoptile phototropism1 (cpt1), from γ-ray–mutagenized japonica-type rice (Oryza sativa). This mutant showed no coleoptile phototropism and severely reduced root phototropism after continuous stimulation. A map-based cloning strategy and transgenic complementation test were applied to demonstrate that a NPH3-like gene deleted in the mutant corresponds to CPT1. Phylogenetic analysis of putative CPT1 homologs of rice and related proteins indicated that CPT1 has an orthologous relationship with Arabidopsis thaliana NPH3. These results, along with those for Arabidopsis, demonstrate that NPH3/CPT1 is a key signal transduction component of higher plant phototropism. In an extended study with the cpt1 mutant, it was found that phototropic differential growth is accompanied by a CPT1-independent inhibition of net growth. Kinetic investigation further indicated that a small phototropism occurs in cpt1 coleoptiles. This response, induced only transiently, was thought to be caused by the CPT1-independent growth inhibition. The 3H-indole-3-acetic acid applied to the coleoptile tip was asymmetrically distributed between the two sides of phototropically responding coleoptiles. However, no asymmetry was induced in cpt1 coleoptiles, indicating that lateral translocation of auxin occurs downstream of CPT1. It is concluded that the CPT1-dependent major phototropism of coleoptiles is achieved by lateral auxin translocation and subsequent growth redistribution. PMID:15598797

  5. Phototropins Function in High-Intensity Blue Light-Induced Hypocotyl Phototropism in Arabidopsis by Altering Cytosolic Calcium1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Yan-Liang; Qiao, Xin-Rong; Wang, Jin; Wang, Lin-Dan; Xu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2), the blue light receptors in plants, regulate hypocotyl phototropism in a fluence-dependent manner. Especially under high fluence rates of blue light (HBL), the redundant function mediated by both phot1 and phot2 drastically restricts the understanding of the roles of phot2. Here, systematic analysis of phototropin-related mutants and overexpression transgenic lines revealed that HBL specifically induced a transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyls and that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was primarily attributed to phot2. Pharmacological and genetic experiments illustrated that HBL-induced Ca2+ increases were modulated differently by phot1 and phot2. Phot2 mediated the HBL-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt mainly by an inner store-dependent Ca2+-release pathway, not by activating plasma membrane Ca2+ channels. Further analysis showed that the increase in [Ca2+]cyt was possibly responsible for HBL-induced hypocotyl phototropism. An inhibitor of auxin efflux carrier exhibited significant inhibitions of both phototropism and increases in [Ca2+]cyt, which indicates that polar auxin transport is possibly involved in HBL-induced responses. Moreover, PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 (PKS1), the phototropin-related signaling element identified, interacted physically with phototropins, auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED1 and calcium-binding protein CALMODULIN4, in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and HBL-induced phototropism was impaired in pks multiple mutants, indicating the role of the PKS family in HBL-induced phototropism. Together, these results provide new insights into the functions of phototropins and highlight a potential integration point through which Ca2+ signaling-related HBL modulates hypocotyl phototropic responses. PMID:23674105

  6. Blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization for root negative phototropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-10-01

    Root negative phototropism is an important response in plants. Although blue light is known to mediate this response, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying root negative phototropism remain unclear. Here, we report that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 3 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. Unilateral blue-light illumination polarized PIN3 to the outer lateral membrane of columella cells at the illuminated root side, and increased auxin activity at the illuminated side of roots, where auxin promotes growth and causes roots bending away from the light source. Furthermore, root negative phototropic response and blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization were modulated by a brefeldin A-sensitive, GNOM-dependent, trafficking pathway and by phot1-regulated PINOID (PID)/PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A (PP2A) activity. Our results indicate that blue-light-induced PIN3 polarization is needed for asymmetric auxin distribution during root negative phototropic response.

  7. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  8. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  9. PIN Auxin Efflux Carriers Are Necessary for Pulse-Induced But Not Continuous Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are thought to have central roles in regulating asymmetrical auxin translocation during tropic responses, including gravitropism and phototropism, in plants. Although PIN3 is known to be involved in phototropism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), no severe defects of phototropism in any of the pin mutants have been reported. We show here that the pulse-induced, first positive phototropism is impaired partially in pin1, pin3, and pin7 single mutants, and severely in triple mutants. In contrast, such impairment was not observed in continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism. Analysis with an auxin-reporter gene demonstrated that PIN3-mediated auxin gradients participate in pulse-induced phototropism but not in continuous-light-induced phototropism. Similar functional separation was also applicable to PINOID, a regulator of PIN localization. Our results strongly suggest the existence of functionally distinct mechanisms i.e. a PIN-dependent mechanism in which transient stimulation is sufficient to induce phototropism, and a PIN-independent mechanism that requires continuous stimulation and does not operate in the former phototropism process. Although a previous study has proposed that blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins, control PIN localization through the transcriptional down-regulation of PINOID, we could not detect this blue-light-dependent down-regulation event, suggesting that other as yet unknown mechanisms are involved in phototropin-mediated phototropic responses. PMID:22843667

  10. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE 1 is a phototropin 1 binding protein required for phototropism.

    PubMed

    Lariguet, Patricia; Schepens, Isabelle; Hodgson, Daniel; Pedmale, Ullas V; Trevisan, Martine; Kami, Chitose; de Carbonnel, Matthieu; Alonso, José M; Ecker, Joseph R; Liscum, Emmanuel; Fankhauser, Christian

    2006-06-27

    Phototropism, or plant growth in response to unidirectional light, is an adaptive response of crucial importance. Lateral differences in low fluence rates of blue light are detected by phototropin 1 (phot1) in Arabidopsis. Only NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL 3 (NPH3) and root phototropism 2, both belonging to the same family of proteins, have been previously identified as phototropin-interacting signal transducers involved in phototropism. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE (PKS) 1 and PKS2 are two phytochrome signaling components belonging to a small gene family in Arabidopsis (PKS1-PKS4). The strong enhancement of PKS1 expression by blue light and its light induction in the elongation zone of the hypocotyl prompted us to study the function of this gene family during phototropism. Photobiological experiments show that the PKS proteins are critical for hypocotyl phototropism. Furthermore, PKS1 interacts with phot1 and NPH3 in vivo at the plasma membrane and in vitro, indicating that the PKS proteins may function directly with phot1 and NPH3 to mediate phototropism. The phytochromes are known to influence phototropism but the mechanism involved is still unclear. We show that PKS1 induction by a pulse of blue light is phytochrome A-dependent, suggesting that the PKS proteins may provide a molecular link between these two photoreceptor families.

  11. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE 1 is a phototropin 1 binding protein required for phototropism

    PubMed Central

    Lariguet, Patricia; Schepens, Isabelle; Hodgson, Daniel; Pedmale, Ullas V.; Trevisan, Martine; Kami, Chitose; de Carbonnel, Matthieu; Alonso, José M.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Liscum, Emmanuel; Fankhauser, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Phototropism, or plant growth in response to unidirectional light, is an adaptive response of crucial importance. Lateral differences in low fluence rates of blue light are detected by phototropin 1 (phot1) in Arabidopsis. Only NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL 3 (NPH3) and root phototropism 2, both belonging to the same family of proteins, have been previously identified as phototropin-interacting signal transducers involved in phototropism. PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE (PKS) 1 and PKS2 are two phytochrome signaling components belonging to a small gene family in Arabidopsis (PKS1–PKS4). The strong enhancement of PKS1 expression by blue light and its light induction in the elongation zone of the hypocotyl prompted us to study the function of this gene family during phototropism. Photobiological experiments show that the PKS proteins are critical for hypocotyl phototropism. Furthermore, PKS1 interacts with phot1 and NPH3 in vivo at the plasma membrane and in vitro, indicating that the PKS proteins may function directly with phot1 and NPH3 to mediate phototropism. The phytochromes are known to influence phototropism but the mechanism involved is still unclear. We show that PKS1 induction by a pulse of blue light is phytochrome A-dependent, suggesting that the PKS proteins may provide a molecular link between these two photoreceptor families. PMID:16777956

  12. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism.

    PubMed

    Mullen, J L; Wolverton, C; Ishikawa, H; Hangarter, R P; Evans, M L

    2002-09-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  13. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  14. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  15. Arabidopsis G-protein β subunit AGB1 interacts with NPH3 and is involved in phototropism.

    PubMed

    Kansup, Jeeraporn; Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2014-02-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (Gα, Gβ and Gγ) have pleiotropic roles in plants, but molecular mechanisms underlying them remain to be elucidated. Here we show that Arabidopsis Gβ (AGB1) interacts with NPH3, a regulator of phototropism. Yeast two-hybrid assays, in vitro pull-down assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that AGB1 and NPH3 physically interact. NPH3-null mutation (nph3) is known to completely abolish hypocotyl phototropism. Loss-of-function mutants of AGB1 (agb1-1 and agb1-2) showed decreased hypocotyl phototropism, and agb1/nph3 double mutants showed no hypocotyl phototropism. These results suggest that AGB1 is involved in the NPH3-mediated regulation of phototropism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypocotyl growth orientation in blue light is determined by phytochrome A inhibition of gravitropism and phototropin promotion of phototropism.

    PubMed

    Lariguet, Patricia; Fankhauser, Christian

    2004-12-01

    How developing seedlings integrate gravitropic and phototropic stimuli to determine their direction of growth is poorly understood. In this study we tested whether blue light influences hypocotyl gravitropism in Arabidopsis. Phototropin1 (phot1) triggers phototropism under low fluence rates of blue light but, at least in the dark, has no effect on gravitropism. By analyzing the growth orientation of phototropism-deficient seedlings in response to gravitropic and phototropic stimulations we show that blue light not only triggers phototropism but also represses hypocotyl gravitropism. At low fluence rates of blue light phot1 mutants were agravitropic. In contrast, phyAphot1 double mutants grew exclusively according to gravity demonstrating that phytochrome A (phyA) is necessary to inhibit gravitropism. Analyses of phot1cry1cry2 triple mutants indicate that cryptochromes play a minor role in this response. Thus the optimal growth orientation of hypocotyls is determined by the action of phyA-suppressing gravitropism and the phototropin-triggering phototropism. It has long been known that phytochromes promote phototropism but the mechanism involved is still unknown. Our data show that by inhibiting gravitropism phyA acts as a positive regulator of phototropism.

  17. OPERATIONAL TEST AND EVALUATION OF PHOTOTROPIC GOGGLES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Irreversible Phototropic Filter Device is one of many such systems. Forty-nine Air Defense Command and twenty-four Tactical Air Command aircrews evaluated the...indicated that: The goggles do not integrate with the oxygen mask, helmet and visor; It is not practicable to carry additional phototropic lenses for...in-flight changes. The Irreversible Phototropic Filter Device is operationally unacceptable for use by aircrew members. Recommend that ASD continue efforts to develop a suitable device for flashblindness protection. (Author)

  18. Phycomyces MADB interacts with MADA to form the primary photoreceptor complex for fungal phototropism

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Catalina; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Idnurm, Alexander; Christie, John M.; Heitman, Joseph; Corrochano, Luis M.; Eslava, Arturo P.

    2009-01-01

    The fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus reacts to environmental signals, including light, gravity, touch, and the presence of nearby objects, by changing the speed and direction of growth of its fruiting body (sporangiophore). Phototropism, growth toward light, shares many features in fungi and plants but the molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Phycomyces mutants with altered phototropism were isolated ≈40 years ago and found to have mutations in the mad genes. All of the responses to light in Phycomyces require the products of the madA and madB genes. We showed that madA encodes a protein similar to the Neurospora blue-light photoreceptor, zinc-finger protein WC-1. We show here that madB encodes a protein similar to the Neurospora zinc-finger protein WC-2. MADA and MADB interact to form a complex in yeast 2-hybrid assays and when coexpressed in E. coli, providing evidence that phototropism and other responses to light are mediated by a photoresponsive transcription factor complex. The Phycomyces genome contains 3 genes similar to wc-1, and 4 genes similar to wc-2, many of which are regulated by light in a madA or madB dependent manner. We did not detect any interactions between additional WC proteins in yeast 2-hybrid assays, which suggest that MADA and MADB form the major photoreceptor complex in Phycomyces. However, the presence of multiple wc genes in Phycomyces may enable perception across a broad range of light intensities, and may provide specialized photoreceptors for distinct photoresponses. PMID:19380729

  19. Phycomyces MADB interacts with MADA to form the primary photoreceptor complex for fungal phototropism.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Catalina; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Idnurm, Alexander; Christie, John M; Heitman, Joseph; Corrochano, Luis M; Eslava, Arturo P

    2009-04-28

    The fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus reacts to environmental signals, including light, gravity, touch, and the presence of nearby objects, by changing the speed and direction of growth of its fruiting body (sporangiophore). Phototropism, growth toward light, shares many features in fungi and plants but the molecular mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Phycomyces mutants with altered phototropism were isolated approximately 40 years ago and found to have mutations in the mad genes. All of the responses to light in Phycomyces require the products of the madA and madB genes. We showed that madA encodes a protein similar to the Neurospora blue-light photoreceptor, zinc-finger protein WC-1. We show here that madB encodes a protein similar to the Neurospora zinc-finger protein WC-2. MADA and MADB interact to form a complex in yeast 2-hybrid assays and when coexpressed in E. coli, providing evidence that phototropism and other responses to light are mediated by a photoresponsive transcription factor complex. The Phycomyces genome contains 3 genes similar to wc-1, and 4 genes similar to wc-2, many of which are regulated by light in a madA or madB dependent manner. We did not detect any interactions between additional WC proteins in yeast 2-hybrid assays, which suggest that MADA and MADB form the major photoreceptor complex in Phycomyces. However, the presence of multiple wc genes in Phycomyces may enable perception across a broad range of light intensities, and may provide specialized photoreceptors for distinct photoresponses.

  20. Root phototropism: from dogma to the mechanism of blue light perception.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Briggs, Winslow R

    2012-03-01

    In roots, the "hidden half" of all land plants, gravity is an important signal that determines the direction of growth in the soil. Hence, positive gravitropism has been studied in detail. However, since the 19th century, the response of roots toward unilateral light has also been analyzed. Based on studies on white mustard (Sinapis alba) seedlings, botanists have concluded that all roots are negatively phototropic. This "Sinapis-dogma" was refuted in a seminal study on root phototropism published a century ago, where it was shown that less then half of the 166 plant species investigated behave like S. alba, whereas 53% displayed no phototropic response at all. Here we summarize the history of research on root phototropism, discuss this phenomenon with reference to unpublished data on garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seedlings, and describe the effects of blue light on the negative bending response in Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana). The ecological significance of root phototropism is discussed and the relationships between gravi- and phototropism are outlined, with respect to the starch-statolith-theory of gravity perception. Finally, we present an integrative model of gravi- and blue light perception in the root tip of Arabidopsis seedlings. This hypothesis is based on our current view of the starch-statolith-concept and light sensing via the cytoplasmic red/blue light photoreceptor phytochrome A and the plasma membrane-associated blue light receptor phototropin-1. Open questions and possible research agendas for the future are summarized.

  1. Light-dependent gravitropism and negative phototropism of inflorescence stems in a dominant Aux/IAA mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, axr2.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuko; Sasaki, Shu; Matsuzaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Kotaro T

    2014-09-01

    Gravitropism and phototropism of the primary inflorescence stems were examined in a dominant Aux/IAA mutant of Arabidopsis, axr2/iaa7, which did not display either tropism in hypocotyls. axr2-1 stems completely lacked gravitropism in the dark but slowly regained it in light condition. Though wild-type stems showed positive phototropism, axr2 stems displayed negative phototropism with essentially the same light fluence-response curve as the wild type (WT). Application of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid-containing lanolin to the stem tips enhanced the positive phototropism of WT, and reduced the negative phototropism of axr2. Decapitation of stems caused a small negative phototropism in WT, but did not affect the negative phototropism of axr2. p-glycoprotein 1 (pgp1) pgp19 double mutants showed no phototropism, while decapitated double mutants exhibited negative phototropism. Expression of auxin-responsive IAA14/SLR, IAA19/MSG2 and SAUR50 genes was reduced in axr2 and pgp1 pgp19 stems relative to that of WT. These suggest that the phototropic response of stem is proportional to the auxin supply from the shoot apex, and that negative phototropism may be a basal response to unilateral blue-light irradiation when the levels of auxin or auxin signaling are reduced to the minimal level in the primary stems. In contrast, all of these treatments reduced or did not affect gravitropism in wild-type or axr2 stems. Tropic responses of the transgenic lines that expressed axr2-1 protein by the endodermis-specific promoter suggest that AXR2-dependent auxin response in the endodermis plays a more crucial role in gravitropism than in phototropism in stems but no significant roles in either tropism in hypocotyls.

  2. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  3. Phytochrome A Mediates Blue-Light Enhancement of Second-Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stuart; Hart, Jaynee E; Rasch, Patrick; Walker, Catriona H; Christie, John M

    2016-01-01

    Hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings is primarily mediated by the blue-light receptor kinase phototropin 1 (phot1). Phot1-mediated curvature to continuous unilateral blue light irradiation (0.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) is enhanced by overhead pre-treatment with red light (20 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 15 min) through the action of phytochrome (phyA). Here, we show that pre-treatment with blue light is equally as effective in eliciting phototropic enhancement and is dependent on phyA. Although blue light pre-treatment was sufficient to activate early phot1 signaling events, phot1 autophosphorylation in vivo was not found to be saturated, as assessed by subsequently measuring phot1 kinase activity in vitro. However, enhancement effects by red and blue light pre-treatment were not observed at higher intensities of phototropic stimulation (10 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Phototropic enhancement by red and blue light pre-treatments to 0.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1) unilateral blue light irradiation was also lacking in transgenic Arabidopsis where PHOT1 expression was restricted to the epidermis. Together, these findings indicate that phyA-mediated effects on phot1 signaling are restricted to low intensities of phototropic stimulation and originate from tissues other than the epidermis.

  4. Phytochrome A Mediates Blue-Light Enhancement of Second-Positive Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Stuart; Hart, Jaynee E.; Rasch, Patrick; Walker, Catriona H.; Christie, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings is primarily mediated by the blue-light receptor kinase phototropin 1 (phot1). Phot1-mediated curvature to continuous unilateral blue light irradiation (0.5 μmol m−2 s−1) is enhanced by overhead pre-treatment with red light (20 μmol m−2 s−1 for 15 min) through the action of phytochrome (phyA). Here, we show that pre-treatment with blue light is equally as effective in eliciting phototropic enhancement and is dependent on phyA. Although blue light pre-treatment was sufficient to activate early phot1 signaling events, phot1 autophosphorylation in vivo was not found to be saturated, as assessed by subsequently measuring phot1 kinase activity in vitro. However, enhancement effects by red and blue light pre-treatment were not observed at higher intensities of phototropic stimulation (10 μmol m−2 s−1). Phototropic enhancement by red and blue light pre-treatments to 0.5 μmol m−2 s−1 unilateral blue light irradiation was also lacking in transgenic Arabidopsis where PHOT1 expression was restricted to the epidermis. Together, these findings indicate that phyA-mediated effects on phot1 signaling are restricted to low intensities of phototropic stimulation and originate from tissues other than the epidermis. PMID:27014313

  5. Regulated proteolysis in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Ute

    2005-10-01

    Photoreceptors regulate many aspects of development throughout the life cycle of a plant. Recent advances have demonstrated the importance of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in the control of development by light. Both some of the photoreceptors themselves and, in particular, transcription factors that are involved in transducing the light signal are subject to regulated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

  6. Arabidopsis nph1 and npl1: Blue light receptors that mediate both phototropism and chloroplast relocation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E.; Christie, John M.; Briggs, Winslow R.; Wada, Masamitsu; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2001-01-01

    UV-A/blue light acts to regulate a number of physiological processes in higher plants. These include light-driven chloroplast movement and phototropism. The NPH1 gene of Arabidopsis encodes an autophosphorylating protein kinase that functions as a photoreceptor for phototropism in response to low-intensity blue light. However, nph1 mutants have been reported to exhibit normal phototropic curvature under high-intensity blue light, indicating the presence of an additional phototropic receptor. A likely candidate is the nph1 homologue, npl1, which has recently been shown to mediate the avoidance response of chloroplasts to high-intensity blue light in Arabidopsis. Here we demonstrate that npl1, like nph1, noncovalently binds the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN) within two specialized PAS domains, termed LOV domains. Furthermore, when expressed in insect cells, npl1, like nph1, undergoes light-dependent autophosphorylation, indicating that npl1 also functions as a light receptor kinase. Consistent with this conclusion, we show that a nph1npl1 double mutant exhibits an impaired phototropic response under both low- and high-intensity blue light. Hence, npl1 functions as a second phototropic receptor under high fluence rate conditions and is, in part, functionally redundant to nph1. We also demonstrate that both chloroplast accumulation in response to low-intensity light and chloroplast avoidance movement in response to high-intensity light are lacking in the nph1npl1 double mutant. Our findings therefore indicate that nph1 and npl1 show partially overlapping functions in two different responses, phototropism and chloroplast relocation, in a fluence rate-dependent manner. PMID:11371609

  7. Arabidopsis nph1 and npl1: blue light receptors that mediate both phototropism and chloroplast relocation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Kagawa, T; Kasahara, M; Swartz, T E; Christie, J M; Briggs, W R; Wada, M; Okada, K

    2001-06-05

    UV-A/blue light acts to regulate a number of physiological processes in higher plants. These include light-driven chloroplast movement and phototropism. The NPH1 gene of Arabidopsis encodes an autophosphorylating protein kinase that functions as a photoreceptor for phototropism in response to low-intensity blue light. However, nph1 mutants have been reported to exhibit normal phototropic curvature under high-intensity blue light, indicating the presence of an additional phototropic receptor. A likely candidate is the nph1 homologue, npl1, which has recently been shown to mediate the avoidance response of chloroplasts to high-intensity blue light in Arabidopsis. Here we demonstrate that npl1, like nph1, noncovalently binds the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN) within two specialized PAS domains, termed LOV domains. Furthermore, when expressed in insect cells, npl1, like nph1, undergoes light-dependent autophosphorylation, indicating that npl1 also functions as a light receptor kinase. Consistent with this conclusion, we show that a nph1 npl1 double mutant exhibits an impaired phototropic response under both low- and high-intensity blue light. Hence, npl1 functions as a second phototropic receptor under high fluence rate conditions and is, in part, functionally redundant to nph1. We also demonstrate that both chloroplast accumulation in response to low-intensity light and chloroplast avoidance movement in response to high-intensity light are lacking in the nph1 npl1 double mutant. Our findings therefore indicate that nph1 and npl1 show partially overlapping functions in two different responses, phototropism and chloroplast relocation, in a fluence rate-dependent manner.

  8. Phototropism: a "simple" physiological response modulated by multiple interacting photosensory-response pathways.

    PubMed

    Liscum, E; Stowe-Evans, E L

    2000-09-01

    Phototropism is the process by which plants reorient growth of various organs, most notably stems, in response to lateral differences in light quantity and/or quality. The ubiquitous nature of the phototropic response in the plant kingdom implies that it provides some adaptive evolutionary advantage. Upon visual inspection it is tempting to surmise that phototropic curvatures result from a relatively simple growth response to a directional stimulus. However, detailed photophysiological, and more recently genetic and molecular, studies have demonstrated that phototropism is in fact regulated by complex interactions among several photosensory systems. At least two receptors, phototropin and a presently unidentified receptor, appear to mediate the primary photoreception of directional blue light cues in dark-grown plants. PhyB may also function as a primary receptor to detect lateral increases in far-red light in neighbor-avoidance responses of light-grown plants. Phytochromes (phyA and phyB at a minimum) also appear to function as secondary receptors to regulate adaptation processes that ultimately modulate the magnitude of curvature induced by primary photoperception. As a result of the interactions of these multiple photosensory systems plants are able to maximize the adaptive advantage of the phototropic response in ever changing light environments.

  9. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  10. Novel hydrotropism mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana and their altered waving response and phototropism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiko; Kobayashi, Akie; Kakimoto, Yoko; Fujii, Nobuharu; Takahashi, Hideyuki

    2003-10-01

    Roots display positive hydrotropism in response to a moisture gradient, which is important for plants to escape from water stress and regulate the directional growth by interacting with other growth movements such as gravitropism, phototropism and waving response. On Earth, hydrotropism is interfered by gravitropism in particular, so that microgravity conditions or agravitropic mutants have been used for the study of hydrotropism. However, we have recently established an experimental system for the study of hydrotropism in Arabidopsis roots that easily develop hydrotropism in response to moisture gradient by overcoming gravitropism. Using the Arabidopsis system, we isolated hydrotropism mutants named root hydrotropism (rhy). In the present study, we examined the hydrotropism, gravitropism, phototropism, waving response and elongation growth of rhy4 and rhy5 roots that were defective in positive hydrotropism. Interestingly, rhy4 roots curved away from the water source and showed a reduced waving response. Both rhy4 and rhy5 showed normal gravitropism and a slight reduction in phototropism. These results suggest that there is a mutual molecular mechanism underlying hydrotropism, waving response and/or phototropism. Thus, we have obtained novel hydrotropic mutants that will be used for revealing molecular mechanism of root hydrotropism and its interaction with waving response and/or phototropism.

  11. Arabidopsis NPH3: A NPH1 photoreceptor-interacting protein essential for phototropism.

    PubMed

    Motchoulski, A; Liscum, E

    1999-10-29

    Phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in response to a blue light source is initiated by nonphototropic hypocotyl 1 (NPH1), a light-activated serine-threonine protein kinase. Mutations in three loci [NPH2, root phototropism 2 (RPT2), and NPH3] disrupt early signaling occurring downstream of the NPH1 photoreceptor. The NPH3 gene, now cloned, encodes a NPH1-interacting protein. NPH3 is a member of a large protein family, apparently specific to higher plants, and may function as an adapter or scaffold protein to bring together the enzymatic components of a NPH1-activated phosphorelay.

  12. Disruptions in AUX1-dependent auxin influx alter hypocotyl phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Bethany B; Stowe-Evans, Emily L; Harper, Reneé M; Celaya, R Brandon; Ljung, Karin; Sandberg, Göran; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Phototropism represents a differential growth response by which plant organs can respond adaptively to changes in the direction of incident light to optimize leaf/stem positioning for photosynthetic light capture and root growth orientation for water/nutrient acquisition. Studies over the past few years have identified a number of components in the signaling pathway(s) leading to development of phototropic curvatures in hypocotyls. These include the phototropin photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2) that perceive directional blue-light (BL) cues and then stimulate signaling, leading to relocalization of the plant hormone auxin, as well as the auxin response factor NPH4/ARF7 that responds to changes in local auxin concentrations to directly mediate expression of genes likely encoding proteins necessary for development of phototropic curvatures. While null mutations in NPH4/ARF7 condition an aphototropic response to unidirectional BL, seedlings carrying the same mutations recover BL-dependent phototropic responsiveness if co-irradiated with red light (RL) or pre-treated with either ethylene. In the present study, we identify second-site enhancer mutations in the nph4 background that abrogate these recovery responses. One of these mutations--map1 (modifier of arf7 phenotypes 1)--was found to represent a missense allele of AUX1--a gene encoding a high-affinity auxin influx carrier previously associated with a number of root responses. Pharmacological studies and analyses of additional aux1 mutants confirmed that AUX1 functions as a modulator of hypocotyl phototropism. Moreover, we have found that the strength of dependence of hypocotyl phototropism on AUX1-mediated auxin influx is directly related to the auxin responsiveness of the seedling in question.

  13. KINETIC STUDIES OF PHOTOTROPIC REACTIONS OF TRIPHENYLMETHANE LEUCONITRILES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The mechanism of the phototropic reaction of triphenylmethane leuconitriles was studied in considerable detail. For the reaction between methyl...violet and cyande is phototropic and on excitation with ultraviolet light will revert to the dye and cyanide. The role of the solvent in the... phototropic process is considered. The excitation energy of the photoropic process is estabished. (Author)

  14. The Arabidopsis PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE2 Protein Is a Phototropin Signaling Element That Regulates Leaf Flattening and Leaf Positioning1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    de Carbonnel, Matthieu; Davis, Phillip; Roelfsema, M. Rob G.; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Schepens, Isabelle; Lariguet, Patricia; Geisler, Markus; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro; Hangarter, Roger; Fankhauser, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the blue light photoreceptor phototropins (phot1 and phot2) fine-tune the photosynthetic status of the plant by controlling several important adaptive processes in response to environmental light variations. These processes include stem and petiole phototropism (leaf positioning), leaf flattening, stomatal opening, and chloroplast movements. The PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE (PKS) protein family comprises four members in Arabidopsis (PKS1–PKS4). PKS1 is a novel phot1 signaling element during phototropism, as it interacts with phot1 and the important signaling element NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3) and is required for normal phot1-mediated phototropism. In this study, we have analyzed more globally the role of three PKS members (PKS1, PKS2, and PKS4). Systematic analysis of mutants reveals that PKS2 (and to a lesser extent PKS1) act in the same subset of phototropin-controlled responses as NPH3, namely leaf flattening and positioning. PKS1, PKS2, and NPH3 coimmunoprecipitate with both phot1-green fluorescent protein and phot2-green fluorescent protein in leaf extracts. Genetic experiments position PKS2 within phot1 and phot2 pathways controlling leaf positioning and leaf flattening, respectively. NPH3 can act in both phot1 and phot2 pathways, and synergistic interactions observed between pks2 and nph3 mutants suggest complementary roles of PKS2 and NPH3 during phototropin signaling. Finally, several observations further suggest that PKS2 may regulate leaf flattening and positioning by controlling auxin homeostasis. Together with previous findings, our results indicate that the PKS proteins represent an important family of phototropin signaling proteins. PMID:20071603

  15. Phototropism: translating light into directional growth.

    PubMed

    Hohm, Tim; Preuten, Tobias; Fankhauser, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Phototropism allows plants to align their photosynthetic tissues with incoming light. The direction of incident light is sensed by the phototropin family of blue light photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis), which are light-activated protein kinases. The kinase activity of phototropins and phosphorylation of residues in the activation loop of their kinase domains are essential for the phototropic response. These initial steps trigger the formation of the auxin gradient across the hypocotyl that leads to asymmetric growth. The molecular events between photoreceptor activation and the growth response are only starting to be elucidated. In this review, we discuss the major steps leading from light perception to directional growth concentrating on Arabidopsis. In addition, we highlight links that connect these different steps enabling the phototropic response.

  16. Phototropism in Arabidopsis roots is mediated by two sensory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Ruppel, Nicholas J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    Phototropism has been well-characterized in stems and stem-like organs, but there have been relatively few studies of root phototropism. Our experiments suggest that there are two photosensory systems that elicit phototropic responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: a previously identified blue-light photoreceptor system mediated by phototropin (= NPH1 protein) and a novel red-light-based mechanism. The phototropic responses in roots are much weaker than the graviresponse, which competes with and often masks the phototropic response. It was through the use of mutant plants with a weakened graviresponse that we were able to identify the activity of the red-light-dependent phototropic system. In addition, the red-light-based photoresponse in roots is even weaker compared to the blue-light response. Our results also suggest that phytochrome may be involved in mediating positive phototropism in roots.

  17. Phototropism in Arabidopsis roots is mediated by two sensory systems.

    PubMed

    Kiss, J Z; Ruppel, N J; Hangarter, R P

    2001-01-01

    Phototropism has been well-characterized in stems and stem-like organs, but there have been relatively few studies of root phototropism. Our experiments suggest that there are two photosensory systems that elicit phototropic responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: a previously identified blue-light photoreceptor system mediated by phototropin (=NPH1 protein) and a novel red-light-based mechanism. The phototropic responses in roots are much weaker than the graviresponse, which competes with and often masks the phototropic response. It was through the use of mutant plants with a weakened graviresponse that we were able to identify the activity of the red-light-dependent phototropic system. In addition, the red-light-based photoresponse in roots is even weaker compared to the blue-light response. Our results also suggest that phytochrome may be involved in mediating positive phototropism in roots. c 2001 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, N J; Hangarter, R P; Kiss, J Z

    2001-02-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  19. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, N. J.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  20. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, N. J.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  1. Regulation of CXCR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Busillo, John M.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 belongs to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, and is directly involved in a number of biological processes including organogenesis, hematopoeisis, and immune response. Recent evidence has highlighted the role of CXCR4 in a variety of diseases including HIV, cancer, and WHIM syndrome. Importantly, the involvement of CXCR4 in cancer metastasis and WHIM syndrome appears to be due to dysregulation of the receptor leading to enhanced signaling. Herein we review what is currently known regarding the regulation of CXCR4 and how dysregulation contributes to disease progression. PMID:17169327

  2. Studying Phototropism Using a Small Growth Chamber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maryanna, F.; Llewellyn, Gerald C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive way to construct two small growth chambers for studying phototropism in the science classroom. One chamber is designed to illustrate how plants grow around obstacles to reach light and the other to illustrate directional light responses. (HM)

  3. PKS1 plays a role in red-light-based positive phototropism in roots.

    PubMed

    Molas, Maria Lia; Kiss, John Z

    2008-06-01

    Aerial parts of plants curve towards the light (i.e. positive phototropism), and roots typically grow away from the light (i.e. negative phototropism). In addition, Arabidopsis roots exhibit positive phototropism relative to red light (RL), and this response is mediated by phytochromes A and B (phyA and phyB). Upon light stimulation, phyA and phyB interact with the phytochrome kinase substrate (PKS1) in the cytoplasm. In this study, we investigated the role of PKS1, along with phyA and phyB, in the positive phototropic responses to RL in roots. Using a high-resolution feedback system, we studied the phenotypic responses of roots of phyA, phyB, pks1, phyA pks1 and phyB pks1 null mutants as well as the PKS1-overexpressing line in response to RL. PKS1 emerged as an intermediary in the signalling pathways and appears to promote a negative curvature to RL in roots. In addition, phyA and phyB were both essential for a positive response to RL and act in a complementary fashion. However, either photoreceptor acting without the other results in negative curvature in response to red illumination so that the mode of action differs depending on whether phyA and phyB act independently or together. Our results suggest that PKS1 is part of a signalling pathway independent of phyA and phyB and that PKS1 modulates RL-based root phototropism.

  4. Topology of an intracellular transduction chain (phototropism of Phycomyces): 1. Joint review of functional, temporal, and spatial aspects.

    PubMed

    Wenzler, D; Reinhardt, M; Fukshansky, L

    2001-08-21

    Two light-induced growth reactions in a unicellular cylindrical sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus-vertical growth acceleration under symmetrical irradiation (photomecism) and directional growth under unilateral irradiation (phototropism)-share common input light perception as well as common output growth mechanism but have strongly divergent dynamics and other distinctive features. This divergence culminates in the phototropic paradoxes the main of which states that photomecism shows total adaptation, while phototropism does not adapt. The basis for this contradiction is that the phototropic transduction chain, unlike that of photomecism, faces a spatially non-uniform stimulus and processes a series of spatial patterns (light and absorption profiles, adaptation profile, etc.). The only way to resolve the paradoxes and correlate features of both responses within a single transduction chain is to assume non-local signal transduction, e.g. a cross-talk between different azimuthal locations within the cylindrical cell. On the other hand, to establish the presence of an appropriate cross-talk is equivalent of gaining insight into the topology of the transduction chain. This series of two papers contains a review reconsidering the entire field from this viewpoint (Paper 1) and a mathematical model of pattern transduction which unifies features of phototropism and resolves the paradoxes (Paper 2). At the same time, this is the first "proof of concept" for the "activity/pooling (a/p) networks"-a specific mathematical apparatus designed to analyse systemic properties and control in metabolic pathways. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. A Ras GTPase associated protein is involved in the phototropic and circadian photobiology responses in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Polaino, Silvia; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M.; Shakya, Viplendra P. S.; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Chaudhary, Suman; Sanz, Catalina; Shahriari, Mahdi; Luque, Eva M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Idnurm, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Light is an environmental signal perceived by most eukaryotic organisms and that can have major impacts on their growth and development. The MadC protein in the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus (Mucoromycotina) has been postulated to form part of the photosensory input for phototropism of the fruiting body sporangiophores, but the madC gene has remained unidentified since the 1960s when madC mutants were first isolated. In this study the madC gene was identified by positional cloning. All madC mutant strains contain loss-of-function point mutations within a gene predicted to encode a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for Ras. The madC gene complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ras-GAP ira1 mutant and the encoded MadC protein interacts with P. blakesleeanus Ras homologs in yeast two-hybrid assays, indicating that MadC is a regulator of Ras signaling. Deletion of the homolog in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa affects the circadian clock output, yielding a pattern of asexual conidiation similar to a ras-1 mutant that is used in circadian studies in N. crassa. Thus, MadC is unlikely to be a photosensor, yet is a fundamental link in the photoresponses from blue light perceived by the conserved White Collar complex with Ras signaling in two distantly-related filamentous fungal species. PMID:28322269

  6. PHOTOTROPISM OF GERMINATING MYCELIA OF SOME PARASITIC FUNGI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    uredinales on young wheat plants; Distribution and significance of the phototropism of germinating mycelia -- confirmation of older data, examination of...eight additional uredinales, probable meaning of negative phototropism for the occurrence of infection; Analysis of the stimulus physiology of the...reaction -- the minimum effective illumination intensity, the effective special region, inversion of the phototropic reaction in liquid paraffin, the negative light- growth reaction, the light-sensitive zone.

  7. Asymmetric distribution of auxin correlates with gravitropism and phototropism but not with autostraightening (autotropism) in pea epicotyls.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Iino, Moritoshi

    2006-01-01

    The relationships between the distribution of the native auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and tropisms in the epicotyl of red light-grown pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings have been investigated. The distribution measurement was made in a defined zone of the third internode, using (3)H-IAA applied from the plumule as a tracer. The tropisms investigated were gravitropism, pulse-induced phototropism, and time-dependent phototropism. The investigation was extended to the phase of autostraightening (autotropism) that followed gravitropic curvature. It was found that IAA is asymmetrically distributed between the two halves of the zone, with a greater IAA level occurring on the convex side, at early stages of gravitropic and phototropic curvatures. This asymmetry was found in epidermal peels and, except for one case (pulse-induced phototropism), no asymmetry was detected in whole tissues. It was concluded, in support of earlier results, that auxin asymmetry mediates gravitropism and phototropism and that the epidermis or peripheral cell layers play an important role in the establishment of auxin asymmetry in pea epicotyls. During autostraightening, which results from a reversal of growth asymmetry, the extent of IAA asymmetry was reduced, but its direction was not reversed. This result demonstrated that autostraightening is not regulated through auxin distribution. In this study, the growth on either side of the investigated zone was also measured. In some cases, the measured IAA distribution could not adequately explain the local growth rate, necessitating further detailed investigation.

  8. Anisotropic plant growth due to phototropism.

    PubMed

    Pietruszka, M; Lewicka, S

    2007-01-01

    Phototropism--the directional curvature of organs in response to lateral differences in light intensity and/or quality--represents one of the most rapid and visually obvious reaction of plants to changes in their light environment. It is a topic of fundamental interest to understand the mechanics of plants during growth. We propose a generalization of the scalar Lockhart model (1965) to three dimensional deformation, solve the new equation in two particular cases and compare results with empirical data. We believe that carefully designed experiments linked to our model will provide (by determining the active transport coefficient) a new method for qualitative description of auxin redistribution during phototropism. The proposed method supplements very recent investigations concerning specific auxin-influx and -efflux carriers (LAX and PIN proteins).

  9. Development of experiments on the interaction between gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis for spaceflight studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, J. Z.; Kumar, P.; Molas, M. L.; Correll, M. J.; Bowman, R. N.; Eodice, M. T.; Edelmann, R. E.

    The interaction among tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of a plant We have defined and developed a project to study the interaction between gravitropism and phototropism in plants to be performed in microgravity on the International Space Station Specifically we are interested in the role of phytochromes in modulating tropisms in seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana This project termed TROPI for tropisms is to be performed on the European Modular Cultivation System EMCS which provides an incubator lighting system and high resolution video that are on a centrifuge platform and the experiments will be performed at mu g 1g control and fractional g-levels In order to optimize these spaceflight experiments we have continued ground-based technical tests as well as basic science experiments Long term storage studies of seeds in the TROPI experimental unique equipment EUE were performed and addition of carbon filters to the EUE improved seed germination and seedling growth Since micoarray analyses will be conducted with frozen plant material once samples are returned to earth we performed gene profiling studies using microarrays and quantitative real-time PCR to characterize gene expression changes in roots of seedlings exposed to red light Several genes in signaling pathways acting downstream of phytochromes in red light signaling were identified in roots In addition our results suggest that red and blue light pathways interact in roots and that many elements involved in regulating the responses to

  10. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pava, Matthew J.; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis. PMID:27031992

  11. Endocannabinoid Signaling Regulates Sleep Stability.

    PubMed

    Pava, Matthew J; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Lovinger, David M

    2016-01-01

    The hypnogenic properties of cannabis have been recognized for centuries, but endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) regulation of vigilance states is poorly characterized. We report findings from a series of experiments in mice measuring sleep with polysomnography after various systemic pharmacological manipulations of the endocannabinoid system. Rapid, unbiased scoring of vigilance states was achieved using an automated algorithm that we devised and validated. Increasing endocannabinoid tone with a selective inhibitor of monoacyglycerol lipase (JZL184) or fatty acid amide hydrolase (AM3506) produced a transient increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to an augmentation of the length of NREM bouts (NREM stability). Similarly, direct activation of type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptors with CP47,497 increased NREM stability, but both CP47,497 and JZL184 had a secondary effect that reduced NREM sleep time and stability. This secondary response to these drugs was similar to the early effect of CB1 blockade with the antagonist/inverse agonist AM281, which fragmented NREM sleep. The magnitude of the effects produced by JZL184 and AM281 were dependent on the time of day this drug was administered. While activation of CB1 resulted in only a slight reduction in gamma power, CB1 blockade had dramatic effects on broadband power in the EEG, particularly at low frequencies. However, CB1 blockade did not significantly reduce the rebound in NREM sleep following total sleep deprivation. These results support the hypothesis that endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 is necessary for NREM stability but it is not necessary for sleep homeostasis.

  12. Phototropism and gravitropism in lateral roots of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Miller, Kelley M.; Ogden, Lisa A.; Roth, Kelly K.

    2002-01-01

    Gravitropism and, to a lesser extent, phototropism have been characterized in primary roots, but little is known about structural/functional aspects of these tropisms in lateral roots. Therefore, in this study, we report on tropistic responses in lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Lateral roots initially are plagiogravitropic, but when they reach a length of approximately 10 mm, these roots grow downward and exhibit positive orthogravitropism. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrate a correlation between positive gravitropism and development of columella cells with large, sedimented amyloplasts in wild-type plants. Lateral roots display negative phototropism in response to white and blue light and positive phototropism in response to red light. As is the case with primary roots, the photoresponse is weak relative to the graviresponse, but phototropism is readily apparent in starchless mutant plants, which are impaired in gravitropism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototropism of lateral roots in any plant species.

  13. Growth distribution during phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K.L. )

    1993-09-01

    The elongation rates of two opposite sides of hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were measured during phototropism by using an infrared imaging system. In first positive phototropism, second positive phototropism, and red light-enhanced first positive phototropism, curvature toward the light source was the result of an increase in the rate of elongation of the shaded side and a decrease in the rate of elongation of the lighted side of the seedlings. The phase of straightening that followed maximum curvature resulted from a decrease in the elongation rate of the shaded side and an increase in the elongation rate of the lighted side. These data for the three types of blue light-induced phototropism tested in this study and for the phase of straightening are all clearly consistent with the growth rate changes predicted by the Cholodny-Went theory. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Phototropism and gravitropism in lateral roots of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Miller, Kelley M; Ogden, Lisa A; Roth, Kelly K

    2002-01-01

    Gravitropism and, to a lesser extent, phototropism have been characterized in primary roots, but little is known about structural/functional aspects of these tropisms in lateral roots. Therefore, in this study, we report on tropistic responses in lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Lateral roots initially are plagiogravitropic, but when they reach a length of approximately 10 mm, these roots grow downward and exhibit positive orthogravitropism. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrate a correlation between positive gravitropism and development of columella cells with large, sedimented amyloplasts in wild-type plants. Lateral roots display negative phototropism in response to white and blue light and positive phototropism in response to red light. As is the case with primary roots, the photoresponse is weak relative to the graviresponse, but phototropism is readily apparent in starchless mutant plants, which are impaired in gravitropism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototropism of lateral roots in any plant species.

  15. Cryptochrome blue-light photoreceptors of Arabidopsis implicated in phototropism.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Jarillo, J A; Smirnova, O; Cashmore, A R

    1998-04-16

    Phototropism-bending towards the light-is one of the best known plant tropic responses. Despite being reported by Darwin and others over a century ago to be specifically under the control of blue light, the photoreceptors mediating phototropism have remained unknown. We have characterized a blue-light photoreceptor from Arabidopsis, named CRY1 for cryptochrome 1; this photoreceptor is a flavoprotein that mediates numerous blue-light-dependent responses. In Arabidopsis, HY4 (the gene encoding CRY1) is a member of a small gene family that also encodes a related photoreceptor, CRY2, which shares considerable functional overlap with CRY1. Here we report that mutant plants lacking both the CRY1 and the CRY2 blue-light photoreceptors are deficient in the phototropic response. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing CRY1 or CRY2 show enhanced phototropic curvature. We conclude that cryptochrome is one of the photoreceptors mediating phototropism in plants.

  16. Phototropism and gravitropism in lateral roots of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Miller, Kelley M.; Ogden, Lisa A.; Roth, Kelly K.

    2002-01-01

    Gravitropism and, to a lesser extent, phototropism have been characterized in primary roots, but little is known about structural/functional aspects of these tropisms in lateral roots. Therefore, in this study, we report on tropistic responses in lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Lateral roots initially are plagiogravitropic, but when they reach a length of approximately 10 mm, these roots grow downward and exhibit positive orthogravitropism. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrate a correlation between positive gravitropism and development of columella cells with large, sedimented amyloplasts in wild-type plants. Lateral roots display negative phototropism in response to white and blue light and positive phototropism in response to red light. As is the case with primary roots, the photoresponse is weak relative to the graviresponse, but phototropism is readily apparent in starchless mutant plants, which are impaired in gravitropism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototropism of lateral roots in any plant species.

