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Sample records for regulates surfactant phospholipid

  1. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  2. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  3. Fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant protein C in spread phospholipid monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1996-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex, secreted into the fluid lining of lungs prevents alveolar collapse at low lung volumes. Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C), an acylated, hydrophobic, alpha-helical peptide, enhances the surface activity of pulmonary surfactant lipids. Fluorescein-labeled SP-C (F-SP-C) (3, 6, 12 wt%) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and DPPC:dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) [DPPC:DPPG 7:3 mol/mol] in spread monolayers was studied by epifluorescence microscopy. Mass spectometry of F-SP-C indicated that the protein is partially deacylated and labeled with 1 mol fluorescein/1 mol protein. The protein partitioned into the fluid, or liquid expanded, phase. Increasing amounts of F-SP-C in DPPC or DPPC:DPPG monolayers decreased the size and total amounts of the condensed phase at all surface pressures. Calcium (1.6 mM) increased the amount of the condensed phase in monolayers of DPPC:DPPG but not of DPPC alone, and such monolayers were also perturbed by F-SP-C. The study indicates that SP-C perturbs the packing of neutral and anionic phospholipid monolayers even when the latter systems are condensed by calcium, indicating that interactions between SP-C and the lipids are predominantly hydrophobic in nature. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 PMID:8804608

  4. Surfactant protein B inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bonnie L.; Waite, B. Moseley; Veldhuizen, Ruud A.; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Seeds, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrolysis of surfactant phospholipids (PL) by secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) contributes to surfactant damage in inflammatory airway diseases such as acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. We and others have reported that each sPLA2 exhibits specificity in hydrolyzing different PLs in pulmonary surfactant and that the presence of hydrophilic surfactant protein A (SP-A) alters sPLA2-mediated hydrolysis. This report tests the hypothesis that hydrophobic SP-B also inhibits sPLA2-mediated surfactant hydrolysis. Three surfactant preparations were used containing varied amounts of SP-B and radiolabeled tracers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (PG): 1) washed ovine surfactant (OS) (pre- and postorganic extraction) compared with Survanta (protein poor), 2) Survanta supplemented with purified bovine SP-B (1–5%, wt/wt), and 3) a mixture of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (DPPC:POPC:POPG, 40:40:20) prepared as vesicles and monomolecular films in the presence or absence of SP-B. Hydrolysis of PG and PC by Group IB sPLA2 (PLA2G1A) was significantly lower in the extracted OS, which contains SP-B, compared with Survanta (P = 0.005), which is SP-B poor. Hydrolysis of PG and PC in nonextracted OS, which contains all SPs, was lower than both Survanta and extracted OS. When Survanta was supplemented with 1% SP-B, PG and PC hydrolysis by PLA2G1B was significantly lower (P < 0.001) than in Survanta alone. When supplemented into pure lipid vesicles and monomolecular films composed of PG and PC mixtures, SP-B also inhibited hydrolysis by both PLA2G1B and Group IIA sPLA2 (PLA2G2A). In films, PLA2G1B hydrolyzed surfactant PL monolayers at surface pressures ≤30 mN/m (P < 0.01), and SP-B lowered the surface pressure range at which hydrolysis can occur. These results suggest the hydrophobic SP, SP-B, protects alveolar surfactant PL from

  5. Mixed micelle formation between amino acid-based surfactants and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Célia M C; Calado, António R T; Garcia-Rio, Luís

    2011-07-15

    The mixed micelle formation in aqueous solutions between an anionic gemini surfactant derived from the amino acid cystine (C(8)Cys)(2), and the phospholipids 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, a micelle-forming phospholipid) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC, a vesicle-forming phospholipid) has been studied by conductivity and the results compared with the ones obtained for the mixed systems with the single-chain surfactant derived from cysteine, C(8)Cys. Phospholipid-surfactant interactions were found to be synergistic in nature and dependent on the type of phospholipid and on surfactant hydrophobicity. Regular solution theory was used to analyse the gemini surfactant-DHPC binary mixtures and the interaction parameter, β(12), has been evaluated, as well as mixed micelle composition. The results have been interpreted in terms of the interplay between reduction of the electrostatic repulsions among the ionic head groups of the surfactants and steric hindrances arising from incorporation of the zwitterionic phospholipids in the mixed micelles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of smoke inhalation on surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung.

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, M.; Moores, H. K.; Scott, J. E.; Janigan, D. T.; Hajela, R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of polyurethane foam. At 8 or 12 hours after exposure, surfactants were isolated separately from lung lavage (extracellular surfactant) and residual lung tissue (intracellular surfactant) for phospholipid analysis. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) was measured on a microsomal fraction prepared from the tissue homogenate. Smoke inhalation produced a twofold increase in extracellular surfactant total phospholipid. While there was no change in the total phospholipid or phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of the intracellular surfactant, smoke inhalation significantly decreased the disaturated species of PC (DSPC). The specific activity of PLA2 was reduced by more than 50% in both groups of exposed mice. Smoke inhalation appears to result in selective depletion of the DSPC of intracellular surfactant and PLA2 involved in its synthesis. This depletion may be compensated for by increased secretion or slower breakdown of the material present in the extracellular compartment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1987765

  7. Oxidized phospholipids derived from ozone-treated lung surfactant extract reduce macrophage and epithelial cell viability.

    PubMed

    Uhlson, Charis; Harrison, Kathleen; Allen, Corrie B; Ahmad, Shama; White, Carl W; Murphy, Robert C

    2002-07-01

    Ozone is known to be a highly toxic gas present in the urban air which exerts its effect on pulmonary tissue through its facile chemical reactions with target molecules in the airway. One of the first barriers encountered by ozone is epithelial lining fluid which contains pulmonary surfactant rich in glycerophosphocholine lipids. The reaction of ozone with calf lung surfactant extract was found to result in the production of 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0a/9-al-GPCho) as an expected product of the ozonolysis of abundant unsaturated phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acyl groups with a double bond at carbon-9. This oxidized phospholipid was identified as a biologically active product in that it reduced elicited macrophage viability by necrosis with an ED(50) of 6 microM. Further studies of the biological activity of 16:0a/9-al-GPCho revealed that concentrations from 100 to 200 nM initiated apoptosis in pulmonary epithelial-like A549 cells as assessed by TUNEL staining, nuclear size, and caspase-3 activation with loss of viability indicated by reduction of mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. The release of IL-8, a neutrophil chemokine, from A549 cells was also stimulated by 50-100 nM 16:0a/9-al-GPCho. Exposure of calf lung surfactant to low levels of ozone (62.5, 125, and 250 ppb) for various time periods from 2 to 48 h in a feedback-regulated ozone exposure chamber resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in the formation of 16:0a/9-al-GPCho as measured by a specific and sensitive LC/MS/MS assay. The quantity of this biologically active chain-shortened glycerophosphocholine lipid generated even at 125 ppb ozone for 2-4 h (50-100 nM) was consistent with this product mediating the toxic effects of ozone on cells in contact with surfactant.

  8. Phospholipid Composition in Synthetic Surfactants Is Important for Tidal Volumes and Alveolar Stability in Surfactant-Treated Preterm Newborn Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, Andrea; Linderholm, Bim; Haegerstrand-Björkman, Marie; Pioselli, Barbara; Pelizzi, Nicola; Johansson, Jan; Curstedt, Tore

    2016-01-01

    The development of synthetic surfactants for the treatment of lung pulmonary diseases has been going on for many years. To investigate the effects of phospholipid mixtures combined with SP-B and SP-C analogues on lung functions in an animal model of respiratory distress syndrome. Natural and synthetic phospholipid mixtures with/without SP-B and/or SP-C analogues were instilled in ventilated premature newborn rabbits. Lung functions were evaluated. Treatment with Curosurf or phospholipids from Curosurf combined with SP-B and SP-C analogues gave similar results. Treatment with phospholipids from adult rabbit lungs or liver combined with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG) gave tidal volumes (VT) well above physiological levels, but alveolar stability at end-expiration was only achieved when these phospholipids were combined with analogues of SP-B and SP-C. Treatment with egg yolk-PC mixed with DPPC with and without POPG gave small VT, but after addition of both analogues VT was only somewhat lower and lung gas volumes (LGV) similar to those obtained with Curosurf. Substitution of egg yolk-PC (≥99% PC) with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and combining them with DPPC, POPG and 2% each of the SP-B and SP-C analogue gave a completely synthetic surfactant with similar effects on VT and LGV as Curosurf. Phospholipid composition is important for VT while the SP-B and SP-C analogues increase alveolar stability at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactant consisting of unsaturated and saturated phosphatidylcholines, POPG and the analogues of SP-B and SP-C has similar activity as Curosurf regarding VT and LGV in an animal model using preterm newborn rabbits ventilated without positive end-expiratory pressure. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Membrane-surfactant interactions. The role of surfactant in mitochondrial complex III-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Valpuesta, J.M.; Arrondo, J.L.; Barbero, M.C.; Pons, M.; Goni, F.M.

    1986-05-15

    Complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase) was purified from beef heart mitochondria in the form of protein-phospholipid-Triton X-100 mixed micelles (about 1:80:100 molar ratio). Detergent may be totally removed by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and the resulting lipoprotein complexes retain full enzyme activity. In order to understand the role of surfactant in the mixed micelles, and the interaction of Triton X-100 with integral membrane proteins and phospholipid bilayers, both the protein-lipid-surfactant mixed micelles and the detergent-free lipoprotein system were examined from the point of view of particle size and ultrastructure, enzyme activity, tryptophan fluorescence quenching, 31P NMR, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NMR and IR spectroscopic studies show that surfactant withdrawal induces a profound change in phospholipid architecture, from a micellar to a lamellar-like phase. However, electron microscopic observations fail to reveal the existence of lipid bilayers in the absence of detergent. We suggest that, under these conditions, the lipid:protein molar ratio (80:1) is too low to permit the formation of lipid bilayer planes, but the relative orientation and mobility of phospholipids with respect to proteins is similar to that of the lamellar phase. Protein conformational changes are also detected as a consequence of surfactant removal. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates an increase of peptide beta-structure in the absence of Triton X-100; changes in the amide II/amide I intensity ratio are also detected, although the precise meaning of these observations is unclear.

  10. Pivotal role of anionic phospholipids in determining dynamic behavior of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ingenito, E P; Mora, R; Mark, L

    2000-03-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) are anionic phospholipids (APLs) present in lung surfactant of virtually all species studied, although their specific contribution to function is unknown. This study examines how APLs influence surfactant monolayer stability and adsorption under static and dynamic conditions. Interfacial properties of surfactants reconstituted with native phospholipids (PL), and phospholipids devoid of anionic species (DAPL), were characterized by pulsating bubble surfactometry. Measurements were made for PL and DAPL alone; with 3% surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B/C); with SP-B/C and 5% surfactant protein A (SP-A); and with SP-B/C, SP-A, and 8% neutral lipids (NL). Equilibrium and dynamic properties of PL and DAPL were similar. However, whereas (DAPL + SP-B/C) and (DAPL + SP-B/C + SP-A) mixtures were similar to corresponding PL mixtures with respect to gamma(equil), they displayed markedly different dynamic behavior. In particular, the degree of film compression required to reach gamma(min) was significantly increased in DAPL mixtures (80 to 90% area reduction) compared with PL, although both samples reached gamma(min) < 3.0 dynes/cm. The addition of NL to (DAPL + SP-B/C + SP-A) produced an increase in gamma(min) to 15 to 20 dynes/cm during dynamic compression, whereas NL had no significant impact on the behavior of (PL + SP-B/C + SP-A). Purified PG (5% wt/wt) restored nearly normal dynamic properties to (DAPL + SP-B/C + SP-A + NL), whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) (5% wt/wt) had no beneficial effect. These results suggest that APLs play a critical role in promoting surface film stability during dynamic compression through interactions with nonlipid surfactant components, and prevent destabilization of the surface film by cholesterol and other NL.

  11. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is not the major surfactant phospholipid species in all mammals.

    PubMed

    Lang, Carol J; Postle, Anthony D; Orgeig, Sandra; Possmayer, Fred; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Panda, Amiya K; Jürgens, Klaus D; Milsom, William K; Nag, Kaushik; Daniels, Christopher B

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, lowers the surface tension in terminal air spaces and is crucial for lung function. Within an animal species, surfactant composition can be influenced by development, disease, respiratory rate, and/or body temperature. Here, we analyzed the composition of surfactant in three heterothermic mammals (dunnart, bat, squirrel), displaying different torpor patterns, to determine: 1) whether increases in surfactant cholesterol (Chol) and phospholipid (PL) saturation occur during long-term torpor in squirrels, as in bats and dunnarts; 2) whether surfactant proteins change during torpor; and 3) whether PL molecular species (molsp) composition is altered. In addition, we analyzed the molsp composition of a further nine mammals (including placental/marsupial and hetero-/homeothermic contrasts) to determine whether phylogeny or thermal behavior determines molsp composition in mammals. We discovered that like bats and dunnarts, surfactant Chol increases during torpor in squirrels. However, changes in PL saturation during torpor may not be universal. Torpor was accompanied by a decrease in surfactant protein A in dunnarts and squirrels, but not in bats, whereas surfactant protein B did not change in any species. Phosphatidylcholine (PC)16:0/16:0 is highly variable between mammals and is not the major PL in the wombat, dunnart, shrew, or Tasmanian devil. An inverse relationship exists between PC16:0/16:0 and two of the major fluidizing components, PC16:0/16:1 and PC16:0/14:0. The PL molsp profile of an animal species is not determined by phylogeny or thermal behavior. We conclude that there is no single PL molsp composition that functions optimally in all mammals; rather, surfactant from each animal is unique and tailored to the biology of that animal.

  12. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products. PMID:21275641

  13. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Han, Gil-Soo

    2011-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with its full complement of organelles, synthesizes membrane phospholipids by pathways that are generally common to those found in higher eukaryotes. Phospholipid synthesis in yeast is regulated in response to a variety of growth conditions (e.g., inositol supplementation, zinc depletion, and growth stage) by a coordination of genetic (e.g., transcriptional activation and repression) and biochemical (e.g., activity modulation and localization) mechanisms. Phosphatidate (PA), whose cellular levels are controlled by the activities of key phospholipid synthesis enzymes, plays a central role in the transcriptional regulation of phospholipid synthesis genes. In addition to the regulation of gene expression, phosphorylation of key phospholipid synthesis catalytic and regulatory proteins controls the metabolism of phospholipid precursors and products.

  14. L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) enhances lung surfactant phospholipid flux in rabbit fetus

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, B.; Datta, S.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Steinberg, H.; Das, D.K.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone on surfactant phospholipid production in fetal lung was studied by simultaneously measuring the surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) content and its turnover in lamellar body and alveolar lavage fractions. Pregnant New Zealand white rabbits of 27 days' gestation were properly anesthetized and the uterus opened by a midline incision. Each fetus in each litter was injected with T/sub 3/ along with (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline. Control fetuses were injected with saline instead of T/sub 3/. PC was isolated from lamellar body and lung lavage from each fetus. Zilversmit equations for a two-compartment precursor-product model was used to analyze specific activity versus time curves and the turnover times for surfactant PC. Fluxes of surfactant PC were then calculated from its turnover times and pool sizes. The biological half-life for (/sup 14/C)-palmitate and (/sup 3/H)-choline labeled PC did not change by T/sub 3/ treatment. Turnover times for labeled palmitate and choline were 9.2 hr and 10.0 hr, respectively, for normal fetus and 6.0 hr and 5.8 hr, respectively, for T/sub 3/-treated fetus. While the pool size of PC recovered by the alveolar wash did not change significantly, T/sub 3/ enhanced the flux of this phospholipid from the lamellar bodies into alveolar space by 1.7 times within 4 hr. These results suggest that thyroid hormone may promote fetal lung development by enhancing the release of surfactant into the alveolar space.

  15. Phospholipid surfactant adsorption by respirable quartz and in vitro expression of cytotoxicity and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Keane, M J; Harrison, J C; Cilento, E V; Ong, T; Wallace, W E

    1998-08-01

    Respirable-sized quartz was treated with a saline dispersion of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a primary component of pulmonary surfactant, to model the adsorption of phospholipid surfactant onto quartz dust following particle deposition in the bronchoalveolar region of the lung. Control and surfactant-treated dusts were used to challenge lavaged rat pulmonary macrophages in vitro over a 1-week period, to determine the effects of adsorbed surfactant on the expression of quartz cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. DNA damage was determined by the single cell gel electrophoresis 'comet' assay. Untreated quartz induced DNA damage, increasing with dose and with time of incubation of dust with macrophages over a 5 day period. DPPC treatment of quartz suppressed DNA damage through 1 day of macrophage challenge. DNA damage then increased over a 5 day period, to approximately half the positive control (untreated quartz) values. Cytotoxicity was measured by trypan blue dye exclusion and by the Live-Dead fluorescence assay for cell viability. Cytotoxicity of surfactant-treated quartz measured one day after challenge of lavaged macrophages was suppressed to values near those of the negative controls, and then increased over a 1 week incubation period to levels near those expressed by native quartz positive controls. Quartz similarly treated with dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine mixed with DPPC substituted in one acyl group with a boron-containing fluorescent chromophore was used with confocal microscopy to measure particle-associated fluorescent surfactant in cells. Approximately half of the fluorescence intensity was lost over a 1 week period following challenge of lavaged macrophage. Results are discussed in terms of a model of restoration of quartz particle surface toxicity as prophylactic surfactant is removed from particle surface by cellular enzymatic digestion processes.

  16. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc depletion

    PubMed Central

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of phospholipids in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by zinc, an essential mineral required for growth and metabolism. Cells depleted of zinc contain increased levels of phosphatidylinositol and decreased levels of phosphatidylethanolamine. In addition to the major phospholipids, the levels of the minor phospholipids phosphatidate and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate decrease in the vacuole membrane of zinc-depleted cells. Alterations in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine can be ascribed to an increase in PIS1-encoded phosphatidylinositol synthase activity and to decreases in the activities of CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes including the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, respectively. Alterations in the minor vacuole membrane phospholipids are due to the induction of the DPP1-encoded diacylglycerol pyrophosphate phosphatase. These changes in the activities of phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes result from differential regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription. Under zinc-deplete conditions, the positive transcription factor Zap1p stimulates the expression of the DPP1 and PIS1 genes through the cis-acting element UASZRE. In contrast, the negative regulatory protein Opi1p, which is involved in inositol-mediated regulation of phospholipid synthesis, represses the expression of the CHO1 gene through the cis-acting element UASINO. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis may provide an important mechanism by which cells cope with the stress of zinc depletion, given the roles that phospholipids play in the structure and function of cellular membranes. PMID:16807089

  17. Molecular dynamics of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its metabolite interacting with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chavarría, Helmut I; Guizado, Teobaldo R C; Pimentel, Andre S

    2015-08-28

    The interaction of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its ultimate carcinogenic 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide with lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers was successfully performed using molecular dynamics. The DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol bilayer (64 : 64 : 2) was used as the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayer model and compared with the DPPC bilayer as a reference. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide were inserted in water and lipid phases in order to investigate their interactions with the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers. The radial distribution function between two P atoms in polar heads shows that the 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide affects the order between the P atoms in the DPPC/DPPG/cholesterol model more than dibenz[a,h]anthracene, which is a consequence of its preference for the polar heads and dibenz[a,h]anthracene prefers to be located in the hydrocarbon chain of the phospholipid bilayers. Dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide may form aggregates in water and lipid phases, and in the water-lipid interface. The implications for the possible effect of dibenz[a,h]anthracene and its 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide in the lung surfactant phospholipid bilayers are discussed.

  18. The interfacial interactions of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles with surfactants and phospholipids revealed through the fluorescent response.

    PubMed

    Bochkova, Olga D; Mustafina, Asiya R; Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Burilov, Vladimir A; Skripacheva, Viktoriya V; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Konovalov, Alexander I; Soloveva, Svetlana E; Antipin, Igor S

    2012-04-01

    The quenching effect of dyes (phenol red and bromothymol blue) on Tb(III)-centered luminescence enables to sense the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants near the silica surface of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles (SN) in aqueous solutions. The Tb-centered luminescence of non-decorated SNs is diminished by the inner filter effect of both dyes. The decoration of the silica surface by cationic surfactants induces the quenching through the energy transfer between silica coated Tb(III) complexes and dye anions inserted into surfactant aggregates. Thus the distribution of surfactants aggregates at the silica/water interface and in the bulk of solution greatly affects dynamic quenching efficiency. The displacement of dye anions from the interfacial surfactant adlayer by anionic surfactants and phospholipids is accompanied by the "off-on" switching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence.

  19. Anionic Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Inhibit Inflammatory Responses from Alveolar Macrophages and U937 Cells by Binding the Lipopolysaccharide-interacting Proteins CD14 and MD-2*♦

    PubMed Central

    Kuronuma, Koji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Nishitani, Chiaki; Chan, Edward D.; Kuroki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mari; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a major cause of acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome. Pulmonary surfactant is secreted as a complex mixture of lipids and proteins onto the alveolar surface of the lung. Surfactant phospholipids are essential in reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface and preventing alveolar collapse at the end of the respiratory cycle. In the present study, we determined that palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol, which are minor components of pulmonary surfactant, and synthetic dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol regulated the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages. The anionic lipids significantly inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production from rat and human alveolar macrophages and a U937 cell line by reducing the LPS-elicited phosphorylation of multiple intracellular protein kinases. The anionic lipids were also effective at attenuating inflammation when administered intratracheally to mice challenged with LPS. Binding studies revealed high affinity interactions between the palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol and the Toll-like receptor 4-interacting proteins CD14 and MD-2. Our data clearly identify important anti-inflammatory properties of the minor surfactant phospholipids at the environmental interface of the lung. PMID:19584052

  20. Negative allometry of docosahexaenoic acid in the fowl lung and pulmonary surfactant phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Szabó, A; Mézes, M; Balogh, K; Romvári, R; Horn, P; Fébel, Hedvig

    2012-06-01

    In a recent study (Comp. Biochem. Physiol. B. (2010)155: 301-308) we reported that the fatty acids (FA) of the avian (7 species) total lung phospholipids (PL) (i.e. lung parenchyma and surfactant together) provide allometric properties. To test whether this allometric scaling also occurs in either of the above components, in six gallinaceous species, in a body weight range from 150 g (Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix japonica) to 19 kg (turkey, Meleagris gallopavo) the PL FA composition (mol%) was determined in the pulmonary surfactant, in native and in thoroughly lavaged lungs (referred to as lung parenchyma). In all three components docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) showed significant and negative allometric scaling (B = -0.056, -0.17 and -0.1, respectively). Surfactant PLs provided further negative allometry for palmitic acid and the opposite was found for palmitoleate and arachidonate. In the lung parenchymal PLs increasing body weight was matched with shorter chain FAs (average FA chain length) and competing n6 and n3 end-product fatty acids (positive allometry for arachidonic acid and negative for DHA). Negative allometric scaling was found for the tissue malondialdehyde concentration in the native and lavaged lungs (B = -0.1582 and -0.1594, respectively). In these tissues strong correlation was found between the MDA concentration and DHA proportion (r = 0.439 and 0.679, respectively), denoting the role of DHA in shaping the allometric properties and influencing the extent of in vivo lipid peroxidation of membrane lipids in fowl lungs.

  1. Antidiabetic phospholipid-nuclear receptor complex reveals the mechanism for phospholipid-driven gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Musille, Paul M; Pathak, Manish C; Lauer, Janelle L; Hudson, William H; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2013-01-31

    The human nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) has an important role in controlling lipid and cholesterol homeostasis and is a potential target for the treatment of diabetes and hepatic diseases. LRH-1 is known to bind phospholipids, but the role of phospholipids in controlling LRH-1 activation remains highly debated. Here we describe the structure of both apo LRH-1 and LRH-1 in complex with the antidiabetic phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC). Together with hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS and functional data, our studies show that DLPC binding is a dynamic process that alters co-regulator selectivity. We show that the lipid-free receptor undergoes previously unrecognized structural fluctuations, allowing it to interact with widely expressed co-repressors. These observations enhance our understanding of LRH-1 regulation and highlight its importance as a new therapeutic target for controlling diabetes.

  2. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc.

    PubMed

    Iwanyshyn, Wendy M; Han, Gil-Soo; Carman, George M

    2004-05-21

    Zinc is an essential nutrient required for the growth and metabolism of eukaryotic cells. In this work, we examined the effects of zinc depletion on the regulation of phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Zinc depletion resulted in a decrease in the activity levels of the CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes phosphatidylserine synthase, phosphatidylserine decarboxylase, phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase, and phospholipid methyltransferase. In contrast, the activity of phosphatidylinositol synthase was elevated in response to zinc depletion. The level of Aut7p, a marker for the induction of autophagy, was also elevated in zinc-depleted cells. For the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, the reduction in activity in response to zinc depletion was controlled at the level of transcription. This regulation was mediated through the UAS(INO) element and by the transcription factors Ino2p, Ino4p, and Opi1p that are responsible for the inositol-mediated regulation of UAS(INO)-containing genes involved in phospholipid synthesis. Analysis of the cellular composition of the major membrane phospholipids showed that zinc depletion resulted in a 66% decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine and a 29% increase in phosphatidylinositol. A zrt1Delta zrt2Delta mutant (defective in the plasma membrane zinc transporters Zrt1p and Zrt2p) grown in the presence of zinc exhibited a phospholipid composition similar to that of wild type cells depleted for zinc. These results indicated that a decrease in the cytoplasmic levels of zinc was responsible for the alterations in phospholipid composition.

  3. Pulmonary toxicity of trichloroethylene: induction of changes in surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Scott, J E; Forkert, P G; Oulton, M; Rasmusson, M G; Temple, S; Fraser, M O; Whitefield, S

    1988-08-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common organic solvent in use as a dry cleaning agent as well as an inhalant anesthetic. Nevertheless the effects of this material on the pulmonary surfactant which prevents alveolar collapse at maximal expiration is not known. Therefore, we have examined the effect of TCE on the intra- and extracellular surfactant pools and the activity of phospholipase A2, an enzyme which controls the remodeling of phosphatidylcholine to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, the primary constituent of the pulmonary surfactant. Male CD-1 mice were treated ip with 2500 or 3000 mg/kg TCE. Twenty-four hours later mice were anesthetized and the lungs lavaged. Mice were then killed, the lungs perfused and excised, and subcellular fractions including lamellar bodies prepared. Some lungs were prepared for ultrastructural examination. Phospholipase A2 was assayed in all subcellular fractions. Phospholipid was assayed in the lavage (extracellular surfactant) and the lamellar bodies (intracellular surfactant). TCE (2500 mg/kg) caused selective exfoliation of Clara cells. However, only the dose of 3000 mg/kg TCE produced a significant decrease in the intracellular surfactant phospholipid. Minimal changes occurred in the phospholipid profiles. Phospholipase A2 specific activity was significantly decreased at both dosages within the lung microsomal fraction. In addition after treatment with 3000 mg/kg TCE the enzyme activity in the lamellar body fraction was significantly increased. These data suggest that inhalation of TCE may damage the enzymes which are responsible for synthesizing the pulmonary surfactant resulting in lower amounts of surfactant being stored and available for secretion into the alveolus.

  4. Phospholipid bilayer-perturbing properties underlying lysis induced by pH-sensitive cationic lysine-based surfactants in biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Daniele Rubert; Mitjans, Montserrat; Busquets, M Antonia; Pérez, Lourdes; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2012-08-14

    Amino acid-based surfactants constitute an important class of natural surface-active biomolecules with an unpredictable number of industrial applications. To gain a better mechanistic understanding of surfactant-induced membrane destabilization, we assessed the phospholipid bilayer-perturbing properties of new cationic lysine-based surfactants. We used erythrocytes as biomembrane models to study the hemolytic activity of surfactants and their effects on cells' osmotic resistance and morphology, as well as on membrane fluidity and membrane protein profile with varying pH. The antihemolytic capacity of amphiphiles correlated negatively with the length of the alkyl chain. Anisotropy measurements showed that the pH-sensitive surfactants, with the positive charge on the α-amino group of lysine, significantly increased membrane fluidity at acidic conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that surfactants induced significant degradation of membrane proteins in hypo-osmotic medium and at pH 5.4. By scanning electron microscopy examinations, we corroborated the interaction of surfactants with lipid bilayer. We found that varying the surfactant chemical structure is a way to modulate the positioning of the molecule inside bilayer and, thus, the overall effect on the membrane. Our work showed that pH-sensitive lysine-based surfactants significantly disturb the lipid bilayer of biomembranes especially at acidic conditions, which suggests that these compounds are promising as a new class of multifunctional bioactive excipients for active intracellular drug delivery.

  5. Phosphatidate phosphatase regulates membrane phospholipid synthesis via phosphatidylserine synthase.

    PubMed

    Carman, George M; Han, Gil-Soo

    2017-08-16

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae serves as a model eukaryote to elucidate the regulation of lipid metabolism. In exponentially growing yeast, a diverse set of membrane lipids are synthesized from the precursor phosphatidate via the liponucleotide intermediate CDP-diacylglycerol. As cells exhaust nutrients and progress into the stationary phase, phosphatidate is channeled via diacylglycerol to the synthesis of triacylglycerol. The CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase, which catalyzes the committed step in membrane phospholipid synthesis via CDP-diacylglycerol, and the PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the committed step in triacylglycerol synthesis are regulated throughout cell growth by genetic and biochemical mechanisms to control the balanced synthesis of membrane phospholipids and triacylglycerol. The loss of phosphatidate phosphatase activity (e.g., pah1Δ mutation) increases the level of phosphatidate and its conversion to membrane phospholipids by inducing Cho1 expression and phosphatidylserine synthase activity. The regulation of the CHO1 expression is mediated through the inositol-sensitive upstream activation sequence (UASINO), a cis-acting element for the phosphatidate-controlled Henry (Ino2-Ino4/Opi1) regulatory circuit. Consequently, phosphatidate phosphatase activity regulates phospholipid synthesis through the transcriptional regulation of the phosphatidylserine synthase enzyme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Time Resolved Studies of Interfacial Reactions of Ozone with Pulmonary Phospholipid Surfactants Using Field Induced Droplet Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W.; Goddard, William A.; Heath, James R.; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) at the air–liquid interface in negative ion mode using FIDI mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate unique characteristics of the heterogeneous reactions at the air–liquid interface. We observe the hydroxyhydroperoxide and the secondary ozonide as major products of POPG ozonolysis in the FIDI-MS spectra. These products are metastable and difficult to observe in the bulk phase, using standard electrospray ionization (ESI) for mass spectrometric analysis. We also present studies of the heterogeneous ozonolysis of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids at the air–liquid interface. A mixture of the saturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and unsaturated POPG is investigated in negative ion mode using FIDI-MS while a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) surfactant is studied in positive ion mode. In both cases FIDI-MS shows the saturated and unsaturated pulmonary surfactants form a mixed interfacial layer. Only the unsaturated phospholipid reacts with ozone, forming products that are more hydrophilic than the saturated phospholipid. With extensive ozonolysis only the saturated phospholipid remains at the droplet surface. Combining these experimental observations with the results of computational analysis provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a surfactant layer system

  7. Time resolved studies of interfacial reactions of ozone with pulmonary phospholipid surfactants using field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hugh I; Kim, Hyungjun; Shin, Young Shik; Beegle, Luther W; Goddard, William A; Heath, James R; Kanik, Isik; Beauchamp, J L

    2010-07-29

    Field induced droplet ionization mass spectrometry (FIDI-MS) comprises a soft ionization method to sample ions from the surface of microliter droplets. A pulsed electric field stretches neutral droplets until they develop dual Taylor cones, emitting streams of positively and negatively charged submicrometer droplets in opposite directions, with the desired polarity being directed into a mass spectrometer for analysis. This methodology is employed to study the heterogeneous ozonolysis of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) at the air-liquid interface in negative ion mode using FIDI mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate unique characteristics of the heterogeneous reactions at the air-liquid interface. We observe the hydroxyhydroperoxide and the secondary ozonide as major products of POPG ozonolysis in the FIDI-MS spectra. These products are metastable and difficult to observe in the bulk phase, using standard electrospray ionization (ESI) for mass spectrometric analysis. We also present studies of the heterogeneous ozonolysis of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated phospholipids at the air-liquid interface. A mixture of the saturated phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and unsaturated POPG is investigated in negative ion mode using FIDI-MS while a mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) surfactant is studied in positive ion mode. In both cases FIDI-MS shows the saturated and unsaturated pulmonary surfactants form a mixed interfacial layer. Only the unsaturated phospholipid reacts with ozone, forming products that are more hydrophilic than the saturated phospholipid. With extensive ozonolysis only the saturated phospholipid remains at the droplet surface. Combining these experimental observations with the results of computational analysis provides an improved understanding of the interfacial structure and chemistry of a surfactant layer system when

  8. The Collapse of Monolayers Containing Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Is Kinetically Determined

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenfei; Piknova, Barbora; Hall, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that during and after slow compressions of monomolecular films containing the complete set of purified phospholipids (PPL) from calf surfactant at an air/water interface, surface pressures (π) reach and sustain values that are remarkably high relative to expectations from simple systems with model lipids. Microscopy shows that the liquid-expanded, tilted-condensed, and collapsed phases are present together in the PPL films between 45 and 65 mN/m. The Gibbs phase rule restricts equilibrium coexistence of three phases to a single π for films with two components but not for more constituents. We therefore determined if the surprising stability of PPL reflects release from the thermodynamic restrictions of simple model systems by the presence of multiple components. Experiments with binary films containing dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine first tested the predictions of the phase rule. The onset of three-phase coexistence, determined by fluorescence microscopy, and its termination, established by relaxation of collapsing films on a captive bubble, occurred at similar π. Experiments for PPL using the same methods suggested that the three phases might coexist over a range of π, but limited to ∼2 mN/m, and extending below rather than above the coexistence π for the binary films. Our results show that the PPL films at high π must deviate from equilibrium and that they must then be metastable. PMID:15985424

  9. The collapse of monolayers containing pulmonary surfactant phospholipids is kinetically determined.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenfei; Piknova, Barbora; Hall, Stephen B

    2005-07-01

    Prior studies have shown that during and after slow compressions of monomolecular films containing the complete set of purified phospholipids (PPL) from calf surfactant at an air/water interface, surface pressures (pi) reach and sustain values that are remarkably high relative to expectations from simple systems with model lipids. Microscopy shows that the liquid-expanded, tilted-condensed, and collapsed phases are present together in the PPL films between 45 and 65 mN/m. The Gibbs phase rule restricts equilibrium coexistence of three phases to a single pi for films with two components but not for more constituents. We therefore determined if the surprising stability of PPL reflects release from the thermodynamic restrictions of simple model systems by the presence of multiple components. Experiments with binary films containing dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine first tested the predictions of the phase rule. The onset of three-phase coexistence, determined by fluorescence microscopy, and its termination, established by relaxation of collapsing films on a captive bubble, occurred at similar pi. Experiments for PPL using the same methods suggested that the three phases might coexist over a range of pi, but limited to approximately 2 mN/m, and extending below rather than above the coexistence pi for the binary films. Our results show that the PPL films at high pi must deviate from equilibrium and that they must then be metastable.

  10. Regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phospholipid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, M A; Homann, M J; Bae-Lee, M S; Carman, G M

    1986-01-01

    The addition of ethanolamine or choline to inositol-containing growth medium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type cells resulted in a reduction of membrane-associated phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) activity in cell extracts. The reduction of activity did not occur when inositol was absent from the growth medium. Under the growth conditions where a reduction of enzyme activity occurred, there was a corresponding qualitative reduction of enzyme subunit as determined by immunoblotting with antiserum raised against purified phosphatidylserine synthase. Water-soluble phospholipid precursors did not effect purified phosphatidylserine synthase activity. Phosphatidylserine synthase (activity and enzyme subunit) was not regulated by the availability of water-soluble phospholipid precursors in S. cerevisiae VAL2C(YEp CHO1) and the opi1 mutant. VAL2C(YEp CHO1) is a plasmid-bearing strain that over produces phosphatidylserine synthase activity, and the opi1 mutant is an inositol biosynthesis regulatory mutant. The results of this study suggest that the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase by the availability of phospholipid precursors occurs at the level of enzyme formation and not at the enzyme activity level. Furthermore, the regulation of phosphatidylserine synthase is coupled to inositol synthesis. Images PMID:3023284

  11. Dynamic properties of cationic diacyl-glycerol-arginine-based surfactant/phospholipid mixtures at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Neus; Pinazo, Aurora; Pérez, Lourdes; Pons, Ramon

    2010-02-16

    In this Article, we study the binary surface interactions of 1,2-dimyristoyl-rac-glycero-3-O-(N(alpha)-acetyl-L-arginine) hydrochloride (1414RAc) with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on 0.1 M sodium chloride solutions. 1414RAc is a novel monocationic surfactant that has potential applications as an antimicrobial agent, is biodegradable, and shows a toxicity activity smaller than that of other commercial cationic surfactants. DPPC phospholipid was used as a model membrane component. The dynamic surface tension of 1414RAc/DPPC aqueous dispersions injected into the saline subphase was followed by tensiometry. The layer formation for the mixtures is always accelerated with respect to DPPC, and surprisingly, the surface tension reduction is faster and reaches lower surface tension values at surfactant concentration below its critical micellar concentration (cmc). Interfacial dilational rheology properties of mixed films spread on the air/water interface were determined by the dynamic oscillation method using a Langmuir trough. The effect of surfactant mole fraction on the rheological parameters of 1414RAc/DPPC mixed monolayers was studied at a relative amplitude of area deformation of 5% and a frequency of 50 mHz. The monolayer viscoelasticity shows a nonideal mixing behavior with predominance of the surfactant properties. This nonideal behavior has been attributed to the prevalence of electrostatic interactions.

  12. Interactions of pulmonary surfactant protein A with phospholipid monolayers change with pH.

    PubMed Central

    Ruano, M L; Nag, K; Casals, C; Pérez-Gil, J; Keough, K M

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) labeled with Texas Red (TR-SP-A) with monolayers containing zwitterionic and acidic phospholipids has been studied at pH 7.4 and 4.5 using epifluorescence microscopy. At pH 7.4, TR-SP-A expanded the pi-A isotherms of film of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). It interacted at high concentration at the edges of condensed-expanded phase domains, and distributed evenly at lower concentration into the fluid phase with increasing pressure. At pH 4.5, TR-SP-A expanded DPPC monolayers to a slightly lower extent than at pH 7.4. It interacted primarily at the phase boundaries but it did not distribute into the fluid phase with increasing pressure. Films of DPPC/dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) 7:3 mol/mol were somewhat expanded by TR-SP-A at pH 7.4. The protein was distributed in aggregates only at the condensed-expanded phase boundaries at all surface pressures. At pH 4.5 TR-SP-A caused no expansion of the pi-A isotherm of DPPC/DPPG, but its fluorescence was relatively homogeneously distributed throughout the expanded phase at all pressures studied. These observations can be explained by a combination of factors including the preference for SP-A aggregates to enter monolayers at packing dislocations and their disaggregation in the presence of lipid under increasing pressure, together with the influence of pH on the aggregation state of SP-A and the interaction of SP-A with zwitterionic and acidic lipid. PMID:10465757

  13. Endogenous regulation of the functional duality of pahutoxin, a marine trunkfish surfactant.

    PubMed

    Kalmanzon, Eliahu; Rahamim, Yocheved; Carmeli, Shmuel; Barenholz, Yechezkel; Zlotkin, Eliahu

    2004-12-15

    Pahutoxin (PHN) is a long chain detergent-like quaternary ammonium cationic substance derived from defensive skin secretions of trunkfish. A recent study has revealed that PHN's ichthyotoxicity and its phospholipid membrane disruption effect are produced by two separate mechanisms, which presumably represent two separate physicochemical domains in the PHN molecule [Kalmanzon, E., Rahamim, Y., Barenholz, Y., Carmeli, S., Zlotkin, E., 2003. Receptor-mediated toxicity of pahutoxin, a marine trunkfish surfactant. Toxicon 42, 63-71]. Here we report on the occurrence of a natural endogenous mechanism, which regulates the above PHN's functional duality. The regulation is performed by the aid of two separates constituents of the trunkfish secretion, which either selectively amplify PHN's ichthyotoxicity (factor I) or suppress its phospholipids permeabilization effect (factor II). The ecological significance of such endogenous regulation is discussed.

  14. Sorption of Cationic Surfactants to Artificial Cell Membranes: Comparing Phospholipid Bilayers with Monolayer Coatings and Molecular Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the distribution coefficient between phospholipid bilayer membranes and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium (DMW,PBS) for 19 cationic surfactants. The method used a sorbent dilution series with solid supported lipid membranes (SSLMs). The existing SSLM protocol, applying a 96 well plate setup, was adapted to use 1.5 mL glass autosampler vials instead, which facilitated sampling and circumvented several confounding loss processes for some of the cationic surfactants. About 1% of the phospholipids were found to be detached from the SSLM beads, resulting in nonlinear sorption isotherms for compounds with log DMW values above 4. Renewal of the medium resulted in linear sorption isotherms. DMW values determined at pH 5.4 demonstrated that cationic surfactant species account for the observed DMW,PBS. Log DMW,PBS values above 5.5 are only experimentally feasible with lower LC-MS/MS detection limits and/or concentrated extracts of the aqueous samples. Based on the number of carbon atoms, dialkylamines showed a considerably lower sorption affinity than linear alkylamine analogues. These SSLM results closely overlapped with measurements on a chromatographic tool based on immobilized artificial membranes (IAM-HPLC) and with quantum-chemistry based calculations with COSMOmic. The SSLM data suggest that IAM-HPLC underestimates the DMW of ionized primary and secondary alkylamines by 0.8 and 0.5 log units, respectively. PMID:28187261

  15. Sorption of Cationic Surfactants to Artificial Cell Membranes: Comparing Phospholipid Bilayers with Monolayer Coatings and Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Niels; Droge, Steven T J

    2017-03-07

    This study reports the distribution coefficient between phospholipid bilayer membranes and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) medium (DMW,PBS) for 19 cationic surfactants. The method used a sorbent dilution series with solid supported lipid membranes (SSLMs). The existing SSLM protocol, applying a 96 well plate setup, was adapted to use 1.5 mL glass autosampler vials instead, which facilitated sampling and circumvented several confounding loss processes for some of the cationic surfactants. About 1% of the phospholipids were found to be detached from the SSLM beads, resulting in nonlinear sorption isotherms for compounds with log DMW values above 4. Renewal of the medium resulted in linear sorption isotherms. DMW values determined at pH 5.4 demonstrated that cationic surfactant species account for the observed DMW,PBS. Log DMW,PBS values above 5.5 are only experimentally feasible with lower LC-MS/MS detection limits and/or concentrated extracts of the aqueous samples. Based on the number of carbon atoms, dialkylamines showed a considerably lower sorption affinity than linear alkylamine analogues. These SSLM results closely overlapped with measurements on a chromatographic tool based on immobilized artificial membranes (IAM-HPLC) and with quantum-chemistry based calculations with COSMOmic. The SSLM data suggest that IAM-HPLC underestimates the DMW of ionized primary and secondary alkylamines by 0.8 and 0.5 log units, respectively.

  16. Lung Surfactant Levels are Regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by Monitoring Surfactant Protein D

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta+/+ and Ig-Hepta−/− mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  17. Studies on pulmonary surfactant. Effects of cortisol administration to fetal rabbits on lung phospholipid content, composition and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rooney, S A; Gobran, L; Gross, I; Wai-lee, T S; Nardone, L L; Motoyama, E K

    1976-11-19

    Corticosteroids are known to accelerate maturation of the fetal lung and production of surfactant. We examined the effect of cortisol administration to fetal rabbits on the phospholipid content and composition of lung lavage and lung tissue, as well as on the activities of enzymes involved in the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, the major surface-active components of surfactant. Cortisol was administered by intrauterine injection at 25 days' gestation and the fetuses were delivered at 27 days (full term, 31 days). Saline-injected fetuses, littermates of the cortisol-treated as well as non-littermates, were used as controls. The amount of phospholipid in lung lavage from the hormone-treated fetuses was almost double that of the saline-injected controls and was similar to that of an untreated fetus of more than 30 days' gestation. Similarly, the phospholipid composition of lung lavage from the hormone-treated fetuses was similar to that of an untreated fetus at a greater gestational age. These data, therefore, suggest that cortisol acts by accelerating physiological development. Cortisol administratration stimulated the activity of cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase and lysolecithin acyltransferase to a small, but statistically significant extent. This is also consistent with an acceleration of normal development. The stimulation of lysolecithin acyltransferase is of interest, since this enzyme is believed to be involved in the synthesis of dipalmitoylglycerophosphocholine, the major surface-active species of phosphatidylcholine. Cortisol administration had no effect on the activities of pulmonary choline kinase, cholinephosphotransferase, lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase and glycerolphosphate phosphatidyltranferase, although we have previously shown the latter enzyme to be stimulated following a longer period of exposure to the hormone. Saline injection produced some maturational effects presumably as a result of stress, which may

  18. Phospholipid packing and hydration in pulmonary surfactant membranes and films as sensed by LAURDAN.

    PubMed

    Picardi, M Victoria; Cruz, Antonio; Orellana, Guillermo; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2011-03-01

    The efficiency of pulmonary surfactant to stabilize the respiratory surface depends critically on the ability of surfactant to form highly packed films at the air-liquid interface. In the present study we have compared the packing and hydration properties of lipids in native pulmonary surfactant and in several surfactant models by analyzing the pressure and temperature dependence of the fluorescence emission of the LAURDAN (1-[6-(dimethylamino)-2-naphthyl]dodecan-1-one) probe incorporated into surfactant interfacial films or free-standing membranes. In interfacial films, compression-driven changes in the fluorescence of LAURDAN, evaluated from the generalized polarization function (GPF), correlated with changes in packing monitored by surface pressure. Compression isotherms and GPF profiles of films formed by native surfactant or its organic extract were compared at 25 or 37 °C to those of films made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC), DPPC/phosphatidylglycerol (PG) (7:3, w/w), or the mixture DPPC/POPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/cholesterol (Chol) (50:25:15.10), which simulates the lipid composition of surfactant. In general terms, compression of surfactant films at 25 °C leads to LAURDAN GPF values close to those obtained from pure DPPC monolayers, suggesting that compressed surfactant films reach a dehydrated state of the lipid surface, which is similar to that achieved in DPPC monolayers. However, at 37 °C, the highest GPF values were achieved in films made of full surfactant organic extract or the mixture DPPC/POPC/POPG/Chol, suggesting a potentially important role of cholesterol to ensure maximal packing/dehydration under physiological constraints. Native surfactant films reached high pressures at 37 °C while maintaining relatively low GPF, suggesting that the complex three-dimensional structures formed by whole surfactant might withstand the highest pressures without necessarily achieving

  19. Effects of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures on rheology of gum tragacanth - possible application for surfactant action on mucus gel simulants.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, R; Puniyani, R R

    2000-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of specialised biomaterials consisting of clove oil- phospholipid mixtures as possible substitute surfactants in diseases of altered mucus viscosity by studying their effect on the viscosity of mucus gel simulants in vitro. Test surfactants consisting of phospholipid-clove oil mixtures in the ratio of 1 part of oil to 9 parts of phospholipid were prepared. The phospholipids used were dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and binary mixtures of PC: PE and PC: PG in the ratio of 2 parts of PC to 3 parts of PE or PG. The effects of the phospholipid-clove oil mixtures on the viscosity of mucus gel simulant (MGS: a polymeric gel consisting predominantly of gum tragacanth and simulating respiratory mucus), was studied by application of steady shear rates ranging from 0.512 to 51.2/s in a concentric cylinder viscometer at 37 degrees C. The change in MGS viscosity, after incubation with surfactants, was found to have a non-Newtonian character and to follow the power law model with R2 values >0.8. The addition of clove oil-phospholipid mixtures caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity when compared with the effect of the phospholipid alone at low shear rates in case of PC, PG and PCPG. The combination of PC : PG with clove oil caused ratios of change in MGS viscosity < 1 i.e., caused a decrease in the MGS viscosity. PC: PG with clove oil was capable of lowering MGS viscosity and should be further researched as possible therapies for diseases of altered mucus rheology.

  20. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Nanoparticle self-assembly in mixtures of phospholipids with styrene/maleic acid copolymers or fluorinated surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Carolyn; Arenas, Rodrigo Cuevas; Frotscher, Erik; Keller, Sandro

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and synthetic membranes and membrane proteins. Considerable efforts are currently underway to replace conventional detergents by milder alternatives such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers and fluorinated surfactants. However, these compounds and their nanosized assemblies remain poorly understood as regards their interactions with lipid membranes, particularly, the thermodynamics of membrane partitioning and solubilisation. Using 19F and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, static and dynamic light scattering, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have systematically investigated the aggregational state of a zwitterionic bilayer-forming phospholipid upon exposure to an SMA polymer with a styrene/maleic acid ratio of 3 : 1 or to a fluorinated octyl phosphocholine derivative called F6OPC. The lipid interactions of SMA(3 : 1) and F6OPC can be thermodynamically conceptualised within the framework of a three-stage model that treats bilayer vesicles, discoidal or micellar nanostructures, and the aqueous solution as distinct pseudophases. The exceptional solubilising power of SMA(3 : 1) is reflected in very low membrane-saturating and solubilising polymer/lipid molar ratios of 0.10 and 0.15, respectively. Although F6OPC saturates bilayers at an even lower molar ratio of 0.031, this nondetergent does not solubilise lipids even at >1000-fold molar excess, thus highlighting fundamental differences between these two types of mild membrane-mimetic systems. We rationalise these findings in terms of a new classification of surfactants based on bilayer-to-micelle transfer free energies and discuss practical implications for membrane-protein research.Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and

  2. Nanoparticle self-assembly in mixtures of phospholipids with styrene/maleic acid copolymers or fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Carolyn; Arenas, Rodrigo Cuevas; Frotscher, Erik; Keller, Sandro

    2015-12-28

    Self-assembling nanostructures in aqueous mixtures of bilayer-forming lipids and micelle-forming surfactants are relevant to in vitro studies on biological and synthetic membranes and membrane proteins. Considerable efforts are currently underway to replace conventional detergents by milder alternatives such as styrene/maleic acid (SMA) copolymers and fluorinated surfactants. However, these compounds and their nanosized assemblies remain poorly understood as regards their interactions with lipid membranes, particularly, the thermodynamics of membrane partitioning and solubilisation. Using (19)F and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, static and dynamic light scattering, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we have systematically investigated the aggregational state of a zwitterionic bilayer-forming phospholipid upon exposure to an SMA polymer with a styrene/maleic acid ratio of 3 : 1 or to a fluorinated octyl phosphocholine derivative called F(6)OPC. The lipid interactions of SMA(3 : 1) and F(6)OPC can be thermodynamically conceptualised within the framework of a three-stage model that treats bilayer vesicles, discoidal or micellar nanostructures, and the aqueous solution as distinct pseudophases. The exceptional solubilising power of SMA(3 : 1) is reflected in very low membrane-saturating and solubilising polymer/lipid molar ratios of 0.10 and 0.15, respectively. Although F(6)OPC saturates bilayers at an even lower molar ratio of 0.031, this nondetergent does not solubilise lipids even at >1000-fold molar excess, thus highlighting fundamental differences between these two types of mild membrane-mimetic systems. We rationalise these findings in terms of a new classification of surfactants based on bilayer-to-micelle transfer free energies and discuss practical implications for membrane-protein research.

  3. Coordinate regulation of phospholipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: pleiotropically constitutive opi1 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Klig, L S; Homann, M J; Carman, G M; Henry, S A

    1985-01-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae opi1 mutant, which excretes inositol and is constitutive for the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase (M. Greenberg, P. Goldwasser, and S. Henry, Mol. Gen. Genet. 186:157-163, 1982), was examined and compared to that of a wild-type strain. In wild-type S. cerevisiae, the phospholipid composition and the relative rates of synthesis of individual phospholipids change in response to the availability of exogenous supplies of soluble phospholipid precursors, particularly inositol. The opi1 mutant, in contrast, displays a relatively invariant phospholipid composition, and its pattern of phospholipid synthesis does not change in response to exogenous phospholipid precursors. Phosphatidylinositol synthase was not found to be regulated in either wild-type or opi1 cells. In wild-type cells, phosphatidylserine synthase and the phospholipid N-methyltransferases are coordinately repressed in response to a combination of inositol and choline. However, in opi1 cells these activities are expressed constitutively. These results suggest that the gene product of the OPI1 locus participates in the coordinate regulation of phospholipid synthesis. Images PMID:3888957

  4. Physiological regulation of phospholipid methylation alters plasma homocysteine in mice.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, René L; Stead, Lori M; Devlin, Cecilia; Tabas, Ira; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T; Vance, Dennis E

    2005-08-05

    Biological methylation reactions and homocysteine (Hcy) metabolism are intimately linked. In previous work, we have shown that phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, an enzyme that methylates phosphatidylethanolamine to form phosphatidylcholine, plays a significant role in the regulation of plasma Hcy levels through an effect on methylation demand (Noga, A. A., Stead, L. M., Zhao, Y., Brosnan, M. E., Brosnan, J. T., and Vance, D. E. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 5952-5955). We have further investigated methylation demand and Hcy metabolism in liver-specific CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase-alpha (CTalpha) knockout mice, since flux through the phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase pathway is increased 2-fold to meet hepatic demand for phosphatidylcholine. Our data show that plasma Hcy is elevated by 20-40% in mice lacking hepatic CTalpha. CTalpha-deficient hepatocytes secrete 40% more Hcy into the medium than do control hepatocytes. Liver activity of betaine:homocysteine methyltransferase and methionine adenosyltransferase are elevated in the knockout mice as a mechanism for maintaining normal hepatic S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels. These data suggest that phospholipid methylation in the liver is a major consumer of AdoMet and a significant source of plasma Hcy.

