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  1. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wilms Tumor KidsHealth > For Parents > Wilms Tumor Print A A A What's in this article? ... their child has cancer. Fortunately, most kids with Wilms tumor, a rare kidney cancer, survive and go on ...

  2. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor What Is Wilms Tumor? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... live normal, healthy lives with just one kidney. Wilms tumors Wilms tumors are the most common cancers in ...

  3. Wilms' Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  4. Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wilms Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early? Wilms tumors are usually found ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  5. What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor? During and after treatment for Wilms tumors, the ... Wilms Tumor Survivors and Their Families More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of kidney cancer that occurs in children. Causes WT is the most common form of childhood kidney cancer. The exact cause of this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye ( ...

  7. Wilms' Tumor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Kidney Tumors (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish What Is Wilms Tumor? (American Cancer Society) Wilms Tumor (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Wilms' Tumor (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ...

  8. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-02-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor.

  9. Max Wilms and his tumor.

    PubMed

    Raffensperger, John

    2015-02-01

    The most common cancer of the kidney in infants and children is named for Max Wilms, a German surgeon. How did this eponym come about? There were excellent reviews of this lesion before Wilms, a second year surgical assistant, published "Die Mischgeschwulste Der Niere" or The Mixed Tumors of the Kidney in 1899. At thirty two years of age, he demonstrated a masterful knowledge of pathology and embryology. Wilms' career was cut short when he became septic after operating on a prisoner of war during WWI. The survival rate for children with Wilms tumor was dismal until William Ladd, at the Boston Children's hospital introduced rational surgical treatment. By mid century, Robert Gross achieved a 47% survival rate with surgery combined with postoperative radiation. Sydney Farber treated Wilms tumors with Actinomycin-d and opened the door to cancer chemotherapy. With protocols developed by the National Wilms Tumor Study Group, the survival rate of children with Wilms tumors reached 90% by the end of the twentieth century.

  10. Drugs Approved for Wilms Tumor

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Wilms tumor and other childhood kidney cancers. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With High-Risk Wilms Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  12. Wilms' tumor and paternal occupation

    SciTech Connect

    Olshan, A.F.; Breslow, N.E.; Daling, J.R.; Falletta, J.M.; Grufferman, S.; Robison, L.L.; Waskerwitz, M.; Hammond, G.D. )

    1990-06-01

    A case-control study was conducted to examine the relationship between Wilms' tumor and paternal occupational exposures. The case group consisted of 200 children diagnosed as having Wilms' tumor who were registered at selected National Wilms' Tumor Study institutions during the period June 1, 1984, to May 31, 1986. Disease-free controls were matched to each case using a random digit dialing procedure. The parents of cases and controls completed a self-administered questionnaire. There was no consistent pattern of increased risk for paternal occupational exposure to hydrocarbons or lead found in this study. However, certain paternal occupations were found to have an elevated odds ratio (OR) of Wilms' tumor, including vehicle mechanics, auto body repairmen, and welders. Offspring of fathers who were auto mechanics had a 4- to 7-fold increased risk of Wilms' tumor for all 3 time periods. The largest increased odds ratio for auto mechanics was in the preconception period (OR = 7.58; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.90-63.9). Welders had a 4- to 8-fold increased odds ratio, with the strongest association during pregnancy (OR = 8.22; CI = 0.95-71.3). Although chance cannot be excluded as a possible explanation, association of Wilms' tumor with these occupations has been reported in previous studies. Further study is needed to provide data on the specific occupational exposures involved.

  13. Regulation of ornithine decarboxylase gene expression by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Skunca, M; Wu, W; Boppana, S M; Rauscher, F J; Dosescu, J

    1996-01-01

    The importance of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) to cell proliferation is underscored by the complex array of cell-specific mechanisms invoked to regulate its synthesis and activity. Misregulation of ODC has severe negative consequences on normal cell function, including the acquisition of tumorigenic growth properties by cells overexpressing ODC. We hypothesize that ODC gene expression is a candidate target for the anti-proliferative function of certain tumor suppressors. Here we show that the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 binds to multiple sites within the human ODC promoter, as determined by DNase I protection and methylation interference assays. The expression of WT1 in transfected HCT 116, NIH/3T3 and HepG2 cells represses activity of the ODC promoter controlling expression of a luciferase reporter gene. In contrast WT1 expression enhances ODC promoter activity in SV40-transfected HepG2 cells. Both the extent of modulation of ODC gene expression and the mediating WT1 binding elements are cell specific. Constructs expressing WT1 deletion mutants implicate two regions required for repressor function, as well as an intrinsic activation domain. Understanding the regulation of ODC gene expression by WT1 may provide valuable insights into the roles of both WT1 and ODC in development and tumorigenesis. PMID:8604351

  14. What Are the Key Statistics about Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor About Wilms Tumor What Are the Key Statistics About Wilms Tumor? Each year, about 500 new ... rare in adults, although cases have been reported. Statistics related to survival for Wilms tumors are discussed ...

  15. What's New in Wilms Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Treatment? Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor What’s New in Wilms Tumor Research and Treatment? Over the ... animals. But eventually researchers hope to test these new drugs with children in clinical trials, so that ...

  16. The WT1 Wilms tumor gene product: a developmentally regulated transcription factor in the kidney that functions as a tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F J

    1993-07-01

    Alteration of transcription factor function is becoming a common theme in molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis. A recent example of this trend is the isolation and characterization of the chromosome 11p13 Wilms tumor suppressor gene, WT1. The WT1 protein contains a DNA binding domain consisting of four zinc fingers of the Cys2-His2 class and a proline-glutamine rich region capable of regulating transcription. Deletions of the WT1 gene or point mutations which destroy the DNA binding activity of the protein are associated with the development of the pediatric nephroblastoma Wilms tumor and Denys-Drash syndrome. This article reviews the role of WT1 in normal kidney development processes, the known biochemical functions of the protein and the status of identifying target genes regulated by this potentially oncogenic transcription factor.

  17. Combination Chemotherapy and Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Wilms Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-28

    Adult Renal Wilms Tumor; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Childhood Renal Wilms Tumor; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Hemihypertrophy; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage V Renal Wilms Tumor

  18. Mesothelioma following Wilms' tumor in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Antman, K.H.; Ruxer, R.L. Jr.; Aisner, J.; Vawter, G.

    1984-07-15

    A high percentage of children with Wilms' tumor are cured with multimodal treatment. A small percentage of these children will develop second tumors, perhaps related to a genetic predisposition to neoplasia or possibly secondary to the treatment utilized for Wilms' tumor. Malignant mesothelioma has been associated with contact with asbestos but has also been reported after radiation exposure. Two patients are reported who developed malignant mesothelioma of the pleura after treatment for Wilms' tumor in childhood. Both received orthovoltage radiation; one patient also received triethylenemelamine (TEM), an alkylating agent closely related to nitrogen mustard, for 5 years. Factors in the development of second tumors are discussed.

  19. [Wilms' tumor. Its multidisciplinary management].

    PubMed

    Rivera Luna, R; Martínez Guerra, G; Ruano Aguilar, J; Cárdenas Cardoz, R; Lanche Guevara, T

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 children with a histopathological diagnosis of Wilms' tumor were studied. The average age was three years. An abdominal tumor was the most frequent clinical manifestations, with a predominating clinicopathological stage II. The most important prognostic factors were the clinical stage and histological subvariety. A five year disease free period during the early stages was very favorable. On the other hand, advances stages and unfavorable histopathology established a poor prognosis. In our experience, stages I and II and favorable histology should not receive radiotherapy but instead brief chemotherapy. The global five year survival was 82%. All the patients with an unfavorable histology occupied stages II and IV. a comparison of disease free survival between stages I and II against III and IV showed statistical significance (p 0.01). Statistical significance also appeared upon comparison between unfavorable versus favorable (p 0.01) histology. Emphasis is placed upon multidisciplinary management of this type of malignant neoplasias.

  20. Paraneoplastic Cushing Syndrome Due To Wilm's Tumor.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Mahwish; Manzoor, Jaida; Saleem, Muhammad; Anwar, Saadia; Mehmood, Qaiser; Hameed, Ambreen; Ali, Agha Shabbir

    2017-05-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are rare disorders that are triggered by an altered immune system response to neoplasm. Paraneoplastic syndromes may be the first or the most prominent manifestations of cancer. Wilm's tumor is the most frequent pediatric renal malignancy and usually presents with abdominal mass. Unusual presentations like acquired von Willebrand disease, sudden death due to pulmonary embolism and Cushing syndrome have been described in the literature. Cushing syndrome, as the presenting symptom of a malignant renal tumor in children, is a very rare entity. Few case reports are available in the literature exploring the option of preoperative chemotherapy as well as upfront nephrectomy. We report a rare case of paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to a Wilm's tumor. Based on gradual decrease of postoperative weight, blood pressure, serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, and plasma cortisol levels, along with histological confirmation of Wilm's tumor, paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to Wilm's tumor was confirmed.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of Wilms' tumor. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of Wilms Tumor; Pathology, staging and prognosis of Wilms Tumor' Biological markers and immunological studies of Wilms Tumor; Surgical treatment of Wilms Tumor; Chemotherapy of Wilms Tumor; Radiotherapy of Wilms Tumor; Multimodal therapy of Wilms Tumor; Etiology and epidemiology of Wilms Tumor; Review of Wilms Tumor.

  2. Wilms' tumor 1 (Wt1) regulates pleural mesothelial cell plasticity and transition into myofibroblasts in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Suman; Surolia, Ranu; Hock, Thomas David; Guroji, Purusotham; Zolak, Jason S.; Duggal, Ryan; Ye, Tong; Thannickal, Victor J.; Antony, Veena B.

    2014-01-01

    Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs), which are derived from the mesoderm, exhibit an extraordinary capacity to undergo phenotypic changes during development and disease. PMC transformation and trafficking has a newly defined role in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); however, the contribution of Wilms' tumor 1 (Wt1)-positive PMCs to the generation of pathognomonic myofibroblasts remains unclear. PMCs were obtained from IPF lung explants and healthy donor lungs that were not used for transplantation. Short hairpin Wt1-knockdown PMCs (sh Wt1) were generated with Wt1 shRNA, and morphologic and functional assays were performed in vitro. Loss of Wt1 abrogated the PMC phenotype and showed evidence of mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT), with a reduced expression of E-cadherin and an increase in the profibrotic markers α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin, along with increased migration and contractility, compared with that of the control. Migration of PMCs in response to active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was assessed by live-cell imaging with 2-photon microscopy and 3D imaging, of Wt1-EGFP transgenic mice. Lineage-tracing experiments to map the fate of Wt1+ PMCs in mouse lung in response to TGF-β1 were also performed by using a Cre-loxP system. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate that Wt1 is necessary for the morphologic integrity of pleural membrane and that loss of Wt1 contributes to IPF via MMT of PMCs into a myofibroblast phenotype.—Karki, S., Surolia, R., Hock, T. D., Guroji, P., Zolak, J. S., Duggal, R., Ye, T., Thannickal, V., J., Antony, V. B. Wilms' tumor 1 (Wt1) regulates pleural mesothelial cell plasticity and transition into myofibroblasts in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24265486

  3. Fibrocytes Regulate Wilms Tumor 1-Positive Cell Accumulation in Severe Fibrotic Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Sontake, Vishwaraj; Shanmukhappa, Shiva K; DiPasquale, Betsy A; Reddy, Geereddy B; Medvedovic, Mario; Hardie, William D; White, Eric S; Madala, Satish K

    2015-10-15

    Collagen-producing myofibroblast transdifferentiation is considered a crucial determinant in the formation of scar tissue in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Multiple resident pulmonary cell types and bone marrow-derived fibrocytes have been implicated as contributors to fibrotic lesions because of the transdifferentiation potential of these cells into myofibroblasts. In this study, we assessed the expression of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1), a known marker of mesothelial cells, in various cell types in normal and fibrotic lungs. We demonstrate that WT1 is expressed by both mesothelial and mesenchymal cells in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis lungs but has limited or no expression in normal human lungs. We also demonstrate that WT1(+) cells accumulate in fibrotic lung lesions, using two different mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis and WT1 promoter-driven fluorescent reporter mice. Reconstitution of bone marrow cells into a TGF-α transgenic mouse model demonstrated that fibrocytes do not transform into WT1(+) mesenchymal cells, but they do augment accumulation of WT1(+) cells in severe fibrotic lung disease. Importantly, the number of WT1(+) cells in fibrotic lesions was correlated with severity of lung disease as assessed by changes in lung function, histology, and hydroxyproline levels in mice. Finally, inhibition of WT1 expression was sufficient to attenuate collagen and other extracellular matrix gene production by mesenchymal cells from both murine and human fibrotic lungs. Thus, the results of this study demonstrate a novel association between fibrocyte-driven WT1(+) cell accumulation and severe fibrotic lung disease. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Wilms' tumor: biology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Szychot, Elwira; Apps, John; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Wilms' tumor is the commonest renal tumor of childhood affecting one in 10,000 children. It is also one of the successes of paediatric oncology with long term survival above 90% for localised disease and 75% for metastatic disease. Successful management of Wilms' tumor necessitates meticulous attention to correct staging of the tumor and a collaborative effort between paediatric oncologists, specialist surgeons, radiologists, pathologists, and radiation oncologists. Although current treatment protocols are based on risk assignment to minimise toxicity for low risk patients and improve outcomes for those with high risk disease, challenges remain in identifying novel molecular, histological and clinical risk factors for stratification of treatment intensity. Knowledge about Wilms' tumor biology and treatment is evolving rapidly and remains a paradigm for multimodal malignancy treatment. Future efforts will focus on the use of biomarkers to improve risk stratification and the introduction of newer molecularly targeted therapies that will minimise toxicity and improve the outcomes for patients with unfavourable histology and recurrent disease. The aim of this article is to summarise advances in our understanding of the biology of Wilms' tumor and to describe the current approaches to clinical management of patients.

  5. Lin28 sustains early renal progenitors and induces Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Urbach, Achia; Yermalovich, Alena; Zhang, Jin; Spina, Catherine S; Zhu, Hao; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R; Shukrun, Rachel; Charlton, Jocelyn; Sebire, Neil; Mifsud, William; Dekel, Benjamin; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Daley, George Q

    2014-05-01

    Wilms Tumor, the most common pediatric kidney cancer, evolves from the failure of terminal differentiation of the embryonic kidney. Here we show that overexpression of the heterochronic regulator Lin28 during kidney development in mice markedly expands nephrogenic progenitors by blocking their final wave of differentiation, ultimately resulting in a pathology highly reminiscent of Wilms tumor. Using lineage-specific promoters to target Lin28 to specific cell types, we observed Wilms tumor only when Lin28 is aberrantly expressed in multiple derivatives of the intermediate mesoderm, implicating the cell of origin as a multipotential renal progenitor. We show that withdrawal of Lin28 expression reverts tumorigenesis and markedly expands the numbers of glomerulus-like structures and that tumor formation is suppressed by enforced expression of Let-7 microRNA. Finally, we demonstrate overexpression of the LIN28B paralog in a significant percentage of human Wilms tumor. Our data thus implicate the Lin28/Let-7 pathway in kidney development and tumorigenesis.

  6. Doxorubicin cardiomyopathy in children with left-sided Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Camitta, B.; Kun, L.; Howarth, C.; Tang, T.

    1982-01-01

    Two children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney experienced severe anthracycline cardiomyopathy after irradiation to the tumor bed and conventional dosage of doxorubicin. The cardiomyopathy is attributed 1) to the fact that radiation fields for left Wilms tumor include the lower portion of the heart and 2) to the interaction of doxorubicin and irradiation on cardiac muscle. It is recommended that doxorubicin dosage be sharply restricted in children with Wilms tumor of the left kidney who receive postoperative irradiation.

  7. Pulmonary function in survivors of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, N.J.; Eden, O.B.; Jenney, M.E.; Stevens, R.F.; Morris-Jones, P.H.; Craft, A.W.; Castillo, L. )

    1991-04-01

    The respiratory status of 47 patients surviving childhood Wilms' tumor was studied. The group that had received flank irradiation (which impinges on the lower lung) (n = 17) had a significantly lower mean percent predicted for forced expiratory volume in one second, residual volume, and total lung capacity when compared to those who had received no irradiation (n = 23). Those patients who had received whole-lung irradiation (n = 3) had significantly lower transfer factor for carbon monoxide and gas transfer per unit lung volume when compared to the nonirradiated group (n = 23). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms between the three groups. Patients receiving any form of radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor may have abnormalities of pulmonary function and should have pulmonary function tests performed as part of their long-term follow-up.

  8. Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis after Wilms' tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Marshall, G.S.; Neblett, W.W.; Gray, G.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1986-04-01

    A 9-yr-old girl developed massive hemorrhage from esophageal varices 2 yr after combined modality therapy for Wilms' tumor. Evaluation showed a patent extrahepatic portal venous system and an elevated splenic pulp pressure. In contrast to previous reports of hepatopathy after irradiation injury, histologic sections of the liver did not demonstrate occlusion of the central veins, but rather a diffuse obliteration of intrahepatic portal venous radicles. This pattern of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has not been described following antitumor therapy.

  9. Extraskeletal osteogenic sarcoma after treatment for Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Belasco, J.B.; Meadows, A.T.; Chatten, J.; Borden, S.; Schnaufer, L.

    1982-11-01

    A large proportion of children with Wilms' tumor will become long-term disease-free survivors. A small number of these children are at risk of developing second malignant neoplasms. There have been no previous reports of osteogenic sarcoma of the chest wall following treatment of Wilms' tumor. Our patient was age seven years when he received surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Wilms' tumor, eight years when he received radiation and chemotherapy for pulmonary metastases of Wilms' tumor, and 13 years when he developed osteogenic sarcoma of the chest wall.

  10. The development of Wilms tumor: from WT1 and microRNA to animal models.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fang; Yourek, Gregory; Shi, Xiaolei; Yang, Yili

    2014-08-01

    Wilms tumor recapitulates the development of the kidney and represents a unique opportunity to understand the relationship between normal and tumor development. This has been illustrated by the findings that mutations of Wnt/β-catenin pathway-related WT1, β-catenin, and WTX together account for about one-third of Wilms tumor cases. While intense efforts are being made to explore the genetic basis of the other two-thirds of tumor cases, it is worth noting that, epigenetic changes, particularly the loss of imprinting of the DNA region encoding the major fetal growth factor IGF2, which results in its biallelic over-expression, are closely associated with the development of many Wilms tumors. Recent investigations also revealed that mutations of Drosha and Dicer, the RNases required for miRNA generation, and Dis3L2, the 3'-5' exonuclease that normally degrades miRNAs and mRNAs, could cause predisposition to Wilms tumors, demonstrating that miRNA can play a pivotal role in Wilms tumor development. Interestingly, Lin28, a direct target of miRNA let-7 and potent regulator of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, is significantly elevated in some Wilms tumors, and enforced expression of Lin28 during kidney development could induce Wilms tumor. With the success in establishing mice nephroblastoma models through over-expressing IGF2 and deleting WT1, and advances in understanding the ENU-induced rat model, we are now able to explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms induced by these genetic, epigenetic, and miRNA alterations in animal models to understand the development of Wilms tumor. These animal models may also serve as valuable systems to assess new treatment targets and strategies for Wilms tumor.

  11. Human lymphocytes express the transcriptional regulator, Wilms tumor 1: the role of WT1 in mediating nitric oxide-dependent repression of lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Davoine, Francis; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Befus, A Dean

    2007-11-16

    The inhibitory roles of nitric oxide (NO) in T cell proliferation have been observed and studied extensively over the last two decades. Despite efforts, the fundamental pathway by which NO exerts its inhibitory actions remains to be elucidated although recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) may be important. WT1 has been linked to numerous developmental pathways in particular nephrogenesis. Due to its roles in development and cell proliferation, polymorphisms within the WT1 gene can result in malignancies such as leukemia and Wilms tumor. WT1 functions as a transcriptional regulator and its activity is controlled through phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). PKA-dependent WT1 phosphorylation results in translocation of WT1 from the nucleus to the cytosol, a process that interferes with WT1 transcriptional activities. In the current study we demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in human lymphocytes. Using the proliferative compound PHA we induced T cell proliferation and growth correlated with an increase in the expression of WT1 measured by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblot. Co-stimulation with the NO donor SNOG at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 600 microM reduced in a concentration dependent way the PHA-induced upregulation of WT1 that correlated with a reduction in T cell proliferation. We conclude that WT1 might be an important component of the NO-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte proliferation and potential function.

  12. Human lymphocytes express the transcriptional regulator, Wilms tumor 1: The role of WT1 in mediating nitric oxide-dependent repression of lymphocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Davoine, Francis; Adamko, Darryl J.; Moqbel, Redwan; Befus, A. Dean

    2007-11-16

    The inhibitory roles of nitric oxide (NO) in T cell proliferation have been observed and studied extensively over the last two decades. Despite efforts, the fundamental pathway by which NO exerts its inhibitory actions remains to be elucidated although recent evidence suggests that the transcription factor Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) may be important. WT1 has been linked to numerous developmental pathways in particular nephrogenesis. Due to its roles in development and cell proliferation, polymorphisms within the WT1 gene can result in malignancies such as leukemia and Wilms tumor. WT1 functions as a transcriptional regulator and its activity is controlled through phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). PKA-dependent WT1 phosphorylation results in translocation of WT1 from the nucleus to the cytosol, a process that interferes with WT1 transcriptional activities. In the current study we demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in human lymphocytes. Using the proliferative compound PHA we induced T cell proliferation and growth correlated with an increase in the expression of WT1 measured by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblot. Co-stimulation with the NO donor SNOG at concentrations of 0, 100, 300 and 600 {mu}M reduced in a concentration dependent way the PHA-induced upregulation of WT1 that correlated with a reduction in T cell proliferation. We conclude that WT1 might be an important component of the NO-dependent regulation of T lymphocyte proliferation and potential function.

  13. Occupational risk factors for Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Bunin, G.; Kramer, S.; Nass, C.; Meadows, A.

    1986-09-01

    A matched case-control study of Wilms' tumor investigated parental occupational risk factors. Cases diagnosed in 1970-1983 were identified through a population-based tumor registry and hospital registries in the Greater Philadelphia area. Controls were selected by random digit dialing and were matched to cases on race, birth date (+/- 3 years), and the area code and exchange of the case's telephone number at diagnosis. Parents of 100 matched pairs were interviewed by telephone. Parents of patients and controls were generally similar in demographic characteristics, except that mothers differed in religion. Published schemes were used to group jobs into clusters of similar exposures and to determine exposures from industry and job title. Analyses were done for preconception, pregnancy, and postnatal time periods. More case than control fathers had jobs in a cluster that includes machinists and welders (odds ratios (ORs) = 4.0-5.7, p less than or equal to 0.04). Paternal exposures to lead, silver, tin, and iron (some exposures of this cluster) were associated with Wilms' tumor in some analyses, with moderate odds ratios (ORs = 1.5-3.4). In general, the highest odds ratios were found for the preconception period among the genetic (prezygotic) cases. No maternal job clusters or exposures gave significantly elevated odds ratios. These results support a previous finding that lead is a risk factor, but not radiation, hydrocarbon, or boron exposures.

  14. Wilms' tumor with intracardiac extension.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, G; Ruano-Aguilar, J; Rivera-Luna, R; Cardenas-Cardos, R; Avila-Ramirez, E; Braun-Roth, G; Altamirano-Alvarez, E; Moreno-Hidalgo, A; Flamand-Rodriguez, E L

    1992-02-01

    Intracardiac tumor extension from nephroblastoma is a rare event. We report on two cases with this peculiar condition who presented with a different set of signs and symptoms. Both were diagnosed in life but only one could be properly managed on time. Emphasis is made upon the most reliable methodology for early detection and the surgical approach as the only plausible way to solve this particular complication.

  15. Bilateral Wilms' tumors: changing concepts in management

    SciTech Connect

    Laberge, J.M.; Nguyen, L.T.; Homsy, Y.L.; Doody, D.P.

    1987-08-01

    Bilaterality is uncommon in Wilms' tumor, being present in 4% to 8% of the cases. We report the combined experience of two children's hospitals in one city over a 20-year period. We encountered nine cases of synchronous bilateral nephroblastoma (National Wilms' Tumor Study 3, stage V). Age at diagnosis ranged from 9 to 41 months (mean 23 months). There were five girls and four boys. Associated findings include nephroblastomatosis in three cases (33%), one of which also had a familial history; undescended testis in two cases; and minor anomalies in two other cases. Surgical treatment consisted of unilateral nephrectomy with contralateral partial nephrectomy or tumorectomy in six cases, nephrectomy with contralateral biopsy only in two cases, and the other patient had bilateral biopsies initially, followed at a later date by partial nephrectomy on one side. All patients received chemotherapy; actinomycin D (AMD) only was used in the oldest case, vincristine and AMD in five cases, to which was added cyclophosphamide in one case and adriamycin in two. Seven patients received radiation therapy. Seven out of the nine patients survived more than 2 years (77%); five are well, off chemotherapy, with no evidence of disease from 4 to 11 years after diagnosis. Two patients suffered from chronic renal failure and one died from complications after renal transplantation more than 19 years after diagnosis. The two patients who died from their disease presented with more advanced tumor. Therefore, the agressiveness of multimodal therapy can be tailored according to stage and histology, and effective chemotherapy allows maximal preservation of renal parenchyma in patients with stage I and II tumors.

  16. Mutations in the transcriptional repressor REST predispose to Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Hanks, Sandra; Karlin, Kristen L; Zachariou, Anna; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Ruark, Elise; Shaw, Chad A; Renwick, Alexander; Ramsay, Emma; Yost, Shawn; Elliott, Anna; Birch, Jillian; Capra, Michael; Gray, Juliet; Hale, Juliet; Kingston, Judith; Levitt, Gill; McLean, Thomas; Sheridan, Eamonn; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Stiller, Charles; Sebire, Neil; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rahman, Nazneen

    2015-12-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal cancer. To identify mutations that predispose to Wilms tumor, we are conducting exome sequencing studies. Here we describe 11 different inactivating mutations in the REST gene (encoding RE1-silencing transcription factor) in four familial Wilms tumor pedigrees and nine non-familial cases. Notably, no similar mutations were identified in the ICR1000 control series (13/558 versus 0/993; P < 0.0001) or in the ExAC series (13/558 versus 0/61,312; P < 0.0001). We identified a second mutational event in two tumors, suggesting that REST may act as a tumor-suppressor gene in Wilms tumor pathogenesis. REST is a zinc-finger transcription factor that functions in cellular differentiation and embryonic development. Notably, ten of 11 mutations clustered within the portion of REST encoding the DNA-binding domain, and functional analyses showed that these mutations compromise REST transcriptional repression. These data establish REST as a Wilms tumor predisposition gene accounting for ∼2% of Wilms tumor.

  17. Wilms' tumor: single centre retrospective study from South India.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, B; Rohan, B; Kavitha, S; Madhumathi, D S; Lokanath, D; Appaji, L

    2013-09-01

    Wilms' tumor is the most common malignant renal tumor in paediatric age group, and is classically managed by multimodal treatment which involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The last few decades have seen a dramatic change in the prognosis of this disease, which once was a uniformly lethal malignancy. While there is plenty of data in world literature on the outcome of Wilms' tumor, there is paucity of data from India. Hence, we conducted the present study to analyze the outcome of Wilms' tumor at our institute. To study the clinicopathologic profile and outcome of Wilms' tumor with NWTS (National Wilms' Tumor Study Group) IV protocol. Sixty-one patients with histopathological proven diagnosis of Wilms' tumor and had received treatment at our institute from Jan 2003 through Dec 2010 were included for analysis. Patients received treatment based on NWTS IV protocol. Patients were analysed for overall survival and event free survival and these outcomes were correlated with age, sex, stage at presentation and histology. Favourable histology which included focal anaplasia was found in 80.3 % while unfavourable histology was elicited in 19.7 % of the cases. The estimated 5 year event-free survival was 83.3 % and overall survival was 85.2 %. Tumour histology was the single most important factor predicting the survival. Patients with childhood Wilms' still present very late in our setting, this poses management challenges as large tumor are technically difficult to deliver at surgery. Histology has a crucial role in outcome of this disease. With multidisciplinary approach, similar survival rates to National Wilms' Tumor Study Group seems to be achievable even in Indian scenario.

  18. Offspring of patients treated for unilateral Wilms' tumor in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.M.; Fine, W.E.; Li, F.P.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-seven women and the wives of nine men who survived unilateral Wilms' tumor in childhood had a total of 59 live born offspring. Among the 33 infants born to women who had received orthovoltage abdominal irradiation, ten weighed less than 2500 g at birth and three died during the perinatal period. In addition, one term infant of normal weight died of complications of a breech delivery. Only one of 26 infants born to the wives of Wilms' tumor patients and unirradiated female patients weighed less than 2500 g at birth and none died. The frequency of congenital malformations and spontaneous abortions in this series was not increased, and no offspring has developed cancer. The findings suggest that the risk of Wilms' tumor is low among progeny of survivors of nonfamilial, unilateral lesions. Damage from abdominal irradiation given to girls with Wilms' tumor may predispose them to the subsequent delivery of low birthweight children.

  19. Uniparental disomy occurs infrequently in Wilms tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Grundy, P.; Wilson, B.; Telzerow, P.; Zhou, W.; Paterson, M.C. )

    1994-02-01

    Wilms tumors commonly exhibit loss of heterozygosity for polymorphic DNA markers located on the short arm of chromosome 11 at band p15. In some instances, the deleted region does not include 11p13, the location of the WT1 gene, suggesting the existence of a second Wilms tumor gene on 11p. Both the exclusive loss of the maternally derived allele in Wilms tumors and the recent description of constitutional paternal isodisomy for this region in patients with either the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or isolated hemihypertrophy have suggested that this second locus is subject to sex-specific genomic imprinting. Given that one of these isodisomic patients had minimal congenital anomalies (hemihypertrophy), the authors hypothesized that a proportion of Wilms tumors which had not lost heterozygosity for 11p markers (about 60% of all cases) might have arisen consequent to 11p paternal heterodisomy and that patients constitutionally homozygous at 11p15 might harbor paternal isodisomy. They have analyzed 40 Wilms tumor cases to determine the parental origin of the child's 11p15 alleles. Paternal heterodisomy could be excluded in all 28 unilateral and 8/9 bilateral potential candidates. It is intriguing that somatic mosaicism for 11p paternal isodisomy was detected in one child with bilateral Wilms tumor and macroglossia. Isodisomy could only be excluded in one of the three possible cases. Thus, 11p paternal hetero- and isodisomy appear to be uncommon causes of non-anomaly-associated Wilms tumors but may be more frequent in Wilms tumor patients with BWS-associated anomalies. 44 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Management of Wilms Tumor: ICMR Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Maya; Vora, Tushar; Agarwala, Sandeep; Laskar, Siddharth; Arora, Brijesh; Bansal, Deepak; Kapoor, Gauri; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Kaur, Tanvir; Rath, G K; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2017-04-03

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common renal tumor of childhood. Although multidisciplinary care including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy have greatly improved the survival rates in WT, there is a scope for further improvement in India and other resource-poor settings. In resource-limited settings, the majority of patients present with large tumors, which may either be unresectable or risky to resect; making preoperative chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery the preferred approach. Histology and staging are used for risk stratification. The imaging procedure of choice is Contrast Enhanced CT scan (CECT) of thorax/ abdomen and pelvis, which is to be done at presentation, as well as for re-evaluation. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment in WT and Radical Nephroureterectomy and Lymph node sampling is the procedure of choice, to be performed at week 5 in Non Metastatic WT and week 7 in Metastatic WT. WT is an extremely chemosensitive and radiosensitive tumor. Preoperative chemotherapy for Non Metastatic WT consists of 4 wk of Vincristine /Actinomycin and 6 wk of Vincristine /Actinomycin/ Adriamycin for Metastatic WT, with post-operative chemotherapy depending on stage and histology. Radiation therapy is recommended mainly in Stage III and Stage IV WT, with other indications given in the text. Other recommendations, such as treatment of WT in special situations and for supportive care are also detailed in the text.

  1. Expression of the 11p13 Wilms' tumor gene, WT1, correlates with histologic category of Wilms' tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, W. L.; Gramling, T. S.; Sens, D. A.; Garvin, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Homozygous inactivation of WT1, a Wilms' tumor gene located on chromosome 11 at p13, is believed to predispose to Wilms' tumor and therefore may be a common occurrence in this cancer. The expression of this gene in primary Wilms' tumors was examined by northern and quantitative RNA slot blot analysis and compared with clinical, histologic, and molecular features of each case. The characteristic 3.2 kb RNA was readily detected in most primary tumors although there was marked variation in the level of WT1-specific transcripts. No abnormal-sized RNA products were detected and expression of WT1 was not coordinated with that of several other oncofetal genes: N-myc, insulinlike growth factor 2 (IGF-2), and c-myc. The relative abundance of WT1-specific RNA did correlate with the histologic category of Wilms' tumor such that those tumors with heterologous differentiation have, in general, lower relative levels of WT1 transcripts than those tumors without heterologous differentiation. These results further establish the heterogeneity of Wilms' tumor with respect to the expression of tumor-associated oncofetal genes and suggest a relationship between WT1 expression and cellular differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:1316081

  2. Global demethylation in loss of imprinting subtype of Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Ludgate, Jackie L; Le Mée, Gwenn; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Rodger, Euan J; Weeks, Robert J; Reeve, Anthony E; Morison, Ian M

    2013-02-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities at the IGF2/H19 locus play a key role in the onset of Wilms tumor. These tumors can be classified into three molecular subtypes depending on the events occurring at this locus: loss of imprinting (LOI), loss of heterozygosity (LOH), or retention of imprinting (ROI). As IGF2 LOI is a consequence of aberrant methylation, we hypothesized that this subtype of Wilms tumors might display global abnormalities of methylation. We therefore analyzed the methylation status of satellite DNA, as a surrogate for global methylation in 50 Wilms tumor patients. Satellite methylation was quantified by a methylation-sensitive quantitative PCR. We confirmed hypomethylation of both satellite α (Sat α) and satellite 2 (Sat 2) DNA in Wilms tumor samples compared with normal kidney. In addition, we found that LOI tumors, unlike ROI or LOH ones, showed concordant hypomethylation of both Sat α and Sat 2 DNA. This would suggest that the LOI subtype of Wilms tumor, which unlike other subtypes results from an epimutation, has a global deregulation of methylation mechanisms.

  3. Histone deacetylase 5 promotes Wilms' tumor cell proliferation through the upregulation of c-Met.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xu; Liu, De-Hong; Zhou, Yun; Yan, Xiang-Ming; Yuan, Li-Qun; Pan, Jian; Fu, Ming-Cui; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family is comprised of enzymes, which are involved in modulating the majority of critical cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle progression. However, the biological function of HDAC5 in Wilms' tumor remains to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the expression and function of HDAC5 in Wilm's tumor. It was demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of HDAC5 were upregulated in human Wilms' tumor tissues. Overexpression of HDAC5 in G401 cells was observed to significantly promote cellular proliferation, as demonstrated by the results of an MTT assay and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay. By contrast, HDAC5 knockdown using small interfering RNA suppressed the proliferation of the G401 cells. At the molecular level, the present study demonstrated that HDAC5 promoted the expression of c‑Met, which has been previously identified as an oncogene. In addition, downregulation of c‑Met inhibited the proliferative effects of HDAC5 in human Wilms' tumor cells. Taken together, these results suggested that HDAC5 promotes cellular proliferation through the upregulation of c‑Met, and may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with Wilms' tumor.

  4. The History of Multimodal Treatment of Wilms' Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K; Bonasso, Patrick C

    2016-06-01

    Multimodal therapy-surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy-the foundation of modern cancer treatment, has led to dramatic improvements in survival. How the three disciplines coalesced to conquer Wilms' tumor is a compelling story that includes two of history's greatest discoveries, X-rays and antibiotics. By the mid-20th century both fields had matured to where dedicated clinicians and creative scientists could apply them to Wilms' tumor and achieve successive improvements in survival. William Ladd was able to achieve a zero operative mortality by 1940, but was left with a 32 per cent survival with surgery alone. Robert Gross and Edwin Neuhauser combined surgery and radiotherapy and achieve 47 per cent survival rate in 1950. Sidney Farber and his colleagues added an antibiotic, dactinomycin, to the treatment regimen and reached 80 per cent survival rate in 1966. The National Wilms' Tumor Study, organized in 1968, was a multidisciplinary effort of surgeons, radiotherapists, and pediatric oncologists across the country. By the 1990s, the National Wilms' Tumor Study achieved survival rates above 95 per cent while minimizing long-term effects through shortening courses of chemotherapy and radiation. The story of Wilms' tumor serves as a paragon for all types of cancer, in both children and adults.

  5. The Wilms Tumor Gene, Wt1, Is Critical for Mouse Spermatogenesis via Regulation of Sertoli Cell Polarity and Is Associated with Non-Obstructive Azoospermia in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya Qing; Chen, Min; Zhang, Jun; Hao, Jian Xiu; Wang, Yan Bo; Sha, Ri Na; Huang, Yi; Liu, Xiao; Hu, Jing Chu; Sun, Guang Qing; Li, Hong Gang; Xiong, Cheng Liang; Xie, Jun; Jiang, Zhi Mao; Cai, Zhi Ming; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Huff, Vicki; Gui, Yao Ting; Gao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Azoospermia is one of the major reproductive disorders which cause male infertility in humans; however, the etiology of this disease is largely unknown. In the present study, six missense mutations of WT1 gene were detected in 529 human patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), indicating a strong association between WT1 mutation and NOA. The Wilms tumor gene, Wt1, is specifically expressed in Sertoli cells (SCs) which support spermatogenesis. To examine the functions of this gene in spermatogenesis, Wt1 was deleted in adult testis using Wt1flox and Cre-ERTM mice strains. We found that inactivation of Wt1 resulted in massive germ cell death and only SCs were present in most of the seminiferous tubules which was very similar to NOA in humans. In investigating the potential mechanism for this, histological studies revealed that the blood–testis barrier (BTB) was disrupted in Wt1 deficient testes. In vitro studies demonstrated that Wt1 was essential for cell polarity maintenance in SCs. Further studies found that the expression of cell polarity associated genes (Par6b and E-cadherin) and Wnt signaling genes (Wnt4, Wnt11) were downregulated in Wt1 deficient SCs, and that the expression of Par6b and E-cadherin was regulated by Wnt4. Our findings suggest that Wt1 is important in spermatogenesis by regulating the polarity of SCs via Wnt signaling pathway and that WT1 mutation is one of the genetic causes of NOA in humans. PMID:23935527

  6. Portal Hypertension in Children With Wilms' Tumor: A Report From the National Wilms' Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Anne B.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Ou, San-San; Green, Daniel M.; Norkool, Pat A.; Peterson, Susan M.; Breslow, Norman E.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: This analysis was undertaken to determine the cumulative risk of and risk factors for portal hypertension (PHTN) in patients with Wilms' tumor (WT). Methods and Materials: Medical records were reviewed to identify cases of PHTN identified with late liver/spleen/gastric toxicities in a cohort of 5,195 patients treated with National Wilms' Tumor Studies (NWTS) protocols 1 to 4. A nested case control study (5 controls/case) was conducted to determine relationships among doxorubicin, radiation therapy (RT) dose to the liver, patient gender, and PHTN. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of PHTN associated with these factors. Results: Cumulative risk of PHTN at 6 years from WT diagnosis was 0.7% for patients with right-sided tumors vs. 0.1% for those with left-sided tumors (p = 0.002). Seventeen of 19 cases were evaluable for RT. The majority of cases (16/17 [94%]) received right-flank RT either alone or as part of whole-abdomen RT and received >15 Gy to the liver. Fifteen of 17 (88%) patients received a higher dose to the liver than they would have with modern WT protocols. Controlling for RT dose, the HR was 3.0 for patients who received doxorubicin (p = 0.32) and 2.8 for females (p = 0.15). Controlling for doxorubicin, the 95% lower confidence bound on the HR associating PHTN with a minimum liver RT dose of >15 Gy vs. <=15 Gy was 2.5 (p = 0.001); it was 2.4 for a maximum liver dose of >15 Gy vs. <=15 Gy (p = 0.001). Conclusions: There was a strong association between higher doses of liver RT (>15 Gy) and the development of PHTN among WT patients.

  7. Wilms' Tumor With Intra-Atrial Extension: Treatment and Management.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Anna; Augustyn, Cyprian; Stankowski, Tomasz; Walek, Ewa; Kowalski, Jan P; Koltowski, Piotr; Cichon, Romuald

    2016-01-01

    Wilms' tumor is the most common renal cancer in children. It can grow for a long time without any characteristic symptoms, causing only fever, abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting, which is the reason why it is often discovered accidentally. In 1% to 4% of the cases, nephroblastoma leads to complications in the form of intravascular and intra-atrial extension. We present a case of a five-year-old boy with Wilms' tumor extending into the inferior vena cava, right atrium, and then prolapsing through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricle.

  8. Mutational Analysis of the Wilms' Tumor (WTI) Gene.

    PubMed

    King-Underwood, L; Pritchard-Jones, K

    1996-01-01

    Mutations of the Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene have been shown to underlie a proportion of cases of Wilms' tumor, an embryonal kidney cancer occurring mainly in childhood. The WTl gene comprtses ten exons spanning approx 50 kb of genomrc DNA. The messenger RNA is approx 3 kb in length and encodes a zinc finger protein. The four zinc fingers, which he at the C-terminal end of the protein, are encoded by separate exons 7-10. The 5' end of the gene is extremely GC-rich, with areas approaching a 70% GC content. This makes this region difficult to amplify in polymerase chain reactions.

  9. Current standards of care and future directions for "high-risk" pediatric renal tumors: Anaplastic Wilms tumor and Rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Geller, James I

    2016-01-01

    'High risk' renal tumors of childhood generally includes anaplastic Wilms tumor, rhabdoid tumor, and metastatic renal sarcomas and carcinomas. In this review, the epidemiology, biology, treatment and prognosis of anaplastic Wilms tumor and rhabdoid tumor are presented. Future directions related to management of such cancers are discussed, with insights provided into possible clinical trials in development that consider integration of novel targeted therapies.

  10. Structure of the Wilms Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Stoll, R.; Lee, B.M.; Debler, E.W.; Laity, J.H.; Wilson, I.A.; Dyson, H.J.; Wright, P.E.

    2009-06-04

    The zinc finger domain of the Wilms tumor suppressor protein (WT1) contains four canonical Cys{sub 2}His{sub 2} zinc fingers. WT1 binds preferentially to DNA sequences that are closely related to the EGR-1 consensus site. We report the structure determination by both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy of the WT1 zinc finger domain in complex with DNA. The X-ray structure was determined for the complex with a cognate 14 base-pair oligonucleotide, and composite X-ray/NMR structures were determined for complexes with both the 14 base-pair and an extended 17 base-pair DNA. This combined approach allowed unambiguous determination of the position of the first zinc finger, which is influenced by lattice contacts in the crystal structure. The crystal structure shows the second, third and fourth zinc finger domains inserted deep into the major groove of the DNA where they make base-specific interactions. The DNA duplex is distorted in the vicinity of the first zinc finger, with a cytidine twisted and tilted out of the base stack to pack against finger 1 and the tip of finger 2. By contrast, the composite X-ray/NMR structures show that finger 1 continues to follow the major groove in the solution complexes. However, the orientation of the helix is non-canonical, and the fingertip and the N terminus of the helix project out of the major groove; as a consequence, the zinc finger side-chains that are commonly involved in base recognition make no contact with the DNA. We conclude that finger 1 helps to anchor WT1 to the DNA by amplifying the binding affinity although it does not contribute significantly to binding specificity. The structures provide molecular level insights into the potential consequences of mutations in zinc fingers 2 and 3 that are associated with Denys-Drash syndrome and nephritic syndrome. The mutations are of two types, and either destabilize the zinc finger structure or replace key base contact residues.

  11. Occupational exposures among fathers of children with Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, J.R.; Sinks, T.H. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    An occupation-and-exposure linkage system was utilized to perform an epidemiologic case-control study of paternal occupation and Wilms tumor in offspring. The first part of the study was designed to test the hypothesis that paternal lead (Pb) exposure is a risk factor for Wilms tumor in offspring. The second part of the study was an exploratory analysis that sought to generate possible etiologic hypotheses about other paternal exposures in the workplace in relation to Wilms tumor. Calculation of odds ratios indicated that there was no statistical difference in the frequency of occupational exposure to Pb, Pb alkyls, and Pb salts for fathers of children with Wilms' tumor and fathers of controls, a finding that contrasts sharply with the results of the one previously reported study in this area. In the exploratory phase of the study, case fathers were found more likely to have been exposed to boron, while control fathers were found more likely to have encountered insecticides, acetylene, o-chlorobenzylidene, oil orange ss, and diethylene glycol; the differences were statistically significant. Troublesome methodologic problems, including exposure misclassification, sample size, and multiple comparisons, are discussed.

  12. Outcome of pregnancy in survivors of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Gimbrere, K.; Gelber, R.D.; Sallan, S.E.; Flamant, F.; Green, D.M.; Heyn, R.M.; Meadows, A.T.

    1987-01-09

    Outcome of pregnancy was reported by 99 patients who were cured of childhood Wilms' tumor at seven pediatric cancer centers during 1931 to 1979. These patients carried or sired 191 singleton pregnancies of at least 20 weeks in duration. Among the 114 pregnancies in women who had received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor, an adverse outcome occurred in 34 (30%). There were 17 perinatal deaths (five in premature low-birth-weight infants) and 17 other low-birth-weight infants. Compared with white women in the United States, the irradiated women had an increased perinatal mortality rate (relative risk, 7.9) and an excess of low-birth-weight infants (relative risk, 4.0). In contrast, an adverse outcome was found in two (3%) of the 77 pregnancies in nonirradiated female patients with Wilms' tumor and wives of male patients. The high risk of adverse pregnancy outcome should be considered in the counseling and prenatal care of women who have received abdominal radiotherapy for Wilms' tumor.

  13. Familial synchronous bilateral teratoid Wilms tumor with elevated alpha-fetoprotein level.

    PubMed

    Okur, Arzu; Pinarli, Faruk Guclu; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Poyraz, Aylar; Fidan, Kibriya; Basaklar, Can; Oguz, Aynur

    2012-11-01

    Familial Wilms tumor is a rare entity that accounts for only 1-2% of all Wilms tumor cases, with an earlier age of onset and an increased frequency of bilateral tumors. Teratoid Wilms tumor is a variant of nephroblastoma with a predominance of heterologous tissues comprising more than 50% of the tumor volume. Wilms tumor does not usually secrete any specific tumor marker and all teratoid Wilms tumor cases previously reported were sporadic non-secreting neoplasms. Here we describe an infant with familial synchronous bilateral teratoid Wilms tumor whose serum alpha-fetoprotein level was elevated. To our knowledge, this extremely rare type of case is reported for the first time in the literature.

  14. [Wilms' tumor, multiple intestinal parasitosis and typhoid fever].

    PubMed

    Franco Vega, G; Llausás Vargas, A; Kumate, J

    1977-01-01

    The case was that of a 21-month-old infant who presented a great inoperable Wilm's tumor that was treated with vincristine to the point of practically disappearing. Severe typhoid fever that was complicated by multiple intestinal parasitoses (ascariasis, trichuriasis, giardiasis and strongyloidiasis) appeared. Possibly, tumoral necrosis, salmonellosis and the parasitoses formed a sac that opened to the hepatic angle of the colon. Finally, multiple liver metastases were discovered and confirmed pathologically. The patient died 36 hours after surgical reexamination and liver biopsies, from causes not clearly explained. Comments are made on the diagnostic problems originated by rareness of the association of typhoid fever resistant to chloramphenicol, intestinal parasitoses and a great Wilms' tumor and the possible influence of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the evolution of the case.

  15. A Rare Coexistence of Bilateral Congenital Wilms Tumor with Ductal Plate Malformation at Autopsy.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Chatterjee, Debajyoti; Gowda, Kiran; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital Wilms tumor is a tumor of childhood. Here we present an unusual case of bilateral congenital Wilms tumor with associated ductal plate malformation. In addition, there was also associated oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, and multiple skeletal anomalies in this index case. Although various syndromic associations of Wilms tumor are well described in the literature, an association of congenital Wilms tumor with ductal plate malformation, polysplenia, and skeletal malformations is not reported. We believe that this is the first reported case of such an association.

  16. [A case of Wilm's tumor with full symptomatic WAGR syndrome].

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, D; Daszkiewicz, P

    1995-03-01

    The authors of this paper presented a case of a baby with full-symptomatic WAGR syndrome (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genital tract malformation and mental retardation) treated in the I Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Pediatrics, Medical Academy Poznań. The etiology of this syndrome was discussed (deletion of the 13th band of the 11th chromosome short arm). The reason for treatment failure was analysed.

  17. Treatment of multiply relapsed wilms tumor with vincristine, irinotecan, temozolomide and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Malogolowkin, Marcio H; Mascarenhas, Leo

    2014-04-01

    As most active chemotherapy agents against Wilms tumor are incorporated into upfront therapy, particularly for those patients with high risk for recurrence, novel regimens are needed to treat children with relapsed Wilms tumor. We describe four consecutive patients with multiply relapsed Wilms tumor who were treated with a combination of vincristine, irinotecan, temozolomide, and bevacizumab. Two had a complete response, and two had a partial response to treatment. Hematological toxicity and diarrhea were the main side effects. This regimen has activity in patients with multiply relapsed Wilms tumor without excessive toxicity, and should be evaluated further in this setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Distinctive properties of an anaplastic Wilms' tumor and its associated epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen-Martin, D. J.; Re, G. G.; Garvin, A. J.; Sens, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Clinically the anaplastic variant of Wilms' tumor differs from the classical Wilms' tumor by its poor prognosis. To begin to understand and characterize the distinctive biology of this rare form of Wilms' tumor, a study of the histology, ultrastructure, and mRNA expression was performed on the anaplastic tumor and its associated cell line. The anaplastic tumor generated mouse heterotransplants that were readily used to establish epithelial cell cultures. The epithelial cultures, in turn, produced tumors when reinjected into nude mice. Microscopic evaluation revealed that the anaplastic epithelial cells were less differentiated than their epithelial counterpart in classical Wilms' tumors. In general the molecular profile of the anaplastic tumor was more consistent with that of an epithelial-rich classic Wilms' tumor than with the classic triphasic Wilms' tumor. Unlike the classic triphasic Wilms' tumor that contains blastema, stroma, and epithelial tubules, the anaplastic tumor expressed only marginal levels of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) mRNA and imperceptible levels of the Wilms' tumor gene (WT-1), Pax-2, and Pax-8 mRNA. In common with the classic Wilms' tumor, the anaplastic variant retained the expression of the N-myc gene while failing to express C-myc. A comparison of cultures derived from an epithelial-rich, classic Wilms' tumor and the anaplastic Wilm's tumor indicated that both lacked IGF-2 and WT-1 mRNA expression. However, the well-differentiated epithelial cell culture derived from the classic Wilms' tumor expressed C-myc, Pax-8, and Pax-2 mRNA, none of which were expressed by the anaplastic epithelial cells. Furthermore, the well-differentiated epithelial cell component failed to express N-myc, which was expressed by both the primary triphasic Wilms' tumor and the anaplastic tumor. Overall, the findings indicate that patterns of gene expression within a single component do not correlate with the aggressive clinical behavior of the anaplastic

  19. Giant renal Angiomyolipoma masquerading as a Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dhua, Anjan Kumar; Ranjan, Abhishek; Agarwala, Sandeep; Bhatnagar, Veereshwar; Mathur, Sandeep R.; Devasenathipathy, Kandasamy

    2017-01-01

    Renal Angiomyolipoma (AML) is not commonly seen in the pediatric age group other than patients of tuberous sclerosis where in they can have renal AMLs within the first decade with bilateral in involvement. Diagnosis of renal AML can generally be made by the current radiological modalities in the appropriate clinical setting, but it can be mistaken for other tumors when it is large and has low-fat content. Herein we report a case of giant renal AML that was initially misdiagnosed as a Wilms tumor in a 12-year-old girl. PMID:28197035

  20. Treatment of Wilms tumor-related hypertension with losartan and captopril.

    PubMed

    Wong, William; Mauger, David

    2004-07-01

    Hypertension is commonly associated with Wilms tumor, but hypertension secondary to renin-secreting Wilms tumor is uncommon. We present an infant with severe hypertension and renin hypersecretion, which was resistant to multiple antihypertensive agents. Blood pressure was eventually controlled with a combination of captopril and losartan.

  1. Wilms tumor in horseshoe kidneys: radiologic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, B.B. Jr.; Dawes, R.K.; Atkinson, G.O. Jr.; Ball, T.I. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    Two cases of nephroblastoma occurring in a horseshoe kidney are reported, and 32 cases from the literature are reviewed. The radiologic signs of horseshoe kidney may be difficult to evaluate with excretory urography when the mass is large. Rotational abnormalities of the opposite kidney that is not involved by tumor should suggest the possibility of an associated horseshoe kidney. Real-time ultrasonography and computed tomography are helpful in identifying the isthmus of the horseshoe kidney. Aortography confirms the presence of the horseshoe kidney and demonstrates the arterial supply to the isthmus and the tumor. Radionuclide scans demonstrate the isthmus when the tumor arises from an upper pole, but may not be diagnostic if the tumor arises from the isthmus.

  2. Occurrence of Wilms' tumor in a child with hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Özyörük, Derya; Demir, Hacı Ahmet; Emir, Suna; Karakuş, Esra; Tunç, Bahattin

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is the most frequent cause of congenital hemolytic anemia. It is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by cell membrane abnormalities, specifically in red blood cells. Although the association between benign, borderline and malignant tumors and HS is not clear, various tumors such as splenoma, adrenal myolipoma, pancreatic schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, extramedullary hematopoiesis, myeloproliferative disorders, multiple myeloma, B-cell lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been presented in case reports concerning HS patients. Here we describe a 6-year-old boy with HS who presented with a mass in the left kidney. Tru-cut biopsy revealed Wilms' tumor (WT). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of WT associated with HS to be reported in the literature.

  3. Prepubertal endocrine follow-up in subjects with Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Perrone, L.; Sinisi, A.A.; Sicuranza, R.; Di Tullio, M.T.; Indolfi, P.; Giuliano, M.G.; Bellastella, A.; Faggiano, M.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three prepubertal subjects treated for Wilms' tumor (10 males and 13 females) were endocrinologically evaluated off therapy from 0.5 to 4.08 years. They were divided into two groups: 11 subjects (6M, 5F) who had received chemotherapy only (group 1) and 12 (4M, 8F) who had in addition received abdominal radiation (1,500-3,000 rads) (group 2). Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), free tri-iodo thyronine (FT3), testosterone (T), estradiol-17 beta (E2), and cortisol (F) were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Plasma levels of TSH, PRL, FT4, FT3, and F were normal in both groups, as were FSH, LH, T, and E2 in group 1. In group 2, female subjects showed FSH levels significantly higher than controls, while LH and E2 were normal; male subjects showed significantly higher LH levels, while FSH and T levels were normal. These results indicate that in the treatment protocol used by us for Wilms' tumor (WT), chemotherapy does not affect endocrine function, whereas abdominal radiation seems to damage gonadal function directly. The present findings indicate that gonadal damage may be revealed in WT before puberty not only in females, as has been previously reported, but also in male subjects.

  4. Somatic mutations in DROSHA and DICER1 impair microRNA biogenesis through distinct mechanisms in Wilms tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rakheja, Dinesh; Chen, Kenneth S.; Liu, Yangjian; Shukla, Abhay A.; Schmid, Vanessa; Chang, Tsung-Cheng; Khokhar, Shama; Wickiser, Jonathan E.; Karandikar, Nitin J.; Malter, James S.; Mendell, Joshua T.; Amatruda, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor is the most common childhood kidney cancer. Here we report the whole-exome sequencing of 44 Wilms tumors, identifying missense mutations in the microRNA (miRNA)-processing enzymes DROSHA and DICER1 and novel mutations in MYCN, SMARCA4 and ARID1A. Examination of tumor miRNA expression, in vitro processing assays, and genomic editing in human cells demonstrate that DICER1 and DROSHA mutations influence miRNA processing through distinct mechanisms. DICER1 RNase IIIB mutations preferentially impair processing of miRNAs deriving from the 5′ arm of pre-miRNA hairpins, while DROSHA RNase IIIB mutations globally inhibit miRNA biogenesis through a dominant-negative mechanism. Both DROSHA and DICER1 mutations impair expression of tumor-suppressing miRNAs including the let-7 family, important regulators of MYCN, LIN28 and other Wilms tumor oncogenes. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms through which mutations in miRNA biogenesis components reprogram miRNA expression in human cancer and suggest that these defects define a distinct subclass of Wilms tumors. PMID:25190313

  5. Outcomes of Children With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor and Peritoneal Implants Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies-4 and -5

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Green, Daniel M.; Haase, Gerald; Anderson, James R.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Grundy, Paul E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: There are no published reports on the optimal management and survival rates of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and peritoneal implants (PIs). Methods and Materials: Among favorable histology WT patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-4 and NWTS-5, 57 children had PIs at the time of nephrectomy. The median age was 3 years 5 months (range, 3 months to 14 years). The majority of children (42 of 57 [74%)] had Stage III tumors; 15 had Stage IV disease. All patients received multimodality therapy. Of 56 children who underwent primary surgery, 48 (84%) had gross total resection of all tumors. All patients received 3-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, and doxorubicin. Whole-abdomen radiotherapy (RT) was used in 47 patients (82%), and in 50 patients (88%) the RT dose was 10.5 Gy. Results: After a median follow-up of 7.5 years, the overall abdominal and systemic tumor control rates were 97% and 93%, respectively. A comparative analysis between children with PIs and those without PIs showed no significant differences in the clinical characteristics between the two groups. The 5-year event-free survival rates with and without PIs were 90% (95% confidence interval, 78-96%) and 83% (95% confidence interval, 81-85%) respectively (p = 0.20). Conclusions: Multimodality therapy with surgery, whole-abdomen RT, and three-drug chemotherapy delivered according to the NWTS-4 and -5 protocols resulted in excellent abdominal and systemic tumor control rates. All children should be monitored in long-term surveillance programs for the early detection and management of therapy-related toxicities.