  17. Regulation of Drosophila lifespan by JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoit; Karpac, Jason; Hwangbo, DaeSung; Jasper, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    Cellular responses to extrinsic and intrinsic insults have to be carefully regulated to properly coordinate cytoprotection, repair processes, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Stress signaling pathways, most prominently the Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway, are critical regulators of such cellular responses and have accordingly been implicated in the regulation of lifespan in various organisms. JNK signaling promotes cytoprotective gene expression, but also interacts with the Insulin signaling pathway to influence growth, metabolism, stress tolerance and regeneration. Here, we review recent studies in Drosophila that elucidate the tissue-specific and systemic consequences of JNK activation that ultimately impact lifespan of the organism. PMID:21111799

  18. Regulation of Hedgehog signaling by ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Elaine Y. C.; Gui, Yirui; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays crucial roles both in embryonic development and in adult stem cell function. The timing, duration and location of Hh signaling activity need to be tightly controlled. Abnormalities of Hh signal transduction lead to birth defects or malignant tumors. Recent data point to ubiquitination-related posttranslational modifications of several key Hh pathway components as an important mechanism of regulation of the Hh pathway. Here we review how ubiquitination regulates the localization, stability and activity of the key Hh signaling components. PMID:26366162

  19. Phototropic liquid crystals comprising one component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewska, Anna; Zawada, Joanna; Bartkiewicz, Stanislaw; Galewski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-01

    Phototropic liquid crystals (PtLC), in which the phase transition can be controlled by the light, are a new class of liquid crystal materials possessing number of potential applications, especially in photonic devices. So far a significant majority of PtLC materials has been realized by the doping a classical liquid crystal with a photochromic dye. Here we report PtLCs comprising a single compound. Liquid-crystalline and photochromic properties have been accomplished in alkylo-alkoxy derivatives of azobenzene. Such compounds show a rich polymorphism which can be controlled by the light. The phenomenon of the photochemical phase transition has been investigated by means of holographic grating recording.

  20. Shade Promotes Phototropism through Phytochrome B-Controlled Auxin Production.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anupama; Karayekov, Elizabeth; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Ren, Hong; Casal, Jorge J; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-12-19

    Phototropism is an asymmetric growth response enabling plants to optimally position their organs. In flowering plants, the phototropin (phot) blue light receptors are essential to detect light gradients. In etiolated seedlings, the phototropic response is enhanced by the red/far-red (R/FR)-sensing phytochromes (phy) with a predominant function of phyA. In this study, we analyzed the influence of the phytochromes on phototropism in green (de-etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings. Our experiments in the laboratory and outdoors revealed that, in open environments (high R/FR ratio), phyB inhibits phototropism. In contrast, under foliar shade, where access to direct sunlight becomes important, the phototropic response was strong. phyB modulates phototropism, depending on the R/FR ratio, by controlling the activity of three basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors of the PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORs (PIFs) family. Promotion of phototropism depends on PIF-mediated induction of several members of the YUCCA gene family, leading to auxin production in the cotyledons. Our study identifies PIFs and YUCCAs as novel molecular players promoting phototropism in photoautotrophic, but not etiolated, seedlings. Moreover, our findings reveal fundamental differences in the phytochrome-phototropism crosstalk in etiolated versus green seedlings. We propose that in natural conditions where the light environment is not homogeneous, the uncovered phytochrome-phototropin co-action is important for plants to adapt their growth strategy to optimize photosynthetic light capture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation patterns in signaling networks of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Formation of cellular malignancy results from the disruption of fine tuned signaling homeostasis for proliferation, accompanied by mal-functional signals for differentiation, cell cycle and apoptosis. We wanted to observe central signaling characteristics on a global view of malignant cells which have evolved to selfishness and independence in comparison to their non-malignant counterparts that fulfill well defined tasks in their sample. Results We investigated the regulation of signaling networks with twenty microarray datasets from eleven different tumor types and their corresponding non-malignant tissue samples. Proteins were represented by their coding genes and regulatory distances were defined by correlating the gene-regulation between neighboring proteins in the network (high correlation = small distance). In cancer cells we observed shorter pathways, larger extension of the networks, a lower signaling frequency of central proteins and links and a higher information content of the network. Proteins of high signaling frequency were enriched with cancer mutations. These proteins showed motifs of regulatory integration in normal cells which was disrupted in tumor cells. Conclusion Our global analysis revealed a distinct formation of signaling-regulation in cancer cells when compared to cells of normal samples. From these cancer-specific regulation patterns novel signaling motifs are proposed. PMID:21110851

  2. Interactions between gravitropism and phototropism in plants.

    PubMed

    Correll, Melanie J; Kiss, John Z

    2002-06-01

    To receive adequate light and nutrients for survival, plants orient stems and stem-like organs toward light and away from the gravity vector and, conversely, orient roots into the soil, away from light toward the direction of gravity. Therefore, both gravity and light can influence the differential growth of plant organs. To add to the complexity of the interactions between gravity and light, each stimulus can enhance or reduce the effectiveness of the other. On earth, the constant presence of gravity makes it difficult to determine whether plant growth and development is influenced by gravity or light alone or the combination of the two stimuli. In the past decade, our understanding of the gravity and light transduction pathways has advanced through the use of mutants in either gravitropic or phototropic responses and the use of innovative techniques that reduce the effects of one stimulus on the other. Thus, both unique and common elements in the transduction pathways of the gravitropic and phototropic responses have been isolated. This article is focused on the interactions between the light- and gravity-transduction pathways and describes methods used to separate the influences of these two environmental stimuli.

  3. Interactions between gravitropism and phototropism in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Kiss, John Z.

    2002-01-01

    To receive adequate light and nutrients for survival, plants orient stems and stem-like organs toward light and away from the gravity vector and, conversely, orient roots into the soil, away from light toward the direction of gravity. Therefore, both gravity and light can influence the differential growth of plant organs. To add to the complexity of the interactions between gravity and light, each stimulus can enhance or reduce the effectiveness of the other. On earth, the constant presence of gravity makes it difficult to determine whether plant growth and development is influenced by gravity or light alone or the combination of the two stimuli. In the past decade, our understanding of the gravity and light transduction pathways has advanced through the use of mutants in either gravitropic or phototropic responses and the use of innovative techniques that reduce the effects of one stimulus on the other. Thus, both unique and common elements in the transduction pathways of the gravitropic and phototropic responses have been isolated. This article is focused on the interactions between the light- and gravity-transduction pathways and describes methods used to separate the influences of these two environmental stimuli.

  4. Interactions between gravitropism and phototropism in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Kiss, John Z.

    2002-01-01

    To receive adequate light and nutrients for survival, plants orient stems and stem-like organs toward light and away from the gravity vector and, conversely, orient roots into the soil, away from light toward the direction of gravity. Therefore, both gravity and light can influence the differential growth of plant organs. To add to the complexity of the interactions between gravity and light, each stimulus can enhance or reduce the effectiveness of the other. On earth, the constant presence of gravity makes it difficult to determine whether plant growth and development is influenced by gravity or light alone or the combination of the two stimuli. In the past decade, our understanding of the gravity and light transduction pathways has advanced through the use of mutants in either gravitropic or phototropic responses and the use of innovative techniques that reduce the effects of one stimulus on the other. Thus, both unique and common elements in the transduction pathways of the gravitropic and phototropic responses have been isolated. This article is focused on the interactions between the light- and gravity-transduction pathways and describes methods used to separate the influences of these two environmental stimuli.

  5. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms. PMID:27054048

  6. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  7. Neurotrophin signalling pathways regulating neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, F D; Kaplan, D R

    2001-07-01

    Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring neuronal death in mammals is regulated by the interplay between receptor-mediated prosurvival and proapoptotic signals. The neurotrophins, a family of growth factors best known for their positive effects on neuronal biology, have now been shown to mediate both positive and negative survival signals, by signalling through the Trk and p75 neurotrophin receptors, respectively. The mechanisms whereby these two neurotrophin receptors interact to determine neuronal survival have been difficult to decipher, largely because both can signal independently or coincidentally, depending upon the cell or developmental context. Nonetheless, the past several years have seen significant advances in our understanding of this receptor signalling system. In this review, we focus on the proapoptotic actions of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), and on the interplay between Trk and p75NTR that determines neuronal survival.

  8. Signaling hierarchy regulating human endothelial cell development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our present knowledge of the regulation of mammalian endothelial cell differentiation has been largely derived from studies of mouse embryonic development. However, unique mechanisms and hierarchy of signals that govern human endothelial cell development are unknown and, thus, explored in these stud...

  9. Dynamic Redox Regulation of IL-4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Gaurav; Gran, Margaret A.; Bagchi, Pritha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the magnitude and dynamics of protein oxidation during cell signaling is technically challenging. Computational modeling provides tractable, quantitative methods to test hypotheses of redox mechanisms that may be simultaneously operative during signal transduction. The interleukin-4 (IL-4) pathway, which has previously been reported to induce reactive oxygen species and oxidation of PTP1B, may be controlled by several other putative mechanisms of redox regulation; widespread proteomic thiol oxidation observed via 2D redox differential gel electrophoresis upon IL-4 treatment suggests more than one redox-sensitive protein implicated in this pathway. Through computational modeling and a model selection strategy that relied on characteristic STAT6 phosphorylation dynamics of IL-4 signaling, we identified reversible protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) oxidation as the primary redox regulatory mechanism in the pathway. A systems-level model of IL-4 signaling was developed that integrates synchronous pan-PTP oxidation with ROS-independent mechanisms. The model quantitatively predicts the dynamics of IL-4 signaling over a broad range of new redox conditions, offers novel hypotheses about regulation of JAK/STAT signaling, and provides a framework for interrogating putative mechanisms involving receptor-initiated oxidation. PMID:26562652

  10. Mechanical Regulation of Signaling Pathways in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, William R.; Rubin, Clinton T.; Rubin, Janet

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of cell types depend on mechanically induced signals to enable appropriate physiological responses. The skeleton is particularly dependent on mechanical information to guide the resident cell population towards adaptation, maintenance and repair. Research at the organ, tissue, cell and molecular levels has improved our understanding of how the skeleton can recognize the functional environment, and how these challenges are translated into cellular information that can site-specifically alter phenotype. This review first considers those cells within the skeleton that are responsive to mechanical signals, including osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and osteoprogenitors. This is discussed in light of a range of experimental approaches that can vary parameters such as strain, fluid shear stress, and pressure. The identity of mechanoreceptor candidates is approached, with consideration of integrins, pericellular tethers, focal adhesions, ion channels, cadherins, connexins, and the plasma membrane including caveolar and non-caveolar lipid rafts and their influence on integral signaling protein interactions. Several mechanically regulated intracellular signaling cascades are detailed including activation of kinases (Akt, MAPK, FAK), β-catenin, GTPases, and calcium signaling events. While the interaction of bone cells with their mechanical environment is complex, an understanding of mechanical regulation of bone signaling is crucial to understanding bone physiology, the etiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, and to the development of interventions to improve bone strength. PMID:22575727

  11. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PHOTOTROPIC ANODIZED ALUMINUM FINISH RESPONSIVE TO GAMMA RADIATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The present investigation was conducted to establish a phototropic anodized aluminum finish sensitive to gamma radiation. A comprehensive literature...search revealed a number of candidate phototropic materials but very little information about gamma radiation response. Because early trials...indicated that each candidate phototropic system possessed different dyeing characteristics for an anodic film, time-consuming trials with dyed anodic films

  12. Negative phototropism of rice root and its influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Mo, Yiwei; Qian, Shanqin; Gu, Yunjie

    2002-10-01

    Some characteristics of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) root were found in the experiment of unilaterally irradiating the roots which were planted in water: (i) All the seminal roots, adventitious roots and their branched roots bent away from light, and their curvatures ranged from 25 degrees to 60 degrees . The curvature of adventitious root of the higher node was often larger than that of the lower node, and even larger than that of the seminal root, (ii) The negative phototropic bending of the rice root was mainly due to the larger growth increment of root-tip cells of the irradiated side compared with that of the shaded side, (iii) Root cap was the site of light perception. If root cap was shaded while the root was irradiated the root showed no negative phototropism, and the root lost the characteristic of negative phototropism when root cap was divested. Rice root could resume the characteristic of negative phototropism when the new root cap grew up, if the original cells of root cap were well protected while root cap was divested, (iv) The growth increment and curvature of rice root were both influenced by light intensity. Within the range of 0-100 mumol . m(2) -s(-1), the increasing of light intensity resulted in the decreasing of the growth increment and the increasing of the curvature of rice root, (v) The growth increment and the curvature reached the maximum at 30 degrees C with the temperature treatment of 10-40 degrees C. (vi) Blue-violet light could prominently induce the negative phototropism of rice root, while red light had no such effect. (vii) The auxin (IAA) in the solution, as a very prominent influencing factor, inhibited the growth, the negative phototropism and the gravitropism of rice root when the concentration of IAA increased. The response of negative phototropism of rice root disappeared when the concentration of IAA was above 10 mg . L(-1).

  13. Structural basis of integrin regulation and signaling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Carman, Christopher V; Springer, Timothy A

    2007-01-01

    Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions. They play critical roles for the immune system in leukocyte trafficking and migration, immunological synapse formation, costimulation, and phagocytosis. Integrin adhesiveness can be dynamically regulated through a process termed inside-out signaling. In addition, ligand binding transduces signals from the extracellular domain to the cytoplasm in the classical outside-in direction. Recent structural, biochemical, and biophysical studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of integrin bidirectional signaling across the plasma membrane. Large-scale reorientations of the ectodomain of up to 200 A couple to conformational change in ligand-binding sites and are linked to changes in alpha and beta subunit transmembrane domain association. In this review, we focus on integrin structure as it relates to affinity modulation, ligand binding, outside-in signaling, and cell surface distribution dynamics.

  14. Structural Basis of Integrin Regulation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bing-Hao; Carman, Christopher V.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions. They play critical roles for the immune system in leukocyte trafficking and migration, immunological synapse formation, costimulation, and phagocytosis. Integrin adhesiveness can be dynamically regulated through a process termed inside-out signaling. In addition, ligand binding transduces signals from the extracellular domain to the cytoplasm in the classical outside-in direction. Recent structural, biochemical, and biophysical studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms of integrin bidirectional signaling across the plasma membrane. Large-scale reorientations of the ectodomain of up to 200 Å couple to conformational change in ligand-binding sites and are linked to changes in α and β subunit transmembrane domain association. In this review, we focus on integrin structure as it relates to affinity modulation, ligand binding, outside-in signaling, and cell surface distribution dynamics. PMID:17201681

  15. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L.; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species. PMID:26464512

  16. Auxin signaling modules regulate maize inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Galli, Mary; Liu, Qiujie; Moss, Britney L; Malcomber, Simon; Li, Wei; Gaines, Craig; Federici, Silvia; Roshkovan, Jessica; Meeley, Robert; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Gallavotti, Andrea

    2015-10-27

    In plants, small groups of pluripotent stem cells called axillary meristems are required for the formation of the branches and flowers that eventually establish shoot architecture and drive reproductive success. To ensure the proper formation of new axillary meristems, the specification of boundary regions is required for coordinating their development. We have identified two maize genes, BARREN INFLORESCENCE1 and BARREN INFLORESCENCE4 (BIF1 and BIF4), that regulate the early steps required for inflorescence formation. BIF1 and BIF4 encode AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins, which are key components of the auxin hormone signaling pathway that is essential for organogenesis. Here we show that BIF1 and BIF4 are integral to auxin signaling modules that dynamically regulate the expression of BARREN STALK1 (BA1), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulator necessary for axillary meristem formation that shows a striking boundary expression pattern. These findings suggest that auxin signaling directly controls boundary domains during axillary meristem formation and define a fundamental mechanism that regulates inflorescence architecture in one of the most widely grown crop species.

  17. Mitochondria: master regulators of danger signalling.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-12-01

    Throughout more than 1.5 billion years of obligate endosymbiotic co-evolution, mitochondria have developed not only the capacity to control distinct molecular cascades leading to cell death but also the ability to sense (and react to) multiple situations of cellular stress, including viral infection. In addition, mitochondria can emit danger signals that alert the cell or the whole organism of perturbations in homeostasis, hence promoting the induction of cell-intrinsic or systemic adaptive responses, respectively. As such, mitochondria can be considered as master regulators of danger signalling.

  18. Role of carotenoids in the phototropic response of corn seedings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-10-01

    The herbicide 4 chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..,-trifluoro-m-tolyl)-3(2H)- pyridazinone (SAN 9789), which blocks the synthesis in higher plants of colored carotenoids but not of flavins, was used to examine the involvement of carotenoids in corn seeding phototropism. It was concluded that ''bulk'' carotenoids are not the photoreceptor pigment based on the results that increasing concentrations of SAN 9789 (up to 100 micromolar) did not alter the phototropic sensitivity to 380 nanometers light (using geotropism as a control) and did not increase the threshold intensities of fluence response curves for both 380 and 450 nanometers light even though carotenoid content was reduced to 1 to 2% of normal. SAN 9789 treatment, however, did reduce seedling sensitivity toward 450 nanometers light indicating that carotenoids are involved in phototropism. Carotenoids, which are located mainly in the primary leaves, may act in phototropism as an internal screen, enhancing the light intensity gradient across the seedling and thus contributing to the ability of the seedling to perceive light direction. These results, indicate that the action spectra for phototropic responses can be significantly affected by the absorbance of screening pigments in vivo thus altering its shape from the in vitro absorption spectrum of the photoreceptor pigment.

  19. Both LOV1 and LOV2 domains of phototropin2 function as the photosensory domain for hypocotyl phototropic responses in Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Kasahara, Masahiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-01-01

    Phototropins (phot) are blue light receptor proteins that mediate phototropism and control photomovement responses, such as chloroplast photorelocation movement and stomatal opening. Arabidopsis thaliana has two phototropins, phot1 and phot2. Although both phot1 and phot2 redundantly mediate photomovement responses, phot2 uniquely regulates phototropism and the chloroplast avoidance response under high-intensity blue light. However, compared to that of phot1, the mechanistic basis of phot2 function is poorly understood, and in particular, the importance of the LOV2 domain in phot2 function has not been clearly demonstrated. Indeed, photocycle-deficient LOV2 transgenic lines expressing phot2 in a phot1phot2 mutant background retained phototropism, although with less sensitivity than wild-type plants. We isolated 11 alleles of phot2 mutants and determined the molecular lesion in each allele. We analyzed hypocotyl phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movement, and leaf flattening in the phot2 mutant and the respective phot1phot2 double mutant plants. We demonstrated that unlike the phot2 null mutant, the phot2-10 mutant, which has the defective phot2 LOV2 domain, retained the phototropic response and had unusual chloroplast movement. Mutants phot2-2 and phot2-6, which have a missense mutation in the kinase activation loop of phot2, had the phot2-null mutant phenotype. Furthermore, we convincingly demonstrated that the commonly used phot2-1 mutant allele is a phot2-null mutant. The analyses of the multiple phot2 mutant alleles provided strong evidence for the importance of both LOV domains and the kinase activation loop of phot2 in phototropism and other phot-dependent responses and also demonstrated that phot2-1 allele is a null mutant.

  20. Blue and green light-induced phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinitz, B.; Ren, Z.; Poff, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wavelengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. The authors advise care in the use of green safelights for studies of phototropism.

  1. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  2. Phototropism and gravitropism in transgenic lines of Arabidopsis altered in the phytochrome pathway.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Jane A; Kiss, John Z

    2012-07-01

    Phytochromes are a family of photoreceptor molecules, absorbing primarily in red and far-red, that are important in many aspects of plant development. These studies investigated the role of phytochromes in phototropism and gravitropism of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. We used two transgenic lines, one which lacked phytochromes specifically in the roots (M0062/UASBVR) and the other lacked phytochromes in the shoots (CAB3::pBVR). These transgenic plants are deficient in the phytochrome chromophore in specific tissues due the expression of biliverdin IXa reductase (BVR), which binds to precursors of the chromophore. Experiments were performed in both light and dark conditions to determine whether roots directly perceive light signals or if the signal is perceived in the shoot and then transmitted to the root during tropistic curvature. Kinetics of tropisms and growth were assayed by standard methods or with a computer-based feedback system. We found that the perception of red light occurs directly in the root during phototropism in this organ and that signaling also may occur from root to shoot in gravitropism. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  3. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism.

  4. Metabolic signals in sleep regulation: recent insights

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Charu; Basheer, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Sleep and energy balance are essential for health. The two processes act in concert to regulate central and peripheral homeostasis. During sleep, energy is conserved due to suspended activity, movement, and sensory responses, and is redirected to restore and replenish proteins and their assemblies into cellular structures. During wakefulness, various energy-demanding activities lead to hunger. Thus, hunger promotes arousal, and subsequent feeding, followed by satiety that promotes sleep via changes in neuroendocrine or neuropeptide signals. These signals overlap with circuits of sleep-wakefulness, feeding, and energy expenditure. Here, we will briefly review the literature that describes the interplay between the circadian system, sleep-wake, and feeding-fasting cycles that are needed to maintain energy balance and a healthy metabolic profile. In doing so, we describe the neuroendocrine, hormonal/peptide signals that integrate sleep and feeding behavior with energy metabolism. PMID:26793010

  5. Localized signals that regulate transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Muller, William A

    2016-02-01

    Transendothelial migration (TEM) of leukocytes is the step in leukocyte emigration in which the leukocyte actually leaves the blood vessel to carry out its role in the inflammatory response. It is therefore, arguably the most critical step in emigration. This review focuses on two of the many aspects of this process that have seen important recent developments. The adhesion molecules, PECAM (CD31) and CD99 that regulate two major steps in TEM, do so by regulating specific signals. PECAM initiates the signaling pathway responsible for the calcium flux that is required for TEM. Calcium enters through the cation channel TRPC6 and recruits the first wave of trafficking of membrane from the lateral border recycling compartment (LBRC). CD99 signals through soluble adenylate cyclase to activate protein kinase A to recruit a second wave of LBRC trafficking. Another process that is critical for TEM is transient removal of VE-cadherin from the site of TEM. However, the local signaling pathways that are responsible for this appear to be different from those that open the junctions to increase vascular permeability.

  6. Cell cycle regulation of Rho signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    David, Muriel; Petit, Dominique; Bertoglio, Jacques

    2012-08-15

    The dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and its regulation by Rho GTPases are essential to maintain cell shape, to allow cell motility and are also critical during cell cycle progression and mitosis. Rho GTPases and their effectors are involved in cell rounding at mitosis onset, in chromosomes alignment and are required for contraction of the actomyosin ring that separates daughter cells at the end of mitosis. Recent studies have revealed how a number of nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases during these processes. This review will focus on how the cell cycle machinery, in turn, regulates expression of proteins in the Rho signaling pathways through transcriptional activation, ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation and modulates their activity through phosphorylation by mitotic kinases.

  7. Kinetics for phototropic curvature by etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared-imaging system has been used to study the influence of gravity on the kinetics of first positive phototropism. The development of phototropic curvature of etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was measured in the absence of visible radiation. Following a pulse of blue light, stationary seedlings curved to a maximum of approximately 16 degrees about 80 minutes after stimulation. The seedlings then curved upward again or straightened by about 6 degrees during the subsequent 100 minutes. Seedlings rotated on a clinostat reached a similar maximum curvature following photostimulation. These seedlings maintained that curvature for 30 to 40 minutes before subsequently straightening to the same extent as the stationary seedlings. It is concluded that straightening is not a consequence of gravitropism, although gravity has some effect on the phototropism kinetics.

  8. Phototropic liquid crystal materials containing naphthopyran dopants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumi, Mariacristina; Cazzell, Seth; Kosa, Tamas; Sukhomlinova, Ludmila; Taheri, Bahman; Bunning, Timothy; White, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Dopant molecules dispersed in a liquid crystalline material usually affects the order of the system and the transition temperature between various phases. If the dopants undergo photoisomerization between conformers with different shapes, the interactions with the liquid crystal molecules can be different for the material in the dark and during exposure to light of appropriate wavelength. This can be used to achieve isothermal photoinduced phase transitions (phototropism). With proper selection of materials components, both order-to-disorder and disorder-to-order photoinduced transition have been demonstrated. Isothermal order-increasing transitions have been observed recently using naphthopyran derivatives as dopants. We are investigating the changes in order parameter and transition temperature of liquid crystal mixtures containing naphthopyrans and how they are related to exposure conditions and to the concentration and molecular structure of the dopants. We are also studying the nature of the photoinduced phase transitions, and comparing the behavior with that of azobenzene-doped mixtures, in which exposure to light leads to a decrease, instead of an increase, in the order of the system.

  9. Understanding phototropism: from Darwin to today.

    PubMed

    Holland, Jennifer J; Roberts, Diana; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Few individuals have had the lasting impact on such a breadth of science as Charles Darwin. While his writings about time aboard the HMS Beagle, his study of the Galapagos islands (geology, fauna, and flora), and his theories on evolution are well known, less appreciated are his studies on plant growth responses to a variety of environmental stimuli. In fact, Darwin, together with the help of his botanist son Francis, left us an entire book, 'The power of movements in plants', describing his many, varied, and insightful observations on this topic. Darwin's findings have provided an impetus for an entire field of study, the study of plant tropic responses, or differential growth (curvature) of plant organs in response to directional stimuli. One tropic response that has received a great deal of attention is the phototropic response, or curvature response to directional light. This review summarizes many of the most significant advancements that have been made in our understanding of this response and place these recent findings in the context of Darwin's initial observations.

  10. Interaction between gravitropism and phototropism in sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus.

    PubMed

    Grolig, F; Eibel, P; Schimek, C; Schapat, T; Dennison, D S; Galland, P A

    2000-06-01

    The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism was analyzed for sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. Fluence rate-response curves for phototropism were generated under three different conditions: (a) for stationary sporangiophores, which reached photogravitropic equilibrium; (b) for sporangiophores, which were clinostated head-over during phototropic stimulation; and (c) for sporangiophores, which were subjected to centrifugal accelerations of 2.3g to 8.4g. For blue light (454 nm), clinostating caused an increase of the slope of the fluence rate-response curves and an increase of the maximal bending angles at saturating fluence rates. The absolute threshold remained, however, practically unaffected. In contrast to the results obtained with blue light, no increase of the slope of the fluence rate-response curves was obtained with near-ultraviolet light at 369 nm. Bilateral irradiation with near-ultraviolet or blue light enhanced gravitropism, whereas symmetric gravitropic stimulation caused a partial suppression of phototropism. Gravitropism and phototropism appear to be tightly linked by a tonic feedback loop that allows the respective transduction chains a mutual influence over each other. The use of tropism mutants allowed conclusions to be drawn about the tonic feedback loop with the gravitropic and phototropic transduction chains. The results from clinostating mutants that lack octahedral crystals (implicated as statoliths) showed that these crystals are not involved in the tonic feedback loop. At elevated centrifugal accelerations, the fluence-rate-response curves for photogravitropic equilibrium were displaced to higher fluence rates and the slope decreased. The results indicate that light transduction possesses a logarithmic transducer, whereas gravi-transduction uses a linear one.

  11. Phototropism experiments in microgravity-the Seedling Growth project in the EMCS on the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John; Edelmann, Richard; Herranz, Raul; Medina, Francisco Javier; Millar, Katherine

    The microgravity environment aboard orbiting spacecraft has provided a unique laboratory to explore important topics in basic plant biology. Our group has utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS) to study plant growth, development, tropisms, and gene expression in a series of spaceflight experiments. The most current project performed on the ISS was termed Seeding Growth-1 (SG-1) which builds on the previous TROPI (for tropisms) experiments. TROPI-1 was the first EMCS experiment, and we discovered a novel red-light-based phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings grown in microgravity (Millar et al. 2010). In TROPI-2, our experiments were extended to reduced gravity levels and found that 0.1-0.3 g can attenuate the red-light response (Kiss et al. 2012). In addition, we performed gene profiling studies and noted that approximately 280 genes that were differentially regulated at least two-fold in the space samples compared to the ground controls (Correll et al. 2013). Major technical and operational changes in SG-1 (launched in March 2013) compared to the TROPI experiments include: improvements in lighting conditions within the EMCS to optimize the environment for phototropism studies and the use of infrared illumination to provide high-quality images of the seedlings. In SG-1, the red-light-based phototropism in roots and hypocotyls of seedlings that was noted in TROPI-2 was confirmed and now can be more precisely characterized based on the improvements in procedures. As we move forward, the SG-2 experiments (to be launched in 2014), in addition to a continued focus on phototropism, will consider the cell cycle as well as the growth and proliferation of plant cells in microgravity (Matía et al. 2010). Furthermore, the lessons learned from sequential experiments from TROPI-1 to TROPI-2 to SG-1 can provide insights to other researchers developing space experiments in plant biology. References: Correll M.J., T

  12. Signaling in Regulation of Podocyte Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The kidney podocyte is a terminally differentiated and highly specialized cell. The function of the glomerular filtration barrier depends on the integrity of the podocyte. Podocyte injury and loss have been observed in human and experimental models of glomerular diseases. Three major podocyte phenotypes have been described in glomerular diseases: effacement, apoptosis, and proliferation. Here, we highlight the signaling cascades that are responsible for the manifestation of these pathologic phenotypes. The integrity of the podocyte foot process is determined by the interaction of nephrin with proteins in the slit diaphragm complex, the regulation of actin dynamics by the Rho family of GTPases, and the transduction of extracellular signals through focal adhesion complexes. Activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and transforming growth factor-β 1 causes podocyte apoptosis. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase and its downstream target AKT protect podocytes from apoptosis. In human immunodeficiency virus-associated nephropathy, Src-dependent activation of Stat3, mitogen- activated protein kinase 1,2, and hypoxia-inducible factor 2α is an important driver of podocyte proliferation. At the level of intracellular signaling, it appears that different extracellular signals can converge onto a few pathways to induce changes in the phenotype of podocytes. PMID:19142027

  13. Desmosome regulation and signaling in disease.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Joshua A; Getsios, Spiro; Green, Kathleen J

    2015-06-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell adhesive organelles with a well-known role in forming strong intercellular adhesion during embryogenesis and in adult tissues subject to mechanical stress, such as the heart and skin. More recently, desmosome components have also emerged as cell signaling regulators. Loss of expression or interference with the function of desmosome molecules results in diseases of the heart and skin and contributes to cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in inherited and acquired disorders remain poorly understood. To address this question, researchers are directing their studies towards determining the functions that occur inside and outside of the junctions and the extent to which functions are adhesion-dependent or independent. This review focuses on recent discoveries that provide insights into the role of desmosomes and desmosome components in cell signaling and disease; wherever possible, we address molecular functions within and outside of the adhesive structure.

  14. Desmosome regulation and signaling in disease

    PubMed Central

    Broussard, Joshua A.; Getsios, Spiro

    2015-01-01

    Desmosomes are cell-cell adhesive organelles with a well-known role in forming strong intercellular adhesion during embryogenesis and in adult tissues subject to mechanical stress, such as the heart and skin. More recently, desmosome components have also emerged as cell signaling regulators. Loss of expression or interference with the function of desmosome molecules results in diseases of the heart and skin and contributes to cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that result in inherited and acquired disorders remain poorly understood. To address this question, researchers are directing their studies towards determining the functions that occur inside and outside of the junctions and the extent to which functions are adhesion-dependent or independent. This review focuses on recent discoveries that provide insights into the role of desmosomes and desmosome components in cell signaling and disease; wherever possible, we address molecular functions within and outside of the adhesive structure. PMID:25693896

  15. Evolutionarily conserved regulation of TOR signalling.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Terunao; Maeda, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) is an evolutionarily conserved protein kinase that regulates cell growth in response to various environmental as well as intracellular cues through the formation of 2 distinct TOR complexes (TORC), TORC1 and TORC2. Dysregulation of TORC1 and TORC2 activity is closely associated with various diseases, including diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Over the past few years, new regulatory mechanisms of TORC1 and TORC2 activity have been elucidated. Furthermore, recent advances in the study of TOR inhibitors have revealed previously unrecognized cellular functions of TORC1. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding of the evolutionarily conserved TOR signalling from upstream regulators to downstream events.

  16. Insulin signalling regulates remating in female Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wigby, Stuart; Slack, Cathy; Grönke, Sebastian; Martinez, Pedro; Calboli, Federico C F; Chapman, Tracey; Partridge, Linda

    2011-02-07

    Mating rate is a major determinant of female lifespan and fitness, and is predicted to optimize at an intermediate level, beyond which superfluous matings are costly. In female Drosophila melanogaster, nutrition is a key regulator of mating rate but the underlying mechanism is unknown. The evolutionarily conserved insulin/insulin-like growth factor-like signalling (IIS) pathway is responsive to nutrition, and regulates development, metabolism, stress resistance, fecundity and lifespan. Here we show that inhibition of IIS, by ablation of Drosophila insulin-like peptide (DILP)-producing median neurosecretory cells, knockout of dilp2, dilp3 or dilp5 genes, expression of a dominant-negative DILP-receptor (InR) transgene or knockout of Lnk, results in reduced female remating rates. IIS-mediated regulation of female remating can occur independent of virgin receptivity, developmental defects, reduced body size or fecundity, and the receipt of the female receptivity-inhibiting male sex peptide. Our results provide a likely mechanism by which females match remating rates to the perceived nutritional environment. The findings suggest that longevity-mediating genes could often have pleiotropic effects on remating rate. However, overexpression of the IIS-regulated transcription factor dFOXO in the fat body-which extends lifespan-does not affect remating rate. Thus, long life and reduced remating are not obligatorily coupled.

  17. Gene profiling of the red light signalling pathways in roots.

    PubMed

    Molas, Maria Lia; Kiss, John Z; Correll, Melanie J

    2006-01-01

    Red light, acting through the phytochromes, controls numerous aspects of plant development. Many of the signal transduction elements downstream of the phytochromes have been identified in the aerial portions of the plant; however, very few elements in red-light signalling have been identified specifically for roots. Gene profiling studies using microarrays and quantitative Real-Time PCR were performed to characterize gene expression changes in roots of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to 1 h of red light. Several factors acting downstream of phytochromes in red-light signalling in roots were identified. Some of the genes found to be differentially expressed in this study have already been characterized in the red-light-signalling pathway for whole plants. For example, PHYTOCHROME KINASE 1 (PKS1), LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), EARLY FLOWERING 4 (ELF4), and GIGANTEA (GI) were all significantly up-regulated in roots of seedlings exposed to 1 h of red light. The up-regulation of SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A RESPONSES 1 (SPA1) and CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1-like (COP1-like) genes suggests that the PHYA-mediated pathway was attenuated by red light. In addition, genes involved in lateral root and root hair formation, root plastid development, phenylpropanoid metabolism, and hormone signalling were also regulated by exposure to red light. Interestingly, members of the RPT2/NPH3 (ROOT PHOTOTROPIC 2/NON PHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL 3) family, which have been shown to mediate blue-light-induced phototropism, were also differentially regulated in roots in red light. Therefore, these results suggest that red and blue light pathways interact in roots of seedlings and that many elements involved in red-light-signalling found in the aerial portions of the plant are differentially expressed in roots within 1 h of red light exposure.

  18. Signaling Networks that Regulate Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Devreotes, Peter; Horwitz, Alan Rick

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Stimuli that promote cell migration, such as chemokines, cytokines, and growth factors in metazoans and cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium, activate signaling pathways that control organization of the actin cytoskeleton and adhesion complexes. The Rho-family GTPases are a key convergence point of these pathways. Their effectors include actin regulators such as formins, members of the WASP/WAVE family and the Arp2/3 complex, and the myosin II motor protein. Pathways that link to the Rho GTPases include Ras GTPases, TorC2, and PI3K. Many of the molecules involved form gradients within cells, which define the front and rear of migrating cells, and are also established in related cellular behaviors such as neuronal growth cone extension and cytokinesis. The signaling molecules that regulate migration can be integrated to provide a model of network function. The network displays biochemical excitability seen as spontaneous waves of activation that propagate along the cell cortex. These events coordinate cell movement and can be biased by external cues to bring about directed migration. PMID:26238352

  19. phot1 Inhibition of ABCB19 Primes Lateral Auxin Fluxes in the Shoot Apex Required For Phototropism

    PubMed Central

    Christie, John M.; Thomson, Catriona E.; Lin, Jinshan; Titapiwatanakun, Boosaree; Ennis, Margaret; Kaiserli, Eirini; Lee, Ok Ran; Adamec, Jiri; Peer, Wendy A.; Murphy, Angus S.

    2011-01-01

    It is well accepted that lateral redistribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies the bending of plant organs towards light. In monocots, photoreception occurs at the shoot tip above the region of differential growth. Despite more than a century of research, it is still unresolved how light regulates auxin distribution and where this occurs in dicots. Here, we establish a system in Arabidopsis thaliana to study hypocotyl phototropism in the absence of developmental events associated with seedling photomorphogenesis. We show that auxin redistribution to the epidermal sites of action occurs at and above the hypocotyl apex, not at the elongation zone. Within this region, we identify the auxin efflux transporter ATP-BINDING CASSETTE B19 (ABCB19) as a substrate target for the photoreceptor kinase PHOTOTROPIN 1 (phot1). Heterologous expression and physiological analyses indicate that phosphorylation of ABCB19 by phot1 inhibits its efflux activity, thereby increasing auxin levels in and above the hypocotyl apex to halt vertical growth and prime lateral fluxes that are subsequently channeled to the elongation zone by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3). Together, these results provide new insights into the roles of ABCB19 and PIN3 in establishing phototropic curvatures and demonstrate that the proximity of light perception and differential phototropic growth is conserved in angiosperms. PMID:21666806

  20. phot1 inhibition of ABCB19 primes lateral auxin fluxes in the shoot apex required for phototropism.

    PubMed

    Christie, John M; Yang, Haibing; Richter, Gregory L; Sullivan, Stuart; Thomson, Catriona E; Lin, Jinshan; Titapiwatanakun, Boosaree; Ennis, Margaret; Kaiserli, Eirini; Lee, Ok Ran; Adamec, Jiri; Peer, Wendy A; Murphy, Angus S

    2011-06-01

    It is well accepted that lateral redistribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies the bending of plant organs towards light. In monocots, photoreception occurs at the shoot tip above the region of differential growth. Despite more than a century of research, it is still unresolved how light regulates auxin distribution and where this occurs in dicots. Here, we establish a system in Arabidopsis thaliana to study hypocotyl phototropism in the absence of developmental events associated with seedling photomorphogenesis. We show that auxin redistribution to the epidermal sites of action occurs at and above the hypocotyl apex, not at the elongation zone. Within this region, we identify the auxin efflux transporter ATP-BINDING CASSETTE B19 (ABCB19) as a substrate target for the photoreceptor kinase PHOTOTROPIN 1 (phot1). Heterologous expression and physiological analyses indicate that phosphorylation of ABCB19 by phot1 inhibits its efflux activity, thereby increasing auxin levels in and above the hypocotyl apex to halt vertical growth and prime lateral fluxes that are subsequently channeled to the elongation zone by PIN-FORMED 3 (PIN3). Together, these results provide new insights into the roles of ABCB19 and PIN3 in establishing phototropic curvatures and demonstrate that the proximity of light perception and differential phototropic growth is conserved in angiosperms.

  1. Desensitization and recovery of phototropic responsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Janoudi, A.K.; Poff, K.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Phototropism is induced by blue light, which also induces desensitization, a partial or total loss of phototropic responsiveness. The fluence and fluence-rate dependence of densensitization and recovery from desensitization have been measured for etiolated and red light (669-nm) preirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The extent of desensitization increased as the fluence of the desensitizing 450-nm light was increased from 0.3 to 60 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. At equal fluences, blue light caused more desensitization when given at a fluence rate of 1.0 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1] than at 0.3 [mu]mol m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. In addition, seedlings irradiated with blue light at the higher fluence rate required a longer recovery time than seedlings irradiated at the lower fluence rate. A red light preirradiation, probably mediated via phytochrome, decreased the time required for recovery from desensitization. The minimum time for detectable recovery was about 65 s, and the maximum time observed was about 10 min. It is proposed that the descending arm of the fluence-response relationship for first positive phototropism is a consequence of desensitization, and that the time threshold for second positive phototropism establishes a period during which recovery from desensitization occurs. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Desensitization and recovery of phototropic responsiveness in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A. K.; Poff, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    Phototropism is induced by blue light, which also induces desensitization, a partial or total loss of phototropic responsiveness. The fluence and fluence-rate dependence of desensitization and recovery from desensitization have been measured for etiolated and red light (669-nm) preirradiated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. The extent of desensitization increased as the fluence of the desensitizing 450-nm light was increased from 0.3 to 60 micromoles m-2 s-1. At equal fluences, blue light caused more desensitization when given at a fluence rate of 1.0 micromole m-2 s-1 than at 0.3 micromole m-2 s-1. In addition, seedlings irradiated with blue light at the higher fluence rate required a longer recovery time than seedlings irradiated at the lower fluence rate. A red light preirradiation, probably mediated via phytochrome, decreased the time required for recovery from desensitization. The minimum time for detectable recovery was about 65 s, and the maximum time observed was about 10 min. It is proposed that the descending arm of the fluence-response relationship for first positive phototropism is a consequence of desensitization, and that the time threshold for second positive phototropism establishes a period during which recovery from desensitization occurs.

  3. FGF signalling regulates bone growth through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Laura; Forrester, Alison; Bartolomeo, Rosa; Svelto, Maria; Venditti, Rossella; Montefusco, Sandro; Polishchuk, Elena; Nusco, Edoardo; Rossi, Antonio; Medina, Diego L; Polishchuk, Roman; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Settembre, Carmine

    2015-12-10

    Skeletal growth relies on both biosynthetic and catabolic processes. While the role of the former is clearly established, how the latter contributes to growth-promoting pathways is less understood. Macroautophagy, hereafter referred to as autophagy, is a catabolic process that plays a fundamental part in tissue homeostasis. We investigated the role of autophagy during bone growth, which is mediated by chondrocyte rate of proliferation, hypertrophic differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in growth plates. Here we show that autophagy is induced in growth-plate chondrocytes during post-natal development and regulates the secretion of type II collagen (Col2), the major component of cartilage ECM. Mice lacking the autophagy related gene 7 (Atg7) in chondrocytes experience endoplasmic reticulum storage of type II procollagen (PC2) and defective formation of the Col2 fibrillary network in the ECM. Surprisingly, post-natal induction of chondrocyte autophagy is mediated by the growth factor FGF18 through FGFR4 and JNK-dependent activation of the autophagy initiation complex VPS34-beclin-1. Autophagy is completely suppressed in growth plates from Fgf18(-/-) embryos, while Fgf18(+/-) heterozygous and Fgfr4(-/-) mice fail to induce autophagy during post-natal development and show decreased Col2 levels in the growth plate. Strikingly, the Fgf18(+/-) and Fgfr4(-/-) phenotypes can be rescued in vivo by pharmacological activation of autophagy, pointing to autophagy as a novel effector of FGF signalling in bone. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a developmentally regulated process necessary for bone growth, and identify FGF signalling as a crucial regulator of autophagy in chondrocytes.

  4. WNK signalling pathways in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Meena; Kurz, Thimo; O'Shaughnessy, Kevin M

    2017-04-01

    Hypertension (high blood pressure) is a major public health problem affecting more than a billion people worldwide with complications, including stroke, heart failure and kidney failure. The regulation of blood pressure is multifactorial reflecting genetic susceptibility, in utero environment and external factors such as obesity and salt intake. In keeping with Arthur Guyton's hypothesis, the kidney plays a key role in blood pressure control and data from clinical studies; physiology and genetics have shown that hypertension is driven a failure of the kidney to excrete excess salt at normal levels of blood pressure. There is a number of rare Mendelian blood pressure syndromes, which have shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in dysregulated ion transport in the distal kidney. One in particular is Familial hyperkalemic hypertension (FHHt), an autosomal dominant monogenic form of hypertension characterised by high blood pressure, hyperkalemia, hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, and hypercalciuria. The clinical signs of FHHt are treated by low doses of thiazide diuretic, and it mirrors Gitelman syndrome which features the inverse phenotype of hypotension, hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Gitelman syndrome is caused by loss of function mutations in the thiazide-sensitive Na/Cl cotransporter (NCC); however, FHHt patients do not have mutations in the SCL12A3 locus encoding NCC. Instead, mutations have been identified in genes that have revealed a key signalling pathway that regulates NCC and several other key transporters and ion channels in the kidney that are critical for BP regulation. This is the WNK kinase signalling pathway that is the subject of this review.

  5. Dynamic near-infrared imaging reveals transient phototropic change in retinal rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongwen; Levy, Alexander M; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Pittler, Steven J; Yao, Xincheng

    2013-10-01

    Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE) is exclusively observed in cone photoreceptors, but why the SCE is absent in rod photoreceptors is still a mystery. In this study, we employed dynamic near infrared light imaging to monitor photoreceptor kinetics in freshly isolated frog and mouse retinas stimulated by oblique visible light flashes. It was observed that retinal rods could rapidly (onset: ∼10 ms for frog and 5 ms for mouse; time-to-peak: ∼200 ms for frog and 30 ms for mouse) shift toward the direction of the visible light, which might quickly compensate for the loss of luminous efficiency due to oblique illumination. In contrast, such directional movement was negligible in retinal cones. Moreover, transient rod phototropism could contribute to characteristic intrinsic optical signal (IOS). We anticipate that further study of the transient rod phototropism may not only provide insight into better understanding of the nature of vision but also promise an IOS biomarker for functional mapping of rod physiology at high resolution.

  6. Regulation of STAT signalling by proteolytic processing.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Lisa; John, Susan

    2004-12-01

    Interaction of cytokines with their cognate receptors leads to the activation of latent transcription factors, the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins. Numerous studies have identified the critical roles played by STAT proteins in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Consequently, the activity of STAT proteins is negatively regulated by a variety of different mechanisms, which include alternative splicing, covalent modifications, protein-protein interactions with negative regulatory proteins and proteolytic processing by proteases. Cleavage of STAT proteins by proteases results in the generation of C-terminally truncated proteins, called STATgamma, which lack the transactivation domain and behave as functional dominant-negative proteins. Currently, STATgamma isoforms have been identified for Stat3, Stat5a, Stat5b and Stat6 in different cellular contexts and biological processes. Evidence is mounting for the role of as yet unidentified serine proteases in the proteolytic processing of STAT proteins, although at least one cysteine protease, calpain is also known to cleave these STATs in platelets and mast cells. Recently, studies of acute myeloid leukaemia and cutaneous T cell lymphoma patients have revealed important roles for the aberrant expression of Stat3gamma and Stat5gamma proteins in the pathology of these diseases. Together, these findings indicate that proteolytic processing is an important mechanism in the regulation of STAT protein biological activity and provides a fertile area for future studies.

  7. Dynamic ubiquitin signaling in cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Gilberto, Samuel; Peter, Matthias

    2017-08-07

    The cell division cycle is driven by a collection of enzymes that coordinate DNA duplication and separation, ensuring that genomic information is faithfully and perpetually maintained. The activity of the effector proteins that perform and coordinate these biological processes oscillates by regulated expression and/or posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitylation is a cardinal cellular modification and is long known for driving cell cycle transitions. In this review, we emphasize emerging concepts of how ubiquitylation brings the necessary dynamicity and plasticity that underlie the processes of DNA replication and mitosis. New studies, often focusing on the regulation of chromosomal proteins like DNA polymerases or kinetochore kinases, are demonstrating that ubiquitylation is a versatile modification that can be used to fine-tune these cell cycle events, frequently through processes that do not involve proteasomal degradation. Understanding how the increasing variety of identified ubiquitin signals are transduced will allow us to develop a deeper mechanistic perception of how the multiple factors come together to faithfully propagate genomic information. Here, we discuss these and additional conceptual challenges that are currently under study toward understanding how ubiquitin governs cell cycle regulation. © 2017 Gilberto and Peter.