  5. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in phosphatidylserine synthase-deficient (chol) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Letts, V A; Henry, S A

    1985-01-01

    chol mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are deficient in the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylserine owing to lowered activity of the membrane-associated enzyme phosphatidylserine synthase. chol mutants are auxotrophic for ethanolamine or choline and, in the absence of these supplements, cannot synthesize phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine (PC). We exploited these characteristics of the chol mutants to examine the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Macromolecular synthesis and phospholipid metabolism were examined in chol cells starved for ethanolamine. As expected, when chol mutants were starved for ethanolamine, the rates of synthesis of the phospholipids phosphatidylethanolamine and PC declined rapidly. Surprisingly, however, coupled to the decline in PC biosynthesis was a simultaneous decrease in the overall rate of phospholipid synthesis. In particular, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylinositol decreased in parallel with the decline in PC biosynthesis. The results obtained suggest that the slowing of PC biosynthesis in ethanolamine-starved chol cells leads to a coordinated decrease in the synthesis of all phospholipids. However, under conditions of ethanolamine deprivation in chol cells, the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase could not be repressed by exogenous inositol, and the endogenous synthesis of the phospholipid precursor inositol appeared to be elevated. The implications of these findings with respect to the coordinated regulation of phospholipid synthesis are discussed. Images PMID:2991194

  6. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy of surfactants and phospholipid monolayers at liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, Beth L.; Walker, R. A.; Gragson, D. E.; Hannon, T. E.; Richmond, Geraldine L.

    1998-04-01

    Work from our laboratory on vibrational sum frequency spectroscopic investigations of molecular ordering at the carbon tetrachloride-water interface is reviewed. Simple charged surfactants adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface are seen to induce alignment of interfacial water molecules to a degree which is dependent on the induced surface potential. Saturation of water molecule alignment occurs at a surfactant surface concentration corresponding to a calculated surface potential of approximately 160 mV. In complementary studies, the relative degree of hydrocarbon chain ordering within monolayers of symmetric phosphatidylcholines of different chain lengths is inferred by the relative signal contributions of the methyl and methylene symmetric stretch modes. The degree of hydrocarbon chain disorder observed depends strongly on the method of monolayer preparation. By one method, a decrease in hydrocarbon chain order is seen with increasing chain length. Another method of monolayer formation yielded very well ordered hydrocarbon chains for the longest chain phosphatidylcholine studied, and showed much greater disorder in shorter chain species which was comparable to the other preparation method. These studies are a foundation for further work with this technique geared towards understanding molecular-level structural features in membrane-like assemblies and surface biochemical interactions of relevance to biomedical research.

  7. Spectral properties of two betaine-type cyanine dyes in surfactant micelles and in the presence of phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorowicz, Antoni; Mora, Czesław; Jabłonka, Stanisław; Poła, Andrzej; Modrzycka, Teresa; Mosiądz, Daniela; Michalak, Krystyna

    2005-06-01

    The interaction of two betaine-type cyanine dyes: 3,3 '-disulfopropyl-4,5,4 ',5 '-dibenzo-9-ethyl-thiacarbocyanine ( I) and 3,3 '-disulfobutyl-5,5 '-diphenyl-9-ethyl-oxacarbocyanine ( II) with ionic surfactants [sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), dimethyl-hexadecyl-ammonio-propanesulphonate (HPS)] and with dispersions of naturally occurring phospholipids [phosphatidylethanoloamine (PE), phosphatidylserine (PS) and lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC)] has been studied by electronic absorption and fluorescence measurements. It was found that micelles of CTAC, SDS, HPS, LPC and bilayers of PS bind the dyes mainly as monomer species. The binding results in strong fluorescence enhancement. In all cases the absorption and fluorescence maxima of the monomers shift to lower frequencies as their local effective polarity decreases. In the presence of PE, PS with Ca 2+ and CTAC below critical micelle concentration (cmc) cyanine II forms highly fluorescent J-aggregates, which was demonstrated by the appearance of a new intense J-absorption band at lower frequencies than the monomer band and strong fluorescence with very small Stokes shift. In cases when both, monomer and J-aggregate are present in the system, dual fluorescence was observed. It seems that both dyes may serve as a valuable molecular probes for detection of micelles and changes of biomembrane structure.

  8. Comparison of a phospholipid-based protein-free surfactant and a natural bovine surfactant (SURVANTA) during pressure and volume-controlled ventilation in an improved rabbit fetus model.

    PubMed

    Häfner, D; Kilian, U; Bühler, R; Beume, R; Habel, R

    1993-03-01

    During pressure- or volume-controlled ventilation different surfactant preparations were compared in an improved rabbit fetus model. Based on a self-designed software program, this model enables on-line registration of lung mechanics and heart rate in up to ten fetuses. Using a commercially available bovine lung surfactant (SURVANTA) as standard, we compared animals treated with a protein-free surfactant preparation containing only phospholipids, PL (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine:palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol++ +, DPPC:POPG 70:30) plus palmitic acid (PA) with an untreated ventilated control group. During pressure-controlled ventilation the insufflation pressure (IP) was decreased and increased stepwise with and without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). SURVANTA was significantly more potent than PL plus PA and both differed significantly from the untreated controls. With additional PEEP the differences between SURVANTA and PL+PA disappeared but the differences to the controls were still present. We found that, with additional PEEP, active natural surfactants lead to ECG-irregularities, which indicates that PEEP influences pulmonary and cardiovascular function and compromises the benefits of surfactant therapy. Also during volume-controlled ventilation SURVANTA was superior to PL+PA and the untreated controls. In order to raise the level of activity of pure PL mixtures to that of natural bovine surfactants, we suggest that a surface active protein (probably SP-C) must be added to such mixtures.

  9. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    SciTech Connect

    Klig, L.S.; Friedli, L.; Schmid, E. )

    1990-08-01

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed.

  10. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in phosphatidylserine synthase-deficient (chol) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, V.A.; Henry, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants, chol, are deficient in the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylserine owing to lowered activity of the membrane-associated enzyme phosphatidylserine synthase. These mutants are auxotrophic for ethanolamine or choline and, in the absence of these supplements, cannot synthesize phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine (PC). The authors exploited these characteristics of the chol mutants to examine the regulation of phospholipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Macromolecular synthesis and phospholipid metabolism were examined in chol cells starved for ethanolamine. Coupled to the decline in PC biosynthesis was a simultaneous decrease in the overall rate of phospholipid synthesis. In particular, the rate of synthesis of phosphatidylinositol decreased in parallel with the decline in PC biosynthesis. However, under conditions of ethanolamine deprivation in chol cells, the cytoplasmic enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase could not be repressed by exogenous inositol, and the endogenous synthesis of the phospholipid precursor inositol appeared to be elevated. The implications of these findings with respect to the coordinated regulation of phospholipid synthesis are discussed.

  11. A microfluidic-based bubble generation platform enables analysis of physical property change in phospholipid surfactant layers by interfacial ozone reaction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Choi, Tae Su; Kim, Hyungjun; Beauchamp, J L; Heath, James R; Kim, Hugh I

    2012-12-21

    The air-liquid interface filled with pulmonary surfactant is a unique feature of our lung alveoli. The mechanical properties of this interface play an important role in breathing and its malfunction induced by an environmental hazard, such as ozone, relates to various lung diseases. In order to understand the interfacial physics of the pulmonary surfactant system, we employed a microfluidic bubble generation platform with a model pulmonary surfactant composed of two major phospholipids: DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine) and POPG (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-phosphatidylglycerol). With fluorescence imaging, we observed the ozone-induced chemical modification of the unsaturated lipid component of the lipid mixture, POPG. This chemical change due to the oxidative stress was further utilized to study the physical characteristics of the interface through the bubble formation process. The physical property change was evaluated through the oscillatory behaviour of the monolayer, as well as the bubble size and formation time. The results presented demonstrate the potential of this platform to study interfacial physics of lung surfactant system under various environmental challenges, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  12. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  13. Photoionization of chlorophyll a in rapidly frozen phospholipid vesicle solutions: Effects of phospholipid headgroup variation and addition of synthetic charged surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-03-09

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) has been applied to measure the photoionization yield of chlorophyll a (Chla) after red-light irradiation with or without electron scavengers in frozen phospholipid vesicles differing in the nature of their headgroups. Along with the Chla monomeric cation, oligomeric cations have been detected. For anionic headgroups the photoionization yield is found to be half or less than that observed with the zwitterionic choline headgroup. A decrease of the yield is also observed when increasing amounts of anionic sodium dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) are added to vary the surface charge of mixed vesicles. Electron spin echo (ESE) experiments in samples prepared with tetrabromo-P-benzoquinone (TBBQ) showed that the average location of the TBBQ radical anion is not sensitive to DHP addition. At low Chla concentration, the photoionization yield is increased more than 2-fold in dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) cationic vesicles, prepared in pure water without electron scavengers, compared to the yield in similar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), vesicles. An increase in yield is also seen in mixed DPPC/DODAC vesicles at low Chla concentration. The results are discussed in terms of electrostatic barriers influencing electron transfer.

  14. Environmental hyperosmolality regulates phospholipid biosynthesis in the renal epithelial cell line MDCK

    PubMed Central

    Casali, Cecilia I.; Weber, Karen; Favale, Nicolás O.; Tome, María C. Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Hyperosmolality is a key signal for renal physiology. On the one hand, it contributes to the differentiation of renal medullary structures and to the development of the urinary concentrating mechanism. On the other, it is a stress factor. In both cases, hyperosmolality activates processes that require an adequate extension of cellular membranes. In the present work, we examined whether hyperosmolality regulates phospholipid biosynthesis, which is needed for the membrane biogenesis in the renal epithelial cell line Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). Because phospholipids are the structural determinants of all cell membranes, we evaluated their content, synthesis, and regulation in MDCK cultures subjected to different hyperosmotic concentrations of NaCl, urea, or both. Hyperosmolality increased phospholipid content in a concentration-dependent manner. Such an effect was exclusively due to changes in NaCl concentration and occurred at the initial stage of hyperosmolar treatment concomitantly with the expression of the osmoprotective protein COX-2. The hypertonic upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis, the main constituent of all cell membranes, involved the transcriptional activation of two main regulatory enzymes, choline kinase (CK) and cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) and required ERK1/2 activation. Considering that physiologically, renal medullary cells are constantly exposed to high and variable NaCl, these findings could contribute to explaining how renal cells could maintain cellular integrity even in a nonfavorable environment. PMID:23269393

  15. An Unrecognized Function of Cholesterol: Regulating the Mechanism Controlling Membrane Phospholipid Asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Koshino, Ichiro; Kamata, Kotoe; Hale, John; Mohandas, Narla; Manno, Sumie; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    An asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in the membrane bilayer is inseparable from physiological functions, including shape preservation and survival of erythrocytes, and by implication other cells. Aminophospholipids, notably phosphatidylserine (PS), are confined to the inner leaflet of the erythrocyte membrane lipid bilayer by the ATP-dependent flippase enzyme, ATP11C, counteracting the activity of an ATP-independent scramblase. Phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), a single-transmembrane protein, was previously reported to possess scrambling activity in erythrocytes. However, its function was cast in doubt by the retention of scramblase activity in erythrocytes of knockout mice lacking this protein. We show that in the human erythrocyte PLSCR1 is the predominant scramblase and by reconstitution into liposomes that its activity resides in the transmembrane domain. At or below physiological intracellular calcium concentrations, total suppression of flippase activity nevertheless leaves the membrane asymmetry undisturbed. When liposomes or erythrocytes are depleted of cholesterol (a reversible process in the case of erythrocytes), PS quickly appears at the outer surface, implying that cholesterol acts in the cell as a powerful scramblase inhibitor. Thus, our results bring to light a previously unsuspected function of cholesterol in regulating phospholipid scrambling. PMID:27267274

  16. Phosphatidate phosphatase plays role in zinc-mediated regulation of phospholipid synthesis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Fakas, Stylianos; Pascual, Florencia; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Carman, George M

    2012-01-06

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of phospholipids is coordinately regulated by mechanisms that control the homeostasis of the essential mineral zinc (Carman, G.M., and Han, G. S. (2007) Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc depletion. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1771, 322-330; Eide, D. J. (2009) Homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 18565-18569). The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine is balanced by the repression of CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes and the induction of Kennedy pathway enzymes. PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase catalyzes the penultimate step in triacylglycerol synthesis, and the diacylglycerol generated in the reaction may also be used for phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. In this work, we showed that the expression of PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase was induced by zinc deficiency through a mechanism that involved interaction of the Zap1p zinc-responsive transcription factor with putative upstream activating sequence zinc-responsive elements in the PAH1 promoter. The pah1Δ mutation resulted in the derepression of the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzyme) and loss of the zinc-mediated regulation of the enzyme. Loss of phosphatidate phosphatase also resulted in the derepression of the CKI1-encoded choline kinase (Kennedy pathway enzyme) but decreased the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine when cells were deficient of zinc. This result confirmed the role phosphatidate phosphatase plays in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway.

  17. Phosphatidate Phosphatase Plays Role in Zinc-mediated Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Cardalda, Aníbal; Fakas, Stylianos; Pascual, Florencia; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the synthesis of phospholipids is coordinately regulated by mechanisms that control the homeostasis of the essential mineral zinc (Carman, G.M., and Han, G. S. (2007) Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by zinc depletion. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1771, 322–330; Eide, D. J. (2009) Homeostatic and adaptive responses to zinc deficiency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 18565–18569). The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine is balanced by the repression of CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzymes and the induction of Kennedy pathway enzymes. PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase catalyzes the penultimate step in triacylglycerol synthesis, and the diacylglycerol generated in the reaction may also be used for phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. In this work, we showed that the expression of PAH1-encoded phosphatidate phosphatase was induced by zinc deficiency through a mechanism that involved interaction of the Zap1p zinc-responsive transcription factor with putative upstream activating sequence zinc-responsive elements in the PAH1 promoter. The pah1Δ mutation resulted in the derepression of the CHO1-encoded phosphatidylserine synthase (CDP-diacylglycerol pathway enzyme) and loss of the zinc-mediated regulation of the enzyme. Loss of phosphatidate phosphatase also resulted in the derepression of the CKI1-encoded choline kinase (Kennedy pathway enzyme) but decreased the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine when cells were deficient of zinc. This result confirmed the role phosphatidate phosphatase plays in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. PMID:22128164

  18. Vacuolar ATPase Regulates Surfactant Secretion in Rat Alveolar Type II Cells by Modulating Lamellar Body Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Mishra, Amarjit; Su, Lijing; Wang, Yang; Ayalew, Sahlu; Hartson, Steven D.; Liu, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) is the enzyme responsible for pumping H+ into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase) dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1), an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca2+ release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca2+ mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion. PMID:20169059

  19. Stachybotrys chartarum alters surfactant-related phospholipid synthesis and CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase activity in isolated fetal rat type II cells.

    PubMed

    Hastings, C; Rand, T; Bergen, H T; Thliveris, J A; Shaw, A R; Lombaert, G A; Mantsch, H H; Giles, B L; Dakshinamurti, S; Scott, J E

    2005-03-01

    Stachybotry chartarum, a fungal contaminant of water-damaged buildings commonly grows on damp cellulose-containing materials. It produces a complex array of mycotoxins. Their mechanisms of action on the pulmonary system are not entirely clear. Previous studies suggest spore products may depress formation of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), the major surface-active component of pulmonary surfactant (PS). If S. chartarum can indeed affect formation of this phospholipid, then mold exposure may be a significant issue for pulmonary function in both mature lung and developing fetal lung. To address this possibility, fetal rat type II cells, the principal source of DSPC, were used to assess effects of S. chartarum extract on formation of DSPC. Isolated fetal rat lung type II cells prelabeled with 3H-choline and incubated with spore extract showed decreased incorporation of 3H-choline into DSPC. The activity of CTP:cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase (CPCT), the rate-limiting enzyme in phosphatidylcholine synthesis was reduced by approximately 50% by a 1:10 dilution of spore extract. Two different S. chartarum extracts (isolates from S. chartarum (Cleveland) and S. chartarum (Hawaiian)) were used to compare activity of CPCT in the presence of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), a known activator. PG produced an approximate two-fold increase in CPCT activity. The spore isolate from Hawaii did not alter enzyme activity. S. chartarum (Cleveland) eliminated the PG-induced activation of CPCT. These results support previous observations that mold products alter PS metabolism and may pose a risk in developing lung, inhibiting surfactant synthesis. Different isolates of the same species of fungus are not equivalent in terms of potential exposure risks.

  20. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou

    2017-01-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis. PMID:28273089

  1. Drosophila TRF2 and TAF9 regulate lipid droplet size and phospholipid fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Lam, Sin Man; Xin, Jingxue; Yang, Xiao; Liu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Shui, Guanghou; Huang, Xun

    2017-03-01

    The general transcription factor TBP (TATA-box binding protein) and its associated factors (TAFs) together form the TFIID complex, which directs transcription initiation. Through RNAi and mutant analysis, we identified a specific TBP family protein, TRF2, and a set of TAFs that regulate lipid droplet (LD) size in the Drosophila larval fat body. Among the three Drosophila TBP genes, trf2, tbp and trf1, only loss of function of trf2 results in increased LD size. Moreover, TRF2 and TAF9 regulate fatty acid composition of several classes of phospholipids. Through RNA profiling, we found that TRF2 and TAF9 affects the transcription of a common set of genes, including peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation-related genes that affect phospholipid fatty acid composition. We also found that knockdown of several TRF2 and TAF9 target genes results in large LDs, a phenotype which is similar to that of trf2 mutants. Together, these findings provide new insights into the specific role of the general transcription machinery in lipid homeostasis.

  2. Differential regulation of the lateral mobility of plasma membrane phospholipids by the extracellular matrix and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ramprasad, O G; Rangaraj, Nandini; Srinivas, G; Thiery, Jean Paul; Dufour, Sylvie; Pande, Gopal

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we compared qualitative and quantitative changes in the lateral mobility of phospholipid molecules in the plasma membrane of intact cells under various conditions of specific interaction of integrins in the cell membrane with two extracellular matrix (ECM) components viz. fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). We found a strong and specific correlation between the lower lateral mobility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and higher lateral mobility of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) when cells were expressing high levels of alpha5beta1 integrin and thus were adherent and motile on FN. The interaction between PC and FN in alpha5 integrin expressing cells was aided by the strong affinity of alpha5 integrin to the FN matrix. Cholesterol was involved in regulating the lateral mobility of PC to a great extent and of PE to a lesser extent without affecting the overall microviscosity of the plasma membrane or the distribution of caveolin-marked domains. The distribution and mobility of PC and PE molecules in the lamellipodial regions differed from that in the rest of the membrane and also in the more motile and in the less motile cells. We propose that these differences in distribution of PC and PE in different regions of cell membrane and their respective lateral mobility are observed due to the specific interaction of PC molecules with FN molecules in the ECM. Our results outline a new role of integrin-matrix interactions in the regulation of membrane phospholipid behavior. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Keeping Lung Surfactant Where It Belongs: Protein Regulation of Two-Dimensional Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2005-01-01

    Lung surfactant causes the surface tension, γ, in the alveoli to drop to nearly zero on exhalation; in the upper airways γ is ∼30 mN/m and constant. Hence, a surface tension gradient exists between alveoli and airways that should lead to surfactant flow out of the alveoli and elimination of the surface tension gradient. However, the lung surfactant specific protein SP-C enhances the resistance to surfactant flow by regulating the ratio of solid to fluid phase in the monolayer, leading to a jamming transition at which the monolayer transforms from fluidlike to solidlike. The accompanying three orders of magnitude increase in surface viscosity helps minimize surfactant flow to the airways and likely stabilizes the alveoli against collapse. PMID:15833995

  4. New generation synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Calkovska, Andrea; Johansson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of preterm newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing simple phospholipid mixtures and peptides gives similar tidal volumes to treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf®). The addition of both surfactant protein B and C analogs to the phospholipid mixture will stabilize the alveoli, measured as lung gas volumes at end expiration, even if no positive end-expiratory pressure is applied. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptides as well as the phospholipid composition. It seems that synthetic surfactants containing two peptides and a more complex phospholipid composition will be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future, but more experiments need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  5. The herpes simplex virus 1 U{sub S}3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wild, Peter; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Sonda, Sabrina; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2012-10-25

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of U{sub S}3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the U{sub S}3 deletion mutant R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [{sup 3}H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection forming folds that equaled {approx}45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled {approx}2400 R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041({Delta}U{sub S}3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that U{sub S}3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  6. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  7. Combinations of fluorescently labeled pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C in phospholipid films.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Taneva, S G; Perez-Gil, J; Cruz, A; Keough, K M

    1997-01-01

    Hydrophobic pulmonary surfactant (PS) proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) modulate the surface properties of PS lipids. Epifluorescence microscopy was performed on solvent-spread monolayers of fluorescently labeled porcine SP-B (R-SP-B, labeled with Texas Red) and SP-C (F-SP-C, labeled with fluorescein) in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) (at protein concentrations of 10 and 20 wt%, and 10 wt% of both) under conditions of cyclic compression and expansion. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) spectroscopy of R-SP-B and F-SP-C indicated that the proteins were intact and labeled with the appropriate fluorescent probe. The monolayers were compressed and expanded for four cycles at an initial rate of 0.64 A2 x mol(-1) x s(-1) (333 mm2 x s x [-1]) up to a surface pressure pi approximately 65 mN/m, and pi-area per residue (pi-A) isotherms at 22 +/- 1 degrees C were obtained. The monolayers were microscopically observed for the fluorescence emission of the individual proteins present in the film lipid matrix, and their visual features were video recorded for image analysis. The pi-A isotherms of the DPPC/protein monolayers showed characteristic "squeeze out" effects at pi approximately 43 mN/m for R-SP-B and 55 mN/m for F-SP-C, as had previously been observed for monolayers of the native proteins in DPPC. Both proteins associated with the expanded (fluid) phase of DPPC monolayers remained in or associated with the monolayers at high pi (approximately 65 mN/m) and redispersed in the monolayer upon its reexpansion. At comparable pi and area/molecule of the lipid, the proteins reduced the amounts of condensed (gel-like) phase of DPPC monolayers, with F-SP-C having a greater effect on a weight basis than did R-SP-B. In any one of the lipid/protein monolayers the amounts of the DPPC in condensed phase were the same at equivalent pi during compression and expansion and from cycle to cycle. This indicated that only minor loss of components from these systems

  8. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  9. Effect of pulmonary surfactant and phospholipid hexadecanol tyloxapol on recombinant human-insulin absorption from intratracheally administered dry powders in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Yang; Fang, Fang; He, Jiake; Li, Ning; Talbi, Amer; Zhang, Ying; Tang, Yue; Zhu, Jiabi; Chen, Xijing

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the enhancement effect of the natural pulmonary surfactant (PS) or its artificial substitute, phospholipid hexadecanol tyloxapol (PHT) on the bioavailability and hypoglycemic activity of recombinant human insulin (rh-insulin) in a pulmonary delivery system. PS- or PHT-loaded insulin formulation was administered to streptozotocin induced diabetic rats, at doses of 5 U/kg, 10 U/kg and 20 U/kg insulin, respectively. The hypoglycemic effect caused by PS or PHT containing rh-insulin was analyzed and the area above the curves (AAC) of serum glucose levels versus time, the minimum glucose concentration (C(min)), the time to C(min) (T(min)) and the pharmacological availability (PA%) were derived from the serum glucose profiles. Results showed that PS and PHT caused significantly decrease in serum glucose levels. The decrease in plasma glucose levels continued for about 5 h after the nadir. The highest AAC value was obtained when 20 U/kg rh-insulin with PS or PHT as absorption enhancer was administered to rats. AAC(0-360 min) of PS- or PHT-loaded rh-insulin was 2-3 times as much as that without PS or PHT and PA% increased by 1.3-2 fold. Thus, the extent of oral absorption of insulin from PS- or PHT-loaded particles was significantly greater when compared with that without them. In addition, PHT as well as PS did not change the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity and N-acetyl-β-D-glucoaminidase (NAG) activity in bronch fluid which are sensitive indicators of acute toxicity to lung cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). It is concluded that PS and PHT is a promising absorption enhancer for pulmonary delivery systems of large molecule drugs as rh-insulin.

  10. PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE1 and 2 Regulate Phospholipid Synthesis at the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, Peter J.; Quettier, Anne-Laure; Kroon, Johan T.M.; Craddock, Christian; Adams, Nicolette; Slabas, Antoni R.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is essential for the construction of most eukaryotic cell membranes, but how this process is regulated in plants remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, two Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolases called PAH1 and PAH2 act redundantly to repress phospholipid biosynthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Leaves from pah1 pah2 double mutants contain ~1.8-fold more phospholipid than the wild type and exhibit gross changes in ER morphology, which are consistent with massive membrane overexpansion. The net rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) is ~1.8-fold greater in the double mutant, and the transcript abundance of several key genes that encode enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis is increased. In particular, we show that PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (PEAMT1) is upregulated at the level of transcription in pah1 pah2 leaves. PEAMT catalyzes the first committed step of choline synthesis in Arabidopsis and defines a variant pathway for PC synthesis not found in yeasts or mammals. Our data suggest that PAH1/2 play a regulatory role in phospholipid synthesis that is analogous to that described in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the target enzymes differ, and key components of the signal transduction pathway do not appear to be conserved. PMID:20699392

  11. An Unconventional Diacylglycerol Kinase That Regulates Phospholipid Synthesis and Nuclear Membrane Growth*♦

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gil-Soo; O'Hara, Laura; Carman, George M.; Siniossoglou, Symeon

    2008-01-01

    Changes in nuclear size and shape during the cell cycle or during development require coordinated nuclear membrane remodeling, but the underlying molecular events are largely unknown. We have shown previously that the activity of the conserved phosphatidate phosphatase Pah1p/Smp2p regulates nuclear structure in yeast by controlling phospholipid synthesis and membrane biogenesis at the nuclear envelope. Two screens for novel regulators of phosphatidate led to the identification of DGK1. We show that Dgk1p is a unique diacylglycerol kinase that uses CTP, instead of ATP, to generate phosphatidate. DGK1 counteracts the activity of PAH1 at the nuclear envelope by controlling phosphatidate levels. Overexpression of DGK1 causes the appearance of phosphatidate-enriched membranes around the nucleus and leads to its expansion, without proliferating the cortical endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Mutations that decrease phosphatidate levels decrease nuclear membrane growth in pah1Δ cells. We propose that phosphatidate metabolism is a critical factor determining nuclear structure by regulating nuclear membrane biogenesis. PMID:18458075

  12. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  13. Phospholipid-dependent regulation of the motor activity of myosin X.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Nobuhisa; Jung, Hyun Suk; Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Osamu; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-06-12

    Myosin X is involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and protrusion of filopodia. Here we studied the molecular mechanism by which bovine myosin X is regulated. The globular tail domain inhibited the motor activity of myosin X in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. Structural analysis revealed that myosin X is monomeric and that the band 4.1-ezrin-radixin-moesin (FERM) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains bind to the head intramolecularly, forming an inhibited conformation. Binding of phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3)) to the PH domain reversed the tail-induced inhibition and induced the formation of myosin X dimers. Consistently, disruption of the binding of PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) attenuated the translocation of myosin X to filopodial tips in cells. We propose the following mechanism: first, the tail inhibits the motor activity of myosin X by intramolecular head-tail interactions to form the folded conformation; second, phospholipid binding reverses the inhibition and disrupts the folded conformation, which induces dimer formation, thereby activating the mechanical and cargo transporter activity of myosin X.

  14. Phospholipid Scramblase-1-Induced Lipid Reorganization Regulates Compensatory Endocytosis in Neuroendocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ory, Stéphane; Ceridono, Mara; Momboisse, Fanny; Houy, Sébastien; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Heintz, Dimitri; Calco, Valérie; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Espinoza, Flor A.; Sims, Peter J.; Bailly, Yannick; Bader, Marie-France; Gasman, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells and neurons is accompanied by the redistribution of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the extracellular space, leading to a disruption of plasma membrane asymmetry. How and why outward translocation of PS occurs during secretion are currently unknown. Immunogold labeling on plasma membrane sheets coupled with hierarchical clustering analysis demonstrate that PS translocation occurs at the vicinity of the secretory granule fusion sites. We found that altering the function of the phospholipid scramblase-1 (PLSCR-1) by expressing a PLSCR-1 calcium-insensitive mutant or by using chromaffin cells from PLSCR-1−/− mice prevents outward translocation of PS in cells stimulated for exocytosis. Remarkably, whereas transmitter release was not affected, secretory granule membrane recapture after exocytosis was impaired, indicating that PLSCR-1 is required for compensatory endocytosis but not for exocytosis. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of specific lipid reorganization and calcium-dependent PLSCR-1 activity in neuroendocrine compensatory endocytosis. PMID:23426682

  15. The mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin is involved in the regulation of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mürke, Eik; Stoll, Steffan; Lendeckel, Uwe; Reinhold, Dirk; Schild, Lorenz

    2016-08-01

    Challenge of the immune system with antigens induces a cascade of processes including activation of naïve T cells, induction of proliferation, differentiation into effector cells and finally contraction via apoptosis. To meet the dynamic requirements of an adequate immune response, T cells must metabolically adapt to actual situations by switching between catabolic and anabolic metabolism. In this context mitochondria are hubs of metabolic regulation. The phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for the structural and functional integrity and, thus, the metabolism of mitochondria. The aim of this study was to verify a possible interrelationship between T cell proliferation and CL composition. For this purpose, we adjusted the proliferation of peripheral human T cells from volunteers by stimulation with different concentrations of the mitogen phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), inhibition with Cyclosporin A (CsA) and exposure of cells to different free fatty acids and subsequently analysed the composition of CL by LC/MS/MS spectroscopy. All of the treatments had significant effects on CL composition. Correlation analysis of the proliferation rate and CL composition revealed that only the amount of incorporated palmitoleic acid and the content of tetralinoleoyl-CL are significantly associated with the proliferation rate. This observation is strongly suggestive of a regulatory function of these particular CL components/species in the process of T cell proliferation. As CL is crucially involved in mitochondrial function one can speculate that changes in CL composition contribute to vital mitochondria-dependent adaptations of energy metabolism in T cells during immune response.

  16. Host-derived oxidized phospholipids and HDL regulate innate immunity in human leprosy.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Daniel; Watson, Andrew D; Miller, Christopher S; Montoya, Dennis; Ochoa, Maria-Teresa; Sieling, Peter A; Gutierrez, Miguel A; Navab, Mohamad; Reddy, Srinivasa T; Witztum, Joseph L; Fogelman, Alan M; Rea, Thomas H; Eisenberg, David; Berliner, Judith; Modlin, Robert L

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular pathogens survive by evading the host immune system and accessing host metabolic pathways to obtain nutrients for their growth. Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, is thought to be the mycobacterium most dependent on host metabolic pathways, including host-derived lipids. Although fatty acids and phospholipids accumulate in the lesions of individuals with the lepromatous (also known as disseminated) form of human leprosy (L-lep), the origin and significance of these lipids remains unclear. Here we show that in human L-lep lesions, there was preferential expression of host lipid metabolism genes, including a group of phospholipases, and that these genes were virtually absent from the mycobacterial genome. Host-derived oxidized phospholipids were detected in macrophages within L-lep lesions, and 1 specific oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5,6-epoxyisoprostane E2)-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (PEIPC), accumulated in macrophages infected with live mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infection and host-derived oxidized phospholipids both inhibited innate immune responses, and this inhibition was reversed by the addition of normal HDL, a scavenger of oxidized phospholipids, but not by HDL from patients with L-lep. The accumulation of host-derived oxidized phospholipids in L-lep lesions is strikingly similar to observations in atherosclerosis, which suggests that the link between host lipid metabolism and innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of both microbial infection and metabolic disease.

  17. Surfactant prevents quartz induced down-regulation of complement receptor 1 in human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, G; Lundahl, J; Curstedt, T; Eklund, A

    1997-02-01

    Quartz is known to induce an inflammatory response in the alveolar space by recruitment of different effector cells. We investigated the interaction between granulocytes and quartz with respect to expression of complement receptor type 1 (CR1) and CR3, with and without the presence of surfactant. Granulocytes from hemolyzed blood were stimulated by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), which mobilize the intracellular pool of CR1 to the surface, and the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) measured by cytofluorometry was 47.4 (46-63.6) (median; interquartile range). Quartz exposure reduced the CR1 expression to 23.2 (22.8-30.6) MFI units (P < 0.01), a porcine surfactant preparation added during quartz exposure abolished the down-regulation completely, 47.7 (43.2-62.3) MFI units (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained after preincubation of the cells with surfactant followed by quartz exposure. No significant influence on CR1 expression was found by a synthetic lipid mixture, nor was the CR3 expression affected. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the presence of surfactant inhibits quartz induced down-regulation of CR1 on activated granulocytes.

  18. Coordinated regulation of sulfur and phospholipid metabolism reflects the importance of methylation in the growth of yeast.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Mark J; Petti, Allegra A; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Silverman, Sanford J; McIsaac, R Scott; Lee, Traci A; Botstein, David

    2011-11-01

    A yeast strain lacking Met4p, the primary transcriptional regulator of the sulfur assimilation pathway, cannot synthesize methionine. This apparently simple auxotroph did not grow well in rich media containing excess methionine, forming small colonies on yeast extract/peptone/dextrose plates. Faster-growing large colonies were abundant when overnight cultures were plated, suggesting that spontaneous suppressors of the growth defect arise with high frequency. To identify the suppressor mutations, we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism and standard genetic analyses. The most common suppressors were loss-of-function mutations in OPI1, encoding a transcriptional repressor of phospholipid metabolism. Using a new system that allows rapid and specific degradation of Met4p, we could study the dynamic expression of all genes following loss of Met4p. Experiments using this system with and without Opi1p showed that Met4 activates and Opi1p represses genes that maintain levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the substrate for most methyltransferase reactions. Cells lacking Met4p grow normally when either SAM is added to the media or one of the SAM synthetase genes is overexpressed. SAM is used as a methyl donor in three Opi1p-regulated reactions to create the abundant membrane phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine. Our results show that rapidly growing cells require significant methylation, likely for the biosynthesis of phospholipids.

  19. Cytochrome c oxidase is regulated by modulations in protein expression and mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition in estivating African lungfish.

    PubMed

    Frick, N T; Bystriansky, J S; Ip, Y K; Chew, S F; Ballantyne, J S

    2010-03-01

    We examined some of the potential mechanisms lungfish (Protopterus dolloi) use to regulate cytochrome c oxidase (CCO), during metabolic depression. CCO activity was reduced by 67% in isolated liver mitochondria of estivating fish. This was likely accomplished, in part, by the 46% reduction in CCO subunit I protein expression in the liver. No change in the mRNA expression levels of CCO subunits I, II, III, and IV were found in the liver, suggesting CCO is under translational regulation; however, in the kidney, messenger limitation may be a factor as the expression of subunits I and II were depressed ( approximately 10-fold) during estivation, suggesting tissue-specific mechanisms of regulation. CCO is influenced by mitochondrial membrane phospholipids, particularly cardiolipin (CL). In P. dolloi, the phospholipid composition of the liver mitochondrial membrane changed during estivation, with a approximately 2.3-fold reduction in the amount of CL. Significant positive correlations were found between CCO activity and the amount of CL and phosphatidylethanolamine within the mitochondrial membrane. It appears CCO activity is regulated through multiple mechanisms in P. dolloi, and individual subunits of CCO are regulated independently, and in a tissue-specific manner. It is proposed that altering the amount of CL within the mitochondrial membrane may be a means of regulating CCO activity during metabolical depression in the African lungfish, P. dolloi.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant protein A and surfactant lipids upregulate IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR-mediated inflammation in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Huy A.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Meyer, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) are exposed to frequent challenges from inhaled particulates and microbes and function as a first line of defense with a highly regulated immune response because of their unique biology as prototypic alternatively activated macrophages. Lung collectins, particularly surfactant protein A (SP-A), contribute to this activation state by fine-tuning the macrophage inflammatory response. During short-term (10 min–2 h) exposure, SP-A's regulation of human macrophage responses occurs through decreased activity of kinases required for proinflammatory cytokine production. However, AMs are continuously exposed to surfactant, and the biochemical pathways underlying long-term reduction of proinflammatory cytokine activity are not known. We investigated the molecular mechanism(s) underlying SP-A- and surfactant lipid-mediated suppression of proinflammatory cytokine production in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 (TLR4) activation over longer time periods. We found that exposure of human macrophages to SP-A for 6–24 h upregulates expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR-mediated NF-κB activation. Exposure to Survanta, a natural bovine lung extract lacking SP-A, also enhances IRAK-M expression, but at lower magnitude and for a shorter duration than SP-A. Surfactant-mediated upregulation of IRAK-M in macrophages suppresses TLR4-mediated TNF-α and IL-6 production in response to LPS, and IRAK-M knockdown by small interfering RNA reverses this suppression. In contrast to TNF-α and IL-6, the surfactant components upregulate LPS-mediated immunoregulatory IL-10 production, an effect reversed by IRAK-M knockdown. In conclusion, these data identify an important signaling regulator in human macrophages that is used by surfactant to control the long-term alveolar inflammatory response, i.e., enhanced IRAK-M activity. PMID:22886503

  1. Purinergic P2X7 receptor regulates lung surfactant secretion in a paracrine manner

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Amarjit; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Guo, Yujie; Weng, Tingting; Su, Lijing; Liu, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar epithelium is composed of alveolar epithelial cells of type I (AEC I) and type II (AEC II). AEC II secrete lung surfactant by means of exocytosis. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a P2 purinergic receptor, has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic transmission and inflammation. Here, we report that P2X7R, which is expressed in AEC I but not AEC II, is a novel mediator for the paracrine regulation of surfactant secretion in AEC II. In primary co-cultures of AEC I and AEC II benzoyl ATP (BzATP; an agonist of P2X7R) increased surfactant secretion, which was blocked by the P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue G. This effect was observed in AEC II co-cultured with human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells stably expressing rat P2X7R, but not when co-cultured with AEC I in which P2X7R was knocked down or in co-cultures of AEC I and AEC II isolated from P2X7R−/− mice. BzATP-mediated secretion involved P2Y2 receptor signaling because it was reduced by the addition of the ATP scavengers apyrase and adenosine deaminase and the P2Y2 receptor antagonist suramin. However, the stimulation with BzATP might also release other substances that potentially increase surfactant secretion as a greater stimulation of secretion was observed in AEC II incubated with BzATP when co-cultured with E10 or HEK-293-P2X7R cells than with ATP alone. P2X7R−/− mice failed to increase surfactant secretion in response to hyperventilation, pointing to the physiological relevance of P2X7R in maintaining surfactant homeostasis in the lung. These results suggest that the activation of P2X7R increases surfactant secretion by releasing ATP from AEC I and subsequently stimulating P2Y2 receptors in AEC II. PMID:21266468

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with a partial defect in the synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol and altered regulation of phospholipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Klig, L S; Homann, M J; Kohlwein, S D; Kelley, M J; Henry, S A; Carman, G M

    1988-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant (cdg1 mutation) was isolated on the basis of an inositol excretion phenotype and exhibited pleiotropic deficiencies in phospholipid biosynthesis. Genetic analysis of the mutant confirmed that the cdg1 mutation represents a new genetic locus and that a defect in a single gene was responsible for the Cdg1 phenotype. CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in mutant haploid cells was 25% of the wild-type derepressed level. Biochemical and immunoblot analyses revealed that the defect in CDP-diacylglycerol synthase activity in the cdg1 mutant was due to a reduced level of the CDP-diacylglycerol synthase Mr-56,000 subunit rather than to an alteration in the enzymological properties of the enzyme. This defect resulted in a reduced rate of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis, an elevated phosphatidate content, and alterations in overall phospholipid synthesis. Unlike wild-type cells, CDP-diacylglycerol synthase was not regulated in response to water-soluble phospholipid precursors. The cdg1 lesion also caused constitutive expression of inositol-1-phosphate synthase and elevated phosphatidylserine synthase. Phosphatidylinositol synthase was not affected in the cdg1 mutant. Images PMID:2832385

  3. Role of phospholipids of subunit III in the regulation of structural rearrangements in cytochrome c oxidase of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Alnajjar, Khadijeh S; Cvetkov, Teresa; Prochaska, Lawrence

    2015-02-03

    Subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase possesses structural domains that contain conserved phospholipid binding sites. Mutations within these domains induce a loss of phospholipid binding, coinciding with decreased electron transfer activity. Functional and structural roles for phospholipids in the enzyme from Rhodobacter sphaeroides have been investigated. Upon the removal of intrinsic lipids using phospholipase A2, electron transfer activity was decreased 30-50%. Moreover, the delipidated enzyme exhibited turnover-induced, suicide inactivation, which was reversed by the addition of exogenous lipids, most specifically by cardiolipin. Cardiolipin exhibited two sites of interaction with the delipidated enzyme, a high-affinity site (Km = 0.14 μM) and a low-affinity site (Km = 26 μM). Subunit I of the delipidated enzyme exhibited a faster digestion rate when it was treated with α-chymotrypsin compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, suggesting that lipid removal induces a conformational change to expose the digestion sites further. Upon reaction of subunit III of the enzyme with a fluorophore (AEDANS), fluorescence anisotropy showed an increased rotational rate of the fluorophore in the absence of lipids, indicating increased flexibility of subunit III within the enzyme's tertiary structure. Additionally, Förster resonance energy transfer between AEDANS and a fluorescently labeled cardiolipin revealed that cardiolipin binds in the v-shaped cleft of subunit III in the delipidated enzyme and that it moves closer to the active site in subunit I upon a change in the redox state of the enzyme. In conclusion, these results show that the phospholipids regulate events occurring during electron transfer activity by maintaining the structural integrity of the enzyme at the active site.

  4. Vesicles from pH-regulated reversible gemini amino-acid surfactants as nanocapsules for delivery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Qiao, Weihong; Li, Zongshi

    2016-10-01

    Reversible transition from micelles to vesicles by regulating pH were realized by gemini amino-acid surfactants N,N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diacetate ethylenediamine. Measurement results of ζ-potential at different pH and DLS at varying solvents revealed that the protonation between H(+) and double NCH2COO(-) groups (generating NH(+)CH2COO(-)), expressed as pKa1 and pKa2, is the key driving force to control the aggregation behaviors of gemini surfactant molecule. Effect of pH on the bilayer structure was studied in detail by using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy of hydrophobic pyrene and Coumarin 153 (C153) respectively and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from C153 to Rhodamine 6G (R6G). Various pH-regulated and pH-reversible self-assemblies were obtained in one surfactant system. Vitamin D3 was encapsulated in vesicle bilayers to form nano-VD3-capsules as VD3 supplement agent for health care products. By using the electrostatic attraction between Ca(2+) and double -COO(-) groups, nano-VD3-capsules with Ca(2+) coated outermost layers were prepared as a formulation for VD3 and calcium co-supplement agent. DLS and TEM were performed to check stability and morphology of the nano-capsules. It is concluded that the pH-regulated gemini amino-acid surfactants can be used to construct colloidal systems for delivering hydrophobic drugs or nutritions without lipids at human physiological pH level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  6. Expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae inositol-1-phosphate synthase (INO1) gene is regulated by factors that affect phospholipid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, J P; Henry, S A

    1986-01-01

    The INO1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the regulated enzyme inositol-1-phosphate synthase, which catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of inositol-containing phospholipids. The expression of this gene was analyzed under conditions known to regulate phospholipid synthesis. RNA blot hybridization with a genomic clone for INO1 detected two RNA species of 1.8 and 0.6 kb. The abundance of the 1.8-kb RNA was greatly decreased when the cells were grown in the presence of the phospholipid precursor inositol, as was the enzyme activity of the synthase. Complementation analysis showed that this transcript encoded the INO1 gene product. The level of INO1 RNA was repressed 12-fold when the cells were grown in medium containing inositol, and it was repressed 33-fold when the cells were grown in the presence of inositol and choline together. The INO1 transcript was present at a very low level in cells containing mutations (ino2 and ino4) in regulatory genes unlinked to INO1 that result in inositol auxotrophy. The transcript was constitutively overproduced in cells containing a mutation (opi1) that causes constitutive expression of inositol-1-phosphate synthase and results in excretion of inositol. The expression of INO1 RNA was also examined in cells containing a mutation (cho2) affecting the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. In contrast to what was observed in wild-type cells, growth of cho2 cells in medium containing inositol did not result in a significant decrease in INO1 RNA abundance. Inositol and choline together were required for repression of the INO1 transcript in these cells, providing evidence for a regulatory link between the synthesis of inositol- and choline-containing lipids. The level of the 0.6-kb RNA was affected, although to a lesser degree, by many of the same factors that influence INO1 expression. Images PMID:3025587

  7. NF-E2-related factor 2 regulates the stress response to UVA-1-oxidized phospholipids in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Florian; Mayer, Herbert; Lengauer, Barbara; Mlitz, Veronika; Sanders, John M; Kadl, Alexandra; Bilban, Martin; de Martin, Rainer; Wagner, Oswald; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Leitinger, Norbert; Tschachler, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Long-wavelength ultraviolet (UVA-1) radiation causes oxidative stress that modifies cellular molecules. To defend themselves against noxious oxidation products, skin cells produce detoxifying enzymes and antioxidants. We have recently shown that UVA-1 oxidized the abundant membrane phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (PAPC), which then induced the stress-response protein heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in dermal fibroblasts. Here we examined the effects of UVA-1- and UV-oxidized phospholipids on global gene expression in human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We identified a cluster of genes that were coinduced by UVA-1-oxidized PAPC and UVA-1 radiation. The cluster included HO-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, aldo-keto reductases-1-C1 and -C2, and IL-8. These genes are members of the cellular stress response system termed "antioxidant response." Accordingly, the regulatory regions of all of these genes contain binding sites for NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major regulator of the antioxidant response. Both UVA-1 irradiation and treatment with oxidized lipids led to increased nuclear accumulation and DNA binding of NRF2. Silencing and deficiency of NRF2 suppressed the antioxidant response. Taken together, our data show that UVA-1-mediated lipid oxidation induces expression of antioxidant response genes, which is dependent on the redox-regulated transcription factor NRF2. Our findings suggest a different view on UV-generated lipid mediators that were commonly regarded as detrimental

  8. Hydroxyalkenals and oxidized phospholipids modulation of endothelial cytoskeleton, focal adhesion and adherens junction proteins in regulating endothelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Usatyuk, Peter V; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids generates bioactive aldehydes, which exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory effects in cells and tissues. Accumulating evidence indicates that 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major aldehyde derived from lipid peroxidation of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids trigger signals that modulates focal adhesion and adherens junction proteins thereby inducing endothelial barrier dysfunction. Similarly, oxidized phospholipids (Ox-PLs) generated by lipid peroxidation of phospholipids with polyunsaturated fatty acids have been implicated in atherogenesis, inflammation and gene expression. Interestingly, physiological concentration of Ox-PLs is anti-inflammatory and protect against endotoxin- and ventilator-associated acute lung injury. Thus, excess generation of bioactive hydroxyalkenals and Ox-PLs during oxidative stress contributes to pathophysiology of various diseases by modulating signaling pathways that regulate pro- and anti-inflammatory responses and barrier regulation. This review summarizes the role of 4-HNE and Ox-PLs affecting cell signaling pathways and endothelial barrier dysfunction through modulation of the activities of proteins/enzymes by Michael adducts formation, enhancing the level of protein tyrosine phosphorylation of the target proteins, and by reorganization of cytoskeletal, focal adhesion, and adherens junction proteins. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms of hydroxyalkenals- and Ox-PLs-mediated pro-and anti-inflammatory responses and barrier function may lead to development of novel therapies to ameliorate oxidative stress related cardio-pulmonary disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cavity Orientation Regulated by Mixture Composition and Clustering of Amphiphilic Cyclodextrins in Phospholipid Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Pinzón Barrantes, John J; Maggio, Bruno; de Rossi, Rita H; Vico, Raquel V

    2017-05-04

    Artificial supramolecular-hierarchical structures that emulate nature represent an overcoming alternative for the design of new drug delivery systems. Thermodynamic and topographic properties of films formed by a monoacylated amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin (βCD-C16) with the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) at the air/water interface were studied. βCD-C16 formed stable mixed films with POPC at several proportions when spread together at the air/water interface. The orientation of βCD-C16 cavity at the interface depends on its mole fraction in the film as reveled by the analysis of partial mean molecular areas as a function of composition. Furthermore, βCD-C16 was able to penetrate POPC preformed films in a broad range of initial surface pressures, including that near the collapse pressure of the phospholipid. These results demonstrated the strong tendency of βCD-C16 to be inserted into this lipid matrix commonly used in liposome formulations. Topography studies show that βCD-C16 segregate from POPC forming clusters enriched in βCD-C16. Segregation of βCD-C16 was especially noticeable when βCD-C16 were incorporated by themselves into a preformed POPC matrix leading to ordered and highly birefringent structures that suggest the formation of hierarchical stacked βCD-C16 arrangement at the interface.

  10. In vitro characterization and endocrine regulation of cholesterol and phospholipid transport in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Ontsouka, Corneille Edgar; Huang, Xiao; Aliyev, Eldar; Albrecht, Christiane

    2017-01-05

    Cell-based studies previously showed that the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) transfers cholesterol across mammary epithelial cells (MEC). Data for phospholipid transport are lacking, and it is unclear from which cellular source the transported cholesterol stems, whether this transport activates signaling pathways, and how lactogenic hormones regulate it. To clarify these aspects, lipid transport and expressional analyses were performed in bovine primary (bMEC) and/or immortalized (MAC-T) MEC cultures. Lipid efflux and ABCA1, ABCG1 and liver X receptorα mRNA levels were higher in MAC-T than bMEC. In MAC-T, the transported cholesterol originated mainly from the plasma membrane. ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux was higher than phosphatidylcholine efflux, was suppressed by probucol (ABCA1 inhibitor), AG490 (janus kinase-2 inhibitor), PD98059 (mitogen activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor) and pretreatment with β-cyclodextrin (lowering membrane cholesterol). Insulin was the only hormone significantly increasing cholesterol efflux. In conclusion, this study gives novel mechanistic and regulatory insights into the transport of cholesterol and phospholipids in MEC.

  11. A phospholipid kinase regulates actin organization and intercellular bridge formation during germline cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Brill, J A; Hime, G R; Scharer-Schuksz, M; Fuller, M T

    2000-09-01

    The endgame of cytokinesis can follow one of two pathways depending on developmental context: resolution into separate cells or formation of a stable intercellular bridge. Here we show that the four wheel drive (fwd) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for intercellular bridge formation during cytokinesis in male meiosis. In fwd mutant males, contractile rings form and constrict in dividing spermatocytes, but cleavage furrows are unstable and daughter cells fuse together, producing multinucleate spermatids. fwd is shown to encode a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI 4-kinase), a member of a family of proteins that perform the first step in the synthesis of the key regulatory membrane phospholipid PIP2. Wild-type activity of the fwd PI 4-kinase is required for tyrosine phosphorylation in the cleavage furrow and for normal organization of actin filaments in the constricting contractile ring. Our results suggest a critical role for PI 4-kinases and phosphatidylinositol derivatives during the final stages of cytokinesis.

  12. Regulation and Essentiality of the StAR-related Lipid Transfer (START) Domain-containing Phospholipid Transfer Protein PFA0210c in Malaria Parasites*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ross J.; Ringel, Alessa; Knuepfer, Ellen; Moon, Robert W.; Blackman, Michael J.; van Ooij, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domains are phospholipid- or sterol-binding modules that are present in many proteins. START domain-containing proteins (START proteins) play important functions in eukaryotic cells, including the redistribution of phospholipids to subcellular compartments and delivering sterols to the mitochondrion for steroid synthesis. How the activity of the START domain is regulated remains unknown for most of these proteins. The Plasmodium falciparum START protein PFA0210c (PF3D7_0104200) is a broad-spectrum phospholipid transfer protein that is conserved in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is most closely related to the mammalian START proteins STARD2 and STARD7. PFA0210c is unusual in that it contains a signal sequence and a PEXEL export motif that together mediate transfer of the protein from the parasite to the host erythrocyte. The protein also contains a C-terminal extension, which is very uncommon among mammalian START proteins. Whereas the biochemical properties of PFA0210c have been characterized, the function of the protein remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the unusual C-terminal extension negatively regulates phospholipid transfer activity. Furthermore, we use the genetically tractable Plasmodium knowlesi model and recently developed genetic technology in P. falciparum to show that the protein is essential for growth of the parasite during the clinically relevant asexual blood stage life cycle. Finally, we show that the regulation of phospholipid transfer by PFA0210c is required in vivo, and we identify a potential second regulatory domain. These findings provide insight into a novel mechanism of regulation of phospholipid transfer in vivo and may have important implications for the interaction of the malaria parasite with its host cell. PMID:27694132

  13. Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) response and regulation during acute and chronic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Hansen, Soren

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in BAL increased within 6 h, peaked at 51 h (4,518 ng/ml), and returned to base level at 99 h (612 ng/ml). Serum levels of SP-D increased immediately (8.6 ng/ml), peaked at 51 h (16 ng/ml), and returned to base levels at 99 h (3.8 ng/ml). In a subacute bleomycin inflammation model, SP-D levels were 4,625 and 367 ng/ml in BAL and serum, respectively, 8 days after exposure. In a chronic Pc inflammation model, the highest level of SP-D was observed 6 weeks after inoculation, with BAL and serum levels of 1,868 and 335 ng/ml, respectively. We conclude that serum levels of SP-D increase during lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically. The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation.