  6. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms Tumor, Liver Cancer, or Thyroid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  7. Extrarenal Wilms tumor: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Yesenia; Slater, Bethany J; Braverman, Richard M; Eldin, Karen W; Thompson, Patrick A; Wesson, David E; Nuchtern, Jed G

    2013-06-01

    Extrarenal Wilms tumors are extremely rare with only isolated case reports in the pediatric literature. We present the case of a 2-year old boy who presented with a large abdominal mass and constipation. Pathologic diagnosis of the tumor was extrarenal Wilms tumor (ERWT) with favorable histology. We discuss the diagnostic workup, radiologic and operative findings, treatment and review of the literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wilms tumor: "State-of-the-art" update, 2016.

    PubMed

    Irtan, Sabine; Ehrlich, Peter F; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2016-10-01

    Despite an impressive increase in survival rate over the past decades, there is still a need to improve the survival of specific subgroups of Wilms tumor (anaplastic, metastatic, and bilateral) and to decrease the late effects of treatment in terms of renal function and heart toxicity. We aim to explore new areas of improvement, from diagnosis to treatment: in the field of radiology the increased use of MRI and exploration of its diffusion-weighted imaging capabilities to predict WT histology at diagnosis and for preoperative assessment; in biology the emergence of new biomarkers that could be integrated into the decision-making process; and surgical techniques with more accurate indication of nephron-sparing surgery that is no longer reserved for bilateral WT and the minimally invasive approach. The long-term outcome of patients with WT should thus be a strong indicator of the improvement in adapting and personalizing the treatment to each individual.

  9. Wilms' tumor in a 51-year-old patient: An extremely rare case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Jin, L U; He, Tao; Li, Yifan; Zhao, Yang; Ding, Y U; Li, Xianxin; Liu, Yunchu; Gui, Yaoting; Mao, Xiangming; Lai, Yongqing; Ni, Liangchao

    2016-06-01

    Wilms tumor or nephroblastoma is a common kidney malignant tumor in childhood, accounting for ~5% of all pediatric tumors. At present, reports on Wilms' tumor occurring in adults, particularly at ages >30 years, are extremely rare. The majority of the cases of adult Wilms' tumor are closely associated with chemotherapy. Furthermore, in rare cases, Wilms' tumor is characterized by three classic types of cells, namely blastemal, stromal and epithelial cells. We herein report a case of Wilms' tumor with three classic types of cells on histological examination in a 51 year-old male patient who had received prior chemotherapy. The patient promptly underwent radical nephrectomy and remains alive. A review of previously presented cases of adult Wilms' tumor from PubMed database was also performed.

  10. Association between TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism and Wilms' tumor risk in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wen; Zhuo, Zhen-Jian; Jia, Wei; Zhu, Jinhong; Zhu, Shi-Bo; Lin, Ze-Feng; Wang, Feng-Hua; Xia, Huimin; He, Jing; Liu, Guo-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Wilms' tumor is one of the most prevalent pediatric malignancies, ranking fourth in childhood cancer worldwide. TP53 is a critical tumor suppressor gene, which encodes a 53 kDa protein, p53. The p53 functions to protect against cancer by regulating cell cycle and apoptosis and maintaining DNA integrity. TP53 gene is highly polymorphic. Several TP53 gene polymorphisms have been considered to be associated with cancer risk. Of them, a nonsynonymous polymorphism, Arg72Pro (rs1042522 C>G), has been most extensively studied for the association with cancer risk; however, few studies have investigated its effect on Wilms' tumor. Because of the central role of p53 in cell cycle control, the TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism is also a good potential candidate predisposition locus for this pediatric cancer. We genotyped this polymorphism in 145 patients and 531 cancer-free controls recruited from Chinese children by Taqman methodology. Overall, our result suggested a lack of association between the TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism and Wilms' tumor. In the stratified analysis, we found that carriers of CG/GG genotypes had a significantly increased Wilms' tumor risk in children not older than 18 months (adjusted odds ratio =2.04, 95% confidence interval =1.003-4.13, P=0.049) compared with CC genotype carriers. Our study indicated that the TP53 gene Arg72Pro polymorphism may have a weak, age-related effect on Wilms' tumor risk in Chinese children. These findings need further validations in other populations with larger sample size.

  11. [Wilms tumor as a novel model of angiogenesis in childood nephropathies].

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Michał; Ostalska-Nowicka, Danuta; Zachwieja, Jacek; Lewandowska, Lidia; Kaczmarek-Kanold, Małgorzata; Miśkowiak, Bogdan

    2006-01-01

    Wilms tumor has a unique possibility of recapitulation within its substance different stages of renal development. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2) are regarded to play the crucial role in the process of simultaneous development of tubules and glomeruli in animal kidney. Neoangiogenesis, secondary to rearrangement of epithelial elements in Wilms tumor, may therefore follow the lack of glomeruli in this neoplasm. The aim of the present research was an immunohistochemical analysis of VEGF-C and VEGFR-2 expressions in Wilms tumor and an attempt of explanation of neovascularisation process in this malignancy. The study group was composed of 16 children diagnosed with Wilms tumor (stage III of clinical classification) hospitalised in Department of Paediatric Oncology, Hematology and Transplantology, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The indirect immunohistochemical assay with the use of monoclonal antibodies directed against VEGF-C and VEGFR-2 was employed. VEGF-C expression was detected within blastemal and hypocellular stromal components of Wilms tumor. On the other hand, immuno-reactivity of VEGFR-2 was established in dysplastic tubules in the closest proximity of VEGF-C positive parts of stromal origin. VEGF-C dependent neovascularisation in Wilms tumor may follow an adequate differentiation of already existing epithelial elements. It may also explain the process of glomeruli-dependent physiological development of kidney and, what is also probable, the phenomenon of neoangiogenesis described in individual childhood nephropathies.

  12. Race disparities in Wilms tumor incidence and biology.

    PubMed

    Axt, Jason; Murphy, Andrew J; Seeley, Erin H; Martin, Colin A; Taylor, Chase; Pierce, Janene; Caprioli, Richard M; Whiteside, Martin; Lovvorn, Harold N

    2011-09-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is thought to arise in children of Black African ancestry with greater frequency than in Whites. To clarify the biological basis for race disparities in WT, we first verified that Black children residing in Tennessee have an increased incidence of WT, and second, established molecular profiles in WT that are specific to race. To assess race disparities in WT epidemiology, the Tennessee Cancer Registry (TCR) was queried for all in-state patients less than 20 y of age and registered between 1999 and 2008. To explore race disparities in WT biology, six Black and four White WT specimens acquired in Tennessee were analyzed using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). TCR data show that Black children are over-represented among WT patients (29%) relative to all other childhood cancers (18.5%; P = 0.01). WT ranked the fifth most common cancer diagnosis among Blacks, but ninth among Whites. The diagnosis of WT occurred 79% more frequently among Blacks (n = 28) than Whites (n = 69; P = 0.01), and proportionally more Blacks tended to present with distant disease. Although overall survival from WT was not statistically different between Blacks (92.9%) and Whites (94.0%), Black males showed the lowest survival (85%; P = 0.21). IMS analysis identified peptide spectra from both WT blastema and stroma that independently classify specimens according to race with greater than 80% accuracy. In Tennessee, Black children appear more susceptible than Whites to develop WT. Race-specific molecular profiles can be determined that may help to clarify pathways of Wilms tumorigenesis and the biological basis for race disparities in WT incidence and biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of pediatric renal tumor: Past and future trials of the Japan Wilms Tumor Study Group.

    PubMed

    Oue, Takaharu; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Koshinaga, Tsugumichi; Okita, Hajime; Nozaki, Miwako; Chin, Motoki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Yukichi; Haruta, Masayuki; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuwajima, Shigeko; Takimoto, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    The Japan Wilms Tumor Study group (JWiTS) was founded in 1996 to improve outcomes for children with renal tumor in Japan, and a nationwide multicenter cooperative study was initiated thereafter. JWiTS-1 (1996-2005) was analyzed, and JWiTS-2 (2005-2014) is now under analysis; the following problems have been identified and used to decide future study protocol: (i) there has been a decline in survival rate for patients with rhabdoid tumor of the kidney (RTK) and new treatment strategies are required; (ii) the survival rate for bilateral Wilms tumors (BWT) has improved, but results for renal preservation are unsatisfactory; (iii) the prognosis of stage IV favorable nephroblastoma is very good, suggesting that the current protocols provide overtreatment, particularly for patients with lung metastasis; and (iv) no effective biological risk factors exist for predicting the outcome of Wilms tumor, and a study of the genetic changes of these tumors is necessary to determine biological markers for use in risk classification. To solve these issues, the development of a new risk classification of pediatric renal tumors is required. In addition, different study protocols should be developed according to the risk-based classification of the patients. Further, a new study protocol for BWT began in 2015, and new study protocols are being prepared for RTK, and for Wilms tumor with lung metastasis. In addition, an analysis of biological markers with regard to risk classification is to be performed. Furthermore, to create new protocols for patients with rare renal tumors, international collaboration with Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology is necessary.

  14. Unusual association of non-anaplastic Wilms tumor and Cornelia de Lange syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Claudia; Apicella, Andrea; Casale, Fiorina; La Manna, Angela; Di Martino, Martina; Di Pinto, Daniela; Indolfi, Cristiana; Perrotta, Silverio

    2016-06-13

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is the prototype for cohesinopathy disorders, which are characterized by defects in chromosome segregation. Kidney malformations, including nephrogenic rests, are common in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Only one post-mortem case report has described an association between Wilms tumor and Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Here, we describe the first case of a living child with both diseases. Non-anaplastic triphasic nephroblastoma was diagnosed in a patient carrying a not yet reported mutation in NIPBL (c.4920 G > A). The patient had the typical facial appearance and intellectual disability associated with Cornelia de Lange syndrome in absence of limb involvement. The child's kidneys were examined by ultrasound at 2 years of age to exclude kidney abnormalities associated with the syndrome. She underwent pre-operative chemotherapy and nephrectomy. Seven months later she was healthy and without residual detectable disease. The previous report of such co-occurrence, together with our report and previous reports of nephrogenic rests, led us to wonder if there may be any causal relationship between these two rare entities. The wingless/integrated (Wnt) pathway, which is implicated in kidney development, is constitutively activated in approximately 15-20 % of all non-anaplastic Wilms tumors. Interestingly, the Wnt pathway was recently found to be perturbed in a zebrafish model of Cornelia de Lange syndrome. Mutations in cohesin complex genes and regulators have also been identified in several types of cancers. On the other hand, there is no clear evidence of an increased risk of cancer in Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and no other similar cases have been published since the fist one reported by Cohen, and this prompts to think Wilms tumor and Cornelia de Lange syndrome occurred together in our patient by chance.

  15. Role for the Wilms tumor gene in genital development?

    PubMed Central

    van Heyningen, V; Bickmore, W A; Seawright, A; Fletcher, J M; Maule, J; Fekete, G; Gessler, M; Bruns, G A; Huerre-Jeanpierre, C; Junien, C

    1990-01-01

    Detailed molecular definition of the WAGR region at chromosome 11p13 has been achieved by chromosome breakpoint analysis and long-range restriction mapping. Here we describe the molecular detection of a cytogenetically invisible 1-megabase deletion in an individual with aniridia, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias but no Wilms tumor (WT). The region of overlap between this deletion and one associated with WT and similar genital anomalies but no aniridia covers a region of 350-400 kilobases, which is coincident with the extent of homozygous deletion detected in tumor tissue from a sporadic WT. A candidate WT gene located within this region has recently been isolated, suggesting nonpenetrance for tumor expression in the first individual. The inclusion within the overlap region of a gene for WT predisposition and a gene for the best-documented WT-associated genitourinary malformations leads us to suggest that both of these anomalies result from a loss-of-function mutation at the same locus. This in turn implies that the WT gene exerts pleiotropic effect on both kidney and genitourinary development, a possibility supported by the observed expression pattern of the WT candidate gene in developing kidney and gonads. Images PMID:1973540

  16. Role for the Wilms tumor gene in genital development

    SciTech Connect

    van Heyningen, V.; Bickmore, W.A.; Seawright, A.; Fletcher, J.M.; Maule, J.; Hastie, N.D. ); Fekete, G. ); Gessler, M.; Bruns, G.A.P. ); Huerre-Jeanpierre, C.; Junien, C. ); Williams, B.R.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Detailed molecular definition of the WAGR region at chromosome 11p13 has been achieved by chromosome breakpoint analysis and long-range restriction mapping. Here the authors describe the molecular detection of a cytogenetically invisible 1-megabase deletion in an individual with aniridia, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias but no Wilms tumor (WT). The region of overlap between this deletion and one associated with WT and similar genital anomalies but no aniridia covers a region of 350-400 kilobases, which is coincident with the extent of homozygous deletion detected in tumor tissue from a sporadic WT. A candidate WT gene located within this region has recently been isolated, suggesting nonpenetrance for tumor expression in the first individual. The inclusion within the overlap region of a gene for WT predisposition and a gene for the best-documented WT-associated genitourinary malformations leads to suggest that both of these anomalies result from a loss-of-function mutation at the same locus. This in turn implies that the WT gene exerts pleiotropic effect on both kidney and genitourinary development, a possibility supported by the observed expression pattern of the WT candidate gene in developing kidney and gonads.

  17. The role of Hispanic ethnicity in pediatric Wilms' tumor survival.

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan

    2013-05-01

    Wilms' tumors (WT) constitute approximately 6-14% of all childhood cancers and about 95% of all pediatric renal malignancies. While prognostic factors for this malignancy are relatively well-defined, few studies have specifically examined the role of Hispanic ethnicity in pediatric WT survival. The purpose of this study was to compare WT survival among non-Hispanic white (NHW), non-Hispanic black (NHB), and Hispanic cases using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. WT cases (ICD-O-3 histological code 8960) under age 20 were isolated from a recent subset of the SEER dataset (1990-2009). Demographics and tumor characteristics were compared by race/ethnicity, and 5- and 10-year survival probabilities were calculated. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to assess the effects of race/ethnicity on WT survival, adjusting for relevant covariates. Hispanic ethnicity was significantly associated with WT-specific mortality hazard, controlling for age, sex, diagnosis/treatment era, laterality, SEER stage, cancer-directed surgery, and radiation therapy (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25). The results of this study suggest that Hispanic pediatric WT cases may have a higher risk of WT-related death, compared to NHW cases. Additional research on racial/ethnic disparities in WT survival is warranted.

  18. Alternative splicing and genomic structure of the Wilms tumor gene WT1

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, D.A. Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown ); Sohn, R.L.; Buckler, A.J.; Pelletier, J.; Call, K.M.; Housman, D.E. )

    1991-11-01

    The chromosome 11p13 Wilms tumor susceptibility gene WT1 appears to play a crucial role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of nephroblasts and gonadal tissue. The WT1 gene consists of 10 exons, encoding a complex pattern of mRNA species: four distinct transcripts are expressed, reflecting the presence or absence of two alternative splices. Splice I consists of a separate exon, encoding 17 amino acids, which is inserted between the proline-rich amino terminus and the zinc finger domains. Splice II arises from the use of an alternative 5{prime} splice junction and results in the insertion of 3 amino acids between zinc fingers 3 and 4. RNase protection analysis demonstrates that the most prevalent splice variant in both human and mouse is that which contains both alternative splices, whereas the least common is the transcript missing both splices. The relative distribution of splice variants is highly conserved between normal fetal kidney tissue and Wilms tumors that have intact WT1 transcripts. The ratio of these different WT1 mRNA species is also maintained as a function of development in the mouse kidney and in various mouse tissues expressing WT1. The conservation in structure and relative levels of each of the four WT1 mRNA species suggest that each encoded polypeptide makes a significant contribution to normal gene function. The control of cellular proliferation and differentiation exerted by the WT1 gene products may involve interactions between four polypeptides with distinct targets and functions.

  19. Breast-feeding and Wilms tumor: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Saddlemire, Stephanie; Olshan, Andrew F; Daniels, Julie L; Breslow, Norman E; Bunin, Greta R; Ross, Julie A

    2006-06-01

    Previous research has shown that breast-feeding offers many nutritional benefits to children including protection against infection and possibly a decreased risk of childhood cancer. We investigated the association between breast-feeding and Wilms tumor, a childhood kidney tumor. We used data from a large case-control study in the United States and Canada. Cases were children under age 16 years who were diagnosed with Wilms tumor from 1999 to 2002 and were participating in the National Wilms Tumor Study. Controls were identified by random-digit dialing and were age and region matched to cases. Mothers of 501 cases and 480 controls provided information on breast-feeding by telephone interviews. Breast-feeding was associated with a reduced risk of Wilms tumor [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.5-0.9]. Longer duration did not provide any additional reduction in risk. When stratified by maternal education, breast-feeding lowered risk among children whose mothers had less than a college education (OR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.8) but not for mothers who had a college degree or more (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.6-1.9). The results of this study are suggestive of an association between breast-feeding and Wilms tumor, but further research is needed to confirm this relationship.

  20. Abdominal irradiation in the treatment of Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, P.N.; Jenkin, R.D.T.

    1980-06-01

    One hundred and fifty-two consecutive children who had Wilms' tumor were treated from 1960 to 1976. This series was analysed to determine the effect of systemic treatment on the incidence of abdominal relapse. Primary treatment included abdominal irradiation in 151 of these patients. Twenty-two patients (14%) had abdominal disease alone or in part at first relapse. For stages I-IV combined, a first abdominal relapse within the irradiated volume occurred in 3/21 patients (14%) who received no systemic treatment; 6/83 patients (7%) who received actinomycin D (AMD) and 1/35 patients (3%) who received AMD and vincristine (VCR). The mean radiation dose, 2400 rad given in 100-125 rad fractions, was essentially constant. Overall two in-field abdominal relapses occurred among 85 patients with stage I or II disease. The optimal radiation dose could not be determined in this retrospective review, but for stages I and II it was not greater than 2400 rad in 24 fractions.

  1. Diffusion-weighted MRI for differentiating Wilms tumor from neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mine; Aslan, Ahmet; Habibi, Hatice Arıöz; Uçar, Ayşe Kalyoncu; Özmen, Evrim; Bakan, Selim; Kuruğoğlu, Sebuh; Adaletli, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Wilms tumor (WT) and neuroblastoma (NB) are the most common pediatric abdominal malignant neoplasms of the kidney and adrenal gland. Differentiating them from each other is essential since their treatments are different. Here, we aimed to show the diffusion characteristics of WT and NB for differentiation. METHODS Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of 17 histopathologically diagnosed lesions (10 NB and 7 WT in 8 female and 9 male patients) was evaluated retrospectively. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value for each tumor was calculated using region-of-interest (ROI) measurements by two observers. The mean ADC values were compared, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed. Intraclass correlation was evaluated for the reliability of ADC measurement. RESULTS The mean ADC values measured by two observers were 0.787±0.09 ×10−3 mm2/s and 0.768±0.08 ×10−3 mm2/s for WT, and 0.524±0.16 ×10−3 mm2/s and 0.529±0.16 ×10−3 mm2/s for NB, respectively (P = 0.006 and P = 0.011). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.955. Utilizing ROC curve analysis, a cutoff ADC value of ≤0.645 ×10−3 mm2/s was obtained to differentiate NB from WT. CONCLUSION ADC values of NBs were significantly lower than WT with a perfect interobserver agreement. We suggest that DWI may have a role in differentiating the two tumors. PMID:28830846

  2. Diffusion-weighted MRI for differentiating Wilms tumor from neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Mine; Aslan, Ahmet; Arıöz Habibi, Hatice; Kalyoncu Uçar, Ayşe; Özmen, Evrim; Bakan, Selim; Kuruğoğlu, Sebuh; Adaletli, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) and neuroblastoma (NB) are the most common pediatric abdominal malignant neoplasms of the kidney and adrenal gland. Differentiating them from each other is essential since their treatments are different. Here, we aimed to show the diffusion characteristics of WT and NB for differentiation. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of 17 histopathologically diagnosed lesions (10 NB and 7 WT in 8 female and 9 male patients) was evaluated retrospectively. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value for each tumor was calculated using region-of-interest (ROI) measurements by two observers. The mean ADC values were compared, and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed. Intraclass correlation was evaluated for the reliability of ADC measurement. The mean ADC values measured by two observers were 0.787±0.09 ×10-3 mm2/s and 0.768±0.08 ×10-3 mm2/s for WT, and 0.524±0.16 ×10-3 mm2/s and 0.529±0.16 ×10-3 mm2/s for NB, respectively (P = 0.006 and P = 0.011). Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.955. Utilizing ROC curve analysis, a cutoff ADC value of ≤0.645 ×10-3 mm2/s was obtained to differentiate NB from WT. ADC values of NBs were significantly lower than WT with a perfect interobserver agreement. We suggest that DWI may have a role in differentiating the two tumors.

  3. CT Pelvis in Children; Should We Routinely Scan Pelvis for Wilms Tumor and Hepatoblastoma? Implications for Imaging Protocol Development.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran; Aslam, Mubashir; Sajjad, Zafar; Abid, Waqas; Youssef, Talaat; Ali, Arif; Fadoo, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma are the most common intra-abdominal solid organ childhood tumors. CT examination is one of the routinely performed procedures in hospitals for children with these tumors inspite of high radiation exposure associated with CT scans. Sixty patients (Wilms tumor = 45, hepatoblastoma = 16) were evaluated retrospectively. Higher proportion (44.4%) of metastatic disease was identified at presentation in the Wilms tumor subset as compared to hepatoblastoma (6.3%) [p=0.006]. Metastatic disease was noted in 6 patients having Wilms tumor on follow-up while it was also low in hepatoblastoma which was noted in only 2 patients (p > 0.05). No significant difference was identified in pelvic extension of disease at presentation in both studied population (p > 0.05). Pelvic metastasis was noted in 1 patient only with Wilms tumor on follow-up while no pelvic metastasis was seen in the hepatoblastoma patients (p-value > 0.05).

  4. The in vitro growth and characterization of the skeletal muscle component of Wilms' tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, A. J.; Surrette, F.; Hintz, D. S.; Rudisill, M. T.; Sens, M. A.; Sens, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Skeletal muscle differentiation within a Wilms' tumor is a well-documented histopathologic entity thought to occur at a relatively low incidence and influence prognosis. A serum-free hormonally defined growth medium has been developed, allowing the long-term growth of the skeletal muscle component of Wilms' tumors. Eight Wilms' tumors have been grown under these conditions. Three cases grew a homogeneous population of cells which ultrastructurally displayed all stages of myogenesis through myotubule formation. They also possessed immunoreactivity for skeletal muscle myosin and myoglobin and synthesized the M and B subunits of creatine kinase. Of interest was the finding that the ability to yield skeletal muscle cultures was limited to those cases which exhibited skeletal muscle fibers in vivo. This technique is also a very sensitive marker for identifying Wilms' tumors possessing a myoid component. A second serum-free hormonally defined medium has also been developed that supports the long-term culture of a unique cell type from Wilms' tumors which contain a myoid component. These cells are spindle-shaped and exhibit all of the characteristics of early myoblasts. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figures 8 and 9 p307-a PMID:2998192

  5. Improved survival for patients with recurrent Wilms tumor: the experience at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Liu, Tiebin; Krasin, Matthew; Lott, Lennie; Shearer, Patricia; Daw, Najat C; Billups, Catherine A; Wilimas, Judith A

    2002-01-01

    Reported estimates of survival for patients with recurrent Wilms tumor are 24% to 43%. Because published survival data are more than a decade old and do not reflect advances in therapy, the authors reviewed their experience in treating recurrent Wilms tumor to determine whether the probability of survival has increased. The authors reviewed the cases of 54 patients with recurrent Wilms tumor who were treated on one of six consecutive clinical trials at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1969 and 2000. Five-year overall survival estimates after relapse were 63.6 +/- 15.7% for patients treated during or after 1984 (n = 20) and 20.6 +/- 6.5% for patients treated before 1984 (n = 34) (P = 0.002). When the analysis was restricted to patients with high-risk clinical features, 5-year overall survival estimates were 47.6 +/- 15.7% for those treated in the modern era (n = 16) and 11.1 +/- 5.2% for those treated in the earlier era (n = 25) (P = 0.005). Only three patients received high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue; one survived. No patients with recurrent anaplastic histology disease survived. Significant progress has been achieved in the treatment of recurrent favorable-histology Wilms tumor using multimodality salvage regimens with conventional doses of chemotherapy. Novel therapeutic strategies will be necessary to cure patients with recurrent anaplastic Wilms tumor.

  6. Cushing syndrome secondary to CRH-producing Wilms tumor in a 6 year old.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon Hee; Cho, Uiju; Lee, Jae-Wook; Cho, Won-Kyoung; Jung, Min Ho; Chung, Nak Gyun; Cho, Bin; Choi, Yeong Jin; Lee, Myung Duk; Suh, Byung-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Cushing syndrome is caused by prolonged exposure to elevated serum cortisol. It is uncommon in children, and etiology includes pituitary adenoma, adrenal tumor, and exogenous glucocorticoid administration. Rarely, it is paraneoplastic in origin. We present a case of paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome due to Wilms tumor that secreted corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). A 6-year-old male presented with polyphagia and weight gain. He showed Cushingoid appearance, hypertension, and palpable left flank mass. Serum cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were elevated. Computed tomography showed a neoplasm originating from the left kidney. Pathologic diagnosis of Wilms tumor was made upon nephroureterectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CRH and negative for ACTH. All features of Cushing syndrome disappeared after surgery. This represents a rare case of Cushing syndrome secondary to Wilms tumor in which CRH production has been demonstrated.

  7. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the kidney mimicking Wilms tumor: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rogério Cardoso; Medeiros Filho, Plínio; Chioato, Lucimara; Silva, Tácio R B; Ribeiro, Sérgio M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-12-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare, aggressive, malignant neoplasm usually present with the widespread abdominal serosal involvement and affects mainly adolescents and young adults. When presenting within visceral organs, as kidney, the diagnosis of DSRCT imposes significant difficulties. We present a case of primary DSRCT of the kidney in a 10-year-old boy mimicking clinically and pathologically Wilms tumor. The tumor showed morphologic and immunohistochemical features of DSRCT and the presence of the Ewing sarcoma and Wilm tumor 1 fusion transcripts resulting from the t(11;22) (p13;q12) reciprocal translocation. DSRCT should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Wilm tumor and other small blue-round cell tumors of the kidney.

  8. SIX2 Effects on Wilms Tumor Biology1

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Janene; Murphy, Andrew J.; Panzer, Alexis; de Caestecker, Christian; Ayers, Gregory D.; Neblett, David; Saito-Diaz, Kenyi; de Caestecker, Mark; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2014-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) blastema retains gene expression profiles characteristic of the multipotent nephron progenitor pool, or cap mesenchyme (CM), in the developing kidney. As a result, WT blastema and the CM are believed to represent contextual analogues of one another. Sine oculis homeobox 2 (SIX2) is a transcription factor expressed specifically in the CM, provides a critical mechanism for CM self-renewal, and remains persistently active in WT blastema, although its purpose in this childhood malignancy remains unclear. We hypothesized that SIX2, analogous to its function in development, confers a survival pathway to blastema, the putative WT stem cell. To test its functional significance in WT biology, wild-type SIX2 was overexpressed in the human WT cell line, WiT49. After validating this model, SIX2 effects on anchorage-independent growth, proliferation, invasiveness, canonical WNT pathway signaling, and gene expression of specific WNT pathway participants were evaluated. Relative to controls, WiT49 cells overexpressing SIX2 showed significantly enhanced anchorage-independent growth and early-passage proliferation representing surrogates of cell survival. Interestingly, overexpression of SIX2 generally repressed TCF/LEF-dependent canonical WNT signaling, which activates and coordinates both differentiation and stem pathways, but significantly heightened canonical WNT signaling through the survivin promoter, a mechanism that exclusively maintains the stem state. In summary, when overexpressed in a human WT cell line, SIX2 enhances cell survival and appears to shift the balance in WNT/β-catenin signaling away from a differentiation path and toward a stem cell survival path. PMID:25500091

  9. Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene expression in rat decidual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Rauscher, F J; Bondy, C

    1993-09-01

    The Wilm's tumor suppressor gene (WT1) encodes a zinc-finger containing transcription factor that is selectively expressed in the developing urogenital tract, where it is thought to play a role in the differentiation of these tissues. We have used immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization to study WT1 expression in the rat uterus during normal development and pregnancy from 0 to 20 days post coitum (p.c.). WT1 mRNA was abundant in uterine stroma from juvenile rats, but was much less abundant in uterine tissue from sexually mature rats; WT1 expression is not affected by ovariectomy or by treatment with estradiol or estradiol plus progesterone. WT1 gene was highly expressed, however, in the endometrial cells of early pregnancy. On day 6 p.c. WT1 mRNA was detected in anti-mesometrial decidual cells, and WT1 immunoreactivity was concentrated in the nuclei of these cells. All cells of fully-developed deciduoma at 7-8 days p.c. demonstrated WT1 expression. WT1 was not detected in trophoblast/placental tissues but remained abundant in the decidua basalis until parturition. The expression of WT1 was compared with insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) and its receptor in the decidual since it has been shown that IGF-II gene transcription is repressed by WT1 in vitro. However, no spatiotemporal correlation in the expression of these three genes was found in differentiation of the rat decidua. In summary, these data suggest a role for WT1 in decidualization, since its expression is activated during the differentiation of uterine stromal cells into decidual cells.

  10. [Laparoscopic nephron-sparing surgery for Wilms tumor: description of two cases].

    PubMed

    López, L; Copete, M; Villamizar, P

    2016-01-25

    Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for Wilms tumor. The research progress of the large study groups worldwide has reduced mortality. However, searching to minimize morbidity, the minimally invasive approach has been applied in selected patients. This article describes two cases of Wilms tumor managed with laparoscopic nephron sparing surgery. The case 1 with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and bilateral disease, and the case 2 non-syndromic unilateral. The approach was intraperitoneally, without intraoperative complications. The follow-up to 18 months (case 1) and six months (case 2) did not have recurrence or metastatic disease.

  11. Allelotyping in Wilms tumors identifies a putative third tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, P.; Benedetti, V.D.; Mondini, P.

    1995-06-10

    An analysis of loss of heterozygosity for markers on both the short and the long arm of chromosome 11 was performed in 24 sporadic Wilms tumors. Six cases (25%) showed allelic losses involving the entire chromosome. In one case (4%) the loss was restricted solely to the WT1 gene on band p13. Two cases (8%) displayed allelic losses for WT1 and for markers on band p15.5, where the putative tumor suppressor gene WT2 has been mapped, but retained heterozygosity for markers on the long arm. In three tumors (13%) the loss of heterozygosity involved markers mapped to chromosomal regions p15.5 and q23.3-qter, but did not affect WT1 and markers on q12-q13. Altogether, the proportion of cases showing allelic losses at the distal region of 11q (37%) was comparable to that of cases with LOH affecting the WT1 (37%) or the WT2 (46%) loci, thus suggesting the existence of a third chromosome 11 tumor suppressor gene involved in the pathogenesis of Wilms tumors. 51 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Tumor size and prognosis in patients with Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    Provenzi, Valentina Oliveira; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Roehe, Adriana Vial; dos Santos, Pedro Paulo Albino; Faulhaber, Fabrízia Rennó Sodero; de Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the relationship of the tumor volume after preoperative chemotherapy (TVAPQ) and before preoperative chemotherapy (TVBPQ) with overall survival at two and at five years, and lifetime. METHODS: Our sample consisted of consecutive patients evaluated in the period from 1989 to 2009 in an Onco-Hematology Service. Clinical, histological and volumetric data were collected from the medical records. For analysis, chi-square, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank and Cox regression tests were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 32 patients, 53.1% were male with a median age at diagnosis of 43 months. There was a significant association between TVAPQ>500mL and the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ (p=0.015) and histologic types of risk (p=0.008). It was also verified an association between the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ and the predominant stromal tumor (p=0.037). When assessing the TVAPQ of all patients, without a cutoff, there was an association of the variable with lifetime (p=0.013), i.e., for each increase of 10mL in TVAPQ there was an average increase of 2% in the risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results indicate that the TVAPQ could be considered alone as a predictor of poor prognosis regardless of the cutoff suggested in the literature, more studies are needed to replace the histology and staging by tumor size as best prognostic variable. PMID:25623730

  13. Follow-up of Wilms tumor: comparison of CT with other imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Randel, S.B.; Gould, R.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a retrospective review, computed tomography (CT) was compared to a ''routine'' combination of other diagnostic imaging procedures used for follow-up evaluations of 13 children being treated for Wilms tumor. The examined variables were diagnostic accuracy, expense, and duration of examination. Results from 13 patients indicated that CT most accurately answers diagnostic queries pertinent to follow-up evaluation of Wilms tumors: the presence and extent of bilateral renal tumors, local recurrence, contralateral renal hypertrophy, and metastasis to liver or lungs. For diagnosing pulmonary metastases, CT was superior to conventional chest radiography both in sensitivity (4/4 vs. 2/4) and specificity (9/9 vs. 6/9). In depiction of liver metastases, CT (3/3) was superior to liver scintigraphy (2/3). The extent of bilateral Wilms tumors was better defined by CT than by urography. In no instances were the alternative diagnostic imaging studies found to be more accurate than CT for the detection of recurrent tumor. Average cost for a CT examination ($344) is considerably less than the cost for a routine combination of the other imaging studies ($594). Examination time and diagnostic radiation doses are also reduced using CT. Pending larger comparison studies, CT is recommended as the primary diagnostic method for follow-up evaluation of patients with Wilms tumor.

  14. FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies of Wilms' tumor.

    PubMed

    Moinul Hossain, A K M; Shulkin, Barry L; Gelfand, Michael J; Bashir, Humayun; Daw, Najat C; Sharp, Susan E; Nadel, Helen R; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the utility of FDG PET/CT scanning in patients with Wilms' tumors. A total of 58 scans were performed in 27 patients (14 male, 13 female; ages: 1.9-23 years, median: 7 years) with proven Wilms' tumor. Twenty-six patients (56 scans) were studied at the time of suspected relapse, progressive disease, persistent disease, or for monitoring of therapy. In the 27 patients with Wilms' tumor, 34 scans showed areas of abnormal uptake consistent with metabolically active tumors. Of the patients, 8 (24 scans) had pulmonary metastases larger than 10 mm in diameter, 10 (12 scans) had hepatic metastases, 11 (11 scans) had regional nodal involvement, 3 (3 scans) had bone metastases, 1 (1 scan) had chest wall involvement, 2 (2 scans) had pancreatic metastasis, and 5 (5 scans) had abdominal and pelvic soft tissue involvement. Two of eight patients with lung metastases had variable uptakes. Lung lesions 10 mm or smaller were not consistently visualized on PET scans. One patient with a liver metastasis showed no uptake on PET scan after treatment (size decreased from 45 to 15 mm). Most Wilms' tumors concentrate FDG. However, small pulmonary metastases may be better visualized with CT. FDG PET/CT appears useful for defining the extent of involvement and assessing the response to treatment.

  15. K-Ras, H-Ras, N-Ras and B-Raf mutation and expression analysis in Wilms tumors: association with tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Dalpa, Efterpi; Gourvas, Victor; Soulitzis, Nikolaos; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-01-01

    Nephroblastoma (Wilms tumor) is a kidney neoplasia, predominately occurring at very young age, resulting from the malignant transformation of renal stem cells. The Ras proto-oncogenes and B-Raf are members of an intracellular cascade pathway, which regulates cell growth and differentiation, and ultimately cancer development. Our objective was to determine the mutation rate and to measure the mRNA levels of the three Ras genes and of B-Raf in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 32 patients with nephroblastoma and 10 controls. No mutations were detected in the four studied genes among our Wilms tumors cases, while Ras and B-Raf expression was higher in malignant samples versus controls. Statistical analysis revealed a positive correlation of K-Ras (p < 0.001) and B-Raf (p = 0.006) with tumor size, a negative correlation of K-Ras (p = 0.041) and H-Ras (p = 0.033) with the percentage of tissue necrosis, and an association of N-Ras (p = 0.047) and B-Raf (p = 0.044) with tissue histology. From the above, we deduce that although Ras and B-Raf mutations are rare events in Wilms tumors, their expression pattern suggests that they play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy.

  16. Familial occurrence of Wilms' tumor: nephroblastoma in one of monozygous twins and in another sibling.

    PubMed Central

    Juberg, R C; St Martin, E C; Hundley, J R

    1975-01-01

    We report the occurrence of pathologically documented Wilm's tumor in a 24-month-old male twin and just 9 months later in his 12-month-old male sibling. We considered the twins to be monozygotic because of their phenotypic similarities, the probability computed from analysis of blood groups, and the comparison of their dermatoglphics. There were no other persons in the kindred with either tumor or associated malformations, and the parents were not consanguineous. Because of the frequency of Wilm's tumor, the few instances of demonstrated occurrence in siblings seem insufficient to postulate monogenic determination. Concordance in monozygotic twins has simply not been proven. The monozygotic unaffected twin of our first patient has remained without evidence of tumor to 5 years, and, as long as he remains so, he appears to represent an exception to the hypothesis of the mutagenic origin of this childhood tumor. PMID:164771

  17. Familial occurrence of Wilms' tumor: nephroblastoma in one of monozygous twins and in another sibling.

    PubMed

    Juberg, R C; St Martin, E C; Hundley, J R

    1975-03-01

    We report the occurrence of pathologically documented Wilm's tumor in a 24-month-old male twin and just 9 months later in his 12-month-old male sibling. We considered the twins to be monozygotic because of their phenotypic similarities, the probability computed from analysis of blood groups, and the comparison of their dermatoglphics. There were no other persons in the kindred with either tumor or associated malformations, and the parents were not consanguineous. Because of the frequency of Wilm's tumor, the few instances of demonstrated occurrence in siblings seem insufficient to postulate monogenic determination. Concordance in monozygotic twins has simply not been proven. The monozygotic unaffected twin of our first patient has remained without evidence of tumor to 5 years, and, as long as he remains so, he appears to represent an exception to the hypothesis of the mutagenic origin of this childhood tumor.

  18. Intra-Tumor Genetic Heterogeneity in Wilms Tumor: Clonal Evolution and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, George D; Apps, John R; Chagtai, Tasnim; Mifsud, Borbala; Bentley, Christopher C; Maschietto, Mariana; Popov, Sergey D; Weeks, Mark E; Olsen, Øystein E; Sebire, Neil J; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Williams, Richard D; Mifsud, William

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of pediatric solid tumors is poorly understood. There is conflicting evidence of intra-tumor genetic homogeneity vs. heterogeneity (ITGH) in a small number of studies in pediatric solid tumors. A number of copy number aberrations (CNA) are proposed as prognostic biomarkers to stratify patients, for example 1q+ in Wilms tumor (WT); current clinical trials use only one sample per tumor to profile this genetic biomarker. We multisampled 20 WT cases and assessed genome-wide allele-specific CNA and loss of heterozygosity, and inferred tumor evolution, using Illumina CytoSNP12v2.1 arrays, a custom analysis pipeline, and the MEDICC algorithm. We found remarkable diversity of ITGH and evolutionary trajectories in WT. 1q+ is heterogeneous in the majority of tumors with this change, with variable evolutionary timing. We estimate that at least three samples per tumor are needed to detect >95% of cases with 1q+. In contrast, somatic 11p15 LOH is uniformly an early event in WT development. We find evidence of two separate tumor origins in unilateral disease with divergent histology, and in bilateral WT. We also show subclonal changes related to differential response to chemotherapy. Rational trial design to include biomarkers in risk stratification requires tumor multisampling and reliable delineation of ITGH and tumor evolution.

  19. Morphology and growth characteristics of epithelial cells from classic Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen-Martin, D. J.; Garvin, A. J.; Gansler, T.; Tarnowski, B. I.; Sens, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The ability to establish cell cultures representing the epithelial component of Wilms' tumor was determined for 18 cases of classic Wilms' tumors. From these 18 cases only two resulted in the culture of epithelial cells. Although the tumors from both cases were composed of a prominent epithelial component, other classic tumors not producing epithelial cell cultures also possessed appreciable epithelial components. Likewise, heterotransplants of these two primary tumors failed to give rise to epithelial cell cultures, although cultures of the blastemal element were produced. This suggests that Wilms' tumors may be prone to differentiate in different directions at varying times during tumor growth, possibly dependent on local tumor environment. Epithelial cells from these two classic cases were grown in culture in basal medium composed of a 1:1 mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and Ham's F-12 medium, supplemented with selenium, insulin, transferrin, hydrocortisone, tri-iodothyronine, and epidermal growth factor, on a collagen type I matrix with absorbed fetal calf serum proteins. One of the two cases also required the addition of bovine pituitary extract, ethanolamine, prostaglandin E1, and putrescine for optimum growth. Morphological analysis disclosed that the cultured cells were very similar to normal renal tubular cells in culture, except that the cells displayed little evidence for differentiated active ion transport and tended to grow in a multilayered arrangement. The culture of the epithelial cells from classic Wilms' tumors provides a model system for the study of tumor differentiation and progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8384407

  20. Immunohistochemical Expression of Ki67 and p53 in Wilms Tumor and Its Relationship with Tumor Histology and Stage at Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, O. H. Radhika; Kayla, Geetha; Abdul Aleem, Mohammed; Malleboyina, Ramani; Reddy Kota, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Evaluate tumor proliferation marker (Ki67) and p53 tumor suppressor marker in Wilms tumor and correlate with histology, anaplasia, and staging. Design. Prospective, hospital based study conducted at a tertiary pediatric referral centre in south India. Setting. Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal malignancy worldwide. Anaplasia on histology is associated with treatment resistance but not with aggressiveness clinical presentation. Chemotherapy for Wilms tumor is based on histology and staging. Most patients respond to current chemotherapy protocol. However, a small fraction relapses or metastasizes. Affordable prognostic markers are needed for histopathological evaluation of this tumor. Subjects. Cases of histologically confirmed Wilms tumor over five years. Cases after chemotherapy were excluded as the immunostaining was inconsistent in necrotic areas. Methods. The clinical and radiological findings of 31 cases of Wilms tumor were documented at a tertiary pediatric referral hospital over five years. In addition to Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, Ki67 proliferation index and p53 expression were correlated with tumor histology and staging. Results. Age incidence was 3–8 years with female preponderance. Significant correlation was noted between Ki67 proliferation index and tumor staging. p53 expression was not useful in stratification of Wilms tumor. Conclusion. Ki67 was cost-effective immunohistochemical marker for prognostication of pediatric Wilms tumor. PMID:26904359

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of Ki67 and p53 in Wilms Tumor and Its Relationship with Tumor Histology and Stage at Presentation.

    PubMed

    Krishna, O H Radhika; Kayla, Geetha; Abdul Aleem, Mohammed; Malleboyina, Ramani; Reddy Kota, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Evaluate tumor proliferation marker (Ki67) and p53 tumor suppressor marker in Wilms tumor and correlate with histology, anaplasia, and staging. Design. Prospective, hospital based study conducted at a tertiary pediatric referral centre in south India. Setting. Wilms tumor is the most common childhood renal malignancy worldwide. Anaplasia on histology is associated with treatment resistance but not with aggressiveness clinical presentation. Chemotherapy for Wilms tumor is based on histology and staging. Most patients respond to current chemotherapy protocol. However, a small fraction relapses or metastasizes. Affordable prognostic markers are needed for histopathological evaluation of this tumor. Subjects. Cases of histologically confirmed Wilms tumor over five years. Cases after chemotherapy were excluded as the immunostaining was inconsistent in necrotic areas. Methods. The clinical and radiological findings of 31 cases of Wilms tumor were documented at a tertiary pediatric referral hospital over five years. In addition to Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, Ki67 proliferation index and p53 expression were correlated with tumor histology and staging. Results. Age incidence was 3-8 years with female preponderance. Significant correlation was noted between Ki67 proliferation index and tumor staging. p53 expression was not useful in stratification of Wilms tumor. Conclusion. Ki67 was cost-effective immunohistochemical marker for prognostication of pediatric Wilms tumor.

  2. Introduction of a normal human chromosome 11 into a Wilm's tumor cell line controls its tumorigenic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, B.E.; Saxon, P.J.; Pasquale, S.R.; Jones, G.R.; Geiser, A.G.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1987-04-10

    The development of Wilm's tumor, a pediatric nephroblastoma, has been associated with a deletion in the p13 region of chromosome 11. The structure and function or functions of this deleted genetic material are unknown. The role of this deletion in the process of malignant transformation was investigated by introducing a normal human chromosome 11 into a Wilms' tumor cell line by means of the microcell transfer technique. These variant cells, derived by microcell hybridization, expressed similar transformed traits in culture as the parental cell line. Furthermore, expression of several proto-oncogenes by the parental cells was unaffected by the introduction of this chromosome. However, the ability of these cells to form tumors in nude mice was completely suppressed. Transfer of other chromosomes, namely X and 13, had no effect on the tumorigenicity of the Wilms' tumor cells. These studies provide support for the existence of genetic information on chromosome 11 which can control the malignant expression of Wilm's tumor cells.

  3. Wilms tumor: Successes and challenges in management outside of cooperative clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Rabeh, Wissam; Akel, Samir; Eid, Toufic; Muwakkit, Samar; Abboud, Miguel; El Solh, Hassan; Saab, Raya

    2016-03-01

    Management of Wilms tumor (WT) in children depends on a multidisciplinary approach to treatment, and outcomes have significantly improved as reported by cooperative group clinical trials. Here, we review the clinical outcomes of patients with WT and identify challenges and barriers encountered in multidisciplinary management outside of cooperative clinical trials. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 35 children with WT treated between April 2002 and June 2013 at the Children's Cancer Institute in Lebanon. Upfront resection was performed in 23 cases. Biopsies were performed for Stage V tumors (n=4), those with unresectable tumors or inferior vena caval thrombus (n=5), and patients who had partial surgery performed elsewhere prior to presentation (n=2). One patient died due to toxicity prior to surgery. The tumor was Stage I in eight patients, Stage II in five patients, Stages III and IV in nine patients each, and bilateral (Stage V) in four patients. Adherence to The National Wilms Tumor Study-5 recommendations was adequate. At the time of analysis, 30 patients were free of disease and four patients had relapse-all having metastatic disease initially. The National Wilms Tumor Study-5 therapy resulted in favorable outcomes in children with nonmetastatic Wilms tumor in the setting of a multidisciplinary approach to therapy and resolution of financial barriers to medical care. Upstaging due to prior intervention and lung radiation therapy to all those with computed tomography-detected lung nodules may both have resulted in overtreatment of a subset of patients. Finally, the relatively high incidence of bilateral tumors suggests the need for further genetic and molecular studies in this patient population. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in a Patient With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Erin P; Mo, Jun; Yoon, Janet M

    2015-11-01

    Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is most commonly associated with malignancy, infection, or an underlying autoimmune disorder. Malignancy-associated hemophagocytic syndrome is responsible for most secondary HLH cases, but it has not been well described in children. We present a case of a 4-year-old female with favorable histology of Wilms tumor who developed secondary HLH after unsuccessful resection of the tumor and initiation of chemotherapy.

  5. A Children's Oncology Group and TARGET initiative exploring the genetic landscape of Wilms tumor. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    We performed genome-wide sequencing and analyzed mRNA and miRNA expression, DNA copy number, and DNA methylation in 117 Wilms tumors, followed by targeted sequencing of 651 Wilms tumors. In addition to genes previously implicated in Wilms tumors (WT1, CTNNB1, AMER1, DROSHA, DGCR8, XPO5, DICER1, SIX1, SIX2, MLLT1, MYCN, and TP53), we identified mutations in genes not previously recognized as recurrently involved in Wilms tumors, the most frequent being BCOR, BCORL1, NONO, MAX, COL6A3, ASXL1, MAP3K4, and ARID1A.

  6. Gain of MYCN region in a Wilms tumor-derived xenotransplanted cell line.

    PubMed

    Noguera, Rosa; Villamón, Eva; Berbegall, Ana; Machado, Isidro; Giner, Francisco; Tadeo, Irene; Navarro, Samuel; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    Wilms tumor is one of the most common pediatric malignant tumors of the kidney. Although the WT1 gene, located at 11p13, has been proven to be implicated in the development of Wilms tumor, other genes such as MYCN are also involved. The purpose of this study is to genetically characterize a Wilms tumor metastasis xenotransplanted in nude mice. Immunogenotype evolution of the xenografts material was monitored for 29 months using molecular techniques, fluorescent in situ hybridization and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, in addition to immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays. Genetic alterations present in the original tumor and retained in the xenotransplanted tumor were located in +1q, +3, +6, -7p, +7q, +8, -9p, +9q, +12. The multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification detected a nondeleted status of genes located close to WT genes, except for a deletion of the EGFR gene (located at 7p11.2) and the GHRHR gene (located at 7p15), both flanking the WT5 gene. The MYCN gene (2p24 exon 3) and DDX1 gene (2p24 exons 2, 7, 15, and 24) were gained in passage 4 and the following passages. MYCN expression was positive from the beginning, without evidence of MYCN gain by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Histopathologic and growth rate changes were observed at those passages where low extra copy number of MYCN was present. In addition to other genetic abnormalities, the WT5 gene located at 7p13-14 is deleted and the MYCN gene gain began after 16 months in vivo evolution in athymic nude mice. MYCN is already used as a stratifying marker in neuroblastomas, and it may be also useful in implementing MYCN testing in prospective studies of Wilms tumors.

  7. Wilms tumor arising in a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    El-Kares, Reyhan; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Blumenkrantz, Miriam; Iglesias, Diana; Ma, Kim; Jabado, Nada; Bichet, Daniel G; Goodyer, Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report on a child with X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) who developed Wilms tumor (WT). Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by mutations of the arginine vasopressin receptor (AVPR2) or aquaporin-II (AQP2) genes. Wilms tumor is also genetically heterogeneous and is associated with mutations of WT1 (15-20%), WTX (20-30%) and other loci. The boy presented at 5 months with failure to thrive, polyuria, hypernatremia and abdominal mass. Analysis of leukocyte DNA showed a novel missense mutation (Q174H) of the AVPR2 gene, which was not present in his mother. In cells (WitS) isolated from the tumor, WTX mRNA expression and coding sequence were intact. However, we identified a 44-kb homozygous deletion of the WT1 gene spanning exons 4 to 10. The WT1 deletion was not present in leukocyte DNA from the patient or his mother. We also noted strong beta-catenin (CTNNB1) expression in the tumor cells and identified a heterozygote missense Ser45Cys mutation of exon 3 of CTNNB1. However, the mutation was absent both in the constitutional DNA of the patient and his mother. The concurrence of WT and NDI has not been previously reported and may be unrelated. Nevertheless, this case nicely illustrates the sequence of events leading to sporadic Wilms tumor.

  8. Radiation therapy for favorable histology Wilms tumor: Prevention of flank recurrence did not improve survival on National Wilms Tumor Studies 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, Norman E. . E-mail: norm@u.washington.edu; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Haase, Gerald M.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Thomas, Patrick; D'Angio, Giulio J.; Green, Daniel M.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) of patients with Wilms tumor of favorable histology prevented flank recurrence and thereby improved the survival outcomes. Methods and Materials: Recurrence and mortality risks were compared among groups of patients with Stage I-IV/favorable histology Wilms tumor enrolled in the third (n = 1,640) and fourth (n = 2,066) National Wilms Tumor Study Group studies. Results: Proportions of patients with flank recurrence were 0 of 513 = 0.0% for 20 Gy, 12 of 805 = 1.5% for 10 Gy, and 44 of 2,388 = 1.8% for no flank RT (p trend 0.001 adjusted for stage and doxorubicin); for intra-abdominal (including flank) recurrence they were 5 of 513 = 1.0%, 30 of 805 = 3.7%, and 58 of 2,388 = 2.4%, respectively (p trend = 0.02 adjusted). Survival percentages at 8 years after intra-abdominal recurrence were 0 of 5 = 0% for 20 Gy, 10 of 30 = 33% for 10 Gy, and 34 of 58 = 56% for no RT (p trend = 0.0001). NWTS-4 discontinued use of 20 Gy RT, and the 8-year flank recurrence risk increased to 2.1% from 1.0% on NWTS-3 (p = 0.013). However, event-free survival was unaltered (88% vs. 86%, p = 0.39), and overall survival was better (93.8% vs. 90.8%, p = 0.036) on NWTS-4. Conclusions: Partly because of lower postrecurrence mortality among nonirradiated patients, prevention of flank recurrence by RT did not improve survival. It is important to evaluate entire treatment policies with regard to long-term outcomes.

  9. DNA recognition by splicing variants of the Wilms' tumor suppressor, WT1.

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, I A; Rupprecht, H D; Rohwer-Nutter, P; Lopez-Guisa, J M; Madden, S L; Rauscher, F J; Sukhatme, V P

    1994-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor, WT1, is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator which exists as multiple forms owing to alternative mRNA splicing. The most abundant splicing variants contain a nine-nucleotide insertion encoding lysine, threonine, and serine (KTS) in the H-C link region between the third and fourth WT1 zinc fingers which disrupts binding to a previously defined WT1-EGR1 binding site. We have identified WT1[+KTS] binding sites in the insulin-like growth factor II gene and show that WT1[+KTS] represses transcription from the insulin-like growth factor II P3 promoter. The highest affinity WT1[+KTS] DNA binding sites included nucleotide contacts involving all four WT1 zinc fingers. We also found that different subsets of three WT1 zinc fingers could bind to distinct DNA recognition elements. A tumor-associated, WT1 finger 3 deletion mutant was shown to bind to juxtaposed nucleotide triplets for the remaining zinc fingers 1, 2, and 4. The characterization of novel WT1 DNA recognition elements adds a new level of complexity to the potential gene regulatory activity of WT1. The results also present the possibility that altered DNA recognition by the dominant WT1 zinc finger 3 deletion mutant may contribute to tumorigenesis. Images PMID:8196623

  10. Topotecan is active against Wilms' tumor: results of a multi-institutional phase II study.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Monika L; Stewart, Clinton F; Freeman, Burgess B; Billups, Catherine A; Hoffer, Fredric A; Wu, Jianrong; Coppes, Max J; Grant, Ronald; Chintagumpala, Murali; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Alvarado, Carlos; Daw, Najat C; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2007-07-20

    A phase II study was conducted to evaluate the activity and safety of topotecan in pediatric patients with recurrent Wilms' tumor. Patients with favorable histology Wilms' tumor (FHWT) and recurrence after at least one salvage chemotherapy regimen or with anaplastic histology Wilms' tumor (AHWT) in first or subsequent recurrence were eligible. Patients were stratified according to histology, with statistical considerations based on the FHWT stratum. Topotecan was administered intravenously over 30 minutes for 5 days on 2 consecutive weeks. Treatment dosages were adjusted to achieve a target area under the curve (AUC) of 80 +/- 10 ng/mL*h. Tumor responses were measured after two cycles of treatment. Thirty-seven patients (26 patients with FHWT) were enrolled and received a total of 94 cycles of topotecan (range, one to six cycles). The median topotecan dosage required to achieve the target AUC was 1.8 mg/m2 (range, 0.7 to 3.2 mg/m2). Of 25 assessable patients with FHWT, 12 had partial response (PR), six had stable disease (SD), and seven had progressive disease (PD), for an overall response rate of 48% (95% CI, 27.8% to 68.7%). Of 11 assessable patients with AHWT, two had PR, one had SD, and eight had PD. The main toxicities were grade 3 and 4 neutropenia (median duration, 13 days) and thrombocytopenia (median duration, 7.5 days). Topotecan administered on a protracted schedule is active against recurrent FHWT. Inclusion of topotecan in front-line clinical trials for patients with recurrent Wilms' tumor should be considered.

  11. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  12. Wilms' tumor and novel TRIM37 mutations in an Australian patient with mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, R H; Mowat, D; Gabbett, M T; O'brien, T A; Kallijärvi, J; Lehesjoki, A-E

    2006-12-01

    Mulibrey nanism is a rare autosomal recessive growth disorder with prenatal onset, including occasional progressive cardiopathy, characteristic facial features, failure of sexual maturation, insulin resistance with type 2 diabetes, and an increased risk for Wilms' tumor. Mulibrey nanism is prevalent in the Finnish population and appears extremely rare elsewhere. However, cases outside of Finland may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed as having the 3-M or Silver-Russell syndrome, two important differential diagnostic disorders. Here, we report the first Australian patient with mulibrey nanism, in whom the occurrence of Wilms' tumor suggested the correct diagnosis. This was confirmed by the identification of two novel mutations in tripartite motif protein 37 (TRIM37) encoding a RING finger ubiquitin E3 ligase. Both mutations, the p.Cys109Ser B-box missense mutation and the p.Glu271_Ser287del in-frame deletion in the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor (TRAF) domain alter the subcellular localization of TRIM37. As both the B-box and the TRAF domains are predicted to be important for mediating the protein-protein interactions, these mutations may help the understanding of the cellular interactions of TRIM37. Our findings imply the importance of early molecular diagnostics in cases of suspected mulibrey nanism and of identifying novel mutations with potential relevance for unraveling the underlying molecular pathology. Ultrasound surveillance for Wilms' tumor is recommended for children with mulibrey nanism.