  8. Evidence that zeaxanthin is not the photoreceptor for phototropism in maize coleoptiles.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J M; Warpeha, K M; Briggs, W R

    1996-04-01

    The photoreceptor that mediates blue-light-induced phototropism in dark-grown seedlings of higher plants has not been identified, although the carotenoid zeaxanthin has recently been proposed as the putative chromophore. In the experiments described in this paper, we analyzed phototropism and a blue-light-induced protein phosphorylation that has been genetically and physiologically implicated in phototropism in wild-type maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings and compared the results with those from seedlings that are either carotenoid deficient through a genetic lesion or have been chemically treated to block carotenoid biosynthesis. The blue-light-dependent phototropism and phosphorylation responses of seedlings deficient in carotenoids are the same as those of seedlings containing normal levels of carotenoids. These results and those in the literature make it unlikely that zeaxanthin or any other carotenoid is the chromophore of the blue-light photoreceptor for phototropism or the blue-light-induced phosphorylation related to phototropism.

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  10. Cytokinin signaling regulates cambial development in poplar.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Immanen, Juha; Laxell, Marjukka; Kauppinen, Leila; Tarkowski, Petr; Dolezal, Karel; Tähtiharju, Sari; Elo, Annakaisa; Decourteix, Mélanie; Ljung, Karin; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Keinonen, Kaija; Albert, Victor A; Helariutta, Ykä

    2008-12-16

    Although a substantial proportion of plant biomass originates from the activity of vascular cambium, the molecular basis of radial plant growth is still largely unknown. To address whether cytokinins are required for cambial activity, we studied cytokinin signaling across the cambial zones of 2 tree species, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and birch (Betula pendula). We observed an expression peak for genes encoding cytokinin receptors in the dividing cambial cells. We reduced cytokinin levels endogenously by engineering transgenic poplar trees (P. tremula x tremuloides) to express a cytokinin catabolic gene, Arabidopsis CYTOKININ OXIDASE 2, under the promoter of a birch CYTOKININ RECEPTOR 1 gene. Transgenic trees showed reduced concentration of a biologically active cytokinin, correlating with impaired cytokinin responsiveness. In these trees, both apical and radial growth was compromised. However, radial growth was more affected, as illustrated by a thinner stem diameter than in WT at same height. To dissect radial from apical growth inhibition, we performed a reciprocal grafting experiment. WT scion outgrew the diameter of transgenic stock, implicating cytokinin activity as a direct determinant of radial growth. The reduced radial growth correlated with a reduced number of cambial cell layers. Moreover, expression of a cytokinin primary response gene was dramatically reduced in the thin-stemmed transgenic trees. Thus, a reduced level of cytokinin signaling is the primary basis for the impaired cambial growth observed. Together, our results show that cytokinins are major hormonal regulators required for cambial development.

  11. Regulation of cell signalling by vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Rimbach, Gerald; Minihane, Anne Marie; Majewicz, Jonathan; Fischer, Alexandra; Pallauf, Josef; Virgli, Fabio; Weinberg, Peter D

    2002-11-01

    Vitamin E, the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant, was discovered at the University of California at Berkeley in 1922. Since its discovery, studies of the constituent tocopherols and tocotrienols have focused mainly on their antioxidant properties. In 1991 Angelo Azzi's group (Boscoboinik et al. 1991a,b) first described non-antioxidant cell signalling functions for alpha-tocopherol, demonstrating that vitamin E regulates protein kinase C activity in smooth muscle cells. At the transcriptional level, alpha-tocopherol modulates the expression of the hepatic alpha-tocopherol transfer protein, as well as the expression of liver collagen alphal gene, collagenase gene and alpha-tropomyosin gene. Recently, a tocopherol-dependent transcription factor (tocopherol-associated protein) has been discovered. In cultured cells it has been demonstrated that vitamin E inhibits inflammation, cell adhesion, platelet aggregation and smooth muscle cell proliferation. Recent advances in molecular biology and genomic techniques have led to the discovery of novel vitamin E-sensitive genes and signal transduction pathways.

  12. Signal Transduction Cascades Regulating Fungal Development and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lengeler, Klaus B.; Davidson, Robert C.; D'souza, Cletus; Harashima, Toshiaki; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Wang, Ping; Pan, Xuewen; Waugh, Michael; Heitman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, mating, and filamentous growth are regulated in many fungi by environmental and nutritional signals. For example, in response to nitrogen limitation, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a dimorphic transition to filamentous growth referred to as pseudohyphal differentiation. Yeast filamentous growth is regulated, in part, by two conserved signal transduction cascades: a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and a G-protein regulated cyclic AMP signaling pathway. Related signaling cascades play an analogous role in regulating mating and virulence in the plant fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis and the human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. We review here studies on the signaling cascades that regulate development of these and other fungi. This analysis illustrates both how the model yeast S. cerevisiae can serve as a paradigm for signaling in other organisms and also how studies in other fungi provide insights into conserved signaling pathways that operate in many divergent organisms. PMID:11104818

  13. THE DYNACELL AND FOCAL PLANE CONCEPTS OF PHOTOTROPIC SYSTEMS APPLICATION TO OPHTHALMIC NUCLEAR FLASH-PROTECTIVE DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Two concepts of phototropic systems application are presented in this report. These concepts, when considered individually or in combination, make...possible the development of improved, directly or indirectly actuated, phototropic , ophthalmic, nuclear flash-protective devices. By the application...of a phototropic filter at the focal plane of an optical system, the attenuation of the phototropic response due to distance is minimized. Using a

  14. SIGNALS AND REGULATORS THAT GOVERN STREPTOMYCES DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Joseph R.; Flärdh, Klas

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is the genetically best characterized species of a populous genus belonging to the Gram-positive Actinobacteria. Streptomycetes are filamentous soil organisms, well known for the production of a plethora of biologically active secondary metabolic compounds. The Streptomyces developmental life cycle is uniquely complex, and involves coordinated multicellular development with both physiological and morphological differentiation of several cell types, culminating in production of secondary metabolites and dispersal of mature spores. This review presents a current appreciation of the signaling mechanisms used to orchestrate the decision to undergo morphological differentiation, and the regulators and regulatory networks that direct the intriguing development of multigenomic hyphae, first to form specialized aerial hyphae, and then to convert them into chains of dormant spores. This current view of S. coelicolor development is destined for rapid evolution as data from “-omics” studies shed light on gene regulatory networks, new genetic screens identify hitherto unknown players, and the resolution of our insights into the underlying cell biological processes steadily improve. PMID:22092088

  15. Intracellular rotation and the phototropic response of Phycomyces.

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, D S; Foster, K W

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during phototropism, Phycomyces sporangiophores use their own net rotation to convert an apparently spatial stimulus to a temporal one. Conversion to a continuous temporal stimulus insures that phototropism never adapts as long as the spatial asymmetry in illumination is maintained. If this temporal stimulus is circumvented by rotating the cell backwards so that there is no net rotation of some of the receptors relative to the light, the response can be reduced by two-thirds. The system thus adapts to the incident light, resulting in a reduced response. For the illumination of a transparent cell, this compensating rotation speed is 10 degrees/min counterclockwise and probably corresponds to the photoreceptor rotation in the most effective part of the growing zone. We infer that this region is in the upper portion of the growing zone and that the receptor system rotates integrally with that region of the cell. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:851569

  16. A novel blue-light phototropic response is revealed in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F Javier; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2016-12-01

    Blue-light positive phototropism in roots is masked by gravity and revealed in conditions of microgravity. In addition, the magnitude of red-light positive phototropic curvature is correlated to the magnitude of gravity. Due to their sessile nature, plants utilize environmental cues to grow and respond to their surroundings. Two of these cues, light and gravity, play a substantial role in plant orientation and directed growth movements (tropisms). However, very little is currently known about the interaction between light- (phototropic) and gravity (gravitropic)-mediated growth responses. Utilizing the European Modular Cultivation System on board the International Space Station, we investigated the interaction between phototropic and gravitropic responses in three Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, Landsberg wild type, as well as mutants of phytochrome A and phytochrome B. Onboard centrifuges were used to create a fractional gravity gradient ranging from reduced gravity up to 1g. A novel positive blue-light phototropic response of roots was observed during conditions of microgravity, and this response was attenuated at 0.1g. In addition, a red-light pretreatment of plants enhanced the magnitude of positive phototropic curvature of roots in response to blue illumination. In addition, a positive phototropic response of roots was observed when exposed to red light, and a decrease in response was gradual and correlated with the increase in gravity. The positive red-light phototropic curvature of hypocotyls when exposed to red light was also confirmed. Both red-light and blue-light phototropic responses were also shown to be affected by directional light intensity. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of a positive blue-light phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots, as well as the first description of the relationship between these phototropic responses in fractional or reduced gravities.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF INORGANIC PHOTOTROPIC MATERIALS AS A BI-OPTIC ELEMENT APPLICABLE IN HIGH DENSITY STORAGE COMPUTER MEMORIES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A general valuation of the various types of phototropic (i.e., reversible, light induced, color producing) phenomenon is given regarding the...application of phototropic material to bioptic high density storage media for compu er memories. The inorganic ’’F’’ center type phototropic systems were

  18. GraPhoBox: Gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizer, K.

    2007-09-01

    The morphology of plants is directed by the directional growth of roots and shoots. Gravity and light direction are the two major environmental stimuli important for directional growth. The 'GraPhoBox' experiment, flown on the Dutch DELTA mission to the ISS in April 2004, tries to elucidate the different effects of gravitropism and phototropism on plants, and their combined effects on plant morphology. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (L.), phototropic-deficient mutants phot1 and gravitropic-deficient mutant pgm1 seeds were germinated in microgravity and in Earth gravity, in low light conditions and darkness. The angle of directional growth of roots and shoots was then assessed. Light is -even in the absense of gravity- the most important environmental cue for directional growth of shoots, while for roots gravity is by far the most important cue, and light is only a very minor factor due to their poor phototropic capacity. Compared to roots, shoots are deviated more than roots in microgravity and therefore less gravity-dependent. All results together suggests that environmental cues are differently percepted by roots and shoots which also adapt differently. Furthermore, environmental cues are probably transferred little or not to the opposite side of the plant.

  19. Proper PIN1 distribution is needed for root negative phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Gong, Wen; Jin, Yan; Shi, Ya-Ya; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Li, Juan; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be adapted to the changing environments through tropic responses, such as light and gravity. One of them is root negative phototropism, which is needed for root growth and nutrient absorption. Here, we show that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 1 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. In darkness, PIN1 is internalized and localized to intracellular compartments; upon blue light illumination, PIN1 relocalize to basal plasma membrane in root stele cells. The shift of PIN1 localization induced by blue light is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropic response. Both blue-light-induced PIN1 redistribution and root negative phototropism is mediated by a BFA-sensitive trafficking pathway and the activity of PID/PP2A. Our results demonstrate that blue-light-induced PIN1 redistribution participate in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism.

  20. Proper PIN1 Distribution Is Needed for Root Negative Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Xu, Heng-Hao; Gong, Wen; Jin, Yan; Shi, Ya-Ya; Yuan, Ting-Ting; Li, Juan; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Plants can be adapted to the changing environments through tropic responses, such as light and gravity. One of them is root negative phototropism, which is needed for root growth and nutrient absorption. Here, we show that the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) 1 is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. In darkness, PIN1 is internalized and localized to intracellular compartments; upon blue light illumination, PIN1 relocalize to basal plasma membrane in root stele cells. The shift of PIN1 localization induced by blue light is involved in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropic response. Both blue-light-induced PIN1 redistribution and root negative phototropism is mediated by a BFA-sensitive trafficking pathway and the activity of PID/PP2A. Our results demonstrate that blue-light-induced PIN1 redistribution participate in asymmetric auxin distribution and root negative phototropism. PMID:24465665

  1. Brown adipocyte differentiation is regulated by hedgehog signaling during development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During development, brown fat tissue arises from mesenchymal precursor cells under the control of signaling networks that are not yet well understood. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is one of the major signaling pathways that regulate mesenchymal cell fate. However, whether the Hh pathway contr...

  2. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  3. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  4. Regulation of neurogenesis by calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna B.; Shum, Andrew K.; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling has essential roles in the development of the nervous system from neural induction to the proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural cells. Ca2+ signaling pathways are shaped by interactions among metabotropic signaling cascades, intracellular Ca2+ stores, ion channels, and a multitude of downstream effector proteins that activate specific genetic programs. The temporal and spatial dynamics of Ca2+ signals are widely presumed to control the highly diverse yet specific genetic programs that establish the complex structures of the adult nervous system. Progress in the last two decades has led to significant advances in our understanding of the functional architecture of Ca2+ signaling networks involved in neurogenesis. In this review, we assess the literature on the molecular and functional organization of Ca2+ signaling networks in the developing nervous system and its impact on neural induction, gene expression, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Particular emphasis is placed on the growing evidence for the involvement of store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in these processes. PMID:27020657

  5. The role of proteases in regulating Eph/ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Atapattu, Lakmali; Lackmann, Martin; Janes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Proteases regulate a myriad of cell functions, both in normal and disease states. In addition to protein turnover, they regulate a range of signaling processes, including those mediated by Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands. A variety of proteases is reported to directly cleave Ephs and/or ephrins under different conditions, to promote receptor and/or ligand shedding, and regulate receptor/ligand internalisation and signaling. They also cleave other adhesion proteins in response to Eph-ephrin interactions, to indirectly facilitate Eph-mediated functions. Proteases thus contribute to Eph/ephrin mediated changes in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell morphology and in cell migration and invasion, in a manner which appears to be tightly regulated by, and co-ordinated with, Eph signaling. This review summarizes the current literature describing the function and regulation of protease activities during Eph/ephrin-mediated cell signaling. PMID:25482632

  6. The dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijiang; Wang, Haohua; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2017-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports that signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation, but how an input signal is encoded by such a dynamic, noisy TF and further decoded by downstream genes remains largely unclear. Here, using a system of stochastic transcription with signal regulation, we show that (1) keeping the intensity of the signal noise invariant but prolonging the signal duration can both enhance the mutual information (MI) and reduce the energetic cost (EC); (2) if the signal duration is fixed, the larger MI needs the larger EC, but if the signal period is fixed, there is an optimal time that the signal spends at one lower branch, such that MI reaches the maximum; (3) if both the period and the duration are simultaneously fixed, increasing the input noise can always enhance MI in the case of transcription regulation rather than in the case of degradation regulation. In addition, we find that the input noise can induce stochastic focusing in a regulation-dependent manner. These results reveal not only the dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation but also the essential role of external noise in controlling gene expression levels. PMID:28176840

  7. The dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peijiang; Wang, Haohua; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2017-02-08

    Experimental evidence supports that signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation, but how an input signal is encoded by such a dynamic, noisy TF and further decoded by downstream genes remains largely unclear. Here, using a system of stochastic transcription with signal regulation, we show that (1) keeping the intensity of the signal noise invariant but prolonging the signal duration can both enhance the mutual information (MI) and reduce the energetic cost (EC); (2) if the signal duration is fixed, the larger MI needs the larger EC, but if the signal period is fixed, there is an optimal time that the signal spends at one lower branch, such that MI reaches the maximum; (3) if both the period and the duration are simultaneously fixed, increasing the input noise can always enhance MI in the case of transcription regulation rather than in the case of degradation regulation. In addition, we find that the input noise can induce stochastic focusing in a regulation-dependent manner. These results reveal not only the dynamic mechanism of noisy signal decoding in gene regulation but also the essential role of external noise in controlling gene expression levels.

  8. A Pivotal Role of DELLAs in Regulating Multiple Hormone Signals.

    PubMed

    Davière, Jean-Michel; Achard, Patrick

    2016-01-04

    Plant phenotypic plasticity is controlled by diverse hormone pathways, which integrate and convey information from multiple developmental and environmental signals. Moreover, in plants many processes such as growth, development, and defense are regulated in similar ways by multiple hormones. Among them, gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones with pleiotropic actions, regulating various growth processes throughout the plant life cycle. Previous work has revealed extensive interplay between GAs and other hormones, but the molecular mechanism became apparent only recently. Molecular and physiological studies have demonstrated that DELLA proteins, considered as master negative regulators of GA signaling, integrate multiple hormone signaling pathways through physical interactions with transcription factors or regulatory proteins from different families. In this review, we summarize the latest progress in GA signaling and its direct crosstalk with the main phytohormone signaling, emphasizing the multifaceted role of DELLA proteins with key components of major hormone signaling pathways.

  9. Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Russell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cell division requires careful orchestration of three major events: entry into mitosis, chromosomal segregation, and cytokinesis. Signaling within and between the molecules that control these events allows for their coordination via checkpoints, a specific class of signaling pathways that ensure the dependency of cell-cycle events on the successful completion of preceding events. Multiple positive- and negative-feedback loops ensure that a cell is fully committed to division and that the events occur in the proper order. Unlike other signaling pathways, which integrate external inputs to decide whether to execute a given process, signaling at cell division is largely dedicated to completing a decision made in G1 phase—to initiate and complete a round of mitotic cell division. Instead of deciding if the events of cell division will take place, these signaling pathways entrain these events to the activation of the cell-cycle kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and provide the opportunity for checkpoint proteins to arrest cell division if things go wrong. PMID:23028116

  10. Erbin regulates NRG1 signaling and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yanmei; Dai, Penggao; Liu, Yu; Marchetto, Sylvie; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Borg, Jean-Paul; Mei, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) plays a critical role in myelination. However, little is known about regulatory mechanisms of NRG1 signaling. We show here that Erbin, a protein that contains leucine-rich repeats (LRR) and a PSD95-Dlg-Zol (PDZ) domain and that interacts specifically with ErbB2, is necessary for NRG1 signaling and myelination of peripheral nervous system (PNS). In Erbin null mice, myelinated axons were hypomyelinated with reduced expression of P0, a marker of mature myelinating Schwann cells (SCs), whereas unmyelinated axons were aberrantly ensheathed in Remak bundles, with increased numbers of axons in the bundles and in pockets. The morphological deficits were associated with decreased nerve conduction velocity and increased sensory threshold to mechanistic stimulation. These phenotypes were duplicated in erbinΔC/ΔC mice, in which Erbin lost the PDZ domain to interact with ErbB2. Moreover, ErbB2 was reduced at protein levels in both Erbin mutant sciatic nerves, and ErbB2 became unstable and NRG1 signaling compromised when Erbin expression was suppressed. These observations indicate a critical role of Erbin in myelination and identify a regulatory mechanism of NRG1 signaling. Our results suggest that Erbin, via the PDZ domain, binds to and stabilizes ErbB2, which is necessary for NRG1 signaling that has been implicated in tumorigenesis, heart development, and neural function. PMID:19458253

  11. An experimental test of the adaptive evolution of phototropins: blue-light photoreceptors controlling phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Galen, Candace; Huddle, Julie; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2004-03-01

    Phototropins are blue-light photoreceptor molecules mediating the capacity for phototropism or bending toward or away from directional light. Like the red-light sensing phytochromes that control shade avoidance, phototropins modulate developmental plasticity in plant architecture. Yet, unlike phytochromes, the adaptive significance of phototropins has been largely a topic of conjecture. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropism of seedling and plant stems is under the control of two paralogous genes, PHOT1 and PHOT2, that encode different phototropins with partially redundant light response qualities. The PHOT1 gene product interacts with the NPH3 gene product to cause phototropic bending over a broad range of light intensity, from very weak light in the soil to stronger light in the aerial environment. The PHOT2 gene product modulates shoot bending in response to light of higher intensity only. We compared the fitness of wild-type, phot1, phot2, and nph3 genotypes over a range of light conditions in the field. Seeds were sown in the field on the soil surface and left bare or covered with either gravel or bark mulch chips. Plantings were made under full sun and dense canopy cover. Rates of seedling emergence, survival to flowering, and total seed set were measured. All mutant genotypes had significantly reduced lifetime fitness compared to wild-type. Consistent with their different fluence rate sensitivities, phot1 and phot2 signaling pathways affected fitness at discrete life-cycle stages. Fitness costs of phot1 and nph3 were expressed mainly during seedling emergence from the soil whereas that of phot2 was expressed solely after emergence. Surprisingly, the only significant genotype-by-environment interaction for fitness occurred during emergence: genotypes blind to dim blue light (phot1 and nph3) had poor emergence in the open, but not in the shade. Possibly, the loss of negative phototropism in seedling roots of mutant genotypes reduced establishment success in

  12. Artificial phototropism based on a photo-thermo-responsive hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishna, Hamsini

    Solar energy is leading in renewable energy sources and the aspects surrounding the efforts to harvest light are gaining importance. One such aspect is increasing the light absorption, where heliotropism comes into play. Heliotropism, the ability to track the sun across the sky, can be integrated with solar cells for more efficient photon collection and other optoelectronic systems. Inspired by plants, which optimize incident sunlight in nature, several researchers have made artificial heliotropic and phototropic systems. This project aims to design, synthesize and characterize a material system and evaluate its application in a phototropic system. A gold nanoparticle (Au NP) incorporated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) hydrogel was synthesized as a photo-thermo-responsive material in our phototropic system. The Au NPs generate heat from the incident via plasmonic resonance to induce a volume phase change of the thermo-responsive hydrogel PNIPAAm. PNIPAAm shrinks or swells at temperature above or below 32°C. Upon irradiation, the Au NP-PNIPAAm micropillar actuates, specifically bending toward the incident light and precisely following the varying incident angle. Swelling ratio tests, bending angle tests with a static incident light and bending tests with varying angles were carried out on hydrogel samples with varying Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios ranging from 1.45 to 2.9 were recorded for pure hydrogel samples and samples with very low Au NP concentrations. Swelling ratios of 2.41 and 3.37 were calculated for samples with low and high concentrations of Au NPs, respectively. A bending of up to 88° was observed in Au NP-hydrogel pillars with a low Au NP concentration with a 90° incident angle. The light tracking performance was assessed by the slope of the pillar Bending angle (response angle) vs. Incident light angle plot. A slope of 1 indicates ideal tracking with top of the pillar being normal to the incident light, maximizing the photon

  13. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  14. Roles for Regulator of G Protein Signaling Proteins in Synaptic Signaling and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Kyle J.; Squires, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family of proteins serves critical roles in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and heterotrimeric G protein signal transduction. RGS proteins are best understood as negative regulators of GPCR/G protein signaling. They achieve this by acting as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Gα subunits and accelerating the turnoff of G protein signaling. Many RGS proteins also bind additional signaling partners that either regulate their functions or enable them to regulate other important signaling events. At neuronal synapses, GPCRs, G proteins, and RGS proteins work in coordination to regulate key aspects of neurotransmitter release, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity, which are necessary for central nervous system physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence has revealed key roles for specific RGS proteins in multiple signaling pathways at neuronal synapses, regulating both pre- and postsynaptic signaling events and synaptic plasticity. Here, we review and highlight the current knowledge of specific RGS proteins (RGS2, RGS4, RGS7, RGS9-2, and RGS14) that have been clearly demonstrated to serve critical roles in modulating synaptic signaling and plasticity throughout the brain, and we consider their potential as future therapeutic targets. PMID:26655302

  15. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  16. Negative Regulation of TLR4 Signaling by RP105

    PubMed Central

    Divanovic, Senad; Trompette, Aurelien; Atabani, Sowsan F.; Madan, Rajat; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Visintin, Alberto; Finberg, Robert W.; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling by microbial signatures is critical to the induction of immune responses. Such responses demand tight regulation. RP105 is a TLR homolog, thought to be largely B cell-specific, which lacks a signaling domain. We report that RP105 expression is wide, directly mirroring that of TLR4 on antigen presenting cells. We further show that RP105 is a specific inhibitor of TLR4 signaling in HEK293 cells, a function conferred by its extracellular domain. Notably, RP105 and its helper molecule, MD-1, interacted directly with the TLR4 signaling complex, inhibiting its ability to bind microbial ligand. Finally, we demonstrate that RP105 regulates TLR4 signaling in dendritic cells, as well as endotoxin responses in vivo. Thus, these results identify RP105 as a physiological negative regulator of TLR4 responses. PMID:15852007

  17. Ubiquitin-Dependent Regulation of TGFβ Signaling in Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Izzi, Luisa; Attisano, Liliana

    2006-01-01

    Abstract The transforming growth factorβ (TGFβ) superfamily regulates a broad spectrum of biological responses throughout embryonic development and adult life, including cell proliferation and differentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. TGFβ members initiate signaling by bringing together a complex of serine/threonine kinase receptors that transmit signals through intracellular Smad proteins. Genetic alterations in numerous components of the TGFβ signaling pathway have been associated with several human cancers. In addition, tight regulation of TGFβ signaling is pivotal to the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of carcinogenesis. The ubiquitin/proteosome system is one mechanism by which cells regulate the expression and activity of effectors of the TGFβ signaling cascade. Mounting evidence also suggests that disruption of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of components of the TGFβ pathway leads to the development and progression of cancer. Therefore, understanding how these two pathways intertwine will contribute to the advancement of our knowledge of cancer development. PMID:16925950

  18. Signal regulators of systemic acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qing-Ming; Zhu, Shifeng; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays a vital role in a number of physiological responses, including plant defense. The last two decades have witnessed a number of breakthroughs related to biosynthesis, transport, perception and signaling mediated by SA. These findings demonstrate that SA plays a crictical role in both local and systemic defense responses. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is one such SA-dependent response. SAR is a long distance signaling mechanism that provides broad spectrum and long-lasting resistance to secondary infections throughout the plant. This unique feature makes SAR a highly desirable trait in crop production. This review summarizes the recent advances in the role of SA in SAR and discusses its relationship to other SAR inducers. PMID:25918514

  19. Signaling pathways involved in MDSC regulation.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Prashant; Carson, William E

    2014-08-01

    The immune system has evolved mechanisms to protect the host from the deleterious effects of inflammation. The generation of immune suppressive cells like myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that can counteract T cell responses represents one such strategy. There is an accumulation of immature myeloid cells or MDSCs in bone marrow (BM) and lymphoid organs under pathological conditions such as cancer. MDSCs represent a population of heterogeneous myeloid cells comprising of macrophages, granulocytes and dendritic cells that are at early stages of development. Although, the precise signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms that lead to MDSC generation and expansion in cancer remains to be elucidated. It is widely believed that perturbation of signaling pathways involved during normal hematopoietic and myeloid development under pathological conditions such as tumorogenesis contributes to the development of suppressive myeloid cells. In this review we discuss the role played by key signaling pathways such as PI3K, Ras, Jak/Stat and TGFb during myeloid development and how their deregulation under pathological conditions can lead to the generation of suppressive myeloid cells or MDSCs. Targeting these pathways should help in elucidating mechanisms that lead to the expansion of MDSCs in cancer and point to methods for eliminating these cells from the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Regulation of TGF-β Signaling by Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Tight regulation of TGF-β superfamily signaling is important for normal cellular functions and tissue homeostasis. Since TGF-β superfamily signaling pathways are activated by a short phosphorylation cascade, from receptor phosphorylation to subsequent phosphorylation and activation of downstream signal transducer R-Smads, reversible phosphorylation serves as a critical step to assure the proper TGF-β signaling. This article will review the current progress on the understanding of dynamic phosphorylation in TGF-β signaling and the essential role of protein phosphatases in this process. PMID:20704570

  1. Dynein-mediated trafficking negatively regulates LET-23 EGFR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Skorobogata, Olga; Meng, Jassy; Gauthier, Kimberley; Rocheleau, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is essential for animal development, and increased signaling underlies many human cancers. Identifying the genes and cellular processes that regulate EGFR signaling in vivo will help to elucidate how this pathway can become inappropriately activated. Caenorhabditis elegans vulva development provides an in vivo model to genetically dissect EGFR signaling. Here we identified a mutation in dhc-1, the heavy chain of the cytoplasmic dynein minus end–directed microtubule motor, in a genetic screen for regulators of EGFR signaling. Despite the many cellular functions of dynein, DHC-1 is a strong negative regulator of EGFR signaling during vulva induction. DHC-1 is required in the signal-receiving cell and genetically functions upstream or in parallel to LET-23 EGFR. LET-23 EGFR accumulates in cytoplasmic foci in dhc-1 mutants, consistent with mammalian cell studies in which dynein is shown to regulate late endosome trafficking of EGFR with the Rab7 GTPase. However, we found different distributions of LET-23 EGFR foci in rab-7 versus dhc-1 mutants, suggesting that dynein functions at an earlier step of LET-23 EGFR trafficking to the lysosome than RAB-7. Our results demonstrate an in vivo role for dynein in limiting LET-23 EGFR signaling via endosomal trafficking. PMID:27654944

  2. Characterization of adaptation in phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Janoudi, A.K.; Poff, K.L. )

    1991-02-01

    Phototropic curvature has been measured for etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings with and without a preirradiation. A bilateral preirradiation with 450-nm light at a fluence greater than about 0.1 micromole per square meter causes a rapid densensitization to a subsequent 450-nanometer unilateral irradiation at 0.5 micromole per square meter. Following a refractory period, the capacity to respond phototropically recovers to the predesensitization level, and the response is then enhanced. The length of the refractory period is between 10 and 20 minutes. Both the time needed for recovery and the extent of enhancement increase with increasing fluence of the bilateral preirradiation. Based on the relative spectral sensitivities of desensitization and enhancement, these responses can be separated. Desensitization is induced by blue light but not by red light. Enhancement, however, is induced by both blue and red light. Thus, enhancement can be induced without desensitization but only vice versa. Both desensitization and enhancement affect only the magnitude of the response and do not affect the fluence threshold.

  3. Characterization of adaptation in phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    Phototropic curvature has been measured for etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings with and without a preirradiation. A bilateral preirradiation with 450-nm light at a fluence greater than about 0.1 micromole per square meter causes a rapid desensitization to a subsequent 450-nanometer unilateral irradiation at 0.5 micromole per square meter. Following a refractory period, the capacity to respond phototropically recovers to the predesensitization level, and the response is then enhanced. The length of the refractory period is between 10 and 20 minutes. Both the time needed for recovery and the extent of enhancement increase with increasing fluence of the bilateral preirradiation. Based on the relative spectral sensitivities of desensitization and enhancement, these responses can be separated. Desensitization is induced by blue light but not by red light. Enhancement, however, is induced by both blue and red light. Thus, enhancement can be induced without desensitization but not vice versa. Both desensitization and enhancement affect only the magnitude of the response and do not affect the fluence threshold.

  4. Interspecific Nematode Signals Regulate Dispersal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Fatma; Alborn, Hans T.; von Reuss, Stephan H.; Ajredini, Ramadan; Ali, Jared G.; Akyazi, Faruk; Stelinski, Lukasz L.; Edison, Arthur S.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Teal, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dispersal is an important nematode behavior. Upon crowding or food depletion, the free living bacteriovorus nematode Caenorhabditis elegans produces stress resistant dispersal larvae, called dauer, which are analogous to second stage juveniles (J2) of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. and infective juveniles (IJ)s of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN), e.g., Steinernema feltiae. Regulation of dispersal behavior has not been thoroughly investigated for C. elegans or any other nematode species. Based on the fact that ascarosides regulate entry in dauer stage as well as multiple behaviors in C. elegans adults including mating, avoidance and aggregation, we hypothesized that ascarosides might also be involved in regulation of dispersal behavior in C. elegans and for other nematodes such as IJ of phylogenetically related EPNs. Methodology/Principal Findings Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of C. elegans dauer conditioned media, which shows strong dispersing activity, revealed four known ascarosides (ascr#2, ascr#3, ascr#8, icas#9). A synthetic blend of these ascarosides at physiologically relevant concentrations dispersed C. elegans dauer in the presence of food and also caused dispersion of IJs of S. feltiae and J2s of plant parasitic Meloidogyne spp. Assay guided fractionation revealed structural analogs as major active components of the S. feltiae (ascr#9) and C. elegans (ascr#2) dispersal blends. Further analysis revealed ascr#9 in all Steinernema spp. and Heterorhabditis spp. infected insect host cadavers. Conclusions/Significance Ascaroside blends represent evolutionarily conserved, fundamentally important communication systems for nematodes from diverse habitats, and thus may provide sustainable means for control of parasitic nematodes. PMID:22701701

  5. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Although there have been tremendous progress in cancer research and treatment, the mortality caused by this disease is still very high. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and second leading cause of death in the United States of America. Signaling, Gene Regulation and Cancer covers topics including the role of various signaling pathways in development, regulation of cell fate, tumor angiogenesis, duodenal neoplasias, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer, cancer development and progression, microRNA in cancer and epigenetic regulation of cancer.

  6. Regulation of Hedgehog Signalling Inside and Outside the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Ramsbottom, Simon A.; Pownall, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is conserved throughout metazoans and plays an important regulatory role in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Many levels of regulation exist that control the release, reception, and interpretation of the hedgehog signal. The fatty nature of the Shh ligand means that it tends to associate tightly with the cell membrane, and yet it is known to act as a morphogen that diffuses to elicit pattern formation. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a major role in the regulation of Hh distribution outside the cell. Inside the cell, the primary cilium provides an important hub for processing the Hh signal in vertebrates. This review will summarise the current understanding of how the Hh pathway is regulated from ligand production, release, and diffusion, through to signal reception and intracellular transduction. PMID:27547735

  7. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  8. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova-St. Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP. PMID:26821046

  9. Feedback Regulation of Kinase Signaling Pathways by AREs and GREs.

    PubMed

    Vlasova-St Louis, Irina; Bohjanen, Paul R

    2016-01-25

    In response to environmental signals, kinases phosphorylate numerous proteins, including RNA-binding proteins such as the AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins, and the GU-rich element (GRE) binding proteins. Posttranslational modifications of these proteins lead to a significant changes in the abundance of target mRNAs, and affect gene expression during cellular activation, proliferation, and stress responses. In this review, we summarize the effect of phosphorylation on the function of ARE-binding proteins ZFP36 and ELAVL1 and the GRE-binding protein CELF1. The networks of target mRNAs that these proteins bind and regulate include transcripts encoding kinases and kinase signaling pathways (KSP) components. Thus, kinase signaling pathways are involved in feedback regulation, whereby kinases regulate RNA-binding proteins that subsequently regulate mRNA stability of ARE- or GRE-containing transcripts that encode components of KSP.

  10. Axon Growth and Guidance: Receptor Regulation and Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Michael; Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of precise connectivity patterns during the establishment of the nervous system depends on the regulated action of diverse, conserved families of guidance cues and their neuronal receptors. Determining how these signaling pathways function to regulate axon growth and guidance is fundamentally important to understanding wiring specificity in the nervous system and will undoubtedly shed light on many neural developmental disorders. Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms that regulate the correct spatial and temporal distribution of guidance receptors and how these receptors in turn signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton to control steering decisions. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms mediating growth cone guidance with a particular emphasis on the control of guidance receptor regulation and signaling. PMID:19400716

  11. Axon growth and guidance: receptor regulation and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael; Chance, Rebecca K; Bashaw, Greg J

    2009-01-01

    The development of precise connectivity patterns during the establishment of the nervous system depends on the regulated action of diverse, conserved families of guidance cues and their neuronal receptors. Determining how these signaling pathways function to regulate axon growth and guidance is fundamentally important to understanding wiring specificity in the nervous system and will undoubtedly shed light on many neural developmental disorders. Considerable progress has been made in defining the mechanisms that regulate the correct spatial and temporal distribution of guidance receptors and how these receptors in turn signal to the growth cone cytoskeleton to control steering decisions. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms mediating growth cone guidance with a particular emphasis on the control of guidance receptor regulation and signaling.

  12. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor: Its Intracellular Signaling and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Li, Yin; Zhang, Weizhen

    2014-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), also known as the ghrelin receptor, is involved in mediating a wide variety of biological effects of ghrelin, including: stimulation of growth hormone release, increase of food intake and body weight, modulation of glucose and lipid metabolism, regulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion, protection of neuronal and cardiovascular cells, and regulation of immune function. Dependent on the tissues and cells, activation of GHSR may trigger a diversity of signaling mechanisms and subsequent distinct physiological responses. Distinct regulation of GHSR occurs at levels of transcription, receptor interaction and internalization. Here we review the current understanding on the intracellular signaling pathways of GHSR and its modulation. An overview of the molecular structure of GHSR is presented first, followed by the discussion on its signaling mechanisms. Finally, potential mechanisms regulating GHSR are reviewed. PMID:24651458

  13. Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

  14. Drosophila Vps36 regulates Smo trafficking in Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Mao, Feifei; Lv, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao; Fu, Lin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2013-09-15

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays a very important role in metazoan development by controlling pattern formation. Malfunction of the Hh signaling pathway leads to numerous serious human diseases, including congenital disorders and cancers. The seven-transmembrane domain protein Smoothened (Smo) is a key transducer of the Hh signaling pathway, and mediates the graded Hh signal across the cell plasma membrane, thereby inducing the proper expression of downstream genes. Smo accumulation on the cell plasma membrane is regulated by its C-tail phosphorylation and the graded Hh signal. The inhibitory mechanism for Smo membrane accumulation in the absence of Hh, however, is still largely unknown. Here, we report that Vps36 of the ESCRT-II complex regulates Smo trafficking between the cytosol and plasma membrane by specifically recognizing the ubiquitin signal on Smo in the absence of Hh. Furthermore, in the absence of Hh, Smo is ubiquitylated on its cytoplasmic part, including its internal loops and C-tail. Taken together, our data suggest that the ESCRT-II complex, especially Vps36, has a special role in controlling Hh signaling by targeting the membrane protein Smo for its trafficking in the absence of Hh, thereby regulating Hh signaling activity.

  15. The Protein Phosphatase 7 Regulates Phytochrome Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Genoud, Thierry; Treviño Santa Cruz, Marcela; Kulisic, Tea; Sparla, Francesca; Fankhauser, Christian; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    The psi2 mutant of Arabidopsis displays amplification of the responses controlled by the red/far red light photoreceptors phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) but no apparent defect in blue light perception. We found that loss-of-function alleles of the protein phosphatase 7 (AtPP7) are responsible for the light hypersensitivity in psi2 demonstrating that AtPP7 controls the levels of phytochrome signaling. Plants expressing reduced levels of AtPP7 mRNA display reduced blue-light induced cryptochrome signaling but no noticeable deficiency in phytochrome signaling. Our genetic analysis suggests that phytochrome signaling is enhanced in the AtPP7 loss of function alleles, including in blue light, which masks the reduced cryptochrome signaling. AtPP7 has been found to interact both in yeast and in planta assays with nucleotide-diphosphate kinase 2 (NDPK2), a positive regulator of phytochrome signals. Analysis of ndpk2-psi2 double mutants suggests that NDPK2 plays a critical role in the AtPP7 regulation of the phytochrome pathway and identifies NDPK2 as an upstream element involved in the modulation of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense pathway by light. Thus, cryptochrome- and phytochrome-specific light signals synchronously control their relative contribution to the regulation of plant development. Interestingly, PP7 and NDPK are also components of animal light signaling systems. PMID:18628957

  16. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  17. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  18. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with decreased amplitude in their phototropic response

    SciTech Connect

    Khurana, J.P.; Ren, Zhangling; Steinitz, B.; Parks, B.; Best, T.R.; Poff, K.L. )

    1989-10-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified with decreased phototropism to 450-nanometer light. Fluence-response relationships for these strains (ZR8 and ZR19) to single and multiple flashes of light show thresholds, curve shapes, and fluence for maximum curvature in first positive phototropism which are the same as those of the wild type. Similarly, there is no alteration from the wild type in the kinetics of curvature or in the optimum dark period separating sequential flashes in a multiple flash regimen. In addition, in both strains, gravitropism is decreased compared to the wild type by an amount which is comparable to the decrease in phototropism. Based on reciprocal backcrosses, it appears that the alteration is due to a recessive nuclear mutation. It is suggested that ZR8 and ZR19 represent alterations in some step analogous to an amplifier, downstream of the photoreceptor pigment, and common to both phototropism and gravitropism.

  19. Mechanism of specific inhibition of phototropism by phenylacetic acid in corn seedling

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.

    1981-05-01

    Using geotropism as a control for phototropism, compounds similar to phenylacetic acid that phototreact with flavins and/or have auxin-like activity were examined for their ability to specifically inhibit phototropism in corn seedlings using geotropism as a control. Results using indole-3-acetic acid, napthalene-1-acetic acid, naphthalene-2-acetic acid, phenylacetic acid, and ..beta..-phenylpyruvic acid suggest that such compounds will specifically inhibit phototropism primarily because of their photoreactivity with flavins and not their auxin activity. In addition, the in vivo concentration of phenylacetic acid required to induce specificity was well below that required to stimulate coleoptile growth. Estimates of the percentage of photoreceptor pigment inactivated by phenylacetic acid (>10%) suggest that phenylacetic acid could be used to photoaffinity label the flavoprotein involved in corn seedling phototropism.

  20. BLEACHING MECHANISM OF ORGANIC PHOTOTROPIC SUBSTANCES USED IN RUBY LASERS AS SWITCHES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The bleaching process of organic phototropic switches under the effect of ruby laser emission was examined. The effect of the atomic constants of solutions on the bleaching process is evaluated. (Author)

  1. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with decreased amplitude in their phototropic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Ren, Z.; Steinitz, B.; Parks, B.; Best, T. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified with decreased phototropism to 450-nanometer light. Fluence-response relationships for these strains (ZR8 and ZR19) to single and multiple flashes of light show thresholds, curve shapes, and fluence for maximum curvature in first positive' phototropism which are the same as those of the wild type. Similarly, there is no alteration from the wild type in the kinetics of curvature or in the optimum dark period separating sequential flashes in a multiple flash regimen. In addition, in both strains, gravitropism is decreased compared to the wild type by an amount which is comparable to the decrease in phototropism. Based on reciprocal backcrosses, it appears that the alteration is due to a recessive nuclear mutation. It is suggested that ZR8 and ZR19 represent alterations in some step analogous to an amplifier, downstream of the photoreceptor pigment, and common to both phototropism and gravitropism.

  2. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with decreased amplitude in their phototropic response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Ren, Z.; Steinitz, B.; Parks, B.; Best, T. R.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana have been identified with decreased phototropism to 450-nanometer light. Fluence-response relationships for these strains (ZR8 and ZR19) to single and multiple flashes of light show thresholds, curve shapes, and fluence for maximum curvature in first positive' phototropism which are the same as those of the wild type. Similarly, there is no alteration from the wild type in the kinetics of curvature or in the optimum dark period separating sequential flashes in a multiple flash regimen. In addition, in both strains, gravitropism is decreased compared to the wild type by an amount which is comparable to the decrease in phototropism. Based on reciprocal backcrosses, it appears that the alteration is due to a recessive nuclear mutation. It is suggested that ZR8 and ZR19 represent alterations in some step analogous to an amplifier, downstream of the photoreceptor pigment, and common to both phototropism and gravitropism.

  3. Regulation of JNK signaling by GSTp.

    PubMed Central

    Adler, V; Yin, Z; Fuchs, S Y; Benezra, M; Rosario, L; Tew, K D; Pincus, M R; Sardana, M; Henderson, C J; Wolf, C R; Davis, R J; Ronai, Z

    1999-01-01

    Studies of low basal Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity in non-stressed cells led us to identify a JNK inhibitor that was purified and identified as glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTp) and was characterized as a JNK-associated protein. UV irradiation or H2O2 treatment caused GSTp oligomerization and dissociation of the GSTp-JNK complex, indicating that it is the monomeric form of GSTp that elicits JNK inhibition. Addition of purified GSTp to the Jun-JNK complex caused a dose-dependent inhibition of JNK activity. Conversely, immunodepleting GSTp from protein extracts attenuated JNK inhibition. Furthermore, JNK activity was increased in the presence of specific GSTp inhibitors and a GSTp-derived peptide. Forced expression of GSTp decreased MKK4 and JNK phosphorylation which coincided with decreased JNK activity, increased c-Jun ubiquitination and decreased c-Jun-mediated transcription. Co-transfection of MEKK1 and GSTp restored MKK4 phosphorylation but did not affect GSTp inhibition of JNK activity, suggesting that the effect of GSTp on JNK is independent of the MEKK1-MKK4 module. Mouse embryo fibroblasts from GSTp-null mice exhibited a high basal level of JNK activity that could be reduced by forced expression of GSTp cDNA. In demonstrating the relationships between GSTp expression and its association with JNK, our findings provide new insight into the regulation of stress kinases. PMID:10064598

  4. Regulation of cardiomyocyte signaling by RGS proteins: differential selectivity towards G proteins and susceptibility to regulation.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jianming; Michalek, Christina; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Ming; Xu, Xiaomei; Mende, Ulrike

    2006-07-01

    Many signals that regulate cardiomyocyte growth, differentiation and function are mediated via heterotrimeric G proteins, which are under the control of RGS proteins (Regulators of G protein Signaling). Several RGS proteins are expressed in the heart, but so far little is known about their function and regulation. Using adenoviral gene transfer, we conducted the first comprehensive analysis of the capacity and selectivity of the major cardiac RGS proteins (RGS2-RGS5) to regulate central G protein-mediated signaling pathways in adult ventricular myocytes (AVM). All four RGS proteins potently inhibited Gq/11-mediated phospholipase C beta stimulation and cell growth (assessed in neonatal myocytes). Importantly, RGS2 selectively inhibited Gq/11 signaling, whereas RGS3, RGS4 and RGS5 had the capacity to regulate both Gq/11 and Gi/o signaling (carbachol-induced cAMP inhibition). Gs signaling was unaffected, and, contrary to reports in other cell lines, RGS2-RGS5 did not appear to regulate adenylate cyclase directly in AVM. Since RGS proteins can be highly regulated in their expression by many different stimuli, we also tested the hypothesis that RGS expression is subject to G protein-mediated regulation in AVM and determined the specificity with which enhanced G protein signaling alters endogenous RGS expression in AVM. RGS2 mRNA and protein were markedly but transiently up-regulated by enhanced Gq/11 signaling (alpha1-adrenergic stimulation or Galphaq* overexpression), possibly by a negative feedback mechanism. In contrast, the other negative regulators of Gq/11 signaling (RGS3-RGS5) were unchanged. Endogenous RGS2 (but not RGS3-RGS5) expression was also up-regulated in cells with enhanced AC signaling (beta-adrenergic or forskolin stimulation). Taken together, these findings suggest diverse roles of RGS proteins in regulating myocyte signaling. RGS2 emerged as the only selective and highly regulated inhibitor of Gq/11 signaling that could potentially become a promising

  5. Neuropilins are positive regulators of Hedgehog signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, R. Tyler; Feng, Brian Y.; Ni, Jun; Woo, Wei-Meng; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Hayden Gephart, Melanie G.; Teruel, Mary N.; Oro, Anthony E.; Chen, James K.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is essential for vertebrate embryogenesis, and excessive Hh target gene activation can cause cancer in humans. Here we show that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp1) and Nrp2, transmembrane proteins with roles in axon guidance and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, are important positive regulators of Hh signal transduction. Nrps are expressed at times and locations of active Hh signal transduction during mouse development. Using cell lines lacking key Hh pathway components, we show that Nrps mediate Hh transduction between activated Smoothened (Smo) protein and the negative regulator Suppressor of Fused (SuFu). Nrp1 transcription is induced by Hh signaling, and Nrp1 overexpression increases maximal Hh target gene activation, indicating the existence of a positive feedback circuit. The regulation of Hh signal transduction by Nrps is conserved between mammals and bony fish, as we show that morpholinos targeting the Nrp zebrafish ortholog nrp1a produce a specific and highly penetrant Hh pathway loss-of-function phenotype. These findings enhance our knowledge of Hh pathway regulation and provide evidence for a conserved nexus between Nrps and this important developmental signaling system. PMID:22051878

  6. EP2 Receptor Signaling Regulates Microglia Death

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Myung-Soon; Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Joe, Eunhye; Dingledine, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The timely resolution of inflammation prevents continued tissue damage after an initial insult. In the brain, the death of activated microglia by apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism to resolve brain inflammation. How microglial death is regulated after activation is still unclear. We reported that exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interleukin (IL)-13 together initially activates and then kills rat microglia in culture by a mechanism dependent on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We show here that activation of the E prostanoid receptor 2 (EP2, PTGER2) for prostaglandin E2 mediates microglial death induced by LPS/IL-13, and that EP2 activation by agonist alone kills microglia. Both EP2 antagonists and reactive oxygen scavengers block microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation. By contrast, the homeostatic induction of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) by LPS/IL-13 or EP2 activation protects microglia. Both the Hmox1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin and a compound that releases the Hmox1 product carbon monoxide (CO) attenuated microglial death produced by LPS/IL-13. Whereas CO reduced COX-2 protein expression, EP2 activation increased Hmox1 and COX-2 expression at both the mRNA and protein level. Interestingly, caspase-1 inhibition prevented microglial death induced by either LPS/IL-13 or low (but not high) concentrations of butaprost, suggestive of a predominantly pyroptotic mode of death. Butaprost also caused the expression of activated caspase-3 in microglia, pointing to apoptosis. These results indicate that EP2 activation, which initially promotes microglial activation, later causes delayed death of activated microglia, potentially contributing to the resolution phase of neuroinflammation. PMID:25715797

  7. Ethylene signaling and regulation in plant growth and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feifei; Cui, Xiankui; Sun, Yue; Dong, Chun-Hai

    2013-07-01

    Gaseous phytohormone ethylene affects many aspects of plant growth and development. The ethylene signaling pathway starts when ethylene binds to its receptors. Since the cloning of the first ethylene receptor ETR1 from Arabidopsis, a large number of studies have steadily improved our understanding of the receptors and downstream components in ethylene signal transduction pathway. This article reviews the regulation of ethylene receptors, signal transduction, and the posttranscriptional modulation of downstream components. Functional roles and importance of the ethylene signaling components in plant growth and stress responses are also discussed. Cross-reactions of ethylene with auxin and other phytohormones in plant organ growth will be analyzed. The studies of ethylene signaling in plant growth, development, and stress responses in the past decade greatly advanced our knowledge of how plants respond to endogenous signals and environmental factors.