  14. A Surfactant-Induced Functional Modulation of a Global Virulence Regulator from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Anindya; Jana, Biswanath; Polley, Soumitra; Sau, Keya; Sau, Subrata

    2016-01-01

    Triton X-100 (TX-100), a useful non-ionic surfactant, reduced the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus significantly. Many S. aureus proteins were expressed in the presence of TX-100. SarA, one of the TX-100-induced proteins, acts as a global virulence regulator in S. aureus. To understand the effects of TX-100 on the structure, and function of SarA, a recombinant S. aureus SarA (rSarA) and its derivative (C9W) have been investigated in the presence of varying concentrations of this surfactant using various probes. Our data have revealed that both rSarA and C9W bind to the cognate DNA with nearly similar affinity in the absence of TX-100. Interestingly, their DNA binding activities have been significantly increased in the presence of pre-micellar concentration of TX-100. The increase of TX-100 concentrations to micellar or post-micellar concentration did not greatly enhance their activities further. TX-100 molecules have altered the secondary and tertiary structures of both proteins to some extents. Size of the rSarA-TX-100 complex appears to be intermediate to those of rSarA and TX-100. Additional analyses show a relatively moderate interaction between C9W and TX-100. Binding of TX-100 to C9W has, however, occurred by a cooperative pathway particularly at micellar and higher concentrations of this surfactant. Taken together, TX-100-induced structural alteration of rSarA and C9W might be responsible for their increased DNA binding activity. As TX-100 has stabilized the somewhat weaker SarA-DNA complex effectively, it could be used to study its structure in the future. PMID:26989900

  15. Gene regulation of lipid and phospholipid metabolism in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Keshuai; Østensen, Mari-Ann; Attramadal, Kari; Winge, Per; Sparstad, Torfinn; Bones, Atle M; Vadstein, Olav; Kjørsvik, Elin; Olsen, Yngvar

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of essentiality of dietary phospholipid (PL) for larval fish is not clear. The main objective of the present study was to determine if the PL requirement of Atlantic cod larvae was due to any genetic impairment caused by functional immaturity. Cod larvae were sampled at 1, 3, 8, 13, 17, 18, 30, 42 and 60 days post hatch (dph) for transcriptome analysis using a recently developed microarray. The fatty acid profile and gene expression levels of cod larvae at 17 dph were compared after feeding differently enriched rotifers, which contained different DHA levels in PL. No significant differences (p<0.05) were found for the two rotifer diets in the overall gene expression level of cod larvae, their growth and survival, and their DHA levels in total lipid and PL fraction. The fatty acid data suggested that dietary EPA was elongated to DPA by cod larvae, and a threshold DHA level in PL to maintain membrane fluidity and other functions may exist. There appeared to be no major effect of development on the expression of key genes of PL biosynthesis suggesting no genetic constrain in early developmental stages. Our overall data suggested that besides the possible limited de novo PC synthesis ability in the intestine, other metabolic constraints should also be considered, especially the possible low input of bile PC as a result of immature liver. Further studies are needed to elucidate the gene expression level and enzyme activity in the PL biosynthesis pathways for specific tissue or cells.

  16. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C.; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M.; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Brown, H. Alex; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C.; St. Croix, Brad

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor of previously unknown function. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. PMID:23684610

  17. Pulmonary Surfactant Protein-A regulates Toll-like receptor expression and activity in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Lisa N.; Azad, Abul K.; Parsa, Kishore V. L.; Crowther, Joy E.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2008-01-01

    The pulmonary innate immune system responds to various airborne microbes. Although its specificity is broad and based on the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), it is uniquely regulated to limit inflammation and thereby prevent damage to the gas-exchanging alveoli. Macrophages, critical cell determinants of this system, recognize microbes through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) which typically mediate pro-inflammatory responses. The lung collectin, surfactant protein-A (SP-A), has emerged as an important innate immune determinant that regulates microbe-macrophage interactions in this environment. Here we report the basal and SP-A-induced transcriptional and post-translational regulation of TLR2 and TLR4 expression during the differentiation of primary human monocytes into macrophages. Despite SP-A’s ability to up-regulate TLR2 expression on human macrophages, it dampens TLR2 and TLR4 signaling in these cells. SP-A decreases the phosphorylation of IκBα, a key regulator of NFκB activity, and nuclear translocation of p65 which result in diminished TNFα secretion in response to TLR ligands. SP-A also reduces the phosphorylation of TLR signaling proteins upstream of NFκB, including members of the MAP kinase family. Finally, we report for the first time that SP-A decreases the phosphorylation of Akt, a major cell regulator of NFκB and potentially MAP kinases. These data identify a critical role for SP-A in modulating the lung inflammatory response by regulating macrophage TLR activity. PMID:18523248

  18. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 regulates Toll-like receptor 9-mediated type I interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Talukder, Amjad H; Bao, Musheng; Kim, Tae Whan; Facchinetti, Valeria; Hanabuchi, Shino; Bover, Laura; Zal, Tomasz; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) senses microbial DNA in the endosomes of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and triggers MyD88-dependent type I interferon (IFN) responses. To better understand TLR9 biology in pDCs, we established a yeast two-hybrid library for the identification of TLR9-interacting proteins. Here, we report that an IFN-inducible protein, phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), interacts with TLR9 in pDCs. Knockdown of PLSCR1 expression by siRNA in human pDC cell line led to a 60-70% reduction of IFN-α responses following CpG-ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide) stimulation. Primary pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice produced lower amount of type 1 IFN than pDCs from the wild-type mice in response to CpG-ODN, herpes simplex virus and influenza A virus. Following CpG-A stimulation, there were much lower amounts of TLR9 in the early endosomes together with CpG-A in pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice. Our study demonstrates that PLSCR1 is a TLR9-interacting protein that plays an important role in pDC's type 1 IFN responses by regulating TLR9 trafficking to the endosomal compartment. PMID:22453241

  19. Cyclic AMP regulation of arachidonic acid (AA) release and phospholipid metabolism in human monocytes: modulation by intracellular calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffstein, S.T.; Manzi, R.M.; Godfrey, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Stimulation of inflammatory cells by specific ligands results in activation of phospholipase(s) and production of oxygenation products of AA. The authors have employed (/sup 3/H)AA labeled monocytes to examine the involvement of cAMP in regulating phospholipase activity as measured by percent of incorporated (/sup 3/H)AA released and TLC analysis of (/sup 3/H)AA cellular lipids. Maximum release of radiolabel (31 +/- 5%) occurred upon challenge with the calcium ionophore A23187/sup -/ (10..mu..M), while FMLP (1..mu..M) yielded 15 +/- 1% and untreated cells 8 +/- 1%. Pretreatment of monocytes with isobutyl methyl xanthine/sup -/(IBMX) or dibutyrl cyclic AMP (d-cAMP) inhibited FMLP stimulated release with IC/sub 50/'s of 2.5 x 10/sup -5/M and 8 x 10/sup -5/M respectively. Exposure of monocytes to maximal levels of IBMX (5 x 10/sup -4/M) or d-cAMP (10/sup -3/M) also reduced release from controls by 40%, while A23187 induced release was uneffected by either. Examination of (/sup 3/H) AA labeled phospholipids showed that phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol were the major pools labeled and that stimulation by FMLP or A23187 appeared to deplete the PC pool exclusively. Prior exposure to IBMX or d-cAMP inhibited the loss from the PC pool only in untreated or FMLP stimulated cells. The data suggests that a phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity, directly primarily towards PC, is regulated by cAMP possibly by inhibiting receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium levels.

  20. Evolution of pulmonary surfactants for the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and paediatric lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazela, Jan; Merritt, T Allen; Gadzinowski, Janusz; Sinha, Sunil

    2006-09-01

    This review documents the evolution of surfactant therapy, beginning with observations of surfactant deficiency in respiratory distress syndrome, the basis of exogenous surfactant treatment and the development of surfactant-containing novel peptides patterned after SP-B. We critically analyse the molecular interactions of surfactant proteins and phospholipids contributing to surfactant function. Peptide-containing surfactant provides clinical efficacy in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome and offers promise for treating other lung diseases in infancy.

  1. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  2. Lipin-1 regulation of phospholipid synthesis maintains endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and is critical for triple-negative breast cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    He, Jingquan; Zhang, Feng; Tay, Li Wei Rachel; Boroda, Salome; Nian, Weiqi; Levental, Kandice R; Levental, Ilya; Harris, Thurl E; Chang, Jeffrey T; Du, Guangwei

    2017-07-01

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to increase the synthesis of macromolecules for rapid proliferation. Compared to fatty acids, much less is known about the synthesis of phospholipids, which is essential for membrane biogenesis in cancer cells. We found that LPIN1, which encodes lipin-1, a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) controlling the rate-limiting step in the phospholipid synthesis pathway, is highly up-regulated in basal-like triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Moreover, high LPIN1 expression correlates with the poor prognosis of these patients. Knockdown of LPIN1 increases apoptosis in basal-like TNBC cell lines, whereas it has minimal or less effect on normal human mammary gland epithelial cells (HMECs) and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cell lines. Fatty acid incorporation and lipidomics analyses showed that LPIN1 knockdown blocks phospholipid synthesis and changes membrane lipid compositions that ultimately induce the activation of 1 of the 3 branches of unfolded protein responses, the inositol-requiring enzyme-1α pathway. We also show for the first time, to our knowledge, that lipin-1 knockdown significantly inhibits tumor growth in vivo using an orthotopic xenograft breast mouse model. Our results suggest that lipin-1 is a potential target for cancer therapy.-He, J., Zhang, F., Tay, L. W. R., Boroda, S., Nian, W., Levental, K. R., Levental, I., Harris, T. E., Chang, J. T., Du, G. Lipin-1 regulation of phospholipid synthesis maintains endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and is critical for triple-negative breast cancer cell survival. © FASEB.

  3. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose surfactants both in droplets and mixed in excipients significantly reduced the contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets.

  4. Adaptation to low body temperature influences pulmonary surfactant composition thereby increasing fluidity while maintaining appropriately ordered membrane structure and surface activity.

    PubMed

    Suri, Lakshmi N M; McCaig, Lynda; Picardi, Maria V; Ospina, Olga L; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Staples, James F; Possmayer, Fred; Yao, Li-Juan; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Orgeig, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    The interfacial surface tension of the lung is regulated by phospholipid-rich pulmonary surfactant films. Small changes in temperature affect surfactant structure and function in vitro. We compared the compositional, thermodynamic and functional properties of surfactant from hibernating and summer-active 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) with porcine surfactant to understand structure-function relationships in surfactant membranes and films. Hibernating squirrels had more surfactant large aggregates with more fluid monounsaturated molecular species than summer-active animals. The latter had more unsaturated species than porcine surfactant. Cold-adapted surfactant membranes displayed gel-to-fluid transitions at lower phase transition temperatures with reduced enthalpy. Both hibernating and summer-active squirrel surfactants exhibited lower enthalpy than porcine surfactant. LAURDAN fluorescence and DPH anisotropy revealed that surfactant bilayers from both groups of squirrels possessed similar ordered phase characteristics at low temperatures. While ground squirrel surfactants functioned well during dynamic cycling at 3, 25, and 37 degrees C, porcine surfactant demonstrated poorer activity at 3 degrees C but was superior at 37 degrees C. Consequently the surfactant composition of ground squirrels confers a greater thermal flexibility relative to homeothermic mammals, while retaining tight lipid packing at low body temperatures. This may represent the most critical feature contributing to sustained stability of the respiratory interface at low lung volumes. Thus, while less effective than porcine surfactant at 37 degrees C, summer-active surfactant functions adequately at both 37 degrees C and 3 degrees C allowing these animals to enter hibernation. Here further compositional alterations occur which improve function at low temperatures by maintaining adequate stability at low lung volumes and when temperature increases during arousal from

  5. Purifying selection drives the evolution of surfactant protein C (SP-C) independently of body temperature regulation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Potter, Sally; Orgeig, Sandra; Donnellan, Stephen; Daniels, Christopher B

    2007-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant system of heterothermic mammals must be capable of dealing with the effect of low body temperatures on the physical state of the lipid components. We have shown previously that there is a modest increase in surfactant cholesterol during periods of torpor, however these changes do not fully explain the capacity of surfactant to function under the wide range of physical conditions imposed by torpor. Here we examine indirectly the role of surfactant protein C (SP-C) in adapting to variable body temperatures by testing for the presence of positive (adaptive) selection during evolutionary transitions between heterothermy and homeothermy. We sequenced SP-C from genomic DNA of 32 mammalian species from groups of closely related heterothermic and homeothermic species (contrasts). We used phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood estimates of rates of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions and fully Bayesian inference of these sequences to determine whether the mode of body temperature regulation exerts a selection pressure driving the molecular adaptation of SP-C. The protein sequence of SP-C is highly conserved with synonymous or highly conservative amino acid substitutions being predominant. The evolution of SP-C among mammals is characterised by high codon usage bias and high rates of transition/transversion. The only contrast to show evidence of positive selection was that of the bears (Ursus americanus and U. maritimus). The significance of this result is unclear. We show that SP-C is under strong evolutionary constraints, driven by purifying selection, presumably to maintain protein function despite variation in the mode of body temperature regulation.

  6. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species

    PubMed Central

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md. Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al3+ ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. PMID:25416794

  7. Higher sterol content regulated by CYP51 with concomitant lower phospholipid content in membranes is a common strategy for aluminium tolerance in several plant species.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Tadao; Khan, Md Shahadat Hossain; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maejima, Eriko; Sekimoto, Hitoshi; Yokota, Takao; Nakano, Takeshi; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Matsuo; Ishikawa, Satoru; Ikka, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akifumi; Kawamura, Takeshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Ueki, Nozomi; Umetsu, Asami; Kannari, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Several studies have shown that differences in lipid composition and in the lipid biosynthetic pathway affect the aluminium (Al) tolerance of plants, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these differences. Phospholipids create a negative charge at the surface of the plasma membrane and enhance Al sensitivity as a result of the accumulation of positively charged Al(3+) ions. The phospholipids will be balanced by other electrically neutral lipids, such as sterols. In the present research, Al tolerance was compared among pea (Pisum sativum) genotypes. Compared with Al-tolerant genotypes, the Al-sensitive genotype accumulated more Al in the root tip, had a less intact plasma membrane, and showed a lower expression level of PsCYP51, which encodes obtusifoliol-14α-demethylase (OBT 14DM), a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme. The ratio of phospholipids to sterols was higher in the sensitive genotype than in the tolerant genotypes, suggesting that the sterol biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in Al tolerance. Consistent with this idea, a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana line with knocked-down AtCYP51 expression showed an Al-sensitive phenotype. Uniconazole-P, an inhibitor of OBT 14DM, suppressed the Al tolerance of Al-tolerant genotypes of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), rice (Oryza sativa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmark cv. Currency). These results suggest that increased sterol content, regulated by CYP51, with concomitant lower phospholipid content in the root tip, results in lower negativity of the plasma membrane. This appears to be a common strategy for Al tolerance among several plant species. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Regulation of pulmonary surfactant secretion in the developing lizard, Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Orgeig, Sandra; Daniels, Christopher B

    2002-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixture of lipids and proteins that is secreted by alveolar type II cells in the lungs of all air-breathing vertebrates. Pulmonary surfactant functions to reduce the surface tension in the lungs and, therefore, reduce the work of breathing. In mammals, the embryonic maturation of the surfactant system is controlled by a host of factors, including glucocorticoids, thyroid hormones and autonomic neurotransmitters. We have used a co-culture system of embryonic type II cells and lung fibroblasts to investigate the ability of dexamethasone, tri-iodothyronine (T(3)), adrenaline and carbamylcholine (carbachol) to stimulate the cellular secretion of phosphatidylcholine in the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) at day 55 (approx. 92%) of incubation and following hatching. Adrenaline stimulated surfactant secretion both before and after hatching, whereas carbachol stimulated secretion only at day 55. Glucocorticoids and triiodothyronine together stimulated secretion at day 55 but did not after hatching. Therefore, adrenaline, carbachol, dexamethasone and T(3), are all involved in the development of the surfactant system in the bearded dragon. However, the efficacy of the hormones is attenuated during the developmental process. These differences probably relate to the changes in the cellular environment during development and the specific biology of the bearded dragon.

  9. Inactivation of surfactant in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Bruni, R; Fan, B R; David-Cu, R; Taeusch, H W; Walther, F J

    1996-02-01

    Although surfactant replacement therapy has dramatically improved the outcome of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, approximately 30% of treated infants show a transient or no response. Nonresponse to surfactant replacement therapy may be due to extreme lung immaturity and possibly surfactant inactivation. Surfactant inactivation involves aspecific biophysical events, such as interference with the formation or activity of an alveolar monolayer, and specific interactions with serum proteins, including antibodies, leaking into the alveolar space. As formulations containing surfactant proteins appear to better tolerate serum inactivation, we used an excised rat lung model to compare the susceptibility to serum inactivation of a mixture of synthetic phospholipids selected from surfactant lipid constituents, Exosurf (a protein-free synthetic surfactant), Survanta [containing surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C)], and a porcine surfactant (containing SP-A, -B, and -C). For each of these preparations, we used pressure/volume determinations as an in situ measure of surfactant activity and retested the same preparations after mixing with human serum, a nonspecific surfactant inactivator. Human serum inactivated porcine surfactant to a lesser extent than Survanta, Exosurf, or synthetic phospholipids. Temperature exerted a significant effect on deflation stability, as shown by a greater lung compliance in untreated, normal lungs and a larger improvement in compliance after treating lavaged lungs with synthetic phospholipids at 37 degrees C than at 22 degrees C. We conclude that surfactant containing SP-A, -B, and -C is only moderately susceptible to inactivation with whole serum and may therefore exert a greater clinical response than protein-free surfactants or those containing only SP-B and -C.

  10. Mdm31 protein mediates sensitivity to potassium ionophores but does not regulate mitochondrial morphology or phospholipid trafficking in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Branislav; Lajdova, Dana; Abelovska, Lenka; Balazova, Maria; Nosek, Jozef; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2015-03-01

    Mdm31p is an inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) protein with unknown function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutants lacking Mdm31p contain only a few giant spherical mitochondria with disorganized internal structure, altered phospholipid composition and disturbed ion homeostasis, accompanied by increased resistance to the electroneutral K+ /H+ ionophore nigericin. These phenotypes are interpreted as resulting from diverse roles of Mdm31p, presumably in linking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to the machinery involved in segregation of mitochondria, in mediating cation transport across IMM and in phospholipid shuttling between mitochondrial membranes. To investigate which of the roles of Mdm31p are conserved in ascomycetous yeasts, we analysed the Mdm31p orthologue in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our results demonstrate that, similarly to its S. cerevisiae counterpart, SpMdm31 is a mitochondrial protein and its absence results in increased resistance to nigericin. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae, Sz. pombe cells lacking SpMdm31 are also less sensitive to the electrogenic K+ ionophore valinomycin. Moreover, mitochondria of the fission yeast mdm31Δ mutant display no changes in morphology or phospholipid composition. Therefore, in terms of function, the two orthologous proteins appear to have considerably diverged between these two evolutionarily distant yeast species, possibly sharing only their participation in ion homeostasis.

  11. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of maternal phospholipid composition and IP3-dependent embryonic membrane dynamics by a specific fatty acid metabolic event in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kniazeva, Marina; Shen, Huali; Euler, Tetyana; Wang, Chen; Han, Min

    2012-01-01

    Natural fatty acids (FAs) exhibit vast structural diversity, but the functional importance of FA variations and the mechanism by which they contribute to a healthy lipid composition in animals remain largely unexplored. A large family of acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSs) regulates FA metabolism by esterifying FA to coenyzme A. However, little is known about how particular FA–ACS combinations affect lipid composition and specific cellular functions. We analyzed how the activity of ACS-1 on branched chain FA C17ISO impacts maternal lipid content, signal transduction, and development in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. We show that expression of ACS-1 in the somatic gonad guides the incorporation of C17ISO into certain phospholipids and thus regulates the phospholipid composition in the zygote. Disrupting this ACS-1 function causes striking defects in complex membrane dynamics, including exocytosis and cytokinesis, leading to early embryonic lethality. These defects are suppressed by hyperactive IP3 signaling, suggesting that C17ISO and ACS-1 functions are necessary for optimal IP3 signaling essential for early embryogenesis. This study shows a novel role of branched chain FAs whose functions in humans and animals are unknown and uncovers a novel intercellular regulatory pathway linking a specific FA–ACS interaction to specific developmental events. PMID:22426533

  13. Creation and regulation of ion channels across reconstituted phospholipid bilayers generated by streptavidin-linked magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Stava, Eric; Yu, Minrui; Blick, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we explore the nature of ion-channel-like conductance fluctuations across a reconstituted phospholipid bilayer due to insertion of ∼100 nm sized, streptavidin-linked magnetite nanoparticles under static magnetic fields (SMFs). For a fixed bias voltage, the frequency of current bursts increases with the application of SMFs. Apart from a closed conductance state G(0) (≤14 pS), we identify four major conductance states, with the lowest conductance level (G(1)) being ∼126 pS. The number of channel events at G(1) is found to be nearly doubled (as compared to G(0)) at a magnetic field of 70 G. The higher-order open states (e.g., 3G(1), 5G(1)) are generally observable at larger values of biasing voltage and magnetic field. When the SMF of 145 G is applied, the multiconductance states are resolved distinctly and are assigned to the simultaneous opening and closing of several independent states. The origin of the current bursts is due to the instantaneous mechanical actuation of streptavidin-linked MNP chains across the phospholipid bilayer. The voltage-controlled, magnetogated ion channels are promising for diagnoses and therapeutic applications of excitable membranes and other biological systems.

  14. Metabolic regulation during early frog development: flow of glycolytic carbon into phospholipids in Xenopus oocytes and fertilized eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Dworkin, M.B.; Dworkin-Rastl, E.

    1989-04-01

    /sup 32/P-labeled glucose 6-phosphate, (/sup 32/P)phosphoenolpyruvate, and (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP were injected into oocytes and fertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis, and the incorporation of the /sup 32/P label was followed into phospholipids. Several classes of phospholipids incorporated /sup 32/P label from the injected glycolytic intermediates, including lysophosphatidic acid, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidylinositol phosphates, inferring de novo synthesis of these lipids from dihydroxyacetone phosphate or glycerol 3-phosphate. Injection of (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP into oocytes and fertilized eggs led to labeling of phosphatidylinositol phosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, indicating an active phosphatidylinositol cycle in resting oocytes and fertilized eggs. Maturation and fertilization of the oocyte led to a qualitative change in phosphatidylinositol metabolism, increased labeling of phosphatidylinositol phosphate compared to phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (either from glycerol 3-phosphate or from ATP). This change occurs late in the maturation process, and the new pattern of phosphatidylinositol metabolism is maintained during the rapid cleavage stages of early embryogenesis.

  15. Unifying the mechanism of recombinant FVIIa action: dose dependence is regulated differently by tissue factor and phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Shibeko, Alexey M.; Woodle, Samuel A.; Lee, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is used for treatment of hemophilia patients with inhibitors, as well for off-label treatment of severe bleeding in trauma and surgery. Effective bleeding control requires supraphysiological doses of rFVIIa, posing both high expense and uncertain thrombotic risk. Two major competing theories offer different explanations for the supraphysiological rFVIIa dosing requirement: (1) the need to overcome competition between FVIIa and FVII zymogen for tissue factor (TF) binding, and (2) a high-dose–requiring phospholipid-related pathway of FVIIa action. In the present study, we found experimental conditions in which both mechanisms contribute simultaneously and independently to rFVIIa-driven thrombin generation in FVII-deficient human plasma. From mathematical simulations of our model of FX activation, which were confirmed by thrombin-generation experiments, we conclude that the action of rFVIIa at pharmacologic doses is dominated by the TF-dependent pathway with a minor contribution from a phospholipid-dependent mechanism. We established a dose-response curve for rFVIIa that is useful to explain dosing strategies. In the present study, we present a pathway to reconcile the 2 major mechanisms of rFVIIa action, a necessary step to understanding future dose optimization and evaluation of new rFVIIa analogs currently under development. PMID:22563088

  16. How to overcome surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome?

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Calkovska, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is caused by meconium components, by plasma proteins leaking through the injured alveolocapillary membrane and by substances originated in meconium-induced inflammation. Surfactant inactivation in MAS may be diminished by several ways. Firstly, aspirated meconium should be removed from the lungs to decrease concentrations of meconium inhibitors coming into the contact with surfactant in the alveolar compartment. Once the endogenous surfactant becomes inactivated, components of surfactant should be substituted by exogenous surfactant at a sufficient dose, and surfactant administration should be repeated, if oxygenation remains compromised. To delay the inactivation by inhibitors, exogenous surfactants may be enriched with surfactant proteins, phospholipids, or other substances such as polymers. Finally, to diminish an adverse action of products of meconium-induced inflammation on both endogenous and exogenously delivered surfactant, anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered. A combined therapeutic approach may result in better outcome in patients with MAS and in lower costs of treatment.

  17. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  18. Formation of oil-in-water emulsions from natural emulsifiers using spontaneous emulsification: sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2015-11-18

    This study examined the possibility of producing oil-in-water emulsions using a natural surfactant (sunflower phospholipids) and a low-energy method (spontaneous emulsification). Spontaneous emulsification was carried out by titrating an organic phase (oil and phospholipid) into an aqueous phase with continuous stirring. The influence of phospholipid composition, surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR), initial phospholipids location, storage time, phospholipid type, and preparation method was tested. The initial droplet size depended on the nature of the phospholipid used, which was attributed to differences in phospholipid composition. Droplet size decreased with increasing SOR and was smallest when the phospholipid was fully dissolved in the organic phase rather than the aqueous phase. The droplets formed using spontaneous emulsification were relatively large (d > 10 μm), and so the emulsions were unstable to gravitational separation. At low SORs (0.1 and 0.5), emulsions produced with phospholipids had a smaller particle diameter than those produced with a synthetic surfactant (Tween 80), but at a higher SOR (1.0), this trend was reversed. High-energy methods (microfluidization and sonication) formed significantly smaller droplets (d < 10 μm) than spontaneous emulsification. The results from this study show that low-energy methods could be utilized with natural surfactants for applications for which fine droplets are not essential.

  19. Glucocorticoids regulate surfactant protein synthesis in a pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, M.A.; Gazdar, A.F.; Clark, J.C.; Pilot-Matias, T.J.; Wert, S.E.; Hull, W.M.; Whitsett, J.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Synthesis of pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C was demonstrated in a cell line derived from a human adenocarcinoma of the lung. The cells contained numerous lamellar inclusion bodies and formed organized groups of cells containing well-developed junctional complexes and apical microvillous membranes. Synthesis of SP-A was detected in the cells by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and by immunoprecipitation of (35S)methionine-labeled protein. SP-A was identified as an Mr 31,000-36,000 polypeptide containing asparagine-linked carbohydrate. Northern blot analysis detected SP-A mRNA of 2.2 kb. Dexamethasone (1-10 nM) enhanced the relative abundance of SP-A mRNA. Despite stimulation of SP-A mRNA, intracellular SP-A content was unaltered or inhibited by dexamethasone. SP-B and SP-C mRNAs and synthesis of the SP-B and SP-C precursors were markedly induced by dexamethasone. ProSP-B was synthesized and secreted primarily as an Mr 42,000-46,000 polypeptide. Proteolysis of the proSP-B resulted in the generation of endoglycosidase F-sensitive Mr = 19,000-21,000 and 25,000-27,000 peptides, which were detected both intra- and extracellularly. SP-C proprotein of Mr = 22,000 and smaller SP-C fragments were detected intracellularly but were not detected in the media. Mature forms of SP-B (Mr = 8,000) and SP-C (Mr = 4,000) were not detected. Glucocorticoids directly enhance the relative synthesis and mRNA of the surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C. Discrepancies among SP-A mRNA, its de novo synthesis, and cell content suggest that glucocorticoid may alter both pre- and posttranslational factors modulating SP-A expression.

  20. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by the A sub 2 adenosine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gilfillan, A.M.; Gobran, L.I.; Rooney, S.A. )

    1987-05-01

    The authors previously reported that adenosine (A) stimulates secretion of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of surfactant, in type II pneumocytes. To determine how this effect is mediated we examined the effect of P{sub 1} purinoceptor agonists -N{sup 6}-phenylisoprpyl-A (PIA), 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxyamido-A (NECA), 2-chloro-A (CA) - and antagonists - theophylline (T) and 8-phenyltheophylline (8PT) - on PC secretion and cAMP levels in type II cells isolated from the adult rat. The cells were preincubated with {sup 3}H-choline for 20 h, transferred to fresh medium and incubated {plus minus} test agents for 1.5 h after which {sup 3}H-PC in the cells and medium was measured. A and its analogs stimulated PC secretion in a dose-dependent manner. At the optimal concentration (A, 1 mM; analogs, 0.01 mM) secretion was stimulated approx. 2-fold from a basal rate of 0.08-1.02% of total PC in the medium after 1.5 h. The potency order was NECA>CA=L-PIA>A>D-PIA. The EC{sub 50} for NECA was 8.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}M. The effect of NECA was significantly inhibited by 8PT (0.01 mM) and T (0.05 mM). NECA, A and L-PIA increased cellular cAMP levels 34, 12 and 8 fold, respectively, from a basal level of 0.23-0.28 pmol/10{sup 6} cells. These data suggest that the A{sub 2} subtype of the P{sub 1} receptor mediates the effect of A. In newborn rabbits, lung lavage PC increased form 24.1 {plus minus} 1.6 ug P/g lung dry wt at 0 h to 62.6 {plus minus} 7.7 after breathing for 3 h (n=13). 8PT (15 mg/kg, i.m.) at 0 h decreased the PC content at 3 h by 29% to 44.4 {plus minus} 5.1 ug/g. This suggests a functional role for the P{sub 1} receptor in lung surfactant secretion.

  1. Membrane phospholipid fatty acid composition regulates cardiac SERCA activity in a hibernator, the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed

    Giroud, Sylvain; Frare, Carla; Strijkstra, Arjen; Boerema, Ate; Arnold, Walter; Ruf, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have strong effects on hibernation and daily torpor. Increased dietary uptake of PUFA of the n-6 class, particularly of Linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6) lengthens torpor bout duration and enables animals to reach lower body temperatures (T(b)) and metabolic rates. As previously hypothesized, this well-known influence of PUFA may be mediated via effects of the membrane fatty acid composition on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+-)ATPase 2a (SERCA) in the heart of hibernators. We tested the hypotheses that high proportions of n-6 PUFA in general, or specifically high proportions of LA (C18:2 n-6) in SR phospholipids (PL) should be associated with increased cardiac SERCA activity, and should allow animals to reach lower minimum T(b) in torpor. We measured activity of SERCA from hearts of hibernating and non-hibernating Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) in vitro at 35 °C. Further, we determined the PL fatty acid composition of the SR membrane of these hearts. We found that SERCA activity strongly increased as the proportion of LA in SR PL increased but was negatively affected by the content of Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3). SR PL from hibernating hamsters were characterized by high proportions of LA and low proportions of DHA. As a result, SERCA activity was significantly higher during entrance into torpor and in torpor compared to inter-bout arousal. Also, animals with increased SERCA activity reached lower T(b) during torpor. Interestingly, a subgroup of hamsters which never entered torpor but remained euthermic throughout winter displayed a phenotype similar to animals in summer. This was characterized by lower proportions of LA and increased proportions of DHA in SR membranes, which is apparently incompatible with torpor. We conclude that the PUFA composition of SR membranes affects cardiac function via modulating SERCA activity, and hence determines the minimum T(b) tolerated by hibernators.

  2. Surface film formation in vitro by infant and therapeutic surfactants: role of surfactant protein B.

    PubMed

    Danhaive, Olivier; Chapin, Cheryl; Horneman, Hart; Cogo, Paola E; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant provides an alveolar surface-active film that is critical for normal lung function. Our objective was to determine in vitro film formation properties of therapeutic and infant surfactants and the influence of surfactant protein (SP)-B content. We used a multiwell fluorescent assay measuring maximum phospholipid surface accumulation (Max), phospholipid concentration required for half-maximal film formation (½Max), and time for maximal accumulation (tMax). Among five therapeutic surfactants, calfactant (highest SP-B content) had film formation values similar to natural surfactant, and addition of SP-B to beractant (lowest SP-B) normalized its Max value. Addition of budesonide to calfactant did not adversely affect film formation. In tracheal aspirates of preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, SP-B content correlated with ½Max and tMax values, and SP-B supplementation of SP-B-deficient infant surfactant restored normal film formation. Reconstitution of normal surfactant indicated a role for both SP-B and SP-C in film formation. Film formation in vitro differs among therapeutic surfactants and is highly dependent on SP-B content in infant surfactant. The results support a critical role of SP-B for promoting surface film formation.

  3. Induction of Virulence Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus by Pulmonary Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hamamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    We performed a genomewide analysis using a next-generation sequencer to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important opportunistic pathogen. RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis of bacterial transcripts at late log phase revealed 142 genes that were upregulated >2-fold following the addition of pulmonary surfactant to the culture medium. Among these genes, we confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis that mRNA amounts for genes encoding ESAT-6 secretion system C (EssC), an unknown hypothetical protein (NWMN_0246; also called pulmonary surfactant-inducible factor A [PsiA] in this study), and hemolysin gamma subunit B (HlgB) were increased 3- to 10-fold by the surfactant treatment. Among the major constituents of pulmonary surfactant, i.e., phospholipids and palmitate, only palmitate, which is the most abundant fatty acid in the pulmonary surfactant and a known antibacterial substance, stimulated the expression of these three genes. Moreover, these genes were also induced by supplementing the culture with detergents. The induction of gene expression by surfactant or palmitate was not observed in a disruption mutant of the sigB gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in bacterial stress responses. Furthermore, each disruption mutant of the essC, psiA, and hlgB genes showed attenuation of both survival in the lung and host-killing ability in a murine pneumonia model. These findings suggest that S. aureus resists membrane stress caused by free fatty acids present in the pulmonary surfactant through the regulation of virulence gene expression, which contributes to its pathogenesis within the lungs of the host animal. PMID:24452679

  4. Induction of virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus by pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-04-01

    We performed a genomewide analysis using a next-generation sequencer to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important opportunistic pathogen. RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis of bacterial transcripts at late log phase revealed 142 genes that were upregulated >2-fold following the addition of pulmonary surfactant to the culture medium. Among these genes, we confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis that mRNA amounts for genes encoding ESAT-6 secretion system C (EssC), an unknown hypothetical protein (NWMN_0246; also called pulmonary surfactant-inducible factor A [PsiA] in this study), and hemolysin gamma subunit B (HlgB) were increased 3- to 10-fold by the surfactant treatment. Among the major constituents of pulmonary surfactant, i.e., phospholipids and palmitate, only palmitate, which is the most abundant fatty acid in the pulmonary surfactant and a known antibacterial substance, stimulated the expression of these three genes. Moreover, these genes were also induced by supplementing the culture with detergents. The induction of gene expression by surfactant or palmitate was not observed in a disruption mutant of the sigB gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in bacterial stress responses. Furthermore, each disruption mutant of the essC, psiA, and hlgB genes showed attenuation of both survival in the lung and host-killing ability in a murine pneumonia model. These findings suggest that S. aureus resists membrane stress caused by free fatty acids present in the pulmonary surfactant through the regulation of virulence gene expression, which contributes to its pathogenesis within the lungs of the host animal.

  5. Surfactant changes during experimental pneumocystosis are related to Pneumocystis development.

    PubMed

    Aliouat, E M; Escamilla, R; Cariven, C; Vieu, C; Mullet, C; Dei-Cas, E; Prévost, M C

    1998-03-01

    Pneumocystosis-related surfactant changes have been reported in both humans and corticosteroid-treated experimental hosts. As corticosteroids induce an increase in pulmonary surfactant, some findings could be considered as controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the surfactant composition changes during experimental pneumocystosis were related to the Pneumocystis development. In this work two corticosteroid-untreated animal models were used: rabbits, which develop spontaneous pneumocystosis at weaning; and severe combined immunodeficiency mice, which were intranasally inoculated with Pneumocystis carinii. Surfactant phospholipid and protein content was explored by bronchoalveolar lavage. The in vitro effect of surfactant on P. carinii growth was also explored. In the two models, the surfactant phospholipid/protein ratio was significantly increased, whereas parasite rates were low. This ratio decreases with the slope increase of the parasite growth curve. These early surfactant changes suggested that Pneumocystis proliferation requires alveolar lining fluid changes, and that normal surfactant is not suitable for parasite development. In this way, in vitro experiments presented here have revealed an inhibitory effect of synthetic or seminatural surfactants on the P. carinii growth. Further studies are needed to determine how Pneumocystis induces the reported early modifications of the surfactant, and why the parasite development is inhibited by pulmonary surfactant.

  6. Functional Anatomy of Phospholipid Binding And Regulation of Phosphoinositide Homeostasis By Proteins of the Sec14 Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Schaaf, G.; Ortlund, E.A.; Tyeryar, K.R.; Mousley, C.J.; Ile, K.E.; Garrett, T.A.; Ren, J.; Woolls, M.J.; Raetz, C.R.H.; Redinbo, M.R.; Bankaitis, V.A.

    2009-05-27

    Sec14, the major yeast phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein, regulates essential interfaces between lipid metabolism and membrane trafficking from the trans-Golgi network (TGN). How Sec14 does so remains unclear. We report that Sec14 binds PtdIns and PtdCho at distinct (but overlapping) sites, and both PtdIns- and PtdCho-binding activities are essential Sec14 activities. We further show both activities must reside within the same molecule to reconstitute a functional Sec14 and for effective Sec14-mediated regulation of phosphoinositide homeostasis in vivo. This regulation is uncoupled from PtdIns-transfer activity and argues for an interfacial presentation mode for Sec14-mediated potentiation of PtdIns kinases. Such a regulatory role for Sec14 is a primary counter to action of the Kes1 sterol-binding protein that antagonizes PtdIns 4-OH kinase activity in vivo. Collectively, these findings outline functional mechanisms for the Sec14 superfamily and reveal additional layers of complexity for regulating phosphoinositide homeostasis in eukaryotes.

  7. The interaction of titin and alpha-actinin is controlled by a phospholipid-regulated intramolecular pseudoligand mechanism.

    PubMed

    Young, P; Gautel, M

    2000-12-01

    The assembly of stable cytoskeletal structures from dynamically recycled molecules requires developmental and spatial regulation of protein interactions. In muscle, titin acts as a molecular ruler organizing the actin cytoskeleton via interactions with many sarcomeric proteins, including the crosslinking protein alpha-actinin. An interaction between the C-terminal domain of alpha-actinin and titin Z-repeat motifs targets alpha-actinin to the Z-disk. Here we investigate the cellular regulation of this interaction. alpha-actinin is a rod shaped head-to-tail homodimer. In contrast to C-terminal fragments, full-length alpha-actinin does not bind Z-repeats. We identify a 30-residue Z-repeat homologous sequence between the actin-binding and rod regions of alpha-actinin that binds the C-terminal domain with nanomolar affinity. Thus, Z-repeat binding is prevented by this 'pseudoligand' interaction between the subunits of the alpha-actinin dimer. This autoinhibition is relieved upon binding of the Z-disk lipid phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphate to the actin-binding domain. We suggest that this novel mechanism is relevant to control the site-specific interactions of alpha-actinin during sarcomere assembly and turnover. The intramolecular contacts defined here also constrain a structural model for intrasterical regulation of all alpha-actinin isoforms.

  8. Conditional deletion of Abca3 in alveolar type II cells alters surfactant homeostasis in newborn and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Besnard, Valérie; Matsuzaki, Yohei; Clark, Jean; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E.; Ikegami, Machiko; Stahlman, Mildred T.; Weaver, Timothy E.; Hunt, Alan N.; Postle, Anthony D.

    2010-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lipid transport protein required for synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. Abca3 was conditionally deleted in respiratory epithelial cells (Abca3Δ/Δ) in vivo. The majority of mice in which Abca3 was deleted in alveolar type II cells died shortly after birth from respiratory distress related to surfactant deficiency. Approximately 30% of the Abca3Δ/Δ mice survived after birth. Surviving Abca3Δ/Δ mice developed emphysema in the absence of significant pulmonary inflammation. Staining of lung tissue and mRNA isolated from alveolar type II cells demonstrated that ∼50% of alveolar type II cells lacked ABCA3. Phospholipid content and composition were altered in lung tissue, lamellar bodies, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice. In adult Abca3Δ/Δ mice, cells lacking ABCA3 had decreased expression of mRNAs associated with lipid synthesis and transport. FOXA2 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein-α, transcription factors known to regulate genes regulating lung lipid metabolism, were markedly decreased in cells lacking ABCA3. Deletion of Abca3 disrupted surfactant lipid synthesis in a cell-autonomous manner. Compensatory surfactant synthesis was initiated in ABCA3-sufficient type II cells, indicating that surfactant homeostasis is a highly regulated process that includes sensing and coregulation among alveolar type II cells. PMID:20190032

  9. Development of the pulmonary surfactant system in the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Daniels, C B; Booth, D T

    2001-05-01

    This study describes the developmental changes in pulmonary surfactant (PS) lipids throughout incubation in the sea turtle, Chelonia mydas. Total phospholipid (PL), disaturated phospholipid (DSP) and cholesterol (Chol) harvested from lung washings increased with advancing incubation, where secretion was maximal at pipping, coincident with the onset of pulmonary ventilation. The DSP/PL ratio increased, whereas the Chol/PL and the Chol/DSP ratio declined throughout development. The phospholipids, therefore, are independently regulated from Chol and their development matches that of mammals. To explore whether hypoxia could elicit an effect on the development of the PS system, embryos were exposed to a chronic dose of 17% O2 for the final approximately 40% of incubation. Hypoxia did not affect incubation time, absolute, nor relative abundance of the surfactant lipids, demonstrating that the development of the system is robust and that embryonic development continues unabated under mild hypoxia. Hypoxia-incubated hatchlings had lighter wet lung weights than those from normoxia, inferring that mild hypoxia facilitates lung clearance in this species.

  10. Control of the development of the pulmonary surfactant system in the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Orgeig, Sandra; Daniels, Christopher B

    2002-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixture of lipids and proteins that controls the surface tension of the fluid lining the inner lung. Its composition is conserved among the vertebrates. Here we hypothesize that the in ovo administration of glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones during late incubation will accelerate surfactant development in the saltwater crocodile, Crocodylus porosus. We also hypothesize that the increased maturation of the type II cells in response to hormone pretreatment will result in enhanced responsiveness of the cells to surfactant secretagogues. We sampled embryos at days 60, 68, and 75 of incubation and after hatching. We administered dexamethasone (Dex), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)), or a combination of both hormones (Dex + T(3)), 48 and 24 h before each prehatching time point. Lavage analysis indicated that the maturation of the phospholipids (PL) in the lungs of embryonic crocodiles occurs rapidly. Only T(3) and Dex + T(3) increased total PL in lavage at embryonic day 60, but Dex, T(3), and Dex + T(3) increased PL at day 75. The saturation of the PLs was increased by T(3) and Dex + T(3) at day 68. Swimming exercise did not increase the amount or alter the saturation of the surfactant PLs. Pretreatment of embryos with Dex, T(3), or Dex + T(3) changed the secretion profiles of the isolated type II cells. Dex + T(3) increased the response of the cells to agonists at days 60 and 68. Therefore, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones regulate surfactant maturation in the crocodile.

  11. Phospholipids of the lung in normal, toxic, and diseased states

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, T.; Ohno, K.

    1981-01-01

    The highly pulmonary concentration of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine (dipalmitoyllecithin) and its implication as an important component of lung surfactant have promoted investigation of phospholipid metabolism in the lung. This review will set the contents including recent informations for better understanding of phospholipid metabolism of the lung in normal state (physiological significances of lung phospholipids, characteristics of phospholipids in lung tissue and alveolar washing, biosynthetic pathways of dipalmitoyllecithin, etc.) as well as in toxic states (pulmonary oxygen toxicity, etc.) and in diseased states (idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, etc.) Since our main concern has been to clarify the most important route for supplying dipalmitoyllecithin, this review will be focused upon the various biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of different molecular species of lecithin and their potential significance in the normal, toxic, and diseased lungs.

  12. Human decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into functional alveolar type II-like cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant complexes.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; de la Torre, Paz; Grande, Jesús; Haller, Thomas; Flores, Ana I; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar type II (ATII) cells are specialized in the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, a lipid-protein complex that reduces surface tension to minimize the work of breathing. Surfactant synthesis, assembly and secretion are closely regulated and its impairment is associated with severe respiratory disorders. At present, well-established ATII cell culture models are not available. In this work, Decidua-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (DMSCs) have been differentiated into Alveolar Type II- Like Cells (ATII-LCs), which display membranous cytoplasmic organelles resembling lamellar bodies, the organelles involved in surfactant storage and secretion by native ATII cells, and accumulate disaturated phospholipid species, a surfactant hallmark. Expression of characteristic ATII cells markers was demonstrated in ATII-LCs at gene and protein level. Mimicking the response of ATII cells to secretagogues, ATII-LCs were able to exocytose lipid-rich assemblies, which displayed highly surface active capabilities, including faster interfacial adsorption kinetics than standard native surfactant, even in the presence of inhibitory agents. ATII-LCs could constitute a highly useful ex vivo model for the study of surfactant biogenesis and the mechanisms involved in protein processing and lipid trafficking, as well as the packing and storage of surfactant complexes.

  13. Development of the pulmonary surfactant system in two oviparous vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Orgeig, S; Lopatko, O V; Daniels, C B

    2000-02-01

    In birds and oviparous reptiles, hatching is often a lengthy and exhausting process, which commences with pipping followed by lung clearance and pulmonary ventilation. We examined the composition of pulmonary surfactant in the developing lungs of the chicken, Gallus gallus, and of the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps. Lung tissue was collected from chicken embryos at days 14, 16, 18 (prepipped), and 20 (postpipped) of incubation and from 1 day and 3 wk posthatch and adult animals. In chickens, surfactant protein A mRNA was detected using Northern blot analysis in lung tissue at all stages sampled, appearing relatively earlier in development compared with placental mammals. Chickens were lavaged at days 16, 18, and 20 of incubation and 1 day posthatch, whereas bearded dragons were lavaged at day 55, days 57-60 (postpipped), and days 58-61 (posthatched). In both species, total phospholipid (PL) from the lavage increased throughout incubation. Disaturated PL (DSP) was not measurable before 16 days of incubation in the chick embryo nor before 55 days in bearded dragons. However, the percentage of DSP/PL increased markedly throughout late development in both species. Because cholesterol (Chol) remained unchanged, the Chol/PL and Chol/DSP ratios decreased in both species. Thus the Chol and PL components are differentially regulated. The lizard surfactant system develops and matures over a relatively shorter time than that of birds and mammals. This probably reflects the highly precocial nature of hatchling reptiles.

  14. Enzymatic activity regulated by a surfactant and hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingzhong; Zhai, Tao; Du, Kun; Li, Yanxin; Feng, Wei

    2013-12-01

    Circular dichroism spectra reveal that sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) at low concentrations can effectively prevent the aggregation of lysozyme molecules, while SDBS at high concentrations can lead to conformational and structural change of the protein. SDBS is able to inhibit the enzymatic activity of lysozyme in a highly efficient dose-dependent manner. The interaction mechanism of SDBS with lysozyme has been investigated by measuring optical spectra. Based on fluorescence and UV-vis spectra, microenvironmental change in and around the active site region induced by SDBS has been revealed and explained. Two-dimensional FTIR spectra have been analyzed to identify the secondary structures and residues of lysozyme, which have a preferential interaction with SDBS. Hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) was used to detach SDBS from the inactivated enzyme, and complete recovery of enzymatic activity was achieved. Thus, the enzymatic activity of lysozyme can be regulated by SDBS and HP-β-CD.

  15. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Wogonin induces the granulocytic differentiation of human NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells and up-regulates phospholipid scramblase 1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Guo, Qing-Long; You, Qi-Dong; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hai-Wei; Yang, Li; Gu, Hong-Yan; Qi, Qi; Tan, Zi; Wang, Xiaotang

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have firmly demonstrated that wogonin, a naturally occurring monoflavonoid extracted from the root of the Chinese herb medicine Scutellaria baicalensis, could effectively inhibit the proliferation of several cancer cell lines. However, little is known about the effect of wogonin on differentiation induction of leukemic cells. Here we investigate the potential role of wogonin in the proliferation and differentiation of NB4, a human promyelocytic leukemia cell line derived from a patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia. Our results indicated that wogonin significantly suppressed the proliferation and efficiently induced the differentiation of NB4 cells. NB4 cell growth was inhibited by 55-60% after treatment with 50 microM wogonin for a period of 5 days. The results of the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test (with 67.13% positive cells by 50 microM wogonin for 5 days), Giemsa staining (with 67.24% positive cells by 50 microM wogonin for 5 days), and the expression of mature-related cell-surface differentiation antigens CD11b and CD14 (with 70.94% CD11b(+) and 5.82% CD14(+) cells by 50 microM wogonin for 5 days) demonstrated an increase in the differentiation-inducing action of wogonin on the NB4 cells, which was accompanied by an increase in mRNA and protein expression of phospholipids scramblase 1 (PLSCR1). Meanwhile, the level of phosphorylated PKC delta (Ser643) was dramatically increased in wogonin treated NB4 cells. Interestingly, wogonin treatment displayed little effect on the apoptosis of NB4 cells. Taken together, the results reported here demonstrated that wogonin could promote the granulocytic differentiation of NB4 cells by up-regulating the expression of PLSCR1 gene.

  17. ABCA3, a key player in neonatal respiratory transition and genetic disorders of the surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Peca, Donatella; Cutrera, Renato; Masotti, Andrea; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier

    2015-10-01

    Genetic disorders of the surfactant system are rare diseases with a broad range of clinical manifestations, from fatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates to chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. ABCA3 [ATP-binding cassette (ABC), subfamily A, member 3] is a lung-specific phospholipid transporter critical for intracellular surfactant synthesis and storage in lamellar bodies (LBs). Its expression is developmentally regulated, peaking prior to birth under the influence of steroids and transcription factors. Bi-allelic mutations of the ABCA3 gene represent the most frequent cause of congenital surfactant deficiency, indicating its critical role in lung function. Mutations affect surfactant lipid and protein processing and LBs' morphology, leading to partial or total surfactant deficiency. Approximately 200 mutations have been reported, most of which are unique to individuals and families, which makes diagnosis and prognosis challenging. Various types of mutations, affecting different domains of the protein, account in part for phenotype diversity. Disease-causing mutations have been reported in most coding and some non-coding regions of the gene, but tend to cluster in the first extracellular loop and the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), leading to defective glycosylation and trafficking defects and interfering with ATP binding and hydrolysis respectively. Mono-allelic damaging and benign variants are often subclinical but may act as disease modifiers in lung diseases such as RDS of prematurity or associate with mutations in other surfactant-related genes. Diagnosis is complex but essential and should combine pathology and ultrastructure studies on lung biopsy with broad-spectrum genetic testing of surfactant-related genes, made possible by recent technology advances in the massive parallel sequencing technology. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. CYTOTOXIC PHOSPHOLIPID OXIDATION PRODUCTS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Yang, Lili; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Phospholipid oxidation products accumulate in the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions, in apoptotic cells, and circulate in oxidized LDL. Phospholipid oxidation generates toxic products, but little is known about which specific products are cytotoxic, their receptors, or the mechanism(s) that induces cell death. We find the most common phospholipid oxidation product of oxidized LDL, phosphatidylcholine with esterified sn-2 azelaic acid, induced apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The synthetic ether phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl phosphatidylcholine (HAzPC) was rapidly internalized, and over-expression of PLA2g7 (PAF acetylhydrolase) that specifically hydrolyzes such oxidized phospholipids suppressed apoptosis. Internalized HAzPC associated with mitochondria, and cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor escaped from mitochondria to the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively, in cells exposed to HAzPC. Isolated mitochondria exposed to HAzPC rapidly swelled, and released cytochrome C and apoptosis-inducing factor. Other phospholipid oxidation products induced swelling, but HAzPC was the most effective and was twice as effective as its diacyl homolog. Cytoplasmic cytochrome C completes the apoptosome, and activated caspase 9 and 3 were present in cells exposed to HAzPC. Irreversible inhibition of caspase 9 blocked downstream caspase 3 activation, and prevented apoptosis. Mitochondrial damage initiated this apoptotic cascade because over-expression of Bcl-XL, an anti-apoptotic protein localized to mitochondria, blocked cytochrome C escape, and apoptosis. Thus, exogenous phospholipid oxidation products target intracellular mitochondria to activate the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. PMID:17597068

  19. Hybrid copolymer-phospholipid vesicles: phase separation resembling mixed phospholipid lamellae, but with mechanical stability and control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Santore, Maria M

    2015-04-07

    Vesicles whose bilayer membranes contain phospholipids mixed with co-polymers or surfactants comprise new hybrid materials having potential applications in drug delivery, sensors, and biomaterials. Here we describe a model polymer-phospholipid hybrid membrane system exhibiting strong similarities to binary phospholipid mixtures, but with more robust membrane mechanics. A lamella-forming graft copolymer, PDMS-co-PEO (polydimethylsiloxane-co-polyethylene oxide) was blended with a high melting temperature phospholipid, DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), over a broad compositional range. The resulting giant hybrid unilamellar vesicles were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to analogous mixed phospholipid membranes in which a low melting temperature phospholipid, DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), was blended with DPPC. The mechanical properties of the hybrid vesicles, even when phase separated, were robust with high lysis stresses and strains approaching those of the pure copolymer vesicles. The temperature-composition phase diagram of the hybrid vesicles closely resembled that of the mixed phospholipids; with only slightly greater nonidealities in the hybrid compared with DOPC/DPPC mixed membranes. In both systems, it was demonstrated that tension could be used to manipulate DPPC solidification into domains of patchy or striped morphologies that exhibited different tracer incorporation. The patch and stripe-shaped domains are thought to be different solid DPPC polymorphys: ripple and tilt (or gel). This work demonstrates that in mixed-phospholipid bilayers where a high-melting phospholipid solidifies on cooling, the lower-melting phospholipid may be substituted by an appropriate copolymer to improve mechanical properties while retaining the underlying membrane physics.