  13. Genomic characterization of Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 targets in nephron progenitor cells during kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Sunny; Ho, Jacqueline; Pandey, Priyanka; MacIsaac, Kenzie; Taglienti, Mary; Xiang, Michael; Alterovitz, Gil; Ramoni, Marco; Fraenkel, Ernest; Kreidberg, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) gene encodes a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in nephron progenitor differentiation during renal development. To identify WT1 target genes that might regulate nephron progenitor differentiation in vivo, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled to mouse promoter microarray (ChIP-chip) using chromatin prepared from embryonic mouse kidney tissue. We identified 1663 genes bound by WT1, 86% of which contain a previously identified, conserved, high-affinity WT1 binding site. To investigate functional interactions between WT1 and candidate target genes in nephron progenitors, we used a novel, modified WT1 morpholino loss-of-function model in embryonic mouse kidney explants to knock down WT1 expression in nephron progenitors ex vivo. Low doses of WT1 morpholino resulted in reduced WT1 target gene expression specifically in nephron progenitors, whereas high doses of WT1 morpholino arrested kidney explant development and were associated with increased nephron progenitor cell apoptosis, reminiscent of the phenotype observed in Wt1−/− embryos. Collectively, our results provide a comprehensive description of endogenous WT1 target genes in nephron progenitor cells in vivo, as well as insights into the transcriptional signaling networks controlled by WT1 that might direct nephron progenitor fate during renal development. PMID:20215353

  14. Out on a LIM: chronic kidney disease, podocyte phenotype and the Wilm's tumor interacting protein (WTIP).

    PubMed

    Sedor, John R; Madhavan, Sethu M; Kim, Jane H; Konieczkowski, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Normal function of the glomerular filtration barrier requires wild-type differentiation of the highly specialized glomerular epithelial cell, the podocyte. Podocytes express three distinct domains, consisting of a cell body, primary processes, and secondary foot processes (FP). These FP express slit diaphragms, which are highly specialized cell-cell contacts critical for filtration-barrier function. Foot processes are dynamic structures that reorganize within minutes through actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. Glomerular diseases are characterized by a persistent simplification in podocyte domain structure with loss of FP, a phenotype described as FP effacement. The generation of such phenotypic plasticity requires that signaling pathways in subcellular compartments be integrated dynamically for a cell to respond appropriately to information flow from its microenvironment. We have identified a LIM-domain-containing protein, Wilm's tumor interacting protein (WTIP), that regulates podocyte actin dynamics to maintain stable cell contacts. After glomerular injury, the WTIP molecule shuttles to the podocyte nucleus in response to changes in slit-diaphragm assembly, and changes gene transcription to permit podocyte remodeling. Defining regulatory pathways of podocyte differentiation identifies novel, druggable targets for chronic kidney diseases characterized by glomerular scarring.

  15. Transcriptional activation of the syndecan-1 promoter by the Wilms' tumor protein WT1.

    PubMed

    Cook, D M; Hinkes, M T; Bernfield, M; Rauscher, F J

    1996-10-17

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene (wt1) encodes a zinc finger DNA binding protein (WT1) which functions as a transcriptional regulator and is essential for normal urogenital development. WTI has previously been shown to repress the transcription of a variety of target genes whose products stimulate growth, such as growth factors, growth factor receptors and other transcription factors. In this study, we identify syndecan-1 as a target gene for WT1-mediated activation. Syndecan-1 is a cell surface proteoglycan whose induction is coincident with epithelial differentiation during kidney development and whose loss of expression is correlated with the loss of the epithelial phenotype and malignant transformation. The murine syndecan-1 promoter contains several potential binding sites for WT1. We demonstrate that both WT1 (-KTS) and WT1 (+KTS) isoforms bind to multiple sites in this highly G + C-rich region, as detected by gel-shift analyses. These WT1 isoforms function as transcriptional activators of syndecan-1 expression in transient transfection assays. Activation of syndecan-1 by WT1 is dependent on an intact zinc-finger region as well as a 179 amino acid proline-rich region in the amino terminus of the protein. Moreover, the endogenous syndecan-1 gene is activated by WT1 in a novel inducible cell line based upon the sheep metallothionein promoter. These results highlight an emerging role for WT1 as an activator of genes like syndecan-1 which may potentiate epithelial differentiation and maintenance in the developing kidney.

  16. Genomic characterization of Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 targets in nephron progenitor cells during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, Sunny; Ho, Jacqueline; Pandey, Priyanka; Macisaac, Kenzie; Taglienti, Mary; Xiang, Michael; Alterovitz, Gil; Ramoni, Marco; Fraenkel, Ernest; Kreidberg, Jordan A

    2010-04-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) gene encodes a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in nephron progenitor differentiation during renal development. To identify WT1 target genes that might regulate nephron progenitor differentiation in vivo, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled to mouse promoter microarray (ChIP-chip) using chromatin prepared from embryonic mouse kidney tissue. We identified 1663 genes bound by WT1, 86% of which contain a previously identified, conserved, high-affinity WT1 binding site. To investigate functional interactions between WT1 and candidate target genes in nephron progenitors, we used a novel, modified WT1 morpholino loss-of-function model in embryonic mouse kidney explants to knock down WT1 expression in nephron progenitors ex vivo. Low doses of WT1 morpholino resulted in reduced WT1 target gene expression specifically in nephron progenitors, whereas high doses of WT1 morpholino arrested kidney explant development and were associated with increased nephron progenitor cell apoptosis, reminiscent of the phenotype observed in Wt1(-/-) embryos. Collectively, our results provide a comprehensive description of endogenous WT1 target genes in nephron progenitor cells in vivo, as well as insights into the transcriptional signaling networks controlled by WT1 that might direct nephron progenitor fate during renal development.

  17. Maturation of pulmonary metastases of Wilms' tumor after therapy: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Shimmoto, K.; Ushigome, S.; Nikaido, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamazaki, Y. )

    1991-04-01

    A case is reported of Wilms' tumor associated with multiple pulmonary metastases histologically showing maturation of the tumor cells at 9 years after the resection of the primary tumor and intensive therapy. A huge tumor of a 22-month-old patient's right kidney was resected. The tumor was diagnosed as Wilms' tumor of mesenchymal type (stage 1), which consisted of predominantly immature mesenchymal tissue including rhabdomyoblasts, smooth muscle and fibrous tissue, and few blastemal and epithelial components. Intensive preoperative and postoperative chemotherapy with actinomycin D and vincristine and postoperative irradiation therapy totaling 16 Gy were carried out. The patient was regularly followed up uneventfully until 9 years after the surgery. On routine chest x ray at the age of 10 years 11 months, multiple pulmonary nodules were found. The excised nodules from the bilateral lungs disclosed similar histology, exclusively composed of dense collagen bundles and fibrocytes intermingled with mature striated muscle bundles. No immature tumor components were detected. The possible effect of intensive therapy in this maturation was stressed, although spontaneous benign differentiation of tumor cells cannot be excluded.

  18. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  19. Synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor: a report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Paolo; Jenkner, Alessandro; Terenziani, Monica; Crocoli, Alessandro; Serra, Annalisa; Collini, Paola; Biasoni, Davide; Gandola, Lorenza; Bisogno, Gianni; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Di Martino, Martina; D'Angelo, Paolo; Bianchi, Maurizio; Conte, Massimo; Inserra, Alessandro; Pession, Andrea; Spreafico, Filippo

    2013-04-15

    The optimal management of bilateral Wilms tumor (BWT) is challenging, and their survival is lower than for unilateral tumors. This report discusses a large series of BWTs treated in Italy in the last 2 decades. This analysis concerns patients with synchronous BWT registered at Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) centers between 1990 and 2011; details on their treatment and outcome are presented and discussed. Ninety BWTs were registered in the AIEOP Wilms tumor database. Preoperative chemotherapy was given for a median 12 weeks before definitive tumor resection was attempted. Forty-eight percent of the patients had preservation of bilateral renal parenchyma. The proportion of bilateral nephron-sparing surgeries was not higher in the 37 patients initially given doxorubicin/vincristine/actinomycin D (32%) than in the 43 children receiving vincristine/actinomycin D alone (58%). The 4-year disease-free survival rate was 66.5% ± 5% and overall survival was 80% ± 5% for the cohort as a whole. The 4-year disease-free survival (overall survival) for 18 children with diffuse anaplasia or postchemotherapy blastemal-type tumors was 51% ± 13% (62% ± 13%), as opposed to 72% ± 3% (88% ± 4%) for 68 children with a favorable histology (log-rank P = .04 [P = .007]). These results provide further evidence that the optimal duration and choice of drugs for preoperative chemotherapy remain an open question. Outcome remained significantly worse for BWT than for unilateral Wilms tumor. To enable the conservative treatment of as many affected kidneys as possible, only centers with experience in BWT should manage such cases. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  20. Array CGH Analysis of Paired Blood and Tumor Samples from Patients with Sporadic Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Crespo, María; Vallespín, Elena; Palomares-Bralo, María; Martin-Arenas, Rubén; Rueda-Arenas, Inmaculada; Silvestre de Faria, Paulo Antonio; García-Miguel, Purificación; Lapunzina, Pablo; Regla Vargas, Fernando; Seuanez, Hector N.; Martínez-Glez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT), the most common cancer of the kidney in infants and children, has a complex etiology that is still poorly understood. Identification of genomic copy number variants (CNV) in tumor genomes provides a better understanding of cancer development which may be useful for diagnosis and therapeutic targets. In paired blood and tumor DNA samples from 14 patients with sporadic WT, analyzed by aCGH, 22% of chromosome abnormalities were novel. All constitutional alterations identified in blood were segmental (in 28.6% of patients) and were also present in the paired tumor samples. Two segmental gains (2p21 and 20q13.3) and one loss (19q13.31) present in blood had not been previously described in WT. We also describe, for the first time, a small, constitutive partial gain of 3p22.1 comprising 2 exons of CTNNB1, a gene associated to WT. Among somatic alterations, novel structural chromosomal abnormalities were found, like gain of 19p13.3 and 20p12.3, and losses of 2p16.1-p15, 4q32.5-q35.1, 4q35.2-q28.1 and 19p13.3. Candidate genes included in these regions might be constitutively (SIX3, SALL4) or somatically (NEK1, PIAS4, BMP2) operational in the development and progression of WT. To our knowledge this is the first report of CNV in paired blood and tumor samples in sporadic WT. PMID:26317783

  1. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination combined with temozolomide against newly diagnosed glioblastoma: safety and impact on immunological response.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoya; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Kagawa, Naoki; Chiba, Yasuyoshi; Izumoto, Shuichi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Kijima, Noriyuki; Oka, Yoshihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Morita, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Junichi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Hosen, Naoki; Oji, Yusuke; Arita, Norio; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the safety of combined Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination and temozolomide treatment of glioblastoma, a phase I clinical trial was designed. Seven patients with histological diagnosis of glioblastoma underwent concurrent radiotherapy and temozolomide therapy. Patients first received Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination 1 week after the end of combined concurrent radio/temozolomide therapy, and administration was continued once per week for 7 weeks. Temozolomide maintenance was started and performed for up to 24 cycles, and the observation period for safety encompassed 6 weeks from the first administration of maintenance temozolomide. All patients showed good tolerability during the observation period. Skin disorders, such as grade 1/2 injection-site reactions, were observed in all seven patients. Although grade 3 lymphocytopenia potentially due to concurrent radio/temozolomide therapy was observed in five patients (71.4 %), no other grade 3/4 hematological or neurological toxicities were observed. No autoimmune reactions were observed. All patients are still alive, and six are on Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination without progression, yielding a progression-free survival from histological diagnosis of 5.2-49.1 months. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination was stopped in one patient after 12 injections by the patient's request. The safety profile of the combined Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination and temozolomide therapy approach for treating glioblastoma was confirmed.

  2. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX Homeodomain Mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Amy L.; Ooms, Ariadne; Gadd, Samantha; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Smith, Malcolm A.; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Chen, Qing-Rong; Hsu, Chih Hao; Yan, Chunhua; Nguyen, Cu; Hu, Ying; Bowlby, Reanne; Brooks, Denise; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Schein, Jacqueline; Marra, Marco A.; Huff, Vicki; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Jafari, Nadereh; Ross, Nicole; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the most common single nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumors (FHWT) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPG) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations. Significantly decreased expression of mature Let-7a and the miR-200 family (responsible for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition) in miRNAPG-mutant tumors is associated with an undifferentiated blastemal histology. The combination of SIX and miRNAPG mutations in the same tumor is associated with evidence of RAS activation and a higher rate of relapse and death. PMID:25670082

  3. Wilms' tumor. January 1978-November 1980 (Citations from the Information Retrieval, Ltd. data base). Report for January 1978-November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning Wilm's tumor, the second most frequent malignant disease in children. The prognosis depends upon the stage of the tumor; therefore, early diagnosis is critical. This bibliography discusses diagnosis, treatment and the complications resulting from treatment. Specific case histories are cited. (Contains 74 citations, fully indexed and including a table of contents.)

  4. Increased expression of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene, IGF1R, in Wilms tumor is correlated with modulation of IGF1R promoter activity by the WT1 Wilms tumor gene product.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Re, G G; Drummond, I A; Sukhatme, V P; Rauscher, F J; Sens, D A; Garvin, A J; LeRoith, D; Roberts, C T

    1993-06-15

    Wilms tumor is a pediatric neoplasm that arises from the metanephric blastema. The expression of the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is often elevated in these tumors. Since many of the actions of IGF-II are mediated through activation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), we have measured the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in normal kidney and in Wilms tumor samples using solution hybridization/RNase protection assays. IGF-IR mRNA levels in the tumors were 5.8-fold higher than in adjacent normal kidney tissue. Among the tumors themselves, the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in those containing heterologous stromal elements were 2-fold higher (P < 0.01) than in tumors without these elements. IGF-IR gene (designated IGF1R) expression in the tumors was inversely correlated with the expression of the Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1, whose inactivation appears to be a key step in the etiology of Wilms tumor. Cotransfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with rat and human IGF-IR gene promoter constructs driving luciferase reporter genes and with WT1 expression vectors showed that the active WT1 gene product represses IGF-IR promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that underexpression, deletion, or mutation of WT1 may result in increased expression of the IGF-IR, whose activation by IGF-II may be an important aspect of the biology of Wilms tumor.

  5. Increased expression of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene, IGF1R, in Wilms tumor is correlated with modulation of IGF1R promoter activity by the WT1 Wilms tumor gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Re, G G; Drummond, I A; Sukhatme, V P; Rauscher, F J; Sens, D A; Garvin, A J; LeRoith, D; Roberts, C T

    1993-01-01

    Wilms tumor is a pediatric neoplasm that arises from the metanephric blastema. The expression of the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) is often elevated in these tumors. Since many of the actions of IGF-II are mediated through activation of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), we have measured the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in normal kidney and in Wilms tumor samples using solution hybridization/RNase protection assays. IGF-IR mRNA levels in the tumors were 5.8-fold higher than in adjacent normal kidney tissue. Among the tumors themselves, the levels of IGF-IR mRNA in those containing heterologous stromal elements were 2-fold higher (P < 0.01) than in tumors without these elements. IGF-IR gene (designated IGF1R) expression in the tumors was inversely correlated with the expression of the Wilms tumor suppressor gene WT1, whose inactivation appears to be a key step in the etiology of Wilms tumor. Cotransfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with rat and human IGF-IR gene promoter constructs driving luciferase reporter genes and with WT1 expression vectors showed that the active WT1 gene product represses IGF-IR promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that underexpression, deletion, or mutation of WT1 may result in increased expression of the IGF-IR, whose activation by IGF-II may be an important aspect of the biology of Wilms tumor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8390684

  6. Is routine pelvic surveillance imaging necessary in patients with Wilms tumor?

    PubMed

    Kaste, Sue C; Brady, Samuel L; Yee, Brian; McPherson, Valerie J; Kaufman, Robert A; Billups, Catherine A; Daw, Najat C; Pappo, Alberto S

    2013-01-01

    It is unclear whether routine pelvic imaging is needed in patients with Wilms tumor. Thus, the primary objective of the current study was to examine the role of routine pelvic computed tomography (CT) in a cohort of pediatric patients with Wilms tumor. With institutional review board approval, the authors retrospectively identified 110 patients who had Wilms tumor diagnosed between January 1999 and December 2009 with surveillance imaging that continued through March 2011. The authors estimated overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and dosimetry from dose length product (DLP) conversion to the effective dose (ED) for every CT in a subgroup of 80 patients who had CT studies obtained using contemporary scanners (2002-2011). Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were placed within organs of anthropomorphic phantoms to directly calculate the truncal ED. ED(DLP) was correlated with ED(MOSFET) to calculate potential pelvic dose savings. Eighty patients underwent 605 CT examinations that contained DLP information, including 352 CT scans of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis; 123 CT scans of the chest and abdomen; 102 CT scans of the chest only; 18 CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis; 9 CT scans of the abdomen only; and 1 CT that was limited to the pelvis. The respective 5-year OS and EFS estimates were 92.8% ± 3% and 2.6% ± 4.3%. Sixteen of 110 patients (15%) developed a relapse a median of 11.3 months (range, 5.0 months to 7.3 years) after diagnosis, and 4 patients died of disease recurrence. Three patients developed pelvic relapses, all 3 of which were symptomatic. The estimated ED savings from sex-neutral CT surveillance performed at a 120-kilovolt peak without pelvic imaging was calculated as 30.5% for the average patient aged 1 year, 30.4% for the average patient aged 5 years, 39.4% for the average patient aged 10 years, and 44.9% for the average patient aged 15 years. Omitting pelvic CT from the routine, off-therapy follow

  7. Compensatory renal growth and function in postnephrectomized patients with Wilms tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.D.; Reid, C.F.; Richard, G.A.; Talbert, J.L.; Rogers, B.M.

    1982-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether or not renal growth and function were adversely affected in the remaining kidneys of patients who had undergone nephrectomy for Wilms tumor. These patients received chemotherapy and some radiotherapy (tumoricidal agents which might affect the remaining kidney). Renal growth was compared between the treatment groups and normal renal growth. Hypertrophy did occur and did not appear to be affected by subsequent treatment. Renal function was minimally altered in all treatment groups irrespective of the type of treatment.

  8. Clonal expansion to anaplasia in Wilms` tumors is associated with p53 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, J.; Beckwith, B.; Bardeesy, N. |

    1994-09-01

    The genetics of Wilms` tumor (WT), a pediatric malignancy of the kidney, is complex. Three loci are implicated in WT initiation and include the WT1 tumor suppressor gene (residing at 11p13), an 11p15 locus, and a non-11p locus. As well, allelic loss at 16q24 in {approximately}20% of sporadic WTs suggests the location of (an) additional gene(s) involved in tumor progression. Initiation and progression in WTs is associated with multiple histological variants. Anaplasia is a rare WT subtype associated with poor prognosis and defined by enlarged and multipolar mitotic figures, a threefold nuclear enlargement (compared with adjacent nuclei of the same cell type), and hyperchromasia of the enlarged nuclei. We have previously demonstrated that p53 gene mutations are exclusively associated with anaplastic WTs, being absent from a large number of non-anaplastic WTs analyzed. To determine if such mutations are involved in clonal progression to anaplasia, we performed a retrospective analysis of histologically defined sections from tumor specimens. Six of ten WTs demonstrated p53 mutations by PCR-single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis. Two of these samples were paired, consisting of geographically demarcated anaplastic cells embedded within a non-anaplastic tumor bed. In these cases, p53 mutations were only present in the anaplastic region of the tumor. An overall decrease in the number of apoptotic cells was found associated with the anaplastic tumor region, compared to adjacent non-anaplastic tumor bed. These results indicate that p53 mutations arise during progression to anaplasia late in Wilms` tumor etiology and are associated with a more aggressive form of this cancer.

  9. Prechemotherapy robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical nephrectomy for an adolescent with Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Cost, Nicholas G; Liss, Zachary J; Bean, Christopher M; Geller, James I; Minevich, Eugene A; Noh, Paul H

    2015-03-01

    Although Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common pediatric renal tumor, adolescent and adult WT is rare. Nevertheless, adolescent renal tumors as a group are sufficiently uncommon that WT must be included in the differential diagnosis for such patients, and in doing so affects the oncologic considerations of the surgery. Herein, we describe a 14-year-old female presenting with a 1-month history of right flank pain. Subsequent work-up revealed a localized, centrally located, enhancing right renal mass. The patient underwent robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical nephrectomy and pathology demonstrated stage II, favorable histology WT. Herein, we will discuss the pertinent details regarding adolescents with renal tumors and the risks and benefits of using a minimally invasive surgical approach.

  10. Use of nephron sparing surgery and impact on survival in children with Wilms tumor: a SEER analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsin-Hsiao S; Abern, Michael R; Cost, Nicholas G; Chu, David I; Ross, Sherry S; Wiener, John S; Routh, Jonathan C

    2014-10-01

    Nephron sparing surgery is the standard of care for many adults with renal tumors and has been described in some children with Wilms tumor. However, beyond case series the data concerning nephron sparing surgery application and outcomes in patients with Wilms tumor are scarce. We examined nephron sparing surgery outcomes and factors associated with its application in children with Wilms tumor. We retrospectively reviewed the 1998 to 2010 SEER database. We identified patients 18 years old or younger with Wilms tumor. Clinical, demographic and socioeconomic data were abstracted, and statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression (predicting use of nephron sparing surgery limited to unilateral tumors smaller than 15 cm) and Cox regression (predicting overall survival) models. We identified 876 boys and 956 girls with Wilms tumor (mean ± SD age 3.3 ± 2.9 years). Of these patients 114 (6.2%) underwent nephron sparing surgery (unilateral Wilms tumor in 74 and bilateral in 37). Median followup was 7.1 years. Regarding procedure choice, nephron sparing surgery was associated with unknown lymph node status (Nx vs N0, p <0.001) and smaller tumor size (p <0.001). Regarding survival, only age (HR 1.09, p = 0.002), race (HR 2.48, p = 0.002), stage (HR 2.99, p <0.001) and lymph node status (HR 2.17, p = 0.001) predicted decreased overall survival. Survival was not significantly different between children undergoing nephron sparing surgery and radical nephrectomy (HR 0.79, p = 0.58). In children with Wilms tumor included in the SEER database nephron sparing surgery has been infrequently performed. Nephron sparing surgery application is associated with smaller, bilateral tumors and with omission of lymphadenectomy. However, there are no evident differences in application of nephron sparing surgery based on demographic or socioeconomic factors. Despite lymph node under staging, overall survival is similar between patients undergoing nephron sparing

  11. Clinical factors in relapses of Wilms' tumor--results for the Polish Pediatric Solid Tumors Study Group.

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Bronowicki, Krzysztof; Pietras, Wojciech; Sawicz-Birkowska, Krystyna; Trybucka, Katarzyna; Rąpała, Małgorzata; Karpińska-Derda, Irena; Kurylak, Andrzej; Marciniak-Stępak, Patrycja; Panasiuk, Anna; Nurzyńska-Flak, Joanna; Peregud-Pogorzelski, Jarosław; Pietrys, Danuta; Rurańska, Iwona; Sobol, Grażyna; Stefanowicz, Joanna; Szymik-Kantorowicz, Sabina; Zubowska, Małgorzata; Godziński, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors responsible for recurrences of Wilms' tumor (nephroblastoma) are still under discussion. The aim of the study was to analyze the relationship between relapses of Wilms' tumor and the patients' clinical history. Clinical data from children registered in the Polish Pediatric Solid Tumors Study Group were analyzed. The clinical stages (CS), pathology variants (high risk: HR, intermediate risk: INT, and low risk: LOW) and chemotherapy regimens were correlated with the outcomes. Recurrences developed in 34 out of 288 (11.8%) patients with Wilms' tumor treated in accordance with International Society for Pediatric Oncology 2001 (SIOP 2001) protocols. Of these 34 patients, 11 initially had CS I, seven were at CS II, four were at CS III, 11 were at CS IV and one had CS V. There were eight patients with second recurrences; of these, seven were in the INT risk group and one in the high histological risk group. There was no correlation between age (p=0.256) or gender (p=0.538) and the risk of tumor recurrence. In the study group, seven out of 10 patients with local recurrences are alive; as are 13 out of 22 patients with distant recurrences (p=0.703). Those who died due to disease progression comprised six out of 26 patients with a first recurrence (four HR, two INT), and seven out of eight with a second recurrence (one HR, six INT). The prognosis after relapse in initially metastatic patients did not differ from that in patients who had primarily localized disease. The pathology variants probably had more significance.

  12. Intraoperative Spillage of Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Cells: Influence of Irradiation and Chemotherapy Regimens on Abdominal Recurrence. A Report From the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Li, Sierra M.; Breslow, Norman E.; Beckwith, J. Bruce; Ritchey, Michael L.; Shamberger, Robert C.; Haase, Gerald M.; Thomas, Patrick R.M.; Grundy, Paul; Green, Daniel M.; D'Angio, Giulio J.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: We undertook this study to determine (1) the frequency with which spilled tumor cells of favorable histology produced intra-abdominal disease in patients treated with differing chemotherapy regimens and abdominal radiation therapy (RT) and (2) the patterns of relapse and outcomes in such patients. Methods and Materials: The influence of RT dose (0, 10, and 20 Gy), RT fields (flank, whole abdomen), and chemotherapy with dactinomycin and vincristine (2 drugs) vs. added doxorubicin (three drugs) on intra-abdominal tumor recurrence rates was analyzed by logistic regression in 450 patients. Each patient was considered at risk for two types of failure: flank and subdiaphragmatic beyond-flank recurrence, with the correlation between the two outcomes accounted for in the analyses. Results: The crude odds ratio for the risk of recurrence relative to no RT was 0.35 (0.15-0.78) for 10Gy and 0.08 (0.01-0.58) for 20Gy. The odds ratio for the risk of recurrence for doxorubicin to two drugs after adjusting for RT was not significant. For Stage II patients (NWTS-4), the 8-year event rates with and without spillage, respectively, were 79% and 87% for relapse-free survival (p = 0.07) and 90% and 95% for overall survival (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Irradiation (10 Gy or 20 Gy) reduced abdominal tumor recurrence rates after tumor spillage. Tumor spillage in Stage II patients reduced relapse-free survival and overall survival, but only the latter was of statistical significance. These data provide a basis for assessing the risks vs. benefits when considering treatment for children with favorable histology Wilms tumor and surgical spillage.

  13. Late orthopedic effects in children with Wilms' tumor treated with abdominal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rate, W.R.; Butler, M.S.; Robertson, W.W. Jr.; D'Angio, G.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1984, 31 children with biopsy-proven Wilms' tumor received nephrectomy, chemotherapy, and abdominal irradiation and were followed beyond skeletal maturity. Three patients (10%) developed late orthopedic abnormalities requiring intervention. Ten children received orthovoltage irradiation, and all cases requiring orthopedic intervention or developing a scoliotic curve of greater than 20 degrees were confined to this group, for a complication frequency of 50%. Those children who developed a significant late orthopedic abnormality (SLOA) as defined were treated to a higher median dose (2,890 cGy) and a larger field size (150 cm2) than those who did not (2,580 cGy and 120 cm2). Age at irradiation, sex, and initial stage of disease did not appear to influence the risk of developing an SLOA. No child who received megavoltage irradiation developed an SLOA despite treatment up to 4,000 cGy or to field sizes of 400 cm2. We conclude that modern radiotherapy techniques rarely lead to significant late orthopedic abnormalities previously associated with abdominal irradiation in children with Wilms' tumor.

  14. Surgical management of Wilms tumor with intravascular extension: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Aspiazu, Diego; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Cabello, Rosa; Ramirez, Gema; Alvarez-Madrid, Antonio; De Agustin, Juan Carlos

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the clinical presentation, treatment, and outcomes of children with Wilms tumor (WT) and intravascular extension who were treated at a single institution. A retrospective review was conducted of medical records of all children with Wilms tumor and intravascular extension treated at Virgen del Rocio Children's Hospital between 1992 and 2010. Seven patients (median age 3.4 years, range 2-8.1 years) were identified. At diagnosis, 6 of the 7 patients (85.7%) presented with tumor thrombus that reached the right atrium (RA) and 1 patient with infrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus. All patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (SIOP 2001 protocol) with vincristine, doxorubicin, and actinomycin D. Regression of the intravascular extension of the tumor was documented in all patients. Postchemotherapy level of extension was suprahepatic IVC in 1 patient, infrahepatic IVC in 2 patients, renal vein (RV) in 1 patient, and RA in 3 patients. Nephrectomy and thrombectomy were performed in all cases, requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for the 4 patients who presented with suprahepatic IVC and RA thrombus. The other 3 patients with infrahepatic IVC and RV involvement underwent cavotomy and thrombus extraction. Computed tomography, ultrasonography, and echocardiography were used for diagnosis and follow-up. All patients remain disease-free with a median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2-19 years). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for WT with intravascular extension may facilitate the resection by decreasing the extent of the tumor thrombus. Cardiopulmonary bypass is indicated for suprahepatic IVC and RA involvement. Accurate diagnostic imaging is necessary.

  15. [Expression of regulatory T cells and natural killer T cells in peripheral blood of children with Wilms tumor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Lin, Tao

    2016-12-01

    To study the changes and clinical significance of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells (Treg) and CD3(+)CD16(+)CD56(+) natural killer T cells (NKT) in peripheral blood of children with Wilms tumor. Twenty-one children with Wilms tumor were enrolled as the case group, and twenty-one healthy children for physical examinations were enrolled as the control group. Flow cytometry was used to detect the levels of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) T cells and CD3(+)CD16(+)CD56(+) T cells in peripheral blood of two groups. The level of Treg cells in peripheral blood of the case group was significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05). The level of NKT cells in peripheral blood of the case group was significantly higher than in the control group (p<0.05). Treg cells and NKT cells play important roles in the occurrence and development of Wilms tumor. Treg cells and NKT cells may be useful indexes for evaluating immunological function in children with Wilms tumor.

  16. Platelet dysfunction associated with Wilms tumor and hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Bracey, A W; Wu, A H; Aceves, J; Chow, T; Carlile, S; Hoots, W K

    1987-03-01

    Acquired von Willebrand disease (AVWD) has been described in two cases of nephroblastoma. We studied a patient with nephroblastoma who presented with a coagulopathy suggestive of AVWD. The subject had undetectable levels of F.VIIIR:Ag, diminished F.VIIIR:WF (16.3%), F.VIII:C activity (37%), and lack of platelet aggregation to ADP, epinephrine, collagen, and arachidonic acid. These results were associated with abnormally high serum levels (850 mg/dl) of hyaluronic acid (HA), which made the patient's serum hyperviscous. Examination of the neoplasm revealed HA in the tumor matrix. All abnormalities of coagulation resolved after chemotherapy and extirpation of the neoplasm, which produced normal serum HA levels. To study the effects of HA on platelet function, we added HA to normal platelet-poor plasma (NPP), which rendered F.VIIIR:Ag undetectable; treatment of HA with hyaluronidase eliminated F.VIIIR:Ag assay interference caused by HA. F.VIII:C activity decreased in vitro when HA was mixed with normal platelet-poor plasma (NPP). HA reduced the initial slope of normal platelet aggregation. Partial correction of platelet aggregation occurred after hyaluronidase treatment of HA-spiked PRP. Experiments in rabbits exposed to HA (serum level 400 mg/dl) demonstrated abnormalities similar to those noted in the patient. Shear rate studies of whole blood containing HA (500 mg/dl) yielded high shear stress, 27-136 dynes/cm2 over shear rates of 10-216 sec-1. We conclude that the coagulopathy demonstrated in this case is secondary to hyperviscosity produced by elevated levels of HA, which interferes with the assay for F.VIIIR:Ag. Thus the acquired coagulopathy associated with other cases of nephroblastoma may present as spurious von Willebrand disease.

  17. Radionuclide angiography: as diagnostic method for Wilms' tumor with direct extension into the heart.

    PubMed

    Avila Ramírez, E; Martínez Guerra, G

    1982-01-01

    Radioisotope angiography may be used as an initial study in Wilms' tumor. We report a patient who had a total nephrectomy but then had severe cardiovascular complications. These led to open heart surgery and removal of a tumor lodged in the right atrium. Radioisotope angiography, performed two weeks earlier, showed a "cold" image on the anterior wall of the right ventricle. This finding was later confirmed by other studies and finally at the time of a second operation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the different methods employed in this case, to emphasize the risks attributed to each, and finally to suggest the use of non-invasive studies such as radioisotope angiography as a practical method of study in infancy.

  18. Molecular analysis of chromosome 11 deletions in aniridia-Wilms tumor syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    van Heyningen, V; Boyd, P A; Seawright, A; Fletcher, J M; Fantes, J A; Buckton, K E; Spowart, G; Porteous, D J; Hill, R E; Newton, M S

    1985-01-01

    We describe five individuals who have constitutional deletions of the short arm of one chromosome 11, including all or part of the band p13. All of these individuals suffer from aniridia; two have had a Wilms tumor removed. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from these and in three cases constructed somatic cell hybrids containing the deleted chromosome 11. Analysis of DNA from the cell lines and hybrids with a cloned cDNA probe has shown that the catalase gene is deleted in four of five patients. The catalase locus must be proximal to the Wilms and aniridia-related loci. We have not detected a deletion of the beta-globin or calcitonin genes in any of these individuals; we conclude these genes are likely to be outside the region 11p12-11p15.4. In addition, we have used monoclonal antibodies in fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to measure expression in the hybrids of two cell surface markers encoded by genes that map to the short arm of chromosome 11. The genes for both of these are deleted in two individuals but are present in the individual with the smallest deletion. Images PMID:3001710

  19. Development of oral cancer vaccine using recombinant Bifidobacterium displaying Wilms' tumor 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Oda, Tsugumi; Saito, Hiroki; Araki, Ayame; Gonoi, Reina; Shigemura, Katsumi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Katayama, Takane; Fujisawa, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-06-01

    Several types of vaccine-delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been developed in basic and clinical research. Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1), identified as a gene responsible for pediatric renal neoplasm, is one of the most promising TAA for cancer immunotherapy. Peptide and dendritic cell-based WT1 cancer vaccines showed some therapeutic efficacy in clinical and pre-clinical studies but as yet no oral WT1 vaccine can be administrated in a simple and easy way. In the present study, we constructed a novel oral cancer vaccine using a recombinant Bifidobacterium longum displaying WT1 protein. B. longum 420 was orally administered into mice inoculated with WT1-expressing tumor cells for 4 weeks to examine anti-tumor effects. To analyze the WT1-specific cellular immune responses to oral B. longum 420, mice splenocytes were isolated and cytokine production and cytotoxic activities were determined. Oral administrations of B. longum 420 significantly inhibited WT1-expressing tumor growth and prolonged survival in mice. Immunohistochemical study and immunological assays revealed that B. longum 420 substantially induced tumor infiltration of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells, systemic WT1-specific cytokine production, and cytotoxic activity mediated by WT1-epitope specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, with no apparent adverse effects. Our novel oral cancer vaccine safely induced WT1-specific cellular immunity via activation of the gut mucosal immune system and achieved therapeutic efficacy with several practical advantages over existing non-oral vaccines.

  20. Fine structure analysis of the WT1 gene in sporadic Wilms tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, R.; Bardeesy, N.; Ghahremani, M.; Pelletier, J.; Petruzzi, M.-J.; Nowak, N.; Shows, T.B.; Adam, M.A.; Grundy, P.

    1994-04-26

    Molecular genetic studies indicate that the etiology of Wilms tumor (WT) is complex, involving at least three loci. Germ-line mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, WT1, have been documented in children with WTs and urogenital developmental anomalies. Sporadic tumors constitute the majority (>90%) of WT cases and previous molecular analyses of the WT1 gene have focused only on the DNA-binding domain. Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) assay, the authors analyzed the structural integrity of the entire WT1 gene in 98 sporadic WTs. By PCR-SSCP they find that mutations in the WT1 gene are rare, occurring in only six tumors analyzed. In one sample, two independent intragenic mutations inactivated both WT1 alleles, providing a singular example of two different somatic alterations restricted to the WT1 gene. This case is consistent with the existence of only one tumor suppressor gene at 11p13 involved in the pathogenesis of WTs. The data, together with the previously ascertained occurrence of large deletions/insertions in WT1, define the frequency at which the WT1 gene is altered in sporadic tumors. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the ultrasound schedule. Blood work and a physical exam may be required to check for adverse effects of the treatment. For kids who relapse (the cancer returns), prognosis and treatment depend on their prior therapy, the cancer's histology, and how long it's been ...

  2. Screening and identification of post-traumatic stress-related serum factors in children with Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Hu, Qian; Guo, Fei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, D A; Yang, Heying; Yu, Jiekai; Niu, Lili; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Shu; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2016-02-01

    Wilms' tumors are one of the most common malignant, solid intra-abdominal tumors observed in children. Although potential tumor markers have been found, inflammatory cytokines interfere with the process of specific protein identification. The present study was undertaken to identify post-traumatic stress-related factors of Wilms' tumors and to verify the accuracy of early-stage tumor-specific serum protein markers. Serum samples were screened for differentially-expressed proteins using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Potential markers were isolated and purified using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and SDS-PAGE. Following enzymatic digestion of the protein samples, the peptide fragments were detected with high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The obtained peptide mass fingerprint was searched in the Swiss-Prot protein sequence database via the Mascot search engine. Differentially-expressed proteins were verified using western blot analysis. Differentially-expressed proteins with a mass/charge of 5,816 were screened out using SELDI-TOF-MS, and significant differences between the tumor and control groups, and the trauma and control groups were observed. Target proteins were isolated and purified using SPE and SDS-PAGE. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) was found to be differentially expressed. In the serum of children with Wilms' tumors, there was an increase in the level of the post-traumatic stress-related inflammatory factor, Trx1, as compared with the normal control group. Thus, the results of this study indicate that Trx1 presents a potential post-traumatic stress-related factor of Wilms' tumors.

  3. Laparoscopic nephron-sparing resection of synchronous Wilms tumors in a case of hyperplasticperilobarnephroblastomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Rauth, Thomas P.; Slone, Jeremy; Crane, Gabriella; Correa, Hernan; Friedman, Debra L.; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse hyperplasticperilobarnephroblastomatosis (DHPLN) is a rare precursor lesion of Wilms tumor (WT). Because of the increased risk to develop WT in either kidney, current management algorithms of DHPLN meritnephron-sparing strategies, beginning with chemotherapy and close radiographic monitoring into late childhood. After resolution of DHPLN, subsequent detection of a renal nodule mandates resection to exclude WT. Here, we report the case of a 4 year-old girl who developed two synchronous nodules in the right kidney more than two years after completion of therapy for DHPLN. Because of the early detection and peripheral location of these two nodules, laparoscopic nephron-sparing resection of each was performed using ultrasonic dissection. Both nodules were determined on pathology to be favorable histology WT with negative surgical margins. The child was placed onvincristine and actinomycin-D therapy for 18 weeks. PMID:21616266

  4. The Perlman syndrome: familial renal dysplasia with Wilms tumor, fetal gigantism and multiple congenital anomalies. 1984.

    PubMed

    Neri, Giovanni; Martini-Neri, Maria Enrica; Katz, Ben E; Opitz, John M

    2013-11-01

    The ensuing paper by Professor Giovanni Neri and colleagues was originally published in 1984, American Journal of Medical Genetics 19:195–207. The original article described a new family with a condition that the authors designated as the Perlman syndrome. This disorder, while uncommon, is an important multiple congenital anomaly and dysplasia syndrome; the causative gene was recently identified. This paper is a seminal work and is graciously republished by Wiley-Blackwell in the Special Festschrift issue honoring Professor Neri. We describe a familial syndrome of renal dysplasia, Wilms tumor, hyperplasia of the endocrine pancreas, fetal gigantism, multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. This condition was previously described by Perlman et al. [1973, 1975] and we propose to call it the "Perlman syndrome." It appears to be transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. The possible relationships between dysplasia, neoplasia and malformation are discussed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Molecular cloning of canine Wilms' tumor 1 for immunohistochemical analysis in canine tissues.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Osamu; Sakurai, Masashi; Sakai, Hiroki; Kubo, Masahito; Hiraoka, Hiroko; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Mizuno, Takuya

    2017-07-28

    Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) expression has been investigated in various human cancers as a target molecule for cancer immunotherapy. However, few studies have focused on WT1 expression in dogs. Firstly, cDNA of canine WT1 (cWT1) was molecularly cloned from normal canine kidney. The cross-reactivity of the anti-human WT1 monoclonal antibody (6F-H2) with cWT1 was confirmed via Western blotting using cells overexpressing cWT1. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that cWT1 expression was detected in all canine lymphoma tissues and in some normal canine tissues, including the kidney and lymph node. cWT1 is a potential immunotherapy target against canine cancers.

  6. The effect of abdominal radiation on spleen function: A study in children with Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.; Brown, E.; Zipursky, A. )

    1986-01-01

    Reports of splenic dysfunction in patients with Hodgkin's disease who received radiation therapy to the spleen raise questions concerning impairment of splenic function and the long-term risk of bacterial sepsis in children who receive abdominal radiation for other diseases. Splenic function was studied in 20 children with Wilms' tumor using a quantitative assessment of vacuolated (pitted) red cells as a measure of reticuloendothelial function. Fourteen children had received abdominal radiation to a field involving the spleen at a median dose of 2000 rads. Their pitted red cells counts were no different from those of 6 children who received therapy without radiation to the spleen or to those of a group of normal children and adults. We conclude that there is no demonstrable long-term impairment of spleen function with radiation doses at or below 2200 rads.

  7. Effectiveness of enteral and parenteral nutrition in the nutritional management of children with Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Rickard, K A; Kirksey, A; Baehner, R L; Grosfeld, J L; Provisor, A; Weetman, R M; Boxer, L A; Ballantine, T V

    1980-12-01

    The effectiveness of enteral and parenteral feeding in supporting a satisfactory nutrition status and/or reversing protein-energy malnutrition was evaluated in nine children, ages 1 to 7 years (eight female), with Wilms' tumors. At the onset of treatment, eight patients received comprehensive enteral nutrition (CEN) which included intense nutritional counseling and oral supplements while one received total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Despite CEN, the initial, intense treatment period was associated with a decreased energy intake (64 +/- 27% Recommended Dietary Allowances), dramatic weight loss (22 +/- 7% by 26 +/- 17 days from the beginning of treatment), decreased skinfold thickness (< 10th percentile), and decreased albumin concentrations (< 3.2 g/dl). Four of those who initially received CEN subsequently required TPN. A total of five patients received TPN for a mean of 31 days (range 11 to 60); kcal averaged 105 +/- 9% Recommended Dietary Allowances during weight gain. At onset of TPN, the mean albumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count were 3.02 +/- 0.45 g/dl, 155 +/- 40 mg/dl, and, 655 +/- 437/mm3, respectively; all children had abnormal anthropometric measurements and anergy to recall skin test antigens. TPN for 28 or more days supported weight gain (+ 2.44 kg), increased serum albumin (+ 0.58 +/- 0.47 g/dl) and transferrin (+ 76 +/- 34 mg/dl), and reversed anergy despite low total lymphocyte counts. During maintenance treatment, nutritional status was maintained or restored with CEN in the group who responded. These preliminary data document the severity of protein-energy malnutrition which accompanies initial, intense treatment of children with Wilms' tumors, the nutritional and immunological benefits of TPN during continuing intense treatment and the effectiveness of CEN in maintaining a satisfactory nutritional status during maintenance treatment.

  8. Race disparities in peptide profiles of North American and Kenyan Wilms tumor specimens.

    PubMed

    Libes, Jaime M; Seeley, Erin H; Li, Ming; Axt, Jason R; Pierce, Janene; Correa, Hernan; Newton, Mark; Hansen, Erik; Judd, Audra; McDonald, Hayes; Caprioli, Richard M; Naranjo, Arlene; Huff, Vicki; O'Neill, James A; Lovvorn, Harold N

    2014-04-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide and arises in children of black African ancestry with greater frequency and severity than other race groups. A biologic basis for this pediatric cancer disparity has not been previously determined. We hypothesized that unique molecular fingerprints might underlie the variable incidence and distinct disease characteristics of WT observed between race groups. To evaluate molecular disparities between WTs of different race groups, the Children's Oncology Group provided 80 favorable histology specimens divided evenly between black and white patients and matched for disease characteristics. As a surrogate of black sub-Saharan African patients, we also analyzed 18 Kenyan WT specimens. Tissues were probed for peptide profiles using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight imaging mass spectrometry. To control for histologic variability within and between specimens, cellular regions were analyzed separately as triphasic (containing blastema, epithelia, and stroma), blastema only, and stroma only. Data were queried using ClinProTools and statistically analyzed. Peptide profiles, detected in triphasic WT regions, recognized race with good accuracy, which increased for blastema- or stroma-only regions. Peptide profiles from North American WTs differed between black and white race groups but were far more similar in composition than Kenyan specimens. Individual peptides were identified that also associated with WT patient and disease characteristics (eg, treatment failure and stage). Statistically significant peptide fragments were used to sequence proteins, revealing specific cellular signaling pathways and candidate drug targets. Wilms tumor specimens arising among different race groups show unique molecular fingerprints that could explain disparate incidences and biologic behavior and that could reveal novel therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published

  9. Genetic variation frequencies in Wilms' tumor: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changkai; Dai, Rong; Li, Xuliang; Liu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few decades, numerous biomarkers in Wilms' tumor have been confirmed and shown variations in prevalence. Most of these studies were based on small sample sizes. We carried out a meta-analysis of the research published from 1992 to 2015 to obtain more precise and comprehensive outcomes for genetic tests. In the present study, 70 out of 5175 published reports were eligible for the meta-analysis, which was carried out using Stata 12.0 software. Pooled prevalence for gene mutations WT1, WTX, CTNNB1, TP53, MYCN, DROSHA, and DGCR8 was 0.141 (0.104, 0.178), 0.147 (0.110, 0.184), 0.140 (0.100, 0.190), 0.410 (0.214, 0.605), 0.071 (0.041, 0.100), 0.082 (0.048, 0.116), and 0.036 (0.026, 0.046), respectively. Pooled prevalence of loss of heterozygosity at 1p, 11p, 11q, 16q, and 22q was 0.109 (0.084, 0.133), 0.334 (0.295, 0.373), 0.199 (0.146, 0.252), 0.151 (0.129, 0.172), and 0.148 (0.108, 0.189), respectively. Pooled prevalence of 1q and chromosome 12 gain was 0.218 (0.161, 0.275) and 0.273 (0.195, 0.350), respectively. The limited prevalence of currently known genetic alterations in Wilms' tumors indicates that significant drivers of initiation and progression remain to be discovered. Subgroup analyses indicated that ethnicity may be one of the sources of heterogeneity. However, in meta-regression analyses, no study-level characteristics of indicators were found to be significant. In addition, the findings of our sensitivity analysis and possible publication bias remind us to interpret results with caution.

  10. Comparing oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive and open surgery for pediatric neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Ezekian, Brian; Englum, Brian R; Gulack, Brian C; Rialon, Kristy L; Kim, Jina; Talbot, Lindsay J; Adibe, Obinna O; Routh, Jonathan C; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Rice, Henry E

    2017-08-09

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has been widely adopted for common operations in pediatric surgery; however, its role in childhood tumors is limited by concerns about oncologic outcomes. We compared open and MIS approaches for pediatric neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor (WT) using a national database. The National Cancer Data Base from 2010 to 2012 was queried for cases of neuroblastoma and WT in children ≤21 years old. Children were classified as receiving open or MIS surgery for definitive resection, with clinical outcomes compared using a propensity matching methodology (two open:one MIS). For children with neuroblastoma, 17% (98 of 579) underwent MIS, while only 5% of children with WT (35 of 695) had an MIS approach for tumor resection. After propensity matching, there was no difference between open and MIS surgery for either tumor for 30-day mortality, readmissions, surgical margin status, and 1- and 3-year survival. However, in both tumors, open surgery more often evaluated lymph nodes and had larger lymph node harvest. Our retrospective review suggests that the use of MIS appears to be a safe method of oncologic resection for select children with neuroblastoma and WT. Further research should clarify which children are the optimal candidates for this approach. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Detection of Preoperative Wilms Tumor Rupture with CT: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, Arlene; Hoffer, Fredric; Mullen, Elizabeth; Geller, James; Gratias, Eric J.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Rosen, Nancy; Grundy, Paul; Dome, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) in identifying the presence or absence of preoperative Wilms tumor rupture. Materials and Methods: The cohort was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children’s Oncology Group. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained before enrollment. The diagnosis of Wilms tumor rupture was established by central review of notes from surgery and/or pathologic examination. Seventy Wilms tumor cases with rupture were matched to 70 Wilms tumor controls without rupture according to age and tumor weight (within 6 months and 50 g, respectively). CT scans were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and the following CT findings were assessed: poorly circumscribed mass, perinephric fat stranding, peritumoral fat planes obscured, retroperitoneal fluid (subcapsular vs extracapsular), ascites beyond the cul-de-sac, peritoneal implants, ipsilateral pleural effusion, and intratumoral hemorrhage. All fluids were classified as hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by using a cutoff of 30 HU. The relationship between CT findings and rupture was assessed with logistic regression models. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detecting Wilms tumor rupture were 54% (36 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 1 and 70% (47 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 2. Interobserver agreement was substantial (ĸ = 0.76). All imaging signs tested, except peritoneal implants, intratumoral hemorrhage, and subcapsular fluid, showed a significant association with rupture (P ≤ .02). The attenuation of ascitic fluid did not have a significant correlation with rupture (P = .9990). Ascites beyond the cul-de-sac was the single best indicator of rupture for both reviewers, followed by perinephric fat stranding and retroperitoneal fluid for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively (P

  12. Clinical Management of Patients with ASXL1 Mutations and Bohring-Opitz Syndrome, Emphasizing the Need for Wilms Tumor Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Bianca; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Kramer, Nancy; Pickart, Angela; Rhead, William; Tan, Wen-Hann; Brownstein, Catherine A; Clarkson, L Kate; Dobson, Amy; Rosenberg, Avi Z; Schrier Vergano, Samantha A.; Helm, Benjamin M.; Harrison, Rachel E; Graham, John M

    2016-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is a rare genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial features, variable microcephaly, hypertrichosis, nevus flammeus, severe myopia, unusual posture (flexion at the elbows with ulnar deviation, and flexion of the wrists and metacarpophalangeal joints), severe intellectual disability, and feeding issues. Nine patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome have been identified as having a mutation in ASXL1. We report on eight previously unpublished patients with Bohring-Opitz syndrome caused by an apparent or confirmed de novo mutation in ASXL1. Of note, two patients developed bilateral Wilms tumors. Somatic mutations in ASXL1 are associated with myeloid malignancies, and these reports emphasize the need for Wilms tumor screening in patients with ASXL1 mutations. We discuss clinical management with a focus on their feeding issues, cyclic vomiting, respiratory infections, insomnia, and tumor predisposition. Many patients are noted to have distinctive personalities (interactive, happy, and curious) and rapid hair growth; features not previously reported. PMID:25921057

  13. Results of Therapy for Wilms Tumor and Other Malignant Kidney Tumors: A Report From the Chilean Pediatric National Cancer Program (PINDA).

    PubMed

    Joannon, Pilar; Becker, Ana; Kabalan, Paola; Concha, Emma; Beresi, Victoria; Salgado, Carmen; Martínez, Pilar; Olate, Paola; Arriagada, Mónica; Espinoza, Felipe; Varas, Mónica; Benavides, Pablo; Valero, Miguel; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the survival of children with Wilms tumor and other malignant renal tumors treated with the TWPINDA-99 protocol. Between January 1999 and December 2013, 226 patients were registered on this trial, based on National Wilms Tumor Study-5. Patient characteristics and survival were evaluated. Two hundred seven patients were diagnosed with Wilms tumor, which represented 91.6% of renal tumors. The male to female ratio was 0.7:1. The median age at diagnosis was 3.3 years. Stage III was the most frequent (39.2%). Metastatic disease was present in 16.7% of the cases. Synchronous bilateral disease was observed in 9.3% of the cases. Favorable histology was diagnosed in 93.6% and anaplastic histology in 6.4% of the patients. Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) for assessable patients with Wilms tumor (n=192) were 82.0% and 89.9%, respectively. OS for patients with stage I was 100% (n=36), stage II: 97.1% (n=35), stage III: 88.6% (n=71), stage IV: 77.9% (n=32), and stage V: 80.8% (n=18). OS for favorable histology (n=180) and anaplastic histology tumors (n=12) were 91.0% and 72.9%, respectively. Other malignant renal tumors had a poorer survival. Prognosis for patients with Wilms tumor treated on TWPINDA-99 seems to be better than previous national trials and is similar to developed countries.

  14. Patterns of abdominal relapse and role of sonography in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Daw, Najat C; Kauffman, William M; Bodner, Sara M; Pratt, Charles B; Hoffer, Fredric A

    2002-03-01

    This study characterizes the patterns of abdominal recurrence of Wilms tumor and describes the role of sonography in its detection. Twelve patients who had initial tumor recurrence in the abdomen were evaluated. Five patients had recurrence in the kidney; all had nephrogenic rests detected by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging but not by sonography. The remaining 7 patients had recurrence in the peritoneum (4), the nephrectomy site (2), or the regional lymph nodes (1); tumor spillage had occurred in five of these patients. Four recurrences were detected during therapy, and eight within 3 years after completion of therapy. Seven of the 12 recurrences were first detected by sonography. All 11 sonograms obtained at the time of relapse showed tumor recurrence. Nine patients died a median of 10 months after relapse. The results suggest that regular sonographic surveillance for 3 years after therapy is likely to reveal most abdominal recurrences. Supplementation with CT or MR imaging is indicated for detection of nephrogenic rests.

  15. Wilms Tumor Gene on X Chromosome (WTX) Inhibits Degradation of NRF2 Protein through Competitive Binding to KEAP1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Nathan D.; James, Richard G.; Dawson, David W.; Yan, Feng; Davison, James M.; Houck, Scott A.; Tang, Xiaobo; Zheng, Ning; Major, Michael B.; Moon, Randall T.

    2012-01-01

    WTX is a tumor suppressor protein that is lost or mutated in up to 30% of cases of Wilms tumor. Among its known functions, WTX interacts with the β-transducin repeat containing family of ubiquitin ligase adaptors and promotes the ubiquitination and degradation of the transcription factor β-catenin, a key control point in the WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway. Here, we report that WTX interacts with a second ubiquitin ligase adaptor, KEAP1, which functions to regulate the ubiquitination of the transcription factor NRF2, a key control point in the antioxidant response. Surprisingly, we find that unlike its ability to promote the ubiquitination of β-catenin, WTX inhibits the ubiquitination of NRF2. WTX and NRF2 compete for binding to KEAP1, and thus loss of WTX leads to rapid ubiquitination and degradation of NRF2 and a reduced response to cytotoxic insult. These results expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of WTX and reveal a novel regulatory mechanism governing the antioxidant response. PMID:22215675

  16. In Vivo Assays for Assessing the Role of the Wilms' Tumor Suppressor 1 (Wt1) in Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Richard J; Ogley, R; Hadoke, Pwf; Hastie, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene (WT1) is widely expressed during neovascularization, but it is almost entirely absent in quiescent adult vasculature. However, in vessels undergoing angiogenesis, WT1 is dramatically upregulated. Studies have shown Wt1 has a role in both tumor and ischemic angiogenesis, but the mechanism of Wt1 action in angiogenic tissue remains to be elucidated. Here, we describe two methods for induction of in vivo angiogenesis (subcutaneous sponge implantation, femoral artery ligation) that can be used to assess the influence of Wt1 on new blood vessel formation. Subcutaneously implanted sponges stimulate an inflammatory and fibrotic response including cell infiltration and angiogenesis. Femoral artery ligation creates ischemia in the distal hindlimb and produces an angiogenic response to reperfuse the limb which can be quantified in vivo by laser Doppler flowmetry. In both of these models, the role of Wt1 in the angiogenic process can be assessed using histological/immunohistochemical staining, molecular analysis (qPCR) and flow cytometry. Furthermore, combined with suitable genetic modifications, these models can be used to explore the causal relationship between Wt1 expression and angiogenesis and to trace the lineage of cells expressing Wt1. This approach will help to clarify the importance of Wt1 in regulating neovascularization in the adult, and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  17. Outcome After Pulmonary Radiotherapy in Wilms' Tumor Patients With Pulmonary Metastases at Diagnosis: A UK Children's Cancer Study Group, Wilms' Tumour Working Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolin, Gary Taylor, Roger; Baughan, Chris; Shannon, Rosemary; Kelsey, Anna; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of whole lung radiotherapy on event-free and overall survival of children with Stage IV Wilms' tumor with pulmonary metastases at diagnosis and to ascertain factors that may have led to the decision to withhold radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We compared recurrence and mortality risks of patients with pulmonary metastases at diagnosis enrolled in the UKW2 and UKW3 clinical trials (1986-2001) according to treatment with pulmonary radiotherapy. Results: Of 102 eligible patients (43 patients in UKW2 and 59 patients in UKW3), 72 (71%) received pulmonary radiotherapy; 30 (29%) did not. After a median follow-up of 9.3 years (range, 0.6-14.1 years), event-free survival was 79.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.8-86.9%) in patients who received pulmonary radiotherapy compared with 53.3% (95% CI, 34.3-69.1%) in patients who did not receive it (p = 0.006), with a hazard ratio of 2.66 (95% CI, 1.28-5.52; p = 0.009). There was no difference in overall survival (84.7% [95% CI, 74.1-91.2%] vs. 73.2% [95% CI, 53.4-85.6%], respectively; p = 0.157). Pulmonary radiotherapy reduced the chance of lung relapse (8.3% vs. 23.3%; p = 0.039). The omission of radiotherapy did not seem to be consistently associated with any specific clinical or radiologic features. Conclusions: Outcome may be compromised if pulmonary radiotherapy is omitted in children with Wilms' tumor with pulmonary metastases. There was a significant effect on event-free survival; the risk of an event, particularly lung recurrence, was increased nearly threefold. Strategies for selection of children for avoidance of pulmonary irradiation need to be developed in a controlled fashion.