  8. A novel phototropic response to red light is revealed in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Millar, Katherine D L; Kumar, Prem; Correll, Melanie J; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Edelmann, Richard E; Kiss, John Z

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate phototropism in plants grown in microgravity conditions without the complications of a 1-g environment. Experiments performed on the International Space Station (ISS) were used to explore the mechanisms of both blue-light- and red-light-induced phototropism in plants. This project utilized the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS), which has environmental controls for plant growth as well as centrifuges for gravity treatments used as a 1-g control. Images captured from video tapes were used to analyze the growth, development, and curvature of Arabidopsis thaliana plants that developed from seed in space. A novel positive phototropic response to red light was observed in hypocotyls of seedlings that developed in microgravity. This response was not apparent in seedlings grown on Earth or in the 1-g control during the space flight. In addition, blue-light-based phototropism had a greater response in microgravity compared with the 1-g control. Although flowering plants are generally thought to lack red light phototropism, our data suggest that at least some flowering plants may have retained a red light sensory system for phototropism. Thus, this discovery may have important implications for understanding the evolution of light sensory systems in plants.

  9. Elucidating the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junli; Lindsey, Keith; Hussey, Patrick J

    2014-02-01

    The pollen tube represents a model system for the study of tip growth, and the root provides a valuable system to study gene and signalling networks in plants. In the present article, using the two systems as examples, we discuss how to elucidate the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells. First, we discuss how hormones and related genes in plant root development form a complex interacting network, and their activities are interdependent. Therefore their roles in root development must be analysed as an integrated system, and elucidation of the regulation of each component requires the adaptation of a novel modelling methodology: regulation analysis. Secondly, hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics are all important properties that regulate plant cell growth. We discuss how regulation analysis can be applied to study the regulation of hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics, using pollen tube growth as a model system. Finally, we discuss future prospects for elucidating the regulation of complex signalling systems in plant cells.

  10. New Insights into How Trafficking Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Rossy, Jérémie; Deng, Qiji; Pageon, Sophie V.; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG) secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been well-studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH). However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions. PMID:27508206

  11. Hypothalamic Wnt Signalling and its Role in Energy Balance Regulation.

    PubMed

    Helfer, G; Tups, A

    2016-03-01

    Wnt signalling and its downstream effectors are well known for their roles in embryogenesis and tumourigenesis, including the regulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. In the nervous system, Wnt signalling has been described mainly during embryonic development, although accumulating evidence suggests that it also plays a major role in adult brain morphogenesis and function. Studies have predominantly concentrated on memory formation in the hippocampus, although recent data indicate that Wnt signalling is also critical for neuroendocrine control of the developed hypothalamus, a brain centre that is key in energy balance regulation and whose dysfunction is implicated in metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and obesity. Based on scattered findings that report the presence of Wnt molecules in the tanycytes and ependymal cells lining the third ventricle and arcuate nucleus neurones of the hypothalamus, their potential importance in key regions of food intake and body weight regulation has been investigated in recent studies. The present review brings together current knowledge on Wnt signalling in the hypothalamus of adult animals and discusses the evidence suggesting a key role for members of the Wnt signalling family in glucose and energy balance regulation in the hypothalamus in diet-induced and genetically obese (leptin deficient) mice. Aspects of Wnt signalling in seasonal (photoperiod sensitive) rodents are also highlighted, given the recent evidence indicating that the Wnt pathway in the hypothalamus is not only regulated by diet and leptin, but also by photoperiod in seasonal animals, which is connected to natural adaptive changes in food intake and body weight. Thus, Wnt signalling appears to be critical as a modulator for normal functioning of the physiological state in the healthy adult brain, and is also crucial for normal glucose and energy homeostasis where its dysregulation can lead to a range of metabolic disorders. © 2016

  12. Metabolism strikes back: metabolic flux regulates cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells depend on growth factor signaling to take up nutrients; however, coordination of glucose and glutamine uptake has been a mystery. In this issue of Genes & Development, Wellen and colleagues (pp. 2784–2799) show that glucose flux through the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway regulates growth factor receptor glycosylation and enables glutamine consumption. This mechanism ensures that cells do not engage in anabolic metabolism when nutrients are limiting, and highlights how substrate availability for protein modifications can modulate cell signaling. PMID:21159812

  13. Regulation of Clock Genes by Adrenergic Receptor Signaling in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao

    2017-07-27

    The clock system has been identified as one of the major mechanisms controlling cellular functions. Circadian clock gene oscillations also actively participate in the functions of various cell types including bone-related cells. Previous studies demonstrated that clock genes were expressed in bone tissue and also that their expression exhibited circadian rhythmicity. Recent findings have shown that sympathetic tone plays a central role in biological oscillations in bone. Adrenergic receptor (AR) signaling regulates the expression of clock genes in cancellous bone. Furthermore, α1-AR signaling in osteoblasts is known to negatively regulate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp4) by up-regulating nuclear factor IL-3 (Nfil3)/e4 promoter-binding protein 4 (E4BP4). The ablation of α1B-AR signaling also increases the expression of the Bmp4 gene in bone. The findings of transient overexpression and siRNA experiments have supported the involvement of the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPδ, Cebpd) in Nfil3 and Bmp4 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. These findings suggest that the effects of Cebpd are due to the circadian regulation of Bmp4 expression, at least in part, by the up-regulated expression of the clock gene Nfil3 in response to α1B-AR signaling in osteoblasts. Therefore, AR signaling appears to modulate cellular functionality through the expression of clock genes that are circadian rhythm regulators in osteoblasts. The expression of clock genes regulated by the sympathetic nervous system and clock-controlled genes that affect bone metabolism are described herein.

  14. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  15. Signals from chloroplasts and mitochondria for iron homeostasis regulation.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Zocchi, Graziano; Bashir, Khurram; Philippar, Katrin; Briat, Jean-François

    2013-06-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for human nutrition. Given that plants represent a major dietary source of Fe worldwide, it is crucial to understand plant Fe homeostasis fully. A major breakthrough in the understanding of Fe sensing and signaling was the identification of several transcription factor cascades regulating Fe homeostasis. However, the mechanisms of activation of these cascades still remain to be elucidated. In this opinion, we focus on the possible roles of mitochondria and chloroplasts as cellular Fe sensing and signaling sites, offering a new perspective on the integrated regulation of Fe homeostasis and its interplay with cellular metabolism. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Signaling Mechanisms Regulating Myelination in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    AHRENDSEN, Jared T.; MACKLIN, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    The precise and coordinated production of myelin is essential for proper development and function of the nervous system. Diseases that disrupt myelin, including multiple sclerosis (MS), cause significant functional disability. Current treatment aims to reduce the inflammatory component of the disease, thereby preventing damage resulting from demyelination. However, therapies are not yet available to improve natural repair processes after damage has already occurred. A thorough understanding of the signaling mechanisms that regulate myelin generation will improve our ability to enhance repair. In this review, we summarize the positive and negative regulators of myelination, focusing primarily on central nervous system myelination. Axon-derived signals, extracellular signals from both diffusible factors and the extracellular matrix, and intracellular signaling pathways within myelinating oligodendrocytes are discussed. Much more is known about the positive regulators that drive myelination, while less is known about the negative regulators that shift active myelination to myelin maintenance at the appropriate time. Therefore, we also provide new data on potential negative regulators of CNS myelination. PMID:23558589

  17. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    PubMed

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators.

  18. Go Signaling in Mushroom Bodies Regulates Sleep in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Yi, Wei; Zhou, Mingmin; Guo, Aike

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is a fundamental physiological process and its biological mechanisms are poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, heterotrimeric Go protein is abundantly expressed in the brain. However, its post-developmental function has not been extensively explored. Design: Locomotor activity was measured using the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System under a 12:12 LD cycle. Sleep was defined as periods of 5 min with no recorded activity. Results: Pan-neuronal elevation of Go signaling induced quiescence accompanied by an increased arousal threshold in flies. By screening region-specific GAL4 lines, we mapped the sleep-regulatory function of Go signaling to mushroom bodies (MBs), a central brain region which modulates memory, decision making, and sleep in Drosophila. Up-regulation of Go activity in these neurons consolidated sleep while inhibition of endogenous Go via expression of Go RNAi or pertussis toxin reduced and fragmented sleep, indicating that the Drosophila sleep requirement is affected by levels of Go activity in the MBs. Genetic interaction results showed that Go signaling serves as a neuronal transmission inhibitor in a cAMP-independent pathway. Conclusion: Go signaling is a novel signaling pathway in MBs that regulates sleep in Drosophila. Citation: Guo F; Yi W; Zhou M; Guo A. Go signaling in mushroom bodies regulates sleep in drosophila. SLEEP 2011;34(3):273-281. PMID:21358844

  19. Regulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wade, Dana S; Calfee, M Worth; Rocha, Edson R; Ling, Elizabeth A; Engstrom, Elana; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients and is a major source of nosocomial infections. This bacterium controls many virulence factors by using two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. The las system is composed of the LasR regulator protein and its cell-to-cell signal, N-(3-oxododecanoyl) homoserine lactone, and the rhl system is composed of RhlR and the signal N-butyryl homoserine lactone. A third intercellular signal, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone), also regulates numerous virulence factors. PQS synthesis requires the expression of multiple operons, one of which is pqsABCDE. Previous experiments showed that the transcription of this operon, and therefore PQS production, is negatively regulated by the rhl quorum-sensing system and positively regulated by the las quorum-sensing system and PqsR (also known as MvfR), a LysR-type transcriptional regulator protein. With the use of DNA mobility shift assays and beta-galactosidase reporter fusions, we have studied the regulation of pqsR and its relationship to pqsA, lasR, and rhlR. We show that PqsR binds the promoter of pqsA and that this binding increases dramatically in the presence of PQS, implying that PQS acts as a coinducer for PqsR. We have also mapped the transcriptional start site for pqsR and found that the transcription of pqsR is positively regulated by lasR and negatively regulated by rhlR. These results suggest that a regulatory chain occurs where pqsR is under the control of LasR and RhlR and where PqsR in turn controls pqsABCDE, which is required for the production of PQS.

  20. Phototropic solar tracking in sunflower plants: an integrative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Briggs, Winslow R.

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the best-known plant movements, phototropic solar tracking in sunflower (Helianthus annuus), has not yet been fully characterized. Two questions are still a matter of debate. (1) Is the adaptive significance solely an optimization of photosynthesis via the exposure of the leaves to the sun? (2) Is shade avoidance involved in this process? In this study, these concepts are discussed from a historical perspective and novel insights are provided. Scope and Methods Results from the primary literature on heliotropic growth movements led to the conclusion that these responses cease before anthesis, so that the flowering heads point to the East. Based on observations on 10-week-old plants, the diurnal East–West oscillations of the upper fifth of the growing stem and leaves in relation to the position of the sun (inclusive of nocturnal re-orientation) were documented, and photon fluence rates on the leaf surfaces on clear, cloudy and rainy days were determined. In addition, the light–response curve of net CO2 assimilation was determined on the upper leaves of the same batch of plants, and evidence for the occurrence of shade-avoidance responses in growing sunflower plants is summarized. Conclusions. Only elongating, vegetative sunflower shoots and the upper leaves perform phototropic solar tracking. Photon fluence response and CO2 assimilation measurements cast doubt on the ‘photosynthesis-optimization hypothesis’ as the sole explanation for the evolution of these plant movements. We suggest that the shade-avoidance response, which maximizes light-driven CO2 assimilation, plays a major role in solar tracking populations of competing sunflower plants, and an integrative scheme of these growth movements is provided. PMID:26420201

  1. Phototropic solar tracking in sunflower plants: an integrative perspective.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Briggs, Winslow R

    2016-01-01

    One of the best-known plant movements, phototropic solar tracking in sunflower (Helianthus annuus), has not yet been fully characterized. Two questions are still a matter of debate. (1) Is the adaptive significance solely an optimization of photosynthesis via the exposure of the leaves to the sun? (2) Is shade avoidance involved in this process? In this study, these concepts are discussed from a historical perspective and novel insights are provided. Results from the primary literature on heliotropic growth movements led to the conclusion that these responses cease before anthesis, so that the flowering heads point to the East. Based on observations on 10-week-old plants, the diurnal East-West oscillations of the upper fifth of the growing stem and leaves in relation to the position of the sun (inclusive of nocturnal re-orientation) were documented, and photon fluence rates on the leaf surfaces on clear, cloudy and rainy days were determined. In addition, the light-response curve of net CO2 assimilation was determined on the upper leaves of the same batch of plants, and evidence for the occurrence of shade-avoidance responses in growing sunflower plants is summarized. Only elongating, vegetative sunflower shoots and the upper leaves perform phototropic solar tracking. Photon fluence response and CO2 assimilation measurements cast doubt on the 'photosynthesis-optimization hypothesis' as the sole explanation for the evolution of these plant movements. We suggest that the shade-avoidance response, which maximizes light-driven CO2 assimilation, plays a major role in solar tracking populations of competing sunflower plants, and an integrative scheme of these growth movements is provided. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. FGF signaling specifies hematopoietic stem cells through its regulation of somitic Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonsung; Manegold, Jennifer E; Kim, Albert D; Pouget, Claire; Stachura, David L; Clements, Wilson K; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derive from hemogenic endothelial cells of the primitive dorsal aorta (DA) during vertebrate embryogenesis. The molecular mechanisms governing this unique endothelial to hematopoietic transition remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate a novel requirement for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in HSC emergence. This requirement is non-cell-autonomous, and acts within the somite to bridge the Wnt and Notch signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that Wnt16 regulates the somitic expression of two Notch ligands, deltaC (dlc) and deltaD (dld), whose combined function is required for HSC fate. How Wnt16 connects to Notch function has remained an open question. Our current studies demonstrate that FGF signaling, via FGF receptor 4 (Fgfr4), mediates a signal transduction pathway between Wnt16 and Dlc, but not Dld, to regulate HSC specification. Our findings demonstrate that FGF signaling acts as a key molecular relay within the developmental HSC niche to instruct HSC fate. PMID:25428693

  3. Potential Mechanisms Underlying Intercortical Signal Regulation via Cholinergic Neuromodulators

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Miles A.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of the cortex is extremely complex, with different areas and even different layers of a cortical column displaying different temporal patterns. A major open question is how the signals from different layers and different brain regions are coordinated in a flexible manner to support function. Here, we considered interactions between primary auditory cortex and adjacent association cortex. Using a biophysically based model, we show how top-down signals in the beta and gamma regimes can interact with a bottom-up gamma rhythm to provide regulation of signals between the cortical areas and among layers. The flow of signals depends on cholinergic modulation: with only glutamatergic drive, we show that top-down gamma rhythms may block sensory signals. In the presence of cholinergic drive, top-down beta rhythms can lift this blockade and allow signals to flow reciprocally between primary sensory and parietal cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Flexible coordination of multiple cortical areas is critical for complex cognitive functions, but how this is accomplished is not understood. Using computational models, we studied the interactions between primary auditory cortex (A1) and association cortex (Par2). Our model is capable of replicating interaction patterns observed in vitro and the simulations predict that the coordination between top-down gamma and beta rhythms is central to the gating process regulating bottom-up sensory signaling projected from A1 to Par2 and that cholinergic modulation allows this coordination to occur. PMID:26558772

  4. Insulin/IGF signaling and its regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Liu, Yiting; Luo, Jiangnan

    2015-09-15

    Taking advantage of Drosophila as a genetically tractable experimental animal much progress has been made in our understanding of how the insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) pathway regulates development, growth, metabolism, stress responses and lifespan. The role of IIS in regulation of neuronal activity and behavior has also become apparent from experiments in Drosophila. This review briefly summarizes these functional roles of IIS, and also how the insulin producing cells (IPCs) are regulated in the fly. Furthermore, we discuss functional aspects of the spatio-temporal production of eight different insulin-like peptides (DILP1-8) that are thought to act on one known receptor (dInR) in Drosophila.

  5. Organelle size: a cilium length signal regulates IFT cargo loading.

    PubMed

    Pan, Junmin; Snell, William J

    2014-01-20

    Cilia grow by assembling structural precursors delivered to their tips by intraflagellar transport. New work on ciliary length control indicates that, during ciliary growth, cilia send a length signal to the cytoplasm that regulates cargo loading onto the constitutively trafficking intraflagellar transport machinery.

  6. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude “miniflashes” emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  7. Interferon gamma Signaling Positively Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cell Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Sawamiphak, Suphansa; Kontarakis, Zacharias; Stainier, Didier Y.R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vertebrate hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region from “hemogenic” endothelium. Here we show that the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifn-γ and its receptor Crfb17 positively regulate HSC development in zebrafish. This regulation does not appear to modulate the proliferation or survival of HSCs or endothelial cells, but rather the endothelial to HSC transition. Notch signaling and blood flow positively regulate the expression of ifng and crfb17 in the AGM. Notably, Ifn-γ overexpression partially rescues the HSC loss observed in the absence of blood flow or Notch signaling. Importantly, Ifn-γ signaling acts cell-autonomously to control the endothelial to HSC transition. Ifn-γ activates Stat3, an atypical transducer of Ifn-γ signaling, in the AGM, and Stat3 inhibition decreases HSC formation. Together, our findings uncover a developmental role for an inflammatory cytokine and place its action downstream of Notch signaling and blood flow to control Stat3 activation and HSC emergence. PMID:25490269

  8. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  9. Regulation of NMDA-receptor synaptic transmission by Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cerpa, Waldo; Gambrill, Abigail; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Barria, Andres

    2011-01-01

    Wnt ligands are secreted glycoproteins controlling gene expression and cytoskeleton reorganization involved in embryonic development of the nervous system. However, their role in later stages of brain development, particularly in the regulation of established synaptic connections is not known. We found that Wnt-5a acutely and specifically up-regulates synaptic NMDAR currents in rat hippocampal slices facilitating induction of LTP, a cellular model of learning and memory. This effect requires an increase in postsynaptic Ca2+ and activation of non-canonical downstream effectors of the Wnt signaling pathway. In contrast, Wnt-7a, an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, has no effect on NMDAR mediated synaptic transmission. Moreover, endogenous Wnt ligands are necessary to maintain basal NMDAR synaptic transmission adjusting the threshold for synaptic potentiation. This novel role for Wnt ligands provides a mechanism for Wnt signaling to acutely modulate synaptic plasticity and brain function in later stages of development and in the mature organism. PMID:21715611

  10. Signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2011-03-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises the involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly-defined signaling, cytoskeletal and membrane mechanisms could be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms regulating GLUT4 exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Nolan J.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Solving how insulin regulates glucose transport into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue remains a fundamental challenge in biology and a significant issue in medicine. A central feature of this process is the coordinated accumulation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 into the plasma membrane. New signaling and cytoskeletal mechanisms of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 exocytosis are of emerging interest, particularly those at or just beneath the plasma membrane. This review examines signals that functionally engage GLUT4 exocytosis, considers cytoskeletal regulation of the stimulated GLUT4 itinerary, and appraises involvement of plasma membrane parameters in GLUT4 control. We also explore how these newly defined signaling, cytoskeletal, and membrane mechanisms may be of therapeutic interest in the treatment and/or prevention of GLUT4 dysregulation in disease. PMID:21216617

  12. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules. PMID:25755281

  13. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Iwata, Junichi

    2015-05-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules.

  14. Wnt signaling in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain new neurons are continuously generated mainly in two regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the SGZ, radial neural stem cells (NSCs) give rise to granule cells that integrate into the hippocampal circuitry and are relevant for the plasticity of the hippocampus. Loss of neurogenesis impairs learning and memory, suggesting that this process is important for adult hippocampal function. Adult neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple signaling pathways, including the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. This pathway plays important roles during the development of neuronal circuits and in the adult brain it modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. Here, we review current knowledge on the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade and the potential mechanisms involved in this regulation. Also we discuss the evidence supporting that the canonical Wnt pathway is part of the signaling mechanisms involved in the regulation of neurogenesis in different physiological conditions. Finally, some unsolved questions regarding the Wnt-mediated regulation of neurogenesis are discussed. PMID:23805076

  15. Electronic signal regulator for constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seman, T. R.; Mallik, R. R.

    1999-06-01

    A relatively simple and inexpensive ac signal regulator is described which facilitates constant resolution inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). Constant resolution is achieved by maintaining an approximately constant ac modulation voltage across IET junctions during spectral scans. The regulator circuit is based upon a field-effect transistor optoisolator with appropriate feedback control acting as a voltage comparator. It is modular in design and can easily be added in the signal path of existing IET spectrometers. A complete schematic diagram of the circuit is provided as well as a discussion on the theory of operation. IET spectra obtained from tunnel junctions with various degrees of nonlinear conductance-voltage behavior are presented with, and without, the circuit. Analysis of these spectra shows that the regulator increases the spectrometer's signal-to-noise ratio, produces no distortion and, in the case of severely nonlinear junctions, reveals spectral features at mid to high bias, which are otherwise difficult or impossible to detect. Additionally, the regulator offers approximately an order of magnitude increase in data acquisition rate over software algorithms for maintaining constant resolution via IEEE-488 control of spectrometer instrumentation. Our results suggest that such a modular analog regulator would be a valuable addition to IET spectrometers, especially for workers wishing to investigate severely nonlinear IET junctions.

  16. Dynamic coordination of innate immune signaling and Insulin signaling regulates systemic responses to localized DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Karpac, Jason; Younger, Andrew; Jasper, Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    Metazoans adapt to changing environmental conditions and to harmful challenges by attenuating growth and metabolic activities systemically. Recent studies in mice and flies indicate that endocrine signaling interactions between Insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) and innate immune signaling pathways are critical for this adaptation, yet the temporal and spatial hierarchy of these signaling events remains elusive. Here we identify and characterize a program of signaling interactions that regulates the systemic response of the Drosophila larva to localized DNA damage. We provide evidence that epidermal DNA damage induces an innate immune response that is kept in check by systemic repression of IIS activity. IIS repression induces NFkB/Relish signaling in the fatbody, which is required for recovery of IIS activity in a second phase of the systemic response to DNA damage. This systemic response to localized DNA damage thus coordinates growth and metabolic activities across tissues, ensuring growth homeostasis and survival of the animal. PMID:21664581

  17. Prostaglandin signaling regulates ciliogenesis by modulating intraflagellar transport

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daqing; Ni, Terri T.; Sun, Jianjian; Wan, Haiyan; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Yu, Guangju; Fleming, Jonathan; Chiang, Chin; Li, Wenyan; Papierniak, Anna; Cheepala, Satish; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P.C.; Zhou, Bin; Drummond, Iain A.; Schuetz, John D.; Malicki, Jarema; Zhong, Tao P.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that mediate signal transduction in a variety of tissues. Despite their importance, the signaling cascades that regulate cilia formation remain incompletely understood. Here we report that prostaglandin signaling affects ciliogenesis by regulating anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT). Zebrafish leakytail (lkt) mutants display ciliogenesis defects, and lkt locus encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC4). We show that Lkt/ABCC4 localizes to the cell membrane and exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a function that is abrogated by the Lkt/ABCC4T804M mutant. PGE2 synthesis enzyme Cyclooxygenase-1 and its receptor, EP4, which localizes to the cilium and activates cAMP-mediated signaling cascade, are required for cilia formation and elongation. Importantly, PGE2 signaling increases anterograde but not retrograde velocity of IFT and promotes ciliogenesis in mammalian cells. These findings lead us to propose that Lkt/ABCC4-mediated PGE2 signaling acts through a ciliary G-protein-coupled receptor, EP4, to upregulate cAMP synthesis and increase anterograde IFT, thereby promoting ciliogenesis. PMID:25173977

  18. Prostaglandin signalling regulates ciliogenesis by modulating intraflagellar transport.

    PubMed

    Jin, Daqing; Ni, Terri T; Sun, Jianjian; Wan, Haiyan; Amack, Jeffrey D; Yu, Guangju; Fleming, Jonathan; Chiang, Chin; Li, Wenyan; Papierniak, Anna; Cheepala, Satish; Conseil, Gwenaëlle; Cole, Susan P C; Zhou, Bin; Drummond, Iain A; Schuetz, John D; Malicki, Jarema; Zhong, Tao P

    2014-09-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that mediate signal transduction in a variety of tissues. Despite their importance, the signalling cascades that regulate cilium formation remain incompletely understood. Here we report that prostaglandin signalling affects ciliogenesis by regulating anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT). Zebrafish leakytail (lkt) mutants show ciliogenesis defects, and the lkt locus encodes an ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCC4). We show that Lkt/ABCC4 localizes to the cell membrane and exports prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a function that is abrogated by the Lkt/ABCC4(T804M) mutant. PGE2 synthesis enzyme cyclooxygenase-1 and its receptor, EP4, which localizes to the cilium and activates the cyclic-AMP-mediated signalling cascade, are required for cilium formation and elongation. Importantly, PGE2 signalling increases anterograde but not retrograde velocity of IFT and promotes ciliogenesis in mammalian cells. These findings lead us to propose that Lkt/ABCC4-mediated PGE2 signalling acts through a ciliary G-protein-coupled receptor, EP4, to upregulate cAMP synthesis and increase anterograde IFT, thereby promoting ciliogenesis.

  19. Epithelial heparan sulfate regulates Sonic Hedgehog signaling in lung development.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Huang, Meina; Sun, Shenfei; Wu, Yihui; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-08-01

    The tree-like structure of the mammalian lung is generated from branching morphogenesis, a reiterative process that is precisely regulated by numerous factors. How the cell surface and extra cellular matrix (ECM) molecules regulate this process is still poorly understood. Herein, we show that epithelial deletion of Heparan Sulfate (HS) synthetase Ext1 resulted in expanded branching tips and reduced branching number, associated with several mesenchymal developmental defects. We further demonstrate an expanded Fgf10 expression and increased FGF signaling activity in Ext1 mutant lungs, suggesting a cell non-autonomous mechanism. Consistent with this, we observed reduced levels of SHH signaling which is responsible for suppressing Fgf10 expression. Moreover, reactivating SHH signaling in mutant lungs rescued the tip dilation phenotype and attenuated FGF signaling. Importantly, the reduced SHH signaling activity did not appear to be caused by decreased Shh expression or protein stability; instead, biologically active form of SHH proteins were reduced in both the Ext1 mutant epithelium and surrounding wild type mesenchymal cells. Together, our study highlights the epithelial HS as a key player for dictating SHH signaling critical for lung morphogenesis.

  20. Temporal regulation of Dpp signaling output in the Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, David D.; Thomas, Sean; Edgar, Bruce A.; Buttitta, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Background The Decapentaplegic (Dpp) signaling pathway is used in many developmental and homeostatic contexts, each time resulting in cellular responses particular to that biological niche. The flexibility of Dpp signaling is clearly evident in epithelial cells of the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. During larval stages of development Dpp functions as a morphogen, patterning the wing developmental field and stimulating tissue growth. A short time later however, as wing-epithelial cells exit the cell cycle and begin to differentiate, Dpp is a critical determinant of vein-cell fate. It is likely that the Dpp signaling pathway regulates different sets of target genes at these two developmental time points. Results To identify mechanisms that temporally control the transcriptional output of Dpp signaling in this system, we have taken a gene expression profiling approach. We identified genes affected by Dpp signaling at late larval or early pupal developmental time points, thereby identifying patterning- and differentiation-specific downstream targets, respectively. Conclusions Analysis of target genes and transcription factor binding sites associated with these groups of genes revealed potential mechanisms by which target-gene specificity of the Dpp signaling pathway is temporally regulated. In addition, this approach revealed novel mechanisms by which Dpp affects the cellular differentiation of wing-veins. PMID:24591046

  1. Epithelial heparan sulfate regulates Sonic Hedgehog signaling in lung development

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shenfei; Wu, Yihui; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-01-01

    The tree-like structure of the mammalian lung is generated from branching morphogenesis, a reiterative process that is precisely regulated by numerous factors. How the cell surface and extra cellular matrix (ECM) molecules regulate this process is still poorly understood. Herein, we show that epithelial deletion of Heparan Sulfate (HS) synthetase Ext1 resulted in expanded branching tips and reduced branching number, associated with several mesenchymal developmental defects. We further demonstrate an expanded Fgf10 expression and increased FGF signaling activity in Ext1 mutant lungs, suggesting a cell non-autonomous mechanism. Consistent with this, we observed reduced levels of SHH signaling which is responsible for suppressing Fgf10 expression. Moreover, reactivating SHH signaling in mutant lungs rescued the tip dilation phenotype and attenuated FGF signaling. Importantly, the reduced SHH signaling activity did not appear to be caused by decreased Shh expression or protein stability; instead, biologically active form of SHH proteins were reduced in both the Ext1 mutant epithelium and surrounding wild type mesenchymal cells. Together, our study highlights the epithelial HS as a key player for dictating SHH signaling critical for lung morphogenesis. PMID:28859094

  2. Copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Grubman, Alexandra; White, Anthony R

    2014-05-22

    Copper is an essential element in many biological processes. The critical functions associated with copper have resulted from evolutionary harnessing of its potent redox activity. This same property also places copper in a unique role as a key modulator of cell signal transduction pathways. These pathways are the complex sequence of molecular interactions that drive all cellular mechanisms and are often associated with the interplay of key enzymes including kinases and phosphatases but also including intracellular changes in pools of smaller molecules. A growing body of evidence is beginning to delineate the how, when and where of copper-mediated control over cell signal transduction. This has been driven by research demonstrating critical changes to copper homeostasis in many disorders including cancer and neurodegeneration and therapeutic potential through control of disease-associated cell signalling changes by modulation of copper-protein interactions. This timely review brings together for the first time the diverse actions of copper as a key regulator of cell signalling pathways and discusses the potential strategies for controlling disease-associated signalling processes using copper modulators. It is hoped that this review will provide a valuable insight into copper as a key signal regulator and stimulate further research to promote our understanding of copper in disease and therapy.

  3. YAP regulates neuronal differentiation through Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Ding, Jing-Ya; Li, Ming-Yang; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2012-09-10

    Tight regulation of cell numbers by controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis is important during development. Recently, the Hippo pathway has been shown to regulate tissue growth and organ size in Drosophila. In mammalian cells, it also affects cell proliferation and differentiation in various tissues, including the nervous system. Interplay of several signaling cascades, such as Notch, Wnt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) pathways, control cell proliferation during neuronal differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether the Hippo pathway coordinates with other signaling cascades in regulating neuronal differentiation. Here, we used P19 cells, a mouse embryonic carcinoma cell line, as a model to study roles of YAP, a core component of the Hippo pathway, in neuronal differentiation. P19 cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons by expressing a neural bHLH transcription factor gene Ascl1. Our results showed that YAP promoted cell proliferation and inhibited neuronal differentiation. Expression of Yap activated Shh but not Wnt or Notch signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, expression of Yap increased the expression of Patched homolog 1 (Ptch1), a downstream target of the Shh signaling. Knockdown of Gli2, a transcription factor of the Shh pathway, promoted neuronal differentiation even when Yap was over-expressed. We further demonstrated that over-expression of Yap inhibited neuronal differentiation in primary mouse cortical progenitors and Gli2 knockdown rescued the differentiation defect in Yap over-expressing cells. In conclusion, our study reveals that Shh signaling acts downstream of YAP in regulating neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes cell proliferation and inhibits neuronal differentiation in P19 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YAP promotes Sonic hedgehog signaling activity during neuronal differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of Gli2 rescues the Yap

  4. Phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana in microgravity and fractional gravity on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Millar, Katherine D L; Edelmann, Richard E

    2012-08-01

    While there is a great deal of knowledge regarding plant growth and development in microgravity aboard orbiting spacecraft, there is little information available about these parameters in reduced or fractional gravity conditions (less than the nominal 1g on Earth). Thus, in these experiments using the European Modular Cultivation System on the International Space Station, we studied the interaction between phototropism and gravitropism in the WT and mutants of phytochrome A and B of Arabidopis thaliana. Fractional gravity and the 1 g control were provided by centrifuges in the spaceflight hardware, and unidirectional red and blue illumination followed a white light growth period in the time line of the space experiments. The existence of red-light-based positive phototropism in hypocotyls of seedlings that is mediated by phytochrome was confirmed in these microgravity experiments. Fractional gravity studies showed an attenuation of red-light-based phototropism in both roots and hypocotyls of seedlings occurring due to gravitational accelerations ranging from 0.l to 0.3 g. In contrast, blue-light negative phototropism in roots, which was enhanced in microgravity compared with the 1g control, showed a significant attenuation at 0.3 g. In addition, our studies suggest that the well-known red-light enhancement of blue-light-induced phototropism in hypocotyls is likely due to an indirect effect by the attenuation of gravitropism. However, red-light enhancement of root blue-light-based phototropism may occur via a more direct effect on the phototropism system itself, most likely through the phytochrome photoreceptors. To our knowledge, these experiments represent the first to examine the behavior of flowering plants in fractional or reduced gravity conditions.

  5. Retinoid signaling regulates breast cancer stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Wicinski, Julien; Cervera, Nathalie; Monville, Florence; Finetti, Pascal; Bertucci, François; Wicha, Max S.; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle

    2010-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis implicates the development of new therapeutic approaches to target the CSC population. Characterization of the pathways that regulate CSCs activity will facilitate the development of targeted therapies. We recently reported that the enzymatic activity of ALDH1, as measured by the ALDELFUOR assay, can be utilized to isolate normal and malignant breast stem cells in both primary tumors and cell lines. In this study, utilizing a tumorsphere assay, we have demonstrated the role of retinoid signaling in the regulation of breast CSCs self-renewal and differentiation. Utilizing the gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) algorithm we identified gene sets and pathways associated with retinoid signaling. These pathways regulate breast CSCs biology and their inhibition may provide novel therapeutic approaches to target breast CSCs. PMID:19806016

  6. Sensitivity control through attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by negative regulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Kakuda, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2012-03-13

    Sensitivity is one of the hallmarks of biological and pharmacological responses. However, the principle of controlling sensitivity remains unclear. Here we theoretically analyse a simple biochemical reaction and find that the signal transfer efficiency of the transient peak amplitude attenuates depending on the strength of negative regulation. We experimentally find that many signalling pathways in various cell lines, including the Akt and ERK pathways, can be approximated by simple biochemical reactions and that the same property of the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency was observed for such pathways. Because of this property, a downstream molecule should show higher sensitivity to an activator and lower sensitivity to an inhibitor than an upstream molecule. Indeed, we experimentally verify that S6, which lies downstream of Akt, shows lower sensitivity to an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor than Akt. Thus, cells can control downstream sensitivity through the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by changing the expression level of negative regulators.

  7. Mechanosensitive β-catenin signaling regulates lymphatic vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Boksik; Srinivasan, R. Sathish

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays a pivotal role in embryonic development and adult homeostasis. However, we have limited information about the involvement of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the lymphatic vascular system that regulates fluid homeostasis by absorbing interstitial fluid and returning it to blood circulation. In this recent publication we report that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is highly active and critical for the formation of lymphovenus valves (LVVs) and lymphatic valves (LVs). β-catenin directly associates with the regulatory elements of the lymphedema-associated transcription factor, FOXC2 and activates its expression in an oscillatory shear stress (OSS)-dependent manner. The phenotype of β-catenin null embryos was rescued by FOXC2 overexpression. These results suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a mechanotransducer that links fluid force with lymphatic vascular development. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 403-404] PMID:27418286

  8. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Dendrosomatic Sonic Hedgehog Signaling in Hippocampal Neurons Regulates Axon Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Petralia, Ronald S.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling components in the neurons of the hippocampus raises a question about what role the Shh signaling pathway may play in these neurons. We show here that activation of the Shh signaling pathway stimulates axon elongation in rat hippocampal neurons. This Shh-induced effect depends on the pathway transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli1. The axon itself does not respond directly to Shh; instead, the Shh signal transduction originates from the somatodendritic region of the neurons and occurs in neurons with and without detectable primary cilia. Upon Shh stimulation, Smo localization to dendrites increases significantly. Shh pathway activation results in increased levels of profilin1 (Pfn1), an actin-binding protein. Mutations in Pfn1's actin-binding sites or reduction of Pfn1 eliminate the Shh-induced axon elongation. These findings indicate that Shh can regulate axon growth, which may be critical for development of hippocampal neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Although numerous signaling mechanisms have been identified that act directly on axons to regulate their outgrowth, it is not known whether signals transduced in dendrites may also affect axon outgrowth. We describe here a transcellular signaling pathway in embryonic hippocampal neurons in which activation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptors in dendrites stimulates axon growth. The pathway involves the dendritic-membrane-associated Shh signal transducer Smoothened (Smo) and the transcription factor Gli, which induces the expression of the gene encoding the actin-binding protein profilin 1. Our findings suggest scenarios in which stimulation of Shh in dendrites results in accelerated outgrowth of the axon, which therefore reaches its presumptive postsynaptic target cell more quickly. By this mechanism, Shh may play critical roles in the development of hippocampal neuronal circuits. PMID:26658865

  10. Regulation of Chemokine Signal Integration by Activator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (AGS4)

    PubMed Central

    Robichaux, William G.; Branham-O’Connor, Melissa; Hwang, Il-Young; Vural, Ali; Kehrl, Johne H.

    2017-01-01

    Activator of G-protein signaling 4 (AGS4)/G-protein signaling modulator 3 (Gpsm3) contains three G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs, each of which can bind Gαi-GDP free of Gβγ. We previously demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi interaction is regulated by seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7-TMR), which may reflect direct coupling of the GPR-Gαi module to the receptor analogous to canonical Gαβγ heterotrimer. We have demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi complex is regulated by chemokine receptors in an agonist-dependent manner that is receptor-proximal. As an initial approach to investigate the functional role(s) of this regulated interaction in vivo, we analyzed leukocytes, in which AGS4/Gpsm3 is predominantly expressed, from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice. Loss of AGS4/Gpsm3 resulted in mild but significant neutropenia and leukocytosis. Dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice also exhibited significant defects in chemoattractant-directed chemotaxis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. An in vivo peritonitis model revealed a dramatic reduction in the ability of AGS4/Gpsm3-null neutrophils to migrate to primary sites of inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that AGS4/Gpsm3 is required for proper chemokine signal processing in leukocytes and provide further evidence for the importance of the GPR-Gαi module in the regulation of leukocyte function. PMID:28062526

  11. Notch signaling regulates gastric antral LGR5 stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Demitrack, Elise S; Gifford, Gail B; Keeley, Theresa M; Carulli, Alexis J; VanDussen, Kelli L; Thomas, Dafydd; Giordano, Thomas J; Liu, Zhenyi; Kopan, Raphael; Samuelson, Linda C

    2015-10-14

    The major signaling pathways regulating gastric stem cells are unknown. Here we report that Notch signaling is essential for homeostasis of LGR5(+) antral stem cells. Pathway inhibition reduced proliferation of gastric stem and progenitor cells, while activation increased proliferation. Notch dysregulation also altered differentiation, with inhibition inducing mucous and endocrine cell differentiation while activation reduced differentiation. Analysis of gastric organoids demonstrated that Notch signaling was intrinsic to the epithelium and regulated growth. Furthermore, in vivo Notch manipulation affected the efficiency of organoid initiation from glands and single Lgr5-GFP stem cells, suggesting regulation of stem cell function. Strikingly, constitutive Notch activation in LGR5(+) stem cells induced tissue expansion via antral gland fission. Lineage tracing using a multi-colored reporter demonstrated that Notch-activated stem cells rapidly generate monoclonal glands, suggesting a competitive advantage over unmanipulated stem cells. Notch activation was associated with increased mTOR signaling, and mTORC1 inhibition normalized NICD-induced increases in proliferation and gland fission. Chronic Notch activation induced undifferentiated, hyper-proliferative polyps, suggesting that aberrant activation of Notch in gastric stem cells may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Intracellular LINGO-1 negatively regulates Trk neurotrophin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Meabon, James S; de Laat, Rian; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Serbzhinsky, Dmitry; Hudson, Mark P; Huber, B Russel; Wiley, Jesse C; Bothwell, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophins, essential regulators of many aspects of neuronal differentiation and function, signal via four receptors, p75, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. The three Trk paralogs are members of the LIG superfamily of membrane proteins, which share extracellular domains consisting of leucine-rich repeat and C2 Ig domains. Another LIG protein, LINGO-1 has been reported to bind and influence signaling of p75 as well as TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. Here we examine the manner in which LINGO-1 influences the function of TrkA, TrkB and TrkC. We report that Trk activation promotes Trk association with LINGO-1, and that this association promotes Trk degradation by a lysosomal mechanism. This mechanism resembles the mechanism by which another LIG protein, LRIG1, promotes lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases such as the EGF receptor. We present evidence indicating that the Trk/LINGO-1 interaction occurs, in part, within recycling endosomes. We show that a mutant form of LINGO-1, with much of the extracellular domain deleted, has the capacity to enhance TrkA signaling in PC12 cells, possibly by acting as an inhibitor of Trk down-regulation by full length LINGO-1. We propose that LINGO-1 functions as a negative feedback regulator of signaling by cognate receptor tyrosine kinases including TrkA, TrkB and TrkC.