  20. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  1. Phospholipids of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Jurtshuk, Peter; Schlech, Barry A.

    1969-01-01

    Analyses of resting cells of Azotobacter vinelandii revealed that numerous phospholipids were present that did not concentrate in the membranous R3 fraction which carried out electron transport function. PMID:5776538

  2. Effects of smoke inhalation on alveolar surfactant subtypes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, M. R.; Janigan, D. T.; MacDonald, J. M.; Faulkner, G. T.; Scott, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on alveolar surfactant subtypes were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of a flexible polyurethane foam. At 4 or 12 hours after the exposure, three surfactant pellets, P10, P60, and P100, and a supernatant, S100, were prepared by sequential centrifugation of lavage fluids at 10,000 g for 30 minutes (P10), 60,000 g for 60 minutes (P60), and 100,000 g for 15 hours (P100 and S100). Phospholipid analysis and electron microscopy were performed on each fraction. Smoke exposure dramatically altered the normal distributions of these fractions: it significantly increased the phospholipid content of the heavier subtype, P10, which is thought to represent newly secreted surfactant; had no effect on the intermediate form, P60; and dramatically increased the phospholipid content (approximately fivefold) of the lighter subtypes, P100 and S100, which are believed to represent catabolic end-products of alveolar surfactant. Only P100 was structurally altered by the smoke. These results represent alterations of the normal metabolic processing of alveolar surfactant. Whereas the mechanism is yet to be defined, it seems to involve a small but significant increase in the newly secreted surfactant, as well as an excessively high accumulation of the structurally altered catabolic forms of the secreted surfactant. Images Figure 3 PMID:7943183

  3. Exogenous surfactant suppresses inflammation in experimental endotoxin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Neha; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2009-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of exogenous surfactant and surfactant phospholipids on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Exogenous surfactant (porcine surfactant) and surfactant phospholipid (dipalmitoyl phospholipid DPPC, hexadecanol, tylaxopol) were instilled intratracheally with LPS in rats. Expression of surfactant apoproteins (SP-A) and the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and -2) was studied by immunohistochemistry, and apoptosis was analyzed by in situ terminal dUTP nick end labeling TUNEL assay. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured in the isolated macrophages by fluorescence measurement with dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). LPS-induced oxidative burst and apoptosis at 72 hours were reduced by both porcine and synthetic surfactant. SP-A as well as COX-1 and -2 expressions were suppressed with synthetic surfactant treatment, whereas with porcine surfactant (P-SF) the SP-A expression was enhanced in response to LPS administration. These results indicate that exogenous surfactant inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This anti-inflammatory activity may be an important outcome of surfactant therapy in endotoxin-induced respiratory distress.

  4. Looking beyond structure: membrane phospholipids of skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Neufer, P. Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. PMID:27370525

  5. Phospholipids from Bacillus stearothermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Card, George L.; Georgi, Carl E.; Militzer, Walter E.

    1969-01-01

    The lipids of Bacillus stearothermophilus strain 2184 were extracted with chloroform-methanol and separated into neutral lipid and three phospholipid fractions by chromatography on silicic acid columns. The phospholipids were identified by specific staining reactions on silicic acid-impregnated paper, by chromatography of alkaline and acid hydrolysis products, and by determination of acyl ester:glycerol:nitrogen:phosphorus molar ratios. The total extractable lipid was 8% of the dry weight of whole cells and consisted of 30 to 40% neutral lipid and 60 to 70% phospholipid. The phospholipid consisted of diphosphatidyl glycerol (23 to 42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (22 to 39%), and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (21 to 32%). The concentrations of diphosphatidyl glycerol and phosphatidyl glycerol were lower in 2-hr cells than in 4- and 8-hr cells. Whole cells were fractionated by sonic treatment and differential centrifugation. The total lipid content, expressed in per cent of dry weight of each fraction was: whole protoplasts, 10%; membrane fraction, 18%; 30,000 × g particulate fraction, 22%; and 105,000 × g particulate fraction, 26%. The relative phospholipid concentrations in each fraction were about the same. As had been previously reported, none of the phospholipid was stable to alkaline hydrolysis. Images PMID:5764328

  6. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  7. Light-regulated mRNA condensation by a photosensitive surfactant works as a series photoswitch of translation activity in the presence of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Saito, Hirohide; Hara, Tomoaki; Inoue, Tan; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Baigl, Damien

    2011-11-14

    AzoTAB, a photosensitive azobenzene cationic surfactant, which phototriggers translation activity through light-regulated condensation of mRNA, is added to a translation solution containing several mRNAs, which can be selectively silenced by specific small RNAs. We find that gene silencing by small RNAs remains functional regardless of AzoTAB concentration and UV illumination. In the absence of UV, the translation of all genes present in the medium is partially to fully inhibited depending on AzoTAB concentration. In contrast, the application of a short UV stimulus (365 nm for 1.5 min) results in the selective photoactivation of genes that are not silenced by small RNA. These results show that light-regulated condensation by AzoTAB works as a sequence-independent series photoswitch added to parallel sequence-specific regulation by small RNAs.

  8. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. PMID:21439262

  9. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-07

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders.

  10. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E; Neal, Charles R; Zuo, Yi Y

    2011-07-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surfactant adsorption and aggregate structure of silica nanoparticles: a versatile stratagem for the regulation of particle size and surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Savita; Rohilla, Deepak; Mehta, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    The area of silica nanoparticles is incredibly polygonal. Silica particles have aroused exceptional deliberation in bio-analysis due to great progress in particular arenas, for instance, biocompatibility, unique properties of modifiable pore size and organization, huge facade areas and pore volumes, manageable morphology and amendable surfaces, elevated chemical and thermal stability. Currently, silica nanoparticles participate in crucial utilities in daily trade rationales such as power storage, chemical and genetic sensors, groceries dispensation and catalysis. Herein, the size-dependent interfacial relation of anionic silica nanoparticles with twelve altered categories of cationic surfactants has been carried out in terms of the physical chemical facets of colloid and interface science. The current analysis endeavours to investigate the virtual consequences of different surfactants through the development of the objective composite materials. The nanoparticle size controls, the surface-to-volume ratio and surface bend relating to its interaction with surfactant will also be addressed in this work. More importantly, the simulated stratagem developed in this work can be lengthened to formulate core-shell nanostructures with functional nanoparticles encapsulated in silica particles, making this approach valuable and extensively pertinent for employing sophisticated materials for catalysis and drug delivery.

  12. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  13. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  14. Effects of early surfactant treatment persisting for one week after lung transplantation in rats.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, M E; Hofstede, G J; Petersen, A H; Haagsman, H P; Oetomo, S B; Prop, J

    1997-08-01

    We investigated whether pulmonary surfactant in rat lung transplants recovered during the first week post-transplantation, along with symptoms of the reimplantation response, and whether this recovery was affected by early surfactant treatment. The severity of pulmonary injury was varied by transplanting left lungs with 6-h and 20-h ischemia (n = 12 and 19, respectively). Half of the transplants were treated by instillation of surfactant before reperfusion. Lungs from sham operated, and normal rats (n = 4 and 5, respectively) served as controls. The pulmonary injury severely impaired lung transplant function; 10 of the worst affected animals died. After 1 wk, symptoms of reimplantation response and properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed. If untreated, the reimplantation response had almost resolved in the 6-h but not in the 20-h ischemia group; pulmonary surfactant, however, continued to be deficient in both ischemia groups (low amounts of surfactant phospholipids and surfactant protein A [SP-A]). Surfactant treatment improved the recovery from injury in the 20-h ischemia group resulting in normal lung function and amounts of surfactant phospholipids. Amounts of SP-A were not improved by surfactant treatment. In conclusion, early surfactant treatment enhances recovery from transplantation injury and is persistently beneficial for pulmonary surfactant in lung transplants.

  15. The detection of surfactant proteins A, B, C and D in the human brain and their regulation in cerebral infarction, autoimmune conditions and infections of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Schob, Stefan; Schicht, Martin; Sel, Saadettin; Stiller, Dankwart; Kekulé, Alexander S; Kekulé, Alexander; Paulsen, Friedrich; Maronde, Erik; Bräuer, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) have been studied intensively in the respiratory system. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D are proteins belonging to the family of collectins each playing a major role in the innate immune system. The ability of surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D to bind various pathogens and facilitate their elimination has been described in a vast number of studies. Surfactant proteins are very important in modulating the host's inflammatory response and participate in the clearance of apoptotic cells. Surfactant protein B and surfactant protein C are proteins responsible for lowering the surface tension in the lungs. The aim of this study was an investigation of expression of surfactant proteins in the central nervous system to assess their specific distribution patterns. The second aim was to quantify surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy subjects compared to patients suffering from different neuropathologies. The expression of mRNA for the surfactant proteins was analyzed with RT-PCR done with samples from different parts of the human brain. The production of the surfactant proteins in the brain was verified using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The concentrations of the surfactant proteins in cerebrospinal fluid from healthy subjects and patients suffering from neuropathologic conditions were quantified using ELISA. Our results revealed that surfactant proteins are present in the central nervous system and that the concentrations of one or more surfactant proteins in healthy subjects differed significantly from those of patients affected by central autoimmune processes, CNS infections or cerebral infarction. Based on the localization of the surfactant proteins in the brain, their different levels in normal versus pathologic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and their well-known functions in the lungs, it appears that the surfactant proteins may play roles in host defense of the brain, facilitation of

  16. Surfactant therapy for meconium aspiration syndrome: current status.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A; Mills, John F

    2005-01-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is an important cause of respiratory distress in the term infant. Therapy for the disease remains problematic, and newer treatments such as high-frequency ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide are being applied with increasing frequency. There is a significant disturbance of the pulmonary surfactant system in MAS, with a wealth of experimental data indicating that inhibition of surfactant function in the alveolar space is an important element of the pathophysiology of the disease. This inhibition may be mediated by meconium, plasma proteins, haemoglobin and oedema fluid, and, at least in vitro, can be overcome by increasing surfactant phospholipid concentration. These observations have served as the rationale for administration of exogenous surfactant preparations in MAS, initially as standard bolus therapy and, more recently, in association with therapeutic lung lavage. Bolus surfactant therapy in ventilated infants with MAS has been found to improve oxygenation in most studies, although there are a significant proportion of nonresponders and in many cases the effect is transient. Pooled data from randomised controlled trials of surfactant therapy suggest a benefit in terms of a reduction in the requirement for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (relative risk 0.48 in surfactant-treated infants) but no diminution of air leak or ventilator days. Current evidence would support the use of bolus surfactant therapy on a case by case basis in nurseries with a relatively high mortality associated with MAS, or the lack of availability of other forms of respiratory support such as high-frequency ventilation or nitric oxide. If used, bolus surfactant should be administered as early as practicable to infants who exhibit significant parenchymal disease, at a phospholipid dose of at least 100 mg/kg, rapidly instilled into the trachea. Natural surfactant or a third-generation synthetic surfactant should be used and the dosage repeated every 6

  17. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Y.; Akino, T. )

    1991-02-15

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed.

  18. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    Our research for the past two years has involved the study of phosphoinositides and their potential role in regulating plant growth and development. Our initial goal was to document the sequence of events involved in inositol phospholipid metabolism in response to external stimuli. Our working hypothesis was that phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) was in the plasma membrane of plants cells and would be hydrolyzed by phospholipase C to yield the second messengers inositol triphosphate (IP/sub 3/) and diacyglycerol (DAG) and that IP/sub 3/ would mobilize intracellular calcium as has been shown for animal cells. Our results with both carrot suspension culture cells and sunflower hypocotyl indicate that this paradigm is not the primary mechanism of signal transduction in these systems. We have observed very rapid, within 5 sec, stimulation of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) kinase which resulted in an increase in PIP/sub 2/. However, there was no evidence for activation of phospholipase C. In addition, we have shown that PIP and PIP/sub 2/ can activate the plasma membrane ATPase. The results of these studies are described briefly in the paragraphs below. Inositol phospholipids are localized in distinct membrane fractions. If PIP and PIP/sub 2/ play a role in the transduction of external signals, they should be present in the plasma membrane. We used the fusogenic carrot suspension culture cells as a model system to study the distribution of inositol phospholipids in various membrane fractions and organelles. Cells were labeled 12 to 18 h with myo(2-/sup 3/H) inositol and the membranes were isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The plasma membrane was enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/ compared to the intracellular membranes.

  19. MALDI imaging MS of phospholipids in the mouse lung[S

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Karin A. Zemski; Li, Bilan; Reynolds, Susan D.; Barkley, Robert M.; Gijón, Miguel A.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Henson, Peter M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid mediators are important in lung biochemistry and are derived from the enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids, which are PUFAs that are present in phospholipids in cell membranes. In this study, MALDI imaging MS was used to determine the localization of arachidonate- and docosahexaenoate-containing phospholipids in mouse lung. These PUFA-containing phospholipids were determined to be uniquely abundant at the lining of small and large airways, which were unequivocally identified by immunohistochemistry. In addition, it was found that the blood vessels present in the lung were characterized by sphingomyelin molecular species, and lung surfactant phospholipids appeared evenly distributed throughout the lung parenchyma, indicating alveolar localization. This technique revealed unexpected high concentrations of arachidonate- and docosahexaenoate-containing phospholipids lining the airways in pulmonary tissue, which could serve as precursors of lipid mediators affecting airways biology. PMID:21508254

  20. Obstructed Diffusion of Phospholipids in Polymer-Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deverall, Miranda; Ke, Puchun; Saxton, Michael; Naumann, Christoph

    2002-03-01

    The obstructed diffusion of phospholipids in polymer-tethered phospholipid bilayers is studied via single molecule fluorescence imaging. Here phospholipids tethered to the polymer cushion act as obstacles for the lateral diffusion of non-tethered phospholipids. The relationship between averaged mean-square displacement and time suggests a random distribution of obstacles at low and moderate obstacle molar concentrations and a micro-phase separation at high obstacle molar concentrations of >30 molcomparison to Monte Carlo calculations indicates that tethered phospholipids behave like mobile point obstacles, thereby showing similar diffusion properties to non-tethered phospholipids. Since polymer-lipid tethering is achieved via lipopolymer molecules consisting of polymer and lipid moieties with a significant molecular area mismatch between both moieties, our studies could help understand the effect that molecules of similar molecular geometries have on lipid diffusion in plasma membranes. In addition, our data are necessary for the understanding of the diffusion of incorporated proteins in phospholipid bilayers.

  1. Meconium-induced inflammation and surfactant inactivation: specifics of molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kopincova, Jana; Calkovska, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome in light of meconium-induced inflammation and inflammatory surfactant inactivation, related to both endogenous and therapeutic exogenous surfactant. The wide effect of meconium on surfactant properties is divided into three points. Direct effect of meconium on surfactant properties refers mainly to fragmentation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and other surfactant phospholipids together with cleavage of surfactant proteins. Initiation of inflammatory response due to activation of receptors by yet unspecified compounds involves complement and Toll-like receptor activation. A possible role of lung collectins, surfactant proteins A and D, which can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory reactions, is discussed. Initiation of inflammatory response by specified compounds in meconium reflects inflammatory functioning of cytokines, bile acids, and phospholipases contained in meconium. Unifying sketch of many interconnections in all these actions aims at providing integrated picture of inflammatory surfactant inactivation.

  2. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  3. New synthetic surfactant - how and when?

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Animal-derived surfactant preparations are very effective in the treatment of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome but they are expensive to produce and supplies are limited. In order to widen the indications for surfactant treatment there is a need for synthetic preparations, which can be produced in large quantities and at a reasonable cost. However, development of clinically active synthetic surfactants has turned out to be more complicated than initially anticipated. The hydrophobic surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, which are involved in the adsorption of surface-active lipids to the air-liquid interface of the alveoli and increase alveolar stability, are either too big to synthesize, structurally complex or unstable in pure form. A new generation of synthetic surfactants containing simplified phospholipid mixtures and small amounts of peptides replacing the hydrophobic proteins is currently under development and will in the near future be introduced into the market. However, more trials need to be performed before any conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of these synthetic surfactants in relation to natural animal-derived preparations. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Lung surfactant as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vermehren, C; Frokjaer, S; Aurstad, T; Hansen, J

    2006-01-03

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of mainly phospholipids and proteins. The composition leads to a unique spreading effect of the surfactant as well as spontaneous vesicle formation, which may be favourable characteristics of a drug delivery system for pulmonary delivery. The aim of study was to investigate the potential use of the surfactant extract, HL10 (LeoPharma, DK) as a drug delivery system. Studies involved incorporation of hydrophilic- and amphipathic model drugs (sucrose and acylated peptides) into HL10 and elucidation of the influence of surfactant proteins on the HL10 behaviour. Results showed that HL10 vesicles did not retain sucrose indicating formation of leaky vesicles. Studying the influence of surfactant proteins on release from DPPC-liposomes showed tendencies toward a protein-induced release. Hence, the surfactant proteins may influence the membrane lipid packing and characteristics resulting in leakiness of the membranes. Incorporation of acylated peptides into HL10 depended on the chain length rendering a successful incorporation of the peptide acylated with C14-acyl chains. This study suggests that HL10 may be a promising drug delivery system for the pulmonary delivery of amphipathic drug substances, e.g. therapeutically active acylated peptides (e.g. acylated insulin).

  5. Aldose Reductase-catalyzed Reduction of Aldehyde Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sanjay; Spite, Matthew; Trent, John O.; West, Matthew B.; Ahmed, Yonis; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxidation of unsaturated phospholipids results in the generation of aldehyde side chains that remain esterified to the phospholipid backbone. Such “core” aldehydes elicit immune responses and promote inflammation. However, the biochemical mechanisms by which phospholipid aldehydes are metabolized or detoxified are not well understood. In the studies reported here, we examined whether aldose reductase (AR), which reduces hydrophobic aldehydes, metabolizes phospholipid aldehydes. Incubation with AR led to the reduction of 5-oxovaleroyl, 7-oxo-5-heptenoyl, 5-hydroxy-6-oxo-caproyl, and 5-hydroxy-8-oxo-6-octenoyl phospholipids generated upon oxidation of 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC). The enzyme also catalyzed the reduction of phospholipid aldehydes generated from the oxidation of 1-alkyl, and 1-alkenyl analogs of PAPC, and 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidic acid or phosphoglycerol. Aldose reductase catalyzed the reduction of chemically synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POVPC) with a Km of 10 μM. Addition of POVPC to the culture medium led to incorporation and reduction of the aldehyde in COS-7 and THP-1 cells. Reduction of POVPC in these cells was prevented by the AR inhibitors sorbinil and tolrestat and was increased in COS-7 cells overexpressing AR. Together, these observations suggest that AR may be a significant participant in the metabolism of several structurally diverse phospholipid aldehydes. This metabolism may be a critical regulator of the pro-inflammatory and immunogenic effects of oxidized phospholipids. PMID:15465833

  6. Biophysical inhibition of synthetic vs. naturally-derived pulmonary surfactant preparations by polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Reasonable suspicion has accumulated that inhaled nano-scale particulate matter influences the biophysical function of the pulmonary surfactant system. Hence, it is evident to provide novel insights into the extent and mechanisms of nanoparticle-surfactant interactions in order to facilitate the fabrication of safe nanomedicines suitable for pulmonary applications. Negatively- and positively-charged poly(styrene) nanoparticles (diameters of ~100nm) served as model carriers. Nanoparticles were incubated with several synthetic and naturally-derived pulmonary surfactants to characterize the sensitivity of each preparation to biophysical inactivation. Changes in surface properties (i.e. adsorption and dynamic surface tension behavior) were monitored in a pulsating bubble surfactometer. Both nanoparticle formulations revealed a dose-dependent influence on the biophysical behavior of all investigated pulmonary surfactants. However, the surfactant sensitivity towards inhibition depended on both the carrier type, where negatively-charged nanoparticles showed increased inactivation potency compared to their positively-charged counterparts, and surfactant composition. Among the surfactants tested, synthetic mixtures (i.e. phospholipids, phospholipids supplemented with surfactant protein B, and Venticute®) were more susceptible to surface-activity inhibition as the more complex naturally-derived preparations (i.e. Alveofact® and large surfactant aggregates isolated from rabbit bronchoalveolar lavage fluid). Overall, nanoparticle characteristics and surfactant constitution both influence the extent of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactants. © 2013.

  7. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Lock-Johansson, Sofie; Vestbo, Jørgen; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2014-11-25

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes, their modification by interventions, and whether changes in clinical outcomes are reflected by changes in the biomarker.

  8. Egg phospholipids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Blesso, Christopher N

    2015-04-13

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized.

  9. Egg Phospholipids and Cardiovascular Health

    PubMed Central

    Blesso, Christopher N.

    2015-01-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized. PMID:25871489

  10. Immunogenicity of surfactant. I. Human alveolar surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, D S; Hallman, M; Merritt, T A

    1991-01-01

    The immunogenicity of lung surfactant derived from amniotic fluid has been well established. We have set out to examine the antigenic similarity of human surfactant to non-human alveolar surfactants currently being used therapeutically in clinical trials with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. To this end, we raised a series of eight monoclonal antibodies in rats directed to human surfactant (H1 to H8). All antibodies bound human surfactant as measured by ELISA. Four of these monoclonal antibodies bound surfactant components by Western blot analysis: all bound a 9-10-kD species. In addition, one antibody (H2) bound a protein of 16 kD, one (H8) a 6-kD protein, and one (H6) a 30-kD protein. When mixed with surfactant, three antibodies, H4, H7 and H8, profoundly altered surfactant activity in vitro in the pulsating bubble surfactometer. Three other antibodies, H1, H2, and H5 moderately inhibited surfactant's surface activity. We also examined the cross-reactivity of these monoclonal antibodies with bovine (CLSE) and porcine (Curosurf) surfactants. By Western blot analysis, only H6 bound these heterologous surfactants. Other antibodies did so by ELISA. However, functional assays indicated that antibodies H7, H8 and H4 all greatly inhibited CLSE surface activity in vitro. Five antibodies (H1-H4 and H8) inhibited Curosurf function. Thus, human surfactant species, especially low molecular weight species, are highly antigenic. Antibodies to alveolar surfactants may inhibit surfactant function in vitro. As indicated by Western blot and cross-inhibition data, human lower molecular weight surfactants share epitopes with proteins from therapeutically important porcine and bovine surfactants. The potential importance of these findings to treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome with heterologous surfactants is discussed. PMID:1988229

  11. Making heads or tails of phospholipids in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Christof; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose functional integrity requires a coordinated supply of proteins and phospholipids. Defined functions of specific phospholipids, like the mitochondrial signature lipid cardiolipin, are emerging in diverse processes, ranging from protein biogenesis and energy production to membrane fusion and apoptosis. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on interorganellar lipid transport between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. The discovery of proteins that regulate mitochondrial membrane lipid composition and of a multiprotein complex tethering ER to mitochondrial membranes has unveiled novel mechanisms of mitochondrial membrane biogenesis. PMID:21220505

  12. Phospholipid composition modulates carbon nanodiamond-induced alterations in phospholipid domain formation.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Mucci, Nicolas J; Tan, Ming Li; Steckley, Ashleigh; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, M Laird; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2015-05-12

    The focus of this work is to elucidate how phospholipid composition can modulate lipid nanoparticle interactions in phospholipid monolayer systems. We report on alterations in lipid domain formation induced by anionically engineered carbon nanodiamonds (ECNs) as a function of lipid headgroup charge and alkyl chain saturation. Using surface pressure vs area isotherms, monolayer compressibility, and fluorescence microscopy, we found that anionic ECNs induced domain shape alterations in zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine lipids, irrespective of the lipid alkyl chain saturation, even when the surface pressure vs area isotherms did not show any significant changes. Bean-shaped structures characteristic of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were converted to multilobed, fractal, or spiral domains as a result of exposure to ECNs, indicating that ECNs lower the line tension between domains in the case of zwitterionic lipids. For membrane systems containing anionic phospholipids, ECN-induced changes in domain packing were related to the electrostatic interactions between the anionic ECNs and the anionic lipid headgroups, even when zwitterionic lipids are present in excess. By comparing the measured size distributions with our recently developed theory derived by minimizing the free energy associated with the domain energy and mixing entropy, we found that the change in line tension induced by anionic ECNs is dominated by the charge in the condensed lipid domains. Atomic force microscopy images of the transferred anionic films confirm that the location of the anionic ECNs in the lipid monolayers is also modulated by the charge on the condensed lipid domains. Because biological membranes such as lung surfactants contain both saturated and unsaturated phospholipids with different lipid headgroup charges, our results suggest that when studying potential adverse effects of nanoparticles on biological systems the role of lipid compositions cannot be neglected.

  13. Functional significance and control of release of pulmonary surfactant in the lizard lung.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S

    1995-10-01

    The amount of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs of the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) increases with increasing body temperature. This increase coincides with a decrease in lung compliance. The relationship between surfactant and lung compliance and the principal stimuli for surfactant release and composition (temperature, ventilatory pattern, and autonomic neurotransmitters) were investigated. We chose to investigate ventilatory pattern (which causes mechanical deformation of the type II cells) and adrenergic agents, because they are the major stimuli for surfactant release in mammals. To examine the effects of body temperature and ventilatory pattern, isolated lungs were ventilated at either 18 or 37 degrees C at different ventilatory regimens. An isolated perfused lung preparation at 27 degrees C was used to analyze the effects of autonomic neurotransmitters. Ventilatory pattern did not affect surfactant release, composition, or lung compliance at either 18 or 37 degrees C. An increase in temperature increased phospholipid reuptake and disproportionately increased cholesterol degradation/uptake. Epinephrine and acetylcholine stimulated phospholipid but not cholesterol release. Removal of surfactant caused a decrease in compliance, regardless of the experimental temperature. Temperature appears to be the principal determinant of lung compliance in the bearded dragon, acting directly to increase the tone of the smooth muscle. Increasing the ambient temperature may result in greater surfactant turnover by increasing cholesterol reuptake/degradation directly and by increasing circulating epinephrine, thereby indirectly increasing phospholipid secretion. We suggest that changing ventilatory pattern may be inadequate as a mechanism for maintaining surfactant homeostasis, given the discontinuous, highly variable reptilian breathing pattern.

  14. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nathan J.; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned towards the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C’s seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C’s molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable poly-valine helix is replaced with a structurally stable, poly-leucine helix and includes a well placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is both structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach

  15. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation.

  16. The Cytoplasmic Tail of the T Cell Receptor CD3 ε Subunit Contains a Phospholipid-Binding Motif that Regulates T Cell Functions1

    PubMed Central

    DeFord-Watts, Laura M.; Tassin, Tara C.; Becker, Amy M.; Medeiros, Jennifer J.; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Love, Paul E.; Wülfing, Christoph; van Oers, Nicolai S. C.

    2010-01-01

    The CD3 ε subunit of the TCR complex contains two defined signaling domains, a proline-rich sequence and an ITAM. We identified a third signaling sequence in CD3 ε, termed the basic-rich stretch (BRS). Herein, we show that the positively charged residues of the BRS enable this region of CD3 ε to complex a subset of acidic phospholipids, including PI(3)P, PI(4)P, PI(5)P, PI(3,4,5)P3, and PI(4,5)P2. Transgenic mice containing mutations of the BRS exhibited varying developmental defects, ranging from reduced thymic cellularity to a complete block in T cell development. Peripheral T cells from BRS-modified mice also exhibited several defects, including decreased TCR surface expression, reduced TCR-mediated signaling responses to agonist peptide-loaded APCs, and delayed CD3 ε localization to the immunological synapse. Overall, these findings demonstrate a functional role for the CD3 ε lipid-binding domain in T cell biology. PMID:19542373

  17. A novel Sec14 phospholipid transfer protein from Nicotiana benthamiana is up-regulated in response to Ralstonia solanacearum infection, pathogen associated molecular patterns and effector molecules and involved in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Akinori; Nakano, Masahito; Vincent-Pope, Patrick; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Endo, Yaeta; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2012-07-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of plant immune responses, we isolated genes whose expression was regulated by inoculation with Ralstonia solanacearum. Here, we report the characterization of Nicotiana benthamiana belonging to the SEC14-gene superfamily designated as Nicotiana benthamiana SEC14 (NbSEC14). NbSEC14 rescued growth defects and impaired invertase secretion associated with the yeast sec14p temperature-sensitive mutant, while recombinant NbSec14 protein had phospholipids transfer activity. NbSEC14 expression was up-regulated in N. benthamiana leaves after inoculation with virulent or avirulent R. solanacearum. Expression of NbSEC14 was induced by treatment with chitin, flg22, and by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of INF1 elicitin, AvrA from R. solanacearum, and co-expression of the capsid protein from Tobacco mild green mosaic virus with its cognate resistance L1 protein. NbSEC14-silenced plants showed accelerated growth of both the virulent and avirulent R. solanacearum as well as acceleration of disease development. This study may provide useful information for the further analysis of the function of plant Sec14 protein homologs in the regulation of plant immune responses.

  18. The use of surfactant in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael; Saute, Milton; Medalion, Benjamin; Bakal, Llana; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2008-12-15

    Lung transplantation impairs surfactant activity, which may contribute to primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Prompted by studies in animals and a few reports in humans, this study sought to determine if the administration of surfactant during transplantation serves as an effective preventive measure. An open, randomized, controlled prospective design was used. Forty-two patients scheduled for single (n=38) or double (n=4) lung transplantation at a major tertiary medical center were randomly assigned to receive, or not, intraoperative surfactant treatment. In the treated group, bovine surfactant was administered at a dose of 20 mg phospholipids/kg through bronchoscope after the establishment of bronchial anastomosis. The groups were compared for oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2), chest X-ray findings, PGD grade, and outcome. Compared with the untreated group, the patients who received surfactant were characterized by better postoperative oxygenation mean PaO2/FiO2 (418.8+/-123.8 vs. 277.9+/-165 mm Hg, P=0.004), better chest radiograph score, a lower PGD grade (0.66 vs. 1.86, P=0.005), fewer cases of severe PGD (1 patient vs. 12, P<0.05), earlier extubation (by 2.2 hr; 95% CI 1.1-4.3 hr, P=0.027), shorter intensive care unit stay (by 2.3 days; 95% CI 1.47-3.74 days, P=0.001), and better vital capacity at 1 month (61% vs. 50%, P=0.022). One treated and 2 untreated patients died during the first postoperative month. Surfactant instillation during lung transplantation improves oxygenation, prevents PGD, shortens intubation time, and enhances early posttransplantation recovery. Further, larger studies are needed to assess whether surfactant should be used routinely in lung transplantation.

  19. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  20. Looking Beyond Structure: Membrane Phospholipids of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heden, Timothy D; Neufer, P Darrell; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria are highly dynamic and are capable of tremendous expansion to meet cellular energetic demands. Such proliferation in mitochondrial mass requires a synchronized supply of enzymes and structural phospholipids. While transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial enzymes has been extensively studied, there is limited information on how mitochondrial membrane lipids are generated in skeletal muscle. Herein we describe how each class of phospholipids that constitute mitochondrial membranes are synthesized and/or imported, and summarize genetic evidence indicating that membrane phospholipid composition represents a significant modulator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiratory function. We also discuss how skeletal muscle mitochondrial phospholipids may mediate the effect of diet and exercise on oxidative metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A phospholipid uptake system in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Lisbeth R; López-Marqués, Rosa L; Pedas, Pai R; McDowell, Stephen C; Brown, Elizabeth; Kunze, Reinhard; Harper, Jeffrey F; Pomorski, Thomas G; Palmgren, Michael

    2015-07-27

    Plants use solar energy to produce lipids directly from inorganic elements and are not thought to require molecular systems for lipid uptake from the environment. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Aminophospholipid ATPase10 (ALA10) is a P4-type ATPase flippase that internalizes exogenous phospholipids across the plasma membrane, after which they are rapidly metabolized. ALA10 expression and phospholipid uptake are high in the epidermal cells of the root tip and in guard cells, the latter of which regulate the size of stomatal apertures to modulate gas exchange. ALA10-knockout mutants exhibit reduced phospholipid uptake at the root tips and guard cells and are affected in growth and transpiration. The presence of a phospholipid uptake system in plants is surprising. Our results suggest that one possible physiological role of this system is to internalize lysophosphatidylcholine, a signalling lipid involved in root development and stomatal control.

  2. Akt-mediated transactivation of the S1P1 receptor in caveolin-enriched microdomains regulates endothelial barrier enhancement by oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Chatchavalvanich, Santipongse; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie; Birukova, Anna A; Fortune, Jennifer A; Klibanov, Alexander M; Garcia, Joe G N; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2009-04-24

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction results in increased vascular permeability, leading to increased mass transport across the vessel wall and leukocyte extravasation, the key mechanisms in pathogenesis of tissue inflammation and edema. We have previously demonstrated that OxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) significantly enhances vascular endothelial barrier properties in vitro and in vivo and attenuates endothelial hyperpermeability induced by inflammatory and edemagenic agents via Rac and Cdc42 GTPase dependent mechanisms. These findings suggested potential important therapeutic value of barrier-protective oxidized phospholipids. In this study, we examined involvement of signaling complexes associated with caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs) in barrier-protective responses of human pulmonary ECs to OxPAPC. Immunoblotting from OxPAPC-treated ECs revealed OxPAPC-mediated rapid recruitment (5 minutes) to CEMs of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1P(1)), the serine/threonine kinase Akt, and the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 and phosphorylation of caveolin-1, indicative of signaling activation in CEMs. Abolishing CEM formation (methyl-beta-cyclodextrin) blocked OxPAPC-mediated Rac1 activation, cytoskeletal reorganization, and EC barrier enhancement. Silencing (small interfering RNA) Akt expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated S1P(1) activation (threonine phosphorylation), whereas silencing S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated Tiam1 recruitment to CEMs, Rac1 activation, and EC barrier enhancement. To confirm our in vitro results in an in vivo murine model of acute lung injury with pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability, we observed that selective lung silencing of caveolin-1 or S1P(1) receptor expression blocked OxPAPC-mediated protection from ventilator-induced lung injury. Taken together, these results suggest Akt-dependent transactivation of S1P(1) within CEMs is important for Ox

  3. Regulation of glucose and protein metabolism in growing steers by long-chain n-3 fatty acids in muscle membrane phospholipids is dose-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, M.; Julien, P.; Couture, Y.; Dubreuil, P.; Chouinard, P. Y.; Latulippe, C.; Davis, T. A.; Thivierge, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    A previous study showed that long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA; >18 carbons n-3) exert an anabolic effect on protein metabolism through the upregulation of insulin sensitivity and activation of the insulin signaling pathway. This study further delineates for the first time whether the anabolic effect of LCn-3PUFA on metabolism is dose responsive. Six steers were used to test three graded amounts of menhaden oil rich in LCn-3PUFA (0%, 2% and 4%; enteral infusions) according to a double 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatment comparisons were made using iso-energetic substitutions of control oil for menhaden oil and using 6-week experimental periods. The LCn-3PUFA in muscle total membrane phospholipids increased from 8%, 14% to 20% as dietary menhaden oil increased. Feeding graded amounts of menhaden oil linearly decreased plasma insulin concentration (49, 35 and 25 μU/ml, P = 0.01). The insulin-stimulated amino acid disposal rates as assessed using hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic–euaminoacidemic clamps (20, 40 and 80 mU/kg per h) were linearly increased by the incremental administrations of menhaden oil from 169, 238 to 375 μmol/kg per h (P = 0.005) during the 40 mU/kg per h clamp, and from 295, 360 and 590 mmol/kg per h (P = 0.02) during the 80 mU/kg per h clamp. Glucose disposal rate responded according to a quadratic relationship with the incremental menhaden oil amounts (P < 0.05). A regression analysis showed that 47% of the amino acid disposal rates elicited during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was related to muscle membrane LCn-3PUFA content (P = 0.003). These results show for the first time that both protein and glucose metabolism respond in a dose-dependent manner to menhaden oil and to muscle membrane LCn-3PUFA. PMID:22443622

  4. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood.

  5. Anti phospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miah, M T; Hoque, M A; Sutradhar, S R; Mahmood, T; Tarafder, B K

    2009-01-01

    Anti Phospholipid Syndrome (APS) is a relatively new conception of syndrome complex first noticed in 1983. It may be primary or secondary to other diseases like SLE, RA, Systemic sclerosis, behchet's syndrome, temporal arteritis, sjogren's syndrome psoriatic arthropathy etc. Clinical manifestations are consequences of vascular thrombosis and embolism like DVT, pulmonary embolism, stroke, TIA, complication of pregnancy with pregnancy loss. We report a 34 years married female housewife who presented with sudden onset of nausea, vomiting, vertigo, dysphagia, dysarthria and ataxia. She had a chronic leg ulcer. Neurological findings were consistent with lateral medullary syndrome due to stroke though she was normotensive, nondiabetic with normal lipid profile. She had history of two abortions in last three years. Investigations were done accordingly and she fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of APS. No secondary cause was detected after thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. She was treated symptomatically along with oral anticoagulation. She improved slowly but steadily.

  6. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant in rat lungs after inhalation of nanomaterials: Fullerenes, nickel oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Chikara; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Ken-ichiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Todoroki, Motoi; Morimoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Isamu; Myojo, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace are a major concern in recent years, and hazard assessments of these materials are being conducted. The pulmonary surfactant of lung alveoli is the first biological entity to have contact with airborne nanomaterials in inhaled air. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the pulmonary surfactant components of rat lungs after a 4-week inhalation exposure to three different nanomaterials: fullerenes, nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), with similar levels of average aerosol concentration (0.13-0.37 mg/m(3)). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rat lungs stored after previous inhalation studies was analyzed, focusing on total protein and the surfactant components, such as phospholipids and surfactant-specific SP-D (surfactant protein D) and the BALF surface tension, which is affected by SP-B and SP-C. Compared with a control group, significant changes in the BALF surface tension and the concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D were observed in rats exposed to NiO nanoparticles, but not in those exposed to fullerenes. Surface tension and the levels of surfactant phospholipids and proteins were also significantly different in rats exposed to MWCNTs. The concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D and BALF surface tension were correlated significantly with the polymorphonuclear neutrophil counts in the BALF. These results suggest that pulmonary surfactant components can be used as measures of lung inflammation.

  7. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  8. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Research progress of surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Minyi; Mo, Lingyun; Qin, Ruqiong; Liang, Liying; Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of surfactant and the large growing use of the materials, the safety of surfactant may be a problem that draw worldwide attention. The surfactant can be discharged into environment through various approach and may cause toxic effects in organism. This paper reviews the environmental effects of surfactant materials for plants and animals, and raises some questions by describing the results of environmental toxicology. We put it that it is a great significant of promote the sustainable development of surfactant industry through a comprehensive understanding of surfactant environmental safety.

  11. Effect of long-term simulated weightlessness on surfactant and water balance in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Bryndina, I G; Vasilieva, N N; Krivonogova, Yu A; Baranov, V M

    2013-07-01

    Weightlessness produces adaptive and maladaptive changes in the respiratory system. We assessed the effects of 30-day antiorthostatic hanging as a model of microgravity on the water balance in the lungs and surface activity and phospholipid composition of pulmonary surfactant in C57Bl/6 mice. Long-term antiorthostatic hanging increased water content in the lungs and reduced surface-active properties of the surfactant. This was accompanied by an increase in the content of alveolar phospholipids and changes in their fractional composition (increase in the relative content of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine).

  12. Biophysicochemical Interaction of a Clinical Pulmonary Surfactant with Nanoalumina.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, F; Le Borgne, R; Seyrek, E; Berret, J-F

    2015-07-07

    We report on the interaction of pulmonary surfactant composed of phospholipids and proteins with nanometric alumina (Al2O3) in the context of lung exposure and nanotoxicity. We study the bulk properties of phospholipid/nanoparticle dispersions and determine the nature of their interactions. The clinical surfactant Curosurf, both native and extruded, and a protein-free surfactant are investigated. The phase behavior of mixed surfactant/particle dispersions was determined by optical and electron microscopy, light scattering, and zeta potential measurements. It exhibits broad similarities with that of strongly interacting nanosystems such as polymers, proteins or particles, and supports the hypothesis of electrostatic complexation. At a critical stoichiometry, micron-sized aggregates arising from the association between oppositely charged vesicles and nanoparticles are formed. Contrary to the models of lipoprotein corona or of particle wrapping, our work shows that vesicles maintain their structural integrity and trap the particles at their surfaces. The agglomeration of particles in surfactant phase is a phenomenon of importance that could change the interactions of the particles with lung cells.

  13. Cloud point of nonionic surfactants: modulation with pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    Na, G C; Yuan, B O; Stevens, H J; Weekley, B S; Rajagopalan, N

    1999-04-01

    To determine the cloud point of a variety of nonionic surfactants and to search for means to raise the surfactant cloud point in liquid formulations. Cloud points of nonionic surfactants were determined visually in a water bath. Organic compounds, many of which have been used as pharmaceutical excipients, were tested initially for effect on the cloud point of poloxamine 908. Four effective cloud point boosters (CPBs) from different structural classes were further tested on additional surfactants. A number of compounds can raise the cloud point of nonionic surfactants. These cloud point boosters are classified into two categories: nonionic and ionic. The nonionic CPBs include poly(ethylene glycols), propylene glycol, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, and 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. They are effective at molar concentrations. The ionic CPBs include anionic and cationic surfactants, charged phospholipids, long chain fatty acids, and bile salts. They are effective at millimolar concentrations. The cloud point of nonionic surfactants used in liquid formulations can be modulated through the proper choice of excipient.

  14. Transient Exposure of Pulmonary Surfactant to Hyaluronan Promotes Structural and Compositional Transformations into a Highly Active State*

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Cruz, Antonio; Richter, Ralf P.; Taeusch, H. William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that lowers surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface, stabilizing the lungs against physical forces tending to collapse alveoli. Dysfunction of surfactant is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome where naturally occurring surfactant-inhibitory agents such as serum, meconium, or cholesterol reach the lung. We analyzed the effect of hyaluronan (HA) on the structure and surface behavior of pulmonary surfactant to understand the mechanism for HA-promoted surfactant protection in the presence of inhibitory agents. In particular, we found that HA affects structural properties such as the aggregation state of surfactant membranes and the size, distribution, and order/packing of phase-segregated lipid domains. These effects do not require a direct interaction between surfactant complexes and HA and are accompanied by a compositional reorganization of large surfactant complexes that become enriched with saturated phospholipid species. HA-exposed surfactant reaches very high efficiency in terms of rapid and spontaneous adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-liquid interface and shows significantly improved resistance to inactivation by serum or cholesterol. We propose that physical effects pertaining to the formation of a meshwork of interpenetrating HA polymer chains are responsible for the changes in surfactant structure and composition that enhance surfactant function and, thus, resistance to inactivation. The higher resistance of HA-exposed surfactant to inactivation persists even after removal of the polymer, suggesting that transient exposure of surfactant to polymers like HA could be a promising strategy for the production of more efficient therapeutic surfactant preparations. PMID:23983120

  15. Transient exposure of pulmonary surfactant to hyaluronan promotes structural and compositional transformations into a highly active state.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Cruz, Antonio; Richter, Ralf P; Taeusch, H William; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2013-10-11

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that lowers surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface, stabilizing the lungs against physical forces tending to collapse alveoli. Dysfunction of surfactant is associated with respiratory pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or meconium aspiration syndrome where naturally occurring surfactant-inhibitory agents such as serum, meconium, or cholesterol reach the lung. We analyzed the effect of hyaluronan (HA) on the structure and surface behavior of pulmonary surfactant to understand the mechanism for HA-promoted surfactant protection in the presence of inhibitory agents. In particular, we found that HA affects structural properties such as the aggregation state of surfactant membranes and the size, distribution, and order/packing of phase-segregated lipid domains. These effects do not require a direct interaction between surfactant complexes and HA and are accompanied by a compositional reorganization of large surfactant complexes that become enriched with saturated phospholipid species. HA-exposed surfactant reaches very high efficiency in terms of rapid and spontaneous adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-liquid interface and shows significantly improved resistance to inactivation by serum or cholesterol. We propose that physical effects pertaining to the formation of a meshwork of interpenetrating HA polymer chains are responsible for the changes in surfactant structure and composition that enhance surfactant function and, thus, resistance to inactivation. The higher resistance of HA-exposed surfactant to inactivation persists even after removal of the polymer, suggesting that transient exposure of surfactant to polymers like HA could be a promising strategy for the production of more efficient therapeutic surfactant preparations.

  16. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  17. Speckle patterns during the spreading of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Martínez-Muñoz, Diana M.; Ferreira, Marcia Zotti Justo; Shin Nishitani, Wagner; Almeida, Alexandre Barros; Alencar, Adriano M.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a very important product in the medical treatment of the syndrome of insufficiency respiratory in neonates. The synthesis of this surfactant in labs need to optimize the rate of spreading in the alveolar interstitial liquid obtaining a monolayer of the phospholipids membrane base capable to maintains several of the dynamical properties of the respiratory system during breathing. The recover of theses mechanical properties has to be archived using the minimal quantities of product and with the optimal proteins composition (SP-B in special). In this paper we show our results of obtaining and process speckle pattern images of the spreading of phospholipids membrane composed the matrix of this product (DPPC) when physiologic interstitial liquid are presented.

  18. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  19. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  20. Budesonide added to modified porcine surfactant Curosurf may additionally improve the lung functions in meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Mokrá, D; Kopincová, J; Tomčíková-Mikušiaková, L; Calkovská, A

    2013-01-01

    Severe meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) in newborns is often treated by exogenous surfactant. Because its efficacy is reduced by meconium-induced inflammation, glucocorticoid budesonide was added into surfactant preparation Curosurf to enhance efficacy of the surfactant therapy in experimental model of MAS. Oxygen-ventilated rabbits were intratracheally given meconium (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) to induce respiratory failure. Thirty minutes later, animals were treated by intratracheal budesonide (0.25 mg/kg) or surfactant lung lavage (10 ml/kg, 5 mg phospholipids/ml) repeated twice, followed by undiluted Curosurf (100 mg phospholipids/kg) or by the above mentioned surfactant treatment with the last surfactant dose fortified with budesonide (0.25 mg/kg) or were untreated. Animals were ventilated for additional 5 hours and respiratory parameters were measured regularly. After sacrificing animals, wet-dry lung weight ratio was evaluated and plasma levels of interleukins (IL)-1beta, -6, -8, and TNF-alpha were measured by ELISA method. Efficacy of the given therapies to enhance lung functions and to diminish lung edema formation and inflammation increased from budesonide-only and surfactant-only therapy to surfactant+budesonide therapy. Combined therapy improved gas exchange from 30 min of administration, and showed a longer-lasting effect than surfactant-only therapy. In conclusions, budesonide additionally improved the effects of exogenous surfactant in experimental MAS.

  1. Single-cell analysis reveals differential regulation of the alveolar macrophage actin cytoskeleton by surfactant proteins A1 and A2: implications of sex and aging.

    PubMed

    Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Phelps, David S; Yengo, Christopher M; Chinchilli, Vernon M; Floros, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) contributes to lung immunity by regulating inflammation and responses to microorganisms invading the lung. The huge genetic variability of SP-A in humans implies that this protein is highly important in tightly regulating the lung immune response. Proteomic studies have demonstrated that there are differential responses of the macrophages to SP-A1 and SP-A2 and that there are sex differences implicated in these responses. Purified SP-A variants were used for administration to alveolar macrophages from SP-A knockout (KO) mice for in vitro studies, and alveolar macrophages from humanized SP-A transgenic mice were isolated for ex vivo studies. The actin cytoskeleton was examined by fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the macrophages were categorized according to the distribution of polymerized actin. In accordance with previous data, we report that there are sex differences in the response of alveolar macrophages to SP-A1 and SP-A2. The cell size and F-actin content of the alveolar macrophages are sex- and age-dependent. Importantly, there are different subpopulations of cells with differential distribution of polymerized actin. In vitro, SP-A2 destabilizes actin in female, but not male, mice, and the same tendency is observed by SP-A1 in cells from male mice. Similarly, there are differences in the distribution of AM subpopulations isolated from SP-A transgenic mice depending on sex and age. There are marked sex- and age-related differences in the alveolar macrophage phenotype as illustrated by F-actin staining between SP-A1 and SP-A2. Importantly, the phenotypic switch caused by the different SP-A variants is subtle, and pertains to the frequency of the observed subpopulations, demonstrating the need for single-cell analysis approaches. The differential responses of alveolar macrophages to SP-A1 and SP-A2 highlight the importance of genotype in immune regulation and the susceptibility to lung disease and the need for development of

  2. Alveolar metabolism of natural vs. synthetic surfactants in preterm newborn rabbits.

    PubMed

    Allen, V; Oulton, M; Stinson, D; MacDonald, J; Allen, A

    2001-01-01

    We compared the recoveries of four surfactant preparations: two natural [term fetal rabbit surfactant (FRS) and adult rabbit surfactant (ARS)] and two commercially available preparations [apoprotein-based Survanta (S) and synthetic Exosurf (E)] from 27-day gestation rabbit pups treated at birth and ventilated up to 120 min. At 5, 60, and 120 min, we measured the recovery of the heavy-aggregate, metabolically active form (H) and the light-aggregate, nonsurface active metabolic breakdown form (L) of alveolar surfactant and determined the phospholipid content and composition of the intracellularly stored lamellar body (LB) pool. Pups treated with FRS had <15% loss of H by 2 h. ARS-treated pups had a >50% loss of H by 1 h, and E- and S-treated pups had approximately 50% loss by 5 min, with a slower rate of continuing loss of up to 80% by 2 h. The major losses of H phospholipid were not explained by the L-form recovery. LB phospholipid significantly increased only in the E-treated pups and only at 2 h. FRS provides a biologically active form (H) of surfactant that appeared to remain in the airway for a significantly longer time than the other surfactant preparations. The unique properties of FRS merit further study.

  3. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Mijatović, Vilena Vrbanović; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student’s t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant. PMID:28027455

  4. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Vrbanović Mijatović, Vilena; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-02-21

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student's t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant.

  5. The Impact of Organic Surfactants and Coatings in Regulating Heterogeneous N2O5 Reaction Kinetics on Nascent Marine Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, O. S.; Campbell, N.; Schill, S.; Pöhlker, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 on aerosol particles impacts both the lifetime of nitrogen oxides, and the production rate of chlorine radicals following the activation of particulate chloride to nitryl chloride in both coastal and continental regions. The extent to which N2O5 reactivity impacts oxidant loadings depends on the heterogeneous reaction rate, which is directly influenced by aerosol chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state. In the marine environment, the chemical composition of aerosol particles produced via wave induced bubble bursting mechanisms varies greatly and is influenced by the composition of the sea surface microlayer . Here, we present direct measurements of N2O5 reaction kinetics determined using model sea-spray particles generated in a novel Marine Aerosol Reference Tank (MART), capable of generating accurate mimics of ambient sea spray particles, in a lab environment. Here, a synthetic sea salt ocean was sequentially doped with organic molecules chosen to mimic organic species present in natural sea water over the course of a phytoplankton bloom in the open ocean. These included sterol, galactose, lippolysaccharide, BSA protein, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DPPA). These observations permit discussion of the role of marine organics in regulating heterogeneous reaction kinetics, as well a re-evaluation of potential organic lab proxies for marine organics.

  6. Pulmonary Inflammation Disrupts Surfactant Function during Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Terry W.; Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong; Harmsen, Allen G.; Gigliotti, Francis

    2001-01-01

    During Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in mice, the degree of pulmonary inflammation correlates directly with the severity of lung function deficits. Therefore, studies were undertaken to determine whether the host inflammatory response contributes to PCP-related respiratory impairment, at least in part, by disrupting the pulmonary surfactant system. Protein and phospholipid content and surfactant activity were measured in the lavage fluid of infected mice in either the absence or presence of an inflammatory response. At 9 weeks postinfection with P. carinii, nonreconstituted SCID mice exhibited no signs of pulmonary inflammation, respiratory impairment, or surfactant dysfunction. Lavage fluid obtained from these mice had protein/phospholipid (Pr/PL) ratios (64% ± 4.7%) and minimum surface tension values (4.0 ± 0.9 mN/m) similar to those of P. carinii-free control mice. However, when infected SCID mice were immunologically reconstituted, an intense inflammatory response ensued. Pr/PL ratios (218% ± 42%) and minimum surface tension values (27.2 ± 2.7 mN/m) of the lavage fluid were significantly elevated compared to those of the lavage fluid from infected, nonreconstituted mice (P < 0.05). To examine the specific role of CD8+ T-cell-mediated inflammation in surfactant dysfunction during PCP, mice with defined T-cell populations were studied. P. carinii-infected, CD4+-depleted mice had elevated lavage fluid Pr/PL ratios (126% ± 20%) and elevated minimum surface tension values (16.3 ± 1.0 mN/m) compared to normal mice (P < 0.05). However, when infected mice were additionally depleted of CD8+ cells, Pr/PL ratios were normal and surfactant activity was improved. These findings demonstrate that the surfactant pathology associated with PCP is related to the inflammatory process rather than being a direct effect of P. carinii. Moreover, CD8+ lymphocytes are involved in the mechanism leading to surfactant dysfunction. PMID:11159965

  7. Encapsulation of ω-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsion-based delivery systems fabricated from natural emulsifiers: Sunflower phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Komaiko, Jennifer; Sastrosubroto, Ashtri; McClements, David Julian

    2016-07-15

    Nanoemulsions have considerable potential for encapsulating and delivering ω-3 fatty acids, but they are typically fabricated from synthetic surfactants. This study shows that fish oil-in-water nanoemulsions can be formed from sunflower phospholipids, which have advantages for food applications because they have low allergenicity and do not come from genetically modified organisms. Nanoemulsions containing small droplets (d<150 nm) could be produced using microfluidization, by optimizing phospholipid type and concentration, with the smallest droplets being formed at high phosphatidylcholine levels and at surfactant-to-oil ratios exceeding unity. The physical stability of the nanoemulsions was mainly attributed to electrostatic repulsion, with droplet aggregation occurring at low pH values (low charge magnitude) and at high ionic strengths (electrostatic screening). These results suggest that sunflower phospholipids may be a viable natural emulsifier to deliver ω-3 fatty acids into food and beverage products.