  18. Recurrent DGCR8, DROSHA, and SIX homeodomain mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    We report the most common single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in favorable histology Wilms tumors (FHWTs) to occur within SIX1/2 (7% of 534 tumors) and microRNA processing genes (miRNAPGs) DGCR8 and DROSHA (15% of 534 tumors). Comprehensive analysis of 77 FHWTs indicates that tumors with SIX1/2 and/or miRNAPG mutations show a pre-induction metanephric mesenchyme gene expression pattern and are significantly associated with both perilobar nephrogenic rests and 11p15 imprinting aberrations.

  19. Wilms' Tumor 1 Susceptibility (WT1) Gene Products are Selectively Expressed in Malignant Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Kunjlata M.; Litzky, Leslie A.; Smythe, W. Roy; Mooney, Anne M.; Morris, Jennifer M.; Mews, Daphne J. Y.; Pass, Harvey I.; Kari, Csaba; Rodeck, Ulrich; Rauscher, Frank J.; Kaiser, Larry R.; Albelda, Steven M.

    1995-01-01

    The distinction between malignant mesothelioma and other neoplastic processes involving the pleura is difficult, partly due to the lack of specific markers expressed on mesothelioma. Because of evidence suggesting that the Wilms' tumor susceptibility gene (WT1), unlike ot her tumor suppressor genes, is restricted mostly to mesenchymaly derived tissues, we hypothesized that the WTI gene products could serve as a potential marker for mesothelioma. The expression of WTI mRNA was analyzed in 19 malignant mesothelioma cell lines and 9 tumors and compared with the expression of WT1 in 10 non-small cell lung cancer lines and 9 lung cancer specimens. WTI mRNA was detectable by Northern analysis in 16 of 19 mesothelioma cell lines and in 5 of 8 malignant mesothelioma tumors. In contrast, WTI mRNA was not detected by Northern analysis in non-small cell lung cancer lines or carcinomas. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-WT1 monoclonal antibody showed that a52-to 54-kdprotein was present in 4 mesothelioma cell lines. Immunostanig with this antibody localizd the WT1 protein to the nucleus in two mesothelioma lines and in 20 of 21 mesothelioma tumors examined. This distinctive pattern of nuclear immunoreactivity was absent in 26 non-mesothelioma tumors involving the lung, including 20 non-small cell lung carcinomas. The detection of WTI mRNA or protein may thus provide a specific molecular or immunohistochemical marker for differentiation of mesothelioma from other pleural tumors, inparticular, adenocarcinoma. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:7856747

  20. Identification of the neurotrophin receptors p75 and trk in a series of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, M. J.; Hempstead, B.; Huber, L. J.; Kaplan, D.; Tsoulfas, P.; Chao, M.; Parada, L.; Schofield, D.

    1994-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Wilms' tumor (WT) are poorly understood, although a variety of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor and insulin-like growth factor are expressed and are thought to contribute to tumor development. In earlier studies, WT cells in culture were found to express the low affinity nerve growth factor receptor, p75. These WT cells were capable of responding to the neurotrophin (NT) NGF, suggesting that NT may be involved in WT pathogenesis. We have examined a group of WT immunohistochemically with antibodies recognizing known trk receptor proteins, the p75 receptor, and the NTs, NGF and NT-3. Confirmatory immunoprecipitation and Western blots were then performed on representative WT samples from the study group. The p75 receptor was found predominantly in the epithelial and blastemal components where high levels of NT were also identified. The trk A and B receptors were primarily within stromal components, whereas the trk C and C' receptors were present within epithelial structures. Western blot analyses confirmed the presence of the respective receptor proteins with variations correlating in some cases with histological type. The selective presence of NT receptors and growth factors in this series of WT implies autocrine/paracrine mechanisms for tumor development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7943171

  1. Advances in Wilms Tumor Treatment and Biology: Progress Through International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dome, Jeffrey S; Graf, Norbert; Geller, James I; Fernandez, Conrad V; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Spreafico, Filippo; Van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-09-20

    Clinical trials in Wilms tumor (WT) have resulted in overall survival rates of greater than 90%. This achievement is especially remarkable because improvements in disease-specific survival have occurred concurrently with a reduction of therapy for large patient subgroups. However, the outcomes for certain patient subgroups, including those with unfavorable histologic and molecular features, bilateral disease, and recurrent disease, remain well below the benchmark survival rate of 90%. Therapy for WT has been advanced in part by an increasingly complex risk-stratification system based on patient age; tumor stage, histology, and volume; response to chemotherapy; and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 1p and 16q. A consequence of this system has been the apportionment of patients into such small subgroups that only collaboration between large international WT study groups will support clinical trials that are sufficiently powered to answer challenging questions that move the field forward. This article gives an overview of the Children's Oncology Group and International Society of Pediatric Oncology approaches to WT and focuses on four subgroups (stage IV, initially inoperable, bilateral, and relapsed WT) for which international collaboration is pressing. In addition, biologic insights resulting from collaborative laboratory research are discussed. A coordinated expansion of international collaboration in both clinical trials and laboratory science will provide real opportunity to improve the treatment and outcomes for children with renal tumors on a global level. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Mutational activation of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene is a common event in the development of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Koesters, R; Ridder, R; Kopp-Schneider, A; Betts, D; Adams, V; Niggli, F; Briner, J; von Knebel Doeberitz, M

    1999-08-15

    Activation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription is the nuclear end point of organ-specific Wnt signaling. In the developing kidney, Wnt-4, a secreted glycoprotein, acts as an autoinducer of the mesenchymal to epithelial transition that underlies normal nephron development. Dysregulation of this epithelial transformation process may lead to Wilms' tumors (WTs). In this study, we investigated the potential role of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene, a candidate downstream target molecule of Wnt-4 signaling, in the development of WTs. In 6 of 40 tumors (15%), mutation analysis revealed heterozygous missense mutations or small deletions that result in the loss of important regulatory phosphorylation sites within the beta-catenin protein. These findings indicate that activating beta-catenin mutations may play a significant role in the development of WTs and establish a direct link between Wilms' tumorigenesis and the Wnt signal transduction pathway governing normal kidney development.

  3. Expression of a possible constitutional hot spot in sperm chromosomes of a patient treated for Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Genesca, A.; Miro, R.; Caballin, M.R.; Benet, J.; Navarro, J.; Templado, C.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J.

    1987-11-01

    Sperm chromosomes were studied in a man who was treated for Wilms' tumor with radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) 18 years ago. Human pronuclear sperm chromosomes were obtained after penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Eighty-nine sperm chromosome complements were analyzed; 12.4% of them showed structural anomalies. This percentage was statistically different from the one found in our laboratory for controls (p less than 0.05). Five of eleven structurally abnormal metaphases had the same aberration: fission of chromosome number1 with the breakpoint at or near the centromere. Breaks and rearrangements of chromosome number1, often involving the centromere region, are among the most frequent anomalies found in Wilms' tumor cells.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of human retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-{alpha}) by Wilms` tumour gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Goodyer, P.R.; Torban, E.; Dehbi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Wilms` tumor gene encodes a 47-49 kDa transcription factor expressed in kidney, gonads and mesothelium during embryogenesis. Inherited mutations of WT1 lead to aberrant urogenital development and Wilms` tumor, but the role of WT1 in development is not fully understood. Since the human RAR-{alpha} gene contains a potential WT1 binding site at its 5{prime} end, we studied the effect of WT1 co-transfection on expression of an RAR-{alpha} promoter/CAT reporter construct in COS cells. COS cells were plated at 5X10{sup 5} cells/dish in DMEM with 10% FBS and transfected by the Ca/PO4 method with an expression plasmid containing the full-length WT1 (-/-) cDNA under the control of the CMV promoter, plasmid containing the RAR-{alpha} promoter (-519 to +36)/CAT reporter and TK/growth hormone plasmid to control for efficiency of transfection. CAT/GH activity at 48 hours was inhibited by co-transfection with increasing amounts of WT1 (-/-); maximum inhibition = 5% of control. WT1 co-transfection did not affect expression of TKGH, nor of a CMV-CAT vector. Expression of WT1 protein in tranfected COS cells was demonstrated by Western blotting. Minimal inhibiton of RAR-{alpha}/CAT activity was seen when cells were co-transfected with vectors containing WT1 deletion mutants, alternate WT1 splicing variants, or WT1 (-/-) cDNA bearing a mutation identified in a patient with Drash syndrome. Gel shift assays indicated binding of WT1 to RAR-{alpha} cDNA but not to an RAR-{alpha} deletion mutant lacking the GCGGGGGGCG site. These observations suggest that WT1 may function to regulate RAR-{alpha} expression during normal development.

  5. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is associated with suppression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Shen-Orr, Z; Rauscher, F J; Morris, J F; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-I-R) gene promoter by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 in intact cells. The levels of endogenous IGF-I-R mRNA and the activity of IGF-I-R gene promoter fragments in luciferase reporter constructs were found to be significantly higher in G401 cells (a Wilms' tumor-derived cell line lacking detectable WT1 mRNA) than in 293 cells (a human embryonic kidney cell line which expresses significant levels of WT1 mRNA). To study whether WT1 could suppress the expression of the endogenous IGF-I-R gene, WT1-negative G401 cells were stably transfected with a WT1 expression vector. Expression of WT1 mRNA in G401 cells resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of cellular proliferation, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of IGF-I-R mRNA, promoter activity, and ligand binding and with a reduction in IGF-I-stimulated cellular proliferation, thymidine incorporation, and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that a major aspect of the action of the WT1 tumor suppressor is the repression of IGF-I-R gene expression. PMID:7791758

  6. Constitutional and somatic methylation status of DMRH19 and KvDMR in Wilms tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Leila C.A.; Tenorio Castaño, Jair A.; Pereira, Hanna S.; Lima, Maria Angélica de F.D.; dos Santos, Anna Cláudia E.; de Faria, Paulo S.; Ferman, Sima; Seuánez, Héctor N.; Nevado, Julián B.; de Almeida, José Carlos Cabral; Lapunzina, Pablo; Vargas, Fernando R.

    2012-01-01

    The most frequent epigenetic alterations in Wilms tumor (WT) occur at WT2, assigned to 11p15. WT2 consists of two domains: telomeric domain 1 (DMRH19) that contains the IGF2 gene and an imprinted maternally expressed transcript (H19) and centromeric domain 2 (KvDMR) that contains the genes KCNQ1, KCNQ1OT1 and CDKN1C. In this work, we used pyrosequencing and MS-MLPA to compare the methylation patterns of DMRH19/KvDMR in blood and tumor samples from 40 WT patients. Normal constitutional KvDMR methylation indicated that most of the epigenetic alterations in WT occur at DMRH19. Constitutional DMRH19 hypermethylation (HM DMRH19) was observed in two patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Pyrosequencing and MS-MLPA showed HM DMRH19 in 28/34 tumor samples: 16/34 with isolated HM DMRH19 and 12/34 with concomitant HM DMRH19 and KvDMR hypomethylation, indicating paternal uniparental disomy. With the exception of one blood sample, the MS-MLPA and pyrosequencing findings were concordant. Diffuse or focal anaplasia was present in five tumor samples and was associated with isolated somatic HM DMRH19 in four of them. Constitutional 11p15 methylation abnormalities were present in 5% of the samples and somatic abnormalities in the majority of tumors. Combined analysis of DMRH19/KvDMR by pyrosequencing and MS-MLPA is beneficial for characterizing epigenetic anomalies in WT, and MS-MLPA is useful and reliable for estimation of DNA methylation in a clinical setting. PMID:23271929

  7. Association of FOXM1 expression with tumor histology and prognosis in Wilms tumor: Potential for a new prognostic marker

    PubMed Central

    Apelt, Nadja; Hubertus, Jochen; Mayr, Doris; Graf, Norbert; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Kappler, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common pediatric renal malignancy. A recent ontogenic model suggests that undifferentiated tumor state, and hence poor prognosis, in WT is determined by stabilization of β-catenin in the nucleus. Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a downstream component of the Wnt pathway and promotes nuclear localization of β-catenin. As elevation of FOXM1 gene expression is prognostic in various types of malignancy, we hypothesized that high FOXM1 expression in WT is associated with undifferentiated histology and thus poor prognosis. In the current study, the expression of FOXM1 mRNA was determined in 46 WT specimens and 11 renal tissue controls from patients undergoing tumor nephrectomy, and these data were assessed with regard to clinicopathological parameters. The results demonstrated an upregulation of FOXM1 in WT by 10-fold compared to normal tissue. Expression differed significantly between controls and tumors of intermediate- and high-risk histopathology (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis), and distinguished normal tissue from tumors of good and adverse clinical outcome (P<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis). Notably, FOXM1 expression was significantly lower (P=0.009) in patients that received preoperative doxorubicin. These results suggest that FOXM1 may serve as a companion diagnostic factor for doxorubicin-based therapies in WT. PMID:27698870

  8. Construction of a protein-protein interaction network of Wilms' tumor and pathway prediction of molecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Teng, W J; Zhou, C; Liu, L J; Cao, X J; Zhuang, J; Liu, G X; Sun, C G

    2016-05-23

    Wilms' tumor (WT), or nephroblastoma, is the most common malignant renal cancer that affects the pediatric population. Great progress has been achieved in the treatment of WT, but it cannot be cured at present. Nonetheless, a protein-protein interaction network of WT should provide some new ideas and methods. The purpose of this study was to analyze the protein-protein interaction network of WT. We screened the confirmed disease-related genes using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, created a protein-protein interaction network based on biological function in the Cytoscape software, and detected molecular complexes and relevant pathways that may be included in the network. The results showed that the protein-protein interaction network of WT contains 654 nodes, 1544 edges, and 5 molecular complexes. Among them, complex 1 is predicted to be related to the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, regulation of hematopoiesis by cytokines, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cytokine and inflammatory responses, and hematopoietic cell lineage pathways. Molecular complex 4 shows a correlation of WT with colorectal cancer and the ErbB signaling pathway. The proposed method can provide the bioinformatic foundation for further elucidation of the mechanisms of WT development.

  9. Transcriptional Repression of Tumor Suppressor CDC73, Encoding an RNA Polymerase II Interactor, by Wilms Tumor 1 Protein (WT1) Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Mohammad Iqbal; Swamy, Shivananda; Gopinath, Kodaganur S.; Kumar, Arun

    2014-01-01

    The Wilms tumor 1 gene (WT1) can either repress or induce the expression of genes. Inconsistent with its tumor suppressor role, elevated WT1 levels have been observed in leukemia and solid tumors. WT1 has also been suggested to act as an oncogene by inducing the expression of MYC and BCL-2. However, these are only the correlational studies, and no functional study has been performed to date. Consistent with its tumor suppressor role, CDC73 binds to RNA polymerase II as part of a PAF1 transcriptional regulatory complex and causes transcriptional repression of oncogenes MYC and CCND1. It also represses β-catenin-mediated transcription. Based on the reduced level of CDC73 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) samples in the absence of loss-of-heterozygosity, promoter methylation, and mutations, we speculated that an inhibitory transcription factor is regulating its expression. The bioinformatics analysis predicted WT1 as an inhibitory transcription factor to regulate the CDC73 level. Our results showed that overexpression of WT1 decreased CDC73 levels and promoted proliferation of OSCC cells. ChIP and EMSA results demonstrated binding of WT1 to the CDC73 promoter. The 5-azacytidine treatment of OSCC cells led to an up-regulation of WT1 with a concomitant down-regulation of CDC73, further suggesting regulation of CDC73 by WT1. Exogenous CDC73 attenuated the protumorigenic activity of WT1 by apoptosis induction. An inverse correlation between expression levels of CDC73 and WT1 was observed in OSCC samples. These observations indicated that WT1 functions as an oncogene by repressing the expression of CDC73 in OSCC. We suggest that targeting WT1 could be a therapeutic strategy for cancer, including OSCC. PMID:24257751

  10. Videolaparoscopic radical nephrectomy after chemotherapy in the treatment of Wilms' tumor: Long-term results of a pioneer group.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cristofani, Lilian Maria; Odone Filho, Vicente; Srougi, Miguel; Dénes, Francisco Tibor

    2017-02-01

    A high cure rate for Wilms' tumor has been achieved using a multidisciplinary approach. The natural step forward is to offer the benefits of a minimally invasive technique for surgery, which is an obligatory part of treatment. Nevertheless, some authors resist using videolaparoscopic radical nephrectomy (VRN) because of concerns about reducing the cure index. The present study included children with unilateral Wilms' tumor treated from December 2003 to December 2015 with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by VRN. Patients were selected based on the size of their tumors compared with the contralateral kidney, and on their stature. VRN was performed in 24 patients of age range 10-93 months, with an average of 38.04 ± 23.37 months. The tumoral kidney's largest diameter after chemotherapy averaged 10% of a patient's height. There was no tumor rupture or spillage and no patient presented intra or immediate postoperative complications, except for prolonged ileum in two patients. One patient required intraoperative transfusion because of preoperative anemia. Another developed a late herniation in the umbilical port that required surgical correction. After an average of 6.65 years of follow-up, two patients presented relapse: one with a stage IV disease had relapse in the lung and another with a stage III, involving the liver, had local relapse because of an unwanted delay in the adjuvant treatment. VRN can be considered a feasible alternative to open surgery in selected cases of children with Wilms' tumor. The present experience shows that besides the benefits of minimally invasive procedures and better cosmetic results, there is no evidence of increased tumor rupture or spillage, peritoneal or port site metastasis, and the long-term oncological results are the same as open procedures. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hui-Bo; Zou, Ji-Zhen; He, Cai; Zeng, Rui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Fei-Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Ye, Hui; Wu, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited. The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT. Methods: We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line. Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests. Results: LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney. There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r = 0.671, P = 0.001). LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r = 0.332, P < 0.01). In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line. Conclusion: These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT. PMID:26608986

  12. Association between Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Methylation and Relative Telomere Length in Wilms Tumor.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hui-Bo; Zou, Ji-Zhen; He, Cai; Zeng, Rui; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Fei-Fei; Liu, Zhuo; Ye, Hui; Wu, Jian-Xin

    2015-11-20

    DNA hypomethylation of long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (LINEs-1) occurs during carcinogenesis, whereas information addressing LINE-1 methylation in Wilms tumor (WT) is limited. The main purpose of our study was to quantify LINE-1 methylation levels and evaluate their relationship with relative telomere length (TL) in WT. We investigated LINE-1 methylation and relative TL using bisulfite-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR, respectively, in 20 WT tissues, 10 normal kidney tissues and a WT cell line. Significant changes were analyzed by t-tests. LINE-1 methylation levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) and relative TLs were significantly shorter (P < 0.05) in WT compared with normal kidney. There was a significant positive relationship between LINE-1 methylation and relative TL in WT (r = 0.671, P = 0.001). LINE-1 Methylation levels were significantly associated with global DNA methylation (r = 0.332, P < 0.01). In addition, relative TL was shortened and LINE-1 methylation was decreased in a WT cell line treated with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine compared with untreated WT cell line. These results suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is common and may be linked to telomere shortening in WT.

  13. Pulmonary dysplasia, Denys-Drash syndrome and Wilms tumor 1 gene mutation in twins.

    PubMed

    Dharnidharka, V R; Ruteshouser, E C; Rosen, S; Kozakewich, H; Harris, H W; Herrin, J T; Huff, V

    2001-03-01

    While a genetic basis for the association of developmental lung and kidney defects has been suspected, the involvement of specific genes in this process is under active investigation. We report such a possible genetic linkage present in identical twins with a mutant Wilms tumor (WT1) gene. Twin girls, born at 35 weeks gestation, manifested symptoms of congenital nephrotic syndrome, renal failure, and severe respiratory abnormalities refractory to assisted ventilation. Both died at 1 month of age. Renal biopsies and autopsy kidney tissue from both the girls revealed diffuse mesangial sclerosis (DMS). Autopsy lung tissue revealed pulmonary dysplasia and hypoplasia in both twins. The WT1 gene from renal tissue in both twins was analyzed for mutations using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. Both twins possessed an identical missense mutation in exon 8 of the WT1 gene, resulting in replacement of arginine by histidine at amino acid 366 (arg366his) in the WTI protein. This mutation has previously been described in Denys-Drash syndrome. The WT1 gene plays a role in mesenchymal epithelial (ME) interactions in the developing urogenital system, and possibly has a similar role during lung morphogenesis. We propose that this WT1 gene mutation contributes to both DMS and developmental pulmonary abnormalities by altering ME interactions in both organs.

  14. Structural chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from children previously treated for Wilms' tumor or Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brogger, A.; Kolmannskog, S.; Nicolaysen, R.B.; Wesenberg, F.; Nygaard, R. )

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen children treated for Wilms' tumor (thirteen cases) or Hodgkin's disease (six cases) with cytostatic agents and/or radiotherapy were studied cytogenetically on lymphocytes cultivated from blood samples drawn after at least 1 year of complete remission after end of therapy. A reference group of children was matched for age, sex, and residence. The frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (5.4 versus 5.6 SCE/cell), and chromosome damage type gaps (6.6 versus 7.1%) and breaks (1.9 versus 1.9%) were not different in the two groups, but exchange type aberrations were more frequent in the patients (0.9 versus 0.06%). Fifty karyotypes were analyzed in all but two cases of Hodgkin's disease. The overall frequency of stable (3.1 versus 3.8%) and unstable (1.7 versus 1.4%) structural chromosome changes such as translocations, deletions, chromatid exchanges, and dicentrics were not different in the patient and the control groups. If the chromosome data reflect a general cancer risk, this risk cannot be considerably higher among the cancer-treated children.

  15. Clinical, Pathologic, and Genetic Features of Wilms Tumors With WTX Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Sanda; Akhavanfard, Sara; Harris, Marian H; Vargas, Sara O

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and pathologic features of patients with WTX-mutated Wilms tumor (WT) have not been studied in detail. We characterize the clinical and pathologic findings in WT with WTX abnormalities and provide comparison with WT without WTX mutation. Clinical, gross, and microscopic features in 35 patients with WT were examined. Karyotype was examined in a subset of cases. All cases had been previously analyzed for WTX, WT1, and CTNNB1 aberrations via array comparative genomic hybridization; OncoMap 4 high throughput genotyping was performed on 18 cases. Eleven tumors had WTX abnormality. No significant differences were identified between patients with mutated versus nonmutated WTX with respect to gender (45% versus 33% male), age (mean 3.9 versus 4.1 years), tumor size (mean 12.7 cm versus 12.8 cm), anaplasia (9% versus 12%), rhabdomyoblastic differentiation (18% versus 8%), cartilage differentiation (9% versus 4%), mucinous epithelial differentiation (9% versus 4%), nephrogenic rests (28% versus 21%), or relapse rate (11% versus 25%). Mutations in KRAS, MYC, and PIK3R1 were restricted to WTX-mutated WT, mutations in AKT, CKDN2A, EFGR, HRAS, MET, and RET were restricted to WT without WTX mutation, and mutations in BRAF, CTTNB1, NRAS, PDGFRA, and STK11 were seen in both groups. Our study revealed no clinical or pathologic distinctions between WT with and without WTX abnormality. This similarity lends support to the concept of a common tumorigenic pathway between WT with aberrant WTX and those without.

  16. Senescence Process in Primary Wilms' Tumor Cell Culture Induced by p53 Independent p21 Expression.

    PubMed

    Theerakitthanakul, Korkiat; Khrueathong, Jeerasak; Kruatong, Jirasak; Graidist, Potchanapond; Raungrut, Pritsana; Kayasut, Kanita; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonal tumor occurring in developing kidney tissue. WT cells showing invasive cancer characteristics, also retain renal stem cell behaviours. In-vitro culture of WT is hampered by limited replicative potential. This study aimed to establish a longterm culture of WT cells to enable the study of molecular events to attempt to explain its cellular senescence. Primary cell cultures from fresh WT tumor specimen were established. Of 5 cultures tried, only 1 could be propagated for more than 7 passages. One culture, identified as PSU-SK-1, could be maintained > 35 passages and was then subjected to molecular characterization and evaluation for cancer characteristics. The cells consistently harbored concomitant mutations of CTNNB1 (Ser45Pro) and WT1 (Arg413Stop) thorough the cultivation. On Transwell invasion assays, the cells exhibited migration and invasion at 55% and 27% capability of the lung cancer cells, A549. On gelatin zymography, PSU-SK-1 showed high expression of the matrix metaloproteinase. The cells exhibited continuous proliferation with 24-hour doubling time until passages 28-30 when the growth slowed, showing increased cell size, retention of cells in G1/S proportion and positive β-galactosidase staining. As with those evidence of senescence in advanced cell passages, expression of p21 and cyclin D1 increased when the expression of β-catenin and its downstream protein, TCF, declined. There was also loss-of-expression of p53 in this cell line. In conclusion, cellular senescence was responsible for limited proliferation in the primary culture of WT, which was also associated with increased expression of p21 and was independent of p53 expression. Decreased activation of the Wnt signalling might explain the induction of p21 expression.

  17. Senescence Process in Primary Wilms' Tumor Cell Culture Induced by p53 Independent p21 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Theerakitthanakul, Korkiat; Saetang, Jirakrit; Kruatong, Jirasak; Graidist, Potchanapond; Raungrut, Pritsana; Kayasut, Kanita; Sangkhathat, Surasak

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonal tumor occurring in developing kidney tissue. WT cells showing invasive cancer characteristics, also retain renal stem cell behaviours. In-vitro culture of WT is hampered by limited replicative potential. This study aimed to establish a longterm culture of WT cells to enable the study of molecular events to attempt to explain its cellular senescence. Methods: Primary cell cultures from fresh WT tumor specimen were established. Of 5 cultures tried, only 1 could be propagated for more than 7 passages. One culture, identified as PSU-SK-1, could be maintained > 35 passages and was then subjected to molecular characterization and evaluation for cancer characteristics. The cells consistently harbored concomitant mutations of CTNNB1 (Ser45Pro) and WT1 (Arg413Stop) thorough the cultivation. On Transwell invasion assays, the cells exhibited migration and invasion at 55% and 27% capability of the lung cancer cells, A549. On gelatin zymography, PSU-SK-1 showed high expression of the matrix metaloproteinase. The cells exhibited continuous proliferation with 24-hour doubling time until passages 28-30 when the growth slowed, showing increased cell size, retention of cells in G1/S proportion and positive β-galactosidase staining. As with those evidence of senescence in advanced cell passages, expression of p21 and cyclin D1 increased when the expression of β-catenin and its downstream protein, TCF, declined. There was also loss-of-expression of p53 in this cell line. In conclusion, cellular senescence was responsible for limited proliferation in the primary culture of WT, which was also associated with increased expression of p21 and was independent of p53 expression. Decreased activation of the Wnt signalling might explain the induction of p21 expression. PMID:27698927

  18. Is Nephron Sparing Surgery Justified in Wilms Tumor With Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome or Isolated Hemihypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Scalabre, Aurélien; Bergeron, Christophe; Brioude, Frederic; Dainese, Linda; Cropet, Claire; Coulomb L'hermine, Aurore; Pasqualini, Claudia; Auber, Frederic; Verschuur, Arnauld; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Le Bouc, Yves; Audry, Georges; Irtan, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) or isolated hemihypertrophy (HH) treated for a Wilms tumor (WT) carry an increased risk of developing metachronous lesion. There are no guidelines on precise indications for nephron sparing surgery (NSS) in unilateral WT (UWT). The objective of this retrospective study was to delineate the indications of NSS in patients with BWS/HH treated for WT and to evaluate their outcome. All cases of BWS/HH treated for a WT according to SIOP protocols from 1980 to 2013 were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups (G): isolated UWT (G1) and bilateral lesions (G2) with two subgroups: bilateral tumors suspected of malignancy (G2a), and unilateral tumor suspected of malignancy with contralateral nephroblastomatosis (G2b). Forty-six patients were included (34 G1, three G2a, and nine G2b). Nine NSS and 25 total nephrectomies (TN) were performed in G1, two bilateral NSS and one NSS with contralateral TN in G2a, and eight NSS and one TN in G2b. The 3-year event-free survival was 92.3% (95% CI [77.9-97.5%]). One death occurred after a local relapse following a TN for a stage III stromal WT (G1) and another after a combined local and distant relapse following a NSS for a stage I diffuse anaplastic WT (G2b). There were two metachronous WT (4%), 3 years after a TN (G1) and 12 years after a NSS (G2b). NSS is recommended in bilateral WT and may be an option in selected UWT patients with BWS/HH because it was not associated with an increased risk of local relapse. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Molecular Mechanism of the Cell Death Induced by the Histone Deacetylase Pan Inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) in Wilms Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yan-Fang, Tao; Zhi-Heng, Li; Li-Xiao, Xu; Fang, Fang; Jun, Lu; Gang, Li; Lan, Cao; Na-Na, Wang; Xiao-Juan, Du; Li-Chao, Sun; Wen-Li, Zhao; Pei-Fang, Xiao; He, Zhao; Guang-Hao, Su; Yan-Hong, Li; Yi-Ping, Li; Yun-Yun, Xu; Hui-Ting, Zhou; Yi, Wu; Mei-Fang, Jin; Lin, Liu; Jian, Ni; Shao-Yan, Hu; Xue-Ming, Zhu; Xing, Feng; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonic kidney cancer, for which histone acetylation might be a therapeutic target. LBH589, a novel targeted agent, suppresses histone deacetylases in many tumors. This study investigated the antitumor activity of LBH589 in SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells. SK-NEP-1 and G401 cell growth was assessed by CCK-8 and in nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry detected apoptosis in cell culture. Gene expressions of LBH589-treated tumor cells were analyzed using an Arraystar Human LncRNA Array. The Multi Experiment View cluster software analyzed the expression data. Differentially expressed genes from the cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. LBH589 inhibited cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V, TUNEL and Hochest 33342 staining analysis showed that LBH589-treated cells showed more apoptotic features compared with the control. LBH589 treatment inhibited the growth of SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Arraystar Human LncRNA Array analysis of genes and lncRNAs regulated by LBH589 identified 6653 mRNAs and 8135 lncRNAs in LBH589-treated SK-NEP-1 cells. The most enriched gene ontology terms were those involved in nucleosome assembly. KEGG pathway analysis identified cell cycle proteins, including CCNA2, CCNB2, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, CDKN1B and HDAC2, etc. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified important upstream molecules: HIST2H3C, HIST1H4A, HIST1A, HIST1C, HIST1D, histone H1, histone H3, RPRM, HSP70 and MYC. LBH589 treatment caused apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1and G401 cells. LBH589 had a significant effect and few side effects on SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors. Expression profiling, and GO, KEGG and IPA analyses identified new targets and a new "network" of genes responding to LBH589 treatment in SK-NEP-1 cells. RPRM, HSP70 and MYC may be important regulators during LBH589 treatment. Our results provide

  20. Molecular Mechanism of the Cell Death Induced by the Histone Deacetylase Pan Inhibitor LBH589 (Panobinostat) in Wilms Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Jun, Lu; Gang, Li; Lan, Cao; Na-Na, Wang; Xiao-Juan, Du; Li-Chao, Sun; Wen-Li, Zhao; Pei-Fang, Xiao; He, Zhao; Guang-Hao, Su; Yan-Hong, Li; Yi-Ping, Li; Yun-Yun, Xu; Hui-Ting, Zhou; Yi, Wu; Mei-Fang, Jin; Lin, Liu; Jian, Ni; Shao-Yan, Hu; Xue-Ming, Zhu; Xing, Feng; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor (WT) is an embryonic kidney cancer, for which histone acetylation might be a therapeutic target. LBH589, a novel targeted agent, suppresses histone deacetylases in many tumors. This study investigated the antitumor activity of LBH589 in SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells. Methods SK-NEP-1 and G401 cell growth was assessed by CCK-8 and in nude mice experiments. Annexin V/propidium iodide staining followed by flow cytometry detected apoptosis in cell culture. Gene expressions of LBH589-treated tumor cells were analyzed using an Arraystar Human LncRNA Array. The Multi Experiment View cluster software analyzed the expression data. Differentially expressed genes from the cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool. Results LBH589 inhibited cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V, TUNEL and Hochest 33342 staining analysis showed that LBH589-treated cells showed more apoptotic features compared with the control. LBH589 treatment inhibited the growth of SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Arraystar Human LncRNA Array analysis of genes and lncRNAs regulated by LBH589 identified 6653 mRNAs and 8135 lncRNAs in LBH589-treated SK-NEP-1 cells. The most enriched gene ontology terms were those involved in nucleosome assembly. KEGG pathway analysis identified cell cycle proteins, including CCNA2, CCNB2, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, CDKN1B and HDAC2, etc. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified important upstream molecules: HIST2H3C, HIST1H4A, HIST1A, HIST1C, HIST1D, histone H1, histone H3, RPRM, HSP70 and MYC. Conclusions LBH589 treatment caused apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of SK-NEP-1and G401 cells. LBH589 had a significant effect and few side effects on SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors. Expression profiling, and GO, KEGG and IPA analyses identified new targets and a new “network” of genes responding to LBH589 treatment in SK-NEP-1 cells. RPRM, HSP70 and MYC may be important regulators

  1. Patterns of intra-abdominal relapse (IAR) in patients with Wilms' tumor who received radiation: analysis by histopathology. A report of National Wilms' tumor studies 1 and 2 (NWTS-1 and 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Tefft, M.; D'Angio, G.J.; Beckwith, B.; Farewell, V.; Meyer, J.A.

    1980-06-01

    336 non-metastatic patients who received radiation in national Wilms' Tumor Study-1 and 2 have been reviewed. Follow-up was minimum of two years. 15/273 (6%) of the favorable history patients had intra-abdominal relapse as compared to 8/44 unfavorable histology (18%) (P = 0.003). Developing intra-abdominal relapse does not seem related to low radiation therapy doses or small volumes. However, a delay of greater than ten days to start radiation therapy from nephrectomy was related to the occurrence of intra-abdominal relapse in unfavorable histology patients (P < 0.001).

  2. A murine model of K-ras and β-catenin induced renal tumors express high levels of E2F1 and resemble human Wilms Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yajun; Polosukhina, Dina; Love, Harold D.; Hembd, Austin; Pickup, Michael; Moses, Harold L.; Lovvorn, Harold N.; Zent, Roy; Clark, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common renal neoplasm of childhood. We previously showed that restricted activation of the WNT/β-catenin pathway in renal epithelium late in kidney development is sufficient to induce small primitive neoplasms with features of epithelial WT. Metastatic disease progression required simultaneous addition of an activating mutation of the oncogene K-RAS. Here, we sought to define the molecular pathways activated in this process and their relationship to human renal malignancies. Methods Affymetrix expression microarray data from murine kidneys with activation of K-ras, Ctnnb1 (β-catenin), or both restricted to renal epithelium were analyzed and compared to publically available expression data from normal and neoplastic human renal tissue. Target genes were verified by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. Results Mouse kidney tumors with activation of K-ras and Ctnnb1 and human renal malignancies have similar mRNA expression signatures and are associated with activation of networks centered on β-catenin and TP53. Up-regulation of WNT/β-catenin targets (MYC, Survivin, FOXA2, Axin2, Cyclin D1) was confirmed by immunoblotting. K-RAS/β-catenin murine kidney tumors were more similar to human WT than other renal malignancies and demonstrated activation of a TP53 dependent network of genes including the transcription factor E2F1. Up-regulation of E2F1 was confirmed in both murine and human WT samples. Conclusions Simultaneous activation of K-RAS and β-catenin in embryonic renal epithelium leads to neoplasms similar to human WT associated with activation of TP53 and up-regulation of E2F1. Further studies to evaluate the role of TP53 and E2F1 in human WT are warranted. PMID:25934441

  3. Molecular characterization of Wilms tumor from a resource-constrained region of sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Andrew J.; Axt, Jason R.; de Caestecker, Christian; Pierce, Janene; Correa, Hernan; Seeley, Erin H.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Newton, Mark W.; de Caestecker, Mark P.; Lovvorn, Harold N.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African children have an increased incidence of Wilms tumor (WT) and experience alarmingly poor outcomes. Although these outcomes are largely due to inadequate therapy, we hypothesized that WT from this region exhibit features of biologic aggressiveness that may warrant broader implementation of high-risk therapeutic protocols. We evaluated 15 Kenyan WT (KWT) for features of aggressive disease (blastemal predominance, Ki67/cellular proliferation) and treatment resistance (anaplasia, p53 immunopositivity). To explore additional biologic features of KWT, we determined the mutational status of the CTNNB1/β-catenin and WT1 genes and performed immunostaining for markers of Wnt pathway activation (β-catenin) and nephronic progenitor cell self-renewal (WT1, CITED1, SIX2). We characterized the proteome of KWT using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Results were compared to histology and age-matched North American WT (NAWT) controls. For KWT patients, blastemal predominance was noted in 53.3% and anaplasia in 13%. We detected increased loss to follow up (p=0.028), disease relapse (p=0.044), mortality (p=0.001), and nuclear unrest (p=0.001) in KWT patients compared to controls. KWT and NAWT showed similar Ki67/cellular proliferation. We detected an increased proportion of epithelial nuclear β-catenin in KWT (p=0.013). All 15 KWT were found to harbor wild-type β-catenin, and 1 contained a WT1 nonsense mutation. WT1 was detected by immunostaining in 100% of KWT, CITED1 in 80%, and SIX2 in 80%. IMS revealed a molecular signature unique to KWT that was distinct from NAWT. African WTs appear to express markers of adverse clinical behavior and treatment resistance and may require alternative therapies or implementation of high-risk treatment protocols. PMID:22437966

  4. Race Disparities in Peptide Profiles of North American and Kenyan Wilms Tumor Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Libes, Jaime M; Seeley, Erin H; Li, Ming; Axt, Jason R; Pierce, Janene; Correa, Hernan; Newton, Mark; Hansen, Erik; Judd, Audra; McDonald, Hayes; Caprioli, Richard M; Naranjo, Arlene; Huff, Vicki; O’Neill, James A; Lovvorn, Harold N

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood kidney cancer worldwide and arises in children of black African ancestry with greater frequency and severity than other race groups. A biologic basis for this pediatric cancer disparity has not been previously determined. We hypothesized that unique molecular fingerprints might underlie the variable incidence and distinct disease characteristics of WT observed between race groups. Study Design To evaluate molecular disparities between WTs of different race groups, the Children’s Oncology Group provided 80 favorable histology specimens divided evenly between black and white patients and matched for disease characteristics. As a surrogate of sub-Saharan African patients, we also analyzed 18 Kenyan WT specimens. Tissues were probed for peptide profiles using MALDI-TOF imaging mass spectrometry. To control for histologic variability within and between specimens, cellular regions were analyzed separately as triphasic (containing blastema, epithelia, and stroma), blastema-only, and stroma-only. Data were queried using ClinProTools and statistically analyzed. Results Peptide profiles, detected in triphasic WT regions, recognized race with good accuracy, which increased for blastema- or stroma-only regions. Peptide profiles from North American WTs differed between black and white race groups but were far more similar in composition than Kenyan specimens. Individual peptides were identified that also associated with WT patient and disease characteristics (eg, treatment failure and stage). Statistically significant peptide fragments were used to sequence proteins, revealing specific cellular signaling pathways and candidate drug targets. Conclusions WT specimens arising among different race groups show unique molecular fingerprints that could explain disparate incidences and biological behavior and that could reveal novel therapeutic targets. PMID:24655859

  5. Successful treatment with caspofungin of candiduria in a child with Wilms tumor; review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rezai, M S; Vaezi, A; Fakhim, H; Soleimani, A; Mohammad Jafari, H; Mohseni, S; Badali, H

    2017-02-07

    Symptomatic candiduria often occurs in patients with indwelling bladder catheters or immunocompromised host. Isolation of Candida in urine in high-risk patients should primarily be considered as a marker for candidemia. Hematological and genitourinary malignancies are one of the main risk factors associated with Candida urinary tract infections (CUTI). Fluconazole is a choice for initial treatment of CUTI, but it is fluctuate depending on the patient's condition including renal failure, site of urinary infection and Candida species. Poor glomerular filtration is the main disadvantage echinocandins resulting in very low urinary concentrations. Therefore, echinocandins have prohibited their use in CUTI. Up to now, there are only 10 cases reported in the literatures with highly effective echinocandins in CUTI because of high concentrations in the tissue are needed to control invasive fungal disease. Herein, we report a candiduria followed by renal candidiasis caused by Candida albicans in a 6-year-old Iranian male with a history of Wilms tumor in left kidney. Direct examination of urine specimen revealed an infection due to budding yeast cells with numerous pseudohyphae and growths of C. albicans was reconfirmed by sequencing of ITS rDNA region. MICs in increasing order were as follows: caspofungin (0.016μg/ml), voriconazole (0.125μg/ml), amphotericin B (0.25μg/ml), itraconazole (0.5μg/ml) and fluconazole (2μg/ml). It seems that successful treatment with caspofungin owes achieved high renal tissue concentrations that are unrelated to glomerular filtration. In conclusion, predisposing factors for better outcome are more important than treatment of CUTI, therefore, management of UTI is essential for critically patients.

  6. Expression of wilms' tumor gene and protein localization during ovarian formation and follicular development in sheep.

    PubMed

    Logan, Kathleen A; McNatty, Kenneth P; Juengel, Jennifer L

    2003-02-01

    Wilms' tumor protein (WT1) is a transcriptional repressor essential for the development of mammalian kidneys and gonads. To gain insight into possible roles of WT1 in ovarian formation and follicular function, we studied patterns of mRNA and protein localization throughout fetal gonadal development and in ovaries of 4-wk-old and adult sheep. At Day 24 after conception, strong expression of WT1 mRNA and protein was observed in the coelomic epithelial region of the mesonephros where the gonad was forming. By Day 30, expression was observed in the surface epithelium and in many mesenchymal and endothelial cells of the gonad. Epithelial cells continued to express WT1 throughout gonadal development, as did pregranulosa cells during the process of follicular formation. However, WT1 expression was not observed in germ cells. During follicular growth, granulosa cells expressed WT1 from the type 1 (primordial) to the type 4 stages, but thereafter expression was reduced in type 5 (antral) follicles, consistent with the differentiation of granulosa cells into steroid-producing cells. The possible progenitor cells for the theca interna (i.e., the cell streams in the ovarian interstitium) expressed WT1 heterogeneously. However, differentiated theca cells in antral follicles did not express WT1. Strong expression of WT1 was observed during gonadal development, which is consistent with a role for WT1 in ovarian and follicular formation in the ewe. WT1 was identified in many cells of the neonatal and adult ovaries, including granulosa cells, suggesting that this factor is important for preantral follicular growth. However, the decline in WT1 expression in antral follicles suggests that WT1 may prevent premature differentiation of somatic cells of the follicle during early follicular growth.

  7. Effect of abdominal irradiation on growth in boys treated for a Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.H.; Shalet, S.M.; Morris-Jones, P.H.; Swindell, R.; Gattamaneni, H.R. )

    1990-01-01

    To study the effect of abdominal irradiation on spinal growth in childhood we have measured final height, sitting height, and leg length in 30 male survivors of a Wilms' tumor. Twenty-one patients received whole abdominal irradiation by either megavoltage therapy (MV: n = 11) or orthovoltage therapy (OV: n = 10); the remainder received flank irradiation. To examine the effect of the adolescent growth spurt on the irradiated spine we have followed prospectively seven patients who received whole abdominal irradiation and nine patients who received flank irradiation through puberty. Compared to a normal population there is a modest reduction in median final standing height SDS (H.SDS: -1.15) accompanied by a marked reduction in median final sitting height SDS (S.HT SDS: -2.41) with no apparent effect on median subischial leg length SDS (SILL.SDS: 0.04). This reduction in spinal growth is reflected by a strongly positive disproportion score (DPS; (SILL SDS-S.HT SDS) + 2.81). The incidence of scoliosis after abdominal irradiation has been low (10%). During puberty there is a significant fall in median sitting height SDS after both whole abdominal (median fall: -0.9, P = 0.02) and flank irradiation (median fall: -1.85, P = 0.01), and this is reflected in a significant increase in disproportion (DPS: whole abdominal; median rise +1.4, P = 0.02: flank, median rise +1.34, P = 0.01). After MV irradiation there is a significant correlation between the degree of disproportion and the age at treatment (P less than 0.0005). The younger the patient is at treatment the more severe is the restriction on spinal growth and the shorter and more disproportionate they become as an adult. The estimated eventual loss in potential height from abdominal irradiation at the age of one is 10 cm and at five years is 7 cm.

  8. Synchronous occurrence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and wilms tumor in two patients: underlying etiology and combined treatment plan.

    PubMed

    Yi, Joanna S; Kamihara, Junne; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Davies, Kimberly; van Hoff, Jack; Silverman, Lewis B; Mullen, Elizabeth A

    2017-05-01

    Synchronous cancers are extraordinarily rare in pediatric patients and present a therapeutic challenge. Patient A presented with synchronous unilateral Wilms tumor (WT) and standard-risk (SR) B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Genetic testing revealed bialleleic BRCA2/FANCD1 mutations. Patient B, after SR B-precursor ALL induction therapy, was noted on fever workup to have a renal mass; pathology demonstrated lesion indeterminate between WT and nephrogenic rest. Therapy was customized for each patient to treat both cancers. Both patients have ongoing remission from their cancers, without excessive toxicity. We report two regimens for treating synchronous WT and ALL and recommend screening such patients for cancer predisposition.

  9. Considerations in the Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric Patients With Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor Who Present With Only Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel M

    2016-04-01

    More than 70% of children with stage IV, favorable histology (FH) Wilms tumor will be relapse-free survivors 16 years after diagnosis. Successful treatment generally includes whole lung radiation therapy and doxorubicin. Such therapy is associated with adverse, long-term effects, including impaired pulmonary function, congestive heart failure, and second malignant neoplasms, especially breast cancer. Cooperative groups have adopted a risk-based approach to the treatment of these patients. It is important to recall the good overall prognosis for this group before recommendations for intensification are made based on preliminary data and in the absence of histological confirmation of persistent malignant disease.

  10. Inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 promoter activity by the product of the Wilms' tumor locus.

    PubMed

    Harrington, M A; Konicek, B; Song, A; Xia, X L; Fredericks, W J; Rauscher, F J

    1993-10-05

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is a member of the immediate early gene family, which is expressed in mitogen-stimulated quiescent fibroblasts. The biological effects of CSF-1 are multifaceted and include stimulation of the proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors and activity of circulating monocytes and tissue-specific macrophages. Ablation of circulating levels of biologically active CSF-1 in mice leads to osteopetrosis and sterility, thus implicating a role for CSF-1 in bone remodeling and implantation. Identification of regulatory elements and cognate transcription factors that bind the csf-1 promoter and mediate such diverse expression patterns is of great interest. We identified a sequence element at -273 to -265 (relative to the transcription initiation site) in the murine csf-1 promoter, which contains overlapping consensus sequences for the Wilms' tumor protein (WT1), EGR-1, SP1, and SP3 proteins. WT1 and EGR-1 proteins produced in vitro bound to this sequence, and co-transfection of wt1 with a csf-1-cat reporter plasmid resulted in repression of promoter activity. Interestingly, nuclear extracts prepared from serum-stimulated C3H10T1/2 cells contained predominantly SP1 and SP3 binding activities, which recognized the -273 to -265 site. Thus repression of the csf-1 promoter by WT1 at this site may involve competition between SP1 family transcriptional activators and the WT1 repressor. Colony-stimulating factor-1 may be a physiologically relevant target gene for regulation by the WT1 transcription factor.

  11. The Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) gene (+KTS isoform) functions with a CTE to enhance translation from an unspliced RNA with a retained intron.

    PubMed

    Bor, Yeou-cherng; Swartz, Jennifer; Morrison, Avril; Rekosh, David; Ladomery, Michael; Hammarskjöld, Marie-Louise

    2006-06-15

    The Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) gene plays an important role in mammalian urogenital development, and dysregulation of this gene is observed in many human cancers. Alternative splicing of WT1 RNA leads to the expression of two major protein isoforms, WT1(+KTS) and WT1(-KTS). Whereas WT1(-KTS) acts as a transcriptional regulator, no clear function has been ascribed to WT1(+KTS), despite the fact that this protein is crucial for normal development. Here we show that WT1(+KTS) functions to enhance expression from RNA possessing a retained intron and containing either a cellular or viral constitutive transport element (CTE). WT1(+KTS) expression increases the levels of unspliced RNA containing a CTE and specifically promotes the association of this RNA with polyribosomes. These studies provide further support for links between different steps in RNA metabolism and for the existence of post-transcriptional operons.

  12. Evaluation of Late Adverse Events in Long-Term Wilms' Tumor Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, Irma van; Oldenburger, Foppe; Cardous-Ubbink, Mathilde C.; Geenen, Maud M.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence and severity of adverse events (AEs) and treatment-related risk factors in long-term Wilms' tumor (WT) survivors, with special attention to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The single-center study cohort consisted of 185 WT survivors treated between 1966 and 1996, who survived at least 5 years after diagnosis. All survivors were invited to a late-effects clinic for medical assessment of AEs. AEs were graded for severity in a standardized manner. Detailed radiotherapy data enabled us to calculate the equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD{sub 2}) to compare radiation doses in a uniform way. Risk factors were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: Medical follow-up was complete for 98% of survivors (median follow-up, 18.9 years; median attained age, 22.9 years); 123 survivors had 462 AEs, of which 392 had Grade 1 or 2 events. Radiotherapy to flank/abdomen increased the risk of any AE (OR, 1.08 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.04-1.13]). Furthermore, radiotherapy to flank/abdomen was associated with orthopedic events (OR, 1.09 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.05-1.13]) and second tumors (OR, 1.11 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.19]). Chest irradiation increased the risk of pulmonary events (OR, 1.14 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.06-1.21]). Both flank/abdominal and chest irradiation were associated with cardiovascular events (OR, 1.05 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.00-1.10], OR, 1.06 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.01-1.12]) and tissue hypoplasia (OR, 1.17 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.10-1.24], OR 1.10 Gy{sup -1} [CI, 1.03-1.18]). Conclusion: The majority of AEs, overall as well as in irradiated survivors, were mild to moderate. Nevertheless, the large amount of AEs emphasizes the importance of follow-up programs for WT survivors.

  13. Wilms Tumor Suppressor, WT1, Cooperates with MicroRNA-26a and MicroRNA-101 to Suppress Translation of the Polycomb Protein, EZH2, in Mesenchymal Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Akpa, Murielle M.; Iglesias, Diana; Chu, LeeLee; Thiébaut, Antonin; Jentoft, Ida; Hammond, Leah; Torban, Elena; Goodyer, Paul R.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary forms of Wilms arise from developmentally arrested clones of renal progenitor cells with biallelic mutations of WT1; recently, it has been found that Wilms tumors may also be associated with biallelic mutations in DICER1 or DROSHA, crucial for miRNA biogenesis. We have previously shown that a critical role for WT1 during normal nephrogenesis is to suppress transcription of the Polycomb group protein, EZH2, thereby de-repressing genes in the differentiation cascade. Here we show that WT1 also suppresses translation of EZH2. All major WT1 isoforms induce an array of miRNAs, which target the 3′ UTR of EZH2 and other Polycomb-associated transcripts. We show that the WT1(+KTS) isoform binds to the 5′ UTR of EZH2 and interacts directly with the miRNA-containing RISC to enhance post-transcriptional inhibition. These observations suggest a novel mechanism through which WT1 regulates the transition from resting stem cell to activated progenitor cell during nephrogenesis. Our findings also offer a plausible explanation for the fact that Wilms tumors can arise either from loss of WT1 or loss of miRNA processing enzymes. PMID:26655220

  14. Heterogeneity of disease classified as stage III in Wilms tumor: a report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; D'Angelo, Paolo; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchianò, Alfonso; Catania, Serena; Fossati Bellani, Franca; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% ± 4% and 92% ± 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% ± 7%, as opposed to 98% ± 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% ± 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heterogeneity of Disease Classified as Stage III in Wilms Tumor: A Report From the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP)

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo; Gandola, Lorenza; Terenziani, Monica; Collini, Paola; Bianchi, Maurizio; Provenzi, Massimo; Indolfi, Paolo; Pession, Andrea; Nantron, Marilina; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Marchiano, Alfonso; Piva, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We analyzed whether the prognosis can differ among Wilms tumors (WT) labeled as Stage III according to currently adopted classification systems. Methods and Materials: Patients with nonanaplastic Stage III WT consecutively registered in two Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) trials (CNR-92, TW-2003) were the subjects in the present analysis. The steady mainstay of therapy was primary nephrectomy, followed by three-drug chemotherapy with vincristine, dactinomycin, doxorubicin, and abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Results: Ninety-nine WT patients met the criteria for classification as Stage III according to a revised version of the National Wilms Tumor Study-3 staging system (51 patients in CNR-92, 48 patients in TW-2003). Regional lymph nodes (LN) were not biopsied in 16 patients. After a median follow-up of 66 months, the 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 85% {+-} 4% and 92% {+-} 3%, respectively, for the whole group. For 38 children with positive LN, the 4-year DFS rate was 73% {+-} 7%, as opposed to 98% {+-} 2% for the 45 children with Stage III WT according to the other criteria but with negative biopsied LN (p = 0.001). The subgroup with the worst prognosis consisted of children more than 2 years old with positive LN (DFS 67% {+-} 8%). A delay between surgery and RT > 30 days had an adverse impact on the abdominal tumor relapse rate. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence that Stage III tumors with LN metastases might be distinguished from WTs meeting the other criteria for classification as Stage III. The worse outcome of the former may warrant a prospective study on the effects of intensified therapy. A subclassification of Stage III tumors is discussed.

  16. Mutations in the SIX1/2 pathway and the DROSHA/DGCR8 miRNA microprocessor complex underlie high-risk blastemal type Wilms tumors.

    PubMed

    Wegert, Jenny; Ishaque, Naveed; Vardapour, Romina; Geörg, Christina; Gu, Zuguang; Bieg, Matthias; Ziegler, Barbara; Bausenwein, Sabrina; Nourkami, Nasenien; Ludwig, Nicole; Keller, Andreas; Grimm, Clemens; Kneitz, Susanne; Williams, Richard D; Chagtai, Tas; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; van Sluis, Peter; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Acha, Tomas; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Bode, Peter K; Niggli, Felix; Tytgat, Godelieve A; van Tinteren, Harm; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Meese, Eckart; Vokuhl, Christian; Leuschner, Ivo; Graf, Norbert; Eils, Roland; Pfister, Stefan M; Kool, Marcel; Gessler, Manfred

    2015-02-09

    Blastemal histology in chemotherapy-treated pediatric Wilms tumors (nephroblastoma) is associated with adverse prognosis. To uncover the underlying tumor biology and find therapeutic leads for this subgroup, we analyzed 58 blastemal type Wilms tumors by exome and transcriptome sequencing and validated our findings in a large replication cohort. Recurrent mutations included a hotspot mutation (Q177R) in the homeo-domain of SIX1 and SIX2 in tumors with high proliferative potential (18.1% of blastemal cases); mutations in the DROSHA/DGCR8 microprocessor genes (18.2% of blastemal cases); mutations in DICER1 and DIS3L2; and alterations in IGF2, MYCN, and TP53, the latter being strongly associated with dismal outcome. DROSHA and DGCR8 mutations strongly altered miRNA expression patterns in tumors, which was functionally validated in cell lines expressing mutant DROSHA.