  13. Hedgehog signaling in prostate epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction, and is also an organ prone to diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. The prostate consists of ducts with an inner layer of epithelium surrounded by stroma. Reciprocal signaling between these two cell compartments is instrumental to normal prostatic development, homeostasis, regeneration, as well as tumor formation. Hedgehog (HH) signaling is a master regulator in numerous developmental processes. In many organs, HH plays a key role in epithelial-mesenchymal signaling that regulates organ growth and tissue differentiation, and abnormal HH signaling has been implicated in the progression of various epithelial carcinomas. In this review, we focus on recent studies exploring the multipotency of endogenous postnatal and adult epithelial and stromal stem cells and studies addressing the role of HH in prostate development and cancer. We discuss the implications of the results for a new understanding of prostate development and disease. Insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial-mesenchymal growth regulation should provide a basis for devising innovative therapies to combat diseases of the prostate. PMID:25641695

  14. TGF-β Signaling Regulates Cementum Formation through Osterix Expression

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hwajung; Ahn, Yu-Hyun; Kim, Tak-Heun; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Lee, Jeong-Chae; You, Hyung-Keun; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    TGF-β/BMPs have widely recognized roles in mammalian development, including in bone and tooth formation. To define the functional relevance of the autonomous requirement for TGF-β signaling in mouse tooth development, we analyzed osteocalcin-Cre mediated Tgfbr2 (OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl) conditional knockout mice, which lacks functional TGF-β receptor II (TβRII) in differentiating cementoblasts and cementocytes. Strikingly, OCCreTgfbr2fl/fl mutant mice exhibited a sharp reduction in cellular cementum mass with reduced matrix secretion and mineral apposition rates. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of TGF-β signaling through TβRII in cementogenesis, we established a mouse cementoblast model with decreased TβRII expression using OCCM-30 cells. Interestingly, the expression of osterix (Osx), one of the major regulators of cellular cementum formation, was largely decreased in OCCM-30 cells lacking TβRII. Consequently, in those cells, functional ALP activity and the expression of genes associated with cementogenesis were reduced and the cells were partially rescued by Osx transduction. We also found that TGF-β signaling directly regulates Osx expression through a Smad-dependent pathway. These findings strongly suggest that TGF-β signaling plays a major role as one of the upstream regulators of Osx in cementoblast differentiation and cementum formation. PMID:27180803

  15. Strigolactone regulates shoot development through a core signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Dörte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Strigolactones are a recently identified class of hormone that regulate multiple aspects of plant development. The DWARF14 (D14) α/β fold protein has been identified as a strigolactone receptor, which can act through the SCFMAX2 ubiquitin ligase, but the universality of this mechanism is not clear. Multiple proteins have been suggested as targets for strigolactone signalling, including both direct proteolytic targets of SCFMAX2, and downstream targets. However, the relevance and importance of these proteins to strigolactone signalling in many cases has not been fully established. Here we assess the contribution of these targets to strigolactone signalling in adult shoot developmental responses. We find that all examined strigolactone responses are regulated by SCFMAX2 and D14, and not by other D14-like proteins. We further show that all examined strigolactone responses likely depend on degradation of SMXL proteins in the SMXL6 clade, and not on the other proposed proteolytic targets BES1 or DELLAs. Taken together, our results suggest that in the adult shoot, the dominant mode of strigolactone signalling is D14-initiated, MAX2-mediated degradation of SMXL6-related proteins. We confirm that the BRANCHED1 transcription factor and the PIN-FORMED1 auxin efflux carrier are plausible downstream targets of this pathway in the regulation of shoot branching, and show that BRC1 likely acts in parallel to PIN1. PMID:27793831

  16. Trithorax regulates systemic signaling during Drosophila imaginal disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Andrea; Khan, Sumbul Jawed; Smith-Bolton, Rachel K

    2015-10-15

    Although tissue regeneration has been studied in a variety of organisms, from Hydra to humans, many of the genes that regulate the ability of each animal to regenerate remain unknown. The larval imaginal discs of the genetically tractable model organism Drosophila melanogaster have complex patterning, well-characterized development and a high regenerative capacity, and are thus an excellent model system for studying mechanisms that regulate regeneration. To identify genes that are important for wound healing and tissue repair, we have carried out a genetic screen for mutations that impair regeneration in the wing imaginal disc. Through this screen we identified the chromatin-modification gene trithorax as a key regeneration gene. Here we show that animals heterozygous for trithorax are unable to maintain activation of a developmental checkpoint that allows regeneration to occur. This defect is likely to be caused by abnormally high expression of puckered, a negative regulator of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, at the wound site. Insufficient JNK signaling leads to insufficient expression of an insulin-like peptide, dILP8, which is required for the developmental checkpoint. Thus, trithorax regulates regeneration signaling and capacity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Shank Modulates Postsynaptic Wnt Signaling to Regulate Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W.; Baas-Thomas, Maximilien S.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Prosap/Shank scaffolding proteins regulate the formation, organization, and plasticity of excitatory synapses. Mutations in SHANK family genes are implicated in autism spectrum disorder and other neuropsychiatric conditions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Shank function are not fully understood, and no study to date has examined the consequences of complete loss of all Shank proteins in vivo. Here we characterize the single Drosophila Prosap/Shank family homolog. Shank is enriched at the postsynaptic membrane of glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions and controls multiple parameters of synapse biology in a dose-dependent manner. Both loss and overexpression of Shank result in defects in synaptic bouton number and maturation. We find that Shank regulates a noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway in the postsynaptic cell by modulating the internalization of the Wnt receptor Fz2. This study identifies Shank as a key component of synaptic Wnt signaling, defining a novel mechanism for how Shank contributes to synapse maturation during neuronal development. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Haploinsufficiency for SHANK3 is one of the most prevalent monogenic causes of autism spectrum disorder, making it imperative to understand how the Shank family regulates neurodevelopment and synapse function. We created the first animal model lacking all Shank proteins and used the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, a model glutamatergic synapse, to characterize the role of Shank at synapses. We identified a novel function of Shank in synapse maturation via regulation of Wnt signaling in the postsynaptic cell. PMID:27225771

  18. Differential Age-Dependent Import Regulation by Signal Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yi-Shan; Chan, Po-Ting; Li, Hsou-min

    2012-01-01

    Gene-specific, age-dependent regulations are common at the transcriptional and translational levels, while protein transport into organelles is generally thought to be constitutive. Here we report a new level of differential age-dependent regulation and show that chloroplast proteins are divided into three age-selective groups: group I proteins have a higher import efficiency into younger chloroplasts, import of group II proteins is nearly independent of chloroplast age, and group III proteins are preferentially imported into older chloroplasts. The age-selective signal is located within the transit peptide of each protein. A group III protein with its transit peptide replaced by a group I transit peptide failed to complement its own mutation. Two consecutive positive charges define the necessary motif in group III signals for older chloroplast preference. We further show that different members of a gene family often belong to different age-selective groups because of sequence differences in their transit peptides. These results indicate that organelle-targeting signal peptides are part of cells' differential age-dependent regulation networks. The sequence diversity of some organelle-targeting peptides is not a result of the lack of selection pressure but has evolved to mediate regulation. PMID:23118617

  19. Toxin synthesis by Clostridium difficile is regulated through quorum signaling.

    PubMed

    Darkoh, Charles; DuPont, Herbert L; Norris, Steven J; Kaplan, Heidi B

    2015-02-24

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is dramatically increasing as a cause of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant pathogen, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. Consequently, it produces toxins A and B that directly cause disease. Despite the enormous public health problem posed by this pathogen, the molecular mechanisms that regulate production of the toxins, which are directly responsible for disease, remained largely unknown until now. Here, we show that C. difficile toxin synthesis is regulated by an accessory gene regulator quorum-signaling system, which is mediated through a small (<1,000-Da) thiolactone that can be detected directly in stools of CDI patients. These findings provide direct evidence of the mechanism of regulation of C. difficile toxin synthesis and offer exciting new avenues both for rapid detection of C. difficile infection and development of quorum-signaling-based non-antibiotic therapies to combat this life-threatening emerging pathogen. Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common definable cause of hospital-acquired and antibiotic-associated diarrhea in the United States, with the total cost of treatment estimated between 1 and 4.8 billion U.S. dollars annually. C. difficile, a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobe, flourishes in the colon after the gut microbiota has been altered by antibiotic therapy. As a result, there is an urgent need for non-antibiotic CDI treatments that preserve the colonic microbiota. C. difficile produces toxins A and B, which are directly responsible for disease. Here, we report that C. difficile regulates its toxin synthesis by quorum signaling, in which a novel signaling peptide activates transcription of the disease-causing toxin genes. This finding provides new therapeutic targets to be harnessed for novel nonantibiotic therapy for C. difficile infections. Copyright © 2015 Darkoh

  20. Regulation of Golgi signaling and trafficking by the KDEL receptor.

    PubMed

    Cancino, Jorge; Jung, Juan E; Luini, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular membrane transport involves the well-coordinated engagement of a series of organelles and molecular machineries that ensure that proteins are delivered to their correct cellular locations according to their function. To maintain the homeostasis of the secretory system, the fluxes of membranes and protein across the transport compartments must be precisely balanced. This control should rely on a mechanism that senses the movement of the traffic and generates the required homeostatic response. Due to its central position in the secretory pathway and to the large amounts of signaling molecules associated with it, the Golgi complex represents the ideal candidate for this regulation. The generation of autonomous signaling by the Golgi complex in response to the arrival of cargo from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been experimentally addressed only in recent years. These studies have revealed that cargo moving from the ER to the Golgi activates a series of signaling pathways, the functional significance of which appears to be to maintain the homeostasis of the Golgi complex and to activate Golgi trafficking according to internal demand. We have termed this regulatory mechanism the Golgi control system. A key player in this Golgi control system is the KDEL receptor, which has previously been shown to retrieve chaperones back to the endoplasmic reticulum and more recently to behave as a signaling receptor. Here, we discuss the particular role of KDEL receptor signaling in the regulation of important pathways involved in the maintenance of the homeostasis of the transport apparatus, and in particular, of the Golgi complex.

  1. Go signaling in mushroom bodies regulates sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Yi, Wei; Zhou, Mingmin; Guo, Aike

    2011-03-01

    Sleep is a fundamental physiological process and its biological mechanisms are poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, heterotrimeric Go protein is abundantly expressed in the brain. However, its post-developmental function has not been extensively explored. Locomotor activity was measured using the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System under a 12:12 LD cycle. Sleep was defined as periods of 5 min with no recorded activity. Pan-neuronal elevation of Go signaling induced quiescence accompanied by an increased arousal threshold in flies. By screening region-specific GAL4 lines, we mapped the sleep-regulatory function of Go signaling to mushroom bodies (MBs), a central brain region which modulates memory, decision making, and sleep in Drosophila. Up-regulation of Go activity in these neurons consolidated sleep while inhibition of endogenous Go via expression of Go RNAi or pertussis toxin reduced and fragmented sleep, indicating that the Drosophila sleep requirement is affected by levels of Go activity in the MBs. Genetic interaction results showed that Go signaling serves as a neuronal transmission inhibitor in a cAMP-independent pathway. Go signaling is a novel signaling pathway in MBs that regulates sleep in Drosophila.

  2. Notch Signaling Pathway Regulates Progesterone Secretion in Murine Luteal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Dong, Qiming; Bao, Riqiang; Lv, Qiulan; Tang, Min; Hu, Chuan; Li, Gang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which involves in various cell life activities. Other studies and our report showed that the Notch signaling plays very important role in follicle development in mammalian ovaries. In luteal cells, Notch ligand, delta-like ligand 4, is involved in normal luteal vasculature. In this study, murine luteal cells were cultured in vitro and treated with Notch signaling inhibitors, L-658,458 and N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester (DAPT). We found that L-658,458 and DAPT treatment decrease basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated progesterone secretion. On the contrary, overexpression of intracellular domain of Notch3 increased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone secretion. Further studies demonstrated that Notch signaling regulated the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A, 2 key enzymes for progesterone synthesis. In conclusion, Notch signaling plays important role in regulating progesterone secretion in murine luteal cells.

  3. Regulators of G protein signalling proteins in the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Ladds, Graham; Zervou, Sevasti; Vatish, Manu; Thornton, Steven; Davey, John

    2009-05-21

    The contractile state of the human myometrium is controlled by extracellular signals that promote relaxation or contraction. Many of these signals function through G protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface, stimulating heterotrimeric G proteins and leading to changes in the activity of effector proteins responsible for bringing about the response. G proteins can interact with multiple receptors and many different effectors and are key players in the response. Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase activating proteins for heterotrimeric G proteins and help terminate the signal. Little is known about the function of RGS proteins in human myometrium and we have therefore analysed transcript levels for RGS proteins at various stages of pregnancy (non-pregnant, preterm, term non-labouring, term labouring). RGS2 and RGS5 were the most abundantly expressed isolates in each of the patient groups. The levels of RGS4 and RGS16 (and to a lesser extent RGS2 and RGS14) increased in term labouring samples relative to the other groups. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation in myometrial cells revealed that both RGS2 and RGS5 interact directly with the cytoplasmic tail of the oxytocin receptor, suggesting they might help regulate signalling through this receptor.

  4. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein. PMID:25642418

  5. Regulation of PP2A by Sphingolipid Metabolism and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Joshua; Ogretmen, Besim

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a serine/threonine phosphatase that is a primary regulator of cellular proliferation through targeting of proliferative kinases, cell cycle regulators, and apoptosis inhibitors. It is through the regulation of these regulatory elements that gives PP2A tumor suppressor functions. In addition to mutations on the regulatory subunits, the phosphatase/tumor suppressing activity of PP2A is also inhibited in several cancer types due to overexpression or modification of the endogenous PP2A inhibitors such as SET/I2PP2A. This review focuses on the current literature regarding the interactions between the lipid signaling molecules, selectively sphingolipids, and the PP2A inhibitor SET for the regulation of PP2A, and the therapeutic potential of sphingolipids as PP2A activators for tumor suppression via targeting SET oncoprotein.

  6. Regulation of PCP by the Fat signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelia, orthogonal to the apical–basal axis, is essential for numerous developmental events and physiological functions. Drosophila model systems have been at the forefront of studies revealing insights into mechanisms regulating PCP and have revealed distinct signaling modules. One of these, involving the atypical cadherins Fat and Dachsous and the ectokinase Four-jointed, appears to link the direction of cell polarization to the tissue axes. We discuss models for the function of this signaling module as well as several unanswered questions that may guide future investigations. PMID:24142873

  7. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, A R; Kahn, C R

    2001-12-13

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  8. Insulin signalling and the regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Alan R.; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2001-12-01

    The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In both disorders, tissues such as muscle, fat and liver become less responsive or resistant to insulin. This state is also linked to other common health problems, such as obesity, polycystic ovarian disease, hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and atherosclerosis. The pathophysiology of insulin resistance involves a complex network of signalling pathways, activated by the insulin receptor, which regulates intermediary metabolism and its organization in cells. But recent studies have shown that numerous other hormones and signalling events attenuate insulin action, and are important in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Phototropic bending of non-elongating and radially growing woody stems results from asymmetrical xylem formation.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Jun; Masumori, Masaya; Tange, Takeshi

    2007-05-01

    Active phototropic bending of non-elongating and radially growing portion of stems (woody stems) has not been previously documented, whereas negative gravitropic bending is well known. We found phototropic bending in woody stems and searched for the underlying mechanism. We inclined 1-year-old Quercus crispula Blume seedlings and unilaterally illuminated them from a horizontal direction perpendicular to ('normal' illumination) or parallel to ('parallel' illumination) the inclination azimuth. With normal illumination, active phototropic bending and xylem formation could be evaluated separately from the negative gravitropic response and vertical deflection resulting from the weight of the seedlings. One-year-old stems with normal illumination bent significantly, with asymmetrical xylem formation towards the illuminated upper surface and side of the stem, whereas those with parallel illumination showed non-significant lateral bending, with asymmetrical xylem formation only on the upper side. A mechanical model was built on the assumption that a bending moment resulted from the asymmetrical xylem formation during phototropic bending of the woody stems. The model fitted the relationship between the observed spatial distributions of the xylem and the observed lateral bending, and thus supported the hypothesis that phototropic bending of woody stems results from asymmetrical xylem formation, as such occurs during gravitropism.

  10. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form.

    PubMed

    Kiss, John Z; Correll, Melanie J; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Edelmann, Richard E

    2003-06-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  11. Defining the site of light perception and initiation of phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Preuten, Tobias; Hohm, Tim; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2013-10-07

    Phototropism is an adaptive response allowing plants to optimize photosynthetic light capture. This is achieved by asymmetric growth between the shaded and lit sides of the stimulated organ. In grass seedlings, the site of phototropin-mediated light perception is distinct from the site of bending; however, in dicotyledonous plants (e.g., Arabidopsis), spatial aspects of perception remain debatable. We use morphological studies and genetics to show that phototropism can occur in the absence of the root, lower hypocotyl, hypocotyl apex, and cotyledons. Tissue-specific expression of the phototropin1 (phot1) photoreceptor demonstrates that light sensing occurs in the upper hypocotyl and that expression of phot1 in the hypocotyl elongation zone is sufficient to enable a normal phototropic response. Moreover, we show that efficient phototropism occurs when phot1 is expressed from endodermal, cortical, or epidermal cells and that its local activation rapidly leads to a global response throughout the seedling. We propose that spatial aspects in the steps leading from light perception to growth reorientation during phototropism differ between grasses and dicots. These results are important to properly interpret genetic experiments and establish a model connecting light perception to the growth response, including cellular and morphological aspects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants.

    PubMed

    Vitha, S; Zhao, L; Sack, F D

    2000-02-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  13. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitha, S.; Zhao, L.; Sack, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  14. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie J.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  15. Kinetic separation of phototropism from blue-light inhibition of stem elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that phototropic bending arises when a light gradient across the stem differentially inhibits cell elongation because of direct inhibition of cell elongation by light (the Blaauw hypothesis). Continuous irradiation of dark-grown cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) with unilateral blue light inhibited hypocotyl elongation within 30 s, but did not induce phototropic curvature until 4.5 h after the start of irradiation. Marking experiments showed that curvature began simultaneously at the top and bottom of the growing region. In situ measurements of the light gradient across the stem with a glass fiber optic indicated that a 5- to 6-fold difference in fluence rate was established on the two sides of the stem. The light gradient established at the start of irradiation was the same as that after 6 h of irradiation. Changes in gravitropic responsiveness during this period were also ruled out. Calculations show that the light gradient should have caused curvature which would be detectable within 30 to 60 min and which would extrapolate to the start of irradiation--if the Blaauw hypothesis were correct. The long lag for phototropism in this case indicates that rapid inhibition of cell elongation by blue light does not cause the asymmetrical growth of phototropism. Rather, phototropism is superimposed upon this separate light growth response.

  16. Root phototropism: how light and gravity interact in shaping plant form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie J.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The interactions among tropisms can be critical in determining the final growth form of plants and plant organs. We have studied tropistic responses in roots as an example of these type of interactions. While gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response in roots, phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth in this organ in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism. In the flowering plant Arabidopsis, the photosensitive pigments phytochrome A (phyA) and phytochrome B (phyB) mediate this positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. While blue-light-based negative phototropism is primarily mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors, the phyA and phyAB mutants (but not phyB) were inhibited in this response relative to the WT. The differences observed in phototropic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in plants and that phytochrome plays a key role in integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  17. Kinetic separation of phototropism from blue-light inhibition of stem elongation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that phototropic bending arises when a light gradient across the stem differentially inhibits cell elongation because of direct inhibition of cell elongation by light (the Blaauw hypothesis). Continuous irradiation of dark-grown cucumber seedlings (Cucumis sativus L.) with unilateral blue light inhibited hypocotyl elongation within 30 s, but did not induce phototropic curvature until 4.5 h after the start of irradiation. Marking experiments showed that curvature began simultaneously at the top and bottom of the growing region. In situ measurements of the light gradient across the stem with a glass fiber optic indicated that a 5- to 6-fold difference in fluence rate was established on the two sides of the stem. The light gradient established at the start of irradiation was the same as that after 6 h of irradiation. Changes in gravitropic responsiveness during this period were also ruled out. Calculations show that the light gradient should have caused curvature which would be detectable within 30 to 60 min and which would extrapolate to the start of irradiation--if the Blaauw hypothesis were correct. The long lag for phototropism in this case indicates that rapid inhibition of cell elongation by blue light does not cause the asymmetrical growth of phototropism. Rather, phototropism is superimposed upon this separate light growth response.

  18. Interaction of Root Gravitropism and Phototropism in Arabidopsis Wild-Type and Starchless Mutants1

    PubMed Central

    Vitha, Stanislav; Zhao, Liming; Sack, Fred David

    2000-01-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 μmol m−2 s−1), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis. PMID:10677438

  19. Interaction of root gravitropism and phototropism in Arabidopsis wild-type and starchless mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitha, S.; Zhao, L.; Sack, F. D.

    2000-01-01

    Root gravitropism in wild-type Arabidopsis and in two starchless mutants, pgm1-1 and adg1-1, was evaluated as a function of light position to determine the relative strengths of negative phototropism and of gravitropism and how much phototropism affects gravitropic measurements. Gravitropism was stronger than phototropism in some but not all light positions in wild-type roots grown for an extended period, indicating that the relationship between the two tropisms is more complex than previously reported. Root phototropism significantly influenced the time course of gravitropic curvature and the two measures of sensitivity. Light from above during horizontal exposure overestimated all three parameters for all three genotypes except the wild-type perception time. At the irradiance used (80 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), the shortest periods of illumination found to exaggerate gravitropism were 45 min of continuous illumination and 2-min doses of intermittent illumination. By growing roots in circumlateral light or by gravistimulating in the dark, corrected values were obtained for each gravitropic parameter. Roots of both starchless mutants were determined to be about three times less sensitive than prior estimates. This study demonstrates the importance of accounting for phototropism in the design of root gravitropism experiments in Arabidopsis.

  20. Merlin, a regulator of Hippo signaling, regulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soyoung; Jho, Eek-hoon

    2016-01-01

    Merlin, encoded by the NF2 gene, is a tumor suppressor that exerts its function via inhibiting mitogenic receptors at the plasma membrane. Although multiple mutations in Merlin have been identified in Neurofibromatosis type II (NF2) disease, its molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we show that Merlin interacts with LRP6 and inhibits LRP6 phosphorylation, a critical step for the initiation of Wnt signaling. We found that treatment of Wnt3a caused phosphorylation of Merlin by PAK1, leading to detachment of Merlin from LRP6 and allowing the initiation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. A higher level of β-catenin was found in tissues from NF2 patients. Enhanced proliferation and migration caused by knockdown of Merlin in glioblastoma cells were inhibited by suppression of β-catenin. Conclusively, these results suggest that sustained Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity induced by abrogation of Merlin-mediated inhibition of LRP6 phosphorylation might be a cause of NF2 disease. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 357-358] PMID:27345717

  1. Metabolic control of signalling pathways and metabolic auto-regulation.

    PubMed

    Lorendeau, Doriane; Christen, Stefan; Rinaldi, Gianmarco; Fendt, Sarah-Maria

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic alterations have emerged as an important hallmark in the development of various diseases. Thus, understanding the complex interplay of metabolism with other cellular processes such as cell signalling is critical to rationally control and modulate cellular physiology. Here, we review in the context of mammalian target of rapamycin, AMP-activated protein kinase and p53, the orchestrated interplay between metabolism and cellular signalling as well as transcriptional regulation. Moreover, we discuss recent discoveries in auto-regulation of metabolism (i.e. how metabolic parameters such as metabolite levels activate or inhibit enzymes and thus metabolic pathways). Finally, we review functional consequences of post-translational modification on metabolic enzyme abundance and/or activities.

  2. Redox regulation of cancer metastasis: molecular signaling and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenyong; Zou, Linzhi; Huang, Canhua; Lei, Yunlong

    2014-08-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Accumulated evidence has shown that high-metastasis potential cancer cells have more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation compared with low-metastasis potential cancer cells. ROS can function as second messengers to regulate multiple cancer metastasis-related signaling pathways via reversible oxidative posttranslational modifications of cysteine in key redox-sensitive proteins, which leads to the structural and functional change of these proteins. Because ROS can promote cancer metastasis, therapeutic strategies aiming at inducing/reducing cellular ROS level or targeting redox sensors involved in metastasis hold great potential in developing new efficient approaches for anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarize recent findings on regulation of tumor metastasis by key redox sensors and describe the potential of targeting redox signaling pathways for cancer therapy.

  3. Gap Junctional Regulation of Signal Transduction in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M.; Stains, Joseph P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of gap junctions, particularly that of connexin43 (Cx43), has become an area of increasing interest in bone physiology. An abundance of studies have shown that Cx43 influences the function of osteoblasts and osteocytes, which ultimately impacts bone mass acquisition and skeletal homeostasis. However, the molecular details underlying how Cx43 regulates bone are only coming into focus and have proven to be more complex than originally thought. In this review, we focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms by which Cx43 gap junctions and hemichannels regulate cell signaling pathways, gene expression, mechanotransduction and cell survival in bone cells. This review will highlight key signaling factors that have been identified as downstream effectors of Cx43 and the impact of these pathways on distinct osteoblast and osteocyte functions. PMID:24486014

  4. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    PubMed

    Atamian, Hagop S; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptive advantage by synchronizing plant physiological and metabolic processes to the external environment. The circadian clock regulates phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling pathways to generate daily rhythms in hormone activity that fine-tune a range of plant processes, enhancing adaptation to local conditions. This review explores our current understanding of the interplay between the circadian clock and hormone signaling pathways.

  5. Redox signaling regulated by electrophiles and reactive sulfur species

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Motohiro; Kumagai, Yoshito; Ihara, Hideshi; Fujii, Shigemoto; Motohashi, Hozumi; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Redox signaling is a key modulator of oxidative stress induced by nonspecific insults of biological molecules generated by reactive oxygen species. Current redox biology is revisiting the traditional concept of oxidative stress, such that toxic effects of reactive oxygen species are protected by diverse antioxidant systems upregulated by oxidative stress responses that are physiologically mediated by redox-dependent cell signaling pathways. Redox signaling is thus precisely regulated by endogenous electrophilic substances that are generated from reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide and its derivative reactive species during stress responses. Among electrophiles formed endogenously, 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) has unique cell signaling functions, and pathways for its biosynthesis, signaling mechanism, and metabolism in cells have been clarified. Reactive sulfur species such as cysteine hydropersulfides that are abundant in cells are likely involved in 8-nitro-cGMP metabolism. These new aspects of redox biology may stimulate innovative and multidisciplinary research in cell and stem cell biology; infectious diseases, cancer, metabolic syndrome, ageing, and neurodegenerative diseases; and other oxidative stress-related disorders. This review focuses on the most recent progress in the biosynthesis, cell signaling, and metabolism of 8-nitro-cGMP, which is a likely target for drug development and lead to discovery of novel therapeutics for many diseases. PMID:27013774

  6. Canonical Wnt Signaling Regulates Atrioventricular Junction Programming and Electrophysiological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. Objective To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. Methods and Results We utilized a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin’s cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiologic criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular preexcitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular preexcitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electrical programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggests that ventricular preexcitation may require both morphologic patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. PMID:25599332

  7. Canonical wnt signaling regulates atrioventricular junction programming and electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed

    Gillers, Benjamin S; Chiplunkar, Aditi; Aly, Haytham; Valenta, Tomas; Basler, Konrad; Christoffels, Vincent M; Efimov, Igor R; Boukens, Bastiaan J; Rentschler, Stacey

    2015-01-30

    Proper patterning of the atrioventricular canal (AVC) is essential for delay of electrical impulses between atria and ventricles, and defects in AVC maturation can result in congenital heart disease. To determine the role of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium during AVC development. We used a novel allele of β-catenin that preserves β-catenin's cell adhesive functions but disrupts canonical Wnt signaling, allowing us to probe the effects of Wnt loss of function independently. We show that the loss of canonical Wnt signaling in the myocardium results in tricuspid atresia with hypoplastic right ventricle associated with the loss of AVC myocardium. In contrast, ectopic activation of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce formation of ectopic AV junction-like tissue as assessed by morphology, gene expression, and electrophysiological criteria. Aberrant AVC development can lead to ventricular pre-excitation, a characteristic feature of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We demonstrate that postnatal activation of Notch signaling downregulates canonical Wnt targets within the AV junction. Stabilization of β-catenin protein levels can rescue Notch-mediated ventricular pre-excitation and dysregulated ion channel gene expression. Our data demonstrate that myocardial canonical Wnt signaling is an important regulator of AVC maturation and electric programming upstream of Tbx3. Our data further suggest that ventricular pre-excitation may require both morphological patterning defects, as well as myocardial lineage reprogramming, to allow robust conduction across accessory pathway tissue. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. PDGFRalphaalpha signaling is regulated through the primary cilium in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Linda; Clement, Christian A; Teilmann, Stefan C; Pazour, Gregory J; Hoffmann, Else K; Satir, Peter; Christensen, Søren T

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings show that cilia are sensory organelles that display specific receptors and ion channels, which transmit signals from the extracellular environment via the cilium to the cell to control tissue homeostasis and function. Agenesis of primary cilia or mislocation of ciliary signal components affects human pathologies, such as polycystic kidney disease and disorders associated with Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Primary cilia are essential for hedgehog ligand-induced signaling cascade regulating growth and patterning. Here, we show that the primary cilium in fibroblasts plays a critical role in growth control via platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRalpha), which localizes to the primary cilium during growth arrest in NIH3T3 cells and primary cultures of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Ligand-dependent activation of PDGFRalphaalpha is followed by activation of Akt and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathways, with Mek1/2 being phosphorylated within the cilium and at the basal body. Fibroblasts derived from Tg737(orpk) mutants fail to form normal cilia and to upregulate the level of PDGFRalpha; PDGF-AA fails to activate PDGFRalphaalpha and the Mek1/2-Erk1/2 pathway. Signaling through PDGFRbeta, which localizes to the plasma membrane, is maintained at comparable levels in wild-type and mutant cells. We propose that ciliary PDGFRalphaalpha signaling is linked to tissue homeostasis and to mitogenic signaling pathways.

  9. Critical regulation of TGFbeta signaling by Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Xia; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2008-07-08

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) controls a diverse set of cellular processes by activating TGFbeta type I (TbetaRI) and type II (TbetaRII) serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFbeta signaling is mediated by Smad2 and Smad3, which are phosphorylated in their SXS motif by activated TbetaRI. The 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone facilitating the folding and stabilization of many protein kinases and intracellular signaling molecules. Here, we present evidence identifying a critical role for Hsp90 in TGFbeta signaling. Inhibition of Hsp90 function by using small-molecule inhibitors such as 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), and also at the genetic level, blocks TGFbeta-induced signaling and transcriptional responses. Furthermore, we identify TbetaRI and TbetaRII as Hsp90-interacting proteins in vitro and in vivo and demonstrate that inhibition of Hsp90 function increases TbetaR ubiquitination and degradation dependent on the Smurf2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. Our data reveal an essential level of TGFbeta signaling regulation mediated by Hsp90 by its ability to chaperone TbetaRs and also implicate the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in blocking undesired activation of TGFbeta signaling in diseases.

  10. Critical regulation of TGFβ signaling by Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, Katharine H.; Lin, Xia; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) controls a diverse set of cellular processes by activating TGFβ type I (TβRI) and type II (TβRII) serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFβ signaling is mediated by Smad2 and Smad3, which are phosphorylated in their SXS motif by activated TβRI. The 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone facilitating the folding and stabilization of many protein kinases and intracellular signaling molecules. Here, we present evidence identifying a critical role for Hsp90 in TGFβ signaling. Inhibition of Hsp90 function by using small-molecule inhibitors such as 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG), and also at the genetic level, blocks TGFβ-induced signaling and transcriptional responses. Furthermore, we identify TβRI and TβRII as Hsp90-interacting proteins in vitro and in vivo and demonstrate that inhibition of Hsp90 function increases TβR ubiquitination and degradation dependent on the Smurf2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. Our data reveal an essential level of TGFβ signaling regulation mediated by Hsp90 by its ability to chaperone TβRs and also implicate the use of Hsp90 inhibitors in blocking undesired activation of TGFβ signaling in diseases. PMID:18591668

  11. Autocrine and Paracrine Hh Signaling Regulate Prostate Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    development and tumorigenesis (13). The forkhead transcription factor Foxe1 was established as a downstream target of the Shh pathway in hair follicle morpho...in the epithelium of the developing prostate; activate Hh target genes expressed in the surrounding mesenchyme and influence prostate ductal growth...postanatally. We propose this temporal growth effects is mediated by the discordant regulation of a subset of target genes by Hh signaling in the prenatal and

  12. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward

    PubMed Central

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Leprflox/flox mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR. PMID:27922639

  13. JAK/Stat signaling regulates heart precursor diversification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron N; Mokalled, Mayssa H; Haden, Tom N; Olson, Eric N

    2011-11-01

    Intercellular signal transduction pathways regulate the NK-2 family of transcription factors in a conserved gene regulatory network that directs cardiogenesis in both flies and mammals. The Drosophila NK-2 protein Tinman (Tin) was recently shown to regulate Stat92E, the Janus kinase (JAK) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) pathway effector, in the developing mesoderm. To understand whether the JAK/Stat pathway also regulates cardiogenesis, we performed a systematic characterization of JAK/Stat signaling during mesoderm development. Drosophila embryos with mutations in the JAK/Stat ligand upd or in Stat92E have non-functional hearts with luminal defects and inappropriate cell aggregations. Using strong Stat92E loss-of-function alleles, we show that the JAK/Stat pathway regulates tin expression prior to heart precursor cell diversification. tin expression can be subdivided into four phases and, in Stat92E mutant embryos, the broad phase 2 expression pattern in the dorsal mesoderm does not restrict to the constrained phase 3 pattern. These embryos also have an expanded pericardial cell domain. We show the E(spl)-C gene HLHm5 is expressed in a pattern complementary to tin during phase 3 and that this expression is JAK/Stat dependent. In addition, E(spl)-C mutant embryos phenocopy the cardiac defects of Stat92E embryos. Mechanistically, JAK/Stat signals activate E(spl)-C genes to restrict Tin expression and the subsequent expression of the T-box transcription factor H15 to direct heart precursor diversification. This study is the first to characterize a role for the JAK/Stat pathway during cardiogenesis and identifies an autoregulatory circuit in which tin limits its own expression domain.

  14. Mesolimbic leptin signaling negatively regulates cocaine-conditioned reward.

    PubMed

    Shen, M; Jiang, C; Liu, P; Wang, F; Ma, L

    2016-12-06

    The regulatory mechanisms underlying the response to addictive drugs are complex, and increasing evidence indicates that there is a role for appetite-regulating pathways in substance abuse. Leptin, an important adipose hormone that regulates energy balance and appetite, exerts its physiological functions via leptin receptors. However, the role of leptin signaling in regulating the response to cocaine remains unclear. Here we examined the potential role of leptin signaling in cocaine reward using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure. Our results showed that inhibition of leptin signaling by intracerebroventricular infusion of the leptin receptor (LepR) antagonist SMLA during cocaine conditioning increased the cocaine-CPP and upregulated the level of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We then selectively knocked down the LepR in the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area (VTA), NAc core and central amygdala (CeA) by injecting AAV-Cre into Lepr(flox/flox) mice. LepR deletion in the VTA increased the dopamine levels in the NAc and enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward. LepR deletion in the NAc core enhanced the cocaine-conditioned reward and impaired the effect of the D2-dopamine receptor on cocaine-CPP, whereas LepR deletion in the CeA had no effect on cocaine-CPP but increased the anxiety level of mice. In addition, prior exposure to saccharin increased LepR mRNA and STAT3 phosphorylation in the NAc and VTA and impaired cocaine-CPP. These results indicate that leptin signaling is critically involved in cocaine-conditioned reward and the regulation of drug reward by a natural reward and that these effects are dependent on mesolimbic LepR.

  15. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Notch1 signaling: the fulcrum of Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jin; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Hee-Sae

    2015-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a pivotal role in cell fate determination, cellular development, cellular self-renewal, tumor progression, and has been linked to developmental disorders and carcinogenesis. Notch1 is activated through interactions with the ligands of neighboring cells, and acts as a transcriptional activator in the nucleus. The Notch1 intracellular domain (Notch1-IC) regulates the expression of target genes related to tumor development and progression. The Notch1 protein undergoes modification after translation by posttranslational modification enzymes. Phosphorylation modification is critical for enzymatic activation, complex formation, degradation, and subcellular localization. According to the nuclear cycle, Notch1-IC is degraded by E3 ligase, FBW7 in the nucleus via phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Here, we summarize the Notch signaling pathway, and resolve to understand the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of Notch signaling as well as to understand its relation to cancer.

  16. Auxin Signaling in Regulation of Plant Translation Reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Ryabova, Lyubov A.

    2017-01-01

    The mRNA translation machinery directs protein production, and thus cell growth, according to prevailing cellular and environmental conditions. The target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway—a major growth-related pathway—plays a pivotal role in optimizing protein synthesis in mammals, while its deregulation triggers uncontrolled cell proliferation and the development of severe diseases. In plants, several signaling pathways sensitive to environmental changes, hormones, and pathogens have been implicated in post-transcriptional control, and thus far phytohormones have attracted most attention as TOR upstream regulators in plants. Recent data have suggested that the coordinated actions of the phytohormone auxin, Rho-like small GTPases (ROPs) from plants, and TOR signaling contribute to translation regulation of mRNAs that harbor upstream open reading frames (uORFs) within their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs). This review will summarize recent advances in translational regulation of a specific set of uORF-containing mRNAs that encode regulatory proteins—transcription factors, protein kinases and other cellular controllers—and how their control can impact plant growth and development. PMID:28659957

  17. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Leah Y.; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J.; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function. PMID:26884397

  19. Hippo Signaling Regulates Pancreas Development through Inactivation of Yap

    PubMed Central

    Day, Caroline E.; Boerner, Brian P.; Johnson, Randy L.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian pancreas is required for normal metabolism, with defects in this vital organ commonly observed in cancer and diabetes. Development must therefore be tightly controlled in order to produce a pancreas of correct size, cell type composition, and physiologic function. Through negative regulation of Yap-dependent proliferation, the Hippo kinase cascade is a critical regulator of organ growth. To investigate the role of Hippo signaling in pancreas biology, we deleted Hippo pathway components in the developing mouse pancreas. Unexpectedly, the pancreas from Hippo-deficient offspring was reduced in size, with defects evident throughout the organ. Increases in the dephosphorylated nuclear form of Yap are apparent throughout the exocrine compartment and correlate with increases in levels of cell proliferation. However, the mutant exocrine tissue displays extensive disorganization leading to pancreatitis-like autodigestion. Interestingly, our results suggest that Hippo signaling does not directly regulate the pancreas endocrine compartment as Yap expression is lost following endocrine specification through a Hippo-independent mechanism. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Hippo signaling plays a crucial role in pancreas development and provide novel routes to a better understanding of pathological conditions that affect this organ. PMID:23071096

  20. Regulation of FcεRI signaling by lipid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuhny, Marcel; Zorn, Carolin N; Huber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are tissue-resident sentinels of hematopoietic origin that play a prominent role in allergic diseases. They express the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI), which when cross-linked by multivalent antigens triggers the release of preformed mediators, generation of arachidonic acid metabolites, and the synthesis of cytokines and chemokines. Stimulation of the FcεRI with increasing antigen concentrations follows a characteristic bell-shaped dose-responses curve. At high antigen concentrations, the so-called supra-optimal conditions, repression of FcεRI-induced responses is facilitated by activation and incorporation of negative signaling regulators. In this context, the SH2-containing inositol-5'-phosphatase, SHIP1, has been demonstrated to be of particular importance. SHIP1 with its catalytic and multiple protein interaction sites provides several layers of control for FcεRI signaling. Regulation of SHIP1 function occurs on various levels, e.g., protein expression, receptor and membrane recruitment, competition for protein-protein interaction sites, and activating modifications enhancing the phosphatase function. Apart from FcεRI-mediated signaling, SHIP1 can be activated by diverse unrelated receptor systems indicating its involvement in the regulation of antigen-dependent cellular responses by autocrine feedback mechanisms or tissue-specific and/or (patho-) physiologically determined factors. Thus, pharmacologic engagement of SHIP1 may represent a beneficial strategy for patients suffering from acute or chronic inflammation or allergies.

  1. Cannabinoid receptor signaling regulates liver development and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Leah Y; Alexa, Kristen; Cortes, Mauricio; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Kim, Andrew J; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; North, Trista E; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-02-15

    Endocannabinoid (EC) signaling mediates psychotropic effects and regulates appetite. By contrast, potential roles in organ development and embryonic energy consumption remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that genetic or chemical inhibition of cannabinoid receptor (Cnr) activity disrupts liver development and metabolic function in zebrafish (Danio rerio), impacting hepatic differentiation, but not endodermal specification: loss of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and cnr2 activity leads to smaller livers with fewer hepatocytes, reduced liver-specific gene expression and proliferation. Functional assays reveal abnormal biliary anatomy and lipid handling. Adult cnr2 mutants are susceptible to hepatic steatosis. Metabolomic analysis reveals reduced methionine content in Cnr mutants. Methionine supplementation rescues developmental and metabolic defects in Cnr mutant livers, suggesting a causal relationship between EC signaling, methionine deficiency and impaired liver development. The effect of Cnr on methionine metabolism is regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factors (Srebfs), as their overexpression rescues Cnr mutant liver phenotypes in a methionine-dependent manner. Our work describes a novel developmental role for EC signaling, whereby Cnr-mediated regulation of Srebfs and methionine metabolism impacts liver development and function.

  2. Regulation of interferon gamma signaling by suppressors of cytokine signaling and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Wilson, Tenisha D; Johnson, Howard M

    2013-12-18

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1(-/-)) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function.

  3. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  4. Hydrogen sulfide anion regulates redox signaling via electrophile sulfhydration

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Motohiro; Sawa, Tomohiro; Kitajima, Naoyuki; Ono, Katsuhiko; Inoue, Hirofumi; Ihara, Hideshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Suematsu, Makoto; Kurose, Hitoshi; van der Vliet, Albert; Freeman, Bruce A; Shibata, Takahiro; Uchida, Koji; Kumagai, Yoshito; Akaike, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    An emerging aspect of redox signaling is the pathway mediated by electrophilic byproducts, such as nitrated cyclic nucleotide (for example, 8-nitroguanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP)) and nitro or keto derivatives of unsaturated fatty acids, generated via reactions of inflammation-related enzymes, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and secondary products. Here we report that enzymatically generated hydrogen sulfide anion (HS−) regulates the metabolism and signaling actions of various electrophiles. HS− reacts with electrophiles, best represented by 8-nitro-cGMP, via direct sulfhydration and modulates cellular redox signaling. The relevance of this reaction is reinforced by the significant 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mouse cardiac tissue after myocardial infarction that is modulated by alterations in HS− biosynthesis. Cardiac HS−, in turn, suppresses electrophile-mediated H-Ras activation and cardiac cell senescence, contributing to the beneficial effects of HS− on myocardial infarction–associated heart failure. Thus, this study reveals HS−-induced electrophile sulfhydration as a unique mechanism for regulating electrophile-mediated redox signaling. PMID:22772154

  5. Semaphorin 6A regulates angiogenesis by modulating VEGF signaling

    PubMed Central

    Segarra, Marta; Maric, Dragan; Salvucci, Ombretta; Hou, Xu; Kumar, Anil; Li, Xuri; Tosato, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Formation of new vessels during development and in the mature mammal generally proceeds through angiogenesis. Although a variety of molecules and signaling pathways are known to underlie endothelial cell sprouting and remodeling during angiogenesis, many aspects of this complex process remain unexplained. Here we show that the transmembrane semaphorin6A (Sema6A) is expressed in endothelial cells, and regulates endothelial cell survival and growth by modulating the expression and signaling of VEGFR2, which is known to maintain endothelial cell viability by autocrine VEGFR signaling. The silencing of Sema6A in primary endothelial cells promotes cell death that is not rescued by exogenous VEGF-A or FGF2, attributable to the loss of prosurvival signaling from endogenous VEGF. Analyses of mouse tissues demonstrate that Sema6A is expressed in angiogenic and remodeling vessels. Mice with null mutations of Sema6A exhibit significant defects in hyaloid vessels complexity associated with increased endothelial cell death, and in retinal vessels development that is abnormally reduced. Adult Sema6A-null mice exhibit reduced tumor, matrigel, and choroidal angiogenesis compared with controls. Sema6A plays important roles in development of the nervous system. Here we show that it also regulates vascular development and adult angiogenesis. PMID:23007403

  6. Endothelial HIF signaling regulates pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Ryan P.; McConaha, Melinda E.; Jones, Brittany R.; Shay, Sheila D.; Moore, Christy S.; Blackwell, Thomas R.; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L.; Burman, Ankita; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Hemnes, Anna R.; Karwandyar, Ayub K.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Talati, Megha A.; Dong, Hui-Jia; Gleaves, Linda A.; Carrier, Erica J.; Gaskill, Christa; Scott, Edward W.; Majka, Susan M.; Fessel, Joshua P.; West, James D.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating chronic parenchymal lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Since the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway is important for development of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxia, we investigated whether HIF signaling in vascular endothelium regulates development of PH related to pulmonary fibrosis. We generated a transgenic model in which HIF is deleted within vascular endothelial cells and then exposed these mice to chronic intraperitoneal bleomycin to induce PH associated with lung fibrosis. Although no differences in the degree of fibrotic remodeling were observed, we found that endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected against development of PH, including right ventricle and pulmonary vessel remodeling. Similarly, endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected from PH after a 4-wk exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In vitro studies of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells isolated from the HIF-targeted mice and controls revealed that endothelial HIF signaling increases endothelial cell expression of connective tissue growth factor, enhances vascular permeability, and promotes pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and wound healing ability, all of which have the potential to impact the development of PH in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that vascular endothelial cell HIF signaling is necessary for development of hypoxia and pulmonary fibrosis associated PH. As such, HIF and HIF-regulated targets represent a therapeutic target in these conditions. PMID:26637636

  7. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  8. Neuroendocrine regulation of Drosophila metamorphosis requires TGFβ/Activin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibbens, Ying Y.; Warren, James T.; Gilbert, Lawrence I.; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    In insects, initiation of metamorphosis requires a surge in the production of the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone from the prothoracic gland, the primary endocrine organ of juvenile larvae. Here, we show that blocking TGFβ/Activin signaling, specifically in the Drosophila prothoracic gland, results in developmental arrest prior to metamorphosis. The terminal, giant third instar larval phenotype results from a failure to induce the large rise in ecdysteroid titer that triggers metamorphosis. We further demonstrate that activin signaling regulates competence of the prothoracic gland to receive PTTH and insulin signals, and that these two pathways act at the mRNA and post-transcriptional levels, respectively, to control ecdysone biosynthetic enzyme expression. This dual regulatory circuitry may provide a cross-check mechanism to ensure that both developmental and nutritional inputs are synchronized before initiating the final genetic program leading to reproductive adult development. As steroid hormone production in C. elegans and mammals is also influenced by TGFβ/Activin signaling, this family of secreted factors may play a general role in regulating developmental transitions across phyla. PMID:21613324

  9. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  10. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  11. Time threshold for second positive phototropism is decreased by a preirradiation with red light.

    PubMed Central

    Janoudi A-K; Konjevic, R; Apel, P; Poff, K L

    1992-01-01

    A second positive phototropic response is exhibited by a plant after the time of irradiation has exceeded a time threshold. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 15 minutes for Arabidopsis thaliana. This threshold is decreased to about 4 minutes by a 669-nanometer preirradiation. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings show a similar response. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 60 minutes for tobacco, and is decreased to about 15 minutes after a preirradiation with either 450- or 669- nanometer light. The existence of a time threshold for second positive phototropism and the dependence of this threshold on the irradiation history of the seedling contribute to the complexity of the fluence response relationship for phototropism. PMID:11537887

  12. Time threshold for second positive phototropism is decreased by a preirradiation with red light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konjevic, R.; Apel, P.; Poff, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A second positive phototropic response is exhibited by a plant after the time of irradiation has exceeded a time threshold. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 15 minutes for Arabidopsis thaliana. This threshold is decreased to about 4 minutes by a 669-nanometer preirradiation. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) seedlings show a similar response. The time threshold of dark-grown seedlings is about 60 minutes for tobacco, and is decreased to about 15 minutes after a preirradiation with either 450- or 669- nanometer light. The existence of a time threshold for second positive phototropism and the dependence of this threshold on the irradiation history of the seedling contribute to the complexity of the fluence response relationship for phototropism.

  13. Kinetics for Phototropic Curvature by Etiolated Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana 1

    PubMed Central

    Orbović, Vladimir; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1991-01-01

    An infrared-imaging system has been used to study the influence of gravity on the kinetics of first positive phototropism. The development of phototropic curvature of etiolated seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana was measured in the absence of visible radiation. Following a pulse of blue light, stationary seedlings curved to a maximum of approximately 16° about 80 minutes after stimulation. The seedlings then curved upward again or straightened by about 6° during the subsequent 100 minutes. Seedlings rotated on a clinostat reached a similar maximum curvature following photostimulation. These seedlings maintained that curvature for 30 to 40 minutes before subsequently straightening to the same extent as the stationary seedlings. It is concluded that straightening is not a consequence of gravitropism, although gravity has some effect on the phototropism kinetics. PMID:11538373

  14. Regulation of NF-κB signalling cascade by immunophilins.

    PubMed

    Lagadari, Mariana; De Leo, Sonia A; Camisay, Maria F; Galigniana, Mario D; Erlejman, Alejandra G

    2016-01-01

    The fine regulation of signalling cascades is a key event required to maintain the appropriate functional properties of a cell when a given stimulus triggers specific biological responses. In this sense, cumulative experimental evidence during the last years has shown that high molecular weight immunophilins possess a fundamental importance in the regulation of many of these processes. It was first discovered that TPR-domain immunophilins such as FKBP51 and FKBP52 play a cardinal role, usually in an antagonistic fashion, in the regulation of several members of the steroid receptor family via its interaction with the heat-shock protein of 90-kDa, Hsp90. These Hsp90-associated cochaperones form a functional unit with the molecular chaperone influencing ligand binding capacity, receptor trafficking, and hormone-dependent transcriptional activity. Recently, it was demonstrated that the same immunophilins are also able to regulate the NF-kB signalling cascade in an Hsp90 independent manner. In this article we analize these properties and discuss the relevance of this novel regulatory pathway in the context of the pleiotropic actions managed by NF-kB in several cell types and tissues.