  8. Decrease in Membrane Phospholipid Unsaturation Induces Unfolded Protein Response*

    PubMed Central

    Ariyama, Hiroyuki; Kono, Nozomu; Matsuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takao; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Various kinds of fatty acids are distributed in membrane phospholipids in mammalian cells and tissues. The degree of fatty acid unsaturation in membrane phospholipids affects many membrane-associated functions and can be influenced by diet and by altered activities of lipid-metabolizing enzymes such as fatty acid desaturases. However, little is known about how mammalian cells respond to changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. In this study we showed that stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) knockdown increased the amount of saturated fatty acids and decreased that of monounsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids without affecting the amount or the composition of free fatty acid and induced unfolded protein response (UPR), evidenced by increased expression of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) mRNAs and splicing of Xbox-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA. SCD1 knockdown-induced UPR was rescued by various unsaturated fatty acids and was enhanced by saturated fatty acid. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3), which incorporates preferentially polyunsaturated fatty acids into phosphatidylcholine, was up-regulated in SCD1 knockdown cells. Knockdown of LPCAT3 synergistically enhanced UPR with SCD1 knockdown. Finally we showed that palmitic acid-induced UPR was significantly enhanced by LPCAT3 knockdown as well as SCD1 knockdown. These results suggest that a decrease in membrane phospholipid unsaturation induces UPR. PMID:20489212

  9. [Lung surfactant changes in acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Uchikov, A; Khristov, Zh; Murdzhev, K; Tar'lov, Z

    2000-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), with mortality rate ranging from 15 to 40 per cent, continues to be a serious challenge to emergency surgeons. Not infrequently, in such cases lesions to the respiratory system develop, with the changes in pulmonary surfactant (PS) occurring during SAP considered as one of the major factors implicated. Alterations in structural phospholipids of PS (lecithin and sphyngomyelin) are assessed under experimental conditions in 26 dogs with modulated SAP at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours, and the obtained results compared to the ones prior to pancreatitis triggering. The animals are divided up into two groups--untreated and given Sandostatin treatment. In either group a reduction of PS fractions is documented, with a statistically significant lesser reduction of the indicators under study being established in the Sandostatin-treated group by comparison with the untreated one. Modulated SAP in dogs accounts for a significant reduction of the surfactant phospholipid values--lecithin and sphyngomyelin--in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL).

  10. Supported phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, L. K.; McConnell, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers have been formed on glass, quartz, and silicon surfaces by a sequential transfer of two monolayers at a pressure of approximately 40 dyn/cm from the air-water interface to the solid substrates. Lateral diffusion measurements of L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers supported on oxidized silicon wafers reveal two sharp phase transitions at temperatures similar to those found in multilayer systems with several different techniques. The diffusion measurements obtained using fluorescence recovery after pattern photobleaching provide evidence for the existence of an intermediate (probably P beta' or ripple) phase in single bilayers. While in the intermediate and high temperature (liquid-crystalline L alpha) phase, the diffusion coefficients do not vary very much with temperature, a strong temperature dependence is observed in the low temperature (gel L beta') phase. This is attributed to defect-mediated diffusion. Lipids in silicon supported bilayers made from L-alpha-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) or L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) diffuse rapidly above their respective chain-melting transition temperatures. Arrhenius plots show straight lines with activation energies of 40.9 and 43.7 kJ/mol, respectively. Supported DPPC bilayers on oxidized silicon form long tubular liposomes when heated through their oxidized silicon form long tubular liposomes when heated through their chain-melting-phase transition, as viewed with epifluorescence microscopy. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the expansion of the lipid on the fixed solid support. Conversely, DOPC bilayers form large void areas on this substrate upon cooling. Large circular membrane defects (holes) are observed under rapid coating conditions. The formation of these defects is modulated by including small amounts of lyso-L-palmitoyl phosphatidylcholine in the DMPC-supported bilayers. A simple model describes the dependence of hole size and hole

  11. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adiponectin receptor homolog Izh2 is involved in the regulation of zinc, phospholipid and pH homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mattiazzi Ušaj, Mojca; Prelec, Metod; Brložnik, Mojca; Primo, Cecilia; Curk, Tomaž; Ščančar, Janez; Yenush, Lynne; Petrovič, Uroš

    2015-09-01

    The functional link between zinc homeostasis and membrane-related processes, including lipid metabolism regulation, extends from yeast to humans, and has a likely role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. The yeast Izh2 protein has been previously implicated in zinc ion homeostasis and in the regulation of lipid and phosphate metabolism, but its precise molecular function is not known. We performed a chemogenomics experiment to determine the genes conferring resistance or sensitivity to different environmental zinc concentrations. We then determined at normal, depleted and excess zinc concentrations, the genetic interactions of IZH2 at the genome-wide level and measured changes in the transcriptome caused by deletion of IZH2. We found evidence for an important cellular function of the Rim101 pathway in zinc homeostasis in neutral or acidic environments, and observed that phosphatidylinositol is a source of inositol when zinc availability is limited. Comparison of our experimental profiles with published gene expression and genetic interaction profiles revealed pleiotropic functions for Izh2. We propose that Izh2 acts as an integrator of intra- and extracellular signals in providing adequate cellular responses to maintain homeostasis under different external conditions, including - but not limited to - alterations in zinc concentrations.

  12. The crystal structure of the actin binding domain from alpha-actinin in its closed conformation: structural insight into phospholipid regulation of alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Franzot, Giacomo; Sjöblom, Björn; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović Carugo, Kristina

    2005-04-22

    Alpha-actinin is the major F-actin crosslinking protein in both muscle and non-muscle cells. We report the crystal structure of the actin binding domain of human muscle alpha-actinin-3, which is formed by two consecutive calponin homology domains arranged in a "closed" conformation. Structural studies and available biochemical data on actin binding domains suggest that two calponin homology domains come in a closed conformation in the native apo-form, and that conformational changes involving the relative orientation of the two calponin homology domains are required for efficient binding to actin filaments. The actin binding activity of muscle isoforms is supposed to be regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2), which binds to the second calponin homology domain. On the basis of structural analysis we propose a distinct binding site for PtdIns(4,5)P2, where the fatty acid moiety would be oriented in a direction that allows it to interact with the linker sequence between the actin binding domain and the first spectrin-like repeat, regulating thereby the binding of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain to this linker.

  13. A Histidine Cluster in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Na-H Exchanger NHE1 Confers pH-sensitive Phospholipid Binding and Regulates Transporter Activity.

    PubMed

    Webb, Bradley A; White, Katharine A; Grillo-Hill, Bree K; Schönichen, André; Choi, Changhoon; Barber, Diane L

    2016-11-11

    The Na-H exchanger NHE1 contributes to intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis in normal cells and the constitutively increased pHi in cancer. NHE1 activity is allosterically regulated by intracellular protons, with greater activity at lower pHi However, the molecular mechanism for pH-dependent NHE1 activity remains incompletely resolved. We report that an evolutionarily conserved cluster of histidine residues located in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain between two phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites (PI(4,5)P2) of NHE1 confers pH-dependent PI(4,5)P2 binding and regulates NHE1 activity. A GST fusion of the wild type C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 showed increased maximum PI(4,5)P2 binding at pH 7.0 compared with pH 7.5. However, pH-sensitive binding is abolished by substitutions of the His-rich cluster to arginine (RXXR3) or alanine (AXXA3), mimicking protonated and neutral histidine residues, respectively, and the RXXR3 mutant had significantly greater PI(4,5)P2 binding than AXXA3. When expressed in cells, NHE1 activity and pHi were significantly increased with NHE1-RXXR3 and decreased with NHE1-AXXA3 compared with wild type NHE1. Additionally, fibroblasts expressing NHE1-RXXR3 had significantly more contractile actin filaments and focal adhesions compared with fibroblasts expressing wild type NHE1, consistent with increased pHi enabling cytoskeletal remodeling. These data identify a molecular mechanism for pH-sensitive PI(4,5)P2 binding regulating NHE1 activity and suggest that the evolutionarily conserved cluster of four histidines in the proximal cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 may constitute a proton modifier site. Moreover, a constitutively activated NHE1-RXXR3 mutant is a new tool that will be useful for studying how increased pHi contributes to cell behaviors, most notably the biology of cancer cells.

  14. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    DOE PAGES

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; ...

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexationmore » of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.« less

  15. Interactions of amelogenin with phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Bekshe Lokappa, Sowmya; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2014-11-22

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral, and cell surfaces. In this paper, we investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, toward the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin–cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. DLS studies indicated complexation of rP172 and phospholipids, although the possibility of fusion of phospholipids following amelogenin addition cannot be ruled out. NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder–order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp in rP172 to DNS-bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Finally, our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities.

  16. Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant is an agent that decreases the surface tension between two media. The surface tension between gaseous-aqueous interphase in the lungs is decreased by the presence of a thin layer of fluid known as pulmonary surfactant. The pulmonary surfactant is produced by the alveolar type-II (AT-II) cells of the lungs. It is essential for efficient exchange of gases and for maintaining the structural integrity of alveoli. Surfactant is a secretory product, composed of lipids and proteins. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol are the major lipid constituents and SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D are four types of surfactant associated proteins. The lipid and protein components are synthesized separately and are packaged into the lamellar bodies in the AT-II cells. Lamellar bodies are the main organelle for the synthesis and metabolism of surfactants. The synthesis, secretion and recycling of the surfactant lipids and proteins is regulated by complex genetic and metabolic mechanisms. The lipid-protein interaction is very important for the structural organization of surfactant monolayer and its functioning. Alterations in surfactant homeostasis or biophysical properties can result in surfactant insufficiency which may be responsible for diseases like respiratory distress syndrome, lung proteinosis, interstitial lung diseases and chronic lung diseases. The biochemical, physiological, developmental and clinical aspects of pulmonary surfactant are presented in this article to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases.

  17. Characterization of phospholipid composition and its control in the plasma membrane of developing soybean root

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of plasma membrane enriched fractions from developing soybean root and several mechanisms which may regulate it have been examined. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from meristematic and mature sections of four-day-old dark grown soybean roots (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Cult. Wells II). Analysis of lipid extracts revealed two major phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Minor phospholipid classes were phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylgylcerol and diphosphatidylgylcerol. Phospholipid composition was similar at each developmental stage. Fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were 16:0, 18:0, 18:2, and 18:3. Fatty acid composition varied with both phospholipid class and the developmental stage of the root. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine by endogenous phospholipase D during membrane isolation indicated that this enzyme might be involved in phospholipid turnover within the membrane. Phospholipase D activity was heat labile and increasing the pH of the enzyme assay from 5.3 to 7.8 resulted in 90% inhibition of activity. The turnover of fatty acids within the phospholipids of the plasma membrane was studied. Mature root sections were incubated with (1-/sup 14/C) acetate, 1 mM Na acetate and 50 ..mu..g/ml chloramphenicol. Membrane lipid extracts analyzed for phospholipid class and acyl chain composition revealed that the long incubation times did not alter the phospholipid composition of the plasma membrane enriched fraction.

  18. A retrospective: Use of Escherichia coli as a vehicle to study phospholipid synthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Dowhan, William

    2012-01-01

    Although the study of individual phospholipids and their synthesis began in the 1920’s first in plants and then mammals, it was not until the early 1960’s that Eugene Kennedy using Escherichia coli initiated studies of bacterial phospholipid metabolism. With the base of information already available from studies of mammalian tissue, the basic blueprint of phospholipid biosynthesis in E. coli was worked out by the late 1960’s. In 1970’s and 1980’s most of the enzymes responsible for phospholipid biosynthesis were purified and many of the genes encoding these enzymes were identified. By the late 1990’s conditional and null mutants were available along with clones of the genes for every step of phospholipid biosynthesis. Most of these genes had been sequenced before the complete E. coli genome sequence was available. Strains of E. coli were developed in which phospholipid composition could be changed in a systematic manner while maintaining cell viability. Null mutants, strains in which phospholipid metabolism was artificially regulated, and strains synthesizing foreign lipids not found in E. coli have been used to this day to define specific roles for individual phospholipid. This review will trace the findings that have led to the development of E. coli as an excellent model system to study mechanisms underlying the synthesis and function of phospholipids that are widely applicable to other prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. PMID:22925633

  19. Comparison of rSP-C surfactant with natural and synthetic surfactants after late treatment in a rat model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Häfner, D; Germann, P G; Hauschke, D

    1998-07-01

    1. In a previous paper we showed that an SP-C containing surfactant preparation has similar activity as bovine-derived surfactants in a rat lung lavage model of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In this study surfactant was given ten minutes after the last lavage (early treatment). In the present investigation we were interested how different surfactant preparations behave when they are administered 1 h after the last lavage (late treatment). 2. Four protein containing surfactants (rSP-C surfactant, bLES, Infasurf and Survanta) were compared with three protein-free surfactants (ALEC, Exosurf and the phospholipid (PL) mixture of the rSP-C surfactant termed PL surfactant) with respect to their ability to improve gas exchange in this more stringent model when surfactant is given one hour after the last lavage. For better comparison of the surfactants the doses were related to phospholipids. The surfactants were given at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg(-1) body weight. The surfactants were compared to an untreated control group that was only ventilated for the whole experimental period. 3. Tracheotomized rats (8-12 per dose and surfactant) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min(-1), inspiration expiration ratio of 1:2, peak inspiratory pressure of 28 cmH2O at positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Animals were ventilated for one hour after the last lavage and thereafter the surfactants were intratracheally instilled. During the whole experimental period the ventilation was not changed. 4. Partial arterial oxygen pressures (PaO2, mmHg) at 30 min and 120 min after treatment were used for statistical comparison. All protein containing surfactants caused a dose-dependent increase of the reduced PaO2 values at 30 min after treatment. The protein-free surfactants showed only weak dose-dependent increase in PaO2 values at this time. This difference between the protein

  20. Diarmed (adamantyl/alkyl) surfactants from nitrilotriacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Trillo, Juan V; Vázquez Tato, José; Jover, Aida; de Frutos, Santiago; Soto, Victor H; Galantini, Luciano; Meijide, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    The compounds presented here constitute a clear example of molecular biomimetics as their design is inspired on the structure and properties of natural phospholipids. Thus novel double-armed surfactants have been obtained in which nitrilotriacetic acid plays the role of glycerol in phospholipids. The hydrophobic arms are linked to the head group through amide bonds (which is also the case of sphingomyelin): (R1NHCOCH2)(R2NHCOCH2)NCH2CO2H (R1 being CH3(CH2)11, CH3(CH2)17, CH3(CH2)7CHCH(CH2)8, and adamantyl, and R2=adamantyl). The dependence of the surface tension with concentration shows the typical profile of surfactants since a breaking point, which corresponds to the critical aggregation concentration (cac), is observed in all cases. The cac of these diarmed derivatives are about 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than those of classical monoalkyl derivatives used as reference compounds. In contrast to conventional surfactants, reversed trends in cac values and molecular areas at the solution-air interface have been observed. This anomalous behavior is tied to the structure of the surfactants and suggests that long and flexible alkyl chains should self-coil previous to the aggregation or adsorption phenomena. Above cac all compounds form large aggregates, globular in shape, which tend to associate forming giant aggregates.

  1. Autonomic control of the pulmonary surfactant system and lung compliance in the lizard.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Andrew, L K; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S; Roberts, C T

    1997-01-01

    An increase in body temperature in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps, is accompanied by an increase in the amount of pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids, with the latter consisting predominantly of phospholipid and cholesterol. This increase may result from a temperature-induced change in autonomic input to the lungs, as perfusing the isolated lungs of P. vitticeps with either acetylcholine or adrenaline increases surfactant phospholipid release. However, whether acetylcholine acts via intrapulmonary sympathetic ganglia or directly on alveolar Type II cells is unknown. Moreover, the relative importance of circulating catecholamines and pulmonary sympathetic nerves on the control of the surfactant system is also obscure. Here, we describe the mechanism of the modulation of the surfactant system and the effect of this modulation on lung compliance. The role of acetylcholine was determined by perfusing isolated lungs with acetylcholine, acetylcholine and the ganglionic antagonist hexamethonium, or acetylcholine, hexamethonium, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Perfusing with acetylcholine significantly increased phospholipid release but did not affect cholesterol release. While histological examination of the lung revealed the presence of a large autonomic ganglion at the apex, blocking sympathetic ganglia with hexamethonium did not prevent the acetylcholine-mediated increase in phospholipid. However, the increase was inhibited by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine, which indicates that acetylcholine acts on muscarinic receptors to stimulate phospholipid release. By increasing pulmonary smooth muscle tone, acetylcholine decreased opening pressure and increased static inflation pressures. Plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline increased with increasing temperature and were accompanied by a greater surfactant content in the lungs. While surfactant content was also higher in animals that exercised, plasma levels of adrenaline

  2. Lipid-protein interactions of hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C in lung surfactant assembly and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gil, J

    2001-01-01

    Phospholipids have the major role in pulmonary surfacant concerning its biophysical function of reducing surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to facilitate respiratory mechanics. However, the presence of some specific, highly hydrophobic polypeptides is essential to modulate the physical behavior of phospholipids and to promote rapid formation of stable surface films that are able to produce surface tensions in the range of 0 dynes/cm during cyclic compression. The present review summarizes the available data on the parameters governing lipid-protein interactions of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C with the main surfactant phospholipids. Lipid-protein interactions in surfactant have been studied in vitro using preparations reconstituted with very different methodological procedures. Conclusions concerning the role of hydrophobic surfactant proteins on the assembly of lipid-protein surfactant structures in vivo have been revised in this respect. This review presents the knowledge available on the disposition of SP-B and SP-C in surfactant structures, the mode, extent, selectivity, and stoichiometry of their lipid-protein interactions, and the effect of the proteins on structure and dynamics of surfactant bilayers and monolayers. Some considerations are given to possible concerted actions, under physiological conditions, of both proteins SP-B and SP-C.

  3. [Phospholipids: properties and health effects].

    PubMed

    Torres García, Jairo; Durán Agüero, Samuel

    2014-09-12

    Phospholipids are amphipathic lipids, which are found in all the cell membranes, organized as a lipid bilayer. They belong to the glycerol-derived lipids, showing a similar structure as triglycerides. The current interest of them comes from its effectiveness to incorporate different fatty acids in the cell membrane, as they exhibit better absorption and utilization than triglycerides. In this paper, the bibliographical data published about the benefits of the phospholipids in inflammatory processes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, liver disease and as an antioxidants transporter is reviewed.

  4. Surfactant Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    or the permeability contrast (i.e., degree of heterogeneity) that is present in the DNAPL zone. To solubilize DNAPL with surfactants, a sufficient...with respect to the effects of permeability and heterogeneity upon the costs of SEAR: as permeability decreases and/or the degree of heterogeneity...not be an issue for surfactant recovery at all sites. The degree to which MEUF will concentrate the calcium is a function of the surfactant itself

  5. Lung Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) Interactions with Model Lung Surfactant Lipids and an SP-B Fragment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A’s interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B’s own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A–Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding. PMID:21553841

  6. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-07

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  7. Dictyostelium uses ether-linked inositol phospholipids for intracellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jonathan; Kay, Robert R; Kielkowska, Anna; Niewczas, Izabella; Fets, Louise; Oxley, David; Stephens, Len R; Hawkins, Phillip T

    2014-10-01

    Inositol phospholipids are critical regulators of membrane biology throughout eukaryotes. The general principle by which they perform these roles is conserved across species and involves binding of differentially phosphorylated inositol head groups to specific protein domains. This interaction serves to both recruit and regulate the activity of several different classes of protein which act on membrane surfaces. In mammalian cells, these phosphorylated inositol head groups are predominantly borne by a C38:4 diacylglycerol backbone. We show here that the inositol phospholipids of Dictyostelium are different, being highly enriched in an unusual C34:1e lipid backbone, 1-hexadecyl-2-(11Z-octadecenoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-myo-inositol), in which the sn-1 position contains an ether-linked C16:0 chain; they are thus plasmanylinositols. These plasmanylinositols respond acutely to stimulation of cells with chemoattractants, and their levels are regulated by PIPKs, PI3Ks and PTEN. In mammals and now in Dictyostelium, the hydrocarbon chains of inositol phospholipids are a highly selected subset of those available to other phospholipids, suggesting that different molecular selectors are at play in these organisms but serve a common, evolutionarily conserved purpose.

  8. Surfactants, skin cleansing protagonists.

    PubMed

    Corazza, M; Lauriola, M M; Zappaterra, M; Bianchi, A; Virgili, A

    2010-01-01

    The correct choice of cosmetic products and cleansers is very important to improve skin hydration, to provide moisturizing benefits and to minimize cutaneous damage caused by surfactants. In fact, surfactants may damage protein structures and solubilize lipids. Soaps, defined as the alkali salts of fatty acids, are the oldest surfactants and are quite aggressive. Syndets (synthetic detergents) vary in composition and surfactant types (anionic, cationic, amphotheric, non-ionic). These new skin cleansing products also contain preservatives, fragrances, and sometimes emollients, humectants and skin nutrients. We present a revision of the literature and discuss recent findings regarding skin cleansers.

  9. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  10. Cyclic phosphatidic acid - a unique bioactive phospholipid.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yuko

    2008-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (CPA) is a naturally occurring analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The sn-2 hydroxy group of CPA forms a 5-membered ring with the sn-3 phosphate. CPA affects numerous cellular functions, including anti-mitogenic regulation of the cell cycle, induction of stress fiber formation, inhibition of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, and regulation of differentiation and survival of neuronal cells. Interestingly, many of these cellular responses caused by CPA oppose those of LPA despite the activation of apparently overlapping receptor populations. Since the early 1990s, studies on CPA actions gradually developed, and we are now beginning to understand the importance of this lipid. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about CPA, including enzymatic formation of CPA, unique biological activities and biological targets of CPA, and we also explore metabolically stabilized CPA analogs.

  11. Targeting Phospholipid Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Menglin; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    All cancers tested so far display abnormal choline and ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism, which has been detected with numerous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) approaches in cells, animal models of cancer, as well as the tumors of cancer patients. Since the discovery of this metabolic hallmark of cancer, many studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular origins of deregulated choline metabolism, to identify targets for cancer treatment, and to develop MRS approaches that detect choline and ethanolamine compounds for clinical use in diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Several enzymes in choline, and recently also ethanolamine, phospholipid metabolism have been identified, and their evaluation has shown that they are involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Several already established enzymes as well as a number of emerging enzymes in phospholipid metabolism can be used as treatment targets for anticancer therapy, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic approaches. This review summarizes the current knowledge of established and relatively novel targets in phospholipid metabolism of cancer, covering choline kinase α, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase D1, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C, sphingomyelinases, choline transporters, glycerophosphodiesterases, phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, and ethanolamine kinase. These enzymes are discussed in terms of their roles in oncogenic transformation, tumor progression, and crucial cancer cell properties such as fast proliferation, migration, and invasion. Their potential as treatment targets are evaluated based on the current literature. PMID:28083512

  12. Mechanisms to explain surfactant responses.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant is now standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant treatments are effective because of complex metabolic interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. The large treatment dose functions as substrate; it is taken up by the preterm lung and is reprocessed and secreted with improved function. The components of the treatment surfactant remain in the preterm lung for days. If lung injury is avoided, then surfactant inhibition is minimized. Prenatal corticosteroids complement surfactant to further enhance lung function. The magic of surfactant therapy results from the multiple interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Han, SeungHye

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension–lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications. PMID:25742123

  14. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  15. Generation and Biological Activities of Oxidized Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Oskolkova, Olga V.; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Binder, Christoph J.; Stöckl, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycerophospholipids represent a common class of lipids critically important for integrity of cellular membranes. Oxidation of esterified unsaturated fatty acids dramatically changes biological activities of phospholipids. Apart from impairment of their structural function, oxidation makes oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) markers of “modified-self” type that are recognized by soluble and cell-associated receptors of innate immunity, including scavenger receptors, natural (germ line-encoded) antibodies, and C-reactive protein, thus directing removal of senescent and apoptotic cells or oxidized lipoproteins. In addition, OxPLs acquire novel biological activities not characteristic of their unoxidized precursors, including the ability to regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Effects of OxPLs described in vitro and in vivo suggest their potential relevance in different pathologies, including atherosclerosis, acute inflammation, lung injury, and many other conditions. This review summarizes current knowledge on the mechanisms of formation, structures, and biological activities of OxPLs. Furthermore, potential applications of OxPLs as disease biomarkers, as well as experimental therapies targeting OxPLs, are described, providing a broad overview of an emerging class of lipid mediators. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1009–1059. PMID:19686040

  16. Dysfunction of pulmonary surfactant in chronically ventilated premature infants.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A; Cnaan, Avital; Hibbs, Anna Maria; Godinez, Rodolfo I; Godinez, Marye H; Truog, William E; Ballard, Philip L

    2004-12-01

    Infants of <30 wk gestation often require respiratory support for several weeks and may develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is associated with long-term pulmonary disability or death in severe cases. To examine the status of surfactant in infants at high risk for BPD, this prospective study analyzed 247 tracheal aspirate samples from 68 infants of 23-30 wk gestation who remained intubated for 7-84 d. Seventy-five percent of the infants had one or more surfactant samples with abnormal function (minimum surface tension 5.1-21.7 mN/m by pulsating bubble surfactometer), which were temporally associated with episodes of infection (p = 0.01) and respiratory deterioration (p = 0.005). Comparing normal and abnormal surfactant samples, there were no differences in amount of surfactant phospholipid, normalized to total protein that was recovered from tracheal aspirate, or in relative content of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. Contents of surfactant proteins (SP) A, B, and C, measured in the surfactant pellet by immunoassay, were reduced by 50%, 80%, and 72%, respectively, in samples with abnormal surface tension (p < or = 0.001). On multivariable analysis of all samples, SP-B content (r = -0.58, p < 0.0001) and SP-C content (r = -0.32, p < 0.001) were correlated with surfactant function. We conclude that most premature infants requiring continued respiratory support after 7 d of age experience transient episodes of dysfunctional surfactant that are associated with a deficiency of SP-B and SP-C.

  17. Immunogenicity of surfactant. II. Porcine and bovine surfactants.

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, D S; Hallman, M; Merritt, T A

    1991-01-01

    Protein-containing surfactants of human and animal origin are being used increasingly to treat neonatal and adult respiratory distress syndromes. This trend led us to examine the antigenicity of two important preparations of animal surfactant, cow lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and a porcine surfactant preparation, Curosurf. We describe here 15 monoclonal antibodies against Curosurf and four against CLSE. Antibodies were studied by Western blot analysis to determine their ability to recognize protein components of their respective surfactant preparations. They were also tested for their ability to inactivate surfactant in vitro, assayed using the pulsating bubble surfactometer. Several antibodies directed against CLSE or Curosurf functionally inactivate the surfactant to which they were raised. We determined the degree of immunologic cross-reactivity between antibodies directed to CLSE and Curosurf against the other surfactant and also against human surfactant, both by Western blot and by examining functional inactivation in vitro. Antibodies to these animal surfactants that are commonly used therapeutically may inactivate the specific animal surfactant to which they were raised, as well as human and other surfactants. Generally, when antibodies inactivate surfactant from more than one animal species, they inactivate heterologous surfactants comparably to the extent to which they inactivate the surfactant to which they are directed. Immune complexes between anti-surfactant antibodies and surfactant have been described in the course of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. The potential pathophysiological importance of anti-surfactant antibodies may therefore lie in their ability to inactivate administered surfactant, other similar surfactants and endogenous surfactant. In so doing, these antibodies may potentiate surfactant deficiency or pulmonary injury initiated by other stimuli. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1988231

  18. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  19. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  20. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  1. Effects of Stachybotrys chartarum (atra) conidia and isolated toxin on lung surfactant production and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mason, C D; Rand, T G; Oulton, M; MacDonald, J M; Scott, J E

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Stachybotrys chartarum conidia and a trichothecene, isosatratoxin-F, on choline incorporation into DSPC by fetal rabbit alveolar type II cells and on alveolar surfactant subtypes in mice. Exposure of fetal rabbit type II cells to S. chartarum conidia at concentrations of 10(3) to 10(6) conidia ml(-1) significantly depressed [3H] choline incorporation after 24 h of exposure. Exposure of the rabbit cells to 10(5) to 10(6) conidia ml(-1) also resulted in significantly depressed [3H] choline uptake after 48 h. Additionally, fetal rabbit alveolar type II cells exposed to isosatratoxin-F in concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-4) M showed a significant reduction in [3H] choline incorporation into DSPC. Alveolar surfactant phospholipid concentrations in the different metabolic subfractions of lung lavage fluid of mice intratracheally exposed to either 50 microl of 10(7) ml(-1) S. chartarum conidia or 50 microl 10(-7) M isosatratoxin-F showed some significant changes at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-exposure, compared to the surfactant subfractions of control mice which were either untreated, exposed to saline or to 50 microl of 10(-7) ml(-1) Cladosporium cladosporioides conidia. In both the S. chartarum- and the isosatratoxin-F-treated mice, exposure significantly increased P10, P100, and S100 phospholipid concentrations, while the P60 phospholipid concentrations were depressed. In contrast, C. cladosporioides-treated mice showed only one significant change in subfraction phospholipid concentration: P60 was depressed at 48 h post-exposure. These results reveal that alveolar type II cells are sensitive to exposure to S. chartarum conidia and to isosatratoxin F. Sensitivity is manifest by alterations in the normal metabolic processing of alveolar surfactant. In exposed mice, this effect appears to involve a significant increase in newly secreted surfactant and an accumulation of the used surfactant forms.

  2. Combined effect of sesamin and soybean phospholipid on hepatic fatty acid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Ide, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    We studied the combined effect of sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamine) and soybean phospholipid on lipid metabolism in rats. Male rats were fed diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g/kg sesamin, and containing 0 or 50 g/kg soybean phospholipid, for 19 days. Sesamin and soybean phospholipid decreased serum triacylglycerol concentrations and the combination of these compounds further decreased the parameter in an additive fashion. Soybean phospholipid but not sesamin reduced the hepatic concentration of triacylglycerol. The combination failed to cause a strong decrease in hepatic triacylglycerol concentration, presumably due to the up-regulation of Cd36 by sesamin. Combination of sesamin and soybean phospholipid decreased the activity and mRNA levels of hepatic lipogenic enzymes in an additive fashion. Sesamin strongly increased the parameters of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Soybean phospholipid increased hepatic activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase although it failed to affect the activity of other enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Sesamin strongly increased hepatic concentration of carnitine. Sesamin and soybean phospholipid combination further increased this parameter, accompanying a parallel increase in mRNA expression of carnitine transporter. These changes can account for the strong decrease in serum triacylglycerol in rats fed a diet containing both sesamin and soybean phospholipid.

  3. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Ana C.; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  4. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  5. Adverse biophysical effects of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles on natural pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E; Zhao, Xinxin; Loo, Joachim S C; Zuo, Yi Y

    2011-08-23

    Inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) must first interact with the pulmonary surfactant (PS) lining layer that covers the entire internal surface of the respiratory tract and plays an important role in surface tension reduction and host defense. Interactions with the PS film determine the subsequent clearance, retention, and translocation of the inhaled NPs and hence their potential toxicity. To date, little is known how NPs interact with PS, and whether or not NPs have adverse effects on the biophysical function of PS. We found a time-dependent toxicological effect of hydroxyapatite NPs (HA-NPs) on a natural PS, Infasurf, and the time scale of surfactant inhibition after particle exposure was comparable to the turnover period of surfactant metabolism. Using a variety of in vitro biophysicochemical characterization techniques, we have determined the inhibition mechanism to be due to protein adsorption onto the HA-NPs. Consequently, depletion of surfactant proteins from phospholipid vesicles caused conversion of original large vesicles into much smaller vesicles with poor surface activity. These small vesicles, in turn, inhibited biophysical function of surfactant films after adsorption at the air-water interface. Cytotoxicity study found that the HA-NPs at the studied concentration were benign to human bronchial epithelial cells, thereby highlighting the importance of evaluating biophysical effect of NPs on PS. The NP-PS interaction mechanism revealed by this study may not only provide new insight into the toxicological study of nanoparticles but also shed light on the feasibility of NP-based pulmonary drug delivery.

  6. Surfactants in the environment.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  7. Interactions of Amelogenin with Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Lokappa, Sowmya Bekshe; Chandrababu, Karthik Balakrishna; Dutta, Kaushik; Perovic, Iva; Evans, John Spencer; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin protein has the potential to interact with other enamel matrix proteins, mineral and cell surfaces. We investigated the interactions of recombinant amelogenin rP172 with small unilamellar vesicles as model membranes, towards the goal of understanding the mechanisms of amelogenin-cell interactions during amelogenesis. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used. In the presence of phospholipid vesicles, a blue shift in the Trp fluorescence emission maxima of rP172 was observed (~334 nm) and the Trp residues of rP172 were inaccessible to the aqueous quencher acrylamide. Though in DLS studies we cannot exclude the possibility of fusion of liposomes as the result of amelogenin addition, NMR and CD studies revealed a disorder-order transition of rP172 in a model membrane environment. Strong FRET from Trp in rP172 to DNS–bound-phospholipid was observed, and fluorescence polarization studies indicated that rP172 interacted with the hydrophobic core region of model membranes. Our data suggest that amelogenin has ability to interact with phospholipids and that such interactions may play key roles in enamel biomineralization as well as reported amelogenin signaling activities. PMID:25298002

  8. Nutritional Deficiencies and Phospholipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, María S.; Oliveros, Liliana B.; Gomez, Nidia N.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipids are important components of the cell membranes of all living species. They contribute to the physicochemical properties of the membrane and thus influence the conformation and function of membrane-bound proteins, such as receptors, ion channels, and transporters and also influence cell function by serving as precursors for prostaglandins and other signaling molecules and modulating gene expression through the transcription activation. The components of the diet are determinant for cell functionality. In this review, the effects of macro and micronutrients deficiency on the quality, quantity and metabolism of different phospholipids and their distribution in cells of different organs is presented. Alterations in the amount of both saturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins A, E and folate, and other micronutrients, such as zinc and magnesium, are discussed. In all cases we observe alterations in the pattern of phospholipids, the more affected ones being phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin. The deficiency of certain nutrients, such as essential fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins and some metals may contribute to a variety of diseases that can be irreversible even after replacement with normal amount of the nutrients. Usually, the sequelae are more important when the deficiency is present at an early age. PMID:21731449

  9. Combined exogenous surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide therapy for lung ischemia-reperfusion injury in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Warnecke, G; Strüber, M; Fraud, S; Hohlfeld, J M; Haverich, A

    2001-05-15

    The combined application of exogenous surfactant and inhaled nitric oxide was evaluated for prevention of ischemia-reperfusion injury of the lung. Left lungs were selectively perfused in 18 minipigs in situ with cold preservation solution. After 90 min of warm ischemia, the lungs were reperfused and the right pulmonary artery and bronchus were ligated (control group, n=6). Exogenous surfactant was instilled via bronchoscopy during ischemia (surfactant group, n=6). In a third group, surfactant was applied, followed by administration of inhaled nitric oxide (surfactant+NO group, n=6). Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were recorded for 7 hr, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was obtained before and after reperfusion for measurement of surface tension, small aggregate/large aggregate ratio, protein and phospholipid contents, and a differential cell count. Control group animals survived for 3.7+/-1.4 hr. In both surfactant-treated groups, five out of six animals survived the observation period (P<0.001). Dynamic compliance of the lung was decreased in control animals (P<0.001). In the surfactant+NO group, arterial PO2 was higher than in both other groups (P<0.001). BALF cell count and histology showed reduced neutrophil infiltration in surfactant+NO-treated lungs. Surface tension assessed in BALF with a pulsating bubble surfactometer was severely impaired in control animals (gammamin, 14.82+/-9.95 mN/m), but maintained in surfactant-treated (gammamin, 1.11+/-0.56 mN/m) and surfactant+NO-treated animals (gammamin, 3.90+/-2.35 mN/m, P=0.02). Administration of exogenous surfactant in lung reperfusion injury results in improved lung compliance. The addition of inhaled NO improves arterial oxygenation and reduces neutrophil extravasation compared with surfactant treatment alone.

  10. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  11. The role of human phospholipid scramblases in apoptosis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanam, Ulaganathan; Palanirajan, Santosh Kumar; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2017-08-24

    Human phospholipid scramblases (hPLSCRs) are a family of four homologous single pass transmembrane proteins (hPLSCR1-4) initially identified as the proteins responsible for Ca(2+) mediated bidirectional phospholipid translocation in plasma membrane. Though in-vitro assays had provided evidence, the role of hPLSCRs in phospholipid translocation is still debated. Recent reports revealed a new class of proteins, TMEM16 and Xkr8 to exhibit scramblase activity challenging the function of hPLSCRs. Apart from phospholipid scrambling, numerous reports have emphasized the multifunctional roles of hPLSCRs in key cellular processes including tumorigenesis, antiviral defense, protein and DNA interactions, transcriptional regulation and apoptosis. In this review, the role of hPLSCRs in mediating cell death through phosphatidylserine exposure, interaction with death receptors, cardiolipin exposure, heavy metal and radiation induced apoptosis and pathological apoptosis followed by their involvement in cancer cells are discussed. This review aims to connect the multifunctional characteristics of hPLSCRs to their decisive involvement in apoptotic pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Recent advances in gemini surfactants: oleic Acid-based gemini surfactants and polymerizable gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Gemini surfactants recently developed by our research group are introduced from the standpoints of their syntheses, aqueous solution properties, and potential applications. Two series of gemini surfactants are introduced in this short review, the first of which is the oleic acid-based gemini surfactants, and the second is the polymerizable gemini surfactants. These gemini surfactants have been developed not only as environmentally friendly materials (the use of gemini surfactants enables the reduction of the total consumption of surfactants in chemical products owing to their excellent adsorption and micellization capabilities at low concentrations) but also as functional organic materials.

  13. Concentration-dependent, temperature-dependent non-Newtonian viscosity of lung surfactant dispersions.

    PubMed

    King, D M; Wang, Z; Kendig, J W; Palmer, H J; Holm, B A; Notter, R H

    2001-07-01

    The bulk shear viscosities of aqueous dispersions of lavaged calf lung surfactant (LS) and its chloroform:methanol extract (CLSE) were measured as a function of concentration, shear rate and temperature. At 10-mg phospholipid per milliliter, dispersions of LS and vortexed CLSE in 0.15 M NaCl (saline) had low viscosities near 1 cp over a range of shear rates from 225 to 1125 s(-1). Lung surfactant viscosity increased with phospholipid concentration and became strongly non-Newtonian with higher values at low shear rates. At 37 degrees C and 40 mg/ml, LS and vortexed CLSE in saline had viscosities of 38 and 34 cp (77 s(-1)) and 12 and 7 cp (770 s(-1)), respectively. Viscosity values for LS and CLSE were dependent on temperature and, at fixed shear, were lower at 23 degrees C than at 37 or 10 degrees C. Hysteresis was also present in viscosity measurements depending on whether shear rate was successively increased or decreased during study. Addition of 5 mM Ca(2+) at 37 degrees C markedly reduced CLSE viscosity at all shear rates and decreased LS viscosity at low shear rates. Dispersion by sonication rather than vortexing increased the viscosity of CLSE at fixed shear, while synthetic phospholipids dispersed by either method had low, relatively Newtonian viscosities. The complex viscous behavior of dispersions of LS and CLSE in saline results from their heterogeneous aggregated microstructure of phospholipids and apoproteins. Viscosity is influenced not only by the aggregate surface area under shear, but also by phospholipid-apoprotein interactions and aggregate structure/deformability. Similar complexities likely affect the viscosities of biologically-derived exogenous surfactant preparations administered to patients in clinical surfactant therapy.

  14. Control of pulmonary surfactant secretion from type II pneumocytes isolated from the lizard Pogona vitticeps.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Lopatko, O V; Orgeig, S; Codd, J R; Daniels, C B

    1999-12-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture consisting of lipids and proteins and secreted by type II cells, functions to reduce the surface tension of the fluid lining of the lung, and thereby decreases the work of breathing. In mammals, surfactant secretion appears to be influenced primarily by the sympathetic nervous system and changes in ventilatory pattern. The parasympathetic nervous system is not believed to affect surfactant secretion in mammals. Very little is known about the factors that control surfactant secretion in nonmammalian vertebrates. Here, a new methodology for the isolation and culture of type II pneumocytes from the lizard Pogona vitticeps is presented. We examined the effects of the major autonomic neurotransmitters, epinephrine (Epi) and ACh, on total phospholipid (PL), disaturated PL (DSP), and cholesterol (Chol) secretion. At 37 degrees C, only Epi stimulated secretion of total PL and DSP from primary cultures of lizard type II cells, and secretion was blocked by the beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist propranolol. Neither of the agonists affected Chol secretion. At 18 degrees C, Epi and ACh both stimulated DSP and PL secretion but not Chol secretion. The secretion of surfactant Chol does not appear to be under autonomic control. It appears that the secretion of surfactant PL is predominantly controlled by the autonomic nervous system in lizards. The sympathetic nervous system may control surfactant secretion at high temperatures, whereas the parasympathetic nervous system may predominate at lower body temperatures, stimulating surfactant secretion without elevating metabolic rate.

  15. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  16. Surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, in respiratory fungal infections: their role in the inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Carreto-Binaghi, Laura Elena; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex fluid that comprises phospholipids and four proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D) with different biological functions. SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D are essential for the lungs' surface tension function and for the organization, stability and metabolism of lung parenchyma. SP-A and SP-D, which are also known as pulmonary collectins, have an important function in the host's lung immune response; they act as opsonins for different pathogens via a C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain and enhance the attachment to phagocytic cells or show their own microbicidal activity by increasing the cellular membrane permeability. Interactions between the pulmonary collectins and bacteria or viruses have been extensively studied, but this is not the same for fungal pathogens. SP-A and SP-D bind glucan and mannose residues from fungal cell wall, but there is still a lack of information on their binding to other fungal carbohydrate residues. In addition, both their relation with immune cells for the clearance of these pathogens and the role of surfactant proteins' regulation during respiratory fungal infections remain unknown. Here we highlight the relevant findings associated with SP-A and SP-D in those respiratory mycoses where the fungal infective propagules reach the lungs by the airways.

  17. Effects of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants on the size and dynamics of phosphatidylcholine bilayers with saturated and unsaturated chains.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu

    2015-07-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants of different sizes were simulated with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) bilayers. Regardless of the phospholipid type, larger surfactants at higher concentrations more significantly insert into the bilayer and increase the bilayer-surface size, in agreement with experiments and previous simulations. Insertion of surfactants only slightly decreases the bilayer thickness, as also observed in experiments. Although the surfactant insertion and its effect on the bilayer size and thickness are similar in different types of bilayers, the volume fractions of surfactants in the bilayer are higher for DMPC bilayers than for POPC and DOPC bilayers. In particular, ionic surfactants with four hydrocarbons yield their volume fractions of 4.6% and 8.7%, respectively, in POPC and DMPC bilayers, in quantitative agreement with experimental values of ∼5% and ∼10%. Also, the inserted surfactants increase the lateral diffusivity of the bilayer, which depends on the bilayer type. These findings indicate that although the surfactant insertion does not depend on the bilayer type, the effects of surfactants on the volume fraction and bilayer dynamics occur more significantly in the DMPC bilayer because of the smaller area per lipid and shorter saturated tails, which helps explain the experimental observations regarding different volume fractions of surfactants in POPC and DMPC bilayers.

  18. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    is designed to evaluate the utility of levels of two phospholipids in serum as a marker of past drinking behavior across month - level time horizons...panel of serum phospholipids (sphingomyelin, and lysophosphatidylcholines) in proportion to the level of consumption in the past month . Further, we...the relationship between the panel of serum phospholipids of interest and the amount of alcohol consumption during the past month in returning

  19. Toxin-Induced Activation of Rat Hepatocyte Prostaglandin Synthesis and Phospholipid Metabolism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-22

    SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necesay and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP - microcystin -LR, arachidonic acid, phospholipid...pool was reduced to 47% (p ɘ.025) by l’ 3’ microcystin -LR. Changes in phospholipid classes indicated that prostaglandin formation induced by microcystin ... microcystin -LR has important effects on the regulation of inflammatory mediator synthesis in hepatocytes. 7.,1 ,- TOXIN-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF RAT HEPATOCYTE

  20. Mechanisms and Functions of Vinculin Interactions with Phospholipids at Cell Adhesion Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Izard, Tina; Brown, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal protein vinculin is a major regulator of cell adhesion and attaches to the cell surface by binding to specific phospholipids. Structural, biochemical, and biological studies provided much insight into how vinculin binds to membranes, what components it recognizes, and how lipid binding is regulated. Here we discuss the roles and mechanisms of phospholipids in regulating the structure and function of vinculin and of its muscle-specific metavinculin splice variant. A full appreciation of these processes is necessary for understanding how vinculin regulates cell motility, migration, and wound healing, and for understanding of its role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26728462

  1. Phospholipid synthesis and transport in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jean E

    2015-01-01

    Membranes of mammalian subcellular organelles contain defined amounts of specific phospholipids that are required for normal functioning of proteins in the membrane. Despite the wide distribution of most phospholipid classes throughout organelle membranes, the site of synthesis of each phospholipid class is usually restricted to one organelle, commonly the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Thus, phospholipids must be transported from their sites of synthesis to the membranes of other organelles. In this article, pathways and subcellular sites of phospholipid synthesis in mammalian cells are summarized. A single, unifying mechanism does not explain the inter-organelle transport of all phospholipids. Thus, mechanisms of phospholipid transport between organelles of mammalian cells via spontaneous membrane diffusion, via cytosolic phospholipid transfer proteins, via vesicles and via membrane contact sites are discussed. As an example of the latter mechanism, phosphatidylserine (PS) is synthesized on a region of the ER (mitochondria-associated membranes, MAM) and decarboxylated to phosphatidylethanolamine in mitochondria. Some evidence is presented suggesting that PS import into mitochondria occurs via membrane contact sites between MAM and mitochondria. Recent studies suggest that protein complexes can form tethers that link two types of organelles thereby promoting lipid transfer. However, many questions remain about mechanisms of inter-organelle phospholipid transport in mammalian cells. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Oxidized Phospholipids: Biomarker for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Mohammad Z.; Kar, Niladri S.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    Biologically active oxidized phospholipids can initiate and modulate many of the cellular events attributed to inflammation leading to atherosclerosis. Produced by enzymatic or non-enzymatic processes, these molecules interact with various cells via specific receptors and in general give rise to inflammatory signals. There is considerable evidence that oxidized phospholipids accumulate in vivo and play significant roles in atherosclerosis and thrombosis, suggesting that oxidized phospholipids could be biomarkers that reflect the global extent of these diseases in vivo. Thus, understanding the biosynthetic pathways, receptor specificity and signaling processes of oxidized phospholipids is important in understanding atherosclerosis, thrombosis and related inflammatory diseases. PMID:19061967

  3. Shapes of Mixed Phospholipid Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-01-01

    We studied the shape of phospholipid vesicles prepared by hydration of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine (SOPC) and phosphatidylserine (SOPS) in different proportions. The aim of the work is to obtain some insight into the influence of the chemical composition of a biomembrane on its shape. The optical microscopy results show that the shape of the vesicles depend on the SOPC:SOPS composition. For low SOPS contents, coiled cylindrical vesicles are observed. The results suggest that specific compositions of the SOPC:SOPS vesicles produce some spontaneous curvature on the membrane and then a coiling instability. PMID:19669461

  4. Interaction of caldesmon with phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Czuryło, E A; Zborowski, J; Dabrowska, R

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of caldesmon with liposomes composed of various phospholipids has been examined by tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicate that caldesmon makes its strongest complex with phosphatidylserine (PS) vesicles (Kass. = 1.45 x 10(5) M-1). Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions contribute to the stability of this complex. The site for strong binding of PS seems to be located in the N-terminal part of the 34 kDa C-terminal fragment of caldesmon. Binding of PS at this site results in displacement of calmodulin from its complex with caldesmon. Images Figure 4 PMID:8484721

  5. Stability and stoichiometry of bilayer phospholipid-cholesterol complexes: relationship to cellular sterol distribution and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Tabei, S M Ali; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L

    2013-10-08

    Is cholesterol distributed among intracellular compartments by passive equilibration down its chemical gradient? If so, its distribution should reflect the relative cholesterol affinity of the constituent membrane phospholipids as well as their capacity for association with the sterol. We examined this issue by analyzing the reactivity to cholesterol oxidase of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing phospholipids and varied levels of cholesterol. The rates of cholesterol oxidation differed among the various phospholipid environments by roughly 4 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, accessibility to the enzyme increased by orders of magnitude at cholesterol thresholds that suggested cholesterol:phospholipid association ratios of 1:1, 2:3, or 1:2 (moles:moles). The accessibility of cholesterol above these thresholds was still constrained by its particular phospholipid environment. One phospholipid, 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine, exhibited no threshold. The analysis suggested values for the stoichiometries of the putative cholesterol-phospholipid complexes, their relative stabilities, and the fractions of bilayer cholesterol not in complexes at the threshold equivalence points. Predictably, the saturated phosphorylcholine species had the lowest apparent stoichiometric ratios and the strongest associations with cholesterol. These results are in general agreement with the equilibrium distribution of cholesterol between the various LUVs and methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, the behavior of the cholesterol in intact human red blood cells matched predictions made from LUVs of the corresponding composition. These results support a passive mechanism for the intracellular distribution of cholesterol that can provide a signal for its homeostatic regulation.

  6. STABILITY AND STOICHIOMETRY OF BILAYER PHOSPHOLIPID-CHOLESTEROL COMPLEXES: RELATIONSHIP TO CELLULAR STEROL DISTRIBUTION AND HOMEOSTASIS&

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ali Tabei, S. M.; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2013-01-01

    Does cholesterol distribute among intracellular compartments by passive equilibration down its chemical gradient? If so, its distribution should reflect the relative cholesterol affinity of the constituent membrane phospholipids as well as their ability to form stoichiometric cholesterol complexes. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the reactivity to cholesterol oxidase of large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing biological phospholipids plus varied cholesterol. The rates of cholesterol oxidation differed among the various phospholipid environments by roughly four orders of magnitude. Furthermore, accessibility to the enzyme increased by orders of magnitude at cholesterol thresholds that suggested stoichiometries of association of 1:1, 2:3 or 1:2 cholesterol:phospholipid (mol:mol). Cholesterol accessibility above the threshold was still constrained by its particular phospholipid environment. One phospholipid, 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine, exhibited no threshold. The analysis suggested values for the relative stabilities of the cholesterol-phospholipid complexes and for the fractions of bilayer cholesterol not in complexes at the threshold equivalence points; predictably, the saturated phosphorylcholine species had the lowest stoichiometries and the strongest affinities for cholesterol. These results were in general agreement with the equilibrium distribution of cholesterol between the various LUVs and methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, the properties of the cholesterol in intact human red blood cells matched predictions made from LUVs of the corresponding composition. These results support a passive mechanism for the intracellular distribution of cholesterol that can provide a signal for its homeostatic regulation. PMID:24000774

  7. Surface-active phospholipid: a Pandora's box of clinical applications. Part I. The lung and air spaces.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2002-04-01

    Almost everywhere in the body there are phospholipids, not only comprising the lipid bilayer of membranes, but also in the free state. What is seldom appreciated, except in respirology, is that these 'free' phospholipids are unusual in that many are highly surface active. Surface activity is a property of certain substances (surfactants), conferred by their molecular constitution and configuration, which predisposes them to locate at interfaces because, in doing so, they reduce interfacial energy. When adsorbed (reversibly bound) to solid surfaces, surfactants can impart many highly desirable properties that have been widely studied and long accepted in the physical sciences, while their commercial applications have withstood the test of time. These desirable properties include lubricity (boundary lubrication), release (antistick) and dewatering, while providing a barrier to corrosion, abrasion, solute transmission and to biological microorganisms. Many of these offer obvious roles for surface-active phospholipid (SAPL), ranging from a corrosion inhibitor in the stomach to a load-bearing lubricant in the joints. This opens a veritable 'Pandora's box' of potential clinical applications. Part I of this review challenges traditional beliefs in respirology that 'surfactant' is unique to the lung and, moreover, that its actions are confined to the liquid-air interface. Evidence is discussed that, by binding to alveolar epithelium, SAPL imparts semi-permeability needed before channels pumping ions can also pump water vital for maintaining fluid balance. Evidence is also reviewed for a lining to upper airways, sinuses and Eustachian tube where it can act like a standard release agent.

  8. Electrostatic control of phospholipid polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Tarahovsky, Y S; Arsenault, A L; MacDonald, R C; McIntosh, T J; Epand, R M

    2000-12-01

    A regular progression of polymorphic phase behavior was observed for mixtures of the anionic phospholipid, cardiolipin, and the cationic phospholipid derivative, 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine. As revealed by freeze-fracture electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray diffraction, whereas the two lipids separately assume only lamellar phases, their mixtures exhibit a symmetrical (depending on charge ratio and not polarity) sequence of nonlamellar phases. The inverted hexagonal phase, H(II,) formed from equimolar mixtures of the two lipids, i.e., at net charge neutrality (charge ratio (CR((+/-))) = 1:1). When one type of lipid was in significant excess (CR((+/-)) = 2:1 or CR((+/-)) = 1:2), a bicontinuous cubic structure was observed. These cubic phases were very similar to those sometimes present in cellular organelles that contain cardiolipin. Increasing the excess of cationic or anionic charge to CR((+/-)) = 4:1 or CR((+/-)) = 1:4 led to the appearance of membrane bilayers with numerous interlamellar contacts, i.e., sponge structures. It is evident that interactions between cationic and anionic moieties can influence the packing of polar heads and hence control polymorphic phase transitions. The facile isothermal, polymorphic interconversion of these lipids may have important biological and technical implications.