  17. Scholastic achievement of children with lymphoma or Wilms tumor at the end of comprehensive education--a nationwide, register-based study.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Päivi M; Sankila, Risto; Pukkala, Eero; Kyyrönen, Pentti; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2008-11-15

    Cancer treatment may affect school performance. School report grades after childhood lymphomas and Wilms tumor have not been previously reported. All Finnish patients with Wilms tumor (N = 74), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) (N = 99) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (N = 94) who were born in 1974-1986 and had achieved the age of 16 years were identified from the Finnish cancer registry. Population controls (N = 1329) were matched for age, gender and residence. Their 9th grade school reports were obtained from Statistics Finland. The overall average and grades for mother tongue, first foreign language, mathematics and physical education were compared between the patients and their controls. Almost all the patients (>98%) had finished their comprehensive school. NHL patients had lower overall averages than their controls (difference -0.27 grade units; 95% CI -0.39, -0.15). Irradiation or age at diagnosis did not explain this difference in NHL patients. The grades of NHL patients were significantly lower than those of their controls in each academic school subject, especially in mathematics (-0.45; 95% CI -0.63, -0.27). In mother tongue, girls with irradiation had greatest difference (-0.66, 95% CI -0.99, -0.34) to their controls. Patients with HL and Wilms tumor performed similarly or even better than their controls in all academic subjects. Grades for physical education were impaired in Wilms tumor patients (-0.20; 95% CI -0.33, -0.06). Impairment of school report grades was observed in patients with NHL. The difference to controls was greatest in mathematics. The patients with HL and Wilms tumor, who had not received any central nervous system directed therapy, achieved equally good grades as their controls in all the academic subjects. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Temporal blastemal cell gene expression analysis in the kidney reveals new Wnt and related signaling pathway genes to be essential for Wilms' tumor onset

    PubMed Central

    Maschietto, M; Trapé, A P; Piccoli, F S; Ricca, T I; Dias, A A M; Coudry, R A; Galante, P A; Torres, C; Fahhan, L; Lourenço, S; Grundy, P E; de Camargo, B; de Souza, S; Neves, E J; Soares, F A; Brentani, H; Carraro, D M

    2011-01-01

    Wilms' tumors (WTs) originate from metanephric blastema cells that are unable to complete differentiation, resulting in triphasic tumors composed of epithelial, stromal and blastemal cells, with the latter harboring molecular characteristics similar to those of the earliest kidney development stages. Precise regulation of Wnt and related signaling pathways has been shown to be crucial for correct kidney differentiation. In this study, the gene expression profile of Wnt and related pathways was assessed in laser-microdissected blastemal cells in WTs and differentiated kidneys, in human and in four temporal kidney differentiation stages (i.e. E15.5, E17.5, P1.5 and P7.5) in mice, using an orthologous cDNA microarray platform. A signaling pathway-based gene signature was shared between cells of WT and of earliest kidney differentiation stages, revealing genes involved in the interruption of blastemal cell differentiation in WT. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR showed high robustness of the microarray data demonstrating 75 and 56% agreement in the initial and independent sample sets, respectively. The protein expression of CRABP2, IGF2, GRK7, TESK1, HDGF, WNT5B, FZD2 and TIMP3 was characterized in WTs and in a panel of human fetal kidneys displaying remarkable aspects of differentiation, which was recapitulated in the tumor. Taken together, this study reveals new genes candidate for triggering WT onset and for therapeutic treatment targets. PMID:22048167

  19. The Simultaneous Elevation of Oxidative Stress Markers and Wilms' Tumor 1 Gene during the Progression of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Naomi; Hasunuma, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Matsuzawa, Yasuo; Iwashita, Youichi; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Yokota, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is closely related to iron overload in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and induces DNA damage. We evaluated the oxidative stress markers derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (dROM) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) during azacitidine treatment in an MDS patient. Simultaneous with an increase in the expression of Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) gene in the peripheral blood, the serum dROM level was elevated, and this increase was observed earlier than the increases in ferritin and 8-OHdG. Throughout the clinical course, dROM and 8-OHdG correlated significantly with WT1 and with ferritin, suggesting that changes in the oxidative stress marker levels reflect not only iron overload but also disease progression of MDS. PMID:27980269

  20. Growth inhibition of breast cancer cell line MCF-7 by siRNA silencing of Wilms tumor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Navakanit, Ruxapon; Graidist, Potchanapond; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Dechsukum, Chavaboon

    2007-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is sequence-specific inhibition of gene expression induced by double-stranded RNA. Define the role of Wilms tumor 1 gene (WT1) in breast cancer oncogenesis using RNAi. MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which express a high level of WT1, were transfected with synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting WT1 (siRNA(WT1)) resulting in inhibition of WTI expression, as well as growth, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The minimum concentration of siRNA(WT1) for growth inhibition and WT1 silencing was 25 nM and 50 nM respectively. WT1 expression was completely abolished at 200 nM siRNA,. These data suggest that WTI1is indispensable for the survival of breast cancer MCF-7 cell line.

  1. Optimized T-cell receptor-mimic chimeric antigen receptor T cells directed toward the intracellular Wilms Tumor 1 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, S; Purdon, TJ; Daniyan, AF; Koneru, M; Dao, T; Liu, C; Scheinberg, DA; Brentjens, RJ

    2017-01-01

    CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are clinically effective in a limited set of leukemia patients. However, CAR T-cell therapy thus far has been largely restricted to targeting extracellular tumor-associated antigens (TAA). Herein, we report a T-cell receptor-mimic (TCRm) CAR, termed WT1-28z, that is reactive to a peptide portion of the intracellular onco-protein Wilms Tumor 1(WT1), as it is expressed on the surface of the tumor cell in the context of HLA-A*02:01. T cells modified to express WT1-28z specifically targeted and lysed HLA-A*02:01+ WT1+ tumors and enhanced survival of mice engrafted with HLA-A*02:01+, WT1+ leukemia or ovarian tumors. This in vivo functional validation of TCRm CAR T cells provides the proof-of-concept necessary to expand the range of TAA that can be effectively targeted for immunotherapy to include attractive intracellular targets, and may hold great potential to expand on the success of CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27924074

  2. Factors possibly affecting prognosis in children with Wilms' tumor diagnosed before 24 months of age: A report from the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) Wilms Tumor Working Group.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paolo; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica; Bisogno, Gianni; Collini, Paola; Di Martino, Martina; Melchionda, Fraia; Mosa, Clara; Nantron, Marilina; Perotti, Daniela; Puccio, Giuseppe; Serra, Annalisa; Catania, Serena; Spreafico, Filippo

    2017-06-09

    Children with Wilms' tumor (WT) aged under 24 months (infants) have a better prognosis than older patients. Our aim was to study the epidemiology of this age group, with focus on the modality of diagnosis, tumor size, and association with malformations/syndromes, seeking to understand if any of these factors might be related to prognosis. Infants diagnosed with WT between 2003 and February 2010 were evaluated. A query form was used to collect data on the modality of WT diagnosis (symptomatic or incidental), tumor volume, maximum diameter, site, and stage. Data were collected for 117 of 124 WT infants registered. Twenty-four cases had an incidental diagnosis (ID) of renal mass, usually arising from an abdominal ultrasound performed for other reasons, and 93 had been diagnosed based on clinical signs/symptoms. The incidental cohort displayed unifocal disease, mean tumor diameter 5.52 cm, mean tumor volume 84.30 ml, and 14 patients showed associated malformations. Symptomatic patients had mean maximum tumor diameter of 10.18 cm, mean tumor volume of 451.18 ml, and six had associated malformations. Our study showed that 20% of the infants had an ID of WT; they had a relatively smaller nonmetastatic tumor and a higher rate of malformations than infants of the symptomatically diagnosed group, but we did not detect any difference in age at diagnosis between the two groups. Conversely, we found a significant difference in the 5-year event-free survival rate (P = 0.018) between infants under 1 year (96%), more frequently associated with congenital malformations, and infants 1-2 years (80%). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human chromosome 11 suppresses the tumorigenicity of adenovirus transformed baby rat kidney cells: involvement of the Wilms' tumor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Menke, A L; van Ham, R C; Sonneveld, E; Shvarts, A; Stanbridge, E J; Miyagawa, K; van der Eb, A J; Jochemsen, A G

    1995-09-27

    Human chromosome 11 was introduced into adenovirus-transformed baby rat kidney (BRK) cells by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. The resulting microcell hybrids (MCHs) showed a reduced ability to form tumors upon s.c. injection into athymic mice. Further analysis, with the use of defined deletion chromosomes of 11p, indicated that the presence of region 11p13-p12 is necessary for the suppression of tumorigenicity. In contrast, the presence of region 11p15-14.1 appeared to increase the rate of tumor growth. Expression studies on the human Wilms' tumor I (WTI) and the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) genes, which lie in regions 11p13 and 11p15, respectively, suggested the involvement of both genes in determining the degree of suppression of tumorigenicity. Finally, stable expression of a murine WTI protein in the adenovirus-transformed cells resulted in almost complete suppression of tumorigenicity, establishing the WTI protein as a tumor suppressor in this cell system.

  4. Tumor suppressor genes which encode transcriptional repressors: studies on the EGR and Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene products.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F J

    1993-01-01

    The study of the WT1 and EGR-1 transcription factors has provided a molecular paradigm for regulation of a coordinate set of target genes during cell growth and differentiation. The next critical questions that must be addressed are: what are the target genes which are normally regulated by WT1-EGR-1, and how does misregulation of these genes result in tumor formation?

  5. The Rare Association of Spina Bifida and Extrarenal Wilms Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Igbaseimokumo, Usiakimi; Cartwright, Cathy; Lewing, Karen; Hutchison, Lisa; Habeebu, Sultan

    2017-08-01

    The diagnosis of nephroblastoma outside of the kidneys, in the absence of a renal primary tumor, is known as extrarenal Wilms tumor (ERWT). ERWT is an uncommon entity that typically involves the embryonic path of the developing kidneys and gonads. The occurrence of ERWT in a dysraphic spine is uncommon, with no reported cases of preoperative diagnosis, with all cases diagnosed at pathology. These tumors are malignant and ideally should be completely excised. Thus, preoperative diagnosis would be highly desirable. A newborn female was found to have a lumbar lipoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to rule out lipomyelomeningocele. The MRI showed a dorsal lipoma on the terminal spinal cord, as well as a 2 × 2 cm uniformly enhancing mass abutting the bifid posterior elements of L5. The lesion was completely excised, and the pathological diagnosis was ERWT. We report this case with a review of the literature to raise awareness of this association, illustrate the key imaging findings, and document the clinical outcome. The lack of pathognomonic radiologic features makes the preoperative diagnosis extremely difficult, but a diagnosis of ERWT should be considered in the context of a soft tissue mass without the typical imaging features of a hemangioma or teratoma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Benign nodal lesions mimicking metastases from pediatric renal neoplasms: a report of the National Wilms' Tumor Study Pathology Center.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D A; Beckwith, J B; Mierau, G W

    1990-12-01

    Regional lymph node status is a key factor in the staging of pediatric renal tumors on the National Wilms' Tumor Study (NWTS). A review of cases entered on the NWTS has uncovered a number of cases where benign lymph node findings were mistaken for metastases. Most frequently, this was due to the presence of complexes of epithelial cells and Tamm-Horsfall protein within nodal sinuses. The epithelial cells were derived from damaged nephrons, usually resulting from obstruction by tumor. Another epithelial pseudometastic lesion, intranodal squamous epithelial cells, was found to originate from metaplastic calyceal urothelium. Benign mesothelial or coelomic inclusions similar to those previously described in pelvic and periaortic lymph nodes of adult females were found in nodes of four patients, including two boys, who are, to our knowledge, the first to be described with this finding. Other sources of confusion included protrusion of lymphoid follicles or germinal centers into nodal sinuses, thick endothelial cells of postcapillary venules mimicking epithelial tubules, nodal megakaryocytes resembling anaplastic nuclear changes, and histiocytic granulomas. Immunocytochemical methods were useful in evaluating some of these phenomena. Recognition of these pseudometastatic lesions is essential in order to avoid unnecessary and potentially hazardous therapeutic intensification.

  7. Development of hypertension is less frequent after bilateral nephron sparing surgery for bilateral Wilms tumor in a long-term survey.

    PubMed

    Hubertus, Jochen; Günther, Brigitte; Becker, Kristina; Graf, Norbert; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Ferrari, Rudolf; Gruhn, Bernd; Stahl, Robert; von Schweinitz, Dietrich; Stehr, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    The option of nephron sparing surgery for unilateral Wilms tumor has been debated in the recent literature. This procedure is being used increasingly to preserve kidney tissue and function. However, nephron sparing surgery is feasible only for selected cases, and a higher local relapse rate has been observed. Moreover, a significant reduction of nephrons is associated with development of renal hypertension and progressive renal failure. We analyzed outcomes after bilateral partial nephrectomy and unilateral partial plus contralateral total nephrectomy in patients with bilateral Wilms tumor. We analyzed data from the Society of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology database on 22 patients with bilateral Wilms tumor. Kidney size was measured using volumetric analysis of magnetic resonance imaging. Patients were matched with children who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen for other malignancies. Mean kidney volumes after unilateral partial plus total contralateral nephrectomy (66.9 cm(3)) were significantly greater than the reference kidneys (p = 0.028), whereas controls were equal to the bilateral partial nephrectomy group (49.7 cm(3), p = 0.959). Total kidney volume was significantly larger after bilateral partial nephrectomy (102.1 cm(3)) vs unilateral partial plus total contralateral nephrectomy (66.9 cm(3), p = 0.0338). Eight patients (66.7%) had renal hypertension after unilateral partial plus total contralateral nephrectomy but only 2 (20%) after bilateral partial nephrectomy (p = 0.043). Overall survival and relapse rates were equal between the groups and did not correlate with unfavorable histology. Our findings suggest that patients with bilateral Wilms tumor benefit from bilateral nephron sparing surgery. Hypertension is less common after bilateral partial nephrectomy, and rates of local relapse or disease associated death are distributed equally between the groups. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research

  8. Long-term administration of Wilms tumor-1 peptide vaccine in combination with gemcitabine causes severe local skin inflammation at injection sites.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Atsuko; Morita-Hoshi, Yuriko; Kaida, Miho; Wakeda, Takako; Yamaki, Yuni; Kojima, Yasushi; Ueno, Hideki; Kondo, Shunsuke; Morizane, Chigusa; Ikeda, Masafumi; Okusaka, Takuji; Heike, Yuji

    2010-12-01

    The skin toxicity of vaccine therapy at injection sites is generally limited to Grades 1-2 due to the nature of their function. We experienced two cases of severe and prolonged local adverse effects in 25 patients following a Phase I study of gemcitabine and Wilms tumor-1 peptide vaccine mixed with incomplete Freund's adjuvant for inoperable pancreatic or biliary tract cancer. These patients requested to continue the treatment after the study period; however, in the course of compassionate use, they developed unacceptable local skin reactions and terminated their vaccine treatment. One patient (human leukocyte antigen, A0201, 3 mg) developed Grade 3 ulceration at the 10th vaccination and another (human leukocyte antigen, A2402, 1 mg) developed Grade 2 indulation and fibrosis at the 16th vaccination. Skin toxicity occurred at 6.4-8.4 months and continued for several months after the final vaccination during gemcitabine treatment. In these cases, activation or induction of Wilms tumor-1-specific T lymphocytes was not apparent in the peripheral blood despite their severe local reactions. Therefore, we need to monitor patients for late-onset, severe and long-lasting skin reactions at injection sites in Wilms tumor-1 cancer vaccine therapy, particularly for combination treatment with gemcitabine.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic anomalies and phenotype alterations in a newly established cell line from Wilms tumor with diffuse anaplasia.

    PubMed

    Faussillon, Marine; Murakami, Ichiro; Bichat, Magalie; Telvi, Louise; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Nezelof, Christian; Jaubert, Francis; Gogusev, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The novel continuous cell line WT-Pe.1 was established in vitro from Wilms tumor with histological features of diffuse anaplasia. The cultures grew as poorly differentiated epithelial-like cells with pleomorphic polygonal shapes and formation of typical monolayers. WT-Pe.1 cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin, vimentin, laminin, villin, CD10, and CD24 proteins. Conventional cytogenetic analysis by RHG-banding revealed a hypotriploid karyotype with numerous abnormalities including ring chromosomes, double-minutes, homogeneous staining regions, radial structures, dicentrics, and several marker chromosomes. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed DNA copy numbers losses on chromosome segments 1p, 3p, 6q, 9q34.1 approximately q34.3, 11q24 approximately q25, 14q12 approximately qter, 16q, 18q, and 22q11 approximately q13; gain of genomic material was localized on chromosome arms 1q, 4p, 6q, and 7p and the entire chromosome 12. With DNA from the original tumor, copy number losses were detected on chromosomes 1p, 14q, 16q, 17q, and 22q and gains were observed on 1q, 4p, 8q, 12p, 12q, and chromosome 14p. Copy number amplifications of distinct loci were found on 1q21.1 and 4p15.3, as well as an elevated copy number of cyclin D2 (CCND2) and cyclin D associated kinase (CDK4) genes on chromosome 12 (confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization).

  10. Risk stratification and consecutive prognosis progresses in childhood Wilms tumors. Two cases report.

    PubMed

    Diaconescu, S; Olaru, C; Mihailă, D; Aprodu, S G; Miron, I

    2013-01-01

    Even if Wilms' tumour is the commonest primary malignant neoplasia in children, it maintained a continuous interest due to actual therapeutic successes contrasting with the customary delayed diagnosis, malignancy and specific risk factors. Two recent illustrative cases from our clinic are presented. The first one - a little girl of 22 months with repeated admissions for habitual constipation and psychomental disturbances revealed at abdominal ultrasonography a hypo-echoic mass at the superior pole of the right kidney. CT confirmed the presence of a solid homogeneous mass of 23/25 mm without node or distant metastases, suggestive for Wilms' tumour. Conforming to SIOP protocol she received chemotherapy and after 4 weeks a superior polar nephrectomy was performed. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of triphasic nephroblastoma of intermediary risk. Postoperative chemotherapy according to the protocol SIOP assured the cure with a disease free period of 23 months. The second case - also a girl, of 3 years, is admitted for constipation, pain in the left flank and mental retard (QI=40). Ultrasonography determined a huge mass (Ø~6 cm) situated at the superior pole of the left kidney. CT attested a nonhomogeneous, encapsulated tumour image of 6.2/5.4/7.2 cm in large posterolateral contact with the renal parenchyma out of which it appears to be developed. The diagnosis of WT is strongly suggested and after chemotherapy a radical left nephrectomy with initial vessels ligature was performed. Pathology: stage IIb nephroblastoma with focal epithelial anaplasia. After surgery she continued the chemotherapy (HR regime), was cured and excepting a medullar aplasia is in a good health after 24 months. Our both cases were girls under 3 years, presenting nonspecific features: constipation and psychic troubles, the tumour being incidentally discovered by the abdominal ultrasonography. CT established the diagnosis. Conventional chemotherapy framing adapted to the tumour's stage and

  11. Study of Kidney Tumors in Younger Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-18

    Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Congenital Mesoblastic Nephroma; Diffuse Hyperplastic Perilobar Nephroblastomatosis; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Wilms Tumor; Stage V Wilms Tumor

  12. Amine Oxidase Copper-containing 1 (AOC1) Is a Downstream Target Gene of the Wilms Tumor Protein, WT1, during Kidney Development*

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Karin M.; Braun, Julian F.W.; Jacobi, Charlotte L.; Rudigier, Lucas J.; Persson, Anja Bondke; Scholz, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Amine oxidase copper-containing 1 (AOC1; formerly known as amiloride-binding protein 1) is a secreted glycoprotein that catalyzes the degradation of putrescine and histamine. Polyamines and their diamine precursor putrescine are ubiquitous to all organisms and fulfill pivotal functions in cell growth and proliferation. Despite the importance of AOC1 in regulating polyamine breakdown, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control its expression. We report here that the Wilms tumor protein, WT1, which is necessary for normal kidney development, activates transcription of the AOC1 gene. Expression of a firefly luciferase reporter under control of the proximal AOC1 promoter was significantly enhanced by co-transfection of a WT1 expression construct. Binding of WT1 protein to a cis-regulatory element in the AOC1 promoter was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Antisense inhibition of WT1 protein translation strongly reduced Aoc1 transcripts in cultured murine embryonic kidneys and gonads. Aoc1 mRNA levels correlated with WT1 protein in several cell lines. Double immunofluorescent staining revealed a co-expression of WT1 and AOC1 proteins in the developing genitourinary system of mice and rats. Strikingly, induced changes in polyamine homeostasis affected branching morphogenesis of cultured murine embryonic kidneys in a developmental stage-specific manner. These findings suggest that WT1-dependent control of polyamine breakdown, which is mediated by changes in AOC1 expression, has a role in kidney organogenesis. PMID:25037221

  13. Influence of Pulmonary Nodules on Chest Computed Tomography and Risk of Recurrence in Stage IV Wilms Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, Robert S.; Nanda, Ronica H.; Alazraki, Adina; Esiashvili, Natia

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Chest computed tomography (CT) is currently accepted as the main modality for initial disease staging and response assessment in Wilms tumor (WT). However, there is great variability in the number and size of lung metastases at the time of diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy. There is a lack of clinical evidence as to how this variability in tumor burden affects choice of therapy and disease outcome. This study sought to evaluate a previously proposed lung metastases risk stratification system based on CT findings and clinical outcomes in stage IV WT patients. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five pediatric patients with a diagnosis of stage IV WT with evaluable pre- and postdiagnosis CT scans between 1997 and 2012 were included in the analysis. Patients were divided into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories based on the size and number of pulmonary metastases before and after 6 weeks of chemotherapy. Association of the lung risk groups with lung recurrence-free survival and overall survival at each time point was analyzed with relevant covariates. Results: Risk group distribution both at diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy was not influenced by tumor histology. Initial risk grouping suggested an association with disease-free survival at 5 years (P=.074); however, the most significant correlation was with postinduction chemotherapy disease status (P=.027). In patients with an intermediate or high burden of disease after 6 weeks of chemotherapy, despite receiving whole-lung and boost irradiation, survival outcomes were poorer. Conclusions: Pulmonary tumor burden in stage IV WT on chest CT can predict disease outcome. Patients with intermediate- or low-risk disease, especially after induction therapy, have a higher risk for recurrence. After prospective validation, this method may become a valuable tool in adaptation of therapy to improve outcome.

  14. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Newly Diagnosed Sarcomas, Wilms Tumor, or Other Rare Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Childhood Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Parts; Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Childhood Solid Neoplasm; Ewing Sarcoma; Hepatoblastoma; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Central Nervous System Neoplasm; Recurrent Childhood Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Hepatoblastoma; Recurrent Malignant Solid Neoplasm; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Rhabdomyosarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor

  15. Prognostic implications of Wilms' tumor gene (WT1) expression in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Barragán, Eva; Cervera, José; Bolufer, Pascual; Ballester, Sandra; Martín, Guillermo; Fernández, Pascual; Collado, Rosa; Sayas, María Josè; Sanz, Miguel Angel

    2004-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene is overexpressed in patients with most forms of acute leukemia. Several studies have reported the usefulness of quantitative assessment of WT1 expression as a molecular marker of minimal residual disease. However, the biological significance and the prognostic impact of WT1 overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still uncertain. We analyzed the prognostic relevance of WT1 expression in a cohort of 77 adult patients with AML, using a real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction approach. WT1 expression was significantly higher in AML patients than in normal controls (p = 0.0001). The normalized levels of WT1 with respect to the control gene for beta-glucuronidase (GUS) in AML samples showed a median WT1/GUS ratio of 0.93 (range 0-25). We classified the patients into two groups according to this ratio. Forty patients (52%) showed a WT1/GUS ratio 1. A ratio > 1, although significantly associated with FLT3 mutations, was the strongest independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival (p = 0.004), relapse risk (p = 0.005) and cumulative incidence risk (p = 0.01). This adverse prognostic value was more evident in patients aged 60 years and younger. The WT1/GUS ratio is an independent prognostic factor for predicting relapse in patients with AML and it could be included as part of the initial evaluation to establish more defined risk groups.

  16. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential detection of cytoplasmic Wilms tumor 1 expression by immunohistochemistry, western blotting and mRNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Maki, Takehiro; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Kuroda, Aki; Kyogoku, Noriaki; Yamamura, Yoshiyuki; Tabata, Yukiko; Abiko, Takehiro; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Hida, Yasuhiro; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Kaga, Kichizo; Hatanaka, Kanako; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Imai, Naoko; Hirano, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) is considered to be a promising target of cancer treatment because it has been reported to be frequently expressed at high levels in various malignancies. Although WT1-targeted cancer treatment has been initiated, conclusive detection methods for WT1 are not established. The present study aimed to consolidate immunohistochemistry for WT1 with statistical basis. Transfected cells with forced WT1 expression yielded specific western blot bands and nuclear immunostaining; cytoplasmic immunostaining was not specifically recognized. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction were performed in 35 human cell lines using multiple WT1 antibodies and their results were quantified. Relationships among the quantified results were statistically analyzed; the nuclear immunostaining positively correlated with western blot bands and mRNA expression levels, whereas cytoplasmic immunostaining did not. These results indicate that nuclear immunostaining reflects WT1 expression but cytoplasmic immunostaining does not. The nuclear immunostaining was barely (3/541) observed in primary cancer of esophagus, bile duct, pancreas and lung. Although the present study has some limitations, the results indicate that the cytoplasmic immunostaining does not correlate with actual WT1 expression and prompts researchers to carefully evaluate target molecule expression in treatment of cancer.

  18. G1 phase arrest induced by Wilms tumor protein WT1 is abrogated by cyclin/CDK complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Kudoh, T; Ishidate, T; Moriyama, M; Toyoshima, K; Akiyama, T

    1995-01-01

    WT1, the Wilms tumor-suppressor gene, maps to the human chromosomal region 11p13 and encodes a transcriptional repressor, WT1, implicated in controlling normal urogenital development. Microinjection of the WT1 cDNA into quiescent cells or cells in early to mid G1 phase blocked serum-induced cell cycle progression into S phase. The activity of WT1 varied significantly depending on the presence or absence of an alternatively spliced region located upstream of the zinc finger domain. The inhibitory activity of WT1 was abrogated by the overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 as well as cyclin D1/CDK4. Furthermore, both CDK4- and CDK2-associated kinase activities were downregulated in cells overexpressing WT1, whereas the levels of CDK4, CDK2, and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged. These findings suggest that inhibition of the activity of cyclin/CDK complexes may be involved in mediating the WT1-induced cell cycle block. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753836

  19. Frequency and timing of loss of imprinting at 11p13 and 11p15 in Wilms' tumor development.

    PubMed

    Brown, Keith W; Power, Frances; Moore, Beth; Charles, Adrian K; Malik, Karim T A

    2008-07-01

    Epigenetic changes occur frequently in Wilms' tumor (WT), especially loss of imprinting (LOI) of IGF2/H19 at 11p15. Our previous results have identified imprinted transcripts (WT1-AS and AWT1) from the WT1 locus at 11p13 and showed LOI of these in some WTs. In this article, we set out to test the relationship between LOI at 11p13 and 11p15 and their timing in WT progression relative to other genetic changes. We found a higher level (83%) of 11p13 LOI in WT than of 11p15 LOI (71%). There was no correlation between methylation levels at the 11p13 and 11p15 differentially methylated regions or between allelic expression of WT1-AS/AWT1 and IGF2. Interestingly, retention of normal imprinting at 11p13 was associated with a small group of relatively late-onset, high-stage WTs. An examination of genetic and epigenetic alterations in nephrogenic rests, which are premalignant WT precursors, showed that LOI at both 11p13 and 11p15 occurred before either 16q loss of heterozygosity (LOH) or 7p LOH. This suggests that these LOH events are very unlikely to be a cause of LOI but that LOH may act by potentiating the effects of overexpression of IGF2 and/or WT1-AS/AWT1 that result from LOI.

  20. Outcomes following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant for patients with relapsed Wilms' tumor: a CIBMTR retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Malogolowkin, M H; Hemmer, M T; Le-Rademacher, J; Hale, G A; Metha, P A; Smith, A R; Kitko, C; Abraham, A; Abdel-Azim, H; Dandoy, C; Angel Diaz, M; Gale, R P; Guilcher, G; Hayashi, R; Jodele, S; Kasow, K A; MacMillian, M L; Thakar, M; Wirk, B M; Woolfrey, A; Thiel, E L

    2017-09-04

    Despite the marked improvement in the overall survival (OS) for patients diagnosed with Wilms' tumor (WT), the outcomes for those who experience relapse have remained disappointing. We describe the outcomes of 253 patients with relapsed WT who received high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) between 1990 and 2013, and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research. The 5-year estimates for event-free survival (EFS) and OS were 36% (95% confidence interval (CI); 29-43%) and 45% (95 CI; 38-51%), respectively. Relapse of primary disease was the cause of death in 81% of the population. EFS, OS, relapse and transplant-related mortality showed no significant differences when broken down by disease status at transplant, time from diagnosis to transplant, year of transplant or conditioning regimen. Our data suggest that HDT followed by autologous HCT for relapsed WT is well tolerated and outcomes are similar to those reported in the literature. As attempts to conduct a randomized trial comparing maintenance chemotherapy with consolidation versus HDT followed by stem cell transplant have failed, one should balance the potential benefits with the yet unknown long-term risks. As disease recurrence continues to be the most common cause of death, future research should focus on the development of consolidation therapies for those patients achieving complete response to therapy.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 4 September 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.178.

  1. Wilms tumor gene (WT1) as a new marker for the detection of minimal residual disease in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, H

    1998-06-01

    WT1 (Wilms tumor gene) expression is a new tumor marker of leukemic blast cells of AML, ALL, and CML. Minimal residual disease (MRD) of leukemia can be detected at frequencies as low as 1 in 10(3) to 10(4) normal bone marrow (BM) cells and 1 in 10(5) normal peripheral blood (PB) cells by means of the quantitation of expression levels of the WT1 gene using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This is regardless of the types of leukemia or the presence or absence of tumor-specific DNA markers. Thus, the WT1 assay makes it possible to rapidly assess the effectiveness of treatment and to evaluate the degree of eradication of leukemic cells in individual leukemia patients. Moreover, molecular relapse using PCR can be diagnosed by the monitoring of WT1 expression levels in BM or PB 1-24 months (means, 7 months for BM and 8 months for PB) before the clinical relapse became apparent. In case of rapid or gradual increase in WT1 expression levels to or over 10(-2) after return to normal BM levels during CR; or retention of the WTI expression at levels near or over 10(-2) in BM without return to normal BM levels even in CR (WT1 expression level in K562 cells was defined as 1.0), it seems that clinical relapse is impending. Since WT1 antisense oligomers inhibit the growth of leukemic cells, it is apparent that the WT1 gene plays an important role in leukemogenesis.

  2. Tumor-specific loss of 11p15. 5 alleles in del11p13 Wilms tumor and in familial adrenocortical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, I.; Grandjouan, S.; Couillin, P.; Barichard, F.; Huerre-Jeanpierre, C.; Glaser, T.; Philip, T.; Lenoir, G.; Chaussain, J.L.; Junien, C. )

    1989-05-01

    The authors have compared constitutional and tumor genotypes in nine cases of hereditary Wilms tumor (WT) and in three unrelated cases of familial adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC). Since susceptibility to these tumors can be observed in malformation syndromes associated with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13 (WT) and with a constitutional duplication of band 11p15.5 (WT, ADCC), they investigated these two candidate regions by using 11p polymorphic markers. As expected, somatic chromosomal events, resulting in a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5, were observed in the tumor of two familial cases of adrenocortical carcinoma. Surprisingly, however, analysis of the WT of two patients with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13, associated with aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome), revealed a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5. These data therefore suggest that observation of a specific loss of heterozygosity may not necessarily point to the site of the initial germinal mutation. Together with previous similar observations of a loss of heterozygosity limited to 11p15.5 in breast cancer and in rhabdomyosarcoma, the data suggest that region 11p15.5 may carry a non-tissue-specific gene that could be involved in genetic predisposition, in tumor progression, or in both.

  3. A novel sphingosine kinase 1 inhibitor (SKI-5C) induces cell death of Wilms' tumor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Heng; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Zhao, He; Li, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Fang; Wu, Yi; Lu, Jun; Li, Yan-Hong; Du, Wei-Wei; Ren, Jun-Li; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian; He, Wei-Qi; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is over-expressed in many cancers and therefore serves as a biomarker for cancer prognosis. SKI-5C is a new SphK1 inhibitor, and until now its molecular function in Wilms' tumor cells remained unknown. Here, using CCK-8 and nude mice experiments we assessed cell growth in Wilms' tumor cell lines (SK-NEP-1 and G401) in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that SphK1 is highly expressed in SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells, and through annexin V/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry analysis, we detected cell apoptosis. Treatment with SKI-5C inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of SK-NEP-1 and G401 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SKI-5C treatment inhibited the growth of SK-NEP-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice, with few side effects. Our microarray analysis revealed that SKI-5C-treated SK-NEP-1 cells mostly downregulated PRKACA and significantly inhibited phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and NF-κB p65. These results imply that SKI-5C induces apoptosis of SK-NEP-1 cells through the PRKACA/MAPK/NF-κB pathway. While, further research is required to determine the underlying details, these results provide new clues for the molecular mechanism of cell death induced by SKI-5C and suggest that SKI-5C may act as new candidate drug for Wilms' tumor.

  4. Novel frame shift mutations ('A' deletion) observed in exon 9 of Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene in a patient reported with glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pasupuleti, Santhosh Kumar; Katari, Venkatesh; Lokanathan, Srikanth; Uppu, Venkateswara Prasad; Thummaginjala, Syama Sundar; Akkamgari, Ram Prasad Reddy; Ayapati, Tyagi; Kottu, Radhika; Potukuchi, Venkata Gurunadha Krishna Sarma

    2014-08-01

    Wilms' tumor-suppressor gene-1 (WT1) is a transcription factor that contains four zinc-finger motifs at the C-terminus and plays a crucial role in kidney and gonad development. We have identified primitive glomeruloid formation using immunohistochemistry in a patient who was clinically diagnosed with a Wilms' tumor. In order to understand the involvement of mutations in the WT1 gene, the genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of the patient (18/F). Exon 9 of the WT1 gene was amplified and sequenced. The obtained sequence was BLAST searched against the transcript variants (TV) of the WT1 gene. An amplified exon 9 sequence of the WT1 gene showing similarity with exon 9 of TV-A, F and exon 10 of TV-B, D and E with a deletion of single nucleotide 'A' causing frame shift in the 4th zinc finger domain of the WT1 protein resulted in Wilms' tumor condition. The deletion position is variable with different transcript variants and they are present at: for TV-A c.1592delA, p.468, for TV-F c.1053delA, p.259, for TV-B c.1643delA, p.485, for TV-D c.1652 delA, p.488, and for TV-E c.1095delA, p.273; all these variations resulted in frame shift mutation. In order to substantiate these results in silico analysis was carried out; the structural superimposition of wild type and mutant WT1 structures showed that the mutated region exhibited a different confirmation with RMSD of 1.759Å. Therefore, these results conclusively explain the mutation in the WT1 gene that leads to structural changes contributing to glomerulosclerosis.

  5. Prognostic impact of Wilms tumor gene mutations in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Magda Abdel Aziz; Kamal Shaaban, Howyda M; Elghannam, Doaa M

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene mutations were detected in patients with most forms of acute leukemia. However, the biological significance and the prognostic impact of WT1 mutation in Egyptian patients with acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) are still uncertain. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and clinical relevance of WT1 gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK). Exons 7 and 9 of WT1 were screened in samples from 216 adult NK-AML using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism techniques. Twenty-three patients (10.6%) harbored WT1 mutations. Younger ages and higher marrow blasts were significantly associated with WT1 mutations (P = 0.006 and 0.003 respectively). Complete remission rates were significantly lower in patients with WT1 mutations than those with WT1 wild-type (P = 0.015). Resistance, relapse, and mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with WT1 mutations than those without (P = 0.041, 0.016, and 0.008 respectively). WT1 mutations were inversely associated with NPM1 mutations (P = 0.007). Patients with WT1 mutations had worse disease-free survival (P < 0.001) and overall survival (P < 0.001) than patients with WT1 wild-type. In multivariable analyses, WT1 mutations independently predicted worse DFS (P < 0.001; hazard ratio [HR] 0.036) and overall survival (P = 0.001; HR = 0.376) when controlling for age, total leukocytic count (TLC), and NPM1 mutational status. In conclusion, WT1 mutations are a negative prognostic indicator in intensively treated patients with AML-NK, may be a part of molecularly based risk assessment and risk-adapted treatment stratification of patients with AML-NK.

  6. A structure-function analysis of transcriptional repression mediated by the WT1, Wilms' tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Madden, S L; Cook, D M; Rauscher, F J

    1993-07-01

    The chromosome 11p13 Wilms' tumor locus (wt1) encodes a zinc finger-containing transcription factor (WT1). WT1 binds to the consensus sequence (5'-GCGGGGGCG-3') and represses transcription when bound to this site in vivo. The mechanism of repression is not yet defined. To investigate the mechanisms of transcriptional repression and map the domains of WT1 responsible, we constructed hybrid proteins between the yeast GAL4 1-147 DNA binding domain and WT1. Fusion of a 298 amino acid glutamine-proline-rich N-terminal segment of WT1 to the GAL4 DNA binding domain created a potent transcriptional repressor. The use of N- and C-terminal truncations of this segment demonstrated that as few as 96 amino acids were required for active repression by GAL4-WT1 hybrid proteins in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. However, the truncated GAL4-WT1 fusion proteins functioned poorly as repressors in embryonic kidney-derived 293 cells, suggesting cell type-specific requirements for transcriptional repression. Site-directed mutagenesis of the WT1 repression domain revealed that deletion of homopolymeric proline and glycine regions, as well as single amino acid changes, partially inactivated the repression function. Single repressor binding sites placed upstream of the transcription start site conferred WT1-mediated repression to a heterologous promoter, whereas multiple sites resulted in additive (non-synergistic) increases in transcriptional repression. Significant repression of transcription was observed when binding sites were placed 760 base pairs upstream or 1000 base pairs downstream relative to the site of transcription initiation. We conclude that the transcriptional repression function of WT1 is contained in the N-terminal, non-DNA binding domain of the protein and that repression can be functionally transferred to a heterologous DNA binding domain.

  7. Advantages of Whole-liver Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Children With Wilms Tumor and Liver Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Pokhrel, Damodar; Gopalakrishnan, Mahesh; Zhang, Yunkai

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in children with Wilms tumor (WT) undergoing whole-liver (WL) RT. Methods and Materials: Computed tomography simulation scans of 10 children, either 3 (3D) or 4-dimensional (4D), were used for this study. The WL PTV was determined by the 3D or 4D liver volumes, with a margin of 1 cm. A total of 40 WL RT plans were performed: 10 each for left- and right-sided WT with IMRT and anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques. The radiation dose-volume coverage of the WL planning target volume (PTV), remaining kidney, and other organs were analyzed and compared. Results: The 95% dose coverage to WL PTV for left and right WT were as follows: 97% ± 4% (IMRT), 83% ± 8% (AP-PA) (P<.01) and 99% ± 1% (IMRT), 94% ± 5% (AP-PA) (P<.01), respectively. When 3D WL PTV was used for RT planning, the AP-PA technique delivered 95% of dose to only 78% ± 13% and 88% ± 8% of 4D liver volume. For left WT, the right kidney V15 and V10 for IMRT were 29% ± 7% and 55% ± 8%, compared with 61% ± 29% (P<.01) and 78% ± 25% (P<.01) with AP-PA. For right WT, the left kidney V15 and V10 were 0 ± 0 and 2% ± 3% for IMRT, compared with 25% ± 19% (P<.01) and 40% ± 31% (P<.01) for AP-PA. Conclusions: The use of IMRT and 4D treatment planning resulted in the delivery of a higher RT dose to the liver compared with the standard AP-PA technique. Whole-liver IMRT also delivered a significantly lower dose to the remaining kidney.

  8. TARGET Researchers Identify Mutations in SIX1/2 and microRNA Processing Genes in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers molecularly characterized favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT), a pediatric renal cancer. Comprehensive genome and transcript analyses revealed single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in microRNA processing genes (15% of FHWT patients) and Sine Oculis Homeobox Homolog 1/2 (SIX1/2) genes (7% of FHWT patients). SIX1/2 genes play a critical role in renal development and were not previously associated with FHWT, thus presenting a novel role for SIX1/2 pathway aberrations in this disease.

  9. Distinct global binding patterns of the Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) −KTS and +KTS isoforms in leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ullmark, Tove; Järvstråt, Linnea; Sandén, Carl; Montano, Giorgia; Jernmark-Nilsson, Helena; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Lennartsson, Andreas; Fioretos, Thoas; Drott, Kristina; Vidovic, Karina; Nilsson, Björn; Gullberg, Urban

    2017-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) acts as an oncogene in acute myeloid leukemia. A naturally occurring alternative splice event between zinc fingers three and four, removing or retaining three amino acids (±KTS), is believed to change the DNA binding affinity of WT1, although there are conflicting data regarding the binding affinity and motifs of the different isoforms. Increased expression of the WT1 −KTS isoform at the expense of the WT1 +KTS isoform is associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia. We determined the genome-wide binding pattern of WT1 −KTS and WT1 +KTS in leukemic K562 cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing. We discovered that the WT1 −KTS isoform predominantly binds close to transcription start sites and to enhancers, in a similar fashion to other transcription factors, whereas WT1 +KTS binding is enriched within gene bodies. We observed a significant overlap between WT1 −KTS and WT1 +KTS target genes, despite the binding sites being distinct. Motif discovery revealed distinct binding motifs for the isoforms, some of which have been previously reported as WT1 binding sites. Additional analyses showed that both WT1 −KTS and WT1 +KTS target genes are more likely to be transcribed than non-targets, and are involved in cell proliferation, cell death, and development. Our study provides evidence that WT1 −KTS and WT1 +KTS share target genes yet still bind distinct locations, indicating isoform-specific regulation in transcription of genes related to cell proliferation and differentiation, consistent with the involvement of WT1 in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27612989

  10. Ataxia-telangiectasia and wilms tumor: reduced treatment but early relapse.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villena, Ana; Cormenzana, María; de Prada, Inmaculada; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Aleo, Esther

    2013-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, a high incidence of lymphoreticular tumors, and an increased sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. The appropriate cancer therapy remains unknown because of high toxicity rates with full-dose conventional protocols. We present a patient with A-T and nephroblastoma, who received an adapted treatment regimen. To our knowledge this is the second report on nephroblastoma in a patient with A-T but the first with confirmed premortem studies. Although the patient tolerated the chemotherapy regimen well, the patient relapsed and died a year after initial diagnosis.

  11. Wilms tumor 1 peptide vaccination after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Tetsuo; Hashii, Yoshiko; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Nakata, Jun; Oji, Yusuke; Oka, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Although the prognosis of leukemia patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has greatly improved, relapse is still a major cause of death after HSCT. Cancer vaccines may have the potential to enhance the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. The post–allogeneic HSCT period provides a unique platform for vaccination, because (I) tumor burden is minimal, (II) lymphopenia allows for rapid expansion of cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), (III) donor-derived CTLs are not exhausted, (IV) inflammation is caused by alloreactions, and (V) the abundance of regulatory T cells is low due to their late recovery. Tumor cell lysates, dendritic cells (DCs), and peptides derived from leukemia-associated antigens (LAAs) have been used as vaccines. Clinical trials with several types of vaccines for post-HSCT patients revealed that the vaccination induced an immunological response and might benefit patients with minimal residual disease; however, the efficacy of this approach must be examined in randomized studies. In addition, it is important to consider the combination of cancer vaccine with checkpoint antibodies, recently shown to be useful in treating leukemia relapse after HSCT. PMID:28078270

  12. The Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1) rs2234593 variant is a prognostic factor in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Niavarani, Ahmadreza; Horswell, Stuart; Sadri, Ramin; Bonnet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within Wilms tumor-1 (WT1) exon 7, rs16754, has been arguably reported to be implicated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) prognosis. We assessed the potential association of selected WT1 SNPs as well as WT1 mutations in normal karyotype (NK)-AML and evaluated the prognostic value of these normal gene variants. Diagnostic samples from a series of 474 young adult NK-AML patients were used to genotype five WT1 SNPs using TaqMan assays and to directly sequence WT1 exons 7 and 9. Analysis of five WT1 gene variants showed an association of rs2234593 allele C with WT1 Ex7 mutation. Prognostic study of the same variants identified rs2234593 significantly associated with relapse and overall survival (OS). Patients with rs2234593AA/AC showed significantly higher 10-year OS (50 vs 36 %, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.69 (0.52–0.90), p = 0.006) and lower cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) (36 vs 51 %, HR = 0.62 (0.45–0.86), p = 0.004) compared to those with rs2234593CC. The effect of AA genotype on CIR remained significant after adjustment for basic covariates including FLT3 internal-tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) mutations (HR = 0.60 (0.41–0.89), p = 0.009), with some evidence of improved survival (HR = 0.75 (0.55–1.03), p = 0.07). A multivariate analysis showed WT1 Ex7-mutant as the major relapse predictor, with a tendency for rs2234593-A effect after allowing for Ex7 mutation (p = 0.07). No adjusted risk benefit was found for previously reported rs16754-G. In conclusion, WT1 normal gene variant rs2234593 is associated with mutational status of WT1 Ex7 and is a further prognostic marker independent from FLT3-ITD and NPM1 mutations in NK-AML.

  13. Outcomes of Patients With Revised Stage I Clear Cell Sarcoma of Kidney Treated in National Wilms Tumor Studies 1-5

    SciTech Connect

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Seibel, Nita L.; Ritchey, Michael; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Grundy, Paul E.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcomes of children with revised stage I clear cell sarcoma of the kidney (CCSK) using the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTS)-5 staging criteria after multimodality treatment on NWTS 1-5 protocols. Methods and Materials: All CCSK patients enrolled in the National Wilms Tumor Study Group protocols had their pathology slides reviewed, and only those determined to have revised stage I tumors according to the NWTS-5 staging criteria were included in the present analysis. All patients were treated with multimodality therapy according to the NWTS 1-5 protocols. Results: A total of 53 children were identified as having stage I CCSK. All patients underwent primary surgery with radical nephrectomy. The chemotherapy regimens used were as follows: regimen A, C, F, or EE in 4 children (8%); regimen DD or DD4A in 33 children (62%); regimen J in 4 children (8%); and regimen I in 12 children (22%). Forty-six patients (87%) received flank radiation therapy (RT). Seven children (13%) did not receive flank RT. The median delay between surgery and the initiation of RT was 9 days (range, 3-61). The median RT dose was 10.8 Gy (range, 10-36). The flank RT doses were as follows: 10.5 or 10.8 Gy in 25 patients (47%), 11-19.9 Gy in 2 patients (4%), 20-29.9 Gy in 9 patients (17%), and 30-40 Gy in 10 patients (19%). The median follow-up for the entire group was 17 years (range, 2-36). The relapse-free and cancer-specific survival rate was 100% at the last follow-up examination. Conclusions: The present results have demonstrated that children with revised stage I CCSK using the NWTS-5 staging criteria have excellent survival rates despite the use of varying RT doses and chemotherapy regimens in the NWTS 1-5 protocols.

  14. Correlation of germ-line mutations and two-hit inactivation of the WT1 gene with Wilms tumors of stromal–predominant histology

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, V.; Schneider, S.; Figge, A.; Wildhardt, G.; Harms, D.; Schmidt, D.; Weirich, A.; Ludwig, R.; Royer-Pokora, B.

    1997-01-01

    The WT1 gene, located on chromosome 11p13, is mutated in a low number of Wilms tumors (WTs). Germ-line mutations in the WT1 gene are found in patients with bilateral WT and/or associated genital tract malformations (GU). We have identified 19 hemizygous WT1 gene mutations/deletions in 64 patient samples. The histology of the tumors with mutations was stromal–predominant in 13, triphasic in 3, blastemal–predominant in 1, and unknown in 2 cases. Thirteen of 21 patients with stromal–predominant tumors had WT1 mutations and 10 of these were present in the germ line. Of the patients with germ-line alterations, six had GU and a unilateral tumor, two had a bilateral tumor and normal GU tracts, and two had a unilateral tumor and normal GU. Three mutations were tumor-specific and were found in patients with unilateral tumors without GU. These data demonstrate a correlation of WT1 mutations with stromal–predominant histology, suggesting that a germ-line mutation in WT1 predisposes to the development of tumors with this histology. Twelve mutations are nonsense mutations resulting in truncations at different positions in the WT1 protein and only two are missense mutations. Of the stromal–predominant tumors, 67% showed loss of heterozygosity, and in one tumor a different somatic mutation in addition to the germ-line mutation was identified. These data show that in a large proportion of a histopathologically distinct subset of WTs the classical two-hit inactivation model, with loss of a functional WT1 protein, is the underlying cause of tumor development. PMID:9108089

  15. Stages of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, such as the chest and abdomen. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ... computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ...

  16. Multiple tumor types including leiomyoma and Wilms tumor in a patient with Gorlin syndrome due to 9q22.3 microdeletion encompassing the PTCH1 and FANC-C loci.

    PubMed

    Garavelli, Livia; Piemontese, Maria Rosaria; Cavazza, Alberto; Rosato, Simonetta; Wischmeijer, Anita; Gelmini, Chiara; Albertini, Enrico; Albertini, Giuseppe; Forzano, Francesca; Franchi, Fabrizia; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    Gorlin syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant condition mainly characterized by the development of mandibular keratocysts which often have their onset during the second decade of life and/or multiple basal cell carcinoma (BCC) normally arising during the third decade. Cardiac and ovarian fibromas can be found. Patients with NBCCS develop the childhood brain malignancy medulloblastoma (now often called primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor [PNET]) in 5% of cases. The risk of other malignant neoplasms is not clearly increased, although lymphoma and meningioma can occur in this condition. Wilms tumor has been mentioned in the literature four times. We describe a patient with a 10.9 Mb 9q22.3 deletion spanning 9q22.2 through 9q31.1 that includes the entire codifying sequence of the gene PTCH1, with Wilms tumor, multiple neoplasms (lung, liver, mesenteric, gastric and renal leiomyomas, lung typical carcinoid tumor, adenomatoid tumor of the pleura) and a severe clinical presentation. We propose including leiomyomas among minor criteria of the NBCCS.

  17. Insulin-like growth factor II in human adrenal and pheochromocytomas and Wilms tumors: expression at the mRNA and protein level

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbacher, G.K.; Irminger, J.C.; Zapf, J.; Ziegler, W.H.; Humbel, R.E.

    1987-02-01

    Two forms of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II with molecular masses of 10 and 7.5 kDa, respectively, were found in tumor tissue from human adrenal pheochromocytomas. The tumors contained 5.3-7.1 ..mu..g of immunoreactive IGF-II per g of tissue, which is about 20 times more than in adrenal medulla. The total bioactive IGF measured by radioimmunoassay in the pheochromocytomas exceeded that in normal liver or kidney, which contained only the 7.5-kDa IGF-II species, by a factor of approx.100. By contrast, the amount of IGF-I was just measurable and did not vary significantly between tumor and normal tissue. The high amounts of IGF-II in the pheochromocytomas were not reflected, however, by a corresponding increase of mRNA. The opposite situations was found in Wilms tumors, where IGF-II content was in the same range as in nontumor tissues despite increased expression of IGF-II mRNA.

  18. Impriniting of human H19: Allele-specific CpG methylation, loss of the active allele in Wilms tumor, and potential for somatic allele switching

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Shields, T.; Crenshaw, T.; Hao, Y.; Moulton, T.; Tycko, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Genomic imprinting and monoallelic gene expression appear to play a role in human genetic disease and tumorigenesis. The human H19 gene, at chromosome 11p15, has previously been shown to be monoallelically expressed. Since CpG methylation has been implicated in imprinting, the authors analyzed methylation of H19 DNA. In fetal and adult organs the transcriptionally silent H19 allele was extensively hypermethylated through the entire gene and its promoter, and, consistent with a functional role for DNA methylation, expression of an H19 promoter-reporter construct was inhibited by in vitro methylation. Gynogenetic ovarian teratomas were found to contain only hypomethylated H19 DNA, suggesting that the expressed H19 allele might be maternal. This was confirmed by analysis of 11p15 polymorphisms in a patient with Wilms tumor. The tumor had lost the maternal 11p15, and H19 expression in the normal kidney was exclusively from this allele. Imprinting of human H19 appears to be susceptible to tissue-specific modulation in somatic development; in one individual, cerebellar cells were found to express only the otherwise silent allele. Implications of these findings for the role of DNA methylation in imprinting and for H19 as a candidate imprinted tumor-suppressor gene are discussed. 57 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Association of chromosome arm 16q loss with loss of imprinting of insulin-like growth factor-II in Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Mummert, Stephanie K; Lobanenkov, Victor A; Feinberg, Andrew P

    2005-06-01

    The most common known molecular defect in Wilms tumor (WT) of the kidney, the most frequent solid tumor of childhood, is loss of imprinting (LOI) of the insulin-like growth factor-II gene (IGF2), which involves activation of the normally silent maternal allele of the gene and hypermethylation of a differentially methylated region upstream of the H19 gene. Hypermethylation impairs binding of the insulator protein CTCF, allowing activation of IGF2 by an enhancer shared between IGF2 and H19. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 16q22.1 is found in 15% of WTs, and 16q22.1 harbors CTCF, raising the possibility that reduced CTCF could lead to LOI of IGF2 in some cases. We hypothesized that there is an association between LOH of 16q and LOI of IGF2 in WT. In 40 WTs examined, LOH of 16q was found in five, one of which also showed LOH of 11p15. All of the remaining four tumors showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 13 of 32 WTs without LOH of 16q or 11p (P = 0.040). When published data not previously analyzed in this manner were included, 6 of 6 tumors with 16q LOH (and without LOH of 11p) showed LOI of IGF2, compared to 24 of 52 without LOH (P = 0.015). Thus, a genetic (16q LOH) and an epigenetic (LOI of IGF2) alteration in WT are linked, the first such association described. Finally, haploinsufficiency of CTCF may be the basis of this association, given that CTCF expression in tumors with 16q LOH was 48% that of tumors without LOH.

  20. Extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, A K; Reddy, M K; Javvadi, V; Kannan, T

    2011-06-01

    We report an unusual case of extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour in a 15-month-old male child. The tumour was retroperitoneal in location and consisted of triphasic Wilms' tumour elements, along with the presence of heterologous components. The heterologous teratoid elements were composed of predominantly glandular epithelium with the presence of focal skeletal muscle, adipose and neuroglial tissues. Although extrarenal Wilms' tumours have been documented in the literature, only a few cases have been noted to date. We present the relevant clinical, radiological, histomorphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical features of this rare tumour, and discuss the various theories of its histogenesis.

  1. A 4-gene expression score associated with high levels of Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1) expression is an adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Niavarani, Ahmadreza; Herold, Tobias; Reyal, Yasmin; Sauerland, Maria C; Buchner, Thomas; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Bohlander, Stefan K; Valk, Peter J M; Bonnet, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1) expression level is implicated in the prognosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We hypothesized that a gene expression profile associated with WT1 expression levels might be a good surrogate marker. We identified high WT1 gene sets by comparing the gene expression profiles in the highest and lowest quartiles of WT1 expression in two large AML studies. Two high WT1 gene sets were found to be highly correlated in terms of the altered genes and expression profiles. We identified a 17-probe set signature of the high WT1 set as the optimal prognostic predictor in the first AML set, and showed that it was able to predict prognosis in the second AML series after adjustment for European LeukaemiaNet genetic groups. The gene signature also proved to be of prognostic value in a third AML series of 163 samples assessed by RNA sequencing, demonstrating its cross-platform consistency. This led us to derive a 4-gene expression score, which faithfully predicted adverse outcome. In conclusion, a short gene signature associated with high WT1 expression levels and the resultant 4-gene expression score were found to be predictive of adverse prognosis in AML. This study provides new clues to the molecular pathways underlying high WT1 states in leukaemia. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Coordinate patterns of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Wilms tumor 1 expression in the histopathologic distinction of ovarian from endometrial serous adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; James, Samuel; Desouki, Mohamed M; Khabele, Dineo

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether composite or coordinate immunoexpression patterns of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene can significantly distinguish between endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC) and ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC). Immunohistochemical analyses were performed on whole tissue sections from 22 uterus-confined ESCs and on a tissue microarray of 140 high-grade, pan-stage OSCs, using antibodies to ER, PR, and WT-1. Estrogen receptor, PR, and WT1 expressions were present in 37%, 49%, and 81% of OSC, respectively, but these markers were also present in 18%, 27%, and 36% of ESC. The ER+/PR+/WT1+ coordinate profile was identified in 33.6% of OSC but in none of ESC (P = .0006), resulting in a calculated sensitivity and specificity of this profile for OSC of 33.6% and 100%, respectively. By contrast, the ER-/PR-/WT1- coordinate profile was identified in 41% of ESC but in only 6.4% of OSC (P = .0001), resulting in a calculated sensitivity and specificity of this profile for ESC of 50% and 94%. In summary, in the differential diagnosis between OSC and ESC, positivity for all 3 markers favors an extrauterine origin, whereas negativity for all 3 markers is supportive of an endometrial origin. The use of single markers for this purpose is not recommended, as each lacks optimal discriminatory power. Coordinate profiles, in general, have a high specificity but low sensitivity in this differential diagnosis.

  3. WT1 exon 1 deletion/insertion mutations in Wilms tumor patients, associated with di- and trinucleotide repeats and deletion hotspot consensus sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, V; Jaffe, N; Saunders, G F; Strong, L C; Villalba, F; Ruteshouser, E C

    1995-01-01

    The WT1 gene is known to play a role in at least some cases of Wilms tumor (WT). The first exon of the gene is highly GC rich and contains many short tandem di- and trinucleotide repeats, interrupted direct repeats, and CCTG (CAGG) motifs that have been identified as hotspots for DNA deletions. We have analyzed 80 WT patient samples for mutations in the first exon of WT1, either by SSCP analysis of the first 131 bp of the coding portion of WT1 exon 1 or by size analysis of a PCR product encompassing the coding region of exon 1 in addition to flanking noncoding regions. We report here the occurrence of somatic and germ-line deletion and insertion mutations in this portion of the gene in four WT patients. The mutations are flanked by short direct repeats, and the breakpoints are within 5 nt of a CCTG (CAGG) sequence. These data suggest that a distinctive mutational mechanism, previously unrecognized for this gene, is important for the generation of DNA mutations at the WT1 locus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7825606

  4. Downregulation of Wilms' tumor gene (WT1) is not a prerequisite for erythroid or megakaryocytic differentiation of the leukemic cell line K562.

    PubMed

    Svedberg, H; Chylicki, K; Gullberg, U

    1999-06-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene (WT1) encodes a transcription factor of the zinc finger type. A high expression of WT1 has been detected in a range of acute leukemias, and WT1 is downregulated during induced differentiation of some leukemic cell lines. Overexpression of WT1 in some myeloid cell lines confers resistance to differentiation induction. These observations suggest that a high WT1 expression in hematopoietic cells is incompatible with differentiation. In this study, each of the four different isoforms of WT1 was constitutively overexpressed in the leukemic cell line K562. K562 cells express endogenous WT1, which is downregulated as a response to induced differentiation along the erythroid and megakaryocytic pathways. We now demonstrate that a forced exogenous expression of the four different isoforms of WT1 in K562 does not affect the differentiation response, as judged by accumulation of hemoglobin in response to hemin or the expression of megakaryocytic cell surface markers in response to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). We conclude that downregulation of WT1 during induced differentiation of K562 cells is not a prerequisite for erythroid or megakaryocytic differentiation of these cells.