  15. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  16. CD23 can negatively regulate B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chaohong; Richard, Katharina; Wiggins, Melvin; Zhu, Xiaoping; Conrad, Daniel H.; Song, Wenxia

    2016-01-01

    CD23 has been implicated as a negative regulator of IgE and IgG antibody responses. However, whether CD23 has any role in B-cell activation remains unclear. We examined the expression of CD23 in different subsets of peripheral B cells and the impact of CD23 expression on the early events of B-cell receptor (BCR) activation using CD23 knockout (KO) mice. We found that in addition to marginal zone B cells, mature follicular B cells significantly down regulate the surface expression level of CD23 after undergoing isotype switch and memory B-cell differentiation. Upon stimulation with membrane-associated antigen, CD23 KO causes significant increases in the area of B cells contacting the antigen-presenting membrane and the magnitude of BCR clustering. This enhanced cell spreading and BCR clustering is concurrent with increases in the levels of phosphorylation of tyrosine and Btk, as well as the levels of F-actin and phosphorylated Wiskott Aldrich syndrome protein, an actin nucleation promoting factor, in the contract zone of CD23 KO B cells. These results reveal a role of CD23 in the negative regulation of BCR signaling in the absence of IgE immune complex and suggest that CD23 down-regulates BCR signaling by influencing actin-mediated BCR clustering and B-cell morphological changes. PMID:27181049

  17. GABA Not Only a Neurotransmitter: Osmotic Regulation by GABAAR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cesetti, Tiziana; Ciccolini, Francesca; Li, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Mature macroglia and almost all neural progenitor types express γ-aminobutyric (GABA) A receptors (GABAARs), whose activation by ambient or synaptic GABA, leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl−) depending on its electro-chemical gradient (ECl). Since the flux of Cl− is indissolubly associated to that of osmotically obliged water, GABAARs regulate water movements by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signaling could affect the movement of water by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. We will here review recent observations indicating that in neural cells GABAAR-mediated osmotic regulation affects the cellular volume thereby activating multiple intracellular signaling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation, and survival. In addition, we will discuss evidence that the osmotic regulation exerted by GABA may contribute to brain water homeostasis in physiological and in pathological conditions causing brain edema, in which the GABAergic transmission is often altered. PMID:22319472

  18. Biophysical mechanism of transient retinal phototropism in rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Thapa, Damber; Wang, Benquan; Gai, Shaoyan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-02-13

    Oblique light stimulation evoked transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been recently detected in frog and mouse retinas. High resolution microscopy of freshly isolated retinas indicated that the TRP is predominated by rod photoreceptors. Comparative confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed that the TRP predominantly occurred from the photoreceptor outer segment (OS). However, biophysical mechanism of rod OS change is still unknown. In this study, frog retinal slices, which open a cross section of retinal photoreceptor and other functional layers, were used to test the effect of light stimulation on rod OS. Near infrared light microscopy was employed to monitor photoreceptor changes in retinal slices stimulated by a rectangular-shaped visible light flash. Rapid rod OS length change was observed after the stimulation delivery. The magnitude and direction of the rod OS change varied with the position of the rods within the stimulated area. In the center of stimulated region the length of the rod OS shrunk, while in the peripheral region the rod OS tip swung towards center region in the plane perpendicular to the incident stimulus light. Our experimental result and theoretical analysis suggest that the observed TRP may reflect unbalanced disc-shape change due to localized pigment bleaching. Further investigation is required to understand biochemical mechanism of the observed rod OS kinetics. Better study of the TRP may provide a noninvasive biomarker to enable early detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other diseases that are known to produce retinal photoreceptor dysfunctions.

  19. Biophysical mechanism of transient retinal phototropism in rod photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Thapa, Damber; Wang, Benquan; Gai, Shaoyan; Yao, Xincheng

    2016-03-01

    Oblique light stimulation evoked transient retinal phototropism (TRP) has been recently detected in frog and mouse retinas. High resolution microscopy of freshly isolated retinas indicated that the TRP is predominated by rod photoreceptors. Comparative confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed that the TRP predominantly occurred from the photoreceptor outer segment (OS). However, biophysical mechanism of rod OS change is still unknown. In this study, frog retinal slices, which open a cross section of retinal photoreceptor and other functional layers, were used to test the effect of light stimulation on rod OS. Near infrared light microscopy was employed to monitor photoreceptor changes in retinal slices stimulated by a rectangular-shaped visible light flash. Rapid rod OS length change was observed after the stimulation delivery. The magnitude and direction of the rod OS change varied with the position of the rods within the stimulated area. In the center of stimulated region the length of the rod OS shrunk, while in the peripheral region the rod OS tip swung towards center region in the plane perpendicular to the incident stimulus light. Our experimental result and theoretical analysis suggest that the observed TRP may reflect unbalanced disc-shape change due to localized pigment bleaching. Further investigation is required to understand biochemical mechanism of the observed rod OS kinetics. Better study of the TRP may provide a noninvasive biomarker to enable early detection of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other diseases that are known to produce retinal photoreceptor dysfunctions.

  20. Diurnal Phototropism in Solar Tracking Leaves of Lavatera cretica

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Amnon; Koller, Dov

    1986-01-01

    On a clear day, leaf laminas of Lavatera cretica tracked the solar position throughout the day. The laminar azimuth did not diverge from the solar azimuth by more than 12° from sunrise to sunset. Tracking of the solar elevation started 1 to 2 hours after sunrise and ceased 1 to 2 hours before sunset. On an overcast day, the laminas reoriented horizontally. After sunset, following a clear day, the laminas performed a nocturnal reorientation, with three well defined phases. During the initial phase the laminas relaxed their strained sunset-facing orientation to one perpendicular to their petioles. This equilibrium configuration was maintained throughout the following phase, which was apparently concerned with time-measuring. During the final phase, the laminas reoriented, before sunrise, to a position facing the direction of the anticipated sunrise. This directional information is phototropic and was retained for 3 to 4 diurnal cycles, probably in the pulvinus itself, which is the site of the response. Laminas of plants transferred from sunlight either to darkness, or to a simulated natural photoperiod under overhead illumination, were facing the originally anticipated direction of sunrise at the time of each of the three to four subsequent sunrises (after which they reverted to the dark orientation in darkness, or to the horizontal one with overhead illumination). Cotyledonary laminas required directional information for the nocturnal reorientation during 3 or 4 cycles of simulated sunrise to sunset transitions. PMID:16664701

  1. Gravitropism and phototropism of oat coleoptiles: post-tropic autostraightening and tissue shrinkage during tropism.

    PubMed

    Tarui, Y; Iino, M

    1999-01-01

    We measured changes in length on the two opposite sides of the red-light-grown oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles subjected to either gravitropic or phototropic stimulation and subsequently rotated on a horizontal clinostat. The length measurement was conducted using three 5 mm-long zones delimited by ink markers from the tip. Curvature of each zone was analyzed from the length difference between the two sides. Gravitropism was induced by displacing the seedling from the vertical by 30 degrees or 90 degrees for 25 min. Phototropism was induced by exposing the coleoptile to unilateral blue light for 30 s, which provided a fluence (1.0 micromoles m-2) optimal for the pulse-induced positive phototropism or a lower, suboptimal fluence (0.03 micromoles m-2). After negatively gravitropic bending, the upper two zones straightened rapidly at either displacement angle. After positively phototropic bending, straightening occurred, but only in the top zone and at the lower fluence. The upper two zones straightened rapidly, however, when bilateral blue light (30 s; 15 micromoles m-2 from either direction) was applied 25 min after unilateral stimulation at the higher fluence. Bilateral blue light alone induced no curvature. These results confirm that the straightening of gravitropically bent coleoptiles is autonomic, and suggest that a similar autonomic response participates in the straightening of phototropically bent coleoptiles. Suppression of elongation on the concave side of the coleoptile mainly accounted for gravitropic and phototropic curvatures. The concave side of the top zone shrank during both tropisms. This shrinkage progressed at a high rate from the beginning of curvature response, suggesting that a drop in turgor pressure is the main and direct cause of the shrinkage.

  2. Effect of Red Light on the Phototropic Sensitivity of Corn Coleoptiles 1

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hyangju P.; Briggs, Winslow R.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of red light in alteration of the phototropic sensitivity of corn coleoptiles (Zea mays L., cultivar Burpee Barbecue Hybrid) is investigated. Phototropic dosage-response curves for etiolated coleoptiles are compared with those for coleoptiles receiving 1 hour of continuous red light immediately prior to phototropic induction. In the former case, only curvature comparable to the first positive curvature of oat coleoptiles is obtained. There is no evidence for first negative curvature and only minimal second positive curvature. The reciprocity law proved valid for all curvatures obtained. With red light, the sensitivity of the first positive curvature was decreased over ten-fold and there was clear appearance of second positive curvature for which the reciprocity law was not valid. Once again there was no evidence for negative curvature. Time course studies indicated that within 1 hour of the beginning of red light treatment at 25°, reactions leading to the decrease in phototropic sensitivity of the first positive component had gone to completion whether the red light was continuous or consisted of a single 1 second exposure followed by a 1 hour dark period. An action spectrum for the red-induced change in phototropic sensitivity showed a marked peak near 660 mμ with a small broad shoulder between 610 and 630 mμ, characteristic of phytochrome-mediated responses. The effect of red light could be fully reversed by low dosages of far-red light, but longer doses of far red were less effective. Large dosages of far-red light alone induced the same alteration in phototropic sensitivity as did red light. PMID:16656463

  3. Interaction between Gravitropism and Phototropism in Sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus1

    PubMed Central

    Grolig, Franz; Eibel, Peter; Schimek, Christine; Schapat, Tanja; Dennison, David S.; Galland, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between gravitropism and phototropism was analyzed for sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. Fluence rate-response curves for phototropism were generated under three different conditions: (a) for stationary sporangiophores, which reached photogravitropic equilibrium; (b) for sporangiophores, which were clinostated head-over during phototropic stimulation; and (c) for sporangiophores, which were subjected to centrifugal accelerations of 2.3g to 8.4g. For blue light (454 nm), clinostating caused an increase of the slope of the fluence rate-response curves and an increase of the maximal bending angles at saturating fluence rates. The absolute threshold remained, however, practically unaffected. In contrast to the results obtained with blue light, no increase of the slope of the fluence rate-response curves was obtained with near-ultraviolet light at 369 nm. Bilateral irradiation with near-ultraviolet or blue light enhanced gravitropism, whereas symmetric gravitropic stimulation caused a partial suppression of phototropism. Gravitropism and phototropism appear to be tightly linked by a tonic feedback loop that allows the respective transduction chains a mutual influence over each other. The use of tropism mutants allowed conclusions to be drawn about the tonic feedback loop with the gravitropic and phototropic transduction chains. The results from clinostating mutants that lack octahedral crystals (implicated as statoliths) showed that these crystals are not involved in the tonic feedback loop. At elevated centrifugal accelerations, the fluence-rate-response curves for photogravitropic equilibrium were displaced to higher fluence rates and the slope decreased. The results indicate that light transduction possesses a logarithmic transducer, whereas gravi-transduction uses a linear one. PMID:10859206

  4. Gravitropism and phototropism of oat coleoptiles: Post-tropic autostraightening and tissue shrinkage during tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarui, Y.; Iino, M.

    1999-01-01

    We measured changes in length on the two opposite sides of the red-light-grown oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles subjected to either gravitropic or phototropic stimulation and subsequently rotated on a horizontal clinostat. The length measurement was conducted using three 5 mm-long zones delimited by ink markers from the tip. Curvature of each zone was analyzed from the length difference between the two sides. Gravitropism was induced by displacing the seedling from the vertical by 30° or 90° for 25 min. Phototropism was induced by exposing the coleoptile to unilateral blue light for 30 s, which provided a fluence (1.0 μmol m-2) optimal for the pulse-induced positive phototropism or a lower, suboptimal fluence (0.03 μmol m-2). After negatively gravitropic bending, the upper two zones straightened rapidly at either displacement angle. After positively phototropic bending, straightening occurred, but only in the top zone and at the lower fluence. The upper two zones straightened rapidly, however, when bilateral blue light (30 s; 15 μmol m-2 from either direction) was applied 25 min after unilateral stimulation at the higher fluence. Bilateral blue light alone induced no curvature. These results confirm that the straightening of gravitropically bent coleoptiles is autonomic, and suggest that a similar autonomic response participates in the straightening of phototropically bent coleoptiles. Suppression of elongation on the concave side of the coleoptile mainly accounted for gravitropic and phototropic curvatures. The concave side of the top zone shrank during both tropisms. This shrinkage progressed at a high rate from the beginning of curvature response, suggesting that a drop in turgor pressure is the main and direct cause of the shrinkage.

  5. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic−/− mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic−/− mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  6. Stra13 regulates satellite cell activation by antagonizing Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Li, Li; Vercherat, Cécile; Gulbagci, Neriman Tuba; Acharjee, Sujata; Li, Jiali; Chung, Teng-Kai; Thin, Tin Htwe; Taneja, Reshma

    2007-01-01

    Satellite cells play a critical role in skeletal muscle regeneration in response to injury. Notch signaling is vital for satellite cell activation and myogenic precursor cell expansion but inhibits myogenic differentiation. Thus, precise spatial and temporal regulation of Notch activity is necessary for efficient muscle regeneration. We report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Stra13 modulates Notch signaling in regenerating muscle. Upon injury, Stra13−/− mice exhibit increased cellular proliferation, elevated Notch signaling, a striking regeneration defect characterized by degenerated myotubes, increased mononuclear cells, and fibrosis. Stra13−/− primary myoblasts also exhibit enhanced Notch activity, increased proliferation, and defective differentiation. Inhibition of Notch signaling ex vivo and in vivo ameliorates the phenotype of Stra13−/− mutants. We demonstrate in vitro that Stra13 antagonizes Notch activity and reverses the Notch-imposed inhibition of myogenesis. Thus, Stra13 plays an important role in postnatal myogenesis by attenuating Notch signaling to reduce myoblast proliferation and promote myogenic differentiation. PMID:17502421

  7. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G.; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-01-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  8. Paradoxical Signaling Regulates Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-02-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3-5 min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium-influx due to NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks and their role is to control both the activation and inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion including CaMKII, RhoA, and Cdc42 and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics.

  9. Localized JNK signaling regulates organ size during development

    PubMed Central

    Willsey, Helen Rankin; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Carlos Pastor-Pareja, José; Willsey, A Jeremy; Beachy, Philip A; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental question of biology is what determines organ size. Despite demonstrations that factors within organs determine their sizes, intrinsic size control mechanisms remain elusive. Here we show that Drosophila wing size is regulated by JNK signaling during development. JNK is active in a stripe along the center of developing wings, and modulating JNK signaling within this stripe changes organ size. This JNK stripe influences proliferation in a non-canonical, Jun-independent manner by inhibiting the Hippo pathway. Localized JNK activity is established by Hedgehog signaling, where Ci elevates dTRAF1 expression. As the dTRAF1 homolog, TRAF4, is amplified in numerous cancers, these findings provide a new mechanism for how the Hedgehog pathway could contribute to tumorigenesis, and, more importantly, provides a new strategy for cancer therapies. Finally, modulation of JNK signaling centers in developing antennae and legs changes their sizes, suggesting a more generalizable role for JNK signaling in developmental organ size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11491.001 PMID:26974344

  10. Molecular signaling pathways regulating muscle proteolysis during atrophy.

    PubMed

    Franch, Harold A; Price, S Russ

    2005-05-01

    Although a variety of diverse stimuli induce muscle atrophy, there is a surprising number of similarities in the intracellular responses. One prominent response is an increase in muscle proteolysis resulting from stimulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Understanding the intracellular signaling pathways that regulate muscle mass should offer insights into the coordination of cellular responses. This review will discuss recent findings on the molecular signaling pathways regulating proteolysis during muscle atrophy. The expression of several muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases is consistently increased in conditions causing muscle atrophy. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 act through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway to suppress the expression of two of these enzymes, MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1. Efforts to identify targets of the muscle-specific E3 ligases are yielding interesting information. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 also attenuate wasting by inhibiting caspase-3, which cleaves actin to facilitate its destruction by the ubiqutin-proteasome system. Other signaling systems involved in the regulation of muscle mass include the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. The maintenance of muscle mass requires a delicate balance between catabolic factors and anabolic factors. These signals inversely modulate the activity of several key regulatory pathways including the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/AKT and nuclear factor kappa B systems, which control the transcription of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway activity, the activity of caspase-3, and perhaps other proteolytic functions. When levels of insulin or insulin-like growth factor-1 are insufficient or inflammatory cytokine production is increased, muscle atrophy ensues.

  11. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. Copyright © 2014

  12. SUMOylation Negatively Regulates Angiogenesis by Targeting Endothelial NOTCH Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Ding, Sha; Qiu, Cong; Shi, Yanna; Song, Lin; Wang, Yueyue; Wang, Yuewen; Li, Jinying; Wang, Yiran; Sun, Yi; Qin, Lingfeng; Chen, Jun; Simons, Michael; Min, Wang; Yu, Luyang

    2017-09-01

    The highly conserved NOTCH (neurogenic locus notch homolog protein) signaling pathway functions as a key cell-cell interaction mechanism controlling cell fate and tissue patterning, whereas its dysregulation is implicated in a variety of developmental disorders and cancers. The pivotal role of endothelial NOTCH in regulation of angiogenesis is widely appreciated; however, little is known about what controls its signal transduction. Our previous study indicated the potential role of post-translational SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification (SUMOylation) in vascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SUMOylation in endothelial NOTCH signaling and angiogenesis. Endothelial SENP1 (sentrin-specific protease 1) deletion, in newly generated endothelial SENP1 (the major protease of the SUMO system)-deficient mice, significantly delayed retinal vascularization by maintaining prolonged NOTCH1 signaling, as confirmed in cultured endothelial cells. An in vitro SUMOylation assay and immunoprecipitation revealed that when SENP1 associated with N1ICD (NOTCH1 intracellular domain), it functions as a deSUMOylase of N1ICD SUMOylation on conserved lysines. Immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses and dual-luciferase assays of natural and SUMO-conjugated/nonconjugated NOTCH1 forms demonstrated that SUMO conjugation facilitated NOTCH1 cleavage. This released N1ICD from the membrane and stabilized it for translocation to the nucleus where it functions as a cotranscriptional factor. Functionally, SENP1-mediated NOTCH1 deSUMOylation was required for NOTCH signal activation in response to DLL4 (Delta-like 4) stimulation. This in turn suppressed VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) receptor signaling and angiogenesis, as evidenced by immunoblotted signaling molecules and in vitro angiogenesis assays. These results establish reversible NOTCH1 SUMOylation as a regulatory mechanism in coordinating endothelial angiogenic signaling; SENP1 acts as a

  13. Effect of xenon on the excited states of phototropic receptor flavin in corn seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierstra, R.D.; Poff, K.L.; Walker, E.B.; Song, P.S.

    1981-05-01

    The chemically inert, water-soluble heavy atom gas, xenon, at millimolar concentrations specifically quenches the triplet excited state of flavin in solution without quenching the flavin singlet excited state. The preferential quenching of the flavin triplet over the singlet excited state by Xe has been established by showing that the flavin triplet-sensitized photooxidation of NADH is inhibited while the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of flavin are not affected by Xe. No significant inhibition of phototropism and geotropism by Xe was observed, suggesting that a flavin singlet state is more likely involved than the triplet state in the primary photoprocess of phototropism in corn.

  14. Lipid phosphate phosphatases regulate signal transduction through glycerolipids and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Brindley, David N; English, Denis; Pilquil, Carlos; Buri, Katherine; Ling, Zong Chao

    2002-05-23

    Lipid phosphate esters including lysophosphatidate (LPA), phosphatidate (PA), sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) are bioactive in mammalian cells and serve as mediators of signal transduction. LPA and S1P are present in biological fluids and activate cells through stimulation of their respective G-protein-coupled receptors, LPA(1-3) and S1P(1-5). LPA stimulates fibroblast division and is important in wound repair. It is also active in maintaining the growth of ovarian cancers. S1P stimulates chemotaxis, proliferation and differentiation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells and is an important participant in the angiogenic response and neovessel maturation. PA and C1P are believed to act primarily inside the cell where they facilitate vesicle transport. The lipid phosphates are substrates for a family of lipid phosphate phosphatases (LPPs) that dramatically alter the signaling balance between the phosphate esters and their dephosphorylated products. In the case of PA, S1P and C1P, the products are diacylglycerol (DAG), sphingosine and ceramide, respectively. These latter lipids are also bioactive and, thus, the LPPs change signals that the cell receives. The LPPs are integral membrane proteins that act both inside and outside the cell. The "ecto-activity" of the LPPs regulates the circulating and locally effective concentrations of LPA and S1P. Conversely, the internal activity controls the relative accumulation of PA or C1P in response to stimulation by various agonists thereby affecting cell signaling downstream of EDG and other receptors. This article will review the various LPPs and discuss how these enzymes could regulate signal transduction by lipid mediators.

  15. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  16. Primary Inhibition of Hypocotyl Growth and Phototropism Depend Differently on Phototropin-Mediated Increases in Cytoplasmic Calcium Induced by Blue Light1

    PubMed Central

    Folta, Kevin M.; Lieg, Erin J.; Durham, Tessa; Spalding, Edgar P.

    2003-01-01

    The phototropin photoreceptors transduce blue-light signals into several physiological and developmental responses in plants. A transient rise in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca2+) that begins within seconds of phototropin 1 (phot1) excitation is believed to be an important element in the transduction pathways leading to one or more of the phot1-dependent responses. The goal of the present work was to determine whether the Ca2+ response was necessary for (a) the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation that develops within minutes of the irradiation, and (b) hypocotyl phototropism (curved growth of the stem in response to asymmetric illumination). After determining that pulses of light delivering photon fluences of between 1 and 1,000 μmol m-2 induced growth inhibition mediated by phot1 without significant interference from other photosensory pathways, the effect of blocking the Ca2+ rise was assessed. Treatment of seedlings with a Ca2+ chelator prevented the rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and prevented phot1-mediated growth inhibition. However, the same chelator treatment did not impair phot1-mediated phototropism. Thus, it appears that the early, transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ is an important intermediary process in at least one but not all phot1-signaling pathways. PMID:14645723

  17. Primary inhibition of hypocotyl growth and phototropism depend differently on phototropin-mediated increases in cytoplasmic calcium induced by blue light.

    PubMed

    Folta, Kevin M; Lieg, Erin J; Durham, Tessa; Spalding, Edgar P

    2003-12-01

    The phototropin photoreceptors transduce blue-light signals into several physiological and developmental responses in plants. A transient rise in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca2+) that begins within seconds of phototropin 1 (phot1) excitation is believed to be an important element in the transduction pathways leading to one or more of the phot1-dependent responses. The goal of the present work was to determine whether the Ca2+ response was necessary for (a). the inhibition of hypocotyl elongation that develops within minutes of the irradiation, and (b). hypocotyl phototropism (curved growth of the stem in response to asymmetric illumination). After determining that pulses of light delivering photon fluences of between 1 and 1000 micromol m-2 induced growth inhibition mediated by phot1 without significant interference from other photosensory pathways, the effect of blocking the Ca2+ rise was assessed. Treatment of seedlings with a Ca2+ chelator prevented the rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ and prevented phot1-mediated growth inhibition. However, the same chelator treatment did not impair phot1-mediated phototropism. Thus, it appears that the early, transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ is an important intermediary process in at least one but not all phot1-signaling pathways.

  18. Phytohormones signaling and crosstalk regulating leaf angle in rice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangyu; Zheng, Jingsheng; Huang, Rongyu; Huang, Yumin; Wang, Houcong; Jiang, Liangrong; Fang, Xuanjun

    2016-12-01

    Leaf angle is an important agronomic trait in rice (Oryza sativa L.). It affects both the efficiency of sunlight capture and nitrogen reservoirs. The erect leaf phenotype is suited for high-density planting and thus increasing crop yields. Many genes regulate leaf angle by affecting leaf structure, such as the lamina joint, mechanical tissues, and the midrib. Signaling of brassinosteroids (BR), auxin (IAA), and gibberellins (GA) plays important roles in the regulation of lamina joint bending in rice. In addition, the biosynthesis and signaling of BR are known to have dominant effects on leaf angle development. In this review, we summarize the factors and genes associated with the development of leaf angle in rice, outline the regulatory mechanisms based on the signaling of BR, IAA, and GA, and discuss the contribution of crosstalk between BR and IAA or GA in the formation of leaf angle. Promising lines of research in the transgenic engineering of rice leaf angle to increase grain yield are proposed.

  19. The Spectrin cytoskeleton regulates the Hippo signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Georgina C; Elbediwy, Ahmed; Khanal, Ichha; Ribeiro, Paulo S; Tapon, Nic; Thompson, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The Spectrin cytoskeleton is known to be polarised in epithelial cells, yet its role remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the Spectrin cytoskeleton controls Hippo signalling. In the developing Drosophila wing and eye, loss of apical Spectrins (alpha/beta-heavy dimers) produces tissue overgrowth and mis-regulation of Hippo target genes, similar to loss of Crumbs (Crb) or the FERM-domain protein Expanded (Ex). Apical beta-heavy Spectrin binds to Ex and co-localises with it at the apical membrane to antagonise Yki activity. Interestingly, in both the ovarian follicular epithelium and intestinal epithelium of Drosophila, apical Spectrins and Crb are dispensable for repression of Yki, while basolateral Spectrins (alpha/beta dimers) are essential. Finally, the Spectrin cytoskeleton is required to regulate the localisation of the Hippo pathway effector YAP in response to cell density human epithelial cells. Our findings identify both apical and basolateral Spectrins as regulators of Hippo signalling and suggest Spectrins as potential mechanosensors. PMID:25712476

  20. Spatial regulation of Raf kinase signaling by RKTG

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Xie, Xiaoduo; Ding, Qiurong; Luo, Xiaolin; He, Jing; Fan, Fengjuan; Liu, Weizhong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2007-01-01

    Subcellular compartmentalization has become an important theme in cell signaling such as spatial regulation of Ras by RasGRP1 and MEK/ERK by Sef. Here, we report spatial regulation of Raf kinase by RKTG (Raf kinase trapping to Golgi). RKTG is a seven-transmembrane protein localized at the Golgi apparatus. RKTG expression inhibits EGF-stimulated ERK and RSK phosphorylation, blocks NGF-mediated PC12 cell differentiation, and antagonizes Ras- and Raf-1-stimulated Elk-1 transactivation. Through interaction with Raf-1, RKTG changes the localization of Raf-1 from cytoplasm to the Golgi apparatus, blocks EGF-stimulated Raf-1 membrane translocation, and reduces the interaction of Raf-1 with Ras and MEK1. In RKTG-null mice, the basal ERK phosphorylation level is increased in the brain and liver. In RKTG-deleted mouse embryonic fibroblasts, EGF-induced ERK phosphorylation is enhanced. Collectively, our results reveal a paradigm of spatial regulation of Raf kinase by RKTG via sequestrating Raf-1 to the Golgi apparatus and thereby inhibiting the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:17724343

  1. CGI-58, a key regulator of lipid homeostasis and signaling in plants, also regulates polyamine metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is an alpha/beta hydrolase-type protein that regulates lipid homeostasis and signaling in eukaryotes by interacting with and stimulating the activity of several different types of proteins, including a lipase in mammalian cells and a peroxisomal ABC transp...

  2. Regulation of neuronal PKA signaling through AKAP targeting dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Smith, Karen E; Gorski, Jessica A; Horne, Eric A; Gibson, Emily S; Gomez, Lisa L

    2006-07-01

    Central to organization of signaling pathways are scaffolding, anchoring and adaptor proteins that mediate localized assembly of multi-protein complexes containing receptors, second messenger-generating enzymes, kinases, phosphatases, and substrates. At the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses, AMPA (AMPAR) and NMDA (NMDAR) glutamate receptors are linked to signaling proteins, the actin cytoskeleton, and synaptic adhesion molecules on dendritic spines through a network of scaffolding proteins that may play important roles regulating synaptic structure and receptor functions in synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPARs are rapidly recruited to dendritic spines through NMDAR activation during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) through pathways that also increase the size and F-actin content of spines. Phosphorylation of AMPAR-GluR1 subunits by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) helps stabilize AMPARs recruited during LTP. In contrast, induction of long-term depression (LTD) leads to rapid calcineurin-protein phosphatase 2B (CaN) mediated dephosphorylation of PKA-phosphorylated GluR1 receptors, endocytic removal of AMPAR from synapses, and a reduction in spine size. However, mechanisms for coordinately regulating AMPAR localization, phosphorylation, and synaptic structure by PKA and CaN are not well understood. A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 is a PKA- and CaN-anchoring protein that is linked to NMDARs and AMPARs through PSD-95 and SAP97 membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) scaffolds. Importantly, disruption of PKA-anchoring in neurons and functional analysis of GluR1-MAGUK-AKAP79 complexes in heterologous cells suggests that AKAP79/150-anchored PKA and CaN may regulate AMPARs in LTD. In the work presented at the "First International Meeting on Anchored cAMP Signaling Pathways" (Berlin-Buch, Germany, October 15-16, 2005), we demonstrate that AKAP79/150 is targeted to dendritic spines by an N-terminal basic

  3. Regulation of ROS signal transduction by NADPH oxidase 4 localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Kirber, Michael T; Xiao, Hui; Yang, Yu; Keaney, John F

    2008-06-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as intracellular signaling molecules in a diverse range of biological processes. However, it is unclear how freely diffusible ROS dictate specific cellular responses. In this study, we demonstrate that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced oxidase 4 (Nox4), a major Nox isoform expressed in nonphagocytic cells, including vascular endothelium, is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER localization of Nox4 is critical for the regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B, also an ER resident, through redox-mediated signaling. Nox4-mediated oxidation and inactivation of PTP1B in the ER serves as a regulatory switch for epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor trafficking and specifically acts to terminate EGF signaling. Consistent with this notion, PTP1B oxidation could also be modulated by ER targeting of antioxidant enzymes but not their untargeted counterparts. These data indicate that the specificity of intracellular ROS-mediated signal transduction may be modulated by the localization of Nox isoforms within specific subcellular compartments.

  4. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Bladder Cancer Growth And Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Wang, Zhiqiang; Flaveny, Colin; Long, Jun; Singh, Samer; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Tokhunts, Robert; Giambelli, Camilla; Briegel, Karoline J.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Karagas, Margaret; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Jorda, Merce; Bejarano, Pablo; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Robbins, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of HEDGEHOG (HH) signaling in bladder cancer remains controversial. The gene encoding the HH receptor and negative regulator PATCHED1 (PTCH1) resides on a region of chromosome 9q, one copy of which is frequently lost in bladder cancer. Inconsistent with PTCH1 functioning as a classic tumor suppressor gene, loss-of-function mutations in the remaining copy of PTCH1 are not commonly found. Here, we provide direct evidence for a critical role of HH signaling in bladder carcinogenesis. We show that transformed human urothelial cells and many urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell lines exhibit constitutive HH signaling, which is required for their growth and tumorigenic properties. Surprisingly, rather than originating from loss of PTCH1, the constitutive HH activity observed in UC cell lines was HH ligand-dependent. Consistent with this finding, increased levels of HH and the HH target gene product GLI1 were found in resected human primary bladder tumors. Furthermore, based on the difference in intrinsic HH dependence of UC cell lines, a gene expression signature was identified that correlated with bladder cancer progression. Our findings therefore indicate that therapeutic targeting of the HH signaling pathway may be beneficial in the clinical management of bladder cancer. PMID:22815529

  5. Wnt signaling regulates pulp volume and dentin thickness

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Won Hee; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Du; Hunter, Daniel J; Zhong, Zhendong; Ramos, Daniel M; Williams, Bart O; Sharpe, Paul T; Bardet, Claire; Mah, Su-jung; Helms, Jill A

    2015-01-01

    Odontoblasts, cementoblasts, ameloblasts and osteoblasts all form mineralized tissues in the craniofacial complex, and all these cell types exhibit active Wnt signaling during postnatal life. We set out to understand the functions of this Wnt signaling, by evaluating the phenotypes of mice in which the essential Wnt chaperone protein, Wingless was eliminated. The deletion of Wls was restricted to cells expressing Osteocalcin, which in addition to osteoblasts includes odontoblasts, cementoblasts, and ameloblasts. Dentin, cementum, enamel, and bone all formed in OCN-Cre;Wlsfl/fl mice but their homeostasis was dramatically affected. The most notable feature was a significant increase in dentin volume and density. We attribute this gain in dentin volume to a Wnt-mediated mis-regulation of Runx2. Normally, Wnt signaling stimulates Runx2, which in turn inhibits DSP; this inhibition must be relieved for odontoblasts to differentiate. In OCN-Cre;Wlsfl/fl mice, Wnt pathway activation is reduced and Runx2 levels decline. The Runx2-mediated repression of DSP is relieved and odontoblast differentiation is accordingly enhanced. This study demonstrates the importance of Wnt signaling in the homeostasis of mineralized tissues of the craniofacial complex. PMID:23996396

  6. Emerging EPO and EPO receptor regulators and signal transducers.

    PubMed

    Kuhrt, David; Wojchowski, Don M

    2015-06-04

    As essential mediators of red cell production, erythropoietin (EPO) and its cell surface receptor (EPO receptor [EPOR]) have been intensely studied. Early investigations defined basic mechanisms for hypoxia-inducible factor induction of EPO expression, and within erythroid progenitors EPOR engagement of canonical Janus kinase 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (JAK2/STAT5), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (RAS/MEK/ERK), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways. Contemporary genetic, bioinformatic, and proteomic approaches continue to uncover new clinically relevant modulators of EPO and EPOR expression, and EPO's biological effects. This Spotlight review highlights such factors and their emerging roles during erythropoiesis and anemia.

  7. Mnk Kinases in Cytokine Signaling and Regulation of Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinases Mnk1 and Mnk2 are activated downstream of the p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Extensive work over the years has shown that these kinases control phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and regulate engagement of other effector elements, including hnRNPA1 and PSF. Mnk kinases are ubiquitously expressed and play critical roles in signaling for various cytokine receptors, while there is emerging evidence that they have important functions as mediators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this review the mechanisms of activation of MNK pathways by cytokine receptors are addressed and their roles in diverse cytokine-dependent biological processes are reviewed. The clinical-translational implications of such work and the relevance of future development of specific MNK inhibitors for the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders are discussed. PMID:23710261

  8. Regulation of cell differentiation by Eph receptor and ephrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, David G

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that in addition to having major roles in morphogenesis, in some tissues Eph receptor and ephrin signaling regulates the differentiation of cells. In one mode of deployment, cell contact dependent Eph-ephrin activation induces a distinct fate of cells at the interface of their expression domains, for example in early ascidian embryos and in the vertebrate hindbrain. In another mode, overlapping Eph receptor and ephrin expression underlies activation within a cell population, which promotes or inhibits cell differentiation in bone remodelling, neural progenitors and keratinocytes. Eph-ephrin activation also contributes to formation of the appropriate number of progenitor cells by increasing or decreasing cell proliferation. These multiple roles of Eph receptor and ephrin signaling may enable a coupling between morphogenesis and the differentiation and proliferation of cells. PMID:25482623

  9. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  10. AKT Regulates BRCA1 Stability in Response to Hormone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew C.; Lyons, Traci R.; Young, Christian D.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Anderson, Steven M.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    BRCA1, with its binding partner BARD1, regulates the cellular response to DNA damage in multiple tissues, yet inherited mutations within BRCA1 result specifically in breast and ovarian cancers. This observation, along with several other lines of evidence, suggests a functional relationship may exist between hormone signaling and BRCA1 function. Our data demonstrates that AKT activation promotes the expression of BRCA1 in response to estrogen and IGF-1 receptor signaling. Further, we have identified a novel AKT phosphorylation site in BRCA1 at S694 which is responsive to activation of these signaling pathways. This rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels appears to occur independently of new protein synthesis and treatment with the clinically utilized proteasome inhibitor bortezomib similarly leads to a rapid increase in BRCA1 protein levels. Together, these data suggest that AKT phosphorylation of BRCA1 increases total protein expression by preventing proteasomal degradation. AKT activation also appears to support nuclear localization of BRCA1, and co-expression of activated AKT with BRCA1 decreases radiation sensitivity, suggesting this interaction has functional consequences for BRCA1's role in DNA repair. We conclude that AKT regulates BRCA1 protein stability and function through direct phosphorylation of BRCA1. Further, the responsiveness of the AKT-BRCA1 regulatory pathway to hormone signaling may, in part, underlie the tissue specificity of BRCA1 mutant cancers. Pharmacological targets within this pathway could provide strategies for modulation of BRCA1 protein, which may prove therapeutically beneficial for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:20085797

  11. Regulation of connexin signaling by the epigenetic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Connexins and their channels are involved in the control of all aspects of the cellular life cycle, ranging from cell growth to cell death, by mediating extracellular, intercellular and intracellular communication. These multifaceted aspects of connexin-related cellular signaling obviously require strict regulation. While connexin channel activity is mainly directed by posttranslational modifications, connexin expression as such is managed by classical cis/trans mechanisms. Over the past few years, it has become clear that connexin production is equally dictated by epigenetic actions. This paper provides an overview of the role of major determinants of the epigenome, including DNA methylation, histone acetylation and microRNA species, in connexin expression. PMID:26566120

  12. Fisetin regulates obesity by targeting mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hwa; Kim, Heemun; Ahn, Jiyun; Jeon, Tae-Il; Lee, Dae-Hee; Ha, Tae-Youl

    2013-08-01

    Fisetin, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, possesses antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we have demonstrated that fisetin prevents diet-induced obesity through regulation of the signaling of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a central mediator of cellular growth, cellular proliferation and lipid biosynthesis. To evaluate whether fisetin regulates mTORC1 signaling, we investigated the phosphorylation and kinase activity of the 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and mTORC1 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Fisetin treatment of preadipocytes reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and mTORC1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. To further our understanding of how fisetin negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling, we analyzed the phosphorylation of S6K1, mTOR and Akt in fisetin-treated TSC2-knockdown cells. The results suggested that fisetin treatment inhibits mTORC1 activity in an Akt-dependent manner. Recent studies have shown that adipocyte differentiation is dependent on mTORC1 activity. Fisetin treatment inhibited adipocyte differentiation, consistent with the negative effect of fisetin on mTOR. The inhibitory effect of fisetin on adipogenesis is dependent of mTOR activity, suggesting that fisetin inhibits adipogenesis and the accumulation of intracellular triglycerides during adipocyte differentiation by targeting mTORC1 signaling. Fisetin supplementation in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) significantly attenuated HFD-induced increases in body weight and white adipose tissue. We also observed that fisetin efficiently suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt, S6K1 and mTORC1 in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by fisetin prevents adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and obesity in HFD-fed mice. Therefore, fisetin may be a useful phytochemical agent for attenuating diet-induced obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. DELLA-mediated gibberellin signalling regulates Nod factor signalling and rhizobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Fonouni-Farde, Camille; Tan, Sovanna; Baudin, Maël; Brault, Mathias; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Niebel, Andreas; Frugier, Florian; Diet, Anouck

    2016-01-01

    Legumes develop symbiotic interactions with rhizobial bacteria to form nitrogen-fixing nodules. Bacterial Nod factors (NFs) and plant regulatory pathways modulating NF signalling control rhizobial infections and nodulation efficiency. Here we show that gibberellin (GA) signalling mediated by DELLA proteins inhibits rhizobial infections and controls the NF induction of the infection marker ENOD11 in Medicago truncatula. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active DELLA protein in the epidermis is sufficient to promote ENOD11 expression in the absence of symbiotic signals. We show using heterologous systems that DELLA proteins can interact with the nodulation signalling pathway 2 (NSP2) and nuclear factor-YA1 (NF-YA1) transcription factors that are essential for the activation of NF responses. Furthermore, MtDELLA1 can bind the ERN1 (ERF required for nodulation 1) promoter and positively transactivate its expression. Overall, we propose that GA-dependent action of DELLA proteins may directly regulate the NSP1/NSP2 and NF-YA1 activation of ERN1 transcription to regulate rhizobial infections. PMID:27586842

  14. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments.

  15. TGFβ signaling regulates lipogenesis in human sebaceous glands cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands are components of the skin essential for its normal lubrication by the production of sebum. This contributes to skin health and more importantly is crucial for the skin barrier function. A mechanistic understanding of sebaceous gland cells growth and differentiation has lagged behind that for keratinocytes, partly because of a lack of an in vitro model that can be used for experimental manipulation. Methods We have developed an in vitro culture model to isolate and grow primary human sebocytes without transformation that display functional characteristics of sebocytes. We used this novel method to probe the effect of Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) signaling on sebocyte differentiation, by examining the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis upon treatment with TGFβ1. We also repressed TGFβ signaling through knockdown of the TGFβ Receptor II to address if the effect of TGFβ activation is mediated via canonical Smad signal transduction. Results We find that activation of the TGFβ signaling pathway is necessary and sufficient for maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. The presence of TGFβ ligand triggered decreased expression in genes required for the production of characteristics sebaceous lipids and for sebocyte differentiation such as FADS2 and PPARγ, thereby decreasing lipid accumulation through the TGFβ RII-Smad2 dependent pathway. Conclusion TGFβ signaling plays an essential role in sebaceous gland regulation by maintaining sebocytes in an undifferentiated state. This data was generated using a novel method for human sebocyte culture, which is likely to prove generally useful in investigations of sebaceous gland growth and differentiation. These findings open a new paradigm in human skin biology with important implications for skin therapies. PMID:23343495

  16. Promoter nucleosome dynamics regulated by signalling through the CTD code

    PubMed Central

    Materne, Philippe; Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Migeot, Valerie; Soriano, Ignacio; Yague-Sanz, Carlo; Hidalgo, Elena; Mignion, Carole; Quintales, Luis; Antequera, Francisco; Hermand, Damien

    2015-01-01

    The phosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a key role in delineating transcribed regions within chromatin by recruiting histone methylases and deacetylases. Using genome-wide nucleosome mapping, we show that CTD S2 phosphorylation controls nucleosome dynamics in the promoter of a subset of 324 genes, including the regulators of cell differentiation ste11 and metabolic adaptation inv1. Mechanistic studies on these genes indicate that during gene activation a local increase of phospho-S2 CTD nearby the promoter impairs the phospho-S5 CTD-dependent recruitment of Set1 and the subsequent recruitment of specific HDACs, which leads to nucleosome depletion and efficient transcription. The early increase of phospho-S2 results from the phosphorylation of the CTD S2 kinase Lsk1 by MAP kinase in response to cellular signalling. The artificial tethering of the Lsk1 kinase at the ste11 promoter is sufficient to activate transcription. Therefore, signalling through the CTD code regulates promoter nucleosomes dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09008.001 PMID:26098123

  17. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gravitropism and phototropism in protonemata of the moss Pohlia nutans (HEDW.) lindb.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkiv, O. T.; Kordyum, E. L.; Kardash, O. R.; Khorkavtsiv, O. Ya.

    1999-01-01

    The gravitropism of protonemata of Pohlia nutans is described and compared with that of other mosses. In darkness, protonemata showed negative gravitropism. Under uniform illumination they grew radially over the substrate surface, whereas unilateral illumination induced positive phototropic growth. Gravitropism was coupled with starch synthesis and amyloplast formation. Protonematal gravitropic growth is more variable than the strict negative gravitropism of Ceratodon chloronema.

  19. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Correll, Melanie J; Coveney, Katrina M; Raines, Steven V; Mullen, Jack L; Hangarter, Roger P; Kiss, John Z

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-05-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli.

  1. Phytochromes play a role in phototropism and gravitropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Correll, Melanie J.; Coveney, Katrina M.; Raines, Steven V.; Mullen, Jack L.; Hangarter, Roger P.; Kiss, John Z.

    2003-01-01

    Phototropism as well as gravitropism plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism, but red light induces positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB mediate the positive red-light-based photoresponse in roots since single mutants (and the double phyAB mutant) were severely impaired in this response. In blue-light-based negative phototropism, phyA and phyAB (but not phyB) were inhibited in the response relative to the WT. In root gravitropism, phyB and phyAB (but not phyA) were inhibited in the response compared to the WT. The differences observed in tropistic responses were not due to growth limitations since the growth rates among all the mutants tested were not significantly different from that of the WT. Thus, our study shows that the blue-light and red-light systems interact in roots and that phytochrome plays a key role in plant development by integrating multiple environmental stimuli. c2003 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gravitropism and phototropism in protonemata of the moss Pohlia nutans (Hedw.) Lindb.

    PubMed

    Demkiv, O T; Kordyum, E L; Kardash, O R; Khorkavtsiv, O Y

    1999-01-01

    The gravitropism of protonemata of Pohlia nutans is described and compared with that of other mosses. In darkness, protonemata showed negative gravitropism. Under uniform illumination they grew radially over the substrate surface, whereas unilateral illumination induced positive phototropic growth. Gravitropism was coupled with starch synthesis and amyloplast formation. Protonematal gravitropic growth is more variable than the strict negative gravitropism of Ceratodon chloronema.