  9. Phospholipid Metabolism in Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Short, Steven A.; White, David C.; Aleem, M. I. H.

    1969-01-01

    The lipid composition of the chemoautotroph Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans has been examined. Fatty acids represent 2% of the dry weight of the cells and 86% of the total are extractable with organic solvents. About 25% of the total fatty acids are associated with diacyl phospholipids. Polar carotenoids, the benzoquinone coenzyme Q-8, and most of the fatty acids are present in the neutral lipids. The phospholipids have been identified as phosphatidyl monomethylethanolamine (42%), phosphatidyl glycerol (23%), phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20%), cardiolipin (13%), phosphatidyl choline (1.5%), and phosphatidyl dimethylethanolamine (1%) by chromatography of the diacyl lipids, by chromatography in four systems of the glycerol phosphate esters derived from the lipids by mild alkaline methanolysis, and by chromatographic identification of the products of acid hydrolysis of the esters. No trace of phosphatidylserine (PS), glycerolphosphorylserine, or serine could be detected in the lipid extract or in derivatives of that extract. This casts some doubt on the postulated involvement of PS in iron metabolism. After growth in the presence of 14C and 32P, there was essentially no difference in the turnover of either isotope in the glycerolphosphate ester derived from each lipid in cells grown at pH 1.5 or 3.5. Images PMID:5802599

  10. Phospholipid liposomes functionalized by protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Savostyanov, G. V.; Grishina, O. A.

    2015-03-01

    Finding new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in newborns is one of the contemporary problems of medicine and pharmaceutical industry. Modern researches in this field indicate the promising prospects of supramolecular transport systems for targeted drug delivery to the brain which can overcome the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, the solution of this problem is actual not only for medicine, but also for society as a whole because it determines the health of future generations. Phospholipid liposomes due to combination of lipo- and hydrophilic properties are considered as the main future objects in medicine for drug delivery through the BBB as well as increasing their bioavailability and toxicity. Liposomes functionalized by various proteins were used as transport systems for ease of liposomes use. Designing of modification oligosaccharide of liposomes surface is promising in the last decade because it enables the delivery of liposomes to specific receptor of human cells by selecting ligand and it is widely used in pharmacology for the treatment of several diseases. The purpose of this work is creation of a coarse-grained model of bilayer of phospholipid liposomes, functionalized by specific to the structural elements of the BBB proteins, as well as prediction of the most favorable orientation and position of the molecules in the generated complex by methods of molecular docking for the formation of the structure. Investigation of activity of the ligand molecule to protein receptor of human cells by the methods of molecular dynamics was carried out.

  11. Self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of stabilized ellagic acid-phospholipid complex with improved dissolution and permeability.

    PubMed

    Avachat, Amelia M; Patel, Vijay G

    2015-07-01

    Ellagic acid (EA), a plant polyphenol known for its wide-range of health benefits has limited use due to its low oral bioavailability. In this study, a new self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS), based on the phospholipid complex technique, was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of ellagic acid. Ellagic acid-phospholipid complex was prepared by an anti-solvent method and characterized. Enhanced lipophilicity after the formation of ellagic acid-phospholipid complex was verified through solubility studies. Preliminary screening was carried out to select oil, surfactant and co-surfactant. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the area of nanoemulsification. Formulations were optimized on the basis of globule size, cloud point and robustness to dilution. The optimized SNEDDS of ellagic acid-phospholipid complex showed mean globule size of 106 ± 0.198 nm and cloud point at 83-85 °C. The in vitro drug release from SNEDDS was found to be higher compared to EA suspension and complex, while ex vivo studies showed increased permeation from SNEDDS compared to EA suspension. Moreover, SNEDDS overcome the food effect which was shown by EA suspension. Thus, SNEDDS were found to be influential in improving the release performance of EA, indicating their potential to improve the oral bioavailability of EA.

  12. Self nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of stabilized ellagic acid–phospholipid complex with improved dissolution and permeability

    PubMed Central

    Avachat, Amelia M.; Patel, Vijay G.

    2014-01-01

    Ellagic acid (EA), a plant polyphenol known for its wide-range of health benefits has limited use due to its low oral bioavailability. In this study, a new self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS), based on the phospholipid complex technique, was developed to improve the oral bioavailability of ellagic acid. Ellagic acid–phospholipid complex was prepared by an anti-solvent method and characterized. Enhanced lipophilicity after the formation of ellagic acid–phospholipid complex was verified through solubility studies. Preliminary screening was carried out to select oil, surfactant and co-surfactant. Ternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the area of nanoemulsification. Formulations were optimized on the basis of globule size, cloud point and robustness to dilution. The optimized SNEDDS of ellagic acid–phospholipid complex showed mean globule size of 106 ± 0.198 nm and cloud point at 83–85 °C. The in vitro drug release from SNEDDS was found to be higher compared to EA suspension and complex, while ex vivo studies showed increased permeation from SNEDDS compared to EA suspension. Moreover, SNEDDS overcome the food effect which was shown by EA suspension. Thus, SNEDDS were found to be influential in improving the release performance of EA, indicating their potential to improve the oral bioavailability of EA. PMID:26106276

  13. Deduced amino acid sequence of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid: SPL(pVal)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitsett, J.A.; Glasser, S.W.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Weaver, T.E.; Clark, J.; Pilot-Matias, T.; Meuth, J.; Fox, J.L.

    1987-05-01

    Hydrophobic, proteolipid-like protein of Mr 6500 was isolated from ether/ethanol extracts of human, canine and bovine pulmonary surfactant. Amino acid composition of the protein demonstrated a remarkable abundance of hydrophobic residues, particularly valine and leucine. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human protein was determined: N-Leu-Ile-Pro-Cys-Cys-Pro-Val-Asn-Leu-Lys-Arg-Leu-Leu-Ile-Val4... An oligonucleotide probe was used to screen an adult human lung cDNA library and resulted in detection of cDNA clones with predicted amino acid sequence with close identity to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the human peptide. SPL(pVal) was found within the reading frame of a larger peptide. SPL(pVal) results from proteolytic processing of a larger preprotein. Northern blot analysis detected in a single 1.0 kilobase SPL(pVal) RNA which was less abundant in fetal than in adult lung. Mixtures of purified canine and bovine SPL(pVal) and synthetic phospholipids display properties of rapid adsorption and surface tension lowering activity characteristic of surfactant. Human SPL(pVal) is a pulmonary surfactant proteolipid which may therefore be useful in combination with phospholipids and/or other surfactant proteins for the treatment of surfactant deficiency such as hyaline membrane disease in newborn infants.

  14. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients*

    PubMed Central

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-01-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  15. The use of natural and synthetic phospholipids as pharmaceutical excipients.

    PubMed

    van Hoogevest, Peter; Wendel, Armin

    2014-09-01

    In pharmaceutical formulations, phospholipids obtained from plant or animal sources and synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are purified from, e.g., soybeans or egg yolk using non-toxic solvent extraction and chromatographic procedures with low consumption of energy and minimum possible waste. Because of the use of validated purification procedures and sourcing of raw materials with consistent quality, the resulting products differing in phosphatidylcholine content possess an excellent batch to batch reproducibility with respect to phospholipid and fatty acid composition. The natural phospholipids are described in pharmacopeias and relevant regulatory guidance documentation of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Synthetic phospholipids with specific polar head group, fatty acid composition can be manufactured using various synthesis routes. Synthetic phospholipids with the natural stereochemical configuration are preferably synthesized from glycerophosphocholine (GPC), which is obtained from natural phospholipids, using acylation and enzyme catalyzed reactions. Synthetic phospholipids play compared to natural phospholipid (including hydrogenated phospholipids), as derived from the number of drug products containing synthetic phospholipids, a minor role. Only in a few pharmaceutical products synthetic phospholipids are used. Natural phospholipids are used in oral, dermal, and parenteral products including liposomes. Natural phospholipids instead of synthetic phospholipids should be selected as phospholipid excipients for formulation development, whenever possible, because natural phospholipids are derived from renewable sources and produced with more ecologically friendly processes and are available in larger scale at relatively low costs compared to synthetic phospholipids. Practical applications: For selection of phospholipid excipients for pharmaceutical formulations, natural phospholipids are preferred

  16. The effect of selected surfactants on the structure of a bicellar system (DMPC/DHPC) studied by SAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Maciej; Domka, Ludwik; Jurga, Stefan

    2007-11-01

    The stabilizing or disturbing effect of different surfactants on the bicellar phase of phospholipids significantly depends on their type. The effect of different surfactants on the bicellar structure made of a mixture of phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-choline (DMPC/DHPC) has been studied by the small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation. The study has been performed for three surfactants: dodecyldimethyl-(hexyloxymethyl)ammonium chloride, n-undecylammonium chloride and t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100) introduced into a bicellar solution of DMPC/DHPC (2.8:1). The bicellar phase has been disturbed in the shortest time in the presence of dodecyldimethyl-(hexyloxymethyl)ammonium chloride in this system a transition from the bicellar to lamellar structure has been directly visible. The changes have been less pronounced in the presence of undecylammonium chloride and practically not noted in the presence of Triton X-100.

  17. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation.

  18. Lung hypoplasia and surfactant system immaturity induced in the fetal rat by prenatal exposure to nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Alfanso, L F; Arnaiz, A; Alvarez, F J; Qi, B; Diez-Pardo, J A; Vallis-i-Soler, A; Tovar, J A

    1996-01-01

    We studied the biochemical maturity of the lungs of fetuses born to rats exposed to nitrofen on day 9.5 of gestation. In comparison with controls, nitrofen-treated fetuses had pulmonary hypoplasia (decreased lung/body weight), lung hypocellularity (low DNA content) and cellular atrophy (low protein/DNA and phospholipid/DNA) on gestational days 19 and 21. Treated animals with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) also had cell atrophy and surfactant immaturity (decreased disaturated phosphatidylcholine/DNA) near term. Our data demonstrate that nitrofen causes lung hypoplasia and some degree of surfactant system immaturity that is particularly prominent in fetuses with CDH.

  19. Impact of C-reactive protein (CRP) on surfactant function

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Hales, C.A.; Thompson, B.T.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F. )

    1989-12-01

    Plasma levels of the acute-phase reactant, C-reactive protein (CRP), increase up to one thousand-fold as a result of trauma or inflammation. CRP binds to phosphorylcholine (PC) in a calcium-ion dependent manner. The structural homology between PC and the major phospholipid component of surfactant, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), led to the present study in which we examined if CRP levels might be increased in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and subsequently interfere with surfactant function. Our results showed that CRP levels in the bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) was increased in patients with ARDS (97.8 +/- 84.2 micrograms/mg total protein vs. 4.04 +/- 2.2 micrograms/mg total protein in normals). Our results show that CRP binds to liposomes containing DPPC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). As a result of this interaction, CRP inhibits the surface activity of a PG-DPPC mixture when tested with a Wilhelmy surfactometer or with the Enhorning pulsating bubble apparatus. Furthermore, the surface activity of a clinically used surfactant replacement, Surfactant TA (2 mg/ml), was also severely impaired by CRP in a dose-dependent manner (doses used ranging from 24.5 to 1,175 micrograms/ml). In contrast, human serum albumin (HSA) at 500 and 900 micrograms/ml had no inhibitory effect on Surfactant TA surface activity. These results suggest that CRP, although not an initiating insult in ARDS, may contribute to the subsequent abnormalities of surfactant function and thus the pathogenesis of the pulmonary dysfunction seen in ARDS.

  20. Metal Nanoparticle Pollutants Interfere with Pulmonary Surfactant Function In Vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Zhao, Lin; Smith, Ronald; Possmayer, Fred; Petersen, Nils O.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Reported associations between air pollution and pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases prompted studies on the effects of gold nanoparticles (Au NP) on pulmonary surfactant function. Low levels (3.7 mol % Au/lipid, 0.98% wt/wt) markedly inhibited adsorption of a semisynthetic pulmonary surfactant (dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol/surfactant protein B (SP-B); 70:30:1 wt %). Au NP also impeded the surfactant's ability to reduce surface tension (γ) to low levels during film compression and to respread during film expansion. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Au NP generated by a seed-growth method were spherical with diameters of ∼15 nm. Including palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol appeared to coat the NP with at least one lipid bilayer but did not affect NP shape or size. Similar overall observations occurred with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol. Dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylglycerol was less effective in NP capping, although similar sized NP were formed. Including SP-B (1% wt/wt) appears to induce the formation of elongated strands of interacting threads with the fluid phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Including DPPC resulted in formation of aggregated, less spherical NP with a larger size distribution. With DPPC, strand formation due to SP-B was not observed. Agarose gel electrophoresis studies demonstrated that the aggregation induced by SP-B blocked migration of PG-coated NP. Migration was also influenced by the fluidity of the PGs. It is concluded that Au NP can interact with and sequester pulmonary surfactant phospholipids and, if inhaled from the atmosphere, could impede pulmonary surfactant function in the lung. PMID:17890383

  1. Phospholipids in plant and animal chromatin.

    PubMed

    Viola-Magni, M P; Gahan, P B; Pacy, J

    1985-01-01

    Isolated hepatic nuclei and hepatic chromatin have been analysed for their DNA, RNA, protein and phospholipid content. The protein/DNA ratio is 3 for nuclei and 1.95 for chromatin extracted from Triton X-100 treated nuclei. The phospholipids, (2.36 +/- 0.91 (S.D.) per cent of the total nuclear material), are lost during the chromatin preparation mainly during the Triton X-100 washings of the nuclei. Nevertheless, 10 per cent of the total nuclear phospholipids remain bound to the chromatin. The comparative analysis of both nuclei and chromatin shows a difference in phospholipids and fatty acid composition. Thus, the chromatin-associated phospholipid cannot be attributed simply to contaminating nuclear membrane. This is supported by the autoradiographic study of semi-thin sections of interphase nuclei from root apices of Vicia faba in which [3H] ethanolamine is clearly localized in the chromatin and nucleolar regions of the nuclei.

  2. Epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP Signaling Regulates Multiple Biological Processes during Perinatal Lung Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, James P.; Schehr, Angelica; Wang, Yanhua; Huo, Liya; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout postnatal life. Defects in the surfactant system are associated with common pulmonary disorders including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome and acute respiratory distress syndrome in children and adults. Lipogenesis is essential for the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant by type II epithelial cells lining the alveoli. This study sought to identify the role of pulmonary epithelial SREBP, a transcriptional regulator of cellular lipid homeostasis, during a critical time period of perinatal lung maturation in the mouse. Genome wide mRNA expression profiling of lung tissue from transgenic mice with epithelial-specific deletions of Scap (ScapΔ/Δ, resulting in inactivation of SREBP signaling) or Insig1 and Insig2 (Insig1/2Δ/Δ, resulting in activation of SREBP signaling) was assessed. Differentially expressed genes responding to SREBP perturbations were identified and subjected to functional enrichment analysis, pathway mapping and literature mining to predict upstream regulators and transcriptional networks regulating surfactant lipid homeostasis. Through comprehensive data analysis and integration, time dependent effects of epithelial SCAP/INSIG/SREBP deletion and defined SCAP/INSIG/SREBP-associated genes, bioprocesses and downstream pathways were identified. SREBP signaling influences epithelial development, cell death and cell proliferation at E17.5, while primarily influencing surfactant physiology, lipid/sterol synthesis, and phospholipid transport after birth. SREBP signaling integrated with the Wnt/β-catenin and glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathways during perinatal lung maturation. SREBP regulates perinatal lung lipogenesis and maturation through multiple mechanisms by interactions with distinct sets of regulatory partners. PMID:24806461

  3. Ionic liquids as surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, N. A.; Safonova, E. A.

    2010-10-01

    Problems of self-assembling in systems containing ionic liquids (ILs) are discussed. Main attention is paid to micellization in aqueous solutions of dialkylimidazolium ILs and their mixtures with classical surfactants. Literature data are reviewed, the results obtained by the authors and co-workers are presented. Thermodynamic aspects of the studies and problems of molecular-thermodynamic modeling receive special emphasis. It is shown that the aggregation behavior of dialkylimidazolium ILs is close to that of alkyltrimethylammonium salts (cationic surfactants) though ILs have a higher ability to self-organize, especially as it concerns long-range ordering. Some aspects of ILs applications are outlined where their common features with classical surfactants and definite specificity are of value.

  4. Lavage administration of dilute surfactant in a piglet model of meconium aspiration.

    PubMed

    Meister, Joan; Balaraman, Venkataraman; Ramirez, Malia; Uyehara, Catherine F T; Killeen, Jeffrey; Ku, Tercia; Person, Donald; Easa, David

    2004-01-01

    Maldistribution of exogenous surfactant may preclude any clinical response in acute lung injury associated with surfactant dysfunction. Our previous studies have shown the effectiveness of surfactant lavage after homogenous lung injury. The present study utilizes a histologically confirmed non-homogeneous lung injury model induced by saline lung-lavage followed by meconium injected into a mainstem bronchus. Piglets were then treated with Infasurf or Exosurf by lavage (I-LAVAGE, n = 7; E-LAVAGE, n = 5) or bolus (I-BOLUS, n = 8; E-BOLUS, n = 5), or went untreated (CONTROL, n = 4). Lavage administration utilized a dilute surfactant (35 ml/kg; 4 mg phospholipid/ml) instilled into the lung, followed by gravity drainage. The retained doses of the respective surfactant in the lavage and bolus groups were similar. Results showed that the surfactant distribution was more uniform in the lavage groups compared to the bolus groups. Significant and consistent increases in PaO2 were observed in the lavage groups compared to the bolus groups and the controls. PaO2 (mmHg) at 240 min posttreatment: I-LAVAGE = 297 +/- 54, E-LAVAGE = 280 +/- 57; I-BOLUS = 139 +/- 31; E-BOLUS = 152 +/- 29; C = 119 +/- 73 (mean +/- SEM). Other improved pulmonary function parameters favored lavage administration. We conclude that better surfactant distribution achieved by lavage administration can be more effective than bolus administration in this type of non-homogeneous lung injury.

  5. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  6. SURFACTANT DYSFUNCTION IN LUNG CONTUSION WITH AND WITHOUT SUPERIMPOSED GASTRIC ASPIRATION IN A RAT MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, Krishnan; Davidson, Bruce A.; Knight, Paul R.; Wang, Zhengdong; Helinski, Jadwiga; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates surfactant dysfunction in rats with lung contusion (LC) induced by blunt chest trauma. Rats at 24 h postcontusion had a decreased percent content of large surfactant aggregates in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and altered large-aggregate composition with decreased phosphatidylcholine (PC), increased lyso-PC, and increased protein compared with uninjured controls. The surface activity of large aggregates on a pulsating bubble surfactometer was also severely impaired at 24 h postcontusion. Decreases in large surfactant aggregate content and surface activity were improved, but still apparent, at 48 and 72 h postcontusion compared with uninjured control rats and returned to normal by 96 h postcontusion. The functional importance of surfactant abnormalities in LC injury was documented in pilot studies showing that exogenous surfactant replacement at 24 h postcontusion improved inflation/deflation lung volumes. Additional experiments investigated a clinically relevant combination of LC plus gastric aspiration (combined acid and small gastric food particles) and found reductions in large surfactant aggregates in BAL similar to those for LC. However, rats given LC + combined acid and small gastric food particles versus LC had more severe surfactant dysfunction based on decreases in surface activity and alterations in large aggregate composition. Combined data for all animal groups had strong statistical correlations between surfactant dysfunction (increased minimum surface tension, decreased large aggregates in BAL, decreased aggregate PC, and increased aggregate lyso-PC) and the severity of inflammatory lung injury (increased total protein, albumin, protein/phospholipid ratio, neutrophils, and erythrocytes in BAL plus increased whole lung myeloperoxidase activity). These results show that surfactant dysfunction is important in the pathophysiology of LC with or without concurrent gastric aspiration and provides a rationale for surfactant

  7. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  8. Phospholipid Vesicles in Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Granick, Steve

    2016-05-11

    The objective of this research was to develop the science basis needed to deploy phospholipid vesicles as functional materials in energy contexts. Specifically, we sought to: (1) Develop an integrated molecular-level understanding of what determines their dynamical shape, spatial organization, and responsiveness to complex, time-varying environments; and (2) Develop understanding of their active transportation in crowded environments, which our preliminary measurements in cells suggest may hold design principles for targeting improved energy efficiency in new materials systems. The methods to do this largely involved fluorescence imaging and other spectroscopy involving single particles, vesicles, particles, DNA, and endosomes. An unexpected importance outcome was a new method to image light-emitting diodes during actual operation using super-resolution spectroscopy.

  9. Atomic force microscopy studies of functional and dysfunctional pulmonary surfactant films, II: albumin-inhibited pulmonary surfactant films and the effect of SP-A.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Tadayyon, Seyed M; Keating, Eleonora; Zhao, Lin; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Petersen, Nils O; Amrein, Matthias W; Possmayer, Fred

    2008-09-15

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) dysfunction because of the leakage of serum proteins into the alveolar space could be an operative pathogenesis in acute respiratory distress syndrome. Albumin-inhibited PS is a commonly used in vitro model for studying surfactant abnormality in acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the mechanism by which PS is inhibited by albumin remains controversial. This study investigated the film organization of albumin-inhibited bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) with and without surfactant protein A (SP-A), using atomic force microscopy. The BLES and albumin (1:4 w/w) were cospread at an air-water interface from aqueous media. Cospreading minimized the adsorption barrier for phospholipid vesicles imposed by preadsorbed albumin molecules, i.e., inhibition because of competitive adsorption. Atomic force microscopy revealed distinct variations in film organization, persisting up to 40 mN/m, compared with pure BLES monolayers. Fluorescence confocal microscopy confirmed that albumin remained within the liquid-expanded phase of the monolayer at surface pressures higher than the equilibrium surface pressure of albumin. The remaining albumin mixed with the BLES monolayer so as to increase film compressibility. Such an inhibitory effect could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles or by adding surfactant protein A. These experimental data indicate a new mechanism of surfactant inhibition by serum proteins, complementing the traditional competitive adsorption mechanism.

  10. [Action of heparin on pulmonary lipids and alveolar surfactant in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Iozzo, A; Garbagni, R; Dalmasso, F; Cardellino, G; Giacone, A; Pellegrino, S; Tondolo, M

    1980-04-02

    The effect of subcutaneous 1000 IU/kg calcic heparin every 12 hr for 7 days on lung lipids and pulmonary surfactant was examined in 10 male rabbits weighing 2.5-3.5 kg. Comparison with an identical control group showed a decrease in phospholipids and lecithins in the lung homogenate extract and in the alveolar liquid bubble stability index. The difference in the means was highly significant (P less than 0.001) for all three parameters.

  11. A unique story in neonatal research: the development of a porcine surfactant.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Halliday, Henry L; Speer, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant deficiency was identified as the cause of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) as long ago as 1959. Trials of surfactant replacement in the 1960s were unsuccessful because the preparations used contained only phospholipids and they were administered inefficiently by nebulization. In the 1970s Bengt Robertson and Göran Enhörning showed that natural surfactant, containing both phospholipids and proteins, could ameliorate the signs of RDS in immature rabbits. In the 1980s Bengt Robertson and Tore Curstedt developed a porcine surfactant, Curosurf (named after their surnames), which was effective in immature animals and was used in a pilot clinical trial beginning in 1983. Subsequent randomized clinical trials were planned a year later by Bengt Robertson, Tore Curstedt and Henry Halliday, and the first trial was begun in 1985. This showed that Curosurf reduced pulmonary air leaks and neonatal mortality in preterm infants with severe RDS. A second trial, coordinated by Christian Speer, demonstrated that multiple doses of Curosurf were more effective than a single dose. Subsequent trials conducted by the Collaborative European Multicenter Study Group, which included among others Guilio Bevilacqua, Janna Koppe, Ola Saugstad, Nils Svenningsen and Jean-Pierre Relier, showed that early treatment was more effective than later administration and that infants treated at birth had similar neurodevelopmental status to untreated controls at a corrected age of 2 years. Members of the Collaborative European Multicenter Study Group in Denmark and Sweden performed studies to demonstrate the benefits of a combination of surfactant treatment and early continuous positive airway pressure. Curosurf has also been compared with several synthetic and natural surfactants, and at a dose of 200 mg/kg Curosurf has been shown to be superior to either Survanta or Curosurf used at a dose of 100 mg/kg. Recently, new-generation synthetic surfactants containing both phospholipids and

  12. Changes in surfactant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after hemithorax irradiation in patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, M.; Maasilta, P.; Kivisaari, L.; Mattson, K. )

    1990-04-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the surfactant system of the lung is affected shortly after irradiation. It is unclear, however, whether surfactant plays a role in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. In the present study surfactant components (saturated phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein A, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol) and other phospholipids of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were studied in four patients with pleural mesothelioma before and during hemithorax irradiation (70 Gy) as well as zero, 1, 2, 3, and 4 months following irradiation. The concentrations of these same components and of soluble proteins were also estimated in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) using urea as a marker of dilution. After radiotherapy, the concentrations of the surfactant components in ELF decreased to 12 to 55% of the control values before radiation, whereas the concentration of sphingomyelin in ELF increased ninefold. There were small changes in the other phospholipids. The concentration of soluble protein in ELF increased sevenfold. The minimum surface activity of crude BAL increased from 12 +/- 4 to 32 +/- 6 mN/m, and that of the sediment fraction of BAL increased from 7 +/- 4 to 22 +/- 6 mN/m, p less than 0.001. The protein-rich supernatant fraction of BAL from irradiated lung had a inhibitory effect on normal surfactant. There were significant correlations between the increasing severity of the radiologic changes on the one hand and, on the other, the saturated phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio (p less than 0.001), the concentrations of soluble protein (p less than 0.001), and the concentrations of the surfactant components (p less than 0.02-0.001) in ELF.

  13. Biophysical activity of animal-derived exogenous surfactants mixed with rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Kolomaznik, M; Calkovska, A; Herting, E; Stichtenoth, G

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous pulmonary surfactant is a potential delivery system for topical medications via the conducting airways. Due to the sensitivity to inactivation of surfactant, mutual interaction with the shipped drug should be evaluated. Little is known about the interactions between surfactant and antimicrobial drugs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether biophysical properties of animal-derived surfactants are modified by the bactericidal antibiotic rifampicin. An intracellular activity and a broad antimicrobiotic spectrum toward Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria make rifampicin an interesting substance against pulmonary infections. Curosurf® (porcine surfactant from minced lungs) and Survanta® (bovine surfactant extract) were diluted to 2.5-5.0 mg/ml of phospholipids in 0.9 % NaCl and rifampicin (RIF) was added at 1, 5, and 10 % (w/w). Minimum (γ(min)) and maximum (γ(max)) surface tension of a cyclically compressed bubble in the mixture was assessed with a pulsating bubble surfactometer. After 5 min, γ(min) of Survanta at a concentration of 3 mg/ml was significantly increased after addition of 5 and 10 % RIF (both p < 0.001). At 1 % RIF, the γ(min) of Survanta was ≈10 mN/m and this value was not significantly different to that of Survanta alone. The γ(min) of Curosurf at 3 mg/ml was increased with 10 % RIF (p < 0.001), but not with 1 and 5 %. At 5 mg/ml Survanta was inhibited by 10 % RIF (p < 0.05), while γ(min) of Curosurf was low (<5 mN/m) in all mixtures. In conclusion, Curosurf and Survanta interfere with RIF in a concentration-dependent manner. At the appropriate phospholipid concentration, especially porcine-derived surfactant is able to retain good surface activity when mixed with antibiotics.

  14. Toxic effects of cadmium on the developing rat lung. II. Glycogen and phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Daston, G.P.

    1982-01-01

    Maternal exposure to Cd reduces lung weight and alters pulmonary surfactant accumulation in the fetus. This may lead to respiratory distress and death postnatally. In this study, the effects of maternal Cd administration on additional biochemical parameters of the fetal lung were investigated. Pregnant rats were given sc injections of 8 mg/kg CdCl/sub 2/ on d 12-15 of gestation and sacrificed throughout late gestation. Fetal lungs were examined for protein, DNA, and glycogen. Incorporation of choline into total and disaturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured in fetal lung slices. The DNA content of the treated lungs was reduced, but the protein/DNA ratio was not altered. Thus the reduced lung weight was due to hypoplasia, not hypotrophy. Incorporation of choline into pulmonary sphingomyelin was not altered by the treatment. Choline incorporation into both total and disaturated phosphatidylcholine, the most important surfactant component, was reduced on the final days of gestation. Glycogen was reduced in both absolute quantity and cellular concentration in lungs of treated fetuses. Glucose derived from glycogen is a major metabolic substrate in the fetal lung and probably contributes greatly to phospholipid synthesis. The reduction in glucose concentration in lungs of treated fetuses may be a factor in the diminished synthesis of pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylcholine before birth. Prenatal Cd exposure causes pulmonary hypoplasia; reduces the amount of glycogen present in the fetal lung; and diminishes the rate of synthesis of pulmonary surfactant phosphatidylcholine.

  15. Lung inflammatory and oxidative alterations after exogenous surfactant therapy fortified with budesonide in rabbit model of meconium aspiration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincová, J; Košútová, P; Čierny, D; Čalkovská, A; Mokrá, D

    2016-12-22

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) triggers inflammatory and oxidative pathways which can inactivate both pulmonary surfactant and therapeutically given exogenous surfactant. Glucocorticoid budesonide added to exogenous surfactant can inhibit inflammation and thereby enhance treatment efficacy. Neonatal meconium (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was administered intratracheally (i.t.) to rabbits. When the MAS model was prepared, animals were treated with budesonide i.t. (Pulmicort, 0.25 mg/kg, M+B); with surfactant lung lavage (Curosurf®, 10 ml/kg, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, M+S) followed by undiluted Curosurf® i.t. (100 mg phospholipids/kg); with combination of budesonide and surfactant (M+S+B); or were untreated (M); or served as controls with saline i.t. instead of meconium (C). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Cell counts in the blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), lung edema formation (wet/dry weight ratio), oxidative damage of lipids/ proteins and inflammatory expression profiles (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, TNF-alpha) in the lung homogenate and plasma were determined. Combined surfactant+budesonide therapy was the most effective in reduction of neutrophil counts in BAL, oxidative damage, levels and mRNA expression of cytokines in the lung, and lung edema formation compared to untreated animals. Curosurf fortified with budesonide mitigated lung inflammation and oxidative modifications what indicate the perspectives of this treatment combination for MAS therapy.

  16. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  17. Distribution of phospholipid based formulations in the skin investigated by combined ATR-FTIR and tape stripping experiments.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Martin; Halper, Maria; Pribyl, Raffaela; Baurecht, Dieter; Valenta, Claudia

    2017-03-15

    The spatial distribution of exogenous substances in the stratum corneum (SC) could have an influence on their skin irritation potential. In this study it was possible to monitor the distribution of phospholipids with their phosphatidylcholine scaffold on porcine ear skin by combining tape stripping and in vitro ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Significant vibrational modes in the spectra could be successfully assigned to the functional groups of the molecules. Thus it was possible to track the phospholipids without the need of their deuterated form by calculating difference spectra from the treated - untreated skin samples. The correlation between four characteristic bands (R(2)≥0.9909) revealed the excellent suitability of this semi-quantitative method for deep profiling analysis. The penetration capabilities of aqueous suspensions of the different phospholipid compositions as well as two monoacyl-phosphatidylcholine based liposome formulations were investigated using this method. Nevertheless, differences in the distribution of the investigated phospholipid species, having different amounts of monoacyl-phosphatidylcholine, could not be found. It could be clearly shown that the deepest skin penetration was seen in the irritating anionic SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate) out of the aqueous solution. The aqueous suspensions based on different phospholipid surfactants showed the same range of penetration depth (10-15% of SC), whereas the smallest skin penetration depth was observed after the application of liposomal formulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic variation in Surfactant Protein-A2 (SP-A2) leads to differential binding to Mycoplasma pneumoniae membranes and regulation of host responses

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Wang, Ying; Nikam, Vinayak; Degan, Simone; Kandasamy, Pitachaimani; Tanyaratsrisakul, Sasipa; Fischer, Bernard M.; Kraft, Monica; Hollingsworth, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) is an extracellular pathogen that colonizes mucosal surfaces of the respiratory tract and is associated with asthma exacerbations. Previous reports demonstrate that surfactant protein-A (SP-A) binds live Mp and mycoplasma membranes (MMF) with high affinity. Humans express a repertoire of single amino acid genetic variants of SP-A that may be associated with lung disease, and our findings demonstrate that allelic differences in SP-A2 (Gln223Lys) affect the binding to MMF. We show that SP-A−/− mice are more susceptible to MMF exposure and have significant increases in mucin production and neutrophil recruitment. Novel humanized-SP-A2 transgenic mice harboring the hSP-A2 223K allele exhibit reduced neutrophil influx and mucin production in the lungs, when challenged with MMF, compared to SP-A−/− mice. Conversely, mice expressing hSP-A2 223Q have increased neutrophil influx and mucin production that is similar to SP-A−/− mice. Using tracheal epithelial cell cultures, we show that enhanced mucin production to MMF occurs in the absence of SP-A, and is not dependent upon neutrophil recruitment. Increased phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was evident in the lungs of MMF-challenged mice when SP-A was absent. Pharmacologic inhibition of EGFR prior to MMF challenge dramatically reduced mucin production in SP-A−/− mice. These findings suggest a protective role for SP-A in limiting MMF-stimulated mucin production that occurs through interference with EGFR mediated signaling. The SP-A interaction with the EGFR signaling pathway appears to occur in an allele specific manner that may have important implications for SP-A polymorphisms in human diseases. PMID:25957169

  19. Effect of dietary phospholipid level and phospholipid:neutral lipid value on the development of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) larvae fed a compound diet.

    PubMed

    Cahu, Chantal L; Zambonino Infante, José L; Barbosa, Valérie

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the influence of dietary phospholipid concentration on survival and development in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) larvae. Larvae were fed from day 9 to day 40 post-hatch with an isoproteic and isolipidic formulated diet with graded phospholipid levels from 27 to 116 g/kg DM and different phospholipid:neutral lipid values. The best growth (32 mg at the end of the experiment) survival (73 %) and larval quality (only 2 % of malformed larvae) were obtained in the larvae fed the diet containing 116 g phospholipid/kg DM (P<0.05). These results were related to the amount of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol included in this diet (35 and 16 g/kg respectively). Amylase, alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase N activities revealed a proper maturation of the digestive tract in the two groups fed the highest phospholipid levels. Regulation of lipase and phospholipase A2 by the relative amount of their substrate in the diet occurred mainly at the transcriptional level. The response of pancreatic lipase to dietary neutral lipid was not linear. As in mammals 200 g triacylglycerol/kg diet seems to represent a threshold level above which the response of pancreatic lipase is maximal. The response of phospholipase A2 to dietary phospholipid content was gradual and showed a great modulation range in expression. Sea bass larvae have more efficient capacity to utilize dietary phospholipid than neutral lipids. For the first time a compound diet sustaining good growth, survival and skeletal development has been formulated and can be used in total replacement of live prey in the feeding sequence of marine fish larvae.

  20. LIPID PEROXIDATION GENERATES BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE PHOSPHOLIPIDS INCLUDING OXIDATIVELY N-MODIFIED PHOSPHOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sean S.; Guo, Lilu

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidation of membranes and lipoproteins converts “inert” phospholipids into a plethora of oxidatively modified phospholipids (oxPL) that can act as signaling molecules. In this review, we will discuss four major classes of oxPL: mildly oxygenated phospholipids, phospholipids with oxidatively truncated acyl chains, phospholipids with cyclized acyl chains, and phospholipids that have been oxidatively N-modified on their headgroups by reactive lipid species. For each class of oxPL we will review the chemical mechanisms of their formation, the evidence for their formation in biological samples, the biological activities and signaling pathways associated with them, and the catabolic pathways for their elimination. We will end by briefly highlighting some of the critical questions that remain about the role of oxPL in physiology and disease. PMID:24704586

  1. Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Inflammation: The Role of Phospholipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, William; Sordillo, Lorraine M.

    2013-01-01

    The composition of fatty acids in the diets of both human and domestic animal species can regulate inflammation through the biosynthesis of potent lipid mediators. The substrates for lipid mediator biosynthesis are derived primarily from membrane phospholipids and reflect dietary fatty acid intake. Inflammation can be exacerbated with intake of certain dietary fatty acids, such as some ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and subsequent incorporation into membrane phospholipids. Inflammation, however, can be resolved with ingestion of other fatty acids, such as ω-3 PUFA. The influence of dietary PUFA on phospholipid composition is influenced by factors that control phospholipid biosynthesis within cellular membranes, such as preferential incorporation of some fatty acids, competition between newly ingested PUFA and fatty acids released from stores such as adipose, and the impacts of carbohydrate metabolism and physiological state. The objective of this review is to explain these factors as potential obstacles to manipulating PUFA composition of tissue phospholipids by specific dietary fatty acids. A better understanding of the factors that influence how dietary fatty acids can be incorporated into phospholipids may lead to nutritional intervention strategies that optimize health. PMID:24152446

  2. Molecular-Scale Biophysical Modulation of an Endothelial Membrane by Oxidized Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ayee, Manuela A A; LeMaster, Elizabeth; Shentu, Tzu Pin; Singh, Dev K; Barbera, Nicolas; Soni, Dheeraj; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Bronova, Irina; Cho, Michael; Akpa, Belinda S; Levitan, Irena

    2017-01-24

    The influence of two bioactive oxidized phospholipids on model bilayer properties, membrane packing, and endothelial cell biomechanics was investigated computationally and experimentally. The truncated tail phospholipids, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC), are two major oxidation products of the unsaturated phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine. A combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, Laurdan multiphoton imaging, and atomic force microscopy microindentation experiments was used to determine the impact of POVPC and PGPC on the structure of a multicomponent phospholipid bilayer and to assess the consequences of their incorporation on membrane packing and endothelial cell stiffness. Molecular simulations predicted differential bilayer perturbation effects of the two oxidized phospholipids based on the chemical identities of their truncated tails, including decreased bilayer packing, decreased bilayer bending modulus, and increased water penetration. Disruption of lipid order was consistent with Laurdan imaging results indicating that POVPC and PGPC decrease the lipid packing of both ordered and disordered membrane domains. Computational predictions of a larger membrane perturbation effect by PGPC correspond to greater stiffness of PGPC-treated endothelial cells observed by measuring cellular elastic moduli using atomic force microscopy. Our results suggest that disruptions in membrane structure by oxidized phospholipids play a role in the regulation of overall endothelial cell stiffness. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mammalian P4-ATPases and ABC Transporters And Their Role in Phospholipid Transport

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jonathan A.; Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Transport of phospholipids across cell membranes plays a key role in a wide variety of biological processes. These include membrane biosynthesis, generation and maintenance of membrane asymmetry, cell and organelle shape determination, phagocytosis, vesicle tranfficking, blood coagulation, lipid homeostasis, regulation of membrane protein function, apoptosis among others. P4-ATPases and ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters are the two principal classes of membranes proteins that actively transport phospholipids across cellular membranes. P4-ATPases utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis to flip aminophospholipids from the exocytoplasmic (extracellular/lumen) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes generating membrane lipid asymmetry and lipid imbalance which can induce membrane curvature. Many ABC transporters play crucial roles in lipid homeostasis by actively transporting phospholipids from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of cell membranes or exporting phospholipids to protein acceptors or micelles. Recent studies indicate that some ABC proteins can also transport phospholipids in the opposite direction. The importance of P4-ATPases and ABC transporters is evident from the findings that mutations in many of these transporters are responsible for severe human genetic diseases linked to defective phospholipid transport. PMID:23103747

  4. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  5. Localization of anionic phospholipids in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Piercen M; Crooks, John A; Leidl, Mathias; Yoon, Earl J; Saghatelian, Alan; Weibel, Douglas B

    2014-10-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is an anionic phospholipid with a characteristically large curvature and is of growing interest for two primary reasons: (i) it binds to and regulates many peripheral membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria, and (ii) it is distributed asymmetrically in rod-shaped cells and is concentrated at the poles and division septum. Despite the growing number of studies of CL, its function in bacteria remains unknown. 10-N-Nonyl acridine orange (NAO) is widely used to image CL in bacteria and mitochondria, as its interaction with CL is reported to produce a characteristic red-shifted fluorescence emission. Using a suite of biophysical techniques, we quantitatively studied the interaction of NAO with anionic phospholipids under physiologically relevant conditions. We found that NAO is promiscuous in its binding and has photophysical properties that are largely insensitive to the structure of diverse anionic phospholipids to which it binds. Being unable to rely solely on NAO to characterize the localization of CL in Escherichia coli cells, we instead used quantitative fluorescence microscopy, mass spectrometry, and mutants deficient in specific classes of anionic phospholipids. We found CL and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) concentrated in the polar regions of E. coli cell membranes; depletion of CL by genetic approaches increased the concentration of PG at the poles. Previous studies suggested that some CL-binding proteins also have a high affinity for PG and display a pattern of cellular localization that is not influenced by depletion of CL. Framed within the context of these previous experiments, our results suggest that PG may play an essential role in bacterial physiology by maintaining the anionic character of polar membranes.

  6. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  7. Surfactant treatment before first breath for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm lambs: comparison of a peptide-containing synthetic lung surfactant with porcine-derived surfactant

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, Johann M; Smith, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background In a recent study utilizing a saline-lavaged adult rabbit model, we described a significant improvement in systemic oxygenation and pulmonary shunt after the instillation of a novel synthetic peptide-containing surfactant, Synsurf. Respiratory distress syndrome in the preterm lamb more closely resembles that of the human infant, as their blood gas, pH values, and lung mechanics deteriorate dramatically from birth despite ventilator support. Moreover, premature lambs have lungs which are mechanically unstable, with the advantage of being able to measure multiple variables over extended periods. Our objective in this study was to investigate if Synsurf leads to improved systemic oxygenation, lung mechanics, and histology in comparison to the commercially available porcine-derived lung surfactant Curosurf® when administered before first breath in a preterm lamb model. Materials and methods A Cesarean section was performed under general anesthesia on 18 time-dated pregnant Dohne Merino ewes at 129–130 days gestation. The premature lambs were delivered and ventilated with an expiratory tidal volume of 6–8 mL/kg for the first 30 minutes and thereafter at 8–10 mL/kg. In a randomized controlled trial, the two surfactants tested were Synsurf and Curosurf®, both at a dose of 100 mg/kg phospholipids (1,2-dipalmitoyl-L-α-phosphatidylcholine; 90% in Synsurf, 40% in Curosurf®). A control group of animals was treated with normal saline. Measurements of physiological variables, blood gases, and lung mechanics were made before and after surfactant and saline replacement and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 and 300 minutes after treatment. The study continued for 5 hours. Results Surfactant treatment led to a significant improvement in oxygenation within 30 minutes, with the Synsurf group and the Curosurf® group having significantly higher ratios between arterial partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2; P = 0.021) compared to that

  8. Nuclear phosphoinositide regulation of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Bree L; Blind, Raymond D

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipid signaling has clear connections to a wide array of cellular processes, particularly in gene expression and in controlling the chromatin biology of cells. However, most of the work elucidating how phospholipid signaling pathways contribute to cellular physiology have studied cytoplasmic membranes, while relatively little attention has been paid to the role of phospholipid signaling in the nucleus. Recent work from several labs has shown that nuclear phospholipid signaling can have important roles that are specific to this cellular compartment. This review focuses on the nuclear phospholipid functions and the activities of phospholipid signaling enzymes that regulate metazoan chromatin and gene expression. In particular, we highlight the roles that nuclear phosphoinositides play in several nuclear-driven physiological processes, such as differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression. Taken together, the recent discovery of several specifically nuclear phospholipid functions could have dramatic impact on our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that enable tight control of cellular physiology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Coacervation with surfactants: From single-chain surfactants to gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Coacervation is a spontaneous process during which a colloidal dispersion separates into two immiscible liquid phases: a colloid-rich liquid phase in equilibrium with a diluted phase. Coacervation is usually divided into simple coacervation and complex coacervation according to the number of components. Surfactant-based coacervation normally contains traditional single-chain surfactants. With the development of surfactants, gemini surfactants with two amphiphilic moieties have been applied to form coacervation. This review summarizes the development of simple coacervation and complex coacervation in the systems of single-chain surfactants and gemini surfactants. Simple coacervation in surfactant solutions with additives or at elevated temperature and complex coacervation in surfactant/polymer mixtures by changing charge densities, molecular weight, ionic strength, pH, or temperature are reviewed. The comparison between gemini surfactants and corresponding monomeric single-chain surfactants reveals that the unique structures of gemini surfactants endow them with higher propensity to generate coacervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  11. Absorption of surfactants by membranes: erythrocytes versus synthetic vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Binford, J S; Palm, W H

    1994-01-01

    Three surfactants (chlorpromazine hydrochloride, thioridazine hydrochloride, and sodium deoxycholate) are found to absorb just as strongly into the protein-containing membranes of erythrocytes as into the phospholipid bilayers of synthetic vesicles. In the concentration region where hemolysis occurs and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm is no longer valid, one may use a phase partition model in which the erythrocyte membrane is one of the phases. The partition coefficients, expressed as the ratio of mole fraction surfactant in the membrane lipid phase to concentration of surfactant in the aqueous phase, have been calculated at the point of saturation in the erythrocyte membrane. These values are Ky = 430 M-1 (chlorpromazine, pH 5.9), 550 M-1 (deoxycholate, pH 7.6), and 640 M-1 (thioridazine, pH 5.9), in isotonic buffer at 27 degrees C. Corresponding values for synthetic vesicles made from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine are Kx = 230 M-1 (chlorpromazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), 440 M-1 (deoxycholate, 0.20 M buffer/NaCl pH 8.0) and 510 M-1 (thioridazine, 0.12 M buffer/KCl pH 5.9), at 27 degrees C. It appears that the surfactants become an integral part of the bilayer in both vesicles and natural membranes and that the absorption is not of a peripheral nature. There is no evidence that the presence of proteins in the natural membrane inhibits the absorption of these surfactants in any way. PMID:8075335

  12. Gravimetric determination of phospholipid concentration.

    PubMed

    Tejera-Garcia, Roberto; Connell, Lisa; Shaw, Walter A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2012-09-01

    Accurate determination of lipid concentrations is an obligatory routine in a research laboratory engaged in studies using this class of biomaterials. For phospholipids, this is frequently accomplished using the phosphate assay (Bartlett, G.R. Phosphorus Assay in Column Chromatography. J. Biol. Chem. 234, 466-468, 1959). Given the purity of the currently commercially available synthetic and isolated natural lipids, we have observed that determination of the dry weight of lipid stock solutions provides the fastest, most accurate, and generic method to assay their concentrations. The protocol described here takes advantage of the high resolution and accuracy obtained by modern weighing technology. We assayed by this technique the concentrations of a number of phosphatidylcholine samples, with different degrees of acyl chain saturation and length, and in different organic solvents. The results were compared with those from Bartlett assay, (31)P NMR, and Langmuir compression isotherms. The data obtained show that the gravimetric assay yields lipid concentrations with a resolution similar or better than obtained by the other techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dielectrophoresis of Functional Phospholipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froude, Victoria; Zhu, Yingxi Elaine

    2008-03-01

    Recently, there has been an emerging interest in using AC-dielectrophoresis (DEP) to transport and assemble phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) and nanoparticles to form functional bio-assemblies where the underlying charge polarization mechanism of colloids in AC fields strongly depends on nano-scaled surface charge. In this work, we study liposomes segregation and aggregation in the presence of nanocolloids and salts in which the biological functionality of liposomes is augmented by the physical functionality of inorganic coating and particles. Liposomes, synthesized by sonication with 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphate (DOPA), are manipulated at varied AC-field frequencies across fabricated micro-electrodes in a quadrapole configuration on glass. We observe the co-assembly of liposome and opposite-charged nanocolloids by confocal microscopy and SEM, where the smaller nanocolloids are captured in between liposome junctions to form stabilized composite vesicles at several distinct frequencies. We observe a strong dependence of the liposome DEP mobility on the number of nanoparticles present in suspension and propose a new mechanism based on charge segregation and charged nanocolloid entrainment in the double layer.

  14. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. The composition and function of the pulmonary surfactant system during metamorphosis in the tiger salamander Ambystoma tigrinum.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, S; Daniels, C B; Smits, A W

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian lungs secrete a mixture of surface-active lipids (surfactant), which greatly reduces the surface tension of the fluid coating the inner lung surface, thereby reducing the risk of collapse upon deflation and increasing compliance upon inflation. During foetal lung maturation, these lipids become enriched in the primary and active ingredient, a disaturated phospholipid. However, disaturated phospholipids exist in their inactive gel-like form at temperatures below 37 degrees C and thus are inappropriate for controlling surface tension in the lungs of many ectotherms. We examined the development of the composition and function of the surfactant system of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum) during metamorphosis from the fully aquatic larva (termed stage I) through an intermediate air-breathing larval form (stage IV) to the terrestrial adult (stage VII). Biochemical analysis of lung washings from these three life stages revealed a decrease in the percentage of disaturated phospholipid per total phospholipid (23.03 versus 15.92%) with lung maturity. The relative cholesterol content remained constant. The increased level of phospholipid saturation in the fully aquatic larvae may reflect their generally higher body temperature and the higher external hydrostatic compression forces exerted on the lungs, compared to the terrestrial adults. Opening pressure (pressure required for initial lung opening) prior to lavage decreased from larval to adult salamanders (7.96 versus 4.69 cm H2O), indicating a decrease in resistance to opening with lung development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Influence of different surfactants on the physicochemical properties of elastic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, R M; Severino, P; Preté, P S C; Santana, M H A

    2017-05-01

    Elastic liposomes are capable to improve drug transport through the skin by acting as penetration enhancers due to the high fluidity and elasticity of the liposome membranes. Therefore, elastic liposomes were prepared and characterized to facilitate the transdermal transport of bioactive molecules. Liposomes consisted of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) as the structural component, with different surfactants derived from lauric acid as elastic components: C12E5 (polyoxyethylene-5-lauryl ether), PEG4L (polyethyleneglycol-4-lauryl ester), PEG4DL (polyethylene glycol-4-dilauryl ester), PEG8L (polyethylene glycol-8-lauryl ester) and PEG8DL (polyethylene glycol-8-dilauryl ester). The elastic liposomes were characterized in terms of their phospholipid content, mean diameter, size distribution, elasticity and stability during storage, as well as their ability to incorporate surfactant and permeate through 50 nm pore size membranes. The results showed that the phospholipid phase transition temperature, the fluidity of the lipid bilayer resulting from incorporation of the surfactant and the preservation of particle integrity were factors determining the performance of the elastic liposomes in permeating through nanoporous membranes. The best results were obtained using DMPC combined with the surfactants PEG8L or PEG8DL. The findings demonstrate the potential of using elastic liposomes for transdermal administration of drugs.

  17. “SP-G”, a Putative New Surfactant Protein – Tissue Localization and 3D Structure

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class. PMID:23094088

  18. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Felix; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Ngueya, Ivan; Bräuer, Lars; Brandt, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP) are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G) was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  19. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  20. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  1. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids*

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. PMID:27302065

  2. Mammalian Glucose Transporter Activity Is Dependent upon Anionic and Conical Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Quigley, Andrew; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Hruz, Paul W

    2016-08-12

    The regulated movement of glucose across mammalian cell membranes is mediated by facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) embedded in lipid bilayers. Despite the known importance of phospholipids in regulating protein structure and activity, the lipid-induced effects on the GLUTs remain poorly understood. We systematically examined the effects of physiologically relevant phospholipids on glucose transport in liposomes containing purified GLUT4 and GLUT3. The anionic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol, were found to be essential for transporter function by activating it and stabilizing its structure. Conical lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine and diacylglycerol, enhanced transporter activity up to 3-fold in the presence of anionic phospholipids but did not stabilize protein structure. Kinetic analyses revealed that both lipids increase the kcat of transport without changing the Km values. These results allowed us to elucidate the activation of GLUT by plasma membrane phospholipids and to extend the field of membrane protein-lipid interactions to the family of structurally and functionally related human solute carriers. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Crystallographic Identification and Functional Characterization of Phospholipids as Ligands for the Orphan Nuclear Receptor Steroidogenic Factor-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong; Choi, Mihwa; Cavey, Greg; Daugherty, Jennifer; Suino, Kelly; Kovach, Amanda; Bingham, Nathan C.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Xu, H.Eric

    2010-11-10

    The orphan nuclear receptor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) regulates the differentiation and function of endocrine glands. Although SF-1 is constitutively active in cell-based assays, it is not known whether this transcriptional activity is modulated by ligands. Here, we describe the 1.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of the SF-1 ligand binding domain in complex with an LXXLL motif from a coregulator protein. The structure reveals the presence of a phospholipid ligand in a surprisingly large pocket ({approx}1600 {angstrom}{sup 3}), with the receptor adopting the canonical active conformation. The bound phospholipid is readily exchanged and modulates SF-1 interactions with coactivators. Mutations designed to reduce the size of the SF-1 pocket or to disrupt hydrogen bonds with the phospholipid abolish SF-1/coactivator interactions and significantly reduce SF-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide evidence that SF-1 is regulated by endogenous ligands and suggest an unexpected relationship between phospholipids and endocrine development and function.