  5. Adoptive transfer of genetically modified Wilms' tumor 1–specific T cells in a novel malignant skull base meningioma model

    PubMed Central

    Iwami, Kenichiro; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohno, Masasuke; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Mineno, Junichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Okamoto, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary intracranial neoplasms. Despite significant advances in modern therapies, the management of malignant meningioma and skull base meningioma remains a challenge. Thus, the development of new treatment modalities is urgently needed for these difficult-to-treat meningiomas. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of build-in short interfering RNA-based Wilms' tumor protein (WT1)–targeted adoptive immunotherapy in a reproducible mouse model of malignant skull base meningioma that we recently established. Methods We compared WT1 mRNA expression in human meningioma tissues and gliomas by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Human malignant meningioma cells (IOMM-Lee cells) were labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and implanted at the skull base of immunodeficient mice by using the postglenoid foramen injection (PGFi) technique. The animals were sacrificed at specific time points for analysis of tumor formation. Two groups of animals received adoptive immunotherapy with control peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or WT1-targeted PBMCs. Results High levels of WT1 mRNA expression were observed in many meningioma tissues and all meningioma cell lines. IOMM-Lee-GFP cells were successfully implanted using the PGFi technique, and malignant skull base meningiomas were induced in all mice. The systemically delivered WT1-targeted PBMCs infiltrated skull base meningiomas and significantly delayed tumor growth and increased survival time. Conclusions We have established a reproducible mouse model of malignant skull base meningioma. WT1-targeted adoptive immunotherapy appears to be a promising approach for the treatment of difficult-to-treat meningiomas. PMID:23460320

  6. Constitutional 560.49 kb chromosome 2p24.3 duplication including the MYCN gene identified by SNP chromosome microarray analysis in a child with multiple congenital anomalies and bilateral Wilms tumor.

    PubMed

    Micale, Mark A; Embrey, Bedford; Macknis, Jacqueline K; Harper, Cheryl E; Aughton, David J

    2016-12-01

    Fewer than 100 patients with partial chromosome 2p trisomy have been reported. Clinical features are variable and depend on the size of the duplicated segment, but generally include psychomotor delay, facial anomalies, congenital heart defect, and other abnormalities. We report a 560.49 kb duplication of chromosome 2p in a 13 month-old male with hydrocephaly, ventricular septal defect, partial agenesis of the corpus callosum, and bilateral Wilms tumor. After discovery of bilateral renal masses at four months of age, the child underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by right radical nephrectomy that revealed triphasic Wilms' tumor. A needle core biopsy on one of two lesions on the left kidney also revealed Wilms tumor. A partial left nephrectomy revealed focally positive margins that necessitated left flank radiotherapy. The tumor karyotype was 46,XY,t(7;8)(q36;p11)[8]/46,XY [12] while his constitutional karyotype was 46,XY, suggesting that the t(7;8)(q36;p11) was associated with the malignancy. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosome microarray analysis of peripheral blood identified a maternally-inherited 560.49 kb chromosome 2p24.3 duplication that involved four OMIM genes: NBAS, DDX1, MYCNOS, and MYCN. SNP array analysis of the tumor revealed the same 2p24.3 duplication. At present, the now 5-year-old boy continues to do well without clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrent disease. This case is instructive because the child's health insurer initially denied authorization for chromosome microarray analysis (CMA), and it took more than one year before such authorization was finally granted. That initial decision to deny coverage could have had untoward health implications for this child, as the identification of constitutional MYCN duplication necessitated surveillance imaging for a number of pediatric malignancies associated with MYCN overexpression/dysregulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The WTX Tumor Suppressor Regulates Mesenchymal Progenitor Cell Fate Specification

    PubMed Central

    Lotinun, Sutada; Akhavanfard, Sara; Coffman, Erik J.; Cook, Edward B.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Schoonmaker, Jesse A.; Burger, Alexa; Kim, Woo Jae; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland; Haber, Daniel A.; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY WTX is an X-linked tumor suppressor targeted by somatic mutations in Wilms tumor, a pediatric kidney cancer, and by germline inactivation in osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis, a bone overgrowth syndrome. Here, we show that Wtx deletion in mice causes neonatal lethality, somatic overgrowth, and malformation of multiple mesenchyme-derived tissues, including bone, fat, kidney, heart, and spleen. Inactivation of Wtx at different developmental stages and in primary mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) reveals that bone mass increase and adipose tissue deficiency are due to altered lineage fate decisions coupled with delayed terminal differentiation. Specification defects in MPCs result from aberrant β-catenin activation, whereas alternative pathways contribute to the subsequently delayed differentiation of lineage-restricted cells. Thus, Wtx is a regulator of MPC commitment and differentiation with stage-specific functions in inhibiting canonical Wnt signaling. Furthermore, the constellation of anomalies in Wtx null mice suggests that this tumor suppressor broadly regulates MPCs in multiple tissues. PMID:21571217

  8. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 expression by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Hossein; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Naderi, Mahmood; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Shams, Seyyede Fatemeh; Motamedirad, Neda; Sheikhi, Maryam; Bahrami, Afsane; Shakeri, Sepideh

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene is originally defined as a tumor suppressor gene and a transcription factor that overexpressed in leukemic cells. It is highly expressed in more than 80% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, both in bone marrow (BM) and in peripheral blood (PB), and it is used as a powerful and independent marker of minimal residual disease (MRD); we have determined the expression levels of the WT1 by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) in PB and BM in 126 newly diagnosed AML patients. Materials and Methods: This study was done in molecular pathology and cancer research center from April 2014 to June 2015, RQ-PCR method was used to determine the WT1 gene expression in BM and/or PB samples from 126 patients of AML, we cloned both WT1 and ABL genes for creating a standard curve, and we calculate copy number of WT1 genes in patients. Results: A total of 126 AML patients consist of 70 males (55.6%) and 56 females (44.4%), with a median age of 26 years; 104 (81%) patients out of 126 show overexpression of WT1 gene. We also concomitant monitoring of fusion transcripts (PML RARa, AML1-ETO, MLL-MLL, CBFb-MYH11, or DEK-CAN) in our patients, the AML1-ETO group showing remarkably low levels of WT1 compared with other fusion transcript and the CBFB-MYH11 showing high levels of WT1. Conclusion: We conclude that WT1 expression by RQ-PCR in AML patients may be employed as an independent tool to detect MRD in the majority of normal karyotype AML patients. PMID:28567073

  9. WT1 exon deletion/insertion mutations in Wilms tumor patients associated with di- and trinucleotide repeats and deletion hotspot consensus sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, V.; Saunders, G.F.; Strong, L.C.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic etiology of Wilms tumor (WT), a childhood kidney tumor, is known to be heterogeneous. One WT gene, WT1 located on chromosomal band 11p13, has been isolated, and mutations specific to the WT1 locus have been identified in some WT patients, demonstrating its importance in the etiology of at least some WT cases. Because of the patient populations selected for study and a focus on specific regions of the gene in identifying WT1 mutations, most mutations described to date are single base substitutions and have occurred in the 3{prime} portion of the gene in exons 7-10 which encode the zinc finger domains of the protein. DNA mutations at the WT1 locus have been reported to be infrequent in WT patients, implying that post-transcriptional modification of the WT1 gene product or alterations at other distinct loci perhaps more commonly play a role in tumorigenesis than do WT1 DNA mutations. We report here the occurrence in four WT patients of inactivating frameshift mutations, three somatic deletions and one germline insertion, in exon 1. This exon is GC-rich (>70%) and contains regions of both di- and trinucleotide direct repeats and ten copies of the sequence, CCTG (CAGG), which has been described as a deletion hotspot in mammalian DNA. The four WT1 exon 1 deletion/insertions range in size from four to 34 bases, are flanked by bi- and/or trinucleotide repeats, and occur in a general context of repetitive sequences. Furthermore, all breakpoints occur at or within five nucleotides of the tetranucleotide sequence, CCTG (CAGG). These data suggest that a mutational mechanism previously unrecognized in WT patients is operating in this repetitive portion of the WT1 gene. The frequency with which mutations of this type are observed in WT patients awaits the complete evaluation of a series of patients. Nevertheless these data indicate that WT1 mutations are more frequent in WT patients than previously thought.

  10. Wilms tumor gene 1 expression as a predictive marker for relapse and survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Jeon, Young-Woo; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Shin, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Lee, Dong-Gun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Hee-Je; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Han, Kyungja; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yoo-Jin

    2015-03-01

    Relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a major concern in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), but the role of Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) as a predictive marker for post-HSCT relapse remains to be validated. We measured WT1 transcript levels by real-time quantitative PCR from marrow samples of 82 MDS patients who underwent transplantation between 2009 and 2013. Pre-HSCT WT1 expression weakly correlated with marrow blast counts or International Prognostic Scoring System scores and failed to predict post-transplantation relapse. Regarding post-HSCT WT1, transcript levels of relapsed patients were significantly higher in comparison to those in remission. Further analysis using receiver operating characteristics curves showed that higher (>154 copies/10(4)ABL) 1-month post-HSCT WT1 resulted in a higher 3-year relapse rate (47.2% versus 6.9%, P < .001) with poorer disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival at 3 years (41.7% versus 79.0% and 54.3% versus 82.1%, P = .003 and P = .033, respectively). Multivariate analysis after adjusting for pre-HSCT karyotype and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also revealed that higher 1-month post-HSCT WT1 was an independent predictive marker for subsequent relapse (P = .002) and poorer DFS (P = .010). In the higher 1-month post-HSCT WT1 subgroup, patients with chronic GVHD showed lower relapse rate and favorable survival outcome. One month post-HSCT WT1 expression was a useful marker for minimal residual disease and relapse prediction in association with chronic GVHD in the context of HSCT for MDS. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Patients With High-Risk Kidney Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Rhabdoid Tumor of the Kidney; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Wilms Tumor; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Wilms Tumor

  12. The hematopoietic tumor suppressor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is upregulated by the antimetabolite cytarabine in leukemic cells involving the zinc finger protein ZNF224, acting as a cofactor of the Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) protein.

    PubMed

    Montano, Giorgia; Ullmark, Tove; Jernmark-Nilsson, Helena; Sodaro, Gaetano; Drott, Kristina; Costanzo, Paola; Vidovic, Karina; Gullberg, Urban

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF8) is highly expressed in myeloid progenitors, while most myeloid leukemias show low or absent expression. Loss of IRF8 in mice leads to a myeloproliferative disorder, indicating a tumor-suppressive role of IRF8. The Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) protein represses the IRF8-promoter. The zinc finger protein ZNF224 can act as a transcriptional co-factor of WT1 and potentiate the cytotoxic response to the cytostatic drug cytarabine. We hypothesized that cytarabine upregulates IRF8 and that transcriptional control of IRF8 involves WT1 and ZNF224. Treatment of leukemic K562 cells with cytarabine upregulated IRF8 protein and mRNA, which was correlated to increased expression of ZNF224. Knock down of ZNF224 with shRNA suppressed both basal and cytarabine-induced IRF8 expression. While ZNF224 alone did not affect IRF8 promoter activity, ZNF224 partially reversed the suppressive effect of WT1 on the IRF8 promoter, as judged by luciferase reporter experiments. Coprecipitation revealed nuclear binding of WT1 and ZNF224, and by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments it was demonstrated that WT1 recruits ZNF224 to the IRF8 promoter. We conclude that cytarabine-induced upregulation of the IRF8 in leukemic cells involves increased levels of ZNF224, which can counteract the repressive activity of WT1 on the IRF8-promoter.

  13. C2H2 zinc finger proteins of the SP/KLF, Wilms tumor, EGR, Huckebein, and Klumpfuss families in metazoans and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2015-01-01

    Specificity proteins (SPs) and Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are C2H2-type Zinc finger transcription factors that play essential roles in differentiation, development, proliferation and cell death. SP/KLF proteins, similarly to Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1), Early Growth Response (EGR), Huckebein, and Klumpfuss, prefer to bind GC-rich sequences such as GC-box and CACCC-box (GT-box). We searched various genomes and transcriptomes of metazoans and single-cell holozoans for members of these families. Seven groups of KLFs (KLFA–G) and three groups of SPs (SPA–C) were identified in the three lineages of Bilateria (Deuterostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Lophotrochozoa). The last ancestor of jawed vertebrates was inferred to have at least 18 KLFs (group A: KLF1/2/4/17, group B: KLF3/8/12; group C: KLF5/5l; group D: KLF6/7; group E: KLF9/13/16; group F: KLF10/KLF11; group G: KLF15/15l) and 10 SPs (group A: SP1/2/3/4; group B: SP5/5l; group C: SP6/7/8/9), since they were found in both cartilaginous and boned fishes. Placental mammals have added KLF14 (group E) and KLF18 (group A), and lost KLF5l (KLF5-like) and KLF15l (KLF15-like). Multiple KLF members were found in basal metazoans (Ctenophora, Porifera, Placozoa, and Cnidaria). Ctenophora has the least number of KLFs and no SPs, which could be attributed to its proposed sister group relationship to other metazoans or gene loss. While SP, EGR and Klumpfuss were only detected in metazoans, KLF, WT1, and Huckebein are present in nonmetazoan holozoans. Of the seven metazoan KLF groups, only KLFG, represented by KLF15 in human, was found in nonmetazoans. In addition, two nonmetazoan groups of KLFs are present in Choanoflagellatea and Filasterea. WT1 could be evolutionarily the earliest among these GC/GT-box-binding families due to its sole presence in Ichthyosporea. PMID:26187067

  14. C2H2 zinc finger proteins of the SP/KLF, Wilms tumor, EGR, Huckebein, and Klumpfuss families in metazoans and beyond.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V

    2015-11-15

    Specificity proteins (SPs) and Krüppel-Like Factors (KLFs) are C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factors that play essential roles in differentiation, development, proliferation and cell death. SP/KLF proteins, similarly to Wilms tumor protein 1 (WT1), Early Growth Response (EGR), Huckebein, and Klumpfuss, prefer to bind GC-rich sequences such as GC-box and CACCC-box (GT-box). We searched various genomes and transcriptomes of metazoans and single-cell holozoans for members of these families. Seven groups of KLFs (KLFA-G) and three groups of SPs (SPA-C) were identified in the three lineages of Bilateria (Deuterostomia, Ecdysozoa, and Lophotrochozoa). The last ancestor of jawed vertebrates was inferred to have at least 18 KLFs (group A: KLF1/2/4/17, group B: KLF3/8/12; group C: KLF5/5l; group D: KLF6/7; group E: KLF9/13/16; group F: KLF10/KLF11; group G: KLF15/15l) and 10 SPs (group A: SP1/2/3/4; group B: SP5/5l; group C: SP6/7/8/9), since they were found in both cartilaginous and boned fishes. Placental mammals have added KLF14 (group E) and KLF18 (group A), and lost KLF5l (KLF5-like) and KLF15l (KLF15-like). Multiple KLF members were found in basal metazoans (Ctenophora, Porifera, Placozoa, and Cnidaria). Ctenophora has the least number of KLFs and no SPs, which could be attributed to its proposed sister group relationship to other metazoans or gene loss. While SP, EGR and Klumpfuss were only detected in metazoans, KLF, WT1, and Huckebein are present in nonmetazoan holozoans. Of the seven metazoan KLF groups, only KLFG, represented by KLF15 in human, was found in nonmetazoans. In addition, two nonmetazoan groups of KLFs are present in Choanoflagellatea and Filasterea. WT1 could be evolutionarily the earliest among these GC/GT-box-binding families due to its sole presence in Ichthyosporea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment Options for Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, such as the chest and abdomen. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ... computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ...

  16. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help make sure the pictures are clear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan An MRI scan might be done if the doctor needs to ... the inferior vena cava) in the abdomen. An MRI scan might also be used to look for possible ...

  17. Neuroendocrine regulation and tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Toni, R; Mirandola, P; Gobbi, G; Vitale, M

    2007-01-01

    The morphogenetic events leading to the transendothelial passage of lymphoid and tumoral cells are analyzed in light of a very recent and global theory of intercellular communication designated as the Triune Information Network (TIN). The TIN system is based on the assumption that cell-cell interactions primarily occur through cell surface informations or topobiological procesess, whose mechanisms rely upon expression of adhesion molecules, and are regulated by an array of locally-borne (autocrine/paracrine signals and autonomic inputs) and distantly-borne (endocrine secretions) messages. The final aim of the TIN is to control homeostatic functions crucial for the organism survival, like morphogenesis. Knowledge of the TIN signals involved in lymphoid and tumoral cell intravasation might offer a new perspetive to study the mechanisms of tumor immunity. Recognition of tumor target cells by immune cytotoxic effectors, in fact, can be considered a notable case of TIN-mediated cell to cell interaction. In particular, Natural Killer (NK) cells play a role in the cell-mediated control of tumor growth and metastatic spreading. Cell targeting and killing are dependent on the different NK cell receptors and on the efficacy of NK cells after cytokine and monoclonal antibody administration in cancer therapy. Since efficacy of NK cell-based immunotheraphy has been proven in KIR-mismatch regimens or in TRAIL-dependent apoptosis, the ability to manipulate the balance of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells and of their cognate ligands as well as the sensitivity of tumor cells to apoptosis, opens new perspectives for NK cell based immunotherapy.

  18. Diagnostic utility of Wilms' tumour-1 protein (WT-1) immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Surbhi; Mishra, Kiran; Sarkar, Urvee; Sharma, Satendra; Kumari, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Renal tumours constitute about 7 per cent of all neoplasms in children. It is important to differentiate Wilms' tumour (commonest tumour) from non-Wilms' tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression and diagnostic role of Wilms' tumour-1 protein (WT1) in paediatric renal tumours. A total of 53 cases of renal tumours in children (below 18 yr) who underwent total nephrectomy were included in this retrospective study. WT1 immunostaining was done using mouse monoclonal WT1 antibody (clone: 6F-H2). Of the 53 cases, 38 (72%) were of Wilms' tumour. Non-Wilms' group (15) included six cases of mesoblastic nephroma (MN), two each of clear cell sarcoma (CCSK), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and peripheral neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and one each of angiomyolipoma (AML), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and malignant rhabdoid tumour (MRT). Proportion of WT1 positivity in Wilms' tumour was 100 per cent in contrast to 26.7 per cent in non-Wilms' tumours ( P<0.001). Epithelial and blastemal components of Wilms' tumour showed moderate (2+) nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in 80 (24/30) and 75 per cent (24/32) cases, respectively. MN, PNET, CCSK and AML were negative for WT1. RMS, RCC and MRT showed cytoplasmic staining, strongest in RMS. No significant association was seen between WT1 expression and NWTSG (National Wilms' Tumor Study Group) stage. WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms' tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms' tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis.

  19. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  20. Regulation of invadopodia by the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christine M; Courtneidge, Sara A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment consists of stromal cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and signaling molecules that communicate with cancer cells. As tumors grow and develop, the tumor microenvironment changes. In addition, the tumor microenvironment is not only influenced by signals from tumor cells, but also stromal components contribute to tumor progression and metastasis by affecting cancer cell function. One of the mechanisms that cancer cells use to invade and metastasize is mediated by actin-rich, proteolytic structures called invadopodia. Here, we discuss how signals from the tumor environment, including growth factors, hypoxia, pH, metabolism, and stromal cell interactions, affect the formation and function of invadopodia to regulate cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Understanding how the tumor microenvironment affects invadopodia biology could aid in the development of effective therapeutics to target cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:24714597

  1. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-17

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  2. Germline mutations in the PAF1 complex gene CTR9 predispose to Wilms tumour.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Sandra; Perdeaux, Elizabeth R; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Mahamdallie, Shazia S; Murray, Anne; Ramsay, Emma; Del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; de Souza, Bianca; Warren-Perry, Margaret; Elliott, Anna; Davidson, Alan; Price, Helen; Stiller, Charles; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-08-07

    Wilms tumour is a childhood kidney cancer. Here we identify inactivating CTR9 mutations in 3 of 35 Wilms tumour families, through exome and Sanger sequencing. By contrast, no similar mutations are present in 1,000 population controls (P<0.0001). Each mutation segregates with Wilms tumour in the family and a second mutational event is present in available tumours. CTR9 is a key component of the polymerase-associated factor 1 complex which has multiple roles in RNA polymerase II regulation and is implicated in embryonic organogenesis and maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency. These data establish CTR9 as a Wilms tumour predisposition gene and suggest it acts as a tumour suppressor gene.

  3. "Wilms Tumor Protein 1" (WT1) peptide vaccination-induced complete remission in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia is accompanied by the emergence of a predominant T-cell clone both in blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Fusi, Alberto; Busse, Antonia; Bauer, Sandra; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Stather, David; Thiel, Eckhard; Keilholz, Ulrich; Letsch, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Within the last few years, the first peptide vaccination trials for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been initiated. Athough the presence of epitope-specific T cells could be seen both in bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB), nothing is known about their clonal composition. In this study, we analyzed material from a patient with recurrent AML vaccinated with "Wilms Tumor Protein 1" (WT1) peptide, who achieved a complete remission (CR) lasting for 12 months. For identification of expanded WT1-specific T-cell clones, enrichment by tetramer and IFNγ secretion were followed by comparative quantitative reverse transcribed PCR (qRT PCR) quantification of all TCR Vβ-families. Vβ-families with increase in the enriched fraction were cloned and sequenced. A predominant clone was quantified by clonotypic qRT PCR from PB and BM. Quantity and functionality of WT1-specific cells were assessed by tetramer analyses and intracellular IFNγ staining. A specific predominant clone was identified during clinical remission. Clone-specific qRT PCR showed an increase both in PB and BM after 8 vaccinations. Six months after achieving CR, the transcript levels in BM decreased. Relapse was accompanied by secondary rise of the WT1-specific clone in PB but not in BM. In parallel, a lack of vaccine-induced WT1 specific IFNγ production was observed at that timepoint. In conclusion, we provide first data regarding evolution and compartmentalization of a peptide vaccine-induced T-cell clone in PB and BM of an AML patient. At the time of relapse, the same clone reappeared spontaneously in PB but not in BM showing impaired functionality.

  4. Wilms' tumor protein 1 (WT1) peptide vaccination in AML patients: predominant TCR CDR3β sequence associated with remission in one patient is detectable in other vaccinated patients.

    PubMed

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Fusi, Alberto; Geikowski, Anne; Stather, David; Busse, Antonia; Stroux, Andrea; Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Clinically effective T-cell responses can be elicited by single peptide vaccination with Wilms' tumor 1 (WT1) epitope 126-134 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We recently showed that a predominant T-cell receptor (TCR) β chain was associated with vaccine-induced complete remission in an AML patient (patient 1). In this study, we address the question of whether this predominant clone or the accompanying Vβ11 restriction could be found in other AML patients vaccinated with the same WT1 peptide. For assessment of Vβ usage, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from four vaccinated patients were divided into specific and non-specific by epitope-specific enrichment. Vβ families were quantified in both fractions using reverse transcribed quantitative PCR. Vβ11-positive 'complementary determining region 3' (CDR3) sequences were amplified from these samples, from bone marrow samples of 17 other vaccination patients, and from peripheral blood of six healthy controls, cloned and sequenced. We observed a clear bias towards Vβ11 usage of the WT1-specific CTL populations in all four patients. The predominant CDR3β amino acid (AA) sequence of patient 1 was detected in two other patients. CDR3β loops with closely related AA sequences were only found in patient 1. There were no CDR3β AA sequences with side chains of identical chemical properties detected in any patient. We provide the first data addressing TCR Vβ chain usage in WT1-specific T-cell populations after HLA A*0201-restricted single peptide vaccination. We demonstrate both shared Vβ restriction and the sharing of a TCR β transcript with proven clinical impact in one patient.

  5. Simvastatin With Topotecan and Cyclophosphamide in Relapsed and/or Refractory Pediatric Solid and CNS Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Retinoblastoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Rhabdoid Tumor; Wilms Tumor; Hepatoblastoma; Neuroblastoma; Germ Cell Tumors; Ewings Sarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma

  6. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines and relationship to platelet-derived growth factor A and insulin-like growth factor 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Langerak, A W; Williamson, K A; Miyagawa, K; Hagemeijer, A; Versnel, M A; Hastie, N D

    1995-02-01

    Mutations in the WT1 tumor suppressor gene are known to contribute to the development of Wilms' tumor (WT) and associated gonadal abnormalities. WT1 is expressed principally in the fetal kidney, developing gonads, and spleen and also in the mesothelium, which lines the coelomic cavities. These tissues develop from mesenchymal components that have subsequently become epithelialized, and it has therefore been proposed that WT1 may play a role in this transition of cell types. To test the possible involvement of this gene in malignant mesothelioma, we have first studied its expression in a panel of human normal and malignant mesothelial cell lines. WT1 mRNA expression levels varied greatly between the cell lines and no specific chromosomal aberration on 11p, which could be related to the variation in WT1 expression in these cell lines, was observed. Furthermore, no gross deletions rearrangements, or functionally inactivating point mutations in the WT1 coding region were identified. All four WT1 splice variants were observed at similar levels in these cell lines. The WT1 gene encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor and the four protein isoforms are each believed to act as transcriptional repressors of certain growth factor genes. Lack of WTI expression in thus predicted to result in growth stimulation of tumor cells. Binding of one particular WT1 isoform construct to the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA) gene promoters has been demonstrated to result in repression of these genes in transient transfection studies. Analysis of IGF2 and PDGFA mRNA expression levels compared with WTI mRNA expression levels failed to demonstrate an inverse correlation in the mesothelial cell lines, which endogenously express these genes. Finally, the putative role of WT1 in the transition of cell types was investigated. No obvious correlation between WT1 expression levels and cell morphology of the malignant mesothelial cell lines was

  7. Adult Wilms' Tumour: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sunny; Tiang, Kor Woi; Inglis, Po; Collins, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) is the most common renal tumour in children. Wilms' tumour in adults is extremely rare and has a poorer prognosis than paediatric Wilms' tumour. It is difficult to differentiate adult Wilms' tumour from renal cell carcinoma based on radiological findings alone. The diagnosis in adults is often serendipitous following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma. Because of the paucity of literature, there are no standard protocols for the management of adult Wilms' tumour, and therefore, it is managed as per paediatric Wilms' tumour. Herein, we report the case of adult Wilms' tumour in a 43-year-old man, which was diagnosed unexpectedly following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma.

  8. Clinical outcome and gene- and microRNA-expression profiling according to the Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) single nucleotide polymorphism rs16754 in adult de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia: a Cancer and Leukemia Group B study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Heiko; Maharry, Kati; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Whitman, Susan P.; Schwind, Sebastian; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Moore, Joseph O.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The alleles of the Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) polymorphism rs16754 harbor adenine (A) or guanine (G). Recently, rs16754 has been reported to affect the outcome of patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. To validate this finding, we investigated pretreatment features and outcome associated with rs16754 in a large cohort of patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods Four-hundred and thirty-three intensively treated and molecularly characterized cytogenetically normal patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (18–83 years old) were analyzed for rs16754. To gain biological insights, we studied the gene- and microRNA-expression profiles for associations with rs16754. Results Three-hundred and nine (71%) patients were homozygous for A (WT1AA), 112 (26%) were heterozygous (WT1AG) and 12 (3%) were homozygous for G (WT1GG). For comparison with previous studies, we grouped WT1AG and WT1GG patients and compared them with WT1AA patients divided into younger (<60 years) and older (≥60 years) adults. We found no independent prognostic impact of WT1AA. However, WT1GG patients, who were less often Caucasian than WT1AG (P=0.001) or WT1AA (P=0.008) patients, and had TET2 mutations more often than WT1AG (P=0.02) patients, had, among patients with FLT3-internal tandem duplication and/or NPM1 wild-type, better disease-free (P=0.02) and overall survival (P=0.04) than WT1AA and WT1AG patients combined. Unsupervised and supervised analyses of the gene- and microRNA-expression profiles suggested that there were no distinct expression patterns associated with any rs16754 genotype. Conclusions We did not observe the previously reported adverse impact of WT1AA but found favorable outcomes associated with the homozygous WT1GG. Considering its low frequency, confirmatory studies are necessary. The biological significance of rs16754 remains questionable as no distinct expression profiles were associated with the genotypes. PMID

  9. Relaxation of IGF2/H19 imprinting in Wilms tumour is associated with a switch in DNA methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, A.E.; Taniguchi, T.; Sullivan, M.J.; Ogawa, O.

    1994-09-01

    We and others have recently shown that the normal imprinting of the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) gene is disrupted in Wilms tumor. The process of relaxation of IGF2 imprinting leads to the activation of transcription of the normally silent maternally inherited IGF2 allele such that both alleles of the IGF2 gene are transcribed. Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting has also been detected as a constitutional event in patients with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrom and a patient with gigantism and Wilms tumor. We have now shown that in Wilms tumors in which imprinting is relaxed, IGF2 is transcribed from the maternal allele and there is a concomitant transcriptional inactivation of the H19 maternal allele. Furthermore, the patterns of methylation of the IGF2 and H19 gene are reversed on the maternal chromosome. Relaxation of imprinting in Wilms tumors appear, therefore, to be associated with a switch in gene expression and methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus. The data supports the notion of a disrupted IGF2/H19 imprinting switch in Wilms tumor.

  10. Understanding the principles in management of Wilms' tumour: can imaging assist in patient selection?

    PubMed

    Kembhavi, S A; Qureshi, S; Vora, T; Chinnaswamy, G; Laskar, S; Ramadwar, M; Arora, B

    2013-07-01

    The management of Wilms' tumour has evolved through thorough systematic research, predominantly lead by two groups: the Wilms' Tumour Study Committee of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) and National Wilms' Tumor Study Group (NWTSG) of North America. These two groups differ in their approach: SIOP advocates initial chemotherapy of 4-6 weeks followed by surgery, whereas the NWTSG advocates upfront surgery, with certain exceptions. This review briefly discusses the principles, and pros and cons of each approach. Both the treatment approaches have equivalent outcomes (in the form of event-free survival and overall survival), when compared stage-wise. With this knowledge, modern imaging can be used for individualizing treatment in anticipation of minimizing complications. The review identifies critical imaging features and discusses the reliability of imaging based on current reports in the literature.

  11. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    Award  Number:    W81XWH-11-1-0260   TITLE:      Regulation  of  the  Prostate   Cancer  Tumor  Microenvironment PRINCIPAL  INVESTIGATOR:      Dr... Cancer Tumor Microenvironment 5a.  CONTRACT  NUMBER   5b.  GRANT  NUMBER  W81XWH--11--1-- 0260 5c.  PROGRAM  ELEMENT  NUMBER   6. AUTHOR(S) Arnold  I...immunity  in  prostate   cancer  tumorigenesis  is  unclear.  We  hypothesis  that  innate  immune  pathways   contribute  to  programming  the

  12. MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on Pediatric Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Relapsed Pediatric Solid Tumors; Refractory Pediatric Solid Tumors; Tumors Located in Bone or Soft Tissue in Close Proximity to Bone; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Neuroblastoma; Wilms Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... healthy and play normally. Swelling or a hard mass in the abdomen (belly): This is often the ... if needed. Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ...

  14. Tumor regulation of the tissue environment in the liver.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Tobias; Greten, Tim F

    2017-02-04

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) in the liver plays an important role in primary and metastatic liver tumor formation and tumor growth promotion. Cellular and non-cellular components of the TME significantly influence tumor development, growth, metastatic spread, anti-tumor immunity and response to tumor therapy. The cellular components of the TME in the liver not only consist of infiltrating immune cells, but also of liver-resident cells such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), which promote tumor growth by negatively regulating tumor-associated immune responses. In this review, we characterize cells of the TME with pro- and anti-tumor function in primary and metastatic liver tumors. Furthermore, we summarize mechanisms that permit growth of hepatic tumors despite the occurrence of spontaneous anti-tumor immune responses and how novel therapeutic approaches targeting the TME could unleash tumor-specific immune responses to improve survival of liver cancer patients.

  15. Aflac ST0901 CHOANOME - Sirolimus in Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-11

    Ewing's Sarcoma; Osteosarcoma; Astrocytoma; Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Ependymoma; Germ Cell Tumor; Glioma; Medulloblastoma; Rhabdoid Tumor; Retinoblastoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Wilms Tumor; Hepatoblastoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma

  16. The Role of the Tumor Microenvironment in Regulating Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Watnick, Randolph S.

    2012-01-01

    The tumor-associated stroma has been shown to play a significant role in cancer formation. Paracrine signaling interactions between epithelial tumor cells and stromal cells are a key component in the transformation and proliferation of tumors in several organs. Whereas the intracellular signaling pathways regulating the expression of several pro- and antiangiogenic proteins have been well characterized in human cancer cells, the intercellular signaling that takes place between tumor cells and the surrounding tumor-associated stroma has not been as extensively studied with regard to the regulation of angiogenesis. In this chapter we define the key players in the regulation of angiogenesis and examine how their expression is regulated in the tumor-associated stroma. The resulting analysis is often seemingly paradoxical, underscoring the complexity of intercellular signaling within tumors and the need to better understand the environmental context underlying these signaling mechanisms. PMID:23209177

  17. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF−/− macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment. PMID:27572316

  18. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2016-10-11

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF-/- macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  19. Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response to immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Hegde, Samarth; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-associated fibrosis is characterized by unchecked pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory signaling. The components of fibrosis including significant numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, dense collagen deposition, and extracellular matrix stiffness, are well appreciated regulators of tumor progression but may also be critical regulators of immune surveillance. While this suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy may be limited in highly fibrotic cancers like pancreas, it also suggests a therapeutic opportunity to target fibrosis in these tumor types to reawaken anti-tumor immunity. This review discusses the mechanisms by which fibrosis might subvert tumor immunity and how to overcome these mechanisms.

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of Ovarian Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    immunity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Protul A. Shrikant, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION : Health Research Inc., Roswell Park Cancer...WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Roswell Park Cancer...intraperitoneal injection on day 10 post-tumor challenge. 2. The cells harvested from the tumor draining LN’s, spleen and the tumor site starting on day 2

  1. A retroperitoneal extra-renal wilms' tumour: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wabada, S; Abubakar, A S; Adamu, A I; Kabir, A; Gana, L B

    2017-03-01

    Wilms' tumour originates predominantly in the renal tissue; in rare cases it can also arise from extra-renal sites accounting for 0.5-1% of cases of Wilms' tumours seen. A diagnosis of extra-renal Wilms' cannot be easily established with clinical and radiological features except when the histological facts are provided. Wilms' tumours arising from extra-renal sites may not be different in clinical features, protocol of treatment and outcome from a typical intra renal Wilms' tumour. A 2-year-old boy presented with an asymptomatic abdominal swelling for 3 months. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans revealed an extra-renal mass. Intravenous urogram (IVU) showed prompt excretion bilaterally. Post excision histology of the tumour confirmed a Wilms' tumour.

  2. Loss of heterozygosity and SOSTDC1 in adult and pediatric renal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Deletions within the short arm of chromosome 7 are observed in approximately 25% of adult and 10% of Wilms pediatric renal tumors. Within Wilms tumors, the region of interest has been delineated to a 2-Mb minimal region that includes ten known genes. Two of these ten candidate genes, SOSTDC1 and MEOX2, are particularly relevant to tumor development and maintenance. This finding, coupled with evidence that SOSTDC1 is frequently downregulated in adult renal cancer and regulates both Wingless-Int (Wnt)- and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced signaling, points to a role for SOSTDC1 as a potential tumor suppressor. Methods To investigate this hypothesis, we interrogated the Oncomine database to examine the SOSTDC1 levels in adult renal clear cell tumors and pediatric Wilms tumors. We then performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and sequencing analyses of SOSTDC1 in 25 pediatric and 36 adult renal tumors. Immunohistochemical staining of patient samples was utilized to examine the impact of SOSTDC1 genetic aberrations on SOSTDC1 protein levels and signaling. Results Within the Oncomine database, we found that SOSTDC1 levels were reduced in adult renal clear cell tumors and pediatric Wilms tumors. Through SNP and sequencing analyses of 25 Wilms tumors, we identified four with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 7p and three that affected SOSTDC1. Of 36 adult renal cancers, we found five with LOH at 7p, two of which affected SOSTDC1. Immunohistochemical analysis of SOSTDC1 protein levels within these tumors did not reveal a relationship between these instances of SOSTDC1 LOH and SOSTDC1 protein levels. Moreover, we could not discern any impact of these genetic alterations on Wnt signaling as measured by altered beta-catenin levels or localization. Conclusions This study shows that genetic aberrations near SOSTDC1 are not uncommon in renal cancer, and occur in adult as well as pediatric renal tumors. These observations of SOSTDC1 LOH, however, did not

  3. MITOCHONDRIAL Akt REGULATION OF HYPOXIC TUMOR REPROGRAMMING

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Young Chan; Vaira, Valentina; Caino, M. Cecilia; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Lucignani, Giovanni; Bertolini, Irene; Locatelli, Marco; Bryant, Kelly G.; Ghosh, Jagadish C.; Lisanti, Sofia; Ku, Bonsu; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R.; Speicher, David W.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypoxia is a universal driver of aggressive tumor behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Using a phosphoproteomics screen, we now show that active Akt accumulates in the mitochondria during hypoxia and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr346 to inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In turn, this pathway switches tumor metabolism towards glycolysis, antagonizes apoptosis and autophagy, dampens oxidative stress, and maintains tumor cell proliferation in the face of severe hypoxia. Mitochondrial Akt-PDK1 signaling correlates with unfavorable prognostic markers and shorter survival in glioma patients and may provide an “actionable” therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27505672

  4. Mitochondrial Akt Regulation of Hypoxic Tumor Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Chan; Vaira, Valentina; Caino, M Cecilia; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Seo, Jae Ho; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Lucignani, Giovanni; Bertolini, Irene; Locatelli, Marco; Bryant, Kelly G; Ghosh, Jagadish C; Lisanti, Sofia; Ku, Bonsu; Bosari, Silvano; Languino, Lucia R; Speicher, David W; Altieri, Dario C

    2016-08-08

    Hypoxia is a universal driver of aggressive tumor behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Using a phosphoproteomics screen, we now show that active Akt accumulates in the mitochondria during hypoxia and phosphorylates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) on Thr346 to inactivate the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. In turn, this pathway switches tumor metabolism toward glycolysis, antagonizes apoptosis and autophagy, dampens oxidative stress, and maintains tumor cell proliferation in the face of severe hypoxia. Mitochondrial Akt-PDK1 signaling correlates with unfavorable prognostic markers and shorter survival in glioma patients and may provide an "actionable" therapeutic target in cancer.

  5. Microenvironmental regulation of tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Quail, DF; Joyce, JA

    2014-01-01

    Cancers develop in complex tissue environments, which they depend upon for sustained growth, invasion and metastasis. Unlike tumor cells, stromal cell types within the tumor microenvironment (TME) are genetically stable, and thus represent an attractive therapeutic target with reduced risk of resistance and tumor recurrence. However, specifically disrupting the pro-tumorigenic TME is a challenging undertaking, as the TME has diverse capacities to induce both beneficial and adverse consequences for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, many studies have shown that the microenvironment is capable of normalizing tumor cells, suggesting that reeducation of stromal cells, rather than targeted ablation per se, may be an effective strategy for treating cancer. Here, we will discuss the paradoxical roles of the TME during specific stages of cancer progression and metastasis, and recent therapeutic attempts to re-educate stromal cells within the TME to have anti-tumorigenic effects. PMID:24202395

  6. microRNA-mediated regulation of the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Jonathan; Shahi, Payam; Werb, Zena

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment includes cells such as fibroblasts, immune cells, endothelial cells, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM), proteases, and cytokines. Together, these components participate in a complex crosstalk with neoplastic tumor cells that affects growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and have recently emerged as important players involved in regulating multiple aspects of cancer biology and the tumor microenvironment. Differential miRNA expression in both the epithelial and stromal compartments of tumors compared with normal tissue suggests that miRNAs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and metastasis. This review article summarizes our current understanding of the diverse roles of miRNAs involved in tumor microenvironment regulation and underscores the importance of miRNAs within multiple cell types that contribute to the hallmarks of cancer. PMID:24036551

  7. Slow growth of an untreated Wilms's tumour in the adolescent.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, P C; Wood, B J; Smith, D F; Teasdale, J M

    1978-01-01

    Retrospective radiological documentation of a growing Wilms's tumour in rare. Considered to be a relatively rapidly growing tumour, we present a case where there was adequate radiological evidence of a Wilms's tumour 4 years before the clinical metastatic presentation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:215089

  8. Tumor microenvironment tenascin-C promotes glioblastoma invasion and negatively regulates tumor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shuli; Lal, Bachchu; Tung, Brian; Wang, Shervin; Goodwin, C Rory; Laterra, John

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. Recent research on cancer stroma indicates that the brain microenvironment plays a substantial role in tumor malignancy and treatment responses to current antitumor therapy. In this work, we have investigated the effect of alterations in brain tumor extracellular matrix tenascin-C (TNC) on brain tumor growth patterns including proliferation and invasion. Since intracranial xenografts from patient-derived GBM neurospheres form highly invasive tumors that recapitulate the invasive features demonstrated in human patients diagnosed with GBM, we studied TNC gain-of-function and loss-of function in these GBM neurospheres in vitro and in vivo. TNC loss-of-function promoted GBM neurosphere cell adhesion and actin cytoskeleton organization. Yet, TNC loss-of-function or exogenous TNC had no effect on GBM neurosphere cell growth in vitro. In animal models, decreased TNC in the tumor microenvironment was accompanied by decreased tumor invasion and increased tumor proliferation, suggesting that TNC regulates the "go-or-grow" phenotypic switch of glioma in vivo. We demonstrated that decreased TNC in the tumor microenvironment modulated behaviors of stromal cells including endothelial cells and microglia, resulting in enlarged tumor blood vessels and activated microglia in tumors. We further demonstrated that tumor cells with decreased TNC expression are sensitive to anti-proliferative treatment in vitro. Our findings suggest that detailed understanding of how TNC in the tumor microenvironment influences tumor behavior and the interactions between tumor cells and surrounding nontumor cells will benefit novel combinatory antitumor strategies to treat malignant brain tumors. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. RORC1 Regulates Tumor-Promoting "Emergency" Granulo-Monocytopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Laura; Sangaletti, Sabina; Consonni, Francesca Maria; Szebeni, Gabor; Morlacchi, Sara; Totaro, Maria Grazia; Porta, Chiara; Anselmo, Achille; Tartari, Silvia; Doni, Andrea; Zitelli, Francesco; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-10

    Cancer-driven granulo-monocytopoiesis stimulates expansion of tumor promoting myeloid populations, mostly myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). We identified subsets of MDSCs and TAMs based on the expression of retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (RORC1/RORγ) in human and mouse tumor bearers. RORC1 orchestrates myelopoiesis by suppressing negative (Socs3 and Bcl3) and promoting positive (C/EBPβ) regulators of granulopoiesis, as well as the key transcriptional mediators of myeloid progenitor commitment and differentiation to the monocytic/macrophage lineage (IRF8 and PU.1). RORC1 supported tumor-promoting innate immunity by protecting MDSCs from apoptosis, mediating TAM differentiation and M2 polarization, and limiting tumor infiltration by mature neutrophils. Accordingly, ablation of RORC1 in the hematopoietic compartment prevented cancer-driven myelopoiesis, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis.

  10. Suppression of colorectal tumor growth by regulated survivin targeting.

    PubMed

    Li, Binghua; Fan, Junkai; Liu, Xinran; Qi, Rong; Bo, Linan; Gu, Jinfa; Qian, Cheng; Liu, Xinyuan

    2006-12-01

    A major goal in cancer gene therapy is to develop efficient gene transfer protocols that allow tissue-specific and tightly regulated expression of therapeutic genes. The ideal vector should efficiently transduce cancer cells with minimal toxicity on normal tissues and persistently express foreign genes. One of the most promising regulatory systems is the mifepristone/RU486-regulated system, which has much lower basal transcriptional activity and high inducibility. In this work, we modified this system by incorporating a cancer-specific promoter, the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. By utilizing hTERT promoter to control the regulator, RU486 could specifically induce the expression of foreign genes in cancer cells but not in normal cells. In the context of this system, a dominant negative mutant of survivin (surDN) was controllably expressed in colorectal tumor cells. The surDN expression induced by RU486 showed a dosage- and time-dependent pattern. Regulated expression of surDN caused caspase-dependent apoptosis in colorectal tumor cells but had little effect on normal cells. Analysis of cell viability showed that RU486-induced expression of surDN suppressed colorectal tumor cell growth and had synergic effect in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. The potential of this system in cancer therapy was evaluated in experimental animals. Tumor xenograft models were established in nude mice with colorectal tumor cells, and RU486 was intraperitoneally administered. The results showed that conditional expression of surDN efficiently inhibited tumor growth in vivo and prolonged the life of tumor-burdened mice. Synergized with the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, regulated surDN expression completely suppressed tumor growth. These results indicated that this modified RU486-regulated system could be useful in cancer-targeting therapy.

  11. Metastasis Suppressors Regulate the Tumor Microenvironment by Blocking Recruitment of Prometastatic Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Frankenberger, Casey; Rabe, Daniel; Bainer, Russell; Sankarasharma, Devipriya; Chada, Kiran; Krausz, Thomas; Gilad, Yoav; Becker, Lev; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2015-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients have the highest risk of recurrence and metastasis. Because they cannot be treated with targeted therapies, and many do not respond to chemotherapy, they represent a clinically underserved group. TNBC is characterized by reduced expression of metastasis suppressors such as Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP), which inhibits tumor invasiveness. Mechanisms by which metastasis suppressors alter tumor cells are well characterized; however, their ability to regulate the tumor microenvironment and the importance of such regulation to metastasis suppression are incompletely understood. Here, we use species-specific RNA sequencing to show that RKIP expression in tumors markedly reduces the number and metastatic potential of infiltrating tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). TAMs isolated from nonmetastatic RKIP(+) tumors, relative to metastatic RKIP(-) tumors, exhibit a reduced ability to drive tumor cell invasion and decreased secretion of prometastatic factors, including PRGN, and shed TNFR2. RKIP regulates TAM recruitment by blocking HMGA2, resulting in reduced expression of numerous macrophage chemotactic factors, including CCL5. CCL5 overexpression in RKIP(+) tumors restores recruitment of prometastatic TAMs and intravasation, whereas treatment with the CCL5 receptor antagonist Maraviroc reduces TAM infiltration. These results highlight the importance of RKIP as a regulator of TAM recruitment through chemokines such as CCL5. The clinical significance of these interactions is underscored by our demonstration that a signature comprised of RKIP signaling and prometastatic TAM factors strikingly separates TNBC patients based on survival outcome. Collectively, our findings identify TAMs as a previously unsuspected mechanism by which the metastasis-suppressor RKIP regulates tumor invasiveness, and further suggest that TNBC patients with decreased RKIP activity and increased TAM infiltration may respond to macrophage

  12. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  13. Oncogenic regulation of tumor metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Tarrado-Castellarnau, Míriam; de Atauri, Pedro; Cascante, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Development of malignancy is accompanied by a complete metabolic reprogramming closely related to the acquisition of most of cancer hallmarks. In fact, key oncogenic pathways converge to adapt the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to the dynamic tumor microenvironment, conferring a selective advantage to cancer cells. Therefore, metabolic properties of tumor cells are significantly different from those of non-transformed cells. In addition, tumor metabolic reprogramming is linked to drug resistance in cancer treatment. Accordingly, metabolic adaptations are specific vulnerabilities that can be used in different therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy. In this review, we discuss the dysregulation of the main metabolic pathways that enable cell transformation and its association with oncogenic signaling pathways, focusing on the effects of c-MYC, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1), phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) on cancer cell metabolism. Elucidating these connections is of crucial importance to identify new targets and develop selective cancer treatments that improve response to therapy and overcome the emerging resistance to chemotherapeutics. PMID:28040803

  14. The perivascular niche regulates breast tumor dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Héctor; Mori, Hidetoshi; Matei, Irina R.; Evason, Kimberley J.; Brazier, Hélène; Almeida, Dena; Koller, Antonius; Hajjar, Katherine A.; Stainier, Didier Y.R.; Chen, Emily I.; Lyden, David

    2013-01-01

    In a significant fraction of breast cancer patients, distant metastases emerge after years or even decades of latency. How disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) are kept dormant, and what ‘wakes them up’, are fundamental problems in tumor biology. To address these questions, we utilized metastasis assays in mice to show that dormant DTCs reside upon microvasculature of lung, bone marrow and brain. We then engineered organotypic microvascular niches to determine whether endothelial cells directly influence breast cancer cell (BCC) growth. These models demonstrated that endothelial-derived thrombospondin-1 induces sustained BCC quiescence. This suppressive cue was lost in sprouting neovasculature; time-lapse analysis showed that sprouting vessels not only permit, but accelerate BCC outgrowth. We confirmed this surprising result in dormancy models and in zebrafish, and identified active TGF-β1 and periostin as tumor-promoting, endothelial tip cell-derived factors. Our work reveals that stable microvasculature constitutes a ‘dormant niche,’ whereas sprouting neovasculature sparks micrometastatic outgrowth. PMID:23728425

  15. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, such as the chest and abdomen. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ... computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ...

  17. General Information about Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body, such as the chest and abdomen. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ... computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography. PET-CT scan : A procedure that combines the pictures from ...

  18. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  19. Classification of a frameshift/extended and a stop mutation in WT1 as gain-of-function mutations that activate cell cycle genes and promote Wilms tumour cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Maike; Schwindt, Heinrich; Brandt, Artur; Beier, Manfred; Görldt, Nicole; Romaniuk, Paul; Toska, Eneda; Roberts, Stefan; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2014-08-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor important for normal kidney development. WT1 is a suppressor for Wilms tumour development and an oncogene for diverse malignant tumours. We recently established cell lines from primary Wilms tumours with different WT1 mutations. To investigate the function of mutant WT1 proteins, we performed WT1 knockdown experiments in cell lines with a frameshift/extension (p.V432fsX87 = Wilms3) and a stop mutation (p.P362X = Wilms2) of WT1, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. We also expressed wild-type and mutant WT1 proteins in human mesenchymal stem cells and established gene expression profiles. A detailed analysis of gene expression data enabled us to classify the WT1 mutations as gain-of-function mutations. The mutant WT1(Wilms2) and WT1(Wilms3) proteins acquired an ability to modulate the expression of a highly significant number of genes from the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and WT1 knockdown experiments showed that they are required for Wilms tumour cell proliferation. p53 negatively regulates the activity of a large number of these genes that are also part of a core proliferation cluster in diverse human cancers. Our data strongly suggest that mutant WT1 proteins facilitate expression of these cell cycle genes by antagonizing transcriptional repression mediated by p53. We show that mutant WT1 can physically interact with p53. Together the findings show for the first time that mutant WT1 proteins have a gain-of-function and act as oncogenes for Wilms tumour development by regulating Wilms tumour cell proliferation.

  20. Circadian Clock in a Mouse Colon Tumor Regulates Intracellular Iron Levels to Promote Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Fumiyasu; Matsunaga, Naoya; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Hiroki; Hamamura, Kengo; Tsuruta, Akito; Tsurudome, Yuya; Ogino, Takashi; Hara, Yukinori; Suzuki, Takuya; Hyodo, Kenji; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; To, Hideto; Aramaki, Hironori; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an important biological catalyst and is critical for DNA synthesis during cell proliferation. Cellular iron uptake is enhanced in tumor cells to support increased DNA synthesis. Circadian variations in DNA synthesis and proliferation have been identified in tumor cells, but their relationship with intracellular iron levels is unclear. In this study, we identified a 24-h rhythm in iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) levels in colon-26 tumors implanted in mice. Our findings suggest that IRP2 regulates the 24-h rhythm of transferrin receptor 1 (Tfr1) mRNA expression post-transcriptionally, by binding to RNA stem-loop structures known as iron-response elements. We also found that Irp2 mRNA transcription is promoted by circadian clock genes, including brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (BMAL1) and the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK) heterodimer. Moreover, growth in colon-26(Δ19) tumors expressing the clock-mutant protein (CLOCKΔ19) was low compared with that in wild-type colon-26 tumor. The time-dependent variation of cellular iron levels, and the proliferation rate in wild-type colon-26 tumor was decreased by CLOCKΔ19 expression. Our findings suggest that circadian organization contributes to tumor cell proliferation by regulating iron metabolism in the tumor. PMID:26797126

  1. Spinal cord and bone metastasizing renal tumor of childhood.

    PubMed

    Arrotegui, J I; Barrios, C

    1995-01-01

    In recent reports on renal tumors of childhood with bone involvement neoplasms originally considered to be Wilms tumor have been assigned to new groups. After reviewing the literature, we knew that Wilms tumor rarely metastasizes in this way. Our case illustrates the unique biological feature of the rare, unfavorable histology Wilms tumor variant know as 'clear cell sarcoma of the kidney' (CCSK). Metastases to the spinal cord, as observed in our patient are distinctly unusual. To our knowledge, only two previous cases have been reported in the world literature.

  2. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Tumor Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    2001. Multiple interactions between SRm160 and SR family proteins in enhancer-dependent splicing and development of Caenorhabditis elegans . 11... Caenorhabditis 36 Lorson, C.L. et al. (1999) A single nucleotide in the Biol. 77, 277-291 elegans . Nature 402, 835-838 SMN gene regulates splicing and is...terminate (Birse et al., 1998; Proudfoot, 2000), mutation of the poly(A) signal resulted in the accumulation to high levels in the nuclear fraction of

  3. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  4. RSUME inhibits VHL and regulates its tumor suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Gerez, J; Tedesco, L; Bonfiglio, J J; Fuertes, M; Barontini, M; Silberstein, S; Wu, Y; Renner, U; Páez-Pereda, M; Holsboer, F; Stalla, G K; Arzt, E

    2015-09-10

    Somatic mutations or loss of von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL) happen in the majority of VHL disease tumors, which present a constitutively active Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), essential for tumor growth. Recently described mechanisms for pVHL modulation shed light on the open question of the HIF/pVHL pathway regulation. The aim of the present study was to determine the molecular mechanism by which RSUME stabilizes HIFs, by studying RSUME effect on pVHL function and to determine the role of RSUME on pVHL-related tumor progression. We determined that RSUME sumoylates and physically interacts with pVHL and negatively regulates the assembly of the complex between pVHL, Elongins and Cullins (ECV), inhibiting HIF-1 and 2α ubiquitination and degradation. We found that RSUME is expressed in human VHL tumors (renal clear-cell carcinoma (RCC), pheochromocytoma and hemangioblastoma) and by overexpressing or silencing RSUME in a pVHL-HIF-oxygen-dependent degradation stability reporter assay, we determined that RSUME is necessary for the loss of function of type 2 pVHL mutants. The functional RSUME/pVHL interaction in VHL-related tumor progression was further confirmed using a xenograft assay in nude mice. RCC clones, in which RSUME was knocked down and express either pVHL wt or type 2 mutation, have an impaired tumor growth, as well as HIF-2α, vascular endothelial growth factor A and tumor vascularization diminution. This work shows a novel mechanism for VHL tumor progression and presents a new mechanism and factor for targeting tumor-related pathologies with pVHL/HIF altered function.

  5. Testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by modifying tumor suppressor genes and tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lisa J.; Xiong, Yin; Nilubol, Naris; He, Mei; Bommareddi, Swaroop; Zhu, Xuguang; Jia, Li; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Jeong-Won; Xu, Xia; Patel, Dhaval; Willingham, Mark C.; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Cancer gender disparity has been observed for a variety of human malignancies. Thyroid cancer is one such cancer with a higher incidence in women, but more aggressive disease in men. There is scant evidence on the role of sex hormones on cancer initiation/progression. Using a transgenic mouse model of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), we found castration led to lower rates of cancer in females and less advanced cancer in males. Mechanistically, less advanced cancer in castrated males was due to increased expression of tumor suppressor (Glipr1, Sfrp1) and immune-regulatory genes and higher tumor infiltration with M1 macrophages and CD8 cells. Functional study showed that GLIPR1 reduced cell growth and increased chemokine secretion (Ccl5) that activates immune cells. Our data demonstrate that testosterone regulates thyroid cancer progression by reducing tumor suppressor gene expression and tumor immunity. PMID:25576159

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factors as key regulators of tumor inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-06-15

    Low levels of oxygen or hypoxia is often an obstacle in health, particularly in pathological disorders like cancer. The main family of transcription factors responsible for cell survival and adaptation under strenuous conditions of hypoxia are the "hypoxia-inducible factors" (HIFs). Together with prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs), HIFs regulates tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, metastasis, in addition to resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Additionally, the entire HIF transcription cascade is involved in the "seventh" hallmark of cancer; inflammation. Studies have shown that hypoxia can influence tumor associated immune cells toward assisting in tumor proliferation, differentiation, vessel growth, distant metastasis and suppression of the immune response via cytokine expression alterations. These changes are not necessarily analogous to HIF's role in non-cancer immune responses, where hypoxia often encourages a strong inflammatory response.

  7. Biophysical regulation of tumor cell invasion: moving beyond matrix stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-04-01

    Invasion of cancer cells into the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key step in tumor infiltration and metastasis. While the strong influence of ECM stiffness in governing tumor cell migration has been well established in two-dimensional culture paradigms, investigation of this parameter in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs has proven considerably more challenging, in part because perturbations that change 3D ECM stiffness often concurrently change microscale matrix parameters that critically regulate cell migration, such as pore size, fiber architecture, and local material deformability. Here we review the potential importance of these parameters in the context of tumor cell migration in 3D ECMs. We begin by discussing biophysical mechanisms of cell motility in 3D ECMs, with an emphasis on the cell-matrix mechanical interactions that underlie this process and key signatures of mesenchymal and amoeboid modes of motility. We then consider microscale matrix physical properties that are particularly relevant to 3D culture and would be expected to regulate motility, including matrix microstructure and nonlinear elasticity. We also discuss how changes in 3D matrix properties might be expected to trigger transitions in subcellular mechanisms, which in turn contribute to mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) by imposing restrictions on 3D motility. We expect that the field will gain valuable insight into invasion and metastasis by deepening its understanding of microscale, biophysical interactions between tumor cells and matrix elements and by creating new 3D scaffolds that permit orthogonal manipulation of specific matrix parameters.