  3. Calcineurin Signaling Regulates Human Islet β-Cell Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanpour, Scott A.; Crutchlow, Michael F.; Ferrari, Alana M.; Raum, Jeffrey C.; Groff, David N.; Rankin, Matthew M.; Liu, Chengyang; De León, Diva D.; Naji, Ali; Kushner, Jake A.; Stoffers, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin intersects with both calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling pathways in the pancreatic β-cell. Pharmacologic calcineurin inhibition, necessary to prevent rejection in the setting of organ transplantation, is associated with post-transplant β-cell failure. We sought to determine the effect of calcineurin inhibition on β-cell replication and survival in rodents and in isolated human islets. Further, we assessed whether the GLP-1 receptor agonist and cAMP stimulus, exendin-4 (Ex-4), could rescue β-cell replication and survival following calcineurin inhibition. Following treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, human β-cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Although we detected no human β-cell replication, tacrolimus significantly decreased rodent β-cell replication. Ex-4 nearly normalized both human β-cell survival and rodent β-cell replication when co-administered with tacrolimus. We found that tacrolimus decreased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that calcineurin could regulate replication and survival via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We identify insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2), a known cAMP-responsive element-binding protein target and upstream regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, as a novel calcineurin target in β-cells. Irs2 mRNA and protein are decreased by calcineurin inhibition in both rodent and human islets. The effect of calcineurin on Irs2 expression is mediated at least in part through the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), as NFAT occupied the Irs2 promoter in a calcineurin-sensitive manner. Ex-4 restored Irs2 expression in tacrolimus-treated rodent and human islets nearly to baseline. These findings reveal calcineurin as a regulator of human β-cell survival in part through regulation of Irs2, with implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes following organ transplantation. PMID:20943662

  4. Calcineurin signaling regulates human islet {beta}-cell survival.

    PubMed

    Soleimanpour, Scott A; Crutchlow, Michael F; Ferrari, Alana M; Raum, Jeffrey C; Groff, David N; Rankin, Matthew M; Liu, Chengyang; De León, Diva D; Naji, Ali; Kushner, Jake A; Stoffers, Doris A

    2010-12-17

    The calcium-regulated phosphatase calcineurin intersects with both calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling pathways in the pancreatic β-cell. Pharmacologic calcineurin inhibition, necessary to prevent rejection in the setting of organ transplantation, is associated with post-transplant β-cell failure. We sought to determine the effect of calcineurin inhibition on β-cell replication and survival in rodents and in isolated human islets. Further, we assessed whether the GLP-1 receptor agonist and cAMP stimulus, exendin-4 (Ex-4), could rescue β-cell replication and survival following calcineurin inhibition. Following treatment with the calcineurin inhibitor tacrolimus, human β-cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Although we detected no human β-cell replication, tacrolimus significantly decreased rodent β-cell replication. Ex-4 nearly normalized both human β-cell survival and rodent β-cell replication when co-administered with tacrolimus. We found that tacrolimus decreased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that calcineurin could regulate replication and survival via the PI3K/Akt pathway. We identify insulin receptor substrate-2 (Irs2), a known cAMP-responsive element-binding protein target and upstream regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, as a novel calcineurin target in β-cells. Irs2 mRNA and protein are decreased by calcineurin inhibition in both rodent and human islets. The effect of calcineurin on Irs2 expression is mediated at least in part through the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), as NFAT occupied the Irs2 promoter in a calcineurin-sensitive manner. Ex-4 restored Irs2 expression in tacrolimus-treated rodent and human islets nearly to baseline. These findings reveal calcineurin as a regulator of human β-cell survival in part through regulation of Irs2, with implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of diabetes following organ transplantation.

  5. praja2 regulates KSR1 stability and mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, L; Delle Donne, R; Sepe, M; Porpora, M; Garbi, C; Chiuso, F; Gallo, A; Parisi, S; Russo, L; Bachmann, V; Huber, R G; Stefan, E; Russo, T; Feliciello, A

    2016-01-01

    The kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) has a fundamental role in mitogenic signaling by scaffolding components of the Ras/MAP kinase pathway. In response to Ras activation, KSR1 assembles a tripartite kinase complex that optimally transfers signals generated at the cell membrane to activate ERK. We describe a novel mechanism of ERK attenuation based on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of KSR1. Stimulation of membrane receptors by hormones or growth factors induced KSR1 polyubiquitination, which paralleled a decline of ERK1/2 signaling. We identified praja2 as the E3 ligase that ubiquitylates KSR1. We showed that praja2-dependent regulation of KSR1 is involved in the growth of cancer cells and in the maintenance of undifferentiated pluripotent state in mouse embryonic stem cells. The dynamic interplay between the ubiquitin system and the kinase scaffold of the Ras pathway shapes the activation profile of the mitogenic cascade. By controlling KSR1 levels, praja2 directly affects compartmentalized ERK activities, impacting on physiological events required for cell proliferation and maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency. PMID:27195677

  6. Novel nuclear localization signal regulated by ambient tonicity in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H Moo

    2008-08-15

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution.

  7. Novel Nuclear Localization Signal Regulated by Ambient Tonicity in Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H. Moo

    2008-01-01

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution. PMID:18579527

  8. [Structural Life Science towards the Regulation of Selective GPCR Signaling].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors in the human genome. They are involved in many diseases and also the target of approximately 30% of all modern medicinal drugs. GPCRs respond to a broad spectrum of chemical entities, ranging from photons, protons, and calcium ions to small organic molecules (including odorants and neurotransmitters), peptides, and glycoproteins. Many GPCRs are members of closely related subfamilies that respond to the same hormone or neurotransmitter. However, they have different physiologic functions based on the cells in which they are expressed and the different signaling pathways that they exploit (e.g., coupling through heterotrimeric G-proteins such as Gs, Gi, and Gq, as well as β-arrestins). Antibody fragments including Fab and Fv can effectively stabilize and crystallize membrane proteins. However, using the mouse hybridoma technology it has been difficult to develop monoclonal antibodies that can recognize conformational epitopes of native GPCRs. We have recently succeeded in developing antibodies against native GPCRs using this technology in combination with our improved immunization and screening methods. In this symposium review, I present a successful example of prostaglandin E2 receptor (one of the GPCRs) crystallization using antibody fragments. To avoid several adverse effects of current therapeutics, it is essential to understand the molecular mechanism of GPCR signaling in a monomeric, dimeric, or oligomeric state. Also, we are interested in selectively regulating GPCR signaling via functional antibodies developed using our methods and/or the designed small organic molecules depending on the GPCR structure.

  9. Adenosine signaling and the regulation of chronic lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Schneider, Daniel J.; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease are characterized by inflammation and tissue remodeling processes that compromise pulmonary function. Adenosine is produced in the inflamed and damaged lung where it plays numerous roles in the regulation of inflammation and tissue remodeling. Extracellular adenosine serves as an autocrine and paracrine signaling molecule by engaging cell surface adenosine receptors. Preclinical and cellular studies suggest that adenosine plays an anti-inflammatory role in processes associated with acute lung disease, where activation of the A2AR and A2BR have promising implications for the treatment of these disorders. In contrast, there is growing evidence that adenosine signaling through the A1R, A2BR and A3R may serve pro-inflammatory and tissue remodeling functions in chronic lung diseases. This review discusses the current progress of research efforts and clinical trials aimed at understanding the complexities of this signaling pathway as they pertain to the development of treatment strategies for chronic lung diseases. PMID:19426761

  10. Insulin signaling and the regulation of insect diapause

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Cheolho; Denlinger, David L.

    2013-01-01

    A rich chapter in the history of insect endocrinology has focused on hormonal control of diapause, especially the major roles played by juvenile hormones (JHs), ecdysteroids, and the neuropeptides that govern JH and ecdysteroid synthesis. More recently, experiments with adult diapause in Drosophila melanogaster and the mosquito Culex pipiens, and pupal diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga crassipalpis provide strong evidence that insulin signaling is also an important component of the regulatory pathway leading to the diapause phenotype. Insects produce many different insulin-like peptides (ILPs), and not all are involved in the diapause response; ILP-1 appears to be the one most closely linked to diapause in C. pipiens. Many steps in the pathway leading from perception of daylength (the primary environmental cue used to program diapause) to generation of the diapause phenotype remain unknown, but the role for insulin signaling in mosquito diapause appears to be upstream of JH, as evidenced by the fact that application of exogenous JH can rescue the effects of knocking down expression of ILP-1 or the Insulin Receptor. Fat accumulation, enhancement of stress tolerance, and other features of the diapause phenotype are likely linked to the insulin pathway through the action of a key transcription factor, FOXO. This review highlights many parallels for the role of insulin signaling as a regulator in insect diapause and dauer formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:23885240

  11. Insulin/FOXO Signaling Regulates Ovarian Prostaglandins Critical for Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Johnathan W.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Dorand, Dixon; Yang, Youfeng; Hoang, Hieu D.; Vibbert, Jack; Kubagawa, Homare M.; Miller, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Abnormalities in insulin/IGF-1 signaling are associated with infertility, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here we use liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry to show that the C. elegans insulin/FOXO pathway regulates the metabolism of locally acting lipid hormones called prostaglandins. C. elegans prostaglandins are synthesized without prostaglandin G/H synthase homologs, the targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Our results support the model that insulin signaling promotes the conversion of oocyte polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) into F-series prostaglandins that guide sperm to the fertilization site. Reduction in insulin signaling activates DAF-16/FOXO, which represses the transcription of germline and intestinal genes required to deliver PUFAs to oocytes in lipoprotein complexes. Nutritional and neuroendocrine cues target this mechanism to control prostaglandin metabolism and reproductive output. Prostaglandins may be conserved sperm guidance factors and widespread downstream effectors of insulin actions that influence both reproductive and nonreproductive processes. PMID:21145501

  12. Nitrite as regulator of hypoxic signaling in mammalian physiology

    PubMed Central

    van Faassen, Ernst E.; Bahrami, Soheyl; Feelisch, Martin; Hogg, Neil; Kelm, Malte; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Kozlov, Andrey V.; Li, Haitao; Lundberg, Jon O.; Mason, Ron; Nohl, Hans; Rassaf, Tienush; Samouilov, Alexandre; Slama-Schwok, Anny; Shiva, Sruti; Vanin, Anatoly F.; Weitzberg, Eddie; Zweier, Jay; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we consider the physiological effects of endogenous and pharmacological levels of nitrite under conditions of hypoxia. In humans, the nitrite anion has long been considered as metastable intermediate in the oxidation of nitric oxide radicals to the stable metabolite nitrate. This oxidation cascade was thought to be irreversible under physiological conditions. However, a growing body of experimental observations attests that the presence of endogenous nitrite regulates a number of signaling events along the physiological and pathophysiological oxygen gradient. Hypoxic signaling events include vasodilation, modulation of mitochondrial respiration, and cytoprotection following ischemic insult. These phenomena are attributed to the reduction of nitrite anions to nitric oxide if local oxygen levels in tissues decrease. Recent research identified a growing list of enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways for this endogenous reduction of nitrite. Additional direct signaling events not involving free nitric oxide are proposed. We here discuss the mechanisms and properties of these various pathways and the role played by the local concentration of free oxygen in the affected tissue. PMID:19219851

  13. The sweet side of AMPK signaling: regulation of GFAT1.

    PubMed

    Scott, John W; Oakhill, Jonathan S

    2017-03-23

    Maintaining a steady balance between nutrient supply and energy demand is essential for all living organisms and is achieved through the dynamic control of metabolic processes that produce and consume adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), the universal currency of energy in all cells. A key sensor of cellular energy is the adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is the core component of a signaling network that regulates energy and nutrient metabolism. AMPK is activated by metabolic stresses that decrease cellular ATP, and functions to restore energy balance by orchestrating a switch in metabolism away from anabolic pathways toward energy-generating catabolic processes. A new study published in a recent issue of Biochemical Journal by Zibrova et al. shows that glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase-1 (GFAT1), the rate-limiting enzyme of the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway (HBP), is a physiological substrate of AMPK. The HBP is an offshoot of the glycolytic pathway that drives the synthesis of uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine, the requisite donor metabolite needed for dynamic β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of cellular proteins. O-GlcNAcylation is a nutrient-sensitive post-translational modification that, like phosphorylation, regulates numerous intracellular processes. Zibrova et al. show that inhibitory phosphorylation of the GFAT1 residue Ser243 by AMPK in response to physiological or small-molecule activators leads to a reduction in cellular protein O-GlcNAcylation. Further work revealed that AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of GFAT1 promotes angiogenesis in endothelial cells. This elegant study demonstrates that the AMPK-GFAT1 signaling axis serves as an important communication point between two nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways and is likely to play a significant role in controlling physiological processes in many other tissues.

  14. Nontranscriptional regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling by IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inhwa; Yang, Jungmin; Hong, Sujeong; Lee, Eun Ju; Lee, Seung-Hyo; Fernandes-Alnemri, Teresa; Alnemri, Emad S; Yu, Je-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Th2 cytokine IL-4 has been previously shown to suppress the production of proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes. However, the underlying molecular mechanism by which IL-4 signaling antagonizes proinflammatory responses is poorly characterized. In particular, whether IL-4 can modulate inflammasome signaling is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that IL-4 suppresses NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation and the subsequent IL-1β secretion but does not inhibit AIM2- or NLRC4-dependent caspase-1 activation in THP-1 and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Upon LPS or LPS/ATP stimulation, IL-4 markedly inhibited the assembly of NLRP3 inflammasome, including NLRP3-dependent ASC oligomerization, NLRP3-ASC interaction, and NLRP3 speck-like oligomeric structure formation. The negative regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome by IL-4 was not due to the impaired mRNA or protein production of NLRP3 and proinflammatory cytokines. Supporting this observation, IL-4 attenuated NLRP3 inflammasome activation even in reconstituted NLRP3-expressing macrophages in which NLRP3 expression is not transcriptionally regulated by TLR-NF-κB signaling. Furthermore, the IL-4-mediated suppression of NLRP3 inflammasome was independent of STAT6-dependent transcription and mitochondrial ROS. Instead, IL-4 inhibited subcellular redistribution of NLRP3 into mitochondria and microtubule polymerization upon NLRP3-activating stimulation. Our results collectively suggest that IL-4 could suppress NLRP3 inflammasome activation in a transcription-independent manner, thus providing an endogenous regulatory machinery to prevent excessive inflammasome activation. PMID:25601272

  15. Modulation of Phototropic Responsiveness in Arabidopsis through Ubiquitination of Phototropin 1 by the CUL3-Ring E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CRL3NPH3[W

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Diana; Pedmale, Ullas V.; Morrow, Johanna; Sachdev, Shrikesh; Lechner, Esther; Tang, Xiaobo; Zheng, Ning; Hannink, Mark; Genschik, Pascal; Liscum, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Plant phototropism is an adaptive response to changes in light direction, quantity, and quality that results in optimization of photosynthetic light harvesting, as well as water and nutrient acquisition. Though several components of the phototropic signal response pathway have been identified in recent years, including the blue light (BL) receptors phototropin1 (phot1) and phot2, much remains unknown. Here, we show that the phot1-interacting protein NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL3 (NPH3) functions as a substrate adapter in a CULLIN3-based E3 ubiquitin ligase, CRL3NPH3. Under low-intensity BL, CRL3NPH3 mediates the mono/multiubiquitination of phot1, likely marking it for clathrin-dependent internalization from the plasma membrane. In high-intensity BL, phot1 is both mono/multi- and polyubiquitinated by CRL3NPH3, with the latter event targeting phot1 for 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation of phot1 under high-intensity BL likely represent means of receptor desensitization, while mono/multiubiquitination-stimulated internalization of phot1 may be coupled to BL-induced relocalization of hormone (auxin) transporters. PMID:21990941

  16. The gene MACCHI-BOU 4/ENHANCER OF PINOID encodes a NPH3-like protein and reveals similarities between organogenesis and phototropism at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Masahiko; Kajiwara, Takahito; Kato, Takehide; Treml, Birgit S; Stockum, Christine; Torres-Ruiz, Ramón A; Tasaka, Masao

    2007-11-01

    Intercellular transport of the phytohormone auxin is a significant factor for plant organogenesis. To investigate molecular mechanisms by which auxin controls organogenesis, we analyzed the macchi-bou 4 (mab4) mutant identified as an enhancer of pinoid (pid). Although mab4 and pid single mutants displayed relatively mild cotyledon phenotypes, pid mab4 double mutants completely lacked cotyledons. We found that MAB4 was identical to ENHANCER OF PINOID (ENP), which has been suggested to control PIN1 polarity in cotyledon primordia. MAB4/ENP encodes a novel protein, which belongs to the NON-PHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL 3 (NPH3) family thought to function as a signal transducer in phototropism and control lateral translocation of auxin. MAB4/ENP mRNA was detected in the protodermal cell layer of the embryo and the meristem L1 layer at the site of organ initiation. In the mab4 embryo, the abundance of PIN1:GFP was severely decreased at the plasma membrane in the protodermal cell layer. In addition, subcellular localization analyses indicated that MAB4/ENP resides on a subpopulation of endosomes as well as on unidentified intracellular compartments. These results indicate that MAB4/ENP is involved in polar auxin transport in organogenesis.

  17. Regulation of cell survival by the HIP-55 signaling network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengzhi; Li, Zenggang; Shi, Zhi; He, Kangmin; Tian, Aiju; Wu, Jimin; Zhang, Youyi; Li, Zijian

    2014-06-01

    HIP-55 (hematopoietic progenitor kinase 1 [HPK1]-interacting protein of 55 kDa) is the mammalian homologue of the yeast Abp1p. It contains a C-terminal Src homology 3 domain and an N-terminal actin depolymerization factor (ADF-H/C) domain. HIP-55 appears to be critical for organ development and immune response and is important for the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton through its interactions with F-actin and various cytoskeletal and cell signaling proteins. However, the function of HIP-55 in tumors remains unknown. Here, we found that HIP-55 is up-regulated or down-regulated in several types of tumor tissues in patients. Of these, lung cancer tissues had the highest expression of HIP-55. To gain full insight into the function of HIP-55 in lung cancer, microarray assay was performed using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 expression arrays in both HIP-55 knockdown and scramble control A549 cells. The ingenuity pathway analysis tool was utilized to construct biological networks and analyze functions that might be associated with HIP-55. Functional analysis strongly suggested that HIP-55 may be involved in cancer cell survival and cell death, which was then confirmed by further experimentation. Experimental results showed that downregulation of HIP-55 decreased the viability and increased the apoptosis of A549 cells treated with the anticancer agent etoposide. Our data suggested that HIP-55 may be a newly discovered regulatory node in the growth signaling network and a new target for therapeutic interventions in proliferative disorders.

  18. CD22 ligand-binding and signaling domains reciprocally regulate B-cell Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jennifer; Obermeier, Ingrid; Wöhner, Miriam; Brandl, Carolin; Mrotzek, Sarah; Angermüller, Sieglinde; Maity, Palash C.; Reth, Michael; Nitschke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    A high proportion of human B cells carry B-cell receptors (BCRs) that are autoreactive. Inhibitory receptors such as CD22 can downmodulate autoreactive BCR responses. With its extracellular domain, CD22 binds to sialic acids in α2,6 linkages in cis, on the surface of the same B cell or in trans, on other cells. Sialic acids are self ligands, as they are abundant in vertebrates, but are usually not expressed by pathogens. We show that cis-ligand binding of CD22 is crucial for the regulation of B-cell Ca2+ signaling by controlling the CD22 association to the BCR. Mice with a mutated CD22 ligand-binding domain of CD22 showed strongly reduced Ca2+ signaling. In contrast, mice with mutated CD22 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs have increased B-cell Ca2+ responses, increased B-cell turnover, and impaired survival of the B cells. Thus, the CD22 ligand-binding domain has a crucial function in regulating BCR signaling, which is relevant for controlling autoimmunity. PMID:23836650

  19. A divergent canonical WNT-signaling pathway regulates microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Krylova, Olga; Smalley, Matthew J.; Dale, Trevor C.; Salinas, Patricia C.

    2004-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) is associated with axonal microtubules and regulates microtubule stability through the inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). In the canonical WNT pathway, the negative regulator Axin forms a complex with β-catenin and GSK-3β, resulting in β-catenin degradation. Inhibition of GSK-3β by DVL increases β-catenin stability and TCF transcriptional activation. Here, we show that Axin associates with microtubules and unexpectedly stabilizes microtubules through DVL. In turn, DVL stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting GSK-3β through a transcription- and β-catenin–independent pathway. More importantly, axonal microtubules are stabilized after DVL localizes to axons. Increased microtubule stability is correlated with a decrease in GSK-3β–mediated phosphorylation of MAP-1B. We propose a model in which Axin, through DVL, stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting a pool of GSK-3β, resulting in local changes in the phosphorylation of cellular targets. Our data indicate a bifurcation in the so-called canonical WNT-signaling pathway to regulate microtubule stability. PMID:14734535

  20. Stem phototropism of trees: a possible significant factor in determining stem inclination on forest slopes.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Jun; Masumori, Masaya; Tange, Takeshi

    2006-09-01

    The main stems of trees on forest slopes incline down the slope to various extents that are characteristic of the species. The inclination has been explained as an active response to a horizontally asymmetrical light environment, but the contributing physiological mechanisms are unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that stem phototropism, gravitropism, or a combination of the two determines the inclination of tree stems on forest slopes. Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Q. serrata were studied. Measurements were made of stem inclination of mature trees on forest slopes in uniform plantations of each species, and changes in stem inclination of potted seedlings in response to illumination treatments (unilateral or overhead) and inclination treatments (artificially inclined or erect). Indices of phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness were evaluated for each species, calculated from the change in stem inclination in response to artificial inclination with unilateral or overhead illumination. Stem inclination on forest slopes varied significantly among species: Q. serrata inclined most in the down-slope direction, C. japonica inclined the least, and P. densiflora and Q. myrsinaefolia were intermediate. The change in stem inclination of seedlings in each treatment varied significantly among species. One-year-old stems of Q. serrata and 2-year-old stems of Q. myrsinaefolia bent toward the light source. Interspecific variation in the change in stem inclination in response to the unilateral illumination or that in the index of phototropic responsiveness was strongly correlated with the variation in stem inclination on forest slopes. The orientation of woody stems that have finished elongation can be actively controlled by phototropism. Interspecific variation in phototropic responsiveness of trees is a possible significant determinant of interspecific variation in stem inclination on forest slopes.

  1. Stem Phototropism of Trees: A Possible Significant Factor in Determining Stem Inclination on Forest Slopes

    PubMed Central

    MATSUZAKI, JUN; MASUMORI, MASAYA; TANGE, TAKESHI

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The main stems of trees on forest slopes incline down the slope to various extents that are characteristic of the species. The inclination has been explained as an active response to a horizontally asymmetrical light environment, but the contributing physiological mechanisms are unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that stem phototropism, gravitropism, or a combination of the two determines the inclination of tree stems on forest slopes. • Methods Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Quercus myrsinaefolia and Q. serrata were studied. Measurements were made of stem inclination of mature trees on forest slopes in uniform plantations of each species, and changes in stem inclination of potted seedlings in response to illumination treatments (unilateral or overhead) and inclination treatments (artificially inclined or erect). Indices of phototropic and gravitropic responsiveness were evaluated for each species, calculated from the change in stem inclination in response to artificial inclination with unilateral or overhead illumination. • Key Results Stem inclination on forest slopes varied significantly among species: Q. serrata inclined most in the down-slope direction, C. japonica inclined the least, and P. densiflora and Q. myrsinaefolia were intermediate. The change in stem inclination of seedlings in each treatment varied significantly among species. One-year-old stems of Q. serrata and 2-year-old stems of Q. myrsinaefolia bent toward the light source. Interspecific variation in the change in stem inclination in response to the unilateral illumination or that in the index of phototropic responsiveness was strongly correlated with the variation in stem inclination on forest slopes. • Conclusions The orientation of woody stems that have finished elongation can be actively controlled by phototropism. Interspecific variation in phototropic responsiveness of trees is a possible significant determinant of interspecific

  2. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  3. A common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janoudi, A.; Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the amount of light and the amount of response for any photobiological process can be based on the number of incident quanta per unit time (fluence rate-response) or on the number of incident quanta during a given period of irradiation (fluence-response). Fluence-response and fluence rate-response relationships have been measured for second positive phototropism by seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. The fluence-response relationships exhibit a single limiting threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter when measured at fluence rates from 2.4 x 10(-5) to 6.5 x 10(-3) micromoles per square meter per second. The threshold values in the fluence rate-response curves decrease with increasing time of irradiation, but show a common fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. These thresholds are the same as the threshold of about 0.01 micromole per square meter measured for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that second positive curvature has a threshold in time of about 10 minutes. Moreover, if the times of irradiation exceed the time threshold, there is a single limiting fluence threshold at about 0.01 micromole per square meter. Thus, the limiting fluence threshold for second positive phototropism is the same as the fluence threshold for first positive phototropism. Based on these data, we suggest that this common fluence threshold for first positive and second positive phototropism is set by a single photoreceptor pigment system.

  4. Interaction with gravitropism, reversibility and lateral movements of phototropically stimulated potato shoots.

    PubMed

    Vinterhalter, D; Savić, J; Stanišić, M; Jovanović, Ž; Vinterhalter, B

    2016-07-01

    Phototropic (PT) and gravitropic (GT) bending are the two major tropic movements that determine the spatial position of potato shoots. We studied PT bending of potato plantlets grown under long-day photoperiods in several prearranged position setups providing different interactions with the GT response. Starting with the standard PT stimulation setup composed of unilateral irradiation of vertically positioned shoots, experiments were also done in antagonistic and synergistic setups and in treatments with horizontal displacement of the light source. In the standard setup, PT bending suppressed the GT bending, which could occur only if the PT stimulation was cancelled. The antagonistic position, with phototropism and gravitropism attempting to bend shoots in opposite directions, showed phototropism and gravitropism as independent bending events with the outcome varying throughout the day reflecting diurnal changes in the competence of individual tropic components. Whilst gravitropism was constant, phototropism had a marked daily fluctuation of its magnitude with a prominent morning maximum starting an hour after the dawn in the growth room and lasting for the next 6 h. When phototropism and gravitropism were aligned in a synergistic position, stimulating shoot bending in the same direction, there was little quantitative addition of their individual effects. The long period of morning PT bending maximum enabled multiple PT bending events to be conducted in succession, each one preceded by a separate lag phase. Studies of secondary PT events showed that potato plantlets can follow and adjust their shoot position in response to both vertical and horizontal movements of a light source. PT bending was reversible, since the 180° horizontal change of a blue light (BL) source position resulted in reversal of bending direction after a 20-min-long lag phase.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  6. Resistant Starch Regulates Gut Microbiota: Structure, Biochemistry and Cell Signalling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoping; Darko, Kwame Oteng; Huang, Yanjun; He, Caimei; Yang, Huansheng; He, Shanping; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Jian; Hocher, Berthold; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Starch is one of the most popular nutritional sources for both human and animals. Due to the variation of its nutritional traits and biochemical specificities, starch has been classified into rapidly digestible, slowly digestible and resistant starch. Resistant starch has its own unique chemical structure, and various forms of resistant starch are commercially available. It has been found being a multiple-functional regulator for treating metabolic dysfunction. Different functions of resistant starch such as modulation of the gut microbiota, gut peptides, circulating growth factors, circulating inflammatory mediators have been characterized by animal studies and clinical trials. In this mini-review, recent remarkable progress in resistant starch on gut microbiota, particularly the effect of structure, biochemistry and cell signaling on nutrition has been summarized, with highlights on its regulatory effect on gut microbiota. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  8. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  9. FAK signalling controls insulin sensitivity through regulation of adipocyte survival

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Cynthia T.; Shi, Sally Yu; Cai, Erica P.; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Krishnamurthy, Mansa; Brunt, Jara J.; Schroer, Stephanie A.; Winer, Daniel A.; Woo, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a central role in integrin signalling, which regulates growth and survival of tumours. Here we show that FAK protein levels are increased in adipose tissue of insulin-resistant obese mice and humans. Disruption of adipocyte FAK in mice or in 3T3 L1 cells decreases adipocyte survival. Adipocyte-specific FAK knockout mice display impaired adipose tissue expansion and insulin resistance on prolonged metabolic stress from a high-fat diet or when crossed on an obese db/db or ob/ob genetic background. Treatment of these mice with a PPARγ agonist does not restore adiposity or improve insulin sensitivity. In contrast, inhibition of apoptosis, either genetically or pharmacologically, attenuates adipocyte death, restores normal adiposity and improves insulin sensitivity. Together, these results demonstrate that FAK is required for adipocyte survival and maintenance of insulin sensitivity, particularly in the context of adipose tissue expansion as a result of caloric excess. PMID:28165007

  10. Regulation of Piezo Channels by Cellular Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, I; Rohacs, T

    2017-01-01

    The recently identified mechanically activated Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels play major roles in various aspects of mechanosensation in mammals, and their mutations are associated with human diseases. Recent reports show that activation of cell surface receptors coupled to heterotrimeric Gq proteins increase the sensitivity of Piezo2 channels to mechanical stimuli. Activation of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate pathway was also shown to potentiate Piezo2 channel activity. This phenomenon may play a role in mechanical allodynia or hyperalgesia during inflammation. Both Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels are inhibited upon depletion of plasma membrane phosphoinositides, in response to phospholipase C activation by Ca(2+) influx via the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels. This review will discuss current knowledge on regulation of Piezo channels by these intracellular signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight.

    PubMed

    Blevins, James E; Ho, Jacqueline M

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models.

  12. Role of oxytocin signaling in the regulation of body weight

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, James E.; Ho, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are growing health concerns in the US and worldwide. In the US alone, more than two-thirds of the adult population is classified as either overweight or obese [1], highlighting the need to develop new, effective treatments for these conditions. Whereas the hormone oxytocin is well known for its peripheral effects on uterine contraction during parturition and milk ejection during lactation, release of oxytocin from somatodendrites and axonal terminals within the central nervous system (CNS) is implicated in both the formation of prosocial behaviors and in the control of energy balance. Recent findings demonstrate that chronic administration of oxytocin reduces food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) and genetically obese rodents with impaired or defective leptin signaling. Importantly, chronic systemic administration of oxytocin out to 6 weeks recapitulates the effects of central administration on body weight loss in DIO rodents at doses that do not result in the development of tolerance. Furthermore, these effects are coupled with induction of Fos (a marker of neuronal activation) in hindbrain areas (e.g. dorsal vagal complex (DVC)) linked to the control of meal size and forebrain areas (e.g. hypothalamus, amygdala) linked to the regulation of food intake and body weight. This review assesses the potential central and peripheral targets by which oxytocin may inhibit body weight gain, its regulation by anorexigenic and orexigenic signals, and its potential use as a therapy that can circumvent leptin resistance and reverse the behavioral and metabolic abnormalities associated with DIO and genetically obese models. PMID:24065622

  13. Bradyoxetin, a unique chemical signal involved in symbiotic gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, John; Carlson, Russell W.; York, William S.; Stacey, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic bacterium that nodulates soybean. Critical for the infection and establishment of this symbiosis are the bacterial nodulation genes (nod, nol, noe), which are induced in the presence of plant produced isoflavones. Transcription of the nodulation genes is also controlled in a population density-dependent fashion. Expression of the nod genes is maximal at low population densities, and decreases significantly at higher culture densities. Population density control of the nodulation genes involves NolA and NodD2, both of which function in tandem to repress nod gene expression. An extracellular secreted factor (CDF) is known to mediate this repression. Here, we report that CDF is a novel signaling molecule, designated bradyoxetin, different from other Gram-negative quorum signals. The proposed structure of bradyoxetin is 2-{4-[[4-(3-aminooxetan-2-yl)phenyl](imino)methyl]phenyl}oxetan-3-ylamine. Interestingly, expression of bradyoxetin is iron-regulated, and is maximally produced under iron-starved conditions. Consistent with this, expression of the nodulation genes occurred in an iron-dependent fashion. Addition of iron to B. japonicum cultures at high optical densities resulted in decreased bradyoxetin production, and a concomitant reduction in nolA expression. A corresponding increase in nodY–lacZ expression was observed with iron treatment. PMID:12393811

  14. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  15. Repair Injured Heart by Regulating Cardiac Regenerative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Paul, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac regeneration is a homeostatic cardiogenic process by which the sections of malfunctioning adult cardiovascular tissues are repaired and renewed employing a combination of both cardiomyogenesis and angiogenesis. Unfortunately, while high-quality regeneration can be performed in amphibians and zebrafish hearts, mammalian hearts do not respond in kind. Indeed, a long-term loss of proliferative capacity in mammalian adult cardiomyocytes in combination with dysregulated induction of tissue fibrosis impairs mammalian endogenous heart regenerative capacity, leading to deleterious cardiac remodeling at the end stage of heart failure. Interestingly, several studies have demonstrated that cardiomyocyte proliferation capacity is retained in mammals very soon after birth, and cardiac regeneration potential is correspondingly preserved in some preadolescent vertebrates after myocardial infarction. There is therefore great interest in uncovering the molecular mechanisms that may allow heart regeneration during adult stages. This review will summarize recent findings on cardiac regenerative regulatory mechanisms, especially with respect to extracellular signals and intracellular pathways that may provide novel therapeutics for heart diseases. Particularly, both in vitro and in vivo experimental evidences will be presented to highlight the functional role of these signaling cascades in regulating cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiomyocyte growth, and maturation, with special emphasis on their responses to heart tissue injury. PMID:27799944

  16. Hypothalamic eIF2α Signaling Regulates Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Benani, Alexandre; Lorsignol, Anne; Brenachot, Xavier; Parry, Laurent; Carraro, Valérie; Guissard, Christophe; Averous, Julien; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Chaveroux, Cédric; B’chir, Wafa; Muranishi, Yuki; Ron, David; Pénicaud, Luc; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Summary The reversible phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) is a highly conserved signal implicated in the cellular adaptation to numerous stresses such as the one caused by amino acid limitation. In response to dietary amino acid deficiency, the brain-specific activation of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 leads to food intake inhibition. We report here that GCN2 is rapidly activated in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) after consumption of a leucine-deficient diet. Furthermore, knockdown of GCN2 in this particular area shows that MBH GCN2 activity controls the onset of the aversive response. Importantly, pharmacological experiments demonstrate that the sole phosphorylation of eIF2α in the MBH is sufficient to regulate food intake. eIF2α signaling being at the crossroad of stress pathways activated in several pathological states, our study indicates that hypothalamic eIF2α phosphorylation could play a critical role in the onset of anorexia associated with certain diseases. PMID:24485657

  17. CD147: regulator of hyaluronan signaling in invasiveness and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Grass, G Daniel; Dai, Lu; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P

    2014-01-01

    Major determinants that influence negative outcome in cancer patients are the abilities of cancer cells to resist current therapies and to invade surrounding host tissue, consequently leading to local and metastatic dissemination. Hyaluronan (HA), a prominent constituent of the tumor microenvironment, not only provides structural support but also interacts with cell surface receptors, especially CD44, that influence cooperative signaling pathways leading to chemoresistance and invasiveness. CD147 (emmprin; basigin) is a member of the Ig superfamily that has also been strongly implicated in chemoresistance and invasiveness. CD147 both regulates HA synthesis and interacts with the HA receptors, CD44, and LYVE-1. Increased CD147 expression induces formation of multiprotein complexes containing CD44 (or LYVE-1) as well as members of the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase, receptor tyrosine kinase, ABC drug transporter, or monocarboxylate transporter families, which become assembled in specialized lipid raft domains along with CD147 itself. In each case, multivalent HA-receptor interactions are essential for formation or stabilization of the lipid raft complexes and for downstream signaling pathways or transporter activities that are driven by these complexes. We conclude that cooperativity between HA, HA receptors, and CD147 may be a major driver of the interconnected pathways of invasiveness and chemoresistance widely critical to malignancy.

  18. Ethylene Signaling Influences Light-Regulated Development in Pea.

    PubMed

    Weller, James L; Foo, Eloise M; Hecht, Valérie; Ridge, Stephen; Vander Schoor, Jacqueline K; Reid, James B

    2015-09-01

    Plant responses to light involve a complex network of interactions among multiple plant hormones. In a screen for mutants showing altered photomorphogenesis under red light, we identified a mutant with dramatically enhanced leaf expansion and delayed petal senescence. We show that this mutant exhibits reduced sensitivity to ethylene and carries a nonsense mutation in the single pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of the ethylene signaling gene ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). Consistent with this observation, the ein2 mutation rescues the previously described effects of ethylene overproduction in mature phytochrome-deficient plants. In seedlings, ein2 confers a marked increase in leaf expansion under monochromatic red, far-red, or blue light, and interaction with phytochromeA, phytochromeB, and long1 mutants confirms that ein2 enhances both phytochrome- and cryptochrome-dependent responses in a LONG1-dependent manner. In contrast, minimal effects of ein2 on seedling development in darkness or high-irradiance white light show that ethylene is not limiting for development under these conditions. These results indicate that ethylene signaling constrains leaf expansion during deetiolation in pea and provide further evidence that down-regulation of ethylene production may be an important component mechanism in the broader control of photomorphogenic development by phytochrome and cryptochrome.

  19. Hedgehog signaling regulates gene expression in planarian glia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Irving E; Lapan, Sylvain W; Scimone, M Lucila; Clandinin, Thomas R; Reddien, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is critical for vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) development, but its role in CNS biology in other organisms is poorly characterized. In the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, hedgehog (hh) is expressed in medial cephalic ganglia neurons, suggesting a possible role in CNS maintenance or regeneration. We performed RNA sequencing of planarian brain tissue following RNAi of hh and patched (ptc), which encodes the Hh receptor. Two misregulated genes, intermediate filament-1 (if-1) and calamari (cali), were expressed in a previously unidentified non-neural CNS cell type. These cells expressed orthologs of astrocyte-associated genes involved in neurotransmitter uptake and metabolism, and extended processes enveloping regions of high synapse concentration. We propose that these cells are planarian glia. Planarian glia were distributed broadly, but only expressed if-1 and cali in the neuropil near hh+ neurons. Planarian glia and their regulation by Hedgehog signaling present a novel tractable system for dissection of glia biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16996.001 PMID:27612382

  20. Integrin signalling regulates YAP and TAZ to control skin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Vincent-Mistiaen, Zoé I.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Stone, Richard K.; Boeing, Stefan; Wculek, Stefanie K.; Cordero, Julia; Tan, Ee H.; Ridgway, Rachel; Brunton, Val G.; Sahai, Erik; Gerhardt, Holger; Behrens, Axel; Malanchi, Ilaria; Sansom, Owen J.; Thompson, Barry J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The skin is a squamous epithelium that is continuously renewed by a population of basal layer stem/progenitor cells and can heal wounds. Here, we show that the transcription regulators YAP and TAZ localise to the nucleus in the basal layer of skin and are elevated upon wound healing. Skin-specific deletion of both YAP and TAZ in adult mice slows proliferation of basal layer cells, leads to hair loss and impairs regeneration after wounding. Contact with the basal extracellular matrix and consequent integrin-Src signalling is a key determinant of the nuclear localisation of YAP/TAZ in basal layer cells and in skin tumours. Contact with the basement membrane is lost in differentiating daughter cells, where YAP and TAZ become mostly cytoplasmic. In other types of squamous epithelia and squamous cell carcinomas, a similar control mechanism is present. By contrast, columnar epithelia differentiate an apical domain that recruits CRB3, Merlin (also known as NF2), KIBRA (also known as WWC1) and SAV1 to induce Hippo signalling and retain YAP/TAZ in the cytoplasm despite contact with the basal layer extracellular matrix. When columnar epithelial tumours lose their apical domain and become invasive, YAP/TAZ becomes nuclear and tumour growth becomes sensitive to the Src inhibitor Dasatinib. PMID:26989177

  1. Neuropeptide Regulation of Signaling and Behavior in the BNST

    PubMed Central

    Kash, Thomas L.; Pleil, Kristen E.; Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A.; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G.; Crowley, Nicole; Mazzone, Christopher; Sugam, Jonathan; Hardaway, J. Andrew; McElligott, Zoe A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical developments have transformed how neuroscientists can probe brain function. What was once thought to be difficult and perhaps impossible, stimulating a single set of long range inputs among many, is now relatively straight-forward using optogenetic approaches. This has provided an avalanche of data demonstrating causal roles for circuits in a variety of behaviors. However, despite the critical role that neuropeptide signaling plays in the regulation of behavior and physiology of the brain, there have been remarkably few studies demonstrating how peptide release is causally linked to behaviors. This is likely due to both the different time scale by which peptides act on and the modulatory nature of their actions. For example, while glutamate release can effectively transmit information between synapses in milliseconds, peptide release is potentially slower [See the excellent review by Van Den Pol on the time scales and mechanisms of release (van den Pol, 2012)] and it can only tune the existing signals via modulation. And while there have been some studies exploring mechanisms of release, it is still not as clearly known what is required for efficient peptide release. Furthermore, this analysis could be complicated by the fact that there are multiple peptides released, some of which may act in contrast. Despite these limitations, there are a number of groups making progress in this area. The goal of this review is to explore the role of peptide signaling in one specific structure, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, that has proven to be a fertile ground for peptide action. PMID:25475545

  2. Sensor–response regulator interactions in a cross-regulated signal transduction network

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Chen, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction involves phosphoryl transfer between a histidine kinase sensor and a response regulator effector. The nitrate-responsive two-component signal transduction systems in Escherichia coli represent a paradigm for a cross-regulation network, in which the paralogous sensor–response regulator pairs, NarX–NarL and NarQ–NarP, exhibit both cognate (e.g. NarX–NarL) and non-cognate (e.g. NarQ–NarL) interactions to control output. Here, we describe results from bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid (BACTH) analysis to examine sensor dimerization as well as interaction between sensor–response regulator cognate and non-cognate pairs. Although results from BACTH analysis indicated that the NarX and NarQ sensors interact with each other, results from intragenic complementation tests demonstrate that they do not form functional heterodimers. Additionally, intragenic complementation shows that both NarX and NarQ undergo intermolecular autophosphorylation, deviating from the previously reported correlation between DHp (dimerization and histidyl phosphotransfer) domain loop handedness and autophosphorylation mode. Results from BACTH analysis revealed robust interactions for the NarX–NarL, NarQ–NarL and NarQ–NarP pairs but a much weaker interaction for the NarX–NarP pair. This demonstrates that asymmetrical cross-regulation results from differential binding affinities between different sensor–regulator pairs. Finally, results indicate that the NarL effector (DNA-binding) domain inhibits NarX–NarL interaction. Missense substitutions at receiver domain residue Ser-80 enhanced NarX–NarL interaction, apparently by destabilizing the NarL receiver–effector domain interface. PMID:25873583

  3. Structure, Regulation, Signaling, and Targeting of Abl Kinases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abl kinases are prototypic cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases and are involved in a variety of chromosomal aberrations in different cancers. This causes the expression of Abl fusion proteins, such as Bcr-Abl, that are constitutively activated and drivers of tumorigenesis. Over the past decades, biochemical and functional studies on the molecular mechanisms of Abl regulation have gone hand in hand with progression of our structural understanding of autoinhibited and active Abl conformations. In parallel, Abl oncoproteins have become prime molecular targets for cancer therapy, using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–competitive kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. Abl-targeting drugs serve as a paradigm for our understanding of kinase inhibitor action, specificity, and resistance development. In this review article, I will review the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the regulation of Abl kinase activity and how oncogenic Abl fusions signal. Furthermore, past and ongoing efforts to target Abl oncoproteins using ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors, as well as future possibilities using combination therapy, will be discussed. PMID:23226581

  4. Structure, functional regulation and signaling properties of Rap2B

    PubMed Central

    QU, DEBAO; HUANG, HUI; DI, JIEHUI; GAO, KEYU; LU, ZHENG; ZHENG, JUNNIAN

    2016-01-01

    The Ras family small guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein Rap2B is is a member of the Ras oncogene family and a novel target of p53 that regulates the p53-mediated pro-survival function of cells. The Rap2B protein shares ~90% homology with Rap2A, and its sequence is 70% identical to other members of the Rap family such as RaplA and RaplB. As a result, Rap2B has been theorized to have similar signaling effectors to the GTPase-binding protein Rap, which mediates various biological functions, including the regulation of sterile 20/mitogen-activated proteins. Since its identification in the early 1990s, Rap2B has elicited a considerable interest. Numerous studies indicate that Rap2B exerts specific biological functions, including binding and stimulating phospholipase C-ε and interferon-γ. In addition, downregulation of Rap2B affects the growth of melanoma cells. The present review summarizes the possible effectors and biological functions of Rap2B. Increasing evidence clearly supports the association between Rap2B function and tumor development. Therefore, it is conceivable that anticancer drugs targeting Rap2B may be generated as novel therapies against cancer. PMID:27073477

  5. Ihh signaling regulates mandibular symphysis development and growth.

    PubMed

    Sugito, H; Shibukawa, Y; Kinumatsu, T; Yasuda, T; Nagayama, M; Yamada, S; Minugh-Purvis, N; Pacifici, M; Koyama, E

    2011-05-01

    Symphyseal secondary cartilage is important for mandibular development, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its formation remain largely unknown. Here we asked whether Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates symphyseal cartilage development and growth. By embryonic days 16.5 to 18.5, Sox9-expressing chondrocytes formed within condensed Tgfβ-1/Runx2-expressing mesenchymal cells at the prospective symphyseal joint site, and established a growth-plate-like structure with distinct Ihh, collagen X, and osteopontin expression patterns. In post-natal life, mesenchymal cells expressing the Ihh receptor Patched1 were present anterior to the Ihh-expressing secondary cartilage, proliferated, differentiated into chondrocytes, and contributed to anterior growth of alveolar bone. In Ihh-null mice, however, symphyseal development was defective, mainly because of enhanced chondrocyte maturation and reduced proliferation of chondroprogenitor cells. Proliferation was partially restored in dual Ihh;Gli3 mutants, suggesting that Gli3 is normally a negative regulator of symphyseal development. Thus, Ihh signaling is essential for symphyseal cartilage development and anterior mandibular growth.

  6. TLR signals posttranscriptionally regulate the cytokine trafficking mediator sortilin

    PubMed Central

    Yabe-Wada, Toshiki; Matsuba, Shintaro; Takeda, Kazuya; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Takai, Toshiyuki; Shi, Haifeng; Philpott, Caroline C.; Nakamura, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Regulating the transcription, translation and secretion of cytokines is crucial for controlling the appropriate balance of inflammation. Here we report that the sorting receptor sortilin plays a key role in cytokine production. We observed interactions of sortilin with multiple cytokines including IFN-α, and sortilin depletion in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) led to a reduction of IFN-α secretion, suggesting a pivotal role of sortilin in the exocytic trafficking of IFN-α in pDCs. Moreover, sortilin mRNA was degraded posttranscriptionally upon stimulation with various TLR ligands. Poly-rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) recognized the C-rich element (CRE) in the 3′ UTR of sortilin mRNA, and depletion of PCBP1 enhanced the degradation of sortilin transcripts, suggesting that PCBP1 can act as a trans-acting factor to stabilize sortilin transcripts. The nucleotide-binding ability of PCBP1 was impaired by zinc ions and alterations of intracellular zinc affect sortilin expression. PCBP1 may therefore control the stability of sortilin transcripts by sensing intracellular zinc levels. Collectively, our findings provide insights into the posttranslational regulation of cytokine production through the posttranscriptional control of sortilin expression by TLR signals. PMID:27220277

  7. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  8. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-03-10

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog.