  4. Enhanced bioavailability and retinal accumulation of lutein from self-emulsifying phospholipid suspension (SEPS).

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan; Park, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Piao, Zong Zhu; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon; Woo, Jong Soo

    2011-06-30

    Ability of any formulation to keep the drug in solubilized form in vivo is essential for bioavailability (BA) enhancement rather than the solubility of drug in the formulation vehicle/matrix itself. Besides, utilization of an excess amount of surfactants/co-surfactants to solubilize the drug in the lipid formulation poses potential pharmaceutical as well as health problems. To address this problem, self-emulsifying phospholipid suspension (SEPS) consisting of high amount of phospholipid (an endogenous lipid with efficient in vivo emulsification capability) and relatively low amount of surfactant/co-surfactant has been proposed to enhance the bioavailability (BA) of lutein. In this study, the ability of SEPS formulation to enhance the BA of lutein was assessed from three SEPS formulations with various amounts of phospholipid (SEPS-0, SEPS-I, and SEPS-II with 0mg, 250 mg, and 500 mg of Phosal 53 MCT, respectively) in beagle dogs following a single oral administration of lutein equivalent to 100mg, and were compared with commercial formulation (CF). In addition, the retinal accumulation of lutein in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats' eyes from SEPS-II formulation (lutein dose of 100mg/kg/day) was investigated following single daily oral administration for a period of 14 days. CF and placebo (vegetable oil without lutein) were also administered for the same period of time and were compared with the SEPS-II formulation. In the relative BA study in beagle dogs, no significant differences were observed between the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of formulation SEPS-O and CF. However, the C(max) in comparison to CF was 3.70 folds and 11.76 folds higher for SEPS-I and SEPS-II, respectively. Relative BA compared to CF was 178.88% and 473.13% for SEPS-I and SEPS-II, respectively. The retinal lutein accumulation was 0.91 ± 0.31 ng/g, 3.45 ± 1.63 ng/g, and 14.72 ± 2.02 ng/g for placebo, CF, and SEPS-II, respectively. This enhancement was about 16.1 folds and 4.27 folds compared to

  5. Health effects of dietary phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Küllenberg, Daniela; Taylor, Lenka A; Schneider, Michael; Massing, Ulrich

    2012-01-05

    Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs) have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs.From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA) residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors) by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits.

  6. Nonenzymatic Reactions above Phospholipid Surfaces of Biological Membranes: Reactivity of Phospholipids and Their Oxidation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Calero, Christian; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Frau, Juan; Muñoz, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipids play multiple and essential roles in cells, as components of biological membranes. Although phospholipid bilayers provide the supporting matrix and surface for many enzymatic reactions, their inherent reactivity and possible catalytic role have not been highlighted. As other biomolecules, phospholipids are frequent targets of nonenzymatic modifications by reactive substances including oxidants and glycating agents which conduct to the formation of advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs). There are some theoretical studies about the mechanisms of reactions related to these processes on phosphatidylethanolamine surfaces, which hypothesize that cell membrane phospholipids surface environment could enhance some reactions through a catalyst effect. On the other hand, the phospholipid bilayers are susceptible to oxidative damage by oxidant agents as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Molecular dynamics simulations performed on phospholipid bilayers models, which include modified phospholipids by these reactions and subsequent reactions that conduct to formation of ALEs and AGEs, have revealed changes in the molecular interactions and biophysical properties of these bilayers as consequence of these reactions. Then, more studies are desirable which could correlate the biophysics of modified phospholipids with metabolism in processes such as aging and diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25977746

  7. Aqueous solutions at the interface with phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Max L; Vácha, Robert

    2012-01-17

    In a sense, life is defined by membranes, because they delineate the barrier between the living cell and its surroundings. Membranes are also essential for regulating the machinery of life throughout many interfaces within the cell's interior. A large number of experimental, computational, and theoretical studies have demonstrated how the properties of water and ionic aqueous solutions change due to the vicinity of membranes and, in turn, how the properties of membranes depend on the presence of aqueous solutions. Consequently, understanding the character of aqueous solutions at their interface with biological membranes is critical to research progress on many fronts. The importance of incorporating a molecular-level description of water into the study of biomembrane surfaces was demonstrated by an examination of the interaction between phospholipid bilayers that can serve as model biological membranes. The results showed that, in addition to well-known forces, such as van der Waals and screened Coulomb, one has to consider a repulsion force due to the removal of water between surfaces. It was also known that physicochemical properties of biological membranes are strongly influenced by the specific character of the ions in the surrounding aqueous solutions because of the observation that different anions produce different effects on muscle twitch tension. In this Account, we describe the interaction of pure water, and also of aqueous ionic solutions, with model membranes. We show that a symbiosis of experimental and computational work over the past few years has resulted in substantial progress in the field. We now better understand the origin of the hydration force, the structural properties of water at the interface with phospholipid bilayers, and the influence of phospholipid headgroups on the dynamics of water. We also improved our knowledge of the ion-specific effect, which is observed at the interface of the phospholipid bilayer and aqueous solution, and its

  8. Quantification of phospholipids classes in human milk.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Francesca; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Flück, Brigitte; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Thakkar, Sagar K; Destaillats, Frédéric; Braun, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    Phospholipids are integral constituents of the milk fat globule membranes and they play a central role in infants' immune and inflammatory responses. A methodology employing liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detector has been optimized and validated to quantify the major phospholipids classes in human milk. Phospholipids were extracted using chloroform and methanol and separated on C18 column. Repeatability, intermediate reproducibility, and recovery values were calculated and a large sample set of human milk analyzed. In human milk, phospholipid classes were quantified at concentrations of 0.6 mg/100 g for phosphatidylinositol; 4.2 mg/100 g for phosphatidylethanolamine, 0.4 mg/100 g for phosphatidylserine, 2.8 mg/100 g for phosphatidylcholine, and 4.6 mg/100 g for sphingomyelin. Their relative standard deviation of repeatability and intermediate reproducibility values ranging between 0.8 and 13.4 % and between 2.4 and 25.7 %, respectively. The recovery values ranged between 67 and 112 %. Finally, the validated method was used to quantify phospholipid classes in human milk collected from 50 volunteers 4 weeks postpartum providing absolute content of these lipids in a relatively large cohort. The average content of total phospholipids was 23.8 mg/100 g that corresponds to an estimated mean intake of 140 mg phospholipids/day in a 4-week old infant when exclusively breast-fed.

  9. Filamentous Fungi with High Cytosolic Phospholipid Transfer Activity in the Presence of Exogenous Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Record, Eric; Lesage, Laurence; Cahagnier, Bernard; Marion, Didier; Asther, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The phospholipid transfer activity of cell extracts from 15 filamentous fungus strains grown on a medium containing phospholipids as the carbon source was measured by a fluorescence assay. This assay was based on the transfer of pyrene-labeled phosphatidylcholines forming the donor vesicles to acceptor vesicles composed of egg phosphatidylcholines. The highest phosphatidylcholine transfer activity was obtained with cell extracts from Aspergillus oryzae. The presence of exogenous phospholipids in the culture medium of A. oryzae was shown to increase markedly the activity of phospholipid transfer as well as the pool of exocellular proteins during the primary phase of growth. Modifications in the biochemical marker activities of cellular organelles were observed: succinate dehydrogenase, a mitochondrial marker; inosine diphosphatase, a Golgi system marker; and cytochrome c oxidoreductase, an endoplasmic reticulum marker, were increased 7.3-, 2-, and 22-fold, respectively, when A. oryzae was grown in the presence of phospholipids. PMID:16349388

  10. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300–500 nm for GP and 200–300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2–20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5–35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed. PMID:26693021

  11. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-12-07

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300-500 nm for GP and 200-300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2-20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5-35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed.

  12. Autistic disorder and phospholipids: A review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine M; Austin, David W

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulated phospholipid metabolism has been proposed as an underlying biological component of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autistic disorder (AD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This review provides an overview of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolism and evidence for phospholipid dysregulation with reference to the membrane hypothesis of schizophrenia. While there is evidence that phospholipid metabolism is at least impaired in individuals with AD, it has not been established whether phospholipid metabolism is implicated in causal, mechanistic or epiphenomenological models. More research is needed to ascertain whether breastfeeding, and specifically, the administration of colostrum or an adequate substitute can play a preventative role by supplying the neonate with essential fatty acids (EFAs) at a critical juncture in their development. Regarding treatment, further clinical trials of EFA supplementation are essential to determine the efficacy of EFAs in reducing AD symptomatology and whether supplementation can serve as a cost-effective and readily available intervention. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  14. Degradation of cholesterol crystals in phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koren, Eugen; Koscec, Mirna; Fugate, Robert D.

    1993-02-01

    Based on previous studies from the laboratory that demonstrated degradation of cholesterol crystals ingested by macrophages in a cell culture system and indicated that intracellular phospholipids could play an important role in mobilization of crystalline cholesterol, the role of each of the three major intracellular phospholipid species in degradation of crystals is further explored. Fluorescently labeled cholesterol crystals are incubated with phospholipids over a period of 5 d. Morphological changes in crystals are monitored using digital imaging fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence redistribution after photobleaching, confocal microscopy, and epifluorescent and phase contrast microscopy. Results clearly demonstrate that all three phospholipids are able to mobilize crystalline cholesterol. However, the mechanisms by which they exert mobilization are different. Sphingomyelin and phosphatidylchloline are found to cause gradual and uniform dissolution of crystals, more or less preserving their original shape. Phosphatidylethanolamine appear to penetrate into the crystal, causing its fragmentation and solubilization. In the mixture of all three phospholipids representing the composition found in macrophages, both of the described mechanisms are working simultaneously.

  15. Model Lung Surfactant Films: Why Composition Matters

    SciTech Connect

    Selladurai, Sahana L.; Miclette Lamarche, Renaud; Schmidt, Rolf; DeWolf, Christine E.

    2016-10-18

    Lung surfactant replacement therapies, Survanta and Infasurf, and two lipid-only systems both containing saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and one containing additional palmitic acid were used to study the impact of buffered saline on the surface activity, morphology, rheology, and structure of Langmuir monolayer model membranes. Isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy show that buffered saline subphases induce a film expansion, except when the cationic protein, SP-B, is present in sufficient quantities to already screen electrostatic repulsion, thus limiting the effect of changing pH and adding counterions. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate an expansion not only of the liquid expanded phase but also an expansion of the lattice of the condensed phase. The film expansion corresponded in all cases with a significant reduction in the viscosity and elasticity of the films. The viscoelastic parameters are dominated by liquid expanded phase properties and do not appear to be dependent on the structure of the condensed phase domains in a phase separated film. The results highlight that the choice of subphase and film composition is important for meaningful interpretations of measurements using model systems.

  16. Evolution, Development, and Function of the Pulmonary Surfactant System in Normal and Perturbed Environments.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; Morrison, Janna L; Daniels, Christopher B

    2015-12-15

    Surfactant lipids and proteins form a surface active film at the air-liquid interface of internal gas exchange organs, including swim bladders and lungs. The system is uniquely positioned to meet both the physical challenges associated with a dynamically changing internal air-liquid interface, and the environmental challenges associated with the foreign pathogens and particles to which the internal surface is exposed. Lungs range from simple, transparent, bag-like units to complex, multilobed, compartmentalized structures. Despite this anatomical variability, the surfactant system is remarkably conserved. Here, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the surfactant system, which likely predates lungs. We describe the evolution of surfactant structure and function in invertebrates and vertebrates. We focus on changes in lipid and protein composition and surfactant function from its antiadhesive and innate immune to its alveolar stability and structural integrity functions. We discuss the biochemical, hormonal, autonomic, and mechanical factors that regulate normal surfactant secretion in mature animals. We present an analysis of the ontogeny of surfactant development among the vertebrates and the contribution of different regulatory mechanisms that control this development. We also discuss environmental (oxygen), hormonal and biochemical (glucocorticoids and glucose) and pollutant (maternal smoking, alcohol, and common "recreational" drugs) effects that impact surfactant development. On the adult surfactant system, we focus on environmental variables including temperature, pressure, and hypoxia that have shaped its evolution and we discuss the resultant biochemical, biophysical, and cellular adaptations. Finally, we discuss the effect of major modern gaseous and particulate pollutants on the lung and surfactant system.

  17. Phospholipid containing mixed micelles. Characterization of diheptanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate and DHPC and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Radha; Vautier-Giongo, Carolina; Bakshi, Mandeep Singh; Bales, Barney L; Hajdu, Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Mixed micelles of l,2-diheptanoyl-sn-grycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) with ionic detergents were prepared to develop well characterized substrates for the study of lipolytic enzymes. The aggregates that formed on mixing DHPC with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and with the positively charged dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) were investigated using time-resolved fluorescence quenching (TRFQ) to determine the aggregation numbers and bimolecular collision rates, and electron spin resonance (ESR) to measure the hydration index and microviscosity of the micelles at the micelle-water interface. Mixed micelles between the phospholipid and each of the detergents formed in all compositions, yielding interfaces with varying charge, hydration, and microviscosity. Both series of micelles were found to be globular up to 0.7 mole fraction of DHPC, while the aggregation numbers varied within the same concentration range of the components less than 15%. Addition of the zwitterionic phospholipid component increased the degree of counterion dissociation as measured by the quenching of the fluorescence of pyrene by the bromide ions bound to DHPC/DTAB micelles, showing that at 0.6 mole fraction of DHPC 80% of the bromide ions are dissociated from the micelles. The interface water concentration decreased significantly on addition of DHPC to each detergent. For combined phospholipid and detergent concentration of 50 mM the interface water concentration decreased, as measured by ESR of the spin-probes, from 38.5 M/L of interface volume in SDS alone to 9 M/L when the phospholipid was present at 0.7 mole fraction. Similar addition of DHPC to DTAB decreased the interfacial water concentration from 27 M/L to 11 M/L. Determination of the physicochemical parameters of the phospholipid containing mixed micelles here presented are likely to provide important insight into the design of assay systems for kinetic studies of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes.

  18. Leptin does not influence surfactant synthesis in fetal sheep and mice lungs

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Atsuyasu; Schehr, Angelica

    2011-01-01

    In the fetus, leptin in the circulation increases at late gestation and likely influences fetal organ development. Increased surfactant by leptin was previously demonstrated in vitro using fetal lung explant. We hypothesized that leptin treatment given to fetal sheep and pregnant mice might increase surfactant synthesis in the fetal lung in vivo. At 122–124 days gestational age (term: 150 days), fetal sheep were injected with 5 mg of leptin or vehicle using ultrasound guidance. Three and a half days after injection, preterm lambs were delivered, and lung function was studied during 30-min ventilation, followed by pulmonary surfactant components analyses. Pregnant A/J mice were given 30 or 300 mg of leptin or vehicle by intraperitoneal injection according to five study protocols with different doses, number of treatments, and gestational ages to treat. Surfactant components were analyzed in fetal lung 24 h after the last maternal treatment. Leptin injection given to fetal sheep increased fetal body weight. Control and leptin-treated groups were similar in lung function (preterm newborn lamb), surfactant components pool sizes (lamb and fetal mice), and expression of genes related to surfactant synthesis in the lung (fetal mice). Likewise, saturated phosphatidylcholine and phospholipid were normal in mice lungs with absence of circulating leptin (ob/ob mice) at all ages. These studies coincided in findings that neither exogenously given leptin nor deficiency of leptin influenced fetal lung maturation or surfactant pool sizes in vivo. Furthermore, the key genes critically required for surfactant synthesis were not affected by leptin treatment. PMID:21216976

  19. Integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier and alveolar surfactant system in smokers.

    PubMed Central

    Schmekel, B; Bos, J A; Khan, A R; Wohlfart, B; Lachmann, B; Wollmer, P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier to technetium-99m labelled diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (99mTc DTPA) is known to be greatly increased in smokers, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Abnormal permeability of the alveolar epithelium as well as impaired surfactant function has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to examine transudation of urea and albumin into the alveoli and alveolar surfactant function in smokers and non-smokers and to relate these variables to the rate of alveolar-capillary transfer of 99mTc DTPA. METHODS: Standardised bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the yield of urea and albumin measured in the lavage fluid. The integrity of the alveolar surfactant system was assessed by measurement of the surface activity and of the yield of phospholipids in alveolar lavage fluid. RESULTS: The mean decay constant for the pulmonary clearance of 99mTc DTPA was 0.028/min in the smokers and 0.009/min in the non-smokers. The recovery of albumin and urea in alveolar lavage fluid was very similar in the two groups. The surface activity of alveolar lavage fluid was lower in smokers than in non-smokers (minimum surface tension 37.9 versus 28.6 mN/m) and the yield of phospholipids was reduced (2.08 versus 3.86 mg). The rate constant for the pulmonary clearance of 99mTc DTPA correlated with the yield of phospholipids at bronchoalveolar lavage. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that increased alveolar-capillary transfer of 99mTc DTPA in smokers is not accompanied by increased transudation of small or large molecules into the alveoli. The findings support the hypothesis that increased clearance of 99mTc DTPA in smokers is related to surfactant dysfunction. PMID:1412116

  20. Low Concentration Ozone Reacts with Plasmalogen Glycerophosphoethanolamine Lipids in Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Wynalda, Kelly M.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Ozone is a common environmental toxicant to which individuals are exposed to on a daily basis. While biochemical endpoints such as increased mortality, decrements in pulmonary function and initiation of inflammatory processes are known, little is actually understood regarding the chemical mechanisms underlying changes in pulmonary health, especially for low concentrations of ozone. This study was undertaken to investigate ozone induced oxidation of endogenous lipids that are potentially exposed to environmental ozone within lung, specifically focusing on plasmalogen glycerophospholipids present in pulmonary surfactant. Sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed to follow oxidation of diacyl and plasmalogen phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) phospholipids, and to identify and quantitate products generated by ozonolysis. Using a unilamellar vesicle system containing a 1:1 molar mixture of 1-O-octadec-1’-enyl-2-octadecenoyl-PE and 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-PC, these studies revealed the vinyl ether bond of plasmalogens was oxidized preferentially at low concentrations of ozone (100 ppb), when compared to olefinic bond oxidation on ω-9 of the fatty acyl chain in the same phospholipids. Major phospholipid products generated were identified as 1-formyl-2-octadecenoyl-PE and 1-hydroxy-2-octadecenoyl-PE. Heptadecanal and heptadecanoic acid production was also quantitated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and production was consistent with oxidation of the vinyl ether, at low concentrations of ozone. Analysis of murine lung surfactant from C57Bl/6 mice revealed several plasmalogen PE lipid species, encompassing ~38% of total PE species. Upon exposure of ozone (0 ppb, 100 ppb) to murine surfactant, plasmalogen PE molecular species preferentially reacted, as compared to diacyl PE molecular species. Lysophospholipids, pentadecanal, and nonanal were found to be the primary products of surfactant ozone oxidation. PMID:19916514

  1. Microstructure of Mixed Surfactant Solutions by Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naranjo, Edward

    1995-01-01

    biological surfactants. We have found that subtle changes by surfactant additives to phosphatidylcholines (PC) produce dramatic changes in the microstructure of the composite that are impossible to determine from simple scattering experiments. Novel microstructures were observed at mole ratios from 4/1 to 9/1 long chain (Di-C_{16}PC)/short chain lipid (Di-C_7PC), including disc-like micelles and rippled bilayers at room temperature. We have also observed for the first time the formation of single layered ripple phase bilayer fragments. The formation of such fragments eliminates a number of theories of formation of this unique structure that depend on coupling between bilayers. In a similar system, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixed with the branched alcohol geraniol produces a bluish and extremely viscoelastic phase of giant multilamellar wormy vesicles. This phase shows the Weissenberg effect under flow due to the distortion of the entangled vesicles and may be related to fluid lamellar phases and L _3 phases often seen in surfactant-alcohol -water systems. Lysophosphatidylcholine, the single-chain counterpart of the diacyl phospholipids, can also form bilayer phases when combined with long-chain fatty acids in water. The phase transition characteristics and appearance of the bilayers in equimolar mixtures of lysolipid and fatty acid are similar to those of the diacyl-PC. Electron microscopy reveals large extended multilayers in mixtures with excess lysolipid and multilamellar vesicles in mixtures with excess fatty acid.

  2. Electrochemical modelling of QD-phospholipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengwen; Chen, Rongjun; Malhotra, Girish; Critchley, Kevin; Vakurov, Alexander; Nelson, Andrew

    2014-04-15

    The aggregation of quantum dots (QDs) and capping of individual QDs affects their activity towards biomembrane models. Electrochemical methods using a phospholipid layer on mercury (Hg) membrane model have been used to determine the phospholipid monolayer activity of thioglycollic acid (TGA) coated quantum dots (QDs) as an indicator of biomembrane activity. The particles were characterised for size and charge. The activity of the QDs towards dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) monolayers is pH dependent, and is most active at pH 8.2 within the pH range 8.2-6.5 examined in this work. This pH dependent activity is the result of increased particle aggregation coupled to decreasing surface charge emanating from the TGA carboxylic groups employed to stabilize the QD dispersion in aqueous media. Capping the QDs with CdS/ZnS lowers the particles' activity to phospholipid monolayers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  4. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  5. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  6. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  7. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  8. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  9. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-11

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than [Formula: see text] to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning-here through ion exchange-unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  10. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  11. Pulmonary phospholipids in amniotic fluid of pathologic pregnancies: relationship with clinical status of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Zapata, A; Hernandez-Garcia, J M; Grande, C; Martinez, I; Perez, J; de la Fuente, P; Usandizaga, J A

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated phospholipids, C-peptide and cortisol levels in amniotic fluid of 203 pathologic pregnancies (63, class A, B and C diabetics; 11 class D, F and H diabetics; 44 preclampsia and 85 Rh-isoimmunization); the control group was 82 normal pregnant women. There was an acceleration of fetal pulmonary maturation in women with preclampsia and severe Rh-isoimmunization in class D, F and H diabetics (at 34 weeks gestation the incidence of mature surfactant (lecithin/sphingomyelin greater than or equal to 2.7 and presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol) in these groups was 30%, 50% and 100%, respectively, while it was zero in the control group). At 37 and 38 weeks only 44.4% of the class A, B and C diabetics had mature surfactant and there was a significant difference with respect to the control group (x2 = 4.9; p less than 0.05); C-peptide levels in these diabetics (class A, B and C) were higher than in controls (p less than 0.001); in pregnant women with accelerated fetal lung maturation they were lower. We demonstrated a close relationship between fetal pulmonary maturity and the type of surfactant in amniotic fluid, which was independent of gestational age.

  12. Phospholipid membrane tubulation using ceramide doping "Cerosomes": Characterization and clinical application in psoriasis treatment.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Rana; Nasr, Maha; Moftah, Noha H; Hamza, Manal Yassin

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology and material surface modification have provided a functional platform for the advancement of several medical fields such as dermatology. Furthermore, the smart choice of preparation material was proven to confer unique properties to the developed nanosystems. In this context, we focused on the sphingolipid "ceramide", whose deficiency was found to negatively affect psoriasis. Ceramide was doped into surfactant based vesicular phospholipid systems to create tubulated vesicles "cerosomes" loaded with a model anti-psoriatic drug "tazarotene", and their properties were tested as compared to ceramide free vesicles. Cerosomes were characterized for their drug entrapment, viscosity, in vitro drug release, morphology, ex vivo drug skin deposition, thermal behavior, and were clinically tested on psoriatic patients. The factorial design study revealed that the surfactant type, the ceramide: surfactant ratio, and the presence of ethanol in the hydration buffer affected the entrapment efficiency and the viscosity of the vesicles. Ceramide increased the entrapment of tazarotene, decreased its release while enhancing its deposition within the skin, correlating with better clinical therapeutic outcome compared to the topical marketed product. Ceramide was also able to cause significant membrane tubulation in the vesicles, causing them to deviate from the conventional spherical morphology. As a conclusion, cerosomes present a new functional treatment modality for psoriasis which is worthy of future experimentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phospholipid complex enriched micelles: A novel drug delivery approach for promoting the antidiabetic effect of repaglinide.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Basha, Mona; Salama, Abeer

    2017-03-01

    To enhance the oral antidiabetic effect of repaglinide (RG), a newly emerging approach, based on the combination of phospholipid complexation and micelle techniques, was employed. Repaglinide-phospholipid complex (RG-PLC) was prepared by the solvent-evaporation method then characterized using Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XPRD). The results revealed obvious disappearance of the characteristic peaks of the prepared RG-PLCs confirming the formation of drug-phospholipid complex. RG-PLC enriched micelles (RG-PLC-Ms) were prepared by the solvent-evaporation technique employing poloxamer 188 as surfactant. The prepared RG-PLC-Ms showed high drug encapsulation efficiencies (93.81-99.38%), with nanometric particle diameters (500.61-665.32nm) of monodisperse distribution and high stability (Zeta potential < -29.8mV). The in vitro release of RG from RG-PLC-Ms was pH-dependant according to the release media. A higher release pattern was reported in pH=1.2 compared to a more retarded release in pH=6.8 owing to two different kinetics of drug release. Oral antidiabetic effect of two optimized RG-PLC-M formulations was evaluated in an alloxan-induced diabetic rat model for 7-day treatment protocol. The two investigated formulations depicted normal blood glucose, serum malondialdehyde and insulin levels as well as an improved lipid profile, at the end of daily oral treatment, in contrast to RG marketed tablets implying enhanced antidiabetic effect of the drug. Hence, phospholipid-complex enriched micelles approach holds a promising potential for promoting the antidiabetic effect of RG.

  14. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  15. Distinctive interactions of oleic acid covered magnetic nanoparticles with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids in Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Matshaya, Thabo J; Lanterna, Anabel E; Granados, Alejandro M; Krause, Rui W M; Maggio, Bruno; Vico, Raquel V

    2014-05-27

    The growing number of innovations in nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology are posing new challenges in understanding the full spectrum of interactions between nanomateriales and biomolecules at nano-biointerfaces. Although considerable achievements have been accomplished by in vivo applications, many issues regarding the molecular nature of these interactions are far from being well-understood. In this work, we evaluate the interaction of hydrophobic magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) covered with a single layer of oleic acid with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids found in biomembranes through the use of Langmuir monolayers. We find distinctive interactions among the MNP with saturated and unsaturated phospholipids that are reflected by both, the compression isotherms and the surface topography of the films. The interaction between MNP and saturated lipids causes a noticeable reduction of the mean molecular area in the interfacial plane, while the interaction with unsaturated lipids promotes area expansion compared to the ideally mixed films. Moreover, when liquid expanded and liquid condensed phases of the phospholipid(s) coexist, the MNP preferably partition to the liquid-expanded phase, thus hindering the coalescence of the condensed domains with increasing surface pressure. In consequence organizational information on long-range order is attained. These results evidence the existence of a sensitive composition-dependent surface regulation given by phospholipid-nanoparticle interactions which enhance the biophysical relevance of understanding nanoparticle surface functionalization in relation to its interactions in biointerfaces constituted by defined types of biomolecules.

  16. On the molecular mechanism of flippase- and scramblase-mediated phospholipid transport.

    PubMed

    Montigny, Cédric; Lyons, Joseph; Champeil, Philippe; Nissen, Poul; Lenoir, Guillaume

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases are key regulators of transbilayer lipid asymmetry in eukaryotic cell membranes, critical to many trafficking and signaling pathways. P4-ATPases, in particular, are responsible for the uphill transport of phospholipids from the exoplasmic to the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane, as well as membranes of the late secretory/endocytic pathways, thereby establishing transbilayer asymmetry. Recent studies combining cell biology and biochemical approaches have improved our understanding of the path taken by lipids through P4-ATPases. Additionally, identification of several protein families catalyzing phospholipid 'scrambling', i.e. disruption of phospholipid asymmetry through energy-independent bi-directional phospholipid transport, as well as the recent report of the structure of such a scramblase, opens the way to a deeper characterization of their mechanism of action. Here, we discuss the molecular nature of the mechanism by which lipids may 'flip' across membranes, with an emphasis on active lipid transport catalyzed by P4-ATPases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  17. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The effect of a peptide-containing synthetic lung surfactant on gas exchange and lung mechanics in a rabbit model of surfactant depletion.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Johann M; Smith, Johan; Hawtrey, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Currently, a new generation of synthetic pulmonary surfactants is being developed that may eventually replace animal-derived surfactants used in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. Enlightened by this, we prepared a synthetic peptide-containing surfactant (Synsurf) consisting of phospholipids and poly-l-lysine electrostatically bonded to poly-l-glutamic acid. Our objective in this study was to investigate if bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-induced acute lung injury and surfactant deficiency with accompanying hypoxemia and increased alveolar and physiological dead space is restored to its prelavage condition by surfactant replacement with Synsurf, a generic prepared Exosurf, and a generic Exosurf containing Ca(2+). Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits receiving conventional mechanical ventilation underwent repeated BAL to create acute lung injury and surfactant-deficient lung disease. Synthetic surfactants were then administered and their effects assessed at specified time points over 5 hours. The variables assessed before and after lavage and surfactant treatment included alveolar and physiological dead space, dead space/tidal volume ratio, arterial end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) difference (mainstream capnography), arterial blood gas analysis, calculated shunt, and oxygen ratios. BAL led to acute lung injury characterized by an increasing arterial PCO2 and a simultaneous increase of alveolar and physiological dead space/tidal volume ratio with no intergroup differences. Arterial end-tidal PCO2 and dead space/tidal volume ratio correlated in the Synsurf, generic Exosurf and generic Exosurf containing Ca(2+) groups. A significant and sustained improvement in systemic oxygenation occurred from time point 180 minutes onward in animals treated with Synsurf compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). A statistically significant decrease in pulmonary shunt (P < 0.001) was found for the Synsurf-treated group of animals, as well as radiographic

  19. The effect of a peptide-containing synthetic lung surfactant on gas exchange and lung mechanics in a rabbit model of surfactant depletion

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, Johann M; Smith, Johan; Hawtrey, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, a new generation of synthetic pulmonary surfactants is being developed that may eventually replace animal-derived surfactants used in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome. Enlightened by this, we prepared a synthetic peptide-containing surfactant (Synsurf) consisting of phospholipids and poly-l-lysine electrostatically bonded to poly-l-glutamic acid. Our objective in this study was to investigate if bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)-induced acute lung injury and surfactant deficiency with accompanying hypoxemia and increased alveolar and physiological dead space is restored to its prelavage condition by surfactant replacement with Synsurf, a generic prepared Exosurf, and a generic Exosurf containing Ca2+. Methods Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits receiving conventional mechanical ventilation underwent repeated BAL to create acute lung injury and surfactant-deficient lung disease. Synthetic surfactants were then administered and their effects assessed at specified time points over 5 hours. The variables assessed before and after lavage and surfactant treatment included alveolar and physiological dead space, dead space/tidal volume ratio, arterial end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) difference (mainstream capnography), arterial blood gas analysis, calculated shunt, and oxygen ratios. Results BAL led to acute lung injury characterized by an increasing arterial PCO2 and a simultaneous increase of alveolar and physiological dead space/tidal volume ratio with no intergroup differences. Arterial end-tidal PCO2 and dead space/tidal volume ratio correlated in the Synsurf, generic Exosurf and generic Exosurf containing Ca2+ groups. A significant and sustained improvement in systemic oxygenation occurred from time point 180 minutes onward in animals treated with Synsurf compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001). A statistically significant decrease in pulmonary shunt (P < 0.001) was found for the Synsurf-treated group of animals, as well

  20. Cyclic Phosphatidic Acid – A Unique Bioactive Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (CPA) is a naturally occurring analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). The sn-2 hydroxy group of CPA forms a 5-membered ring with the sn-3 phosphate. CPA affects numerous cellular functions, including antimitogenic regulation of the cell cycle, induction of stress fiber formation, inhibition of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, and regulation of differentiation and survival of neuronal cells. Interestingly, many of these cellular responses caused by CPA oppose those of LPA despite the activation of apparently overlapping receptor populations. Since the early 1990s, studies on CPA actions gradually developed, and we are now beginning to understand the importance of this lipid. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge about CPA, including enzymatic formation of CPA, unique biological activities and biological targets of CPA, and we also explore metabolically stabilized CPA analogs. PMID:18554524

  1. Solubilizing effects caused by the nonionic surfactant dodecylmaltoside in phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    de la Maza, A; Parra, J L

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of the nonionic surfactant dodecylmaltoside (DM) with phosphatidylcholine liposomes was investigated. Permeability alterations were detected as a change in 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein released from the interior of vesicles and bilayer solubilization as a decrease in the static light scattered by liposome suspensions. This surfactant showed higher capacity to saturate and solubilize PC liposomes and greater affinity with these structures than those reported for the octyl glucoside. At subsolubilizing level an initial maximum in the bilayer/water partitioning (K) followed by an abrupt decrease of this parameter occurred as the effective molar ratio of surfactant to phospholipid in bilayers (Re) rose. However, at solubilizing level a direct dependence was established between both parameters. A direct correlation took place in the initial interaction steps (Re up to 0.28) between the growth of vesicles, their fluidity, and Re. A similar direct dependence was established during solubilization (Re range from 0.9 to 1.7) between the decrease in both the surfactant-PC aggregate size, the light scattering of the system, and Re (composition of aggregates). The fact that the free DM concentration at subsolubilizing and solubilizing levels showed values lower than and similar to its critical micelle concentration indicates that permeability alterations and solubilization were determined, respectively, by the action of surfactant monomer and by the formation of mixed micelles. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:9083670

  2. Artificial surfactants based on analogues of SP-B and SP-C.

    PubMed

    Johansson, J; Curstedt, T; Robertson, B

    2001-01-01

    The hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C are important components of natural surfactant preparations currently used in clinical practice, and physiologically active surfactants can be made from isolated SP-B and/or SP-C reconstituted with synthetic lipids. Efforts have been made to produce these polypeptides, or analogues with similarfunction, by organic synthesis or expression in heterologous systems. It is important to obtain proper folding of the synthetic peptides, as required for optimal interaction with the surfactant lipids. Another issue is to avoid loss of SP-C activity due to alpha-helix to beta-sheet transition. This latter problem can be circumvented by replacing the polyvaline stretch of SP-C with a polyleucine stretch containing a few lysines. Palmitoylation of cysteines or serines at positions 5 and 6 also seems important for the properties of SP-C. SP-B, which is too big a molecule to be easily produced by organic synthesis. apparently can be replaced in an artificial surfactant by a peptide capable of cross-linking phospholipid bilayers. The development of synthetic analogues of the surfacant proteins might make it possible to tailor artificial surfactants for specific therapeutic missions, for instance by enhancing resistance to inactivation by meconium, plasma proteins, or oxygen radicals or maximizing bacteriostatic effects.

  3. Aerosolised surfactant generated by a novel noninvasive apparatus reduced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Yang, Rui; Zhong, Ji-gen; Fang, Feng; Jiang, Jin-jin; Liu, Ming-yao; Lu, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Exogenous surfactant has been explored as a potential therapy for acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In the present study, a nebuliser driven by oxygen lines found in the hospital was developed to deliver aerosolised porcine pulmonary surfactant (PPS). We hypothesised that aerosolised surfactant inhaled through spontaneous breathing may effectively reduce severe lung injury. Methods Rats were intravenously injected with oleic acid (OA) to induce ALI and 30 minutes later they were divided into five groups: model (injury only), PPS aerosol (PPS-aer), saline aerosol (saline-aer), PPS instillation (PPS-inst), and saline instillation (Saline-Inst). Blood gases, lung histology, and protein and TNF-α concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were examined. Results The PPS aerosol particles were less than 2.0 μm in size as determined by a laser aerosol particle counter. Treatment of animals with a PPS aerosol significantly increased the phospholipid content in the BALF, improved lung function, reduced pulmonary oedema, decreased total protein and TNF-α concentrations in BALF, ameliorated lung injury and improved animal survival. These therapeutic effects are similar to those seen in the PPS-inst group. Conclusions This new method of PPS aerosolisation combines the therapeutic effects of a surfactant with partial oxygen inhalation under spontaneous breathing. It is an effective, simple and safe method of administering an exogenous surfactant. PMID:19257907

  4. Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency as a cause of pulmonary surfactant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Goetzman, Eric S; Alcorn, John F; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Uppala, Radha; McHugh, Kevin J; Kosmider, Beata; Chen, Rimei; Zuo, Yi Y; Beck, Megan E; McKinney, Richard W; Skilling, Helen; Suhrie, Kristen R; Karunanidhi, Anuradha; Yeasted, Renita; Otsubo, Chikara; Ellis, Bryon; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Kagan, Valerian E; Mallampalli, Rama K; Vockley, Jerry

    2014-04-11

    Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) is a mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzyme whose expression in humans is low or absent in organs known to utilize fatty acids for energy such as heart, muscle, and liver. This study demonstrates localization of LCAD to human alveolar type II pneumocytes, which synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant. The physiological role of LCAD and the fatty acid oxidation pathway in lung was subsequently studied using LCAD knock-out mice. Lung fatty acid oxidation was reduced in LCAD(-/-) mice. LCAD(-/-) mice demonstrated reduced pulmonary compliance, but histological examination of lung tissue revealed no obvious signs of inflammation or pathology. The changes in lung mechanics were found to be due to pulmonary surfactant dysfunction. Large aggregate surfactant isolated from LCAD(-/-) mouse lavage fluid had significantly reduced phospholipid content as well as alterations in the acyl chain composition of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. LCAD(-/-) surfactant demonstrated functional abnormalities when subjected to dynamic compression-expansion cycling on a constrained drop surfactometer. Serum albumin, which has been shown to degrade and inactivate pulmonary surfactant, was significantly increased in LCAD(-/-) lavage fluid, suggesting increased epithelial permeability. Finally, we identified two cases of sudden unexplained infant death where no lung LCAD antigen was detectable. Both infants were homozygous for an amino acid changing polymorphism (K333Q). These findings for the first time identify the fatty acid oxidation pathway and LCAD in particular as factors contributing to the pathophysiology of pulmonary disease.

  5. Pulmonary surfactant function studied with the pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) and the capillary surfactometer (CS).

    PubMed

    Enhorning, G

    2001-05-01

    Two instruments, the pulsating bubble surfactometer (PBS) and the capillary surfactometer (CS), were constructed for a study of pulmonary surfactant's physical properties. The instruments study spherical surfaces as in alveoli (PBS) and cylindrical surfaces as in terminal conducting airways (CS). Phospholipids, pulmonary surfactant's main components, are amphiphilic and, therefore, spontaneously form a film at air-liquid interfaces. When the film in the PBS is compressed to a reduced area during 'expiration', the molecules come closer together. Thereby, a high surface pressure develops, causing surface tension to be reduced more than bubble radius. If these conditions, observed with the PBS are analogous in lungs, alveolar stability would be promoted. The CS was developed for a study of how surfactant has ability to maintain patency of narrow conducting airways. Provided adsorption is extremely fast, a surfactant film will line the terminal conducting airway as soon as liquid blocking the airway has been extruded. During expiration that film will develop high surface pressure (=low surface tension). This will counteract the tendency for liquid to accumulate in the airway's most narrow section. If surfactant is dysfunctioning, liquid is likely to accumulate and block terminal airways. Airway resistance would then increase, causing FEV(1) to be reduced.

  6. Determinants of bioactivity of oxidized phospholipids. Specific oxidized fatty acyl groups at the sn-2 position.

    PubMed

    Subbanagounder, G; Leitinger, N; Schwenke, D C; Wong, J W; Lee, H; Rizza, C; Watson, A D; Faull, K F; Fogelman, A M; Berliner, J A

    2000-10-01

    these molecules. In summary, these studies identify 6 new bioactive, oxidized phospholipids that are increased in MM-LDL and, where measured, in atherosclerotic lesions. They thus suggest that a family of phospholipid oxidation products containing oxovaleroyl, glutaroyl, and epoxyisoprostane at the sn-2 position play an important role in the regulation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions, bioactivity being in part controlled by several types of phospholipid hydrolases.

  7. PLA2-responsive and SPIO-loaded phospholipid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Yan, Lesan; Chiorazzo, Michael; Delikatny, E. James; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cheng, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    A PLA2-responsive and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle-loaded phospholipid micelle was developed. The release of phospholipid-conjugated dye from these micelles was triggered due to phospholipid degradation by phospholipase A2. High relaxivity of the encapsulated SPIO could enable non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26139589

  8. An evaluation of serum high density lipoproteins-phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ide, H; Tsuji, M; Shimada, M; Kondo, T; Fujiya, S; Asanuma, Y; Agishi, Y

    1988-07-01

    Phospholipids in high density lipoproteins (HDL) is being used as a negative risk indicator of atherosclerosis. Phospholipids in HDL may not demonstrate the actual level of HDL-phospholipids when determined by the precipitation or ultracentrifugal methods, because HDL fractions contain very high density lipoproteins (VHDL) and albumin. In the present study, the true level of phospholipids in HDL was estimated using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and it was compared with the level of phospholipids in HDL determined by the precipitation method. Sera from 18 healthy subjects were used as materials. In the HPLC method, the HDL fraction was extracted making sure that it contained no free albumin, which is albumin not bound to phospholipids. The HDL fraction was separated into subfractions. It was found that phospholipids in the VHDL fraction make a 20.2 +/- 7.3% (mean +/- S.D.) part of the total HDL-phospholipids. A large part of the VHDL fraction was constituted of albumin-bound phospholipids. A significant correlation was observed between HDL-phospholipids determined by the precipitation method, which contain albumin, and the actual HDL fraction phospholipids determined by HPLC, which do not contain VHDL (r = 0.903, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that HDL-phospholipids values determined by the precipitation method give useful clinical data.

  9. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    PubMed

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of (31)P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  10. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  11. Surfactant damping of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1997-11-01

    The most well known and perhaps most important distinguishing characteristic of a water surface laden with surfactant is the profound increase in small-wave damping with the addition of even small amounts of surfactant material. It would seem to follow that damping increases with increasing surfactant concentration. This is undoubtedly true for some surfactants, however our experiments with a soluble surfactant show that it is possible to increase surfactant concentration and measure a decrease in damping. While the increased concentration is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in measured static surface tension, some of the capillary-wave frequency regime is less damped. Experimental measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the wave speed are compared with existing theory where at least one other physical quantity besides surface tension is needed to properly model the interface. Our on-going work with insoluble surfactants may also provide an example of this type of behavior for materials that do not readily transfer to and from the bulk water. [Supported by the Office of Naval Research

  12. Time-dependent changes in pulmonary surfactant function and composition in acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pneumonia or aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Markart, Philipp; Ruppert, Clemens; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Kuchenbuch, Tim; Walmrath, Dieter; Seeger, Werner; Guenther, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Background Alterations to pulmonary surfactant composition have been encountered in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). However, only few data are available regarding the time-course and duration of surfactant changes in ARDS patients, although this information may largely influence the optimum design of clinical trials addressing surfactant replacement therapy. We therefore examined the time-course of surfactant changes in 15 patients with direct ARDS (pneumonia, aspiration) over the first 8 days after onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Three consecutive bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed shortly after intubation (T0), and four days (T1) and eight days (T2) after intubation. Fifteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Phospholipid-to-protein ratio in BAL fluids, phospholipid class profiles, phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species, surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, -D, and relative content and surface tension properties of large surfactant aggregates (LA) were assessed. Results At T0, a severe and highly significant reduction in SP-A, SP-B and SP-C, the LA fraction, PC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) percentages, and dipalmitoylation of PC (DPPC) was encountered. Surface activity of the LA fraction was greatly impaired. Over time, significant improvements were encountered especially in view of LA content, DPPC, PG and SP-A, but minimum surface tension of LA was not fully restored (15 mN/m at T2). A highly significant correlation was observed between PaO2/FiO2 and minimum surface tension (r = -0.83; p < 0.001), SP-C (r = 0.64; p < 0.001), and DPPC (r = 0.59; p = 0.003). Outcome analysis revealed that non-survivors had even more unfavourable surfactant properties as compared to survivors. Conclusion We concluded that a profound impairment of pulmonary surfactant composition and function occurs in the very early stage of the disease and only gradually resolves over time. These observations may explain why former surfactant replacement

  13. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  14. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Sligar, Stephen G; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2008-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor:factor VIIa complex (TF:FVIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood-clotting proteases such as TF:FVIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood-clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in "simple" model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood-clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:FVIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes.

  15. Blood clotting reactions on nanoscale phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Pureza, Vincent; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Blood clotting reactions, such as those catalyzed by the tissue factor/factor VIIa complex (TF:VIIa), assemble on membrane surfaces containing anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS). In fact, membrane binding is critical for the function of most of the steps in the blood clotting cascade. In spite of this, our understanding of how the membrane contributes to catalysis, or even how these proteins interact with phospholipids, is incomplete. Making matters more complicated, membranes containing mixtures of PS and neutral phospholipids are known to spontaneously form PS-rich membrane microdomains in the presence of plasma concentrations of calcium ions, and it is likely that blood clotting proteases such as TF:VIIa partition into these PS-rich microdomains. Unfortunately, little is known about how membrane microdomain composition influences the activity of blood clotting proteases, which is typically not under experimental control even in “simple” model membranes. Our laboratories have developed and applied new technologies for studying membrane proteins to gain insights into how blood clotting protease-cofactor pairs assemble and function on membrane surfaces. This includes using a novel, nanoscale bilayer system (Nanodiscs) that permits assembling blood clotting protease-cofactor pairs on stable bilayers containing from 65 to 250 phospholipid molecules per leaflet. We have used this system to investigate how local (nanometer-scale) changes in phospholipid bilayer composition modulate TF:VIIa activity. We have also used detailed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoscale bilayers to provide atomic-scale predictions of how the membrane-binding domain of factor VIIa interacts with PS in membranes. PMID:18691494

  16. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  17. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  18. The application of P-gp inhibiting phospholipids as novel oral bioavailability enhancers - An in vitro and in vivo comparison.

    PubMed

    Weinheimer, Manuel; Fricker, Gert; Burhenne, Jürgen; Mylius, Patricia; Schubert, Rolf

    2016-08-30

    The efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) significantly modulates drug transport across the intestinal mucosa, strongly reducing the systemic absorption of various active pharmaceutical ingredients. P-gp inhibitors could serve as helpful tools to enhance the oral bioavailability of those substances. As a membrane-associated protein P-gp is surrounded and influenced by phospholipids. Some synthetic phospholipids have been found to strongly reduce P-gp's activity. In this study two representative phospholipids, 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (8:0 PC) and 1,2-didecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (10:0 PC), were compared with Tween® 80 and Cremophor® EL, both commonly used surfactants with P-gp inhibitory properties. Their influence on the cellular transport of the P-gp substrate rhodamine 123 (RH123) was examined using Caco-2 cell layers. In addition, fluorescence anisotropy measurements were performed in order to investigate their effect on membrane fluidity. Finally, we compared the phospholipids with Tween® 80 and the competitive P-gp inhibitor verapamil in an in vivo study, testing their effects on the oral bioavailability of the P-gp substrate drug ritonavir. Both phospholipids not only led to the strongest absorption of RH123, but a permeability enhancing effect was detected in addition to the P-gp inhibition. Their effects on membrane fluidity were not consistent with their P-gp inhibiting effects, and therefore suggested a more complex mode of action. Both phospholipids significantly increased the area under the ritonavir plasma level curve (AUC) within 150min by more than tenfold, but were inferior to Tween® 80, which showed superior solubilizing effects. Finally, these phospholipids represent a novel substance class showing a high permeabilization potential for P-gp substrates. Because of their physiological structure and intestinal degradability, good tolerability without systemic absorption is expected. Formulating P-gp substrates with

  19. Minimally invasive approaches for surfactant administration.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, D; Marchetto, L

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common respiratory morbidity in preterm infants. In addition to respiratory support, the current clinical treatment includes endotracheal intubation and rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant. However, this approach needs skilled operators and has been associated with complications such as hemodynamic instability and electroencephalogram abnormalities. New, less invasive methods for surfactant administration are needed. In this article, we reviewed the available noninvasive procedures for surfactant administration. In particular, we focused on aerosolized surfactant and surfactant administration through LMA.

  20. Lung surfactant: Function and composition in the context of development and respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex with a unique phospholipid and protein composition. Its specific function is to reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface. The underlying Young-Laplace equation, applying to the surface of any geometrical structure, is the more important the smaller its radii are. It therefore applies to the alveoli and bronchioli of mature lungs, as well as to the tubules and saccules of immature lungs. Surfactant comprises 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC), of which dipalmitoyl-PC, palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC together are 75%. Anionic phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol are about 10% each, whereas surfactant proteins SP-A to -D comprise 2-5%. Maturation of the surfactant system is not essentially due to increased synthesis but to decreased turnover of specific components. Molecular differences correlate with resting respiratory rate (RR), where PC16:0/16:0 is the lower the higher RR is. PC16:0/14:0 is increased during alveolar formation, and decreases immune reactions that might impair alveolar development. In rigid bird lungs, with air-capillaries rather than alveoli, and no surface area changes during the respiratory cycle, PC16:0/16:0 is highest and PC16:0/14:0 absent. As there is no need for a surface-associated surfactant reservoir, SP-C is absent in birds as well. Airflow is lowest and particle sedimentation highest in the extrapulmonary air-sacs, rather than in the gas-exchange area. Consequently, SP-A and -D for particle opsonization are absent in bird surfactant. In essence, comparative analysis is consistent with the concept that surfactant is adapted to the physiologic needs of a given vertebrate species at a given developmental stage.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy. Without normal surfactant, the tissue surrounding the air sacs in the lungs (the alveoli ) sticks together (because of a force called surface tension) after exhalation, causing the alveoli ...

  2. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  3. Interactions between polymers and surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    de Gennes, P.G. )

    1990-11-01

    A surfactant film (at the water/air interface, or in a bilayer) is exposed to a solution of a neutral, flexible, polymer. Depending on the interactions, and on the Langmuir pressure II of the pure surfactant film, the authors expected to find three types of behavior: (I) the polymer does not absorb; (II) the polymer absorbs and mixes with the surfactant; (III) the polymer absorbs but segregates from the surfactant. Their interest here is in case II. They predict that (a) bilayers become rigid; (b) bilayers, exposed to polymer on one side only, tend to bend strongly; (c) the surface viscosity of monolayers or bilayers is considerably increased; soap films or foams, which usually drain by turbulent (two-dimensional) flows, may be stabilized in case II.

  4. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  5. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  6. Phospholipid stabilized gold nanorods: towards improved colloidal stability and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Thomas, Neethu; Sudhakar, Swathi; Chadha, Anju; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2017-07-19

    Biocompatible and colloidally stable gold nanorods (GNRs) with well-defined plasmonic properties are essential for biomedical and theranostic applications. The as-synthesized GNRs using the seed-mediated method are stabilized by the surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which is known for its cytotoxicity in many cell lines. Biocompatible GNRs synthesized using known protocols exhibit some extent of cytotoxicity and colloidal instability because of the incomplete removal of CTAB. We report a facile method for the efficient removal of CTAB molecules with 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid molecules, which are naturally present in cell membranes. The kinetics of the ligand exchange process is studied using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and corroborated with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. From colloidal stability studies using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, the optimal lipid concentration and duration required for the successful ligand exchange of CTAB by DMPC are reported. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the surface concentration of DMPC on colloidally stable GNRs is found to be approximately 9 molecules per nm(2). The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays show that the surface-modified DMPC-GNRs have significantly better biocompatibility than those of CTAB-GNRs. Studies on the ligand exchange, colloidal stability and biocompatibility of DMPC-GNRs with aspect ratios ranging from 2.2 to 4.2 demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method. The results provide insights into the important factors to be considered while designing biocompatible GNRs suitable for applications in nanomedicine.

  7. Intestinal surfactant-like material. A novel secretory product of the rat enterocyte.

    PubMed Central

    DeSchryver-Kecskemeti, K; Eliakim, R; Carroll, S; Stenson, W F; Moxley, M A; Alpers, D H

    1989-01-01

    Surface-active phospholipid-containing particles are traditionally considered to be the product of type II pneumocytes. We now demonstrate membrane-bound lamellar cytoplasmic organelles in adult and suckling rat enterocytes that are densely reactive with phospholipid-staining reagents. These structures were seen in the basolateral space, within the intercellular junctions, and unraveling on the lumenal surface, and were more abundant after fat feeding. Light scrapings of intestinal mucosa and lumenal washings that contained these bodies, as evidenced by morphology and biochemical analysis, lowered surface tension in a pulsating bubble assay. Production by normal enterocytes of material with surfactant-like appearance and properties demonstrates that these structures are present in extrapulmonary epithelia, and extends the possible range of their function beyond gaseous exchange, e.g., solute exchange or lubrication on membrane surfaces. Images PMID:2794067

  8. Effect of Lung Surfactant Protein SP-C and SP-C-Promoted Membrane Fragmentation on Cholesterol Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Nuria; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Slotte, J Peter; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; García-Álvarez, Begoña

    2016-10-18

    To allow breathing and prevent alveolar collapse, lung surfactant (LS) develops a complex membranous system at the respiratory surface. LS is defined by a specific protein and lipid composition, including saturated and unsaturated phospholipid species and cholesterol. Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been suggested to be an essential element for sustaining the presence of cholesterol in surfactant without functional impairment. In this work, we used a fluorescent sterol-partitioning assay to assess the effect of the surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C on cholesterol distribution in membranes. Our results suggest that in the LS context, the combined action of SP-B and SP-C appears to facilitate cholesterol dynamics, whereas SP-C does not seem to establish a direct interaction with cholesterol that could increase the partition of free cholesterol into membranes. Interestingly, SP-C exhibits a membrane-fragmentation behavior, leading to the conversion of large unilamellar vesicles into highly curved vesicles ∼25 nm in diameter. Sterol partition was observed to be sensitive to the bending of bilayers, indicating that the effect of SP-C to mobilize cholesterol could be indirectly associated with SP-C-mediated membrane remodeling. Our results suggest a potential role for SP-C in generating small surfactant structures that may participate in cholesterol mobilization and pulmonary surfactant homeostasis at the alveolar interfaces. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Are organosilicon surfactants safe for bees or humans?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Fine, Julia D; Mullin, Christopher A

    2017-08-29

    Organosilicon surfactants are the most potent adjuvants available for formulating and applying agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, household cleaning and personal care products, dental impressions and medicines. Risk assessment of pesticides, drugs or personal care products that takes into account only active ingredients without the other formulation ingredients and adjuvants commonly used in their application will miss important toxicity outcomes detrimental to non-target species including pollinators and humans. Over a billion pounds of organosilicon surfactants from all uses are produced globally per year, making this a major component of the chemical landscape to which bees and humans are exposed. These silicones, like most "inerts", are generally recognized as safe, have no mandated tolerances, and their residues are largely unmonitored. Lack of their public disclosure and adequate analytical methods constrains evaluation of their risk. Organosilicon surfactants, the most super-spreading and -penetrating adjuvants available, at relevant exposure levels impair honey bee learning, are acutely toxic, and in combination with bee viruses cause synergistic mortality. Organosilicon surfactants need to be regulated as a separate class of "inerts" from the more common silicones. In turn, impacts of organosilicon surfactant exposures on humans need to be evaluated. Silicones in their great diversity probably represent the single most ubiquitous environmental class of global synthetic pollutants. Do honey bees, a model environmental indicator organism, forewarn of hidden risks to humans of ubiquitous silicone exposures? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interaction of isopropylthioxanthone with phospholipid liposomes.