  8. Natural Compounds Regulate Glycolysis in Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian-Li; Chen, Ying-Ge

    2015-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, Otto Heinrich Warburg described an elevated rate of glycolysis occurring in cancer cells, even in the presence of atmospheric oxygen (the Warburg effect). Recently it became a therapeutically interesting strategy and is considered as an emerging hallmark of cancer. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is one of the key transcription factors that play major roles in tumor glycolysis and could directly trigger Warburg effect. Thus, how to inhibit HIF-1-depended Warburg effect to assist the cancer therapy is becoming a hot issue in cancer research. In fact, HIF-1 upregulates the glucose transporters (GLUT) and induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, such as hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. So small molecules of natural origin used as GLUT, hexokinase, or pyruvate kinase isoform M2 inhibitors could represent a major challenge in the field of cancer treatment. These compounds aim to suppress tumor hypoxia induced glycolysis process to suppress the cell energy metabolism or enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. In this review, we highlight the role of natural compounds in regulating tumor glycolysis, with a main focus on the glycolysis under hypoxic tumor microenvironment. PMID:25685782

  9. Netrin-4 regulates angiogenic responses and tumor cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Nacht, Mariana; St Martin, Thia B.; Byrne, Ann; Klinger, Katherine W.; Teicher, Beverly A.; Madden, Stephen L. Jiang, Yide

    2009-03-10

    Netrin-4 is a 628 amino acid basement membrane component that promotes neurite elongation at low concentrations but inhibits neurite extension at high concentrations. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that several molecules, including netrins, are regulators of both neuronal and vascular growth. It is believed that molecules that guide neural growth and development are also involved in regulating morphogenesis of the vascular tree. Further, netrins have recently been implicated in controlling epithelial cell branching morphogenesis in the breast, lung and pancreas. Characterization of purified netrin-4 in in vitro angiogenesis assays demonstrated that netrin-4 markedly inhibits HMVEC migration and tube formation. Moreover, netrin-4 inhibits proliferation of a variety of human tumor cells in vitro. Netrin-4 has only modest effects on proliferation of endothelial and other non-transformed cells. Netrin-4 treatment results in phosphorylation changes of proteins that are known to control cell growth. Specifically, Phospho-Akt-1, Phospho-Jnk-2, and Phospho-c-Jun are reduced in tumor cells that have been treated with netrin-4. Together, these data suggest a potential role for netrin-4 in regulating tumor growth.

  10. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  11. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    Independence in human tochemical and morphometric study. Anticancer Res 2002, 22: breast cancer. In vivo 1998, 2:95-106. 1231-1238. 17. Sheikh MS, Garcia ...breast Am J Surg 11. Zapata-Benavides P, Tuna M, Lopez -Berestein G, Tari AM: Down- Pathol. 2001, 25:1054-1060. regulation of Wilmstumor 1 protein...1998;2:95-106. cells at different stages during tumor progression, to identify 15. Sheikh MS, Garcia M, Pujol P, et al. Why are estrogen receptor

  12. 'Primary extrarenal Wilms' tumour': rare presentation of a common paediatric tumour.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vandana; Verma, Amit Kumar; Batra, Vineeta; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2014-06-06

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma), the most common abdominal malignancy of childhood, occurs primarily as a malignant renal tumour. Extrarenal Wilms' tumour is rare with occasional reports from the Indian subcontinent. The various locations of extrarenal Wilms' tumour include retroperitoneum, uterus, skin and thorax. In this report we will discuss the imaging features highlighting the imaging differential diagnosis in a case of retroperitoneal (extrarenal) primary Wilms' tumour.

  13. Kidney Tumors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Pediatric kidney tumors fall into four primary categories: Wilms tumors (~85% of all cases), clear cell sarcomas of the kidney (~5%), congenital mesoblastic nephromas (~4%), and rhabdoid tumors of the kidney (~3%). The TARGET initiative is investigating three of these tumor types.

  14. p53 regulates cytoskeleton remodeling to suppress tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Araki, Keigo; Ebata, Takahiro; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Tobiume, Kei; Wolf, Steven John; Kawauchi, Keiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer cells possess unique characteristics such as invasiveness, the ability to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and an inherent stemness. Cell morphology is altered during these processes and this is highly dependent on actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is, therefore, important for determination of cell fate. Mutations within the TP53 (tumor suppressor p53) gene leading to loss or gain of function (GOF) of the protein are often observed in aggressive cancer cells. Here, we highlight the roles of p53 and its GOF mutants in cancer cell invasion from the perspective of the actin cytoskeleton; in particular its reorganization and regulation by cell adhesion molecules such as integrins and cadherins. We emphasize the multiple functions of p53 in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling in response to the extracellular microenvironment, and oncogene activation. Such an approach provides a new perspective in the consideration of novel targets for anti-cancer therapy.

  15. Survivin isoform Delta Ex3 regulates tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Magali; Ceballos-Cancino, Gisela; Callaghan, Richard; Maldonado, Vilma; Patiño, Nelly; Ruíz, Víctor; Meléndez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2012-05-01

    Survivin is an important member of the Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) family and has essential roles in apoptosis and cell cycle progression. This gene is commonly upregulated in human cancer and provides an exciting diagnostic and therapeutic target. Survivin is expressed as several isoforms that are generated by alternative splicing, and some of these present antagonistic activities. Currently, information regarding the regulation of these isoforms is lacking. In this study, we sought to analyze survivin Delta Ex3 expression in a three-dimensional model of avascular tumors and its overexpression effects in processes such as proliferation, clonogenicity and apoptosis. We found a positive correlation between spheroid growth and survivin Delta Ex3 expression during the exponential phase. We demonstrated that this isoform not only decreased apoptosis but also inhibited tumor spheroid formation by decreasing proliferation and clonogenic survival. These results point toward a dual and antagonistic effect of this spliced survivin isoform in cancer development.

  16. Twist1 regulates keratinocyte proliferation and skin tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Jaya; Rho, Okkyung; Youssef, Ronnie M; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of deleting Twist1 on keratinocyte proliferation and on skin tumor development using the two-stage chemical carcinogenesis model. BK5.Cre × Twist1(flox/flox) mice, which have a keratinocyte-specific Twist1 knockout (Twist1 KO), developed significantly reduced numbers of papilloma (70% reduction) and squamous cell carcinoma (75% reduction) as well as delayed tumor latency compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, knockdown of Twist1 in primary keratinocytes impeded cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition that coincided with reduced levels of the cell cycle proteins c-Myc, Cyclin E1, and E2F1 and increased levels of p53 and p21. Furthermore, ChIP analyses revealed that Twist1 bound to the promoter regions of Cyclin E1, E2F1, and c-Myc at the canonical E-box binding motif suggesting a direct transcriptional regulation. Further analyses of Twist1 KO mice revealed a significant reduction in the number of label-retaining cells as well as the number of α6-integrin(+) /CD34(+) cells in the hair follicles of untreated mice compared to WT mice. These mice also exhibited significantly reduced epidermal proliferation in response to TPA treatment that again correlated with reduced levels of cell cycle regulators and increased levels of p53 and p21. Finally, Twist1 deficiency in keratinocytes led to an upregulation of p53 via its stabilization and nuclear localization, which is responsible for the increased expression of p21 in these cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that Twist1 has a novel role in epithelial carcinogenesis by regulating proliferation of keratinocytes, including keratinocyte stem cells during tumor promotion. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  18. Genes regulated by estrogen in breast tumor cells in vitro are similarly regulated in vivo in tumor xenografts and human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Creighton, Chad J; Cordero, Kevin E; Larios, Jose M; Miller, Rebecca S; Johnson, Michael D; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Lippman, Marc E; Rae, James M

    2006-01-01

    Background Estrogen plays a central role in breast cancer pathogenesis. Although many studies have characterized the estrogen regulation of genes using in vitro cell culture models by global mRNA expression profiling, it is not clear whether these genes are similarly regulated in vivo or how they might be coordinately expressed in primary human tumors. Results We generated DNA microarray-based gene expression profiles from three estrogen receptor α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cell lines stimulated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in vitro over a time course, as well as from MCF-7 cells grown as xenografts in ovariectomized athymic nude mice with E2 supplementation and after its withdrawal. When the patterns of genes regulated by E2 in vitro were compared to those obtained from xenografts, we found a remarkable overlap (over 40%) of genes regulated by E2 in both contexts. These patterns were compared to those obtained from published clinical data sets. We show that, as a group, E2-regulated genes from our preclinical models were co-expressed with ERα in a panel of ERα+ breast tumor mRNA profiles, when corrections were made for patient age, as well as with progesterone receptor. Furthermore, the E2-regulated genes were significantly enriched for transcriptional targets of the myc oncogene and were found to be coordinately expressed with Myc in human tumors. Conclusion Our results provide significant validation of a widely used in vitro model of estrogen signaling as being pathologically relevant to breast cancers in vivo. PMID:16606439

  19. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  20. Epigenetic regulation of putative tumor suppressor TGFBI in human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongbo; Liu, Jing; Guo, Dan; Liu, Peixiang; Zhao, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated the TGFBI gene functions as a putative tumor suppressor and is frequently downregulated in human tumors of different histological types. The hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter, as one of the main regulatory mechanisms, is associated with TGFBI silencing. In this study, we used a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) method to evaluate the methylation status of the TGFBI promoter in human leukemias. Real-time RT-PCR and methylation-specific PCR approaches were performed to define the TGFBI expression and promoter methylation in human leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from leukemia patients, bisulfite-converted, and analyzed by the MSP method. Hypermethylation of the TGFBI promoter occurred in leukemia cell lines and demethylation treatment reexpressed TGFBI at a substantially increased level in most of leukemia cell lines tested. Furthermore, a much higher level of CpG island methylation and a significantly lower TGFBI expression were also identified in clinical leukemia samples. The results suggest an important role of promoter methylation in regulating TGFBI expression in leukemia, which provides a useful diagnostic marker for clinical management of human leukemias.

  1. Regulation of cell signaling and apoptosis by tumor suppressor WWOX

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jui-Yen; Chou, Ying-Tsen; Lai, Feng-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Human fragile WWOX gene encodes a tumor suppressor WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (named WWOX, FOR, or WOX1). Functional suppression of WWOX prevents apoptotic cell death induced by a variety of stress stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor, UV radiation, and chemotherapeutic drug treatment. Loss of WWOX gene expression due to gene deletions, loss of heterozygosity, chromosomal translocations, or epigenetic silencing is frequently observed in human malignant cancer cells. Acquisition of chemoresistance in squamous cell carcinoma, osteosarcoma, and breast cancer cells is associated with WWOX deficiency. WWOX protein physically interacts with many signaling molecules and exerts its regulatory effects on gene transcription and protein stability and subcellular localization to control cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, autophagy, and metabolism. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which WWOX regulates cellular functions and stress responses. A potential scenario is that activation of WWOX by anticancer drugs is needed to overcome chemoresistance and trigger cancer cell death, suggesting that WWOX can be regarded as a prognostic marker and a candidate molecule for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:25595191

  2. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  3. Tissue Elasticity Regulated Tumor Gene Expression: Implication for Diagnostic Biomarkers of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Long T.; Keschrumrus, Vic; Zhang, Xi; Zhong, Jiang F.; Su, Qingning; Kabeer, Mustafa H.; Loudon, William G.; Li, Shengwen Calvin

    2015-01-01

    Background The tumor microenvironment consists of both physical and chemical factors. Tissue elasticity is one physical factor contributing to the microenvironment of tumor cells. To test the importance of tissue elasticity in cell culture, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) stem cells were cultured on soft polyacrylamide (PAA) hydrogel plates that mimics the elasticity of brain tissue compared with PNET on standard polystyrene (PS) plates. We report the molecular profiles of PNET grown on either PAA or PS. Methodology/Principal Findings A whole-genome microarray profile of transcriptional expression between the two culture conditions was performed as a way to probe effects of substrate on cell behavior in culture. The results showed more genes downregulated on PAA compared to PS. This led us to propose microRNA (miRNA) silencing as a potential mechanism for downregulation. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a greater number of miRNA binding sites from the 3' UTR of downregulated genes and identified as specific miRNA binding sites that were enriched when cells were grown on PAA—this supports the hypothesis that tissue elasticity plays a role in influencing miRNA expression. Thus, Dicer was examined to determine if miRNA processing was affected by tissue elasticity. Dicer genes were downregulated on PAA and had multiple predicted miRNA binding sites in its 3' UTR that matched the miRNA binding sites found enriched on PAA. Many differentially regulated genes were found to be present on PS but downregulated on PAA were mapped onto intron sequences. This suggests expression of alternative polyadenylation sites within intron regions that provide alternative 3' UTRs and alternative miRNA binding sites. This results in tissue specific transcriptional downregulation of mRNA in humans by miRNA. We propose a mechanism, driven by the physical characteristics of the microenvironment by which downregulation of genes occur. We found that tissue elasticity-mediated cytokines

  4. Tumor-suppressor genes: cardinal factors in inherited predisposition to human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, H J; Prosser, J

    1992-01-01

    A predisposition to the development of certain specific and familial cancers is associated with the inheritance of a single mutated gene. In the best-characterized cases, this primary mutation is a loss of function mutation consistent with viability but resulting in neoplastic change consequent to the acquisition of a second somatic mutation at the same locus. Such genes are referred to as tumor-suppressor genes. Classical examples are the Rb-1 gene associated with the development of retinoblastoma and the p53 gene, which is associated with a wider range of neoplasms, including breast cancer. Other tumor-suppressor genes have been isolated which are associated with Wilms' tumor, neurofibromatosis, and inherited and sporadic forms of colorectal cancer. Some of these genes appear to act as negative regulators of mitotic cycle genes, and others may have different properties. The nature of these genes is discussed, as is the evidence for the involvement of tumor-suppressor genes in other inherited, and sporadic, forms of cancer. Some recent data on the Wilms' tumor gene, WT1, and on the involvement of the p53 gene in breast cancer are presented, and the importance of genomic imprinting in contributing to the excess of suppressor gene mutations in chromosomes of paternal origin is considered. PMID:1336726

  5. Tie2 Regulates Tumor Metastasis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Daisuke; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Miyamoto, Isao; Kimura, Yasushi; Saito, Tomoaki; Suzuki, Takane; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial-specific receptor, tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin-like loops and epidermal growth factor homology domains-2 (Tie2) is a member of the tyrosine kinase family and is ubiquitous in normal tissues; however, little is known about the mechanisms and roles of Tie2 in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). In the current study, we investigated the expression status of Tie2 in OSCCs by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry and the functional mechanisms of Tie2 using its overexpressed OSCC (oeTie2) cells and Tie2 blocking by its antibody. We found that Tie2 expression was down-regulated significantly (p < 0.05) in OSCCs compared with normal counterparts in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, oeTie2 cells showed higher cellular adhesion (p < 0.05) and lower cellular invasion (p < 0.05) compared with control cells; whereas there was similar cellular proliferation in both transfectants. Furthermore, cellular adhesion was inhibited and invasion was activated by Tie2 function-blocking antibody (p < 0.05), indicating that Tie2 directly regulates cellular adhesion and invasion. As expected, among the clinical variables analyzed, Tie2-positivity in patients with OSCC was correlated closely with negative lymph node metastasis. These results suggested for the first time that Tie2 plays an important role in tumor metastasis and may be a potential biomarker for OSCC metastasis. PMID:27053959

  6. Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Palamarchuk, Alexey; Efanov, Alexey; Maximov, Vadim; Aqeilan, Rami I; Croce, Carlo M; Pekarsky, Yuri

    2005-12-15

    Programmed cell death 4 (Pdcd4) is a tumor suppressor protein that interacts with eukaryotic initiation factor 4A and inhibits protein synthesis. Pdcd4 also suppresses the transactivation of activator protein-1 (AP-1)-responsive promoters by c-Jun. The Akt (protein kinase B) serine/threonine kinase is a key mediator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, and growth. Because Pdcd4 has two putative Akt phosphorylation sites at Ser(67) and Ser(457), we investigated whether Akt phosphorylates and regulates Pdcd4. Our results show that Akt specifically phosphorylates Ser(67) and Ser(457) residues of Pdcd4 in vitro and in vivo. We further show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt causes nuclear translocation of Pdcd4. Using luciferase assay, we show that phosphorylation of Pdcd4 by Akt also causes a significant decrease of the ability of Pdcd4 to interfere with the transactivation of AP-1-responsive promoter by c-Jun.

  7. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25911043

  8. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases.

  9. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  10. The HMGB1/RAGE inflammatory pathway promotes pancreatic tumor growth by regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kang, R; Tang, D; Schapiro, NE; Loux, T; Livesey, KM; Billiar, TR; Wang, H; Van Houten, B; Lotze, MT; Zeh, HJ

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells require increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to support anabolism and proliferation. The precise mechanisms regulating this process in tumor cells are unknown. Here, we show that the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) and one of its primary ligands, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), are required for optimal mitochondrial function within tumors. We found that RAGE is present in the mitochondria of cultured tumor cells as well as primary tumors. RAGE and HMGB1 coordinately enhanced tumor cell mitochondrial complex I activity, ATP production, tumor cell proliferation and migration. Lack of RAGE or inhibition of HMGB1 release diminished ATP production and slowed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings link, for the first time, the HMGB1–RAGE pathway with changes in bioenergetics. Moreover, our observations provide a novel mechanism within the tumor microenvironment by which necrosis and inflammation promote tumor progression. PMID:23318458

  11. Speed-accuracy strategy regulations in prefrontal tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Fabio; Skrap, Miran; Vallesi, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    The ability to flexibly switch between fast and accurate decisions is crucial in everyday life. Recent neuroimaging evidence suggested that left lateral prefrontal cortex plays a role in switching from a quick response strategy to an accurate one. However, the causal role of the left prefrontal cortex in this particular, non-verbal, strategy switch has never been demonstrated. To fill this gap, we administered a perceptual decision-making task to neuro-oncological prefrontal patients, in which the requirement to be quick or accurate changed randomly on a trial-by-trial basis. To directly assess hemispheric asymmetries in speed-accuracy regulation, patients were tested a few days before and a few days after surgical excision of a brain tumor involving either the left (N=13) or the right (N=12) lateral frontal brain region. A group of age- and education-matched healthy controls was also recruited. To gain more insight on the component processes implied in the task, performance data (accuracy and speed) were not only analyzed separately but also submitted to a diffusion model analysis. The main findings indicated that the left prefrontal patients were impaired in appropriately adopting stricter response criteria in speed-to-accuracy switching trials with respect to healthy controls and right prefrontal patients, who were not impaired in this condition. This study demonstrates that the prefrontal cortex in the left hemisphere is necessary for flexible behavioral regulations, in particular when setting stricter response criteria is required in order to successfully switch from a speedy strategy to an accurate one. PMID:26772144

  12. Tumor Protein (TP)-p53 Members as Regulators of Autophagy in Tumor Cells upon Marine Drug Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ratovitski, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting autophagic pathways might play a critical role in designing novel chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of human cancers, and the prevention of tumor-derived chemoresistance. Marine compounds were found to decrease tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Some of them were shown to induce autophagic flux in tumor cells. In this study, we observed that the selected marine life-derived compounds (Chromomycin A2, Psammaplin A, and Ilimaquinone) induce expression of several autophagic signaling intermediates in human squamous cell carcinoma, glioblastoma, and colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro through a transcriptional regulation by tumor protein (TP)-p53 family members. These conclusions were supported by specific qPCR expression analysis, luciferase reporter promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation of promoter sequences bound to the TP53 family proteins, and silencing of the TP53 members in tumor cells. PMID:27537898

  13. Computational evaluation of new homologous down regulators of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) targeted for tumor reversion.

    PubMed

    Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Yadav, Mukesh; Wishard, Rohan

    2013-12-01

    The Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) has been investigated for tumor reversion and is a target of cancer therapy. Down regulators which suppress the expression of TCTP can trigger the process of tumor reversion leading to the transformation of tumor cells into revertant cells. The present investigation is a novel protein-protein docking approach to target TCTP by a set of proteins similar to the protein: sorting nexin 6 (SNX6) which is an established down regulator of TCTP. The established down regulator along with its set of most similar proteins were modeled using the PYTHON based software - MODELLER v9.9, followed by structure validation using the Procheck Package. Further TCTP was docked with its established and prospective down regulators using the flexible docking protocol suite HADDOCK. The results were evaluated and ranked according to the RMSD values of the complex and the HADDOCK score, which is a weighted sum of van der Waal's energy, electrostatic energy, restraints violation energy and desolvation energy. Results concluded the protein sorting nexin 6 of Mus musculus to be a better down regulator of TCTP, as compared to the suggested down regulator (Homo sapiens snx6).

  14. Regulation of Prostate Cancer Progression by the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease . Experimental data has uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26828013

  15. Regulation of prostate cancer progression by the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Stephen L; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Chung, Leland W K

    2016-09-28

    Prostate cancer remains the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men in North America, and despite recent advances in treatment patients with metastatic disease continue to have poor five-year survival rates. Recent studies in prostate cancer have revealed the critical role of the tumor microenvironment in the initiation and progression to advanced disease. Experimental data have uncovered a reciprocal relationship between the cells in the microenvironment and malignant tumor cells in which early changes in normal tissue microenvironment can promote tumorigenesis and in turn tumor cells can promote further pro-tumor changes in the microenvironment. In the tumor microenvironment, the presence of persistent immune infiltrates contributes to the recruitment and reprogramming of other non-immune stromal cells including cancer-associated fibroblasts and a unique recently identified population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs). These MICs, which can also be found as part of the circulating tumor cell (CTC) population in PC patients, promote cancer cell transformation, enhance metastatic potential and confer therapeutic resistance. MICs act can on other cells within the tumor microenvironment in part by secreting exosomes that reprogram adjacent stromal cells to create a more favorable tumor microenvironment to support continued cancer growth and progression. We review here the current data on the intricate relationship between inflammation, reactive stroma, tumor cells and disease progression in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biodegradable Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Enhancing Antitumor Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kong, Miao; Tang, Jiamin; Qiao, Qi; Wu, Tingting; Qi, Yan; Tan, Songwei; Gao, Xueqin; Zhang, Zhiping

    2017-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that regulating tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in improving antitumor efficiency. Herein, to remodel tumor immune microenvironment and elicit synergistic antitumor effects, lipid-coated biodegradable hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticle (dHMLB) was constructed with co-encapsulation of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), doxorubicin (DOX) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) for chemo-immunotherapy. The nanoparticle-mediated combinational therapy provided a benign regulation on tumor microenvironment through activation of tumor infiltrating T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, promotion of cytokines secretion of IFN-γ and IL-12, and down-regulation of immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells, cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β. ATRA/DOX/IL-2 co-loaded dHMLB demonstrated significant tumor growth and metastasis inhibition, and also exhibited favorable biodegradability and safety. This nanoplatform has great potential in developing a feasible strategy to remodel tumor immune microenvironment and achieve enhanced antitumor effect.

  17. Ixabepilone in Treating Young Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-13

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Alveolar Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Embryonal Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  18. Cixutumumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Childhood Hepatoblastoma; Childhood Synovial Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adrenocortical Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Liver Cancer; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive; Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Retinoblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors

  19. Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Immunosuppressive Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an important complementary strategy for treating cancer in China. The mechanism is related to regulating the internal environment and remodeling the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment (TIM). Herein we illustrate how TIM is reformed and its protumor activity on promoting tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, tumor invasion, and the oncogenicity of cancer stem cells. Furthermore we summarize the effects and mechanism of TCM on regulating TIM via enhancing antitumor immune responses (e.g., regulating the expression of MHC molecules and Fas/FasL, attenuating cancerigenic ability of cancer stem cells) and remolding immunosuppressive cells (e.g., reversing immune phenotypes of T lymphocytes and tumor associated macrophages, promoting dendritic cells mature, restraining myeloid derived suppressor cells function, and regulating Th1/Th2 factors). We also reveal the bidirectional and multitargeting functions of TCM on regulating TIM. Hopefully, it provides new theoretical basis for TCM clinical practice in cancer treatment and prevention. PMID:26161392

  20. Role of curcumin-dependent modulation of tumor microenvironment of a murine T cell lymphoma in altered regulation of tumor cell survival

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2011-05-01

    Using a murine model of a T cell lymphoma, in the present study, we report that tumor growth retarding action of curcumin involves modulation of some crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment regulating tumor progression. Curcumin-administration to tumor-bearing host caused an altered pH regulation in tumor cells associated with alteration in expression of cell survival and apoptosis regulatory proteins and genes. Nevertheless, an alteration was also observed in biophysical parameters of tumor microenvironment responsible for modulation of tumor growth pertaining to hypoxia, tumor acidosis, and glucose metabolism. The study thus sheds new light with respect to the antineoplastic action of curcumin against a tumor-bearing host with progressively growing tumor of hematological origin. This will help in optimizing application of the drug and anticancer research and therapy. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  1. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingnan; Song, Zhuo; Guo, Qiujun; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the "seeds" and "soil," which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Traditional Chinese medicine displays a broad range of biological effects, and increasing evidence has shown that it may relate with synergistic effect on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Based on literature review and our previous studies, we summarize the synergistic effect and the molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells.

  2. Synergistic Effect and Molecular Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Regulating Tumor Microenvironment and Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuo; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment is like a relationship between the “seeds” and “soil,” which is a hotspot in recent cancer research. Targeting at tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells has become a new strategy for cancer treatment. Conventional cancer treatments mostly focused on single targets or single mechanism (the seeds or part of the soil); few researches intervened in the whole tumor microenvironment and achieved ideal therapeutic effect as expected. Traditional Chinese medicine displays a broad range of biological effects, and increasing evidence has shown that it may relate with synergistic effect on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. Based on literature review and our previous studies, we summarize the synergistic effect and the molecular mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine on regulating tumor microenvironment and cancer cells. PMID:27042656

  3. Piezo2 protein: A novel regulator of tumor angiogenesis and hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Liu, Chang; Zhou, Rong-Mei; Yao, Jin; Li, Xiu-Miao; Shen, Yi; Cheng, Hong; Yuan, Jun; Yan, Biao; Jiang, Qin

    2016-07-12

    Angiogenesis is important for invasive tumor growth and metastasis. Its inhibition is a promising tactic for limiting tumor progression. Here, we showed that Piezo2 knockdown led to decreased glioma angiogenesis and reduced vascular hyperpermeability. Piezo2 was highly expressed in tumor endothelial cells, and its knockdown suppressed vascular leakage and tumor angiogenesis. In a retinal vasculature development assay, corneal angiogenesis assay and a modified Miles assay, Piezo2 knockdown obviously decreased angiogenesis and vascular hyperpermeability. In vitro assays revealed that Piezo2 knockdown inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation. Moreover, In vitro co-culture system assay showed that Piezo2 knockdown in endothelial cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma tumor cells. Piezo2 could regulate glioma angiogenesis via Ca2+/Wnt11/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells. Taken together, these studies provide the evidence for Piezo2 as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis and vascular permeability.

  4. Piezo2 protein: A novel regulator of tumor angiogenesis and hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Miao; Shen, Yi; Cheng, Hong; Yuan, Jun; Yan, Biao; Jiang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is important for invasive tumor growth and metastasis. Its inhibition is a promising tactic for limiting tumor progression. Here, we showed that Piezo2 knockdown led to decreased glioma angiogenesis and reduced vascular hyperpermeability. Piezo2 was highly expressed in tumor endothelial cells, and its knockdown suppressed vascular leakage and tumor angiogenesis. In a retinal vasculature development assay, corneal angiogenesis assay and a modified Miles assay, Piezo2 knockdown obviously decreased angiogenesis and vascular hyperpermeability. In vitro assays revealed that Piezo2 knockdown inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation. Moreover, In vitro co-culture system assay showed that Piezo2 knockdown in endothelial cells suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma tumor cells. Piezo2 could regulate glioma angiogenesis via Ca2+/Wnt11/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells. Taken together, these studies provide the evidence for Piezo2 as a critical regulator of tumor angiogenesis and vascular permeability. PMID:27329839

  5. In vivo major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) expression on MHCIlow tumor cells is regulated by gammadelta T and NK cells during the early steps of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Riond, Joëlle; Rodriguez, Stéphane; Nicolau, Marie-Laure; al Saati, Talal; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2009-11-02

    Cell surface expression of MHC class I molecules by tumor cells is determinant in the interplay between tumor cells and the immune system. Nevertheless, the mechanisms which regulate MHCI expression on tumor cells are not clear. We previously showed that immune innate cells from the spleen can regulate MHCI expression on MHCI(low) tumor cells. Here, using the murine model of B16 melanoma, we demonstrate that the MHCI status of tumor cells in vivo is regulated by the microenvironment. In subcutaneous grafts, induction of MHCI molecules on tumor cells is concomitant to the recruitment of lymphocytes and relies on an IFNgamma-mediated mechanism. gammadelta T and NK cells are essential to this regulation. A small proportion of tumor-infiltrating NK cells and gammadelta T cells were found to produce IFNgamma, suggesting a possible direct participation to the MHCI increase on the tumor cells upon tumor cell recognition. Depletion of gammadelta T cells increases the tumor growth rate, confirming their anti-tumoral role in our model. Taken together, our results demonstrate that in vivo, NK and gammadelta T cells play a dual role during the early growth of MHCI(low) tumor cells. In addition to controlling the growth of tumor cells, they contribute to modifying the immunogenic profile of residual tumor cells.

  6. Reprogramming of the Tumor Microenvironment by Stromal Pten-regulated miR-320

    PubMed Central

    Bronisz, A; Godlewski, J; Wallace, JA; Merchant, AS; Nowicki, MO; Mathsyaraja, H; Srinivasan, R; Trimboli, AJ; Martin, CK; Li, F; Yu, L; Fernandez, SA; Pécot, T; Rosol, TJ; Cory, S; Hallett, M; Park, M; Piper, MG; Marsh, CB; Yee, LD; Jimenez, RE; Nuovo, G; Lawler, SE; Chiocca, EA; Leone, G; Ostrowski, MC

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (Pten) in stromal fibroblasts suppresses epithelial mammary tumors, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Using proteomic and expression profiling, we show that Pten loss from mammary stromal fibroblasts activates an oncogenic secretome that orchestrates the transcriptional reprogramming of other cell types in the microenvironment. Downregulation of miR-320 and upregulation of one of its direct targets, ETS2, are critical events in Pten-deleted stromal fibroblasts responsible for inducing this oncogenic secretome, which in turn promotes tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Expression of the Pten-miR-320-Ets2 regulated secretome distinguished human normal breast stroma from tumor stroma and robustly correlated with recurrence in breast cancer patients. This work reveals miR-320 as a critical component of the Pten tumor suppressor axis that acts in stromal fibroblasts to reprogram the tumor microenvironment and curtail tumor progression. PMID:22179046

  7. Regulation of hematogenous tumor metastasis by acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Carpinteiro, Alexander; Becker, Katrin Anne; Japtok, Lukasz; Hessler, Gabriele; Keitsch, Simone; Požgajovà, Miroslava; Schmid, Kurt W; Adams, Constantin; Müller, Stefan; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J; Grassmé, Heike; Helfrich, Iris; Gulbins, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of cancer cells is the ultimate hallmark of malignancy and accounts for approximately 90% of human cancer deaths. We investigated the role of acid sphingomyelinase (Asm) in the hematogenous metastasis of melanoma cells. Intravenous injection of B16F10 melanoma cells into wild-type mice resulted in multiple lung metastases, while Asm-deficient mice (Smpd1−/− mice) were protected from pulmonary tumor spread. Transplanting wild-type platelets into Asm-deficient mice reinstated tumor metastasis. Likewise, Asm-deficient mice were protected from hematogenous MT/ret melanoma metastasis to the spleen in a mouse model of spontaneous tumor metastasis. Human and mouse melanoma cells triggered activation and release of platelet secretory Asm, in turn leading to ceramide formation, clustering, and activation of α5β1 integrins on melanoma cells finally leading to adhesion of the tumor cells. Clustering of integrins by applying purified Asm or C16 ceramide to B16F10 melanoma cells before intravenous injection restored trapping of tumor cells in the lung in Asm-deficient mice. This effect was revertable by arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptides, which are known inhibitors of integrins, and by antibodies neutralizing β1 integrins. These findings indicate that melanoma cells employ platelet-derived Asm for adhesion and metastasis. PMID:25851537

  8. Endothelial Caveolin-1 regulates the radiation response of epithelial prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Klein, D; Schmitz, T; Verhelst, V; Panic, A; Schenck, M; Reis, H; Drab, M; Sak, A; Herskind, C; Maier, P; Jendrossek, V

    2015-01-01

    The membrane protein caveolin-1 (Cav1) recently emerged as a novel oncogene involved in prostate cancer progression with opposed regulation in epithelial tumor cells and the tumor stroma. Here we examined the role of stromal Cav1 for growth and radiation response of MPR31-4 prostate cancer xenograft tumors using Cav1-deficient C57Bl/6 mice. Syngeneic MPR31-4 tumors grew faster when implanted into Cav1-deficient mice. Increased tumor growth on Cav1-deficient mice was linked to decreased integration of smooth muscle cells into the wall of newly formed blood vessels and thus with a less stabilized vessel phenotype compared with tumors from Cav1 wild-type animals. However, tumor growth delay of MPR31-4 tumors grown on Cav1 knockout mice to a single high-dose irradiation with 20 Gray was more pronounced compared with tumors grown on wild-type mice. Increased radiation-induced tumor growth delay in Cav1-deficient mice was associated with an increased endothelial cell apoptosis. In vitro studies using cultured endothelial cells (ECs) confirmed that the loss of Cav1 expression increases sensitivity of ECs to radiation-induced apoptosis and reduces their clonogenic survival after irradiation. Immunohistochemical analysis of human tissue specimen further revealed that although Cav1 expression is mostly reduced in the tumor stroma of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, the vascular compartment still expresses high levels of Cav1. In conclusion, the radiation response of MPR31-4 prostate tumors is critically regulated by Cav1 expression in the tumor vasculature. Thus, Cav1 might be a promising therapeutic target for combinatorial therapies to counteract radiation resistance of prostate cancer at the level of the tumor vasculature. PMID:25985209

  9. Selective up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor I in tumor-bearing rats with cancer-related cachexia.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Arena, Katia; Costelli, Paola; Aragno, Manuela; Danni, Oliviero; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are important mediators in cancer cachexia; however, the expression of these cytokines and their receptors in tumor-bearing animals is poorly characterized. We analyzed expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-RI, TNF-RII) and interleukin 6 (IL-6R) receptors in the brain, kidney, spleen, liver, muscle, ascite tumors and serum, from Yoshida AH-130 hepatoma-bearing rats. TNF-alpha increased in the brain, spleen, liver, and muscle of cachectic animals; IL-6 increased in the liver and muscle. AH-130 cells expressed a good level of TNF-alpha; on the contrary, no TNF-alpha or IL-6 protein was detected in the serum of either tumor-bearing or control animals. TNF-RI mRNA was up-regulated in the spleen, liver and muscle of tumor-bearing rats. TNF-RI protein levels confirmed up-regulation in the spleen and liver, but failed to detect any increase in the muscle. Western blotting against TNF-RI revealed two bands of lower molecular weight in cachectic muscle, suggesting proteolysis involving TNF-RI. No significant increase of either TNF-RII or IL-6R was observed. This is the first demonstration of a selective up-regulation of TNF-RI in cancer cachexia and suggests that local production of TNF-alpha and IL-6 is a corner-stone in the induction/maintenance of this syndrome.

  10. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-10-20

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis.

  11. Critical Role of Shp2 in Tumor Growth Involving Regulation of c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan; Chen, Zhengming; Chen, Liwei; Fang, Bin; Win-Piazza, Hla; Haura, Eric; Koomen, John M.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Activating mutants of Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, are linked to leukemia. In solid tumors, however, PTPN11 mutations occur at low frequencies, while the wild-type Shp2 is activated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in cancer cells and mediates PTK signaling. Therefore, it is important to address whether the wild-type Shp2 plays a functional role critical for tumor growth. Using shRNAs and a PTP-inactive mutant to inhibit Shp2, we find here that tumor growth of DU145 prostate cancer and H292 lung cancer cells depends on Shp2. Suppression of Shp2 inhibited cell proliferation, decreased c-Myc, and increased p27 expression in cell cultures. In H292 tumor tissues, c-Myc–positive cells coincided with Ki67-positive cells, and smaller tumors from Shp2 knockdown cells had less c-Myc–positive cells and more nuclear p27. Shp2-regulated c-Myc expression was mediated by Src and Erk1/2. Down-regulation of c-Myc reduced cell proliferation, while up-regulation of c-Myc in Shp2 knockdown H292 cells partially rescued the inhibitory effect of Shp2 suppression on cell proliferation. Tyrosine phosphoproteomic analysis of H292 tumor tissues showed that Shp2 could both up-regulate and down-regulate tyrosine phosphorylation on cellular proteins. Among other changes, Shp2 inhibition increased phosphorylation of Src Tyr-530 and Cdk1 Thr-14/Tyr-15 and decreased phosphorylation of Erk1- and Erk2-activating sites in the tumors. Significantly, we found that Shp2 positively regulated Gab1 Tyr-627/Tyr-659 phosphorylation. This finding reveals that Shp2 can autoregulate its own activating signal. Shp2 Tyr-62/Tyr-63 phosphorylation was observed in tumor tissues, indicating that Shp2 is activated in the tumors. PMID:21442024

  12. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  13. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates Integrity and Functionality of Tumor Blood Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y.; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-01-01

    Summary We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. PMID:22897853

  14. Small GTPase R-Ras regulates integrity and functionality of tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Junko; Urakami, Takeo; Li, Fangfei; Urakami, Akane; Zhu, Weiquan; Fukuda, Minoru; Li, Dean Y; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Komatsu, Masanobu

    2012-08-14

    We show that R-Ras, a small GTPase of the Ras family, is essential for the establishment of mature, functional blood vessels in tumors. The genetic disruption of R-Ras severely impaired the maturation processes of tumor vessels in mice. Conversely, the gain of function of R-Ras improved vessel structure and blood perfusion and blocked plasma leakage by enhanced endothelial barrier function and pericyte association with nascent blood vessels. Thus, R-Ras promotes normalization of the tumor vasculature. These findings identify R-Ras as a critical regulator of vessel integrity and function during tumor vascularization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Osteopontin facilitates tumor metastasis by regulating epithelial–mesenchymal plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Rongjie; Liang, Yingchao; Chen, Rui; Liu, Guoke; Wang, Hao; Tang, Min; Zhou, Xuyu; Wang, Huajing; Yang, Yang; Wei, Huafeng; Li, Bohua; Song, Yipeng; Zhao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis leads to high mortality; therefore, understanding the mechanisms that underlie tumor metastasis is crucial. Generally seen as a secretory protein, osteopontin (OPN) is involved in multifarious pathophysiological events. Here, we present a novel pro-metastatic role of OPN during metastatic colonization. Unlike secretory OPN (sOPN), which triggers the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) to initiate cancer metastasis, intracellular/nuclear OPN (iOPN) induces the mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) to facilitate the formation of metastases. Nuclear OPN is found to interact with HIF2α and impact the subsequent AKT1/miR-429/ZEB cascade. In vivo assays confirm that the progression of metastatic colonization is accompanied by the nuclear accumulation of OPN and the MET process. Furthermore, evidence of nuclear OPN in the lung metastases is exhibited in clinical specimens. Finally, VEGF in the microenvironment was shown to induce the translocation of OPN into the nucleus through a KDR/PLCγ/PKC-dependent pathway. Taken together, our results describe the pleiotropic roles of OPN in the tumor metastasis cascade, which indicate its potential as an effective target for both early and advanced tumors. PMID:28032860

  16. Pu-erh Tea Inhibits Tumor Cell Growth by Down-Regulating Mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms’ metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects. PMID:22174618

  17. Pu-erh tea inhibits tumor cell growth by down-regulating mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lanjun; Jia, Shuting; Tang, Wenru; Sheng, Jun; Luo, Ying

    2011-01-01

    Pu-erh tea is a kind of fermented tea with the incorporation of microorganisms' metabolites. Unlike green tea, the chemical characteristics and bioactivities of Pu-erh tea are still not well understood. Using water extracts of Pu-erh tea, we analyzed the tumor cell growth inhibition activities on several genetically engineered mouse tumor cell lines. We found that at the concentration that did not affect wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) growth, Pu-erh tea extracts could inhibit tumor cell growth by down-regulated S phase and cause G1 or G2 arrest. Further study showed that Pu-erh tea extracts down-regulated the expression of mutant p53 in tumor cells at the protein level as well as mRNA level. The same concentration of Pu-erh tea solution did not cause p53 stabilization or activation of its downstream pathways in wild type cells. We also found that Pu-erh tea treatment could slightly down-regulate both HSP70 and HSP90 protein levels in tumor cells. These data revealed the action of Pu-erh tea on tumor cells and provided the possible mechanism for Pu-erh tea action, which explained its selectivity in inhibiting tumor cells without affecting wild type cells. Our data sheds light on the application of Pu-erh tea as an anti-tumor agent with low side effects.

  18. DT-13 inhibits cancer cell migration by regulating NMIIA indirectly in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongzhi; Huang, Yue; Hou, Xiaoyin; Yu, Xiaowen; Lin, Sensen; Wei, Xiaohui; Li, Ruiming; Khan, Ghulam Jilany; Yuan, Shengtao; Sun, Li

    2016-08-01

    Tumor metastasis is one of the main causes of mortality among patients with malignant tumors. Previous studies concerning tumor metastasis have merely focused on the cancer cells in the tumor. However, an increasing number of studies show that the tumor microenvironment plays a vital role in the progression of cancer, particularly in tumor metastasis. Since fibroblasts and adipocytes are two of the most representative mesenchymal cells in the tumor microenvironment, we established a hypoxia-induced cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) model and a chemically induced adipocyte model to reveal the effect of the microenvironment on cancer development. In these models, the conditioned medium from the tumor microenvironment was found to significantly promote the migration of human lung cancer cell line 95D and regulate the expression of non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA), which is consistent with results in the published literature. Then, we confirmed the hypothesis that the tumor microenvironment can regulate NMIIA in cancer cells and facilitate migration by using the non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, blebbistatin. Thus, this is the first report that the tumor microenvironment can promote cancer cell migration by regulating the expression of NMIIA. Our present data also indicated that DT-13, the saponin monomer 13 of dwarf lilyturf tuber, inhibited cancer cell migration in the tumor microenvironment model. Further results showed that DT-13 exhibited anti-migratory effects by inhibiting the c-raf/ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Consequently, our research confirmed that DT-13 significantly inhibited 95D cell migration in vitro, indicating the potential anti-metastatic effect of DT-13 on lung cancer and the scientific basis for drug development.

  19. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  20. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  1. Near complete resolution of refractory, relapsed, metastatic Wilms' tumour in an adolescent with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shiyam; Burney, Ikram A; Al-Moundhri, Mansour S

    2014-03-01

    Wilms' tumour is common among children but rare in adults. Children with Wilms' tumour have better prognosis even when diagnosed at advanced stage. We report the case of an adolescent girl with chemo-resistant metastatic Wilms' tumour treated previously with two lines of chemotherapy. Upon progression on second line chemotherapy, there was a partial response to Bevacizumab based combination chemotherapy in the third line. Patient was referred for high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell therapy. The latter could not be achieved. The patient had a relapse 3 months later and succumbed to the disease.

  2. A rare case of bilateral cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma recurring as bilateral cystic Wilms tumour.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Jujju Jacob; Ninan, Pradeep Joseph

    2015-04-15

    Childhood cystic partially differentiated nephroblastoma (CPDN) is an uncommon renal neoplasm. Bilateral CPDN or CPDN co-existing with a cystic nephroma/Wilms tumour is extremely rare. Treatment of CPDN is by complete surgical excision. Although local recurrences are uncommon, distant metastases have not been described. We present a case of bilateral CPDN that, after complete excision, recurred as bilateral cystic Wilms tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature where a bilateral CPDN has recurred as bilateral Wilms tumour.

  3. An activated form of ADAM10 is tumor selective and regulates cancer stem-like cells and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Nayanendu; Eissman, Moritz F.; Xu, Kai; Llerena, Carmen; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ding, Bi-Sen; Cao, Zhongwei; Rafii, Shahin; Ernst, Matthias; Scott, Andrew M.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Lackmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane metalloprotease ADAM10 sheds a range of cell surface proteins, including ligands and receptors of the Notch, Eph, and erbB families, thereby activating signaling pathways critical for tumor initiation and maintenance. ADAM10 is thus a promising therapeutic target. Although widely expressed, its activity is normally tightly regulated. We now report prevalence of an active form of ADAM10 in tumors compared with normal tissues, in mouse models and humans, identified by our conformation-specific antibody mAb 8C7. Structure/function experiments indicate mAb 8C7 binds an active conformation dependent on disulfide isomerization and oxidative conditions, common in tumors. Moreover, this active ADAM10 form marks cancer stem-like cells with active Notch signaling, known to mediate chemoresistance. Importantly, specific targeting of active ADAM10 with 8C7 inhibits Notch activity and tumor growth in mouse models, particularly regrowth after chemotherapy. Our results indicate targeted inhibition of active ADAM10 as a potential therapy for ADAM10-dependent tumor development and drug resistance. PMID:27503072

  4. Loss of heterozygosity at 7p in Wilms' tumour development

    PubMed Central

    Powlesland, R M; Charles, A K; Malik, K T A; Reynolds, P A; Pires, S; Boavida, M; Brown, K W

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome 7p alterations have been implicated in the development of Wilms' tumour (WT) by previous studies of tumour cytogenetics, and by our analysis of a constitutional translocation (t(1;7)(q42;p15)) in a child with WT and radial aplasia. We therefore used polymorphic microsatellite markers on 7p for a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) study, and found LOH in seven out of 77 informative WTs (9%). The common region of LOH was 7p15–7p22, which contains the region disrupted by the t(1;7) breakpoint. Four WTs with 7p LOH had other genetic changes; a germline WT1 mutation with 11p LOH, LOH at 11p, LOH at 16q, and loss of imprinting of IGF2. Analysis of three tumour-associated lesions from 7p LOH cases revealed a cystic nephroma-like area also having 7p LOH. However, a nephrogenic rest and a contralateral WT from the two other cases showed no 7p LOH. No particular clinical phenotype was associated with the WTs which showed 7p LOH. The frequency and pattern of 7p LOH demonstrated in our studies indicate the presence of a tumour suppressor gene at 7p involved in the development of Wilms' tumour. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646884

  5. Multiple mechanisms of MYCN dysregulation in Wilms tumour.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richard D; Chagtai, Tasnim; Alcaide-German, Marisa; Apps, John; Wegert, Jenny; Popov, Sergey; Vujanic, Gordan; van Tinteren, Harm; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Kool, Marcel; de Kraker, Jan; Gisselsson, David; Graf, Norbert; Gessler, Manfred; Pritchard-Jones, Kathy

    2015-03-30

    Genomic gain of the proto-oncogene transcription factor gene MYCN is associated with poor prognosis in several childhood cancers. Here we present a comprehensive copy number analysis of MYCN in Wilms tumour (WT), demonstrating that gain of this gene is associated with anaplasia and with poorer relapse-free and overall survival, independent of histology. Using whole exome and gene-specific sequencing, together with methylation and expression profiling, we show that MYCN is targeted by other mechanisms, including a recurrent somatic mutation, P44L, and specific DNA hypomethylation events associated with MYCN overexpression in tumours with high risk histologies. We describe parallel evolution of genomic copy number gain and point mutation of MYCN in the contralateral tumours of a remarkable bilateral case in which independent contralateral mutations of TP53 also evolve over time. We report a second bilateral case in which MYCN gain is a germline aberration. Our results suggest a significant role for MYCN dysregulation in the molecular biology of Wilms tumour. We conclude that MYCN gain is prognostically significant, and suggest that the novel P44L somatic variant is likely to be an activating mutation.

  6. Interaction between CXCR4 and CCL20 Pathways Regulates Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Begin, Michal; Wald, Hanna; Weiss, Ido D.; Wald, Ori; Pikarsky, Eli; Abramovitch, Rinat; Zeira, Evelyne; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 is overexpressed in the majority of tumors and is critically involved in the development and metastasis of these tumors. CXCR4 is expressed in malignant tumor cells whereas its ligand SDF-1 (CXCL12) is expressed mainly by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF). Similarly to CXCR4, the chemokine CCL20 is overexpressed in variety of tumors; however its role and regulation in tumors is not fully clear. Here, we show that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 stimulates the production of the chemokine CCL20 and that CCL20 stimulates the proliferation and adhesion to collagen of various tumor cells. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL20 in tumor cells promotes growth and adhesion in vitro and increased tumor growth and invasiveness in vivo. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to CCL20 inhibit the in vivo growth of tumors that either overexpress CXCR4 or CCL20 or naturally express CCL20. These results reveal a role for CCL20 in CXCR4-dependent and -independent tumor growth and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCL20 and CCR6 antagonists in the treatment of CXCR4- and CCL20-dependent malignancies. PMID:19340288

  7. Interaction between CXCR4 and CCL20 pathways regulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Begin, Michal; Wald, Hanna; Weiss, Ido D; Wald, Ori; Pikarsky, Eli; Abramovitch, Rinat; Zeira, Evelyne; Galun, Eithan; Nagler, Arnon; Peled, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 is overexpressed in the majority of tumors and is critically involved in the development and metastasis of these tumors. CXCR4 is expressed in malignant tumor cells whereas its ligand SDF-1 (CXCL12) is expressed mainly by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF). Similarly to CXCR4, the chemokine CCL20 is overexpressed in variety of tumors; however its role and regulation in tumors is not fully clear. Here, we show that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 stimulates the production of the chemokine CCL20 and that CCL20 stimulates the proliferation and adhesion to collagen of various tumor cells. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL20 in tumor cells promotes growth and adhesion in vitro and increased tumor growth and invasiveness in vivo. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to CCL20 inhibit the in vivo growth of tumors that either overexpress CXCR4 or CCL20 or naturally express CCL20. These results reveal a role for CCL20 in CXCR4-dependent and -independent tumor growth and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCL20 and CCR6 antagonists in the treatment of CXCR4- and CCL20-dependent malignancies.

  8. FAK regulates platelet extravasation and tumor growth after antiangiogenic therapy withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Haemmerle, Monika; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Pradeep, Sunila; Taylor, Morgan L.; Hansen, Jean M.; Dalton, Heather J.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Cho, Min Soon; Nick, Alpa M.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Gutschner, Tony; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Han, Hee Dong; Zand, Behrouz; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Wu, Sherry Y.; Pecot, Chad V.; Burns, Alan R.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies in patients with ovarian cancer suggest that tumor growth may be accelerated following cessation of antiangiogenesis therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of therapy withdrawal to those of continuous treatment with various antiangiogenic agents. Cessation of therapy with pazopanib, bevacizumab, and the human and murine anti-VEGF antibody B20 was associated with substantial tumor growth in mouse models of ovarian cancer. Increased tumor growth was accompanied by tumor hypoxia, increased tumor angiogenesis, and vascular leakage. Moreover, we found hypoxia-induced ADP production and platelet infiltration into tumors after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy, and lowering platelet counts markedly inhibited tumor rebound after withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelets regulated their migration into the tumor microenvironment, and FAK-deficient platelets completely prevented the rebound tumor growth. Additionally, combined therapy with a FAK inhibitor and the antiangiogenic agents pazopanib and bevacizumab reduced tumor growth and inhibited negative effects following withdrawal of antiangiogenic therapy. In summary, these results suggest that FAK may be a unique target in situations in which antiangiogenic agents are withdrawn, and dual targeting of FAK and VEGF could have therapeutic implications for ovarian cancer management. PMID:27064283

  9. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-01-01

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation. PMID:21677687

  10. WW domain interactions regulate the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway.

    PubMed

    Salah, Z; Aqeilan, R I

    2011-06-16

    The Hippo kinase pathway is emerging as a conserved signaling pathway that is essential for organ growth and tumorigenesis in Drosophila and mammalians. Although the signaling of the core kinases is relatively well understood, less is known about the upstream inputs, downstream outputs and regulation of the whole cascade. Enrichment of the Hippo pathway components with WW domains and their cognate proline-rich interacting motifs provides a versatile platform for further understanding the mechanisms that regulate organ growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we review recently discovered mechanisms of WW domain-mediated interactions that contribute to the regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway in tumorigenesis. We further discuss new insights and future directions on the emerging role of such regulation.

  11. Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells or Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Shin, Young Kee

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs), which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation, are thought to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, therapy resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Tumor recurrence and chemoresistance are major causes of poor survival rates of ovarian cancer patients, which may be due in part to the existence of CSC/TICs. Therefore, elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ovarian CSC/TICs is required to develop a cure for this malignancy. Recent studies have indicated that the properties of CSC/TICs can be regulated by microRNAs, genes and signaling pathways which also function in normal stem cells. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironments surrounding CSC/TICs are crucial for the maintenance of these cells. Similarly, efforts are now being made to unravel the mechanism involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs, although much work is still needed. This review considers recent advances in identifying the genes and pathways involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs. Furthermore, current approaches targeting ovarian CSC/TICs are described. Targeting both CSC/TICs and bulk tumor cells is suggested as a more effective approach to eliminating ovarian tumors. Better understanding of the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs might facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies for recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23528891

  12. Folliculin Contributes to VHL Tumor Suppressing Activity in Renal Cancer through Regulation of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Emily; Mikhaylova, Olga; Yi, Ying; Sartor, Maureen A.; Medvedovic, Mario; Biesiada, Jacek; Meller, Jarek; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor (VHL) is lost in the majority of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Folliculin (FLCN) is a tumor suppressor whose function is lost in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a disorder characterized by renal cancer of multiple histological types including clear cell carcinoma, cutaneous fibrofolliculoma, and pneumothorax. Here we explored whether there is connection between VHL and FLCN in clear cell renal carcinoma cell lines and tumors. We demonstrate that VHL regulates expression of FLCN at the mRNA and protein levels in RCC cell lines, and that FLCN protein expression is decreased in human ccRCC tumors with VHL loss, as compared with matched normal kidney tissue. Knockdown of FLCN results in increased formation of tumors by RCC cells with wild-type VHL in orthotopic xenografts in nude mice, an indication that FLCN plays a role in the tumor-suppressing activity of VHL. Interestingly, FLCN, similarly to VHL, is necessary for the activity of LC3C-mediated autophagic program that we have previously characterized as contributing to the tumor suppressing activity of VHL. The results show the existence of functional crosstalk between two major tumor suppressors in renal cancer, VHL and FLCN, converging on regulation of autophagy. PMID:23922894

  13. Heparanase regulates secretion, composition, and function of tumor cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Camilla A; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2013-04-05

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  14. Heparanase Regulates Secretion, Composition, and Function of Tumor Cell-derived Exosomes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Camilla A.; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C.; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression. PMID:23430739

  15. Epigenetic regulator Smchd1 functions as a tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Leong, Huei San; Chen, Kelan; Hu, Yifang; Lee, Stanley; Corbin, Jason; Pakusch, Miha; Murphy, James M; Majewski, Ian J; Smyth, Gordon K; Alexander, Warren S; Hilton, Douglas J; Blewitt, Marnie E

    2013-03-01

    SMCHD1 is an epigenetic modifier of gene expression that is critical to maintain X chromosome inactivation. Here, we show in mouse that genetic inactivation of Smchd1 accelerates tumorigenesis in male mice. Loss of Smchd1 in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts increased tumor growth upon transplantation into immunodeficient nude mice. In addition, loss of Smchd1 in Eμ-Myc transgenic mice that undergo lymphomagenesis reduced disease latency by 50% relative to control animals. In premalignant Eμ-Myc transgenic mice deficient in Smchd1, there was an increase in the number of pre-B cells in the periphery, likely accounting for the accelerated disease in these animals. Global gene expression profiling suggested that Smchd1 normally represses genes activated by MLL chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia, implying that Smchd1 loss may work through the same pathways as overexpressed MLL fusion proteins do in leukemia and lymphoma. Notably, we found that SMCHD1 is underexpressed in many types of human hematopoietic malignancy. Together, our observations collectively highlight a hitherto uncharacterized role for SMCHD1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in hematopoietic cancers.