  9. EGFR/ARF6 regulation of Hh signalling stimulates oncogenic Ras tumour overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Chabu, Chiswili; Li, Da-Ming; Xu, Tian

    2017-01-01

    Multiple signalling events interact in cancer cells. Oncogenic Ras cooperates with Egfr, which cannot be explained by the canonical signalling paradigm. In turn, Egfr cooperates with Hedgehog signalling. How oncogenic Ras elicits and integrates Egfr and Hedgehog signals to drive overgrowth remains unclear. Using a Drosophila tumour model, we show that Egfr cooperates with oncogenic Ras via Arf6, which functions as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. Oncogenic Ras induces the expression of Egfr ligands. Egfr then signals through Arf6, which regulates Hh transport to promote Hh signalling. Blocking any step of this signalling cascade inhibits Hh signalling and correspondingly suppresses the growth of both, fly and human cancer cells harbouring oncogenic Ras mutations. These findings highlight a non-canonical Egfr signalling mechanism, centered on Arf6 as a novel regulator of Hh signalling. This explains both, the puzzling requirement of Egfr in oncogenic Ras-mediated overgrowth and the cooperation between Egfr and Hedgehog. PMID:28281543

  10. MicroRNAs: new regulators of Toll-like receptor signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaobing; Jing, Zhizhong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a critical family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are responsible for the innate immune responses via signalling pathways to provide effective host defence against pathogen infections. However, TLR-signalling pathways are also likely to stringently regulate tissue maintenance and homeostasis by elaborate modulatory mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators and as an essential part of the networks involved in regulating TLR-signalling pathways. In this review, we highlight our understanding of the regulation of miRNA expression profiles by TLR-signalling pathways and the regulation of TLR-signalling pathways by miRNAs. We focus on the roles of miRNAs in regulating TLR-signalling pathways by targeting multiple molecules, including TLRs themselves, their associated signalling proteins and regulatory molecules, and transcription factors and functional cytokines induced by them, at multiple levels.

  11. MicroRNAs: New Regulators of Toll-Like Receptor Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobing; Jing, Zhizhong; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a critical family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), are responsible for the innate immune responses via signalling pathways to provide effective host defence against pathogen infections. However, TLR-signalling pathways are also likely to stringently regulate tissue maintenance and homeostasis by elaborate modulatory mechanisms. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators and as an essential part of the networks involved in regulating TLR-signalling pathways. In this review, we highlight our understanding of the regulation of miRNA expression profiles by TLR-signalling pathways and the regulation of TLR-signalling pathways by miRNAs. We focus on the roles of miRNAs in regulating TLR-signalling pathways by targeting multiple molecules, including TLRs themselves, their associated signalling proteins and regulatory molecules, and transcription factors and functional cytokines induced by them, at multiple levels. PMID:24772440

  12. Myostatin signaling regulates Akt activity via the regulation of miR-486 expression.

    PubMed

    Hitachi, Keisuke; Nakatani, Masashi; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2014-02-01

    Myostatin, also known as growth and differentiation factor-8, is a pivotal negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass and reduces muscle protein synthesis by inhibiting the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. However, the precise mechanism by which myostatin inhibits the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the global microRNA expression profile in myostatin knockout mice and identified miR-486, a positive regulator of the IGF-1/Akt pathway, as a novel target of myostatin signaling. In myostatin knockout mice, the expression level of miR-486 in skeletal muscle was significantly increased. In addition, we observed increased expression of the primary transcript of miR-486 (pri-miR-486) and Ankyrin 1.5 (Ank1.5), the host gene of miR-486, in myostatin knockout mice. In C2C12 cells, myostatin negatively regulated the expression of Ank1.5. Moreover, canonical myostatin signaling repressed the skeletal muscle-specific promoter activity of miR-486/Ank1.5. This repression was partially mediated by the E-box elements in the proximal region of the promoter. We also show that overexpression of miR-486 induced myotube hypertrophy in vitro and that miR-486 was essential to maintain skeletal muscle size both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, inhibition of miR-486 led to a decrease in Akt activity in C2C12 myotubes. Our findings indicate that miR-486 is one of the intermediary molecules connecting myostatin signaling and the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway in the regulation of skeletal muscle size.

  13. Differential roles of auxin efflux carrier PIN proteins in hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings depend on the direction of light stimulus.

    PubMed

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that although the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins, such as PIN3 and PIN7, are required for the pulse-induced first positive phototropism in etiolated Arabidopsis hypocotyls, they are not necessary for the continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism when the seedlings are grown on the surface of agar medium, which causes the hypocotyls to separate from the agar surface. Previous reports have shown that hypocotyl phototropism is slightly impaired in pin3 single mutants when they are grown along the surface of agar medium, where the hypocotyls always contact the agar, producing some friction. To clarify the possible involvement of PIN3 and PIN7 in continuous-light-induced phototropism, we investigated hypocotyl phototropism in the pin3 pin7 double mutant grown along the surface of agar medium. Intriguingly, the phototropic curvature was slightly impaired in the double mutant when the phototropic stimulus was presented on the adaxial side of the hook, but was not impaired when the phototropic stimulus was presented on the abaxial side of the hook. These results indicate that PIN proteins are required for continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism, depending on the direction of the light stimulus, when the seedlings are in contact with agar medium.

  14. Differential roles of auxin efflux carrier PIN proteins in hypocotyl phototropism of etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings depend on the direction of light stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Ken; Sakai, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated that although the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins, such as PIN3 and PIN7, are required for the pulse-induced first positive phototropism in etiolated Arabidopsis hypocotyls, they are not necessary for the continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism when the seedlings are grown on the surface of agar medium, which causes the hypocotyls to separate from the agar surface. Previous reports have shown that hypocotyl phototropism is slightly impaired in pin3 single mutants when they are grown along the surface of agar medium, where the hypocotyls always contact the agar, producing some friction. To clarify the possible involvement of PIN3 and PIN7 in continuous-light-induced phototropism, we investigated hypocotyl phototropism in the pin3 pin7 double mutant grown along the surface of agar medium. Intriguingly, the phototropic curvature was slightly impaired in the double mutant when the phototropic stimulus was presented on the adaxial side of the hook, but was not impaired when the phototropic stimulus was presented on the abaxial side of the hook. These results indicate that PIN proteins are required for continuous-light-induced second positive phototropism, depending on the direction of the light stimulus, when the seedlings are in contact with agar medium. PMID:23104115

  15. Extracellular signal regulated kinase 5 mediates signals triggered by the novel tumor promoter palytoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Charlson, Aaron T.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-12-01

    Palytoxin is classified as a non-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-type skin tumor because it does not bind to or activate protein kinase C. Palytoxin is thus a novel tool for investigating alternative signaling pathways that may affect carcinogenesis. We previously showed that palytoxin activates three major members of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Here we report that palytoxin also activates another MAPK family member, called ERK5, in HeLa cells and in keratinocytes derived from initiated mouse skin (308 cells). By contrast, TPA does not activate ERK5 in these cell lines. The major cell surface receptor for palytoxin is the Na+,K+-ATPase. Accordingly, ouabain blocked the ability of palytoxin to activate ERK5. Ouabain alone did not activate ERK5. ERK5 thus represents a divergence in the signaling pathways activated by these two agents that bind to the Na+,K+-ATPase. Cycloheximide, okadaic acid, and sodium orthovanadate did not mimic the effect of palytoxin on ERK5. These results indicate that the stimulation of ERK5 by palytoxin is not simply due to inhibition of protein synthesis or inhibition of serine/threonine or tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, the mechanism by which palytoxin activates ERK5 differs from that by which it activates ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Finally, studies that used pharmacological inhibitors and shRNA to block ERK5 action indicate that ERK5 contributes to palytoxin-stimulated c-Fos gene expression. These results suggest that ERK5 can act as an alternative mediator for transmitting diverse tumor promoter-stimulated signals.

  16. Regulation of longevity by regulator of G-protein signaling protein, Loco.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuh-Ru; Kim, Keetae; Yang, Yanfei; Ivessa, Andreas; Sadoshima, Junichi; Park, Yongkyu

    2011-06-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins contribute to G-protein signaling pathways as activators or repressors with GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity. To characterize whether regulation of RGS proteins influences longevity in several species, we measured stress responses and lifespan of RGS-overexpressing and RGS-lacking mutants. Reduced expression of Loco, a RGS protein of Drosophila melanogaster, resulted in a longer lifespan for both male and female flies, also exhibiting stronger resistance to three different stressors (starvation, oxidation, and heat) and higher manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity. In addition, this reduction in Loco expression increased fat content and diminished cAMP levels. In contrast, overexpression of both genomic and cDNA loco gene significantly shortened the lifespan with weaker stress resistance and lower fat content. Deletion analysis of the Loco demonstrated that its RGS domain is required for the regulation of longevity. Consistently, when expression of RGS14, mammalian homologue of Loco, was reduced in rat fibroblast cells, the resistance to oxidative stress increased with higher MnSOD expression. The changes of yeast Rgs2 expression, which shares a conserved RGS domain with the fly Loco protein, also altered lifespan and stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we provide the first evidence that RGS proteins with GAP activity affect both stress resistance and longevity in several species.

  17. Regulation of adult neural progenitor cell functions by purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Illes, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular purines are signaling molecules in the neurogenic niches of the brain and spinal cord, where they activate cell surface purinoceptors at embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) and adult neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Although mRNA and protein are expressed at NSCs/NPCs for almost all subtypes of the nucleotide-sensitive P2X/P2Y, and the nucleoside-sensitive adenosine receptors, only a few of those have acquired functional significance. ATP is sequentially degraded by ecto-nucleotidases to ADP, AMP, and adenosine with agonistic properties for distinct receptor-classes. Nucleotides/nucleosides facilitate or inhibit NSC/NPC proliferation, migration and differentiation. The most ubiquitous effect of all agonists (especially of ATP and ADP) appears to be the facilitation of cell proliferation, usually through P2Y1Rs and sometimes through P2X7Rs. However, usually P2X7R activation causes necrosis/apoptosis of NPCs. Differentiation can be initiated by P2Y2R-activation or P2X7R-blockade. A key element in the transduction mechanism of either receptor is the increase of the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, which may arise due to its release from intracellular storage sites (G protein-coupling; P2Y) or due to its passage through the receptor-channel itself from the extracellular space (ATP-gated ion channel; P2X). Further research is needed to clarify how purinergic signaling controls NSC/NPC fate and how the balance between the quiescent and activated states is established with fine and dynamic regulation. GLIA 2017;65:213-230. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Signaling-Regulated, Short-Chain Dehydrogenase of Stagonospora nodorum Regulates Asexual Development ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kar-Chun; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Millar, A. Harvey; Thomson, Gordon; Oliver, Richard P.; Solomon, Peter S.

    2008-01-01

    The fungus Stagonospora nodorum is a causal agent of leaf and glume blotch disease of wheat. It has been previously shown that inactivation of heterotrimeric G protein signaling in Stagonospora nodorum caused development defects and reduced pathogenicity [P. S. Solomon et al., Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 17:456-466, 2004]. In this study, we sought to identify targets of the signaling pathway that may have contributed to phenotypic defects of the signaling mutants. A comparative analysis of Stagonospora nodorum wild-type and Gα-defective mutant (gna1) intracellular proteomes was performed via two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Several proteins showed significantly altered abundances when comparing the two strains. One such protein, the short-chain dehydrogenase Sch1, was 18-fold less abundant in the gna1 strain, implying that it is positively regulated by Gα signaling. Gene expression and transcriptional enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion analyses of Sch1 indicates strong expression during asexual development. Mutant strains of Stagonospora nodorum lacking Sch1 demonstrated poor growth on minimal media and exhibited a significant reduction in asexual sporulation on all growth media examined. Detailed histological experiments on sch1 pycnidia revealed that the gene is required for the differentiation of the subparietal layers of asexual pycnidia resulting in a significant reduction in both pycnidiospore size and numbers. PMID:18776038

  19. Bone remodeling is regulated by inner ear vestibular signals.

    PubMed

    Vignaux, Guillaume; Besnard, Stéphane; Ndong, Jean; Philoxène, Bruno; Denise, Pierre; Elefteriou, Florent

    2013-10-01

    Bone remodeling allows the conservation of normal bone mass despite constant changes in internal and external environments. The adaptation of the skeleton to these various stimuli leads credence to the notion that bone remodeling is a true homeostatic function, and as such is under the control of specific centers in the central nervous system (CNS). Hypothalamic and brainstem centers, as well as the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), have been identified as regulators of bone remodeling. However, the nature of the afferent CNS stimuli that may modulate CNS centers involved in the control of bone remodeling, with the exception of leptin, remains unclear. Based on the partial efficacy of exercise and mechanical stimulation regimens to prevent microgravity-induced bone loss and the known alterations in vestibular functions associated with space flights, we hypothesized that inner ear vestibular signals may contribute to the regulation of bone remodeling. Using an established model of bilateral vestibular lesions and microtomographic and histomorphometric bone analyses, we show here that induction of bilateral vestibular lesion in rats generates significant bone loss, which is restricted to weight-bearing bones and associated with a significant reduction in bone formation, as observed in rats under microgravity conditions. Importantly, this bone loss was not associated with reduced locomotor activity or metabolic abnormalities, was accompanied with molecular signs of increased sympathetic outflow, and could be prevented by the β-blocker propranolol. Collectively, these data suggest that the homeostatic process of bone remodeling has a vestibulosympathetic regulatory component and that vestibular system pathologies might be accompanied by bone fragility. © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  20. Regulation of postsynaptic retrograde signaling by presynaptic exosome release

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Ceren; Li, Yihang; Koles, Kate; Brewer, Cassandra; Ashley, James; Yoshihara, Motojiro; Budnik, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Retrograde signals from postsynaptic targets are critical during development and plasticity of synaptic connections. These signals serve to adjust the activity of presynaptic cells according to postsynaptic cell outputs and to maintain synaptic function within a dynamic range. Despite their importance, the mechanisms that trigger the release of retrograde signals and the role of presynaptic cells in this signaling event are unknown. Here we show that a retrograde signal mediated by Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4) is transmitted to the postsynaptic cell through anterograde delivery of Syt4 via exosomes. Thus, by transferring an essential component of retrograde signaling through exosomes, presynaptic cells enable retrograde signaling. PMID:23522040

  1. AKAP Signaling Complexes in Regulation of Excitatory Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Jennifer L.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system is believed to be critical for neuronal circuits to process and encode information allowing animals to perform complex behaviors such as learning and memory. In addition, alterations in synaptic plasticity are associated with human diseases including Alzheimer's, epilepsy, chronic pain, drug addiction, and schizophrenia. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the hippocampal region of the brain are two forms of synaptic plasticity that increase or decrease, respectively, the strength of synaptic transmission by postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Both LTP and LTD are induced by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors but differ in the level and duration of Ca2+ influx through the NMDA receptor and the subsequent engagement of downstream signaling by protein kinases including PKA, PKC, and CaMKII and phosphatases including PP1 and calcineurin-PP2B (CaN). This review addresses the important emerging roles of the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) family of scaffold proteins in regulating localization of PKA and other kinases and phosphatases to postsynaptic multi-protein complexes that control NMDA and AMPA receptor function during LTP and LTD. PMID:21498812

  2. AKAP signaling complexes in regulation of excitatory synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Jennifer L; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2011-06-01

    Plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the central nervous system is believed to be critical for neuronal circuits to process and encode information, allowing animals to perform complex behaviors such as learning and memory. In addition, alterations in synaptic plasticity are associated with human diseases, including Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, chronic pain, drug addiction, and schizophrenia. Long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) in the hippocampal region of the brain are two forms of synaptic plasticity that increase or decrease, respectively, the strength of synaptic transmission by postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Both LTP and LTD are induced by activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors but differ in the level and duration of Ca(2+) influx through the NMDA receptor and the subsequent engagement of downstream signaling by protein kinases, including PKA, PKC, and CaMKII, and phosphatases, including PP1 and calcineurin-PP2B (CaN). This review addresses the important emerging roles of the A-kinase anchoring protein family of scaffold proteins in regulating localization of PKA and other kinases and phosphatases to postsynaptic multiprotein complexes that control NMDA and AMPA receptor function during LTP and LTD.

  3. Regulation of PKC Mediated Signaling by Calcium during Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nivedita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Majumder, Saikat; Majumdar, Subrata; Sen, Parimal C.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is an ubiquitous cellular signaling molecule that controls a variety of cellular processes and is strictly maintained in the cellular compartments by the coordination of various Ca2+ pumps and channels. Two such fundamental calcium pumps are plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) which play a pivotal role in maintaining intracellular calcium homeostasis. This intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is often disturbed by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani, the causative organism of visceral leishmaniasis. In the present study we have dileneated the involvement of PMCA4 and SERCA3 during leishmaniasis. We have observed that during leishmaniasis, intracellular Ca2+ concentration was up-regulated and was further controlled by both PMCA4 and SERCA3. Inhibition of these two Ca2+-ATPases resulted in decreased parasite burden within the host macrophages due to enhanced intracellular Ca2+. Contrastingly, on the other hand, activation of PMCA4 was found to enhance the parasite burden. Our findings also highlighted the importance of Ca2+ in the modulation of cytokine balance during leishmaniasis. These results thus cumulatively suggests that these two Ca2+-ATPases play prominent roles during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:25329062

  4. BMP signaling and microtubule organization regulate synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Robin W.; Peled, Einat; Guerrero, Giovanna; Isacoff, Ehud Y.

    2015-01-01

    The strength of synaptic transmission between a neuron and multiple postsynaptic partners can vary considerably. We have studied synaptic heterogeneity using the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), which contains multiple synaptic connections of varying strength between a motor axon and muscle fiber. In larval NMJs, there is a gradient of synaptic transmission from weak proximal to strong distal boutons. We imaged synaptic transmission with the postsynaptically targeted fluorescent calcium sensor SynapCam, to investigate the molecular pathways that determine synaptic strength and set up this gradient. We discovered that mutations in the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway disrupt production of strong distal boutons. We find that strong connections contain unbundled microtubules in the boutons, suggesting a role for microtubule organization in transmission strength. The spastin mutation, which disorganizes microtubules, disrupted the transmission gradient, supporting this interpretation. We propose that the BMP pathway, shown previously to function in the homeostatic regulation of synaptic growth, also boosts synaptic transmission in a spatially selective manner that depends on the microtubule system. PMID:25681521

  5. Fibronectin regulates Wnt7a signaling and satellite cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Bentzinger, C. Florian; Wang, Yu Xin; von Maltzahn, Julia; Soleimani, Vahab D.; Yin, Hang; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The influence of the extracellular matrix (ECM) within the stem cell niche remains poorly understood. We found that Syndecan-4 (Sdc4) and Frizzled-7 (Fzd7) form a co-receptor complex in satellite cells and that binding of the ECM glycoprotein Fibronectin (FN) to Sdc4 stimulates the ability of Wnt7a to induce the symmetric expansion of satellite stem cells. Newly activated satellite cells dynamically remodel their niche by transient high-level expression of FN. Knockdown of FN in prospectively isolated satellite cells severely impaired their ability to repopulate the satellite cell niche. Conversely, in vivo over-expression of FN with Wnt7a dramatically stimulated the expansion of satellite stem cells in regenerating muscle. Therefore, activating satellite cells remodel their niche through autologous expression of FN that provides feedback to stimulate Wnt7a signaling through the Fzd7/Sdc4 co-receptor complex. Thus, FN and Wnt7a together regulate the homeostatic levels of satellite stem cells and satellite myogenic cells during regenerative myogenesis. PMID:23290138

  6. Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jui-Yen; Chou, Ying-Tsen; Lai, Feng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Human fragile WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (named WWOX, FOR, or WOX1). Functional suppression of WWOX prevents apoptotic cell death induced by a variety of stress stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor, UV radiation, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Loss of WWOX gene expression due to gene deletions, loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, or epigenetic silencing is frequently observed in human malignant cancer cells. Acquisition of chemoresistance in squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and breast cancer cells is associated with WWOX deficiency. WWOX protein physically interacts with many signaling molecules and exerts its regulatory effects on gene transcription and protein stability and subcellular localization to control cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, and metabolism. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which WWOX regulates cellular functions and stress responses. A potential scenario is that activation of WWOX by anticancer drugs is needed to overcome chemoresistance and trigger cancer cell death, suggesting that WWOX can be regarded as a prognostic marker and a candidate molecule for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:25595191

  7. MEKK4 Signaling Regulates Filamin Expression and Neuronal Migration

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisian, Matthew R.; Bartley, Christopher M.; Chi, Hongbo; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue; Torii, Masaaki; Flavell, Richard A.; Rakic, Pasko

    2007-01-01

    Summary Periventricular heterotopia (PVH) is a congenital malformation of human cerebral cortex frequently associated with Filamin-A (FLN-A) mutations but the pathogenetic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the MEKK4 (MAP3K4) pathway is involved in Fln-A regulation and PVH formation. MEKK4−/− mice developed PVH associated with breaches in the neuroependymal lining which were largely comprised of neurons that failed to reach the cortical plate. RNA interference (RNAi) targeting MEKK4 also impaired neuronal migration. Expression of Fln was elevated in MEKK4−/− forebrain, most notably near sites of failed neuronal migration. Importantly, recombinant-MKK4 protein precipitated a complex containing MEKK4 and Fln-A, and MKK4 mediated signaling between MEKK4 and Fln-A, suggesting that MKK4 may bridge these molecules during development. Finally, we showed that wild-type FLN-A over-expression inhibited neuronal migration. Collectively, our results demonstrate a link between MEKK4 and Fln-A that impacts neuronal migration-initiation and provides insight into the pathogenesis of human PVH. PMID:17145501

  8. Repetition of the classical Boysen-Jensen and Nielsen's experiment on phototropism of oat coleoptiles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Nakano, H; Yokotani-Tomita, K; Bruinsma, J; Yamamura, S; Hasegawa, K

    2000-03-01

    The classical experiment of phototropic response as reported by Boysen-Jensen and Nielsen (1926), which supports the Cholodny-Went theory, was repeated in detail. In the original experiment, etiolated oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Victory) coleoptiles with mica inserted into their tip only showed a positive response when the mica was placed parallel toward the light source and not if it was inserted perpendicularly. On the contrary, we found a positive response irrespective of whether the mica was inserted parallel or perpendicularly to the light source. Damage owing to rude splitting severely reduced the response upon perpendicular insertion. These results invalidate the Boysen-Jensen and Nielsen's experiment as a support of the Cholodny-Went theory and lend support to the Bruinsma-Hasegawa theory ascribing phototropism to the local light-induced accumulation of growth inhibitors against a background of even auxin distribution, the diffusion of auxin being unaffected.

  9. Regulator of G protein signaling proteins differentially modulate signaling of μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihua; Li, Zhisong; Guo, Lei; Ye, Caiying; Li, Juan; Yu, Xiaoli; Yang, Huifen; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Chongguang; Zhang, Dechang; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Effects of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins on μ and δ opioid receptors were investigated in HEK293 cells. Co-expression of RGS1, RGS2, RGS4, RGS9, RGS10 or RGS19 (Gα-interacting protein (GAIP)) significantly reduced [Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO)-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) mediated by μ opioid receptor, but only RGS9 decreased the effects of [Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-p-Chloro-Phe-D-Pen]-Enkephalin (DPDPE) mediated by δ opioid receptor. When C-tails of the receptors were exchanged (μ/δC and δ/μC chimeras), RGS proteins decreased δ/μC-mediated AC inhibition, but none had significant effects on that via μ/δC receptor. Thus, the C-terminal domains of the receptors are critical for the differential effects of RGS proteins, which may be due to differences in receptor - G protein - RGS protein interactions in signaling complexes. PMID:17433292

  10. The effect of phototropic centers on energy-extraction efficiency in YSGG:Cr,Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstigneev, V. L.; Zharikov, E. V.; Zavartsev, Iu. D.; Nerobov, O. V.; Studenikin, P. A.

    1990-06-01

    The suppression of amplified spontaneous emission and a 1.5-fold increase in energy efficiency were achieved in YSGG:Cr(3+), Nd(3+) laser crystals under the formation of saturable Cr(4+) centers which absorb at a wavelength of 1.06 micron. It is shown that the efficiency of amplifiers and lasers operating in the Q-switched regime can be significantly enhanced by creating phototropic centers in the doped YSGG crystal.

  11. Fractional gravity studies on the ISS of sensory mechanisms involved in phototropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Correll, Melanie; Edelmann, Richard; Millar, Katherine

    The major goals of this research are (1) to better understand cellular mechanisms of pho-totropism in plants and (2) to determine the effects and influence of gravity on light perception in plants. Because of the interfering effect of the strong gravitropic response, microgravity conditions are needed to effectively study phototropism. Experiments performed on the In-ternational Space Station (ISS) were used to explore the mechanisms of both blue-light and red-light-induced phototropism in plants. We utilized the European Modular Cultivation Sys-tem (EMCS), which has environmental controls for plant growth as well as centrifuges for gravity treatments. TROPI-1 (for tropisms) was successfully performed on the ISS during late 2006. We obtained data on seedlings grown in microgravity and discovered a novel positive phototropic response to red light in hypocotyls of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, one problem encoun-tered during TROPI-1 was low seed germination due to long storage periods (8 months) in flight hardware. Thus, the originally proposed fractional gravity studies were not performed. TROPI-2 provides an opportunity to regain the results from these important fractional gravity experiments. TROPI-2 experiments will provide a better understanding of how plants integrate sensory input from multiple light and gravity perception systems. This information is important for growing plants on long-term space missions as part of life support systems. The fractional gravity studies contain 0.16g (Moon) and 0.38g (Mars) treatments, so information to be obtained is relevant to exploration objectives

  12. Phototropism involves a lateral gradient of growth inhibitors, not of auxin. A review.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, J; Hasegawa, K

    1989-01-01

    During phototropic curvature, indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA) remains evenly distributed in the hypocotyl of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and in the oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptile. At the irradiated side, growth inhibiting substances accumulate. In sunflower, basipetal movement of a growth factor is not involved, since the top of the seedling can be covered or removed without affecting the photo-tropic response; this response, moreover, is independent of the rate of elongation growth. The chemical nature of the growth-inhibiting substances is only partly known. In the hypocotyl they occur in the neutral fraction: in sunflower cis-xanthoxin is one of them, in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) cis- and trans-raphanusanins, and possibly raphanusamide, are involved. The inhibitor(s) in the oat coleoptile are acidic. During curvature, their amount remains rather constant but the distribution changes with an accumulation at the irradiated side. It is concluded that phototropic curvature is brought about by an accumulation, at the irradiated side, of growth-inhibiting substances that unilaterally reduce cell elongation even though the IAA distribution is uniform.

  13. Phototropic growth control of nanoscale pattern formation in photoelectrodeposited Se–Te films

    PubMed Central

    Sadtler, Bryce; Burgos, Stanley P.; Batara, Nicolas A.; Beardslee, Joseph A.; Atwater, Harry A.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Photoresponsive materials that adapt their morphologies, growth directions, and growth rates dynamically in response to the local incident electromagnetic field would provide a remarkable route to the synthesis of complex 3D mesostructures via feedback between illumination and the structure that develops under optical excitation. We report the spontaneous development of ordered, nanoscale lamellar patterns in electrodeposited selenium–tellurium (Se–Te) alloy films grown under noncoherent, uniform illumination on unpatterned substrates in an isotropic electrolyte solution. These inorganic nanostructures exhibited phototropic growth in which lamellar stripes grew toward the incident light source, adopted an orientation parallel to the light polarization direction with a period controlled by the illumination wavelength, and showed an increased growth rate with increasing light intensity. Furthermore, the patterns responded dynamically to changes during growth in the polarization, wavelength, and angle of the incident light, enabling the template-free and pattern-free synthesis, on a variety of substrates, of woodpile, spiral, branched, or zigzag structures, along with dynamically directed growth toward a noncoherent, uniform intensity light source. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations in combination with Monte Carlo growth simulations were used to model light–matter interactions in the Se–Te films and produced a model for the morphological evolution of the lamellar structures under phototropic growth conditions. The experiments and simulations are consistent with a phototropic growth mechanism in which the optical near-field intensity profile selects and reinforces the dominant morphological mode in the emergent nanoscale patterns. PMID:24218617

  14. Phototropic growth control of nanoscale pattern formation in photoelectrodeposited Se-Te films.

    PubMed

    Sadtler, Bryce; Burgos, Stanley P; Batara, Nicolas A; Beardslee, Joseph A; Atwater, Harry A; Lewis, Nathan S

    2013-12-03

    Photoresponsive materials that adapt their morphologies, growth directions, and growth rates dynamically in response to the local incident electromagnetic field would provide a remarkable route to the synthesis of complex 3D mesostructures via feedback between illumination and the structure that develops under optical excitation. We report the spontaneous development of ordered, nanoscale lamellar patterns in electrodeposited selenium-tellurium (Se-Te) alloy films grown under noncoherent, uniform illumination on unpatterned substrates in an isotropic electrolyte solution. These inorganic nanostructures exhibited phototropic growth in which lamellar stripes grew toward the incident light source, adopted an orientation parallel to the light polarization direction with a period controlled by the illumination wavelength, and showed an increased growth rate with increasing light intensity. Furthermore, the patterns responded dynamically to changes during growth in the polarization, wavelength, and angle of the incident light, enabling the template-free and pattern-free synthesis, on a variety of substrates, of woodpile, spiral, branched, or zigzag structures, along with dynamically directed growth toward a noncoherent, uniform intensity light source. Full-wave electromagnetic simulations in combination with Monte Carlo growth simulations were used to model light-matter interactions in the Se-Te films and produced a model for the morphological evolution of the lamellar structures under phototropic growth conditions. The experiments and simulations are consistent with a phototropic growth mechanism in which the optical near-field intensity profile selects and reinforces the dominant morphological mode in the emergent nanoscale patterns.

  15. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  16. Caveolin-1 regulates shear stress-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, H.; Go, Y. M.; Darji, R.; Choi, J. W.; Lisanti, M. P.; Maland, M. C.; Jo, H.

    2000-01-01

    Fluid shear stress activates a member of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), by mechanisms dependent on cholesterol in the plasma membrane in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Caveolae are microdomains of the plasma membrane that are enriched with cholesterol, caveolin, and signaling molecules. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 regulates shear activation of ERK. Because caveolin-1 is not exposed to the outside, cells were minimally permeabilized by Triton X-100 (0.01%) to deliver a neutralizing, polyclonal caveolin-1 antibody (pCav-1) inside the cells. pCav-1 then bound to caveolin-1 and inhibited shear activation of ERK but not c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase. Epitope mapping studies showed that pCav-1 binds to caveolin-1 at two regions (residues 1-21 and 61-101). When the recombinant proteins containing the epitopes fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST-Cav(1-21) or GST-Cav(61-101)) were preincubated with pCav-1, only GST-Cav(61-101) reversed the inhibitory effect of the antibody on shear activation of ERK. Other antibodies, including m2234, which binds to caveolin-1 residues 1-21, had no effect on shear activation of ERK. Caveolin-1 residues 61-101 contain the scaffolding and oligomerization domains, suggesting that binding of pCav-1 to these regions likely disrupts the clustering of caveolin-1 or its interaction with signaling molecules involved in the shear-sensitive ERK pathway. We suggest that caveolae-like domains play a critical role in the mechanosensing and/or mechanosignal transduction of the ERK pathway.

  17. Regulation of fat intake in the absence of flavour signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Jozélia G; Tellez, Luis A; Ren, Xueying; Yeckel, Catherine W; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2012-01-01

    Animals, including humans, can achieve precise regulation of caloric intake by adjusting consumption in response to covert changes in energy density. It remains unknown, however, whether the presence of flavour cues are required for the ability to maintain constant caloric intake. Also unknown are the brain circuits that may function as the central calorie monitors that control adaptive adjustments in energy intake. Here we show that mice trained to lick a dry spout in order to receive intra-gastric infusions of a fat emulsion maintained constant hourly caloric intake by adjusting the number of dry licks in response to changes in caloric density. Animals also increased dry licking according to hunger levels, and developed conditioned preferences for dry sippers associated with high calorie infusions. Importantly, striatal dopamine levels were closely associated with the amount of calories ingested, rather than with the number of dry licks produced. Dopamine levels in dorsal and ventral striatum also reflected caloric density in mice passively receiving intra-gastric infusions of fat emulsions. Consistent with the above, systemic administration of the dopamine receptor blocker haloperidol markedly increased the production of dry licks needed to obtain high-calorie infusions, as if the caloric density of the infusions had been diluted. Conversely, haloperidol markedly decreased the production of dry licks needed to obtain low-calorie infusions. Taken together, our results support the proposition that brain dopamine circuits function as one central sensor of calorie ingestion, since (1) extracellular striatal dopamine levels fluctuate in proportion to the caloric density of nutrients infused in the gut; and (2) inhibiting dopamine receptor signalling disrupts the animals’ ability to maintain constant caloric intake across experimental sessions. PMID:22219333

  18. Blue light-induced phototropism of inflorescence stems and petioles is mediated by phototropin family members phot1 and phot2.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2009-10-01

    Phototropin family photoreceptors, phot1 and phot2, in Arabidopsis thaliana control the blue light (BL)-mediated phototropic responses of the hypocotyl, chloroplast relocation movement and stomatal opening. Phototropic responses in dark-grown tissues have been well studied but those in de-etiolated green plants are not well understood. Here, we analyzed phototropic responses of inflorescence stems and petioles of wild-type and phototropin mutant plants of A. thaliana. Similar to the results obtained from dark-grown seedlings, inflorescence stems and petioles in wild-type and phot2 mutant plants showed phototropic bending towards low fluence BL, while in phot1 mutant plants, a high fluence rate of BL was required. phot1 phot2 double mutant plants did not show any phototropic responses even under very high fluence rates of BL. We further studied the photoreceptive sites for phototropic responses of stems and petioles by partial tissue irradiation. The whole part of the inflorescence stem is sensitive to BL and shows phototropism, but in the petiole only the irradiated abaxial side is sensitive. Similar to dark-grown etiolated seedlings, phot1 plays a major role in phototropic responses under weak light, but phot2 functions under high fluence rate conditions in green plants.

  19. Irradiance-dependent regulation of gravitropism by red light in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, V. D.; Sack, F. D.

    1999-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus (Hedw.) Brid. are negatively gravitropic in the dark and positively phototropic in red light. Various fluence rates of unilateral red light were tested to determine whether both tropisms operate simultaneously. At irradiances > or = 140 nmol m-2 s-1 no gravitropism could be detected and phototropism predominated, despite the presence of amyloplast sedimentation. Gravitropism occurred at irradiances lower than 140 nmol m-1 s-1 with most cells oriented above the horizontal but not upright. At these low fluence rates, phototropism was indistinct at 1 g but apparent in microgravity, indicating that gravitropism and phototropism compete at 1 g. The frequency of protonemata that were negatively phototropic varied with the fluence rate and the duration of illumination, as well as with the position of the apical cell before illumination. These data show that the fluence rate of red light regulates whether gravitropism is allowed or completely repressed, and that it influences the polarity of phototropism and the extent to which apical cells are aligned in the light path.

  20. Complex regulation of HSC emergence by the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Butko, Emerald; Pouget, Claire; Traver, David

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are formed during embryonic development, and serve as the foundation of the definitive blood program for life. Notch signaling has been well established as an essential direct contributor to HSC specification. However, several recent studies have indicated that the contribution of Notch signaling is complex. HSC specification requires multiple Notch signaling inputs, some received directly by hematopoietic precursors, and others that occur indirectly within neighboring somites. Of note, proinflammatory signals provided by primitive myeloid cells are needed for HSC specification via upregulation of the Notch pathway in hemogenic endothelium. In addition to multiple requirements for Notch activation, recent studies indicate that Notch signaling must subsequently be repressed to permit HSC emergence. Finally, Notch must then be reactivated to maintain HSC fate. In this review, we discuss the growing understanding of the dynamic contributions of Notch signaling to the establishment of hematopoiesis during development. PMID:26586199

  1. Rabconnectin-3 is a functional regulator of mammalian Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Nilay; Yan, Yan; Quek, Debra; Schupbach, Trudi; Kang, Yibin

    2010-11-05

    The Notch signaling pathway is important for cell fate decisions in embryonic development and adult life. Defining the functional importance of the Notch pathway in these contexts requires the elucidation of essential signal transduction components that have not been fully characterized. Here, we show that Rabconnectin-3B is required for the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rabconnectin-3B in mammalian cells attenuated Notch signaling and disrupted the activation and nuclear accumulation of the Notch target Hes1. Rabconnectin-3B knockdown also disrupted V-ATPase activity in mammalian cells, consistent with previous observations in Drosophila. Pharmacological inhibition of the V-ATPase complex significantly reduced Notch signaling in mammalian cells. Finally, Rabconnectin-3B knockdown phenocopied functional disruption of Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation. Collectively, these findings define an important role for Rabconnectin-3 and V-ATPase activity in the Notch signaling pathway in mammalian cells.

  2. Plastids Are Major Regulators of Light Signaling in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ruckle, Michael E.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lawrence, Lauren A.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Larkin, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    We previously provided evidence that plastid signaling regulates the downstream components of a light signaling network and that this signal integration coordinates chloroplast biogenesis with both the light environment and development by regulating gene expression. We tested these ideas by analyzing light- and plastid-regulated transcriptomes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the enrichment of Gene Ontology terms in these transcriptomes is consistent with the integration of light and plastid signaling (1) down-regulating photosynthesis and inducing both repair and stress tolerance in dysfunctional chloroplasts and (2) helping coordinate processes such as growth, the circadian rhythm, and stress responses with the degree of chloroplast function. We then tested whether factors that contribute to this signal integration are also regulated by light and plastid signals by characterizing T-DNA insertion alleles of genes that are regulated by light and plastid signaling and that encode proteins that are annotated as contributing to signaling, transcription, or no known function. We found that a high proportion of these mutant alleles induce chloroplast biogenesis during deetiolation. We quantified the expression of four photosynthesis-related genes in seven of these enhanced deetiolation (end) mutants and found that photosynthesis-related gene expression is attenuated. This attenuation is particularly striking for Photosystem II subunit S expression. We conclude that the integration of light and plastid signaling regulates a number of END genes that help optimize chloroplast function and that at least some END genes affect photosynthesis-related gene expression. PMID:22383539

  3. Plant elicitor peptides are conserved signals regulating direct and indirect anti-herbivore defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect-induced defenses occur in nearly all plants and are regulated by conserved signaling pathways. As the first described plant peptide signal, systemin regulates anti-herbivore defenses in the Solanaceae, but in other plant families peptides with analogous activity have remained elusive. In th...

  4. Plant elicitor peptides are conserved signals regulating direct and indirect anti-herbivore defense

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect-induced defenses occur in nearly all plants and are regulated by conserved signaling pathways. As the first described plant peptide signal, systemin regulates anti-herbivore defenses in the Solanaceae, but in other plant families peptides with analogous activity have remained elusive. In the ...

  5. Microenvironments and Signaling Pathways Regulating Early Dissemination, Dormancy, and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Andreas Hartkopf, Florin-Andrei Taran, Tanja Fehm, Gunter Meister, Christoph A. Klein. “Her2 and progesterone signaling cooperate for early dissemination... progesterone receptor-B (PgR) favored side branching (Brisken et al., 2000). With Hosseini et al., we also found that PgR signaling is enriched in the pre...signaling in early stages of breast cancer progression may awaken programs of motility, invasion and stem cell-like behavior observed during pregnancy

  6. Microfluidic perfusion for regulating diffusible signaling in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Blagovic, Katarina; Kim, Lily Y; Voldman, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Autocrine & paracrine signaling are widespread both in vivo and in vitro, and are particularly important in embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and lineage commitment. Although autocrine signaling via fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF4) is known to be required in mouse ESC (mESC) neuroectodermal specification, the question of whether FGF4 autocrine signaling is sufficient, or whether other soluble ligands are also involved in fate specification, is unknown. The spatially confined and closed-loop nature of diffusible signaling makes its experimental control challenging; current experimental approaches typically require prior knowledge of the factor/receptor in order to modulate the loop. A new approach explored in this work is to leverage transport phenomena at cellular resolution to downregulate overall diffusible signaling through the physical removal of cell-secreted ligands. We develop a multiplex microfluidic platform to continuously remove cell-secreted (autocrine\\paracrine) factors to downregulate diffusible signaling. By comparing cell growth and differentiation in side-by-side chambers with or without added cell-secreted factors, we isolate the effects of diffusible signaling from artifacts such as shear, nutrient depletion, and microsystem effects, and find that cell-secreted growth factor(s) are required during neuroectodermal specification. Then we induce FGF4 signaling in minimal chemically defined medium (N2B27) and inhibit FGF signaling in fully supplemented differentiation medium with cell-secreted factors to determine that the non-FGF cell-secreted factors are required to promote growth of differentiating mESCs. Our results demonstrate for the first time that flow can downregulate autocrine\\paracrine signaling and examine sufficiency of extracellular factors. We show that autocrine\\paracrine signaling drives neuroectodermal commitment of mESCs through both FGF4-dependent and -independent pathways. Overall, by uncovering autocrine

  7. Signalling of abscisic acid to regulate plant growth.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelbach, A; Iten, M; Grill, E

    1998-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) mediated growth control is a fundamental response of plants to adverse environmental cues. The linkage between ABA perception and growth control is currently being unravelled by using different experimental approaches such as mutant analysis and microinjection experiments. So far, two protein phosphatases, ABI1 and ABI2, cADPR, pH, and Ca2+ have been identified as main components of the ABA signalling pathway. Here, the ABA signal transduction pathway is compared to signalling cascades from yeast and mammalian cells. A model for a bifurcated ABA signal transduction pathway exerting a positive and negative control mechanism is proposed. PMID:9800207

  8. Pea3 expression is regulated by FGF signaling in developing retina

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn Leigh; McGuire, Chris; Reh, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    FGF signaling has been implicated as an important regulator of retinal development. As a first step in characterizing potential downstream targets of FGF signaling in the retina, we have analyzed expression of Pea3, a member of the Pea3 class of Ets-domain transcription factors, in the developing eye. We find that Pea3 is expressed in the developing retina, and its transcription is regulated by FGF receptor activation. In addition, FGF signaling activates Cath5, a gene necessary for retinal ganglion cell differentiation. These results suggest that FGF signaling via MAPK up-regulates transcription factors that in turn control retinal ganglion cell differentiation. PMID:16273524

  9. Akt1 signaling coordinates BMP signaling and β-catenin activity to regulate second heart field progenitor development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Zhao, Xia; Jin, Hengwei; Tao, Lichan; Zhu, Jingai; Wang, Huijuan; Hemmings, Brian A; Yang, Zhongzhou

    2015-02-15

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors exhibit continued proliferation and delayed differentiation, which are modulated by FGF4/8/10, BMP and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PTEN-Akt signaling regulates the stem cell/progenitor cell homeostasis in several systems, such as hematopoietic stem cells, intestinal stem cells and neural progenitor cells. To address whether PTEN-Akt signaling is involved in regulating cardiac progenitors, we deleted Pten in SHF progenitors. Deletion of Pten caused SHF expansion and increased the size of the SHF derivatives, the right ventricle and the outflow tract. Cell proliferation of cardiac progenitors was enhanced, whereas cardiac differentiation was unaffected by Pten deletion. Removal of Akt1 rescued the phenotype and early lethality of Pten deletion mice, suggesting that Akt1 was the key downstream target that was negatively regulated by PTEN in cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of FOXO by Akt1 suppressed the expression of the gene encoding the BMP ligand (BMP7), leading to dampened BMP signaling in the hearts of Pten deletion mice. Cardiac activation of Akt also increased the Ser552 phosphorylation of β-catenin, thus enhancing its activity. Reducing β-catenin levels could partially rescue heart defects of Pten deletion mice. We conclude that Akt signaling regulates the cell proliferation of SHF progenitors through coordination of BMP signaling and β-catenin activity.

  10. Nuclear movement regulated by non-Smad Nodal signaling via JNK is associated with Smad signaling during zebrafish endoderm specification.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Shunya; Aoki, Shun; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2017-09-25

    Although asymmetric nuclear positioning is observed during animal development, the regulation and significance of this nuclear positioning in cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Using zebrafish blastulae, we provide evidence that nuclear movement toward the yolk syncytial layer, which comprises extraembryonic tissue, occurs in the first endoderm specified cells during endoderm specification. Nodal signaling is essential for nuclear movement, whereas nuclear envelope proteins are involved in the movement through the microtubule formation. The positioning of the microtubule organizing center, which is proposed to be critical for nuclear movement, is regulated by Nodal signaling and nuclear envelope proteins. The non-Smad JNK signaling pathway, which is downstream of Nodal signaling, regulates nuclear movement independent of the Smad pathway, and this nuclear movement is associated with Smad signal transduction toward the nucleus. Our study provides insights into the function of nuclear movement in Smad signaling toward the nucleus, and could be applied to the control of Transforming Growth Factor-β signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Redox regulation of resveratrol-mediated switching of death signal into survival signal.

    PubMed

    Das, Samarjit; Khan, Nadeem; Mukherjee, Subhendu; Bagchi, Debasis; Gurusamy, Narasimman; Swartz, Harold; Das, Dipak K

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we determined the changes in the intracellular redox environment of the heart during ischemia and reperfusion and the effects of resveratrol on such changes. Because redox regulation by thioredoxin (Trx) plays a crucial role in signal transduction and cytoprotection against ROS, the effects of resveratrol on the changes in the amounts of thioredoxin were monitored in an attempt to determine the role of intracellular thioredoxin in resveratrol-mediated changes in intracellular redox environment and its role in resveratrol-mediated cardioprotection. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: group I, control (rats were gavaged with vehicle only); group II, rats were gavaged with 2.5 mg/kg body wt resveratrol per day for 10 days; group III, rats were given resveratrol for 10 days, but on the 7th day, they were treated with shRNA against Trx-1; group IV, rats were given resveratrol for 10 days, but were injected (iv) with cisplatin (1 mg/kg body wt) on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. In concert, two groups of mice (Dn-Trx-1) and a corresponding wild-type group were also gavaged with 2.5 mg/kg body wt resveratrol for 10 days. After 10 days, isolated rat and mouse hearts perfused via working mode were made globally ischemic for 30 min followed by 2 h of reperfusion. Ischemia/reperfusion developed an infarct size of about 40% and resulted in about 25% apoptotic cardiomyocytes, which were reduced by resveratrol. Cisplatin, but not shRNA-Trx-1, abolished the cardioprotective abilities of resveratrol. In the experiments with mouse hearts, similar to rat hearts, resveratrol significantly reduced the ischemia/reperfusion-mediated increase in infarct size and apoptosis in both groups. MDA formation, a presumptive marker for lipid peroxidation, was increased in the I/R group and reduced in the resveratrol group, and resveratrol-mediated reduction in MDA formation was abolished with cisplatin, but not with shRNA-Trx-1. I/R-induced reduction in GSH/GSSH ratio was

  12. Regulation of transcriptional bursting by a naturally oscillating signal.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Adam M; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2014-01-20

    Transcription is highly stochastic, occurring in irregular bursts. For temporal and spatial precision of gene expression, cells must somehow deal with this noisy behavior. To address how this is achieved, we investigated how transcriptional bursting is entrained by a naturally oscillating signal, by direct measurement of transcription together with signal dynamics in living cells. We identify a Dictyostelium gene showing rapid transcriptional oscillations with the same period as extracellular cAMP signaling waves. Bursting approaches antiphase to cAMP waves, with accelerating transcription cycles during differentiation. Although coupling between signal and transcription oscillations was clear at the pop