    PubMed

    Momo, Federico; Fabris, Sabrina; Stevanato, Roberto

    2007-04-01

    Isopropylthioxanthone (ITX) is a highly lipophilic molecule which can be released in foods and beverages from the packages, where it is present as photoinitiator of inks in printing processes. Recently it was found in babies milk, and its toxicity cannot be excluded. The structure of the molecule suggests a possible strong interaction with the lipid moiety of biological membranes, and this is the first study of its effects on phospholipid organization, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and spin labelling techniques. The data obtained with multilamellar liposomes of saturated phospholipids of different length, with and without cholesterol, point out that the molecule changes the lipid structure; in particular, in the gel state, behaving like a disordering agent it increases the mobility of the bilayer, while, in the fluid state, tends to rigidify the membrane, in a cholesterol like way. This behavior supports the hypothesis that ITX experiences a relocation process when the lipid matrix passes from the gel to the fluid state.

  11. Phospholipid Bilayers: Stability and Encapsulation of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Elnaz; Halverson, Duncan; McWhirter, Samantha; Walker, Gilbert C.

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles are widely studied for their potential medical uses in diagnostics and therapeutics. The interface between a nanoparticle and its target has been a focus of research, both to guide the nanoparticle and to prevent it from deactivating. Given nature's frequent use of phospholipid vesicles as carriers, much attention has been paid to phospholipids as a vehicle for drug delivery. The physical chemistry of bilayer formation and nanoparticle encapsulation is complex, touching on fundamental properties of hydrophobicity. Understanding the design rules for particle synthesis and encapsulation is an active area of research. The aim of this review is to provide a perspective on what preparative guideposts have been empirically discovered and how these are related to theoretical understanding. In addition, we aim to summarize how modern theory is beginning to help guide the design of functional particles that can effectively cross biological membranes.

  12. 'De-watering' capabilities of surfactants in human amniotic fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Hills, B A

    1984-01-01

    The phospholipid extracts from each of eleven samples of human amniotic fluid obtained from eleven full-term births were deposited as orientated monolayers adsorbed to glass. The surfaces were found to be rendered hydrophobic with maximum contact angles averaging 54.5 degrees while, upon withdrawing fluid, the edge of the saline pool receded to expose dry surface with minimum contact angles averaging 15.4 degrees. The extracts were found to be surface-active at the liquid-air interface and there was some indication that direct adsorption to solid surfaces was facilitated by calcium ions. It was found that, in all extracts, a continuous layer of saline adjacent to the adsorbed surface would break up spontaneously to expose dry surface when the thickness was reduced to an average of 764 micron, corresponding to several alveolar diameters. This phenomenon is discussed as a possible means of establishing dry patches on the alveolar membrane, especially in the new-born after the fetal alveolar wall has been exposed to the same surfactants in much the same physical form as found in amniotic fluid. Surfactant adsorbed directly to the tissue subphase is suggested as a physical basis for the discontinuity of the aqueous hypophase seen in many electron micrographs of the adult alveolus. This 'de-watering' of the alveolar surface could facilitate gas transfer. PMID:6546947

  13. Effect of isoxsuprine on fetal lung surfactant in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kanjanapone, V; Hartig-Beecken, I; Epstein, M F

    1980-04-01

    To examine the effect of beta adrenergic drugs on fetal lung development, we administered isoxsuprine to pregnant rabbits for 24 hr and measured indices of pulmonary surfactant synthesis, storage, and release in rabbit fetuses at 26 days gestation. Incorporation of radiolabeled choline into total and disaturated phosphatidylcholine was measured in vitro in fetal lung slices. There was a significant increase in the rate of choline incorporation into disaturated phosphatidylcholine in the isoxsuprine-treated group and a tendency toward an increased incorporation into total phosphatidylcholine as well. We also observed an increase in the pulmonary phospholipid reservoir as evidenced by a significant increase in total lung disaturated phosphatidylcholine and a trend toward higher total lung phosphatidylcholine in the isoxsuprine group. In addition, there was a significant increase in lung lavage L/S ratio in the treated fetuses and in lung deflation stability determined by pressure volume curve. We conclude that isoxsuprine increases synthesis, storage, and release of surfactant in rabbit fetuses at 26 days gestation.

  14. The melting of pulmonary surfactant monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenfei; Biswas, Samares C.; Laderas, Ted G.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Monomolecular films of phospholipids in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase after supercompression to high surface pressures (π), well above the equilibrium surface pressure (πe) at which fluid films collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase, and in the tilted-condensed (TC) phase both replicate the resistance to collapse that is characteristic of alveolar films in the lungs. To provide the basis for determining which film is present in the alveolus, we measured the melting characteristics of monolayers containing TC dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), as well as supercompressed 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE). Films generated by appropriate manipulations on a captive bubble were heated from ≤27°C to ≥60°C at different constant π above πe. DPPC showed the abrupt expansion expected for the TC-LE phase transition, followed by the contraction produced by collapse. Supercompressed CLSE showed no evidence of the TC-LE expansion, arguing that supercompression did not simply convert the mixed lipid film to TC DPPC. For both DPPC and CLSE, the melting point, taken as the temperature at which collapse began, increased at higher π, in contrast to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, for which higher π produced collapse at lower temperatures. For π between 50 and 65 mN/m, DPPC melted at 48–55°C, well above the main transition for bilayers at 41°C. At each π, CLSE melted at temperatures >10°C lower. The distinct melting points for TC DPPC and supercompressed CLSE provide the basis by which the nature of the alveolar film might be determined from the temperature-dependence of pulmonary mechanics. PMID:17194731

  15. The melting of pulmonary surfactant monolayers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenfei; Biswas, Samares C; Laderas, Ted G; Hall, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Monomolecular films of phospholipids in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase after supercompression to high surface pressures (pi), well above the equilibrium surface pressure (pi(e)) at which fluid films collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase, and in the tilted-condensed (TC) phase both replicate the resistance to collapse that is characteristic of alveolar films in the lungs. To provide the basis for determining which film is present in the alveolus, we measured the melting characteristics of monolayers containing TC dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), as well as supercompressed 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine and calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE). Films generated by appropriate manipulations on a captive bubble were heated from < or =27 degrees C to > or =60 degrees C at different constant pi above pi(e). DPPC showed the abrupt expansion expected for the TC-LE phase transition, followed by the contraction produced by collapse. Supercompressed CLSE showed no evidence of the TC-LE expansion, arguing that supercompression did not simply convert the mixed lipid film to TC DPPC. For both DPPC and CLSE, the melting point, taken as the temperature at which collapse began, increased at higher pi, in contrast to 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, for which higher pi produced collapse at lower temperatures. For pi between 50 and 65 mN/m, DPPC melted at 48-55 degrees C, well above the main transition for bilayers at 41 degrees C. At each pi, CLSE melted at temperatures >10 degrees C lower. The distinct melting points for TC DPPC and supercompressed CLSE provide the basis by which the nature of the alveolar film might be determined from the temperature-dependence of pulmonary mechanics.

  16. Effects of phospholipid composition on MinD-membrane interactions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Fishov, Itzhak; Fu, Xueyao; Corbin, Brian D; Margolin, William; Dowhan, William

    2003-06-20

    binding strength. These results suggest that MinD has a preference for anionic phospholipids and that MinD oscillation behavior, and therefore cell division site selection, may be regulated by membrane phospholipid composition.

  17. Colorimetric estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions.

    PubMed

    Hallen, R M

    1980-05-01

    A method for the estimation of phospholipids in aqueous dispersions is described. The method is based on the formation of a lipid-molybdenum blue complex, which is extracted into chloroform from the aqueous phase. Phosphate ions, detergents, proteins, neutral lipids and various other ions do not interfere in the lipid estimation. The method is sensitive down to a lipid concentration of 0.1 mumol/ml, with an accuracy better than +/- 3%.

  18. Visualization of Ca2+-Induced Phospholipid Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverstick, Doris M.; Glaser, Michael

    1987-07-01

    Large vesicles (5-15 μ m) were formed by hydrating a dried lipid film containing phospholipids labeled with a fluorophore in one fatty acid chain. By using a fluorescence microscope attached to a low-light-intensity charge-coupled-device camera and digital-image processor, the vesicles were easily viewed and initially showed uniform fluorescence intensity across the surface. The fluorescence pattern of vesicles made with a fluorophore attached to phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine was unaffected by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, or Cd2+. The fluorescence pattern of vesicles containing a fluorophore attached to the acidic phospholipids phosphatidylserine or phosphatidic acid showed distinct differences when treated with Ca2+ or Cd2+, although they were unaffected by Mg2+, Mn2+, or Zn2+. Treatment with 2.0 mM Ca2+ or Cd2+ resulted in the movement of the fluorophore to a single large patch on the surface of the vesicle. When vesicles were formed in the presence of 33 mol% cholesterol, patching was seen at a slightly lower Ca2+ concentration (1.0 mM). The possibility of interactions between Ca2+ and acidic phospholipids in plasma membranes was investigated by labeling erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts with fluorescent phosphatidic acid. When Ca2+ was added, multiple (five or six) small patches were seen per individual cell. The same pattern was observed when vesicles formed from whole lipid extracts of erythrocytes were labeled with fluorescent phosphatidic acid and then treated with Ca2+. This shows that the size and distribution of the Ca2+-induced domains depend on phospholipid composition.

  19. Organization and function of anionic phospholipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-05-01

    In addition to playing a central role as a permeability barrier for controlling the diffusion of molecules and ions in and out of bacterial cells, phospholipid (PL) membranes regulate the spatial and temporal position and function of membrane proteins that play an essential role in a variety of cellular functions. Based on the very large number of membrane-associated proteins encoded in genomes, an understanding of the role of PLs may be central to understanding bacterial cell biology. This area of microbiology has received considerable attention over the past two decades, and the local enrichment of anionic PLs has emerged as a candidate mechanism for biomolecular organization in bacterial cells. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of anionic PLs in bacteria, including their biosynthesis, subcellular localization, and physiological relevance, discuss evidence and mechanisms for enriching anionic PLs in membranes, and conclude with an assessment of future directions for this area of bacterial biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology.

  20. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  1. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Cholesterol autoxidation in phospholipid membrane bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Sevanian, A.; McLeod, L.L.

    1987-09-01

    Lipid peroxidation in unilamellar liposomes of known cholesterol-phospholipid composition was monitored under conditions of autoxidation or as induced by a superoxide radical generating system, gamma-irradiation or cumene hydroperoxide. Formation of cholesterol oxidation products was indexed to the level of lipid peroxidation. The major cholesterol oxidation products identified were 7-keto-cholesterol, isomeric cholesterol 5,6-epoxides, isomeric 7-hydroperoxides and isomeric 3,7-cholestane diols. Other commonly encountered products included 3,5-cholestadiene-7-one and cholestane-3 beta, 5 alpha, 6 beta-triol. Superoxide-dependent peroxidation required iron and produced a gradual increase in 7-keto-cholesterol and cholesterol epoxides. Cholesterol oxidation was greatest in liposomes containing high proportions of unsaturated phospholipid to cholesterol (4:1 molar ratio), intermediate with low phospholipid to cholesterol ratios (2:1) and least in liposomes prepared with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and cholesterol. This relationship held regardless of the oxidizing conditions used. Cumene hydroperoxide-dependent lipid peroxidation and/or more prolonged oxidations with other oxidizing systems yielded a variety of products where cholesterol-5 beta,6 beta-epoxide, 7-ketocholesterol and the 7-hydroperoxides were most consistently elevated. Oxyradical initiation of lipid peroxidation produced a pattern of cholesterol oxidation products distinguishable from the pattern derived by cumene hydroperoxide-dependent peroxidation.

  3. New ATP-binding cassette A3 mutation causing surfactant metabolism dysfunction pulmonary type 3.

    PubMed

    Piersigilli, Fiammetta; Peca, Donatella; Campi, Francesca; Corsello, Mirta; Landolfo, Francesca; Boldrini, Renata; Danhaive, Olivier; Dotta, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) may occur in term and near-term infants because of mutations in surfactant-related genes. ATP-binding cassette A3 (ABCA3), a phospholipid carrier specifically expressed in the alveolar epithelium, is the most frequently involved protein. We report the case of a couple of late-preterm fraternal twin infants of opposite sex carrying the same compound heterozygous ABCA3 mutations, one of which has never been previously reported, with different disease severity, suggesting variable penetrance or sex-related differences. ABCA3 deficiency should be considered in term or near-term babies who develop unexplained RDS. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Membrane-Derived Phospholipids Control Synaptic Neurotransmission and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Victoria; Montero, Fernando; González-Forero, David; Rodríguez-Bey, Guillermo; Gómez-Pérez, Laura; Medialdea-Wandossell, María Jesús; Domínguez-Vías, Germán; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Moreno-López, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic communication is a dynamic process that is key to the regulation of neuronal excitability and information processing in the brain. To date, however, the molecular signals controlling synaptic dynamics have been poorly understood. Membrane-derived bioactive phospholipids are potential candidates to control short-term tuning of synaptic signaling, a plastic event essential for information processing at both the cellular and neuronal network levels in the brain. Here, we showed that phospholipids affect excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by different degrees, loci, and mechanisms of action. Signaling triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked rapid and reversible depression of excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. At excitatory synapses, LPA-induced depression depended on LPA1/Gαi/o-protein/phospholipase C/myosin light chain kinase cascade at the presynaptic site. LPA increased myosin light chain phosphorylation, which is known to trigger actomyosin contraction, and reduced the number of synaptic vesicles docked to active zones in excitatory boutons. At inhibitory synapses, postsynaptic LPA signaling led to dephosphorylation, and internalization of the GABAAγ2 subunit through the LPA1/Gα12/13-protein/RhoA/Rho kinase/calcineurin pathway. However, LPA-induced depression of GABAergic transmission was correlated with an endocytosis-independent reduction of GABAA receptors, possibly by GABAAγ2 dephosphorylation and subsequent increased lateral diffusion. Furthermore, endogenous LPA signaling, mainly via LPA1, mediated activity-dependent inhibitory depression in a model of experimental synaptic plasticity. Finally, LPA signaling, most likely restraining the excitatory drive incoming to motoneurons, regulated performance of motor output commands, a basic brain processing task. We propose that lysophospholipids serve as potential local messengers that tune synaptic strength to precedent activity of the neuron. PMID:25996636

  5. Pulmonary surfactant metabolism in the alveolar airspace: Biogenesis, extracellular conversions, recycling.

    PubMed

    Olmeda, Bárbara; Martínez-Calle, Marta; Pérez-Gil, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that lines and stabilizes the respiratory interface in the alveoli, allowing for gas exchange during the breathing cycle. At the same time, surfactant constitutes the first line of lung defense against pathogens. This review presents an updated view on the processes involved in biogenesis and intracellular processing of newly synthesized and recycled surfactant components, as well as on the extracellular surfactant transformations before and after the formation of the surface active film at the air-water interface. Special attention is paid to the crucial regulation of surfactant homeostasis, because its disruption is associated with several lung pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Physicochemical Properties of Solid Phospholipid Particles as a Drug Delivery Platform for Improving Oral Absorption of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku; Miyazaki, Aoi; Fukushima, Mayuko; Sato, Keiko; Yamamura, Yuko; Mohri, Kohta; Sakuma, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    A novel drug delivery platform, mesoporous phospholipid particle (MPP), is introduced. Its physicochemical properties and ability as a carrier for enhancing oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs are discussed. MPP was prepared through freeze-drying a cyclohexane/t-butyl alcohol solution of phosphatidylcholine. Its basic properties were revealed using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, hygroscopicity measurement, and so on. Fenofibrate was loaded to MPP as a poorly soluble model drug, and effect of MPP on the oral absorption behavior was observed. MPP is spherical in shape with a diameter typically in the range of 10-15 μm and a wide surface area that exceeds 10 m(2)/g. It has a bilayer structure that may accommodate hydrophobic drugs in the acyl chain region. When fenofibrate was loaded in MPP as a model drug, it existed partially in a crystalline state and improvement in the dissolution behavior was achieved in the presence of a surfactant, because of the formation of mixed micelles composed of phospholipids and surfactants in the dissolution media. MPP greatly improved the oral absorption of fenofibrate compared to that of the crystalline drug and its efficacy was almost equivalent to that of an amorphous drug dispersion. MPP is a promising option for improving the oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs based on the novel mechanism of dissolution improvement.

  7. Phospholipid-Dextran with a Single Coupling Point: a Useful Amphiphile for Functionalization of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Andrew P.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Welsher, Kevin; Sherlock, Sarah P.; Prencipe, Giuseppe; Dai, Hongjie

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials hold much promise for biological applications, but they require appropriate functionalization to provide biocompatibility in biological environments. For non-covalent functionalization with biocompatible polymers, the polymer must also remain attached to the nanomaterial after removal of its excess to mimic the high dilution conditions of administration in vivo. Reported here are the synthesis and utilization singly-substituted conjugates of dextran and a phospholipid (Dextran-DSPE) as stable coatings for nanomaterials. Suspensions of single walled carbon nanotubes were found not only to be stable to phosphate buffered saline (PBS), serum, and a variety of pH’s after excess polymer removal, but also provide brighter photoluminescence than carbon nanotubes suspended by poly(ethylene glycol)-DSPE. In addition, both gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and gold nanorods (AuNRs) were found to maintain their dispersion and characteristic optical absorbance after transfer into Dextran-DSPE, and were obtained in much better yield than similar suspensions with PEG-phospholipid and commonly used thiol-PEG. These suspensions were also stable to PBS, serum, and a variety of pH’s after removal of excess polymer. Dextran-DSPE thus shows great promise as a general surfactant material for the functionalization of a variety of nanomaterials, which could facilitate future biological applications. PMID:19061329

  8. Vitamin E alters alveolar type II cell phospholipid synthesis in oxygen and air

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, K.A.; Snyder, J.M.; Stenzel, W.; Saito, K.; Warshaw, J.B. )

    1990-11-01

    Newborn rats were injected with vitamin E or placebo daily until 6 days after birth. The effect of vitamin E pretreatment on in vitro surfactant phospholipid synthesis was examined in isolated type II cells exposed to oxygen or air form 24 h in vitro. Type II cells were also isolated from untreated 6-day-old rats and cultured for 24 h in oxygen or air with control medium or vitamin E supplemented medium. These cells were used to examine the effect of vitamin E exposure in vitro on type II cell phospholipid synthesis and ultrastructure. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis was reduced in cells cultured in oxygen as compared with air. This decrease was not prevented by in vivo pretreatment or in vitro supplementation with vitamin E. Vitamin E pretreatment increased the ratio of disaturated PC to total PC and increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis. The volume density of lamellar bodies in type II cells was increased in cells maintained in oxygen. Vitamin E did not affect the volume density of lamellar bodies. We conclude that in vitro hyperoxia inhibits alveolar type II cell phosphatidylcholine synthesis without decreasing lamellar body volume density and that supplemental vitamin E does not prevent hyperoxia-induced decrease in phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

  9. Natural emulsifiers - Biosurfactants, phospholipids, biopolymers, and colloidal particles: Molecular and physicochemical basis of functional performance.

    PubMed

    McClements, David Julian; Gumus, Cansu Ekin

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing consumer pressure for commercial products that are more natural, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, including foods, cosmetics, detergents, and personal care products. Industry has responded by trying to identify natural alternatives to synthetic functional ingredients within these products. The focus of this review article is on the replacement of synthetic surfactants with natural emulsifiers, such as amphiphilic proteins, polysaccharides, biosurfactants, phospholipids, and bioparticles. In particular, the physicochemical basis of emulsion formation and stabilization by natural emulsifiers is discussed, and the benefits and limitations of different natural emulsifiers are compared. Surface-active polysaccharides typically have to be used at relatively high levels to produce small droplets, but the droplets formed are highly resistant to environmental changes. Conversely, surface-active proteins are typically utilized at low levels, but the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Certain phospholipids are capable of producing small oil droplets during homogenization, but again the droplets formed are highly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Biosurfactants (saponins) can be utilized at low levels to form fine oil droplets that remain stable over a range of environmental conditions. Some nature-derived nanoparticles (e.g., cellulose, chitosan, and starch) are effective at stabilizing emulsions containing relatively large oil droplets. Future research is encouraged to identify, isolate, purify, and characterize new types of natural emulsifier, and to test their efficacy in food, cosmetic, detergent, personal care, and other products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ontogeny of the pulmonary surfactant and antioxidant enzyme systems in the viviparous lizard, Tiliqua rugosa.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sonya D; Starrs, Adam P; Daniels, Christopher B; Orgeig, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    The antioxidant enzyme (AOE) system protects the lung from oxidative damage. The pulmonary surfactant (PS) system lowers the interfacial pressure within the lung, improving lung compliance and aiding lung clearance. In mammals, the AOE and PS systems develop in tandem during the final 10%-20% of gestation. Here, we investigated the development of these systems in the viviparous skink, Tiliqua rugosa. The content of total phospholipid (PL), disaturated phospholipid (DSP), and cholesterol (Chol) increased in lung washings from foetal lizards with advancing gestational age. Similarly, the relative saturation of the PLs increased throughout gestation, with mid-stage 40 foetuses having a DSP/PL equivalent to newborns and adults. Maternal lizards had significantly less total PL, DSP, and Chol than nongravid and newborn lizards; however, the relative composition did not differ from nongravid animals. This presumably results from compression of the lungs under the bulk of the developing foetus. The Chol/PL and Chol/DSP ratios declined early in development such that mid-stage 40 embryos had comparable ratios to both newborns and adults. Thus, it appears that the PS system matures in a similar manner in skinks and in mammals. However, the composition of surfactant is complete some weeks before parturition, probably to enable improved survivorship of the precocial young in the event of premature birth. Unlike the surfactant lipids, the AOEs, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase did not differ appreciably throughout gestation. It appears therefore that like the surfactant lipids the AOE system is in readiness for air breathing throughout the latter stages of gestation, possibly in preparation for premature birth. Unlike mammals, the PS and AOE systems develop independently from one another.

  11. Crosstalk between DnaA Protein, the Initiator of Escherichia coli Chromosomal Replication, and Acidic Phospholipids Present in Bacterial Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Rahul; Fingland, Nicholas; Patil, Digvijay; Sharma, Anjali K.; Crooke, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Anionic (i.e., acidic) phospholipids such as phosphotidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL), participate in several cellular functions. Here we review intriguing in vitro and in vivo evidence that suggest emergent roles for acidic phospholipids in regulating DnaA protein-mediated initiation of Escherichia coli chromosomal replication. In vitro acidic phospholipids in a fluid bilayer promote the conversion of inactive ADP-DnaA to replicatively proficient ATP-DnaA, yet both PG and CL also can inhibit the DNA-binding activity of DnaA protein. We discuss how cellular acidic phospholipids may positively and negatively influence the initiation activity of DnaA protein to help assure chromosomal replication occurs once, but only once, per cell-cycle. Fluorescence microscopy has revealed that PG and CL exist in domains located at the cell poles and mid-cell, and several studies link membrane curvature with sub-cellular localization of various integral and peripheral membrane proteins. E. coli DnaA itself is found at the cell membrane and forms helical structures along the longitudinal axis of the cell. We propose that there is cross-talk between acidic phospholipids in the bacterial membrane and DnaA protein as a means to help control the spatial and temporal regulation of chromosomal replication in bacteria. PMID:23595001

  12. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes.

    PubMed

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1-SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops.

  13. Structural insight into the TRIAP1/PRELI-like domain family of mitochondrial phospholipid transfer complexes

    PubMed Central

    Miliara, Xeni; Garnett, James A; Tatsuta, Takashi; Abid Ali, Ferdos; Baldie, Heather; Pérez-Dorado, Inmaculada; Simpson, Peter; Yague, Ernesto; Langer, Thomas; Matthews, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial membrane is important for its architecture and proper function. Mitochondria depend on a tightly regulated supply of phospholipid via intra-mitochondrial synthesis and by direct import from the endoplasmic reticulum. The Ups1/PRELI-like family together with its mitochondrial chaperones (TRIAP1/Mdm35) represent a unique heterodimeric lipid transfer system that is evolutionary conserved from yeast to man. Work presented here provides new atomic resolution insight into the function of a human member of this system. Crystal structures of free TRIAP1 and the TRIAP1–SLMO1 complex reveal how the PRELI domain is chaperoned during import into the intermembrane mitochondrial space. The structural resemblance of PRELI-like domain of SLMO1 with that of mammalian phoshatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) suggest that they share similar lipid transfer mechanisms, in which access to a buried phospholipid-binding cavity is regulated by conformationally adaptable loops. PMID:26071602

  14. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  15. The Lantibiotic Nisin Induces Transmembrane Movement of a Fluorescent Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Gert N.; Konings, Wil N.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Nisin is a pore-forming antimicrobial peptide. The capacity of nisin to induce transmembrane movement of a fluorescent phospholipid in lipid vesicles was investigated. Unilamellar phospholipid vesicles that contained a fluorescent phospholipid (1-acyl-2-{6-[(7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino]caproyl}-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in the inner leaflet of the bilayer were used. Nisin-induced movement of the fluorescent phospholipid from the inner leaflet to the outer leaflet of the membrane reached stable levels, which were dependent on the concentration of nisin added. The rate constant k of this nisin-induced transmembrane movement increased with the nisin concentration but was not dependent on temperature within the range of 5 to 30°C. In contrast, the rate constant of movement of fluorescent phospholipid from vesicle to vesicle strongly depended on temperature. The data indicate that nisin transiently disturbs the phospholipid organization of the target membrane. PMID:9852000

  16. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  17. Xylem Surfactants Introduce a New Element to the Cohesion-Tension Theory.

    PubMed

    Schenk, H Jochen; Espino, Susana; Romo, David M; Nima, Neda; Do, Aissa Y T; Michaud, Joseph M; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Yang, Jinlong; Zuo, Yi Y; Steppe, Kathy; Jansen, Steven

    2017-02-01

    Vascular plants transport water under negative pressure without constantly creating gas bubbles that would disable their hydraulic systems. Attempts to replicate this feat in artificial systems almost invariably result in bubble formation, except under highly controlled conditions with pure water and only hydrophilic surfaces present. In theory, conditions in the xylem should favor bubble nucleation even more: there are millions of conduits with at least some hydrophobic surfaces, and xylem sap is saturated or sometimes supersaturated with atmospheric gas and may contain surface-active molecules that can lower surface tension. So how do plants transport water under negative pressure? Here, we show that angiosperm xylem contains abundant hydrophobic surfaces as well as insoluble lipid surfactants, including phospholipids, and proteins, a composition similar to pulmonary surfactants. Lipid surfactants were found in xylem sap and as nanoparticles under transmission electron microscopy in pores of intervessel pit membranes and deposited on vessel wall surfaces. Nanoparticles observed in xylem sap via nanoparticle-tracking analysis included surfactant-coated nanobubbles when examined by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Based on their fracture behavior, this technique is able to distinguish between dense-core particles, liquid-filled, bilayer-coated vesicles/liposomes, and gas-filled bubbles. Xylem surfactants showed strong surface activity that reduces surface tension to low values when concentrated as they are in pit membrane pores. We hypothesize that xylem surfactants support water transport under negative pressure as explained by the cohesion-tension theory by coating hydrophobic surfaces and nanobubbles, thereby keeping the latter below the critical size at which bubbles would expand to form embolisms. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Xylem Surfactants Introduce a New Element to the Cohesion-Tension Theory1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Espino, Susana; Nima, Neda; Do, Aissa Y.T.; Michaud, Joseph M.; Papahadjopoulos-Sternberg, Brigitte; Yang, Jinlong; Steppe, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    Vascular plants transport water under negative pressure without constantly creating gas bubbles that would disable their hydraulic systems. Attempts to replicate this feat in artificial systems almost invariably result in bubble formation, except under highly controlled conditions with pure water and only hydrophilic surfaces present. In theory, conditions in the xylem should favor bubble nucleation even more: there are millions of conduits with at least some hydrophobic surfaces, and xylem sap is saturated or sometimes supersaturated with atmospheric gas and may contain surface-active molecules that can lower surface tension. So how do plants transport water under negative pressure? Here, we show that angiosperm xylem contains abundant hydrophobic surfaces as well as insoluble lipid surfactants, including phospholipids, and proteins, a composition similar to pulmonary surfactants. Lipid surfactants were found in xylem sap and as nanoparticles under transmission electron microscopy in pores of intervessel pit membranes and deposited on vessel wall surfaces. Nanoparticles observed in xylem sap via nanoparticle-tracking analysis included surfactant-coated nanobubbles when examined by freeze-fracture electron microscopy. Based on their fracture behavior, this technique is able to distinguish between dense-core particles, liquid-filled, bilayer-coated vesicles/liposomes, and gas-filled bubbles. Xylem surfactants showed strong surface activity that reduces surface tension to low values when concentrated as they are in pit membrane pores. We hypothesize that xylem surfactants support water transport under negative pressure as explained by the cohesion-tension theory by coating hydrophobic surfaces and nanobubbles, thereby keeping the latter below the critical size at which bubbles would expand to form embolisms. PMID:27927981

  19. Mixing Behavior in Binary Anionic Gemini Surfactant-Perfluorinated Fatty Acid Langmuir Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Jeveria; Sowah-Kuma, David; Stevens, Amy L; Bu, Wei; Paige, Matthew F

    2017-10-03

    The miscibility and film structure of mixed Langmuir monolayer films composed of an anionic gemini N,N,N',N'-dialkyl-N,N'-diacetate ethylenediamine surfactant (Ace(12)-2-Ace(12)) with perfluorotetradecanoic acid (C13F27COOH; PF) have been investigated using a variety of thermodynamic and structural characterization methods. The two film components were found to be miscible in monolayers at the air-water interface over a range of compositions and at all but the lowest surface pressures, with attractive interactions occurring between the two components. While pure PF monolayers formed crystalline lattices with hexagonal symmetry and with the surfactant tails oriented normal to the underlying water subphase, the pure gemini surfactant formed amorphous films with little tendency to orient at the subphase. In mixed films with mole ratios of PF:Ace(12)-2-Ace(12) < 2.5, the miscibility of the two components resulted in a nearly complete loss of crystallinity of the PF, though films at higher mole fractions of PF showed some residual crystallinity, albeit with lattice structures that were significantly different from that of pure PF. Miscibility and film structure in this mixed system are discussed in comparison with other mixed gemini surfactant systems in the literature as well as binary mixtures of phospholipids or monomeric fatty acids with PF.

  20. A modified squeeze-out mechanism for generating high surface pressures with pulmonary surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Eleonora; Zuo, Yi Y.; Tadayyon, Seyed M.; Petersen, Nils O.; Possmayer, Fred; Veldhuizen, Ruud A.W.

    2017-01-01

    The exact mechanism by which pulmonary surfactant films reach the very low surface tensions required to stabilize the alveoli at end expiration remains uncertain. We utilized the nanoscale sensitivity of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to examine phospholipid (PL) phase transition and multilayer formation for two Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) systems: a simple 3 PL surfactant-like mixture and the more complex bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES). AFM height images demonstrated that both systems develop two types of liquid condensed (LC) domains (micro- and nano-sized) within a liquid expanded phase (LE). The 3 PL mixture failed to form significant multilayers at high surface pressure (π while BLES forms an extensive network of multilayer structures containing up to three bilayers. A close examination of the progression of multilayer formation reveals that multilayers start to form at the edge of the solid-like LC domains and also in the fluid-like LE phase. We used the elemental analysis capability of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to show that multilayer structures are enriched in unsaturated PLs while the saturated PLs are concentrated in the remaining interfacial monolayer. This supports a modified squeeze-out model where film compression results in the hydrophobic surfactant protein-dependent formation of unsaturated PL-rich multilayers which remain functionally associated with a monolayer enriched in disaturated PL species. This allows the surface film to attain low surface tensions during compression and maintain values near equilibrium during expansion. PMID:22206628

  1. Macrophages interaction with pulmonary surfactant using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Minette; Telesford, Dana Marie; Allen, Heather

    2012-04-01

    Alveolar pulmonary surfactant, composed mostly of phospholipids, is essential for maintenance of normal lung function. However, increased production of lung surfactant can lead to many pulmonary inflammatory disorders. Alveolar macrophages are responsible for the degradation of the surfactant and exhibit increased lipid uptake in inflamated lungs. Owing to their limited clearance capability, excessive accumulation of surfactant may impair their phagocytic function. In this study, the interaction of the macrophages with different lipid components was studied using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. CARS microscopy, a nonlinear vibrational technique which combines spectroscopy and microscopy, allows noninvasive characterization and imaging of chemical species without preparation or labeling. A monolayer of THP-1 macrophages and palmitic acid-d31 on phosphate buffer solution was transferred to a coverslip using the Langmuir-Blodgett method and then imaged using CARS by mapping the CH2 stretch signal of the lipid membrane of the macrophage and C-D stretch signal from palmitic acid-d31. Preliminary results showed CARS images of the macrophage on the solid substrate and thermal degradation of the sample due to long exposure to high laser power. A contrast image is expected to be observed by mapping the CH2 and C-D signals, which can show the lipid interaction and phagocytosis of the macrophage.

  2. Surface motility and associated surfactant production in Agrobacterium vitis.

    PubMed

    Süle, S; Cursino, L; Zheng, D; Hoch, H C; Burr, T J

    2009-11-01

    Agrobacterium vitis is the causal agent of crown gall of grapevine. Surface motility (swarming), an important mechanism for bacterial colonization of new environments and a previously unknown behaviour of Ag. vitis, was demonstrated. Surface motility assays were performed on half-strength potato dextrose agar (Difco) containing 0.75% agar. To test for surfactant production, a drop-collapse test was used. Quorum-sensing (QS) negative and complemented mutants were tested for swarming activity. Ninety-one Agrobacterium strains representing -Agrobacterium tumefaciens (17 strains), Agrobacterium rhizogenes (14 strains) and Ag. vitis (60 strains) were tested for swarming and production of surfactant. All Ag. vitis strains expressed a surface-related motility. In contrast, none of 17 strains of Ag. tumefaciens or 14 strains of Ag. rhizogenes exhibited this behaviour. Surface motility in Ag. vitis was associated with surfactant secretion; both of which are regulated by a QS system previously associated with induction of a hypersensitive response on tobacco and necrosis on grape. An aviR (belongs to luxR family) mutant was surface motility negative and did not produce surfactant. An avsI mutant (autoinducer synthase) was also surface motility negative and was complemented with an Ag. tumefaciens clone expressing avsI. Agrobacterium vitis is able to produce a characteristic swarming phenotype that is regulated by a complex QS system. Swarming activity is unique to Ag. vitis among Agrobacterium sp. and may be associated with the ability of the pathogen to colonize grapevines.

  3. Palmitoylation as a key factor to modulate SP-C-lipid interactions in lung surfactant membrane multilayers.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Nuria; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Garcia-Alvarez, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) has been regarded as the most specific protein linked to development of mammalian lungs, and great efforts have been done to understand its structure-function relationships. Previous evidence has outlined the importance of SP-C palmitoylation to sustain the proper dynamics of lung surfactant, but the mechanism by which this posttranslational modification aids SP-C to stabilize the interfacial surfactant film along the compression-expansion breathing cycles, is still unrevealed. In this work we have compared the structure, orientation and lipid-protein interactions of a native palmitoylated SP-C with those of a non-palmitoylated recombinant SP-C (rSP-C) form in air-exposed multilayer membrane environments, by means of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Palmitoylation does not affect the secondary structure of the protein, which exhibits a full α-helical conformation in partly dehydrated phospholipid multilayer films. However, differences between the Amide I band of the IR spectrum of palmitoylated and non-palmitoylated proteins suggest subtle differences affecting the environment of their helical component. These differences are accompanied by differential effects on the IR bands from phospholipid phosphates, indicating that palmitoylation modulates lipid-protein interactions at the headgroup region of phospholipid layers. On the other hand, the relative dichroic absorption of polarized IR has allowed calculating that the palmitoylated protein adopts a more tilted transmembrane orientation than the non-palmitoylated SP-C, likely contributing to more compact, dehydrated and possibly stable multilayer lipid-protein films. As a whole, the behavior of multilayer films containing palmitoylated SP-C may reflect favorable structural properties for surfactant reservoirs at the air-liquid respiratory interface.

  4. Preparations of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y H

    2001-08-01

    Due to hydrophilic environment at its surface, natural bentonite is an ineffective sorbent for nonpolar nonionic organic compounds in water even though it has high surface area. The surface properties of natural bentonite can be greatly modified by simple ion-exchange reactions with large organic cations (cationic surfactants) and this organobentonite is highly effective in removing nonionic organic compounds from water. Cationic surfactant derived organobentonites have been investigated extensively for a wide variety of environmental applications. In this study, the preparation of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants has been investigated for the first time. Results indicate that nonionic surfactants intercalates into the interlamellar space of bentonite and may demonstrate higher sorption capacity than cationic surfactant. It is possible to create large interlayer spacing and high organic carbon content organobentonite by use of nonionic surfactants with suitable balance between the hydrocarbon and ethylene oxide chain lengths. In addition, nonionic surfactant derived organobentonites are more chemically stable than cationic surfactant derived organobentonites.

  5. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  6. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  7. Surfactant for Pediatric Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Willson, Douglas F.; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS, including the multifaceted pathology of inflammatory lung injury, the effectiveness of surfactant delivery in injured lungs, and composition-based activity differences among clinical exogenous surfactant preparations. PMID:18501754

  8. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  9. Cationic surfactants derived from lysine: effects of their structure and charge type on antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Colomer, A; Pinazo, A; Manresa, M A; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Infante, M R; Pérez, L

    2011-02-24

    Three different sets of cationic surfactants from lysine have been synthesized. The first group consists of three monocatenary surfactants with one lysine as the cationic polar head with one cationic charge. The second consists of three monocatenary surfactants with two amino acids as cationic polar head with two positive charges. Finally, four gemini surfactants were synthesized in which the spacer chain and the number and type of cationic charges have been regulated. The micellization process, antimicrobial activity, and hemolytic activity were evaluated. The critical micelle concentration was dependent only on the hydrophobic character of the molecules. Nevertheless, the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities were related to the structure of the compounds as well as the type of cationic charges. The most active surfactants against the bacteria were those with a cationic charge on the trimethylated amino group, whereas all of these surfactants showed low hemolytic character.

  10. Phospholipid methylation in starfish spermatozoa is linked to sperm chemoattraction.

    PubMed Central

    Tezon, J; Miller, R L; Bardin, C W

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism whereby ovarian peptides cause sperm attraction was studied in the starfish. Phospholipid methylation and protein-O-carboxyl methylation, reactions linked to chemotactic responses in a variety of systems, were studied in starfish sperm. When sperm were preincubated with [methyl-3H]methionine and then exposed to the attractant, a rapid drop in radioactivity occurred in the phospholipid fraction. Methylated phospholipids decreased by 90% in the first 2 sec; however, no change was observed in endogenous methylation of protein carboxyl groups. The effect on phospholipid methylation was dose dependent, with a 40% reduction in radioactive phospholipids in sperm occurring with the minimal amount of attractant necessary to obtain a positive response in a sperm attraction bioassay. Attractants from species of starfish with little or no cross-reactivity in the bioassay had a limited effect on phospholipid methylation. The transmethylase inhibitor, homocysteine, caused a marked decrease in the accumulation of methylated phospholipids under basal conditions, which was correlated with as much as a 50-fold increase in sperm sensitivity to the attractant. The addition of chemoattractant resulted in a reduction in the amount of all individual methylated phospholipids, but the amount of phosphatidylmono[3H]methylethanolamine relative to the other methylated phospholipid decreased by a factor of 4 after stimulation. Homocysteine had the same effect. The reduction in methylated phospholipids by attractants suggests that phospholipid methylation is linked to the mechanism of action of these peptides. Methylation of phospholipids may play a role in the rapid desensitization of sperm cells to the attractant, which would be required for the orientation of the spermatozoa in the gradient of ovarian peptide. PMID:3459145

  11. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  12. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-07-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis.

  13. Phospholipid biosynthesis and solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkart, H C; White, D C

    1997-01-01

    The role of the cell envelope in the solvent tolerance mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida was investigated. The responses of a solvent-tolerant strain, P. putida Idaho, and a solvent-sensitive strain, P. putida MW1200, were examined in terms of phospholipid content and composition and of phospholipid biosynthetic rate following exposure to a nonmetabolizable solvent, o-xylene. Following o-xylene exposure, P. putida MW1200 exhibited a decrease in total phospholipid content. In contrast, P. putida Idaho demonstrated an increase in phospholipid content 1 to 6 h after exposure. Analysis of phospholipid biosynthesis showed P. putida Idaho to have a higher basal rate of phospholipid synthesis than MW1200. This rate increased significantly following exposure to xylene. Both strains showed little significant turnover of phospholipid in the absence of xylene. In the presence of xylene, both strains showed increased phospholipid turnover. The rate of turnover was significantly greater in P. putida Idaho than in P. putida MW1200. These results suggest that P. putida Idaho has a greater ability than the solvent-sensitive strain MW1200 to repair damaged membranes through efficient turnover and increased phospholipid biosynthesis. PMID:9209036

  14. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  15. Fiber coating with surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Amy Q.; Gleason, Blake; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-11-01

    When a fiber is withdrawn at low speeds from a pure fluid, the variation in the thickness of the entrained film with imposed fiber velocity is well-predicted by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin (LLD) equation. However, surfactant additives are known to alter this response. We study the film thickening properties of the protein BSA (bovine serum albumin), the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, and the anionic surfactant SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate). For each of these additives, the film thickening factor alpha (the ratio of the measured thickness to the LLD prediction) for a fixed fiber radius varies as a function of the ratio of the surfactant concentration c to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In the case of BSA, which does not form micelles, the reference value is the concentration at which multilayers form. As a result of Marangoni effects, alpha reaches a maximum as c approaches the CMC from below. However, when the surfactant concentration c exceeds the CMC, the behavior of alpha varies as a consequence of the dynamic surface properties, owing for example to different sorption kinetics of these additives, or possibly surface or bulk rheological effects. For SDS, alpha begins to decrease when c exceeds the CMC and causes the surface to become partially or completely remobilized, which is consistent with the experimental and theoretical results published for studies of slug flows of bubbles and surfactant solutions in a capillary tube and the rise of bubbles in surfactant solutions. However, when the SDS or Triton X-100 surfactant concentration is well above the CMC, we observe that the film thickening parameter alpha increases once again. In the case of SDS we observe a second maximum in the film thickening factor. For all the experiments, transport of monomers to the interface is limited by diffusion and the second maximum in the film thickening factor may be explained as a result of a nonmonotonic change in the stability characteristics of suspended SDS

  16. Phospholipid biosynthetic enzymes in human brain.

    PubMed

    Ross, B M; Moszczynska, A; Blusztajn, J K; Sherwin, A; Lozano, A; Kish, S J

    1997-04-01

    Growing evidence suggests an involvement of brain membrane phospholipid metabolism in a variety of neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions. This has prompted the use of drugs (e.g., CDPcholine) aimed at elevating the rate of neural membrane synthesis. However, no information is available regarding the human brain enzymes of phospholipid synthesis which these drugs affect. Thus, the objective of our study was to characterize the enzymes involved, in particular, whether differences existed in the relative affinity of substrates for the enzymes of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) compared to those of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. The concentration of choline in rapidly frozen human brain biopsies ranged from 32-186 nmol/g tissue, a concentration similar to that determined previously for ethanolamine. Since human brain ethanolamine kinase possessed a much lower affinity for ethanolamine (Km = 460 microM) than choline kinase did for choline (Km = 17 microM), the activity of ethanolamine kinase in vivo may be more dependent on substrate availability than that of choline kinase. In addition, whereas ethanolamine kinase was inhibited by choline, and to a lesser extent by phosphocholine, choline kinase activity was unaffected by the presence of ethanolamine, or phosphoethanolamine, and only weakly inhibited by phosphocholine. Phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (PECT) and phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (PCCT) also displayed dissimilar characteristics, with PECT and PCCT being located predominantly in the cytosolic and particulate fractions, respectively. Both PECT and PCCT exhibited a low affinity for CTP (Km approximately 1.2 mM), suggesting that the activities of these enzymes, and by implication, the rate of phospholipid synthesis, are highly dependent upon the cellular concentration of CTP. In conclusion our data indicate different regulatory properties of PE and PC synthesis in human brain, and suggest that the rate of PE synthesis may be more

  17. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  18. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Jeffrey S.; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Tandy, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the ability of PLs to inhibit cholesterol absorption is of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22254012

  19. Phospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kai; Beverley, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs) are abundant membrane components and reservoirs for important signaling molecules. In Leishmania, the composition, metabolism, and function of PLs and SLs differ significantly from those in mammalian cells. Although only a handful of enzymes have been experimentally characterized, available data suggest many steps of PL/SL metabolism are critical for Leishmania viability and/or virulence, and could be a source for new drug targets. Further studies of genes involved in the synthesis (de novo and salvage) and degradation of PLs and SLs will reveal their diverse effects on Leishmania pathogenesis. PMID:20026359

  20. Membrane phospholipid asymmetry in human thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, F A; Yuan, J; Lewis, R A; Snyder, L M; Kiefer, C R; Bunyaratvej, A; Fucharoen, S; Ma, L; Styles, L; de Jong, K; Schrier, S L

    1998-04-15

    Phospholipid asymmetry in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid bilayer is well maintained during the life of the cell, with phosphatidylserine (PS) virtually exclusively located in the inner monolayer. Loss of phospholipid asymmetry, and consequently exposure of PS, is thought to play an important role in red cell pathology. The anemia in the human thalassemias is caused by a combination of ineffective erythropoiesis (intramedullary hemolysis) and a decreased survival of adult RBCs in the peripheral blood. This premature destruction of the thalassemic RBC could in part be due to a loss of phospholipid asymmetry, because cells that expose PS are recognized and removed by macrophages. In addition, PS exposure can play a role in the hypercoagulable state reported to exist in severe beta-thalassemia intermedia. We describe PS exposure in RBCs of 56 comparably anemic patients with different genetic backgrounds of the alpha- or beta-thalassemia phenotype. The use of fluorescently labeled annexin V allowed us to determine loss of phospholipid asymmetry in individual cells. Our data indicate that in a number of thalassemic patients, subpopulations of red cells circulate that expose PS on their outer surface. The number of such cells can vary dramatically from patient to patient, from as low as that found in normal controls (less than 0.2%) up to 20%. Analysis by fluorescent microscopy of beta-thalassemic RBCs indicates that PS on the outer leaflet is distributed either over the entire membrane or localized in areas possibly related to regions rich in membrane-bound alpha-globin chains. We hypothesize that these membrane sites in which iron carrying globin chains accumulate and cause oxidative damage, could be important in the loss of membrane lipid organization. In conclusion, we report the presence of PS-exposing subpopulations of thalassemic RBC that are most likely physiologically important, because they could provide a surface for enhancing hemostasis as recently reported

  1. Protein-phospholipid interactions in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, James H; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-04-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein-Phospholipid Interactions in Blood Clotting

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, James H.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Tavoosi, Narjes; Ke, Ke; Pureza, Vincent; Boettcher, John M.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2010-01-01

    Most steps of the blood clotting cascade require the assembly of a serine protease with its specific regulatory protein on a suitable phospholipid bilayer. Unfortunately, the molecular details of how blood clotting proteins bind to membrane surfaces remain poorly understood, owing to a dearth of techniques for studying protein-membrane interactions at high resolution. Our laboratories are tackling this question using a combination of approaches, including nanoscale membrane bilayers, solid-state NMR, and large-scale molecular dynamics simulations. These studies are now providing structural insights at atomic resolution into clotting protein-membrane interactions. PMID:20129649

  3. The miR-200 family and its targets regulate type II cell differentiation in human fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Pierce, Brianne M; Mendelson, Carole R

    2015-09-11

    Type II cell differentiation and expression of the major surfactant protein, SP-A, in mid-gestation human fetal lung (HFL) are induced by cAMP and inhibited by TGF-β. cAMP induction of SP-A promoter activity is mediated by increased phosphorylation and DNA binding of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1/Nkx2.1), a master regulator of lung development. To further define mechanisms for developmental induction of surfactant synthesis in HFL, herein, we investigated the potential roles of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs). To identify and characterize differentially regulated miRNAs in mid-gestation HFL explants during type II pneumocyte differentiation in culture, we performed miRNA microarray of RNA from epithelial cells isolated from mid-gestation HFL explants before and after culture with or without Bt2cAMP. Interestingly, the miR-200 family was significantly up-regulated during type II cell differentiation; miR-200 induction was inversely correlated with expression of known targets, transcription factors ZEB1/2 and TGF-β2. miR-200 antagonists inhibited TTF-1 and surfactant proteins and up-regulated TGF-β2 and ZEB1 expression in type II cells. Overexpression of ZEB1 in type II cells decreased DNA binding of endogenous TTF-1, blocked cAMP stimulation of surfactant proteins, and inhibited miR-200 expression, whereas cAMP markedly inhibited ZEB1/2 and TGF-β. Importantly, overexpression of ZEB1 or miR-200 antagonists in HFL type II cells also inhibited LPCAT1 and ABCA3, enzymes involved in surfactant phospholipid synthesis and trafficking, and blocked lamellar body biogenesis. Our findings suggest that the miR-200 family and ZEB1, which exist in a double-negative feedback loop regulated by TGF-β, serve important roles in the developmental regulation of type II cell differentiation and function in HFL. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Static and dynamic microscopy of the chemical stability and aggregation state of silver nanowires in components of murine pulmonary surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Ioannis G.; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.

    2016-01-01

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them, may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation, and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf® and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nano-silver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag+ ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment. PMID:26061974

  5. Static and Dynamic Microscopy of the Chemical Stability and Aggregation State of Silver Nanowires in Components of Murine Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Ioannis G; Botelho, Danielle; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D; Shaffer, Milo S P; Gow, Andrew; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E

    2015-07-07

    The increase of production volumes of silver nanowires (AgNWs) and of consumer products incorporating them may lead to increased health risks from occupational and public exposures. There is currently limited information about the putative toxicity of AgNWs upon inhalation and incomplete understanding of the properties that control their bioreactivity. The lung lining fluid (LLF), which contains phospholipids and surfactant proteins, represents a first contact site with the respiratory system. In this work, the impact of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), Curosurf, and murine LLF on the stability of AgNWs was examined. Both the phospholipid and protein components of the LLF modified the dissolution kinetics of AgNWs, due to the formation of a lipid corona or aggregation of the AgNWs. Moreover, the hydrophilic proteins, but neither the hydrophobic surfactant proteins nor the phospholipids, induced agglomeration of the AgNWs. Finally, the generation of a secondary population of nanosilver was observed and attributed to the reduction of Ag(+) ions by the surface capping of the AgNWs. Our findings highlight that combinations of spatially resolved dynamic and static techniques are required to develop a holistic understanding of which parameters govern AgNW behavior at the point of exposure and to accurately predict their risks on human health and the environment.

  6. Physical properties of botanical surfactants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lillian Espíndola; Schiedeck, Gustavo

    2017-08-24

    Some vegetal species have saponins in their composition with great potential to be used as natural surfactants in organic crops. This work aims to evaluate some surfactants physical properties of Quillaja brasiliensis and Agave angustifolia, based on different methods of preparation and concentration. The vegetal samples were prepared by drying and grinding, frozen and after chopped or used fresh and chopped. The neutral bar soap was used as a positive control. The drying and grinding of samples were the preparation method that resulted in higher foam column height in both species but Q. brasiliensis was superior to A. angustifolia in all comparisons and foam index was 2756 and 1017 respectively. Critical micelle concentration of Q. brasiliensis was 0.39% with the superficial tension of 54.40mNm(-1) while neutral bar soap was 0.15% with 34.96mNm(-1). Aspects such as genetic characteristics of the species, environmental conditions, and analytical methods make it difficult to compare the results with other studies, but Q. brasiliensis powder has potential to be explored as a natural surfactant in organic farming. Not only the surfactants physical properties of botanical saponins should be taken into account but also its effect on insects and diseases control when decided using them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation induced secretion of surfactant from cell cultures of type II pneumocytes: an in vitro model of radiation toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.L.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Rubin, P.; Penney, D.P.; Siemann, D.W.

    1984-03-01

    The pathogenesis of pneumonitis and fibrosis secondary to lung irradiation is incompletely understood. The role of the type II alveolar epithelial pneumocyte in these processes has been under investigation. The type II pneumocyte has been shown in vivo to respond to radiation induced injury with release of pulmonary surfactant. The effect of irradiation on cell cultures of type II pneumocytes was studied to determine if this could be reproduced in vitro. Type II pneumocytes were found to release surfactant material with a threshold of radiation dose between 1000 and 1500 rad. This is similar to the dosage range over which the same effect has been demonstrated in vivo. Experimental results support the concept that the release of surfactant is not due to either cell disruption or non-specific release of phospholipid from cell membranes. Irradiation appears to trigger membrane receptor mediated surfactant release. In addition, irradiation abolishes the ability of cells to subsequently respond to a physiologic agonist, suggesting radiation induced damage to the secretory mechanism. These studies establish that surfactant release in response to irradiation in vivo is a direct effect on type II pneumocytes. Cell cultures of type II pneumocytes can serve as a laboratory model of lung cell radiation toxicity.

  8. Shifts in microbial community structure during in situ surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.