  16. Heat shock protein 60 regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Jagadish C; Siegelin, Markus D; Dohi, Takehiko; Altieri, Dario C

    2010-11-15

    Mitochondrial apoptosis plays a critical role in tumor maintenance and dictates the response to therapy in vivo; however, the regulators of this process are still largely elusive. Here, we show that the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) directly associates with cyclophilin D (CypD), a component of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This interaction occurs in a multichaperone complex comprising Hsp60, Hsp90, and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein-1, selectively assembled in tumor but not in normal mitochondria. Genetic targeting of Hsp60 by siRNA triggers CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and suppression of intracranial glioblastoma growth in vivo. Therefore, Hsp60 is a novel regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition, contributing to a cytoprotective chaperone network that antagonizes CypD-dependent cell death in tumors. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  17. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Gadd, Samantha; Arold, Stefan T.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Jennings, Lawrence; Huff, Vicki; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Hsu, Chih Hao; Nguyen, Cu; Anderson, James; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Marra, Marco A.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Ross, Nicole; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails. Moreover, MLLT1-mutant tumours show an increase in MYC gene expression and HOX dysregulation. Patients with MLLT1-mutant tumours present at a younger age and have a high prevalence of precursor intralobar nephrogenic rests. These data support a model whereby activating MLLT1 mutations early in renal development result in the development of Wilms tumour. PMID:26635203

  18. Dclk1, a tumor stem cell marker, regulates pro-survival signaling and self-renewal of intestinal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Yao, Jiannan; Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ge, Yang; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M; Gude, Modhi; Vega, Kenneth; Bannerman-Menson, Eddie; Xia, Lijun; Bronze, Michael; An, Guangyu; Houchen, Courtney W

    2017-02-01

    More than 80% of intestinal neoplasia is associated with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1), a kinase protein, is overexpressed in colorectal cancer and specifically marks tumor stem cells (TSCs) that self-renew and increased the tumor progeny in Apc (Min/+) mice. However, the role of Dclk1 expression and its contribution to regulating pro-survival signaling for tumor progression in Apc mutant cancer is poorly understood. We analyzed DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling gene expression datasets of 329 specimens from TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma Cancer Data. The network of DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling was analyzed utilizing the GeneMANIA database. We examined the expression levels of Dclk1 and other stem cell-associated markers, pro-survival signaling pathways, cell self-renewal in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice with high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. To determine the functional role of Dclk1 for tumor progression, we knocked down Dclk1 and determined the pro-survival signaling pathways and stemness. We used siRNA technology to gene silence pro-survival signaling in colon cancer cells in vitro. We utilized FACS, IHC, western blot, RT-PCR, and clonogenic (self-renewal) assays. We found a correlation between DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling expression. The expression of Dclk1 and stem cell-associated markers Lgr5, Bmi1, and Musashi1 were significantly higher in the intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice than in wild-type controls. Intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice showed increased expression of pro-survival signaling, pluripotency and self-renewal ability. Furthermore, the enteroids formed from the intestinal Dclk1(+) cells of Apc (Min/+) mice display higher pluripotency and pro-survival signaling. Dclk1 knockdown in Apc (Min/+) mice attenuates intestinal adenomas and adenocarcinoma, and decreases pro-survival signaling and self-renewal. Knocking down RELA and NOTCH1

  19. Marine Drugs Regulating Apoptosis Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)

    PubMed Central

    Elmallah, Mohammed I. Y.; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Marine biomass diversity is a tremendous source of potential anticancer compounds. Several natural marine products have been described to restore tumor cell sensitivity to TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced cell death. TRAIL is involved during tumor immune surveillance. Its selectivity for cancer cells has attracted much attention in oncology. This review aims at discussing the main mechanisms by which TRAIL signaling is regulated and presenting how marine bioactive compounds have been found, so far, to overcome TRAIL resistance in tumor cells. PMID:26580630

  20. Identification of recurrent regulated alternative splicing events across human solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Danan-Gotthold, Miri; Golan-Gerstl, Regina; Eisenberg, Eli; Meir, Keren; Karni, Rotem; Levanon, Erez Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that involves aberrant gene expression regulation. Discriminating the modified expression patterns driving tumor biology from the many that have no or little contribution is important for understanding cancer molecular basis. Recurrent deregulation patterns observed in multiple cancer types are enriched for such driver events. Here, we studied splicing alterations in hundreds of matched tumor and normal RNA-seq samples of eight solid cancer types. We found hundreds of cassette exons for which splicing was altered in multiple cancer types and identified a set of highly frequent altered splicing events. Specific splicing regulators, including RBFOX2, MBNL1/2 and QKI, appear to account for many splicing alteration events in multiple cancer types. Together, our results provide a first global analysis of regulated splicing alterations in cancer and identify common events with a potential causative role in solid tumor development. PMID:25908786

  1. NKD2, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, S; Kurenbekova, L; Gao, Y; Roos, A; Creighton, CJ; Rao, P; Hicks, J; Man, T-K; Lau, C; Brown, AMC; Jones, SN; Lazar, AJ; Ingram, D; Lev, D; Donehower, LA; Yustein, JT

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most frequent pediatric malignant bone tumor that has a high propensity for metastases. Through osteoblast-specific alteration of p53 status, we developed a genetically engineered mouse model of localized and metastatic OS to gain an understanding into the molecular pathogenesis of OS. Microarray analysis of both localized tumors and metastatic tumors identified the downregulation of the naked cuticle homolog 2 (NKD2) gene, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Overexpression of NKD2 in metastatic human and mouse OS cells significantly decreases cell proliferation, migration and invasion ability in vitro and drastically diminishes OS tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas downregulation enhances migratory and invasive potential. Evaluation of NKD2-overexpressing tumors revealed upregulation of tumor-suppressor genes and downregulation of molecules involved in blood vessel formation and cell migration. Furthermore, assessment of primary human OS revealed downregulation of NKD2 in metastatic and recurrent OS. Finally, we provide biological evidence that use of small-molecule inhibitors targeting the Wnt pathway can have therapeutic efficacy in decreasing metastatic properties in OS. Our studies provide compelling evidence that downregulation of NKD2 expression and alterations in associated regulated pathways have a significant role in driving OS tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:25579177

  2. Regulation of tumor pH and the role of carbonic anhydrase 9.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Harris, Adrian L

    2007-06-01

    The high metabolic rate required for tumor growth often leads to hypoxia in poorly-perfused regions. Hypoxia activates a complex gene expression program, mediated by hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1alpha). One of the consequences of HIF1alpha activation is up-regulation of glycolysis and hence the production of lactic acid. In addition to the lactic acid-output, intracellular titration of acid with bicarbonate and the engagement of the pentose phosphate shunt release CO(2) from cells. Expression of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase 9 on the tumor cell surface catalyses the extracellular trapping of acid by hydrating cell-generated CO(2) into [see text] and H(+). These mechanisms contribute towards an acidic extracellular milieu favoring tumor growth, invasion and development. The lactic acid released by tumor cells is further metabolized by the tumor stroma. Low extracellular pH may adversely affect the intracellular milieu, possibly triggering apoptosis. Therefore, primary and secondary active transporters operate in the tumor cell membrane to protect the cytosol from acidosis. We review mechanisms regulating tumor intracellular and extracellular pH, with a focus on carbonic anhydrase 9. We also review recent evidence that may suggest a role for CA9 in coordinating pH(i) among cells of large, unvascularized cell-clusters.

  3. Regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition by tumor-associated macrophages in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Yao, Hongmei; Song, Ge; Liao, Xia; Xian, Yao; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    It should be urgently better understood of the mechanism that contributes cancer aggressiveness. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a fundamental role in tumor progression and metastasis formation by invasion, resistance to cell death and senescence, resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy, immune surveillance, immunosuppression and inflammation, confers stem cell properties. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are key orchestrators and a set of macrophages in tumor microenvironment. They are major players in the connection between inflammation and cancer. TAMs could promote proliferation, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, stimulate tumor angiogenesis, and inhibit anti-tumor immune response mediated by T cell followed by promoting tumor progression. Recently, studies showed that TAMs played critical role in the regulation of EMT in cancer, although the underlying mechanism of TAMs-mediated acquisition of EMT has been largely unclear. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of TAMs in the regulation of EMT during tumorigenesis and summarize the recent ongoing experimental and pre-clinical TAMs targeted studies. PMID:26692918

  4. Hypoxia Up-Regulates Galectin-3 in Mammary Tumor Progression and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Barros, Rita; Gomes, Catarina; de Matos, Augusto J; Reis, Celso A; Rutteman, Gerard R; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment encompasses several stressful conditions for cancer cells such as hypoxia, oxidative stress and pH alterations. Galectin-3, a well-studied member of the beta-galactoside-binding animal family of lectins has been implicated in multiple steps of metastasis as cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, promotion of angiogenesis, cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. However, both its aberrantly up- and down-regulated expression was observed in several types of cancer. Thus, the mechanisms that regulate galectin-3 expression in neoplastic settings are not clear. In order to demonstrate the putative role of hypoxia in regulating galectin-3 expression in canine mammary tumors (CMT), in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. In malignant CMT cells, hypoxia was observed to induce expression of galectin-3, a phenomenon that was almost completely prevented by catalase treatment of CMT-U27 cells. Increased galectin-3 expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Under hypoxic conditions the expression of galectin-3 shifts from a predominant nuclear location to cytoplasmic and membrane expressions. In in vivo studies, galectin-3 was overexpressed in hypoxic areas of primary tumors and well-established metastases. Tumor hypoxia thus up-regulates the expression of galectin-3, which may in turn increase tumor aggressiveness.

  5. Hypoxia Up-Regulates Galectin-3 in Mammary Tumor Progression and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Rita; Gomes, Catarina; de Matos, Augusto J.; Reis, Celso A.; Rutteman, Gerard R.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment encompasses several stressful conditions for cancer cells such as hypoxia, oxidative stress and pH alterations. Galectin-3, a well-studied member of the beta-galactoside-binding animal family of lectins has been implicated in multiple steps of metastasis as cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion, promotion of angiogenesis, cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. However, both its aberrantly up- and down-regulated expression was observed in several types of cancer. Thus, the mechanisms that regulate galectin-3 expression in neoplastic settings are not clear. In order to demonstrate the putative role of hypoxia in regulating galectin-3 expression in canine mammary tumors (CMT), in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. In malignant CMT cells, hypoxia was observed to induce expression of galectin-3, a phenomenon that was almost completely prevented by catalase treatment of CMT-U27 cells. Increased galectin-3 expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Under hypoxic conditions the expression of galectin-3 shifts from a predominant nuclear location to cytoplasmic and membrane expressions. In in vivo studies, galectin-3 was overexpressed in hypoxic areas of primary tumors and well-established metastases. Tumor hypoxia thus up-regulates the expression of galectin-3, which may in turn increase tumor aggressiveness. PMID:26222311

  6. Integral role of transcription factor 8 in the negative regulation of tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, Takayuki; Tsuda, Masumi; Tanaka, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Higashi, Yujiro; Ohba, Yusuke

    2009-02-15

    Angiogenesis is involved in various physiologic and pathological conditions, including tumor growth, and is tightly regulated by the orchestration of proangiogenic and antiangiogenic factors. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), the best-established antiangiogenic treatment in cancer, has shown some effectiveness; however, the identification of novel regulators, whose function is independent of VEGF, is required to achieve better outcomes. Here, we show that transcription factor 8 (TCF8) is up-regulated in endothelial cells during angiogenesis, acting as a negative regulator. Furthermore, TCF8 is specifically expressed in the endothelium of tumor vessels. Tcf8-heterozygous knockout mice are more permissive than wild-type mice to the formation of tumor blood vessels in s.c. implanted melanoma, which seems to contribute to the more aggressive growth and the lung metastases of the tumor in mutant mice. Suppression of TCF8 facilitates angiogenesis in both in vitro and ex vivo models, and displays comprehensive cellular phenotypes, including enhanced cell invasion, impaired cell adhesion, and increased cell monolayer permeability due to, at least partly, MMP1 overexpression, attenuation of focal adhesion formation, and insufficient VE-cadherin recruitment, respectively. Taken together, our findings define a novel, integral role for TCF8 in the regulation of pathologic angiogenesis, and propose TCF8 as a target for therapeutic intervention in cancer.

  7. Evidence for susceptibility genes to familial Wilms tumour in addition to WT1, FWT1 and FWT2

    PubMed Central

    Rapley, E A; Barfoot, R; Bonaïti-Pellié, C; Chompret, A; Foulkes, W; Perusinghe, N; Reeve, A; Royer-Pokora, B; Schumacher, V; Shelling, A; Skeen, J; Tourreil, S de; Weirich, A; Pritchard-Jones, K; Stratton, M R; Rahman, N

    2000-01-01

    Three loci have been implicated in familial Wilms tumour: WT1 located on chromosome 11p13, FWT1 on 17q12-q21, and FWT2 on 19q13. Two out of 19 Wilms tumour families evaluated showed strong evidence against linkage at all three loci. Both of these families contained at least three cases of Wilms tumour indicating that they were highly likely to be due to genetic susceptibility and therefore that one or more additional familial Wilms tumour susceptibility genes remain to be found. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901367

  8. PRC2/EED-EZH2 Complex Is Up-Regulated in Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis Compared to Primary Tumor and Correlates with Tumor Proliferation In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongxiang; Simons, Diana L.; Segall, Ilana; Carcamo-Cavazos, Valeria; Schwartz, Erich J.; Yan, Ning; Zuckerman, Neta S.; Dirbas, Frederick M.; Johnson, Denise L.; Holmes, Susan P.; Lee, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymph node metastasis is a key event in the progression of breast cancer. Therefore it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms which facilitate regional lymph node metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed gene expression profiling of purified tumor cells from human breast tumor and lymph node metastasis. By microarray network analysis, we found an increased expression of polycomb repression complex 2 (PRC2) core subunits EED and EZH2 in lymph node metastatic tumor cells over primary tumor cells which were validated through real-time PCR. Additionally, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and quantitative image analysis of whole tissue sections showed a significant increase of EZH2 expressing tumor cells in lymph nodes over paired primary breast tumors, which strongly correlated with tumor cell proliferation in situ. We further explored the mechanisms of PRC2 gene up-regulation in metastatic tumor cells and found up-regulation of E2F genes, MYC targets and down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin targets in lymph node metastasis through GSEA analyses. Using IHC, the expression of potential EZH2 target, E-cadherin was examined in paired primary/lymph node samples and was found to be significantly decreased in lymph node metastases over paired primary tumors. Conclusions/Significance This study identified an over expression of the epigenetic silencing complex PRC2/EED-EZH2 in breast cancer lymph node metastasis as compared to primary tumor and its positive association with tumor cell proliferation in situ. Concurrently, PRC2 target protein E-cadherin was significant decreased in lymph node metastases, suggesting PRC2 promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in lymph node metastatic process through repression of E-cadherin. These results indicate that epigenetic regulation mediated by PRC2 proteins may provide additional advantage for the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in lymph nodes. This opens

  9. Tumor-associated macrophages and stromal TNF-α regulate collagen structure in a breast tumor model as visualized by second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ryan M; Madden, Kelley S; Perry, Seth W; Zettel, Martha L; Brown, Edward B

    2013-08-01

    Collagen fibers can be imaged with second harmonic generation (SHG) and are associated with efficient tumor cell locomotion. Preferential locomotion along these fibers correlates with a more aggressively metastatic phenotype, and changes in SHG emission properties accompany changes in metastatic outcome. We therefore attempted to elucidate the cellular and molecular machinery that influences SHG in order to understand how the microstructure of tumor collagen fibers is regulated. By quantifying SHG and immunofluorescence (IF) from tumors grown in mice with and without stromal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and in the presence or absence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), we determined that depletion of TAMs alters tumor collagen fibrillar microstructure as quantified by SHG and IF. Furthermore, we determined that abrogation of TNF-α expression by tumor stromal cells also alters fibrillar microstructure and that subsequent depletion of TAMs has no further effect. In each case, metastatic burden correlated with optical readouts of collagen microstructure. Our results implicate TAMs and stromal TNF-α as regulators of breast tumor collagen microstructure and suggest that this regulation plays a role in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, these results indicate that quantification of SHG represents a useful strategy for evaluating the cells and molecular pathways responsible for manipulating fibrillar collagen in breast tumor models.

  10. Tumor-associated macrophages and stromal TNF-α regulate collagen structure in a breast tumor model as visualized by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Ryan M.; Madden, Kelley S.; Perry, Seth W.; Zettel, Martha L.; Brown, Edward B.

    2013-08-01

    Collagen fibers can be imaged with second harmonic generation (SHG) and are associated with efficient tumor cell locomotion. Preferential locomotion along these fibers correlates with a more aggressively metastatic phenotype, and changes in SHG emission properties accompany changes in metastatic outcome. We therefore attempted to elucidate the cellular and molecular machinery that influences SHG in order to understand how the microstructure of tumor collagen fibers is regulated. By quantifying SHG and immunofluorescence (IF) from tumors grown in mice with and without stromal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and in the presence or absence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), we determined that depletion of TAMs alters tumor collagen fibrillar microstructure as quantified by SHG and IF. Furthermore, we determined that abrogation of TNF-α expression by tumor stromal cells also alters fibrillar microstructure and that subsequent depletion of TAMs has no further effect. In each case, metastatic burden correlated with optical readouts of collagen microstructure. Our results implicate TAMs and stromal TNF-α as regulators of breast tumor collagen microstructure and suggest that this regulation plays a role in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, these results indicate that quantification of SHG represents a useful strategy for evaluating the cells and molecular pathways responsible for manipulating fibrillar collagen in breast tumor models.

  11. Markers for Sebaceoma Show a Spectrum of Cell Cycle Regulators, Tumor Suppressor Genes, and Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Ana Maria Abreu; Howard, Michael S; Kim, Jinah; Googe, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sebaceoma is a tumor for which the causative oncogenes are not well-understood. Sebaceomas demonstrate some histopathologic features similar to basal cell carcinoma (BCC), such as palisading borders and basaloid cells with additional features, including foamy cytoplasm and indented nuclei. Aims: We examine multiple cell-cycle, oncogene, and tumor suppressor gene markers in sebaceomas, to try to find some suitable biological markers for this tumor, and compare with other published studies. Materials and Methods: We investigated a panel of immunohistochemical (IHC) stains that are important for cellular signaling, including a cell cycle regulator, tumor suppressor gene, oncogene, hormone receptor, and genomic stability markers in our cohort of sebaceomas. We collected 30 sebaceomas from three separate USA dermatopathology laboratories. The following IHC panel: Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA)/CD227, cytokeratin AE1/AE3, cyclin D1, human breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA-1), C-erb-2, Bcl-2, human androgen receptor (AR), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27kip1), p53, topoisomerase II alpha, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and Ki-67 were tested in our cases. Results: EMA/CD227 was positive in the well-differentiated sebaceomas (13/30). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B was positive in tumors with intermediate differentiation (22/30). The less well-differentiated tumors failed to stain with EMA and AR. Most of the tumors with well-differentiated palisaded areas demonstrated positive staining for topoisomerase II alpha, p27kip1, and p53, with positive staining in tumoral basaloid areas (22/30). Numerous tumors were focally positive with multiple markers, indicating a significant degree of variability in the complete group. Conclusions: Oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, cell cycle regulators, and hormone receptors are variably expressed in sebaceomas. Our results suggest that in these tumors, selected marker staining seems to correlate with tumor

  12. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  13. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  14. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  15. Hereditary hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome: the endocrine tumor gene HRPT2 maps to chromosome 1q21-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, J.; Heath, B.; Hill, V.M.; Heath, H. III; Leppert, M.F.; Jackson, C.E.; Zarbo, R.J.; Mallette, L.E.; Huff, V.; Chew, S.L.

    1995-04-01

    The syndrome of hereditary hyperparathyroidism and jaw tumors (HPT-JT) is characterized by inheritance, in an autosomal dominant pattern, of recurrent parathyroid adenomas, fibro-osseous tumors of the mandible and/or maxilla, Wilms tumor, and parathyroid carcinoma. This syndrome is clinically and genetically distinct from other endocrine neoplasia syndromes and appears to result from mutation of an endocrine tumor gene designated {open_quotes}HRPT2{close_quotes}. We studied five HPT-JT families (59 persons, 20 affected); using PCR-based markers, we instituted a genome-wide linkage search after excluding several candidate genes. Lod scores were calculated at various recombination fractions ({theta}), penetrance 90%. We mapped HRPT2 to the long arm of chromosome 1 (1q21-q31). The maximal lod score was 6.10 at {theta} = .0 with marker D1S212, or >10{sup 6} odds in favor of linkage. In six hereditary Wilms tumor families (96 persons, 29 affected), we found no linkage to 1q markers closely linked with HRPT2 (lod scores -15.6 [D1S191] and -17.8 [D1S196], {theta} = .001). Nine parathyroid adenomas and one Wilms tumor from nine members of three HPT-JT families were examined for loss of heterozygosity at linked loci. The parathyroid adenomas and Wilms tumor showed no loss of heterozygosity for these DNA markers. Our data establish that HRPT2, an endocrine tumor gene on the long arm of chromosome 1, is responsible for the HPT-JT syndrome but not for the classical hereditary Wilms tumor syndrome. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Glucose regulated protein 78: a critical link between tumor microenvironment and cancer hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwei; Li, Zhuoyu

    2012-08-01

    Glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) has long been recognized as a molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and can be induced by the ER stress response. Besides its location in the ER, GRP78 has been found to be present in cell plasma membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus as well as cellular secretions. GRP78 is implicated in tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis resistance, immune escape, metastasis and angiogenesis, and its elevated expression usually correlates with a variety of tumor microenvironmental stresses, including hypoxia, glucose deprivation, lactic acidosis and inflammatory response. GRP78 protein acts as a centrally located sensor of stress, which feels and adapts to the alteration in the tumor microenvironment. This article reviews the potential contributions of GRP78 to the acquisition of cancer hallmarks based on intervening in stress responses caused by tumor niche alterations. The paper also introduces several potential GRP78 relevant targeted therapies.

  17. Nardilysin regulates inflammation, metaplasia, and tumors in murine stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuto; Ikuta, Kozo; Kimura, Takeshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Nishi, Eiichiro; Seno, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to a wide variety of human disorders. In the stomach, longstanding gastritis often results in structural alterations in the gastric mucosa, including metaplastic changes and gastric cancers. Therefore, it is important to elucidate factors that are involved in gastric inflammation. Nardilysin (N-arginine dibasic convertase; Nrdc) is a metalloendopeptidase of the M16 family that promotes ectodomain shedding of the precursor forms of various growth factors and cytokines by enhancing the protease activities of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) proteins. Here, we have demonstrated that Nrdc crucially regulates gastric inflammation caused by Helicobacter felis infection or forced expression of prostaglandin E2 in K19-C2mE mice. Metaplastic changes following gastric inflammation were suppressed by the deletion of Nrdc. Furthremore, the deletion of Nrdc significantly suppressed N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced gastric tumorigenesis in the murine stomach. These data may lead to a global therapeutic approach against various gastric disorders by targeting Nrdc. PMID:28230087

  18. Pediatric liver tumors--a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Jha, Priyanka; Chawla, Soni C; Tavri, Sidhartha; Patel, Chirag; Gooding, Charles; Daldrup-Link, Heike

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic masses constitute about 5-6% of all intra-abdominal masses in children. The majority of liver tumors in children are malignant; these malignant liver tumors constitute the third most common intra-abdominal malignancy in the pediatric age group after Wilms' tumor and neuroblastoma. Only about one third of the liver tumors are benign. A differential diagnosis of liver tumors in children can be obtained based on the age of the child, clinical information (in particular AFP) and imaging characteristics. The purpose of this review is to report typical clinical and imaging characteristics of benign and malignant primary liver tumors in children.

  19. The ARF Tumor Suppressor Regulates Bone Remodeling and Osteosarcoma Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harding, John C.; Deng, Hongju; Shea, Lauren K.; Eagleton, Mark C.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Lairmore, Michael D.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Rosol, Thomas J.; Weber, Jason D.; Ratner, Lee; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2010-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor regulates p53 as well as basic developmental processes independent of p53, including osteoclast activation, by controlling ribosomal biogenesis. Here we provide evidence that ARF is a master regulator of bone remodeling and osteosarcoma (OS) development in mice. Arf-/- mice displayed increased osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) activity with a significant net increase in trabecular bone volume. The long bones of Arf-/- mice had increased expression of OB genes while Arf-/- OB showed enhanced differentiation in vitro. Mice transgenic for the Tax oncogene develop lymphocytic tumors with associated osteolytic lesions, while Tax+Arf-/- mice uniformly developed spontaneous OS by 7 months of age. Tax+Arf-/- tumors were well differentiated OS characterized by an abundance of new bone with OC recruitment, expressed OB markers and displayed intact levels of p53 mRNA and reduced Rb transcript levels. Cell lines established from OS recapitulated characteristics of the primary tumor, including the expression of mature OB markers and ability to form mineralized tumors when transplanted. Loss of heterozygosity in OS tumors arising in Tax+Arf+/- mice emphasized the necessity of ARF-loss in OS development. Hypothesizing that inhibition of ARF-regulated bone remodeling would repress development of OS, we demonstrated that treatment of Tax+Arf-/- mice with zoledronic acid, a bisphosphonate inhibitor of OC activity and repressor of bone turnover, prevented or delayed the onset of OS. These data describe a novel role for ARF as a regulator of bone remodeling through effects on both OB and OC. Finally, these data underscore the potential of targeting bone remodeling as adjuvant therapy or in patients with genetic predispositions to prevent the development of OS. PMID:21209895

  20. Tumor Therapeutics Work as Stress Inducers to Enhance Tumor Sensitivity to Natural Killer (NK) Cell Cytolysis by Up-regulating NKp30 Ligand B7-H6.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoshuai; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Xiaodong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-12-11

    Immune cells are believed to participate in initiating anti-tumor effects during regular tumor therapy such as chemotherapy, radiation, hyperthermia, and cytokine injection. One of the mechanisms underlying this process is the expression of so-called stress-inducible immunostimulating ligands. Although the activating receptor NKG2D has been proven to play roles in tumor therapy through targeting its ligands, the role of NKp30, another key activating receptor, is seldom addressed. In this study, we found that the NKp30 ligand B7-H6 was widely expressed in tumor cells and closely correlated to their susceptibility to NK cell lysis. Further studies showed that treatment of tumor cells with almost all standard tumor therapeutics, including chemotherapy (cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil), radiation therapy, non-lethal heat shock, and cytokine therapy (TNF-α), could up-regulate the expression of B7-H6 in tumor cells and enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis. B7-H6 shRNA treatment effectively dampened sensitization of tumor cells to NK-mediated lysis. Our study not only reveals the possibility that tumor therapeutics work as stress inducers to enhance tumor sensitivity to NK cell cytolysis but also suggests that B7-H6 could be a potential target for tumor therapy in the future.

  1. Differential splicing of exon 5 of the Wilms tumour (WTI) gene.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, J; King-Underwood, L; Pritchard-Jones, K

    1997-08-01

    The WTI gene encodes a developmentally regulated transcription factor whose function is altered by alternative splicing at two sites: the 17 amino acids of exon 5, whose functional effects are ill-defined, and the 3 amino acids (KTS) between exons 9 and 10, which determine sequence-specific DNA binding and nuclear localisation. Germline mutations, which prevent normal KTS splicing, can underlie the Denys-Drash syndrome, and disruptions of splicing of exon 5 may occur in Wilms tumours. We analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification the relative ratios of the four splice variants of WTI mRNA in normal and tumour tissues and found tissue-specific, developmental stage-specific, and species-specific differences in the splicing of exon 5 but not of KTS. We found no evidence for disrupted splicing in acute leukaemias or gonadal tumours. The significance of these findings is discussed, and the possibility is raised that WTI may orchestrate the appropriate response to growth and differentiation factor signalling, mediated by alterations in the relative levels of exon 5 containing WTI isoforms.

  2. Mitochondrial Dynamics Protein Drp1 Is Overexpressed in Oncocytic Thyroid Tumors and Regulates Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1 - a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line—and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells’ migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype. PMID:25822260

  3. Mitochondrial dynamics protein Drp1 is overexpressed in oncocytic thyroid tumors and regulates cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1--a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line--and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells' migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype.

  4. PI3K{gamma} activation by CXCL12 regulates tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Monterrubio, Maria; Mellado, Mario; Carrera, Ana C.

    2009-10-16

    Tumor dissemination is a complex process, in which certain steps resemble those in leukocyte homing. Specific chemokine/chemokine receptor pairs have important roles in both processes. CXCL12/CXCR4 is the most commonly expressed chemokine/chemokine receptor pair in human cancers, in which it regulates cell adhesion, extravasation, metastatic colonization, angiogenesis, and proliferation. All of these processes require activation of signaling pathways that include G proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), JAK kinases, Rho GTPases, and focal adhesion-associated proteins. We analyzed these pathways in a human melanoma cell line in response to CXCL12 stimulation, and found that PI3K{gamma} regulates tumor cell adhesion through mechanisms different from those involved in cell invasion. Our data indicate that, following CXCR4 activation after CXCL12 binding, the invasion and adhesion processes are regulated differently by distinct downstream events in these signaling cascades.

  5. Renal and adrenal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Zderic, Stephen A

    2004-08-01

    Survival rates for children with kidney tumors approach 90% for even the most advanced stages of disease, but the surgical management of large lesions remains challenging. With the development of additional chemotherapeutic regimens and the use of radiation therapy, survival rates have improved dramatically. The National Wilms' Tumor Study has conducted four long-term studies addressing how adjunctive therapy may be tailored optimally to maximize survival and minimize the exposure to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  6. Caveolin-1 is down-regulated in alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas and negatively regulates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Huertas-Martínez, Juan; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Herrero-Martín, David; Barrau, Ignasi; García-Monclús, Silvia; Sáinz-Jaspeado, Miguel; Lagares-Tena, Laura; Núñez-Álvarez, Yaiza; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Mora, Jaume; Roma, Josep; Toran, Nuria; Moran, Sebastian; López-Alemany, Roser; Gallego, Soledad; Esteller, Manel; Peinado, Miguel A.; Xavier García del, Muro; Tirado, Oscar M.

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite advances in therapy, patients with histological variant of rhabdomyosarcoma known as alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) have a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Caveolin-1 (CAV1), encoding the structural component of cellular caveolae, is a suggested tumor suppressor gene involved in cell signaling. In the present study we report that compared to other forms of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) CAV1 expression is either undetectable or very low in ARMS cell lines and tumor samples. DNA methylation analysis of the promoter region and azacytidine-induced re-expression suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the silencing of CAV1. Reintroduction of CAV1 in three of these cell lines impairs their clonogenic capacity and promotes features of muscular differentiation. In vitro, CAV1-expressing cells show high expression of Caveolin-3 (CAV3), a muscular differentiation marker. Blockade of MAPK signaling is also observed. In vivo, CAV1-expressing xenografts show growth delay, features of muscular differentiation and increased cell death. In summary, our results suggest that CAV1 could function as a potent tumor suppressor in ARMS tumors. Inhibition of CAV1 function therefore, could contribute to aberrant cell proliferation, leading to ARMS development. PMID:25313138

  7. E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 negatively regulates tumor suppressor p53 to promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, C; Wang, X L; Ly, P; Belyi, V; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Young, K H; Hu, W; Feng, Z

    2014-11-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 has a key role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis through its regulation of cellular stress responses, including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. To ensure its proper levels and functions in cells, p53 is tightly regulated mainly through post-translational modifications, such as ubiquitination. Here, we identified E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 as a novel p53 target gene and negative regulator to regulate p53-mediated stress responses. In response to stress, such as DNA damage, p53 binds to the p53 responsive element in the promoter of the TRIM32 gene and transcriptionally induces the expression of TRIM32 in cells. In turn, TRIM32 interacts with p53 and promotes p53 degradation through ubiquitination. Thus, TRIM32 negatively regulates p53-mediated apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress. TRIM32 is frequently overexpressed in different types of human tumors. TRIM32 overexpression promotes cell oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis in mice in a largely p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our results demonstrated that as a novel p53 target and a novel negative regulator for p53, TRIM32 has an important role in regulation of p53 and p53-mediated cellular stress responses. Furthermore, our results also revealed that impairing p53 function is a novel mechanism for TRIM32 in tumorigenesis.

  8. Lin28 regulates BMP4 and functions with Oct4 to affect ovarian tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei; Ma, Jing; Xu, Jie; Qiao, Chong; Branscum, Adam; Cardenas, Andres; Baron, Andre T.; Schwartz, Peter; Maihle, Nita J.; Huang, Yingqun

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in regulating cancer stem cells (CSCs) and tumor progression through both autocrine and paracrine signaling. Elevated production of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from human ovarian cancer cells and stroma has been shown to increase CSC proliferation and tumor growth. Here, we report that Lin28, a stem cell factor, binds to BMP4 mRNA in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells, thereby promoting BMP4 expression at the post-transcriptional level. As co-expression of Lin28 and Oct4 (another stem cell factor) has been implicated in ovarian cancer CSCs, we also determined that high levels of Lin28 are associated with an unfavorable prognosis when co-expressed with high levels of Oct4. Together, these findings uncover a new level of regulation of BMP4 expression and imply a novel Lin28/Oct4/BMP4-mediated mechanism of regulating ovarian tumor cell growth, thus holding potential for the development of new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23255092

  9. Molecular chaperone Hsp27 regulates the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vahid, Sepideh; Thaper, Daksh; Gibson, Kate F.; Bishop, Jennifer L.; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is a molecular chaperone highly expressed in aggressive cancers, where it is involved in numerous pro-tumorigenic signaling pathways. Using functional genomics we identified for the first time that Hsp27 regulates the gene signature of transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ, which are negatively regulated by the Hippo Tumor Suppressor pathway. The Hippo pathway inactivates YAP by phosphorylating and increasing its cytoplasmic retention with the 14.3.3 proteins. Gain and loss of function experiments in prostate, breast and lung cancer cells showed that Hsp27 knockdown induced YAP phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization while overexpression of Hsp27 displayed opposite results. Mechanistically, Hsp27 regulates the Hippo pathway by accelerating the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated MST1, the core Hippo kinase, resulting in reduced phosphorylation/activity of LATS1 and MOB1, its downstream effectors. Importantly, our in vitro results were supported by data from human tumors; clinically, high expression of Hsp27 in prostate tumors is correlated with increased expression of YAP gene signature and reduced phosphorylation of YAP in lung and invasive breast cancer clinical samples. This study reveals for the first time a link between Hsp27 and the Hippo cascade, providing a novel mechanism of deregulation of this tumor suppressor pathway across multiple cancers. PMID:27555231

  10. Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihara, Takashi; Collado, Denise; Hamaguchi, Masaaki . E-mail: hamaguchi@fordham.edu

    2007-07-13

    The expression of tumor suppressor gene DBC2 causes certain breast cancer cells to stop growing [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. Recently, DBC2 was found to participate in diverse cellular functions such as protein transport, cytoskeleton regulation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control [V. Siripurapu, J.L. Meth, N. Kobayashi, M. Hamaguchi, DBC2 significantly influences cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeleton, and membrane trafficking pathways. J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 83-89]. Its tumor suppression mechanism, however, remains unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that DBC2 suppresses breast cancer proliferation through down-regulation of Cyclin D1 (CCND1). Additionally, the constitutional overexpression of CCND1 prevented the negative impact of DBC2 expression on their growth. Under a CCND1 promoter, the expression of CCNE1 exhibited the same protective effect. Our results indicate that the down-regulation of CCND1 is an essential step for DBC2's growth suppression of cancer cells. We believe that this discovery contributes to a better understanding of DBC2's tumor suppressor function.

  11. Myeloid cell receptor LRP1/CD91 regulates monocyte recruitment and angiogenesis in tumors.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Nicole D; Jo, Minji; Hu, Jingjing; Bristow, Jeanne M; Pizzo, Donald P; Gaultier, Alban; VandenBerg, Scott R; Gonias, Steven L

    2013-07-01

    Recruitment of monocytes into sites of inflammation is essential in the immune response. In cancer, recruited monocytes promote invasion, metastasis, and possibly angiogenesis. LDL receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic and cell-signaling receptor that regulates cell migration. In this study, we isografted PanO2 pancreatic carcinoma cells into mice in which LRP1 was deleted in myeloid lineage cells. Recruitment of monocytes into orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors was significantly increased in these mice, compared with control mice. LRP1-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) expressed higher levels of multiple chemokines, including, most prominently, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/CCL3, which is known to amplify inflammation. Increased levels of CCL3 were detected in LRP1-deficient tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), isolated from PanO2 tumors, and in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells in which LRP1 was silenced. LRP1-deficient BMDMs migrated more rapidly than LRP1-expressing cells in vitro. The difference in migration was reversed by CCL3-neutralizing antibody, by CCR5-neutralizing antibody, and by inhibiting NF-κB with JSH-23. Inhibiting NF-κB reversed the increase in CCL3 expression associated with LRP1 gene silencing in RAW 264.7 cells. Tumors formed in mice with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells showed increased angiogenesis. Although VEGF mRNA expression was not increased in LRP1-deficient TAMs, at the single-cell level, the increase in TAM density in tumors with LRP1-deficient myeloid cells may have allowed these TAMs to contribute an increased amount of VEGF to the tumor microenvironment. Our results show that macrophage density in tumors is correlated with cancer angiogenesis in a novel model system. Myeloid cell LRP1 may be an important regulator of cancer progression. ©2013 AACR.

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity. PMID:27834810

  13. CAPS1 Negatively Regulates Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development through Alteration of Exocytosis-Associated Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruyi; Tang, Wenqing; Dong, Pingping; Weng, Shuqiang; Ma, Lijie; Chen, She; Liu, Taotao; Shen, Xizhong; Huang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Si; Dong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles (DCVs) in neurons and neuroendocrine cells. The role of CAPS1 in cancer biology remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CAPS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the levels of CAPS1 in eight hepatoma cell lines and 141 HCC specimens. We evaluated the prognostic value of CAPS1 expression and its association with clinical parameters. We investigated the biological consequences of CAPS1 overexpression in two hepatoma cell lines in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that loss of CAPS1 expression in HCC tissues was markedly correlated with aggressive tumor phenotypes, such as high-grade tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage (p = 0.003) and absence of tumor encapsulation (p = 0.016), and was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.008) and high recurrence (p = 0.015). CAPS1 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation and migration by changing the exocytosis-associated tumor microenvironment in hepatoma cells in vitro. The in vivo study showed that CAPS1 overexpression inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Together, these results identified a previously unrecognized tumor suppressor role for CAPS1 in HCC development. PMID:27689999

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells' growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells' behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  15. The role of natural killer cells in tumor control--effectors and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Morgan E; Smyth, Mark J

    2005-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the primary effector cells of the innate immune system and have a well-established role in tumor rejection in a variety of spontaneous and induced cancer models. NK cell function is regulated by a complex balance of inhibitory and activating signals that allow them to selectively target and kill cells that display an abnormal pattern of cell surface molecules, while leaving normal healthy cells unharmed. In this review we discuss NK cell function, the role of NK cells in cancer therapies, the emerging concept of bi-directional cross-talk between NK cells and dendritic cells, and the implications of these interactions for tumor immunotherapy.

  16. Regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) tumor suppressor function by PME-1.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-12-15

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a major role in maintaining cellular signaling homeostasis by dephosphorylation of a variety of signaling proteins and acts as a tumor suppressor. Protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) negatively regulates PP2A activity by highly complex mechanisms that are reviewed here. Importantly, recent studies have shown that PME-1 promotes oncogenic MAPK/ERK and AKT pathway activities in various cancer types. In human glioma, high PME-1 expression correlates with tumor progression and kinase inhibitor resistance. We discuss the emerging cancer-associated function of PME-1 and its potential clinical relevance.

  17. Role of Liprins in the Regulation of Tumor Cell Motility and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiaretti, Sara; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Invasion leading to the formation of metastasis is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Analysis of different human cancers has led to the identification of the PPFIA1 gene encoding the protein liprin-α1, a possible player in cancer. The PPFIA1 gene is amplified in malignant tumors, including about 20% of breast cancers. Also the liprin-α1 protein is found overexpressed in tumors. Liprin-α1 belongs to the liprin family of cytosolic scaffold proteins that includes four liprin-α, two liprin-β members, and liprin-γ/kazrinE. In this review we will discuss the available evidence on the role of different members of the liprin family in distinct aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion. Evidence from in vitro studies indicates that the widely expressed liprin-α1 protein regulates the migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. Liprin-α1 affects cell migration and invasion by regulating the organization of lamellipodia and invadopodia, two structures relevant to cell invasion. In the cell liprin-α1 forms a complex with liprin-β1, ERC1/ELKS and LL5 proteins, which localizes at the front of migrating cells and positively regulates lamellipodia stability, and integrin-mediated focal adhesions. On the other hand, liprin-β2 appears to play a role as tumor suppressor by inhibiting breast cancer cell motility and invasion. The available data indicate that liprins are central players in the regulation of tumor cell invasion, therefore representing interesting targets for anti-metastatic therapy.

  18. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  19. Neem leaf glycoprotein regulates function of tumor associated M2 macrophages in hypoxic tumor core: Critical role of IL-10/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Kuntal Kanti; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Sarbari; Saha, Akata; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Barik, Subhasis; Banerjee, Saptak; Roy, Soumyabrata; Bose, Anamika; Dasgupta, Parthasarathi; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-12-01

    Heterogeneous tumor microenvironment (TME), broadly divided into tumor core and peripheral sub-microenvironments, differentially polarize normal macrophages into a different form known as tumor associated M2 macrophages (M2TAMs) to promote tumor growth. In view of the extensive immune-editing role of NLGP, here, we have observed that NLGP is effective to convert M2TAMs (CD11b(+)F4/80(high)) to M1 (CD11b(+)F4/80(low)) more prominently in tumor core, along with downregulation of other M2 associated markers, like, ManR, Ym1, Fizz1. High IL-10:IL-12 ratio at tumor core was downregulated in NLGP treated melanoma bearing mice. Decrease in IL-10 by NLGP is again associated with the decrease in hypoxia, as indicated by prominent downregulation of HIF1α and VEGF, particularly at tumor core. Macrophages exposed to hypoxic tumor core lysates in vitro exhibited high IL-10, HIF1α and VEGF expression that was significantly downregulated by NLGP. Further evidences suggest M2TAM to M1 conversion by NLGP is associated with STAT3-regulated IL-10 dependent pathway without affecting the IL-4 dependent one. Such TAM modulatory functions of NLGP might help in the restriction of melanoma growth by increasing the proportion of M1 TAMs in tumor core that helps in prevention of tumor relapse and dissemination of the tumor mass.

  20. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-04-29

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  1. Diagnostic value of tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) in neuroblastoma and Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Rebhandl, W.; Rami, B.; Turnbull, J.; Felberbauer, F. X.; Paya, K.; Bancher-Todesca, D.; Gherardini, R.; Mittlboeck, M.; Horcher, E.

    1998-01-01

    Although tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) has been described as a potentially useful serum marker of tumour activity in adult epithelial tumours, few data are available for childhood malignancies. Neuroblastomas and Wilms' tumours are the commonest types of solid malignancies found in the retroperitoneum of children. At this time, a widely used marker for Wilms' tumour is not available. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, serum TPS levels in 23 children with neuroblastomas, nine with Wilms' tumours and 22 with benign tumours were evaluated to test the usefulness of the marker in identifying malignancies. Compared with healthy children (n = 110), the preoperative least-square means (LSM) of serum TPS were considerably elevated in both neuroblastoma (LSM = 209 U l(-1)) and Wilms' tumour (LSM = 235 U l(-1)), whereas values in benign tumours were only slightly elevated. Although the Wilms' tumours were associated with higher preoperative serum TPS levels, there was no statistically significant difference compared with neuroblastomas. Receiver operating characteristic analysis (ROC curves) showed a high sensitivity and specificity for both malignancies. Successful treatment resulted in decrease in TPS serum values. Serum TPS measurements in children presenting with abdominal masses can help in diagnosing the two commonest extracranial solid malignancies of childhood. Furthermore, TPS could acquire a pivotal role in monitoring therapy. PMID:9836484

  2. Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting in Wilms tumours associated with specific changes in IGF2 methylation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Taniguchi, T; Jhee, A; Kerr, N; Reeve, A E

    1999-12-09

    Relaxation of IGF2 imprinting occurs in Wilms tumours and many other cancers, but the mechanism of loss of imprinting (LOI) remains unknown. To investigate the role of altered DNA methylation in LOI, we examined the pattern of methylation of the human insulin-IGF2 region in Wilms tumours and the normal kidney. The analysis included regions homologous to three 'differentially methylated regions' of the mouse Igf2 gene (dmrs 0, 1 and 2). In tumours displaying normal IGF2 imprinting, and in the normal kidney, maternal allele-specific DNA methylation was identified spanning exons 2 and 3. This region is homologous to dmr 0, a site of maternal-specific differential methylation in the mouse. In Wilms tumours with relaxed imprinting or 11p15.5 LOH this region was unmethylated. No other differential methylation was identified. In particular, two sites of paternal methylation in the mouse (dmrs 1 and 2), and all three imprinted IGF2 promoters were not methylated in the kidney or in Wilms tumours. We postulate that LOI in Wilms tumours is associated with loss of maternal allele-specific methylation from a region located upstream of the imprinted IGF2 promoters. This region may contain cis acting sequences that coordinately influence imprinting.

  3. Juxtarenal/pararenal Wilms' tumour in a six-year-old Malay girl.

    PubMed

    Ngan, K W; Shaari, S; Subramaniam, T

    2009-09-01

    We report a six-year-old Malay girl who presented with a right retroperitoneal tumour that measured 7.5 cm in diameter. A wide excision of the lesion was performed. The tumour was separated from a normal-appearing right kidney by a capsule. Microscopically, this well-encapsulated tumour was composed of classical triphasic components: epithelial, mesenchymal and blastemal areas. The immunohistochemical study showed WT1 expression in the blastemal area. Thus, a diagnosis of Wilms' tumour with favourable histology was made. The patient was well for 12 months. Extrarenal Wilms' tumour is uncommon, with the majority of cases occurring in the retroperitoneal and inguinal areas. Wilms' tumour that is not arising from the intrarenal area but shares a common capsule with the ipsilateral kidney, is even rarer. Indeed, our case would be more appropriately classified as juxtarenal/pararenal Wilms' tumour. Despite its rarity, an extrarenal or even juxtarenal/pararenal Wilms' tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumour.

  4. Regulators of skeletal development: a cluster analysis of 206 bone tumors reveals diagnostically useful markers.

    PubMed

    Horvai, Andrew E; Roy, Ritu; Borys, Dariusz; O'Donnell, Richard J

    2012-11-01

    The molecules Indian hedgehog (IHH), SP7 (also known as osterix), sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and TWIST1 regulate the normal differentiation of osteo- and chondrogenic cells from precursors during skeletal development and remodeling. The aberrant function of the same molecules has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone tumors. Preliminary studies suggest that antibodies against these molecules have practical, diagnostic or prognostic utility in tumors. However, a comprehensive analysis of the expression of these molecules in a large, diverse set of bone tumors has yet to be reported. The goals of this study were to compare the immunohistochemical profiles of IHH, SP7, SOX9, RUNX2 and TWIST1 among bone tumors and to determine the optimum panel for diagnostic utility. Tissue microarrays prepared from 206 undecalcified tumors (71 osteosarcomas, 26 osteoblastomas/osteoid osteomas, 50 giant cell tumors, 5 chondromyxoid fibromas and 54 chondroblastomas) were stained with antibodies to IHH, SP7, SOX9, RUNX2 and TWIST1. The stains were scored for intensity (0-3+) and distribution. The results were analyzed by cluster analysis. Optimum antibody panels for diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Analysis revealed six main clusters that corresponded well to tumor types and suggested a close relationship between the stromal cells of giant cell tumor and the osteoblasts of osteosarcoma. The expression profile of chondromyxoid fibroma and chondroblastoma also suggested related differentiation. The distribution of osteoblastomas and osteoid osteomas was more heterogeneous. RUNX2, SOX9 and TWIST1 represented the most sensitive and specific immunohistochemical panel to distinguish among these diagnoses with the limitation that no result could discriminate between chondroblastoma and chondromyxoid fibroma. IHH and SP7 did not yield additional utility.

  5. COX-2 inhibitor prevents tumor induced down regulation of classical DC lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC and decreased tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vipul K; Amin, Prayag J; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between the immune and tumor cells in the microenvironment is an important factor deciding the progression of cancer. Though many of the soluble mediators in the microenvironment that mediate immunosuppression are known, the mechanism by which the tumor affects the distal progenitors is not known. We report that the tumor derived prostanoids down regulated classical dendritic cells DC (cDC) lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 in the progenitor cells which affects its differentiation. Prostanoids also induced ERK/CREB/IL-10 signaling pathway in DC that is more important for maturation of DC. This was observed under in vitro as well as in vivo conditions leading to phenotypic and functional impairment of DC. siRNA mediated knockdown of Zbtb46 and not exogenous IL-10 mimicked the effects of tumor conditioned medium (TCM) on suppression of maturation markers. Treatment of tumor cells with COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 averted TCM induced phenotypic impairment of DC in vitro. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with NS-398 prevented tumor induced down regulation of Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC which in turn led to a decrease in tumor burden. The effects of NS-398 was indeed through immunomodulation was corroborated by no such response in SCID mice. Our study provides novel insight into the distal regulation of progenitor cells by tumor and the importance of Zbtb46 expression in anti-tumor immunity. These results identify Zbtb46 expression as an indicator of immunocompetent DC in tumor and also highlights that COX-2 inhibitors could be useful in cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  7. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-07-10

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression.

  8. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M.; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26036260

  9. Cholecystokinin down-regulation by RNA interference impairs Ewing tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Jaime; García-Aragoncillo, Eva; Azorín, Daniel; Agra, Noelia; Sastre, Ana; González-Mediero, Imelda; García-Miguel, Purificación; Pestaña, Angel; Gallego, Soledad; Segura, Dolores; Alonso, Javier

    2007-04-15

    Tumors of the Ewing family are characterized by chromosomal translocations that yield chimeric transcription factors, such as EWS/FLI1, which regulate the expression of specific genes that contribute to the malignant phenotype. In the present study, we show that cholecystokinin (CCK) is a new target of the EWS/FLI1 oncoprotein and assess its functional role in Ewing tumor pathogenesis. Relevant EWS/FLI1 targets were identified using a combination of cell systems with inducible EWS/FLI1 expression, Ewing tumors and cell lines, microarrays, and RNA interference with doxycycline-inducible small hairpin RNA (shRNA) vectors. A doxycycline-inducible CCK-shRNA vector was stably transfected in A673 and SK-PN-DW Ewing cell lines to assess the role of CCK in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Microarray analysis revealed that CCK was up-regulated by EWS/FLI1 in HeLa cells. CCK was overexpressed in Ewing tumors as compared with other pediatric malignancies such as rhabdomyosarcoma and neuroblastoma, with levels close to those detected in normal tissues expressing the highest levels of CCK. Furthermore, EWS/FLI1 knockdown in A673 and SK-PN-DW Ewing cells using two different doxycycline-inducible EWS/FLI1-specific shRNA vectors down-regulated CCK mRNA expression and diminished the levels of secreted CCK, showing that CCK is a EWS/FLI1 specific target gene in Ewing cells. A doxycycline-inducible CCK-specific shRNA vector successfully down-regulated CCK expression, reduced the levels of secreted CCK in Ewing cell lines, and inhibited cell growth and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Ewing cell lines and tumors express CCK receptors and that the growth inhibition produced by CCK silencing can be rescued by culturing the cells with medium containing CCK. Our data support the hypothesis that CCK acts as an autocrine growth factor stimulating the proliferation of Ewing cells and suggest that therapies targeting CCK could be promising in the treatment of

  10. In vivo photolabeling of tumor-infiltrating cells reveals highly regulated egress of T-cell subsets from tumors.

    PubMed

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Hampton, Henry R; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2017-05-30

    Immune therapy is rapidly gaining prominence in the clinic as a major weapon against cancer. Whereas much attention has been focused on the infiltration of tumors by immune cells, the subsequent fate of these infiltrates remains largely unexplored. We therefore established a photoconversion-based model that allowed us to label tumor-infiltrating immune cells and follow their migration. Using this system, we identified a population of tumor-experienced cells that emigrate from primary tumors to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatic vessels. Although the majority of tumor-infiltrating cells were myeloid, T cells made up the largest population of tumor-egressing leukocytes. Strikingly, the subset composition of tumor-egressing T cells was greatly skewed compared with those that had infiltrated the tumor and those resident in the draining lymph node. Some T-cell subsets such as CD8(+) T cells emigrated more readily; others including CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells were preferentially retained, suggesting that specific mechanisms guide immune cell egress from tumors. Furthermore, tumor-egressing T cells were more activated and displayed enhanced effector function in comparison with their lymph node counterparts. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating T cells migrate to distant secondary tumors and draining lymph nodes, highlighting a mechanism whereby tumor-experienced effector T cells may mediate antitumor immunity at metastatic sites. Thus, our results provide insights into migration and function of tumor-infiltrating immune cells and the role of these cells in tumor immunity outside of primary tumor deposits.

  11. Interleukin-8 promotes canine hemangiosarcoma growth by regulating the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Frantz, Aric M.; Anderson, Katie L.; Graef, Ashley J.; Scott, Milcah C.; Robinson, Sally; Sharkey, Leslie C.; O'Brien, Timothy D.; Dickerson, Erin B.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression is highly up-regulated in canine hemangiosarcoma (HSA); however, its role in the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown. We investigated the expression of IL-8 in canine HSA tissues and cell lines, as well and the effects of IL-8 on canine HSA in vitro, and in vivo using a mouse xenograft model for the latter. Constitutive expression of IL-8 mRNA, IL-8 protein, and IL-8 receptor were variable among different tumor samples and cell lines, but they showed stable steady states in each cell line. Upon the addition of IL-8, HSA cells showed transient intracellular calcium fluxes, suggesting that their IL-8 receptors are functional and that IL-8 binding activates relevant signaling pathways. Yet, neither addition of exogenous IL-8 nor blockade of endogenous IL-8 by neutralizing anti-IL-8 antibody (α-IL-8 Ab) affected HSA cell proliferation or survival in vitro. To assess potential effects of IL-8 in other tumor constituents, we stratified HSA cell lines and whole tumor samples into “IL-8 high” and “IL-8 low” groups. Genome-wide gene expression profiling showed that samples in the “IL-8 high” tumor group were enriched for genes associated with a “reactive microenvironment,” including activation of coagulation, inflammation, and fibrosis networks. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that the effects of IL-8 on these tumors were mostly indirect, regulating interactions with the microenvironment. This hypothesis was supported by in vivo xenograft experiments where survival and engraftment of tumor cells was inhibited by administration of neutralizing α-IL-8 Ab. Together, our results suggest that IL-8 contributes to establishing a permissive microenvironment during the early stages of tumorigenesis in HSA. - Highlights: • IL-8 is expressed in canine hemangiosarcoma tumor samples and cell lines. • IL-8 transduces a relevant biological signal in canine hemangiosarcoma cells. • IL-8 gene signature is associated

  12. Biallelic DICER1 mutations occur in Wilms tumours.

    PubMed

    Wu, M K; Sabbaghian, N; Xu, B; Addidou-Kalucki, S; Bernard, C; Zou, D; Reeve, A E; Eccles, M R; Cole, C; Choong, C S; Charles, A; Tan, T Y; Iglesias, D M; Goodyer, P R; Foulkes, W D

    2013-06-01

    DICER1 is an endoribonuclease central to the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Germline mutations in DICER1 have been associated with a pleiotropic tumour predisposition syndrome and Wilms tumour (WT) is a rare manifestation of this syndrome. Three WTs, each in a child with a deleterious germline DICER1 mutation, were screened for somatic DICER1 mutations and were found to bear specific mutations in either the RNase IIIa (n = 1) or the RNase IIIb domain (n = 2). In the two latter cases, we demonstrate that the germline and somatic DICER1 mutations were in trans, suggesting that the two-hit hypothesis of tumour formation applies for these examples of WT. Among 191 apparently sporadic WTs, we identified five different missense or deletion somatic DICER1 mutations (2.6%) in four individual WTs; one tumour had two very likely deleterious somatic mutations in trans in the RNase IIIb domain (c.5438A>G and c.5452G>A). In vitro studies of two somatic single-base substitutions (c.5429A>G and c.5438A>G) demonstrated exon 25 skipping from the transcript, a phenomenon not previously reported in DICER1. Further we show that DICER1 transcripts lacking exon 25 can be translated in vitro. This study has demonstrated that a subset of WTs exhibits two 'hits' in DICER1, suggesting that these mutations could be key events in the pathogenesis of these tumours.

  13. A cell-instructive hydrogel to regulate malignancy of 3D tumor spheroids with matrix rigidity.

    PubMed

    Liang, Youyun; Jeong, Jaehyun; DeVolder, Ross J; Cha, Chaenyung; Wang, Fei; Tong, Yen Wah; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2011-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid models are becoming important biomedical tools for both fundamental and applied cancer studies, but current models do not account for different levels of cancer malignancy. Several studies have reported that the mechanical rigidity of a hydrogel plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes of cancer cells adhered to the gel surface. This finding suggests that matrix rigidity should also modulate the malignancy of 3D tumor spheroids. However, the role of matrix stiffness is often confounded by concurrent changes in 3D matrix permeability. This study reports an advanced strategy to assemble 3D liver tumor spheroids with controlled intercellular organization, phenotypes, and angiogenic activities using hydrogels with controlled stiffness and minimal differences in molecular diffusivity. The elastic moduli of cell-encapsulated collagen gels were increased by stiffening interconnected collagen fibers with varied amounts of poly(ethylene glycol) di-(succinic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester). Interestingly, hepatocellular carcinoma cells encapsulated in a fat-like, softer hydrogel formed malignant cancer spheroids, while cells cultured in a liver-like, stiffer gel formed compact hepatoids with suppressed malignancy. Overall, both the hydrogel and the 3D tumor spheroids developed in this study will be greatly useful to better understand and regulate the emergent behaviors of various cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Asymmetric segregation of the tumor suppressor brat regulates self-renewal in Drosophila neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Betschinger, Joerg; Mechtler, Karl; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2006-03-24

    How stem cells generate both differentiating and self-renewing daughter cells is unclear. Here, we show that Drosophila larval neuroblasts-stem cell-like precursors of the adult brain-regulate proliferation by segregating the growth inhibitor Brat and the transcription factor Prospero into only one daughter cell. Like Prospero, Brat binds and cosegregates with the adaptor protein Miranda. In larval neuroblasts, both Brat and Prospero are required to inhibit self-renewal in one of the two daughter cells. While Prospero regulates cell-cycle gene transcription, Brat acts as a posttranscriptional inhibitor of dMyc. In brat or prospero mutants, both daughter cells grow and behave like neuroblasts leading to the formation of larval brain tumors. Similar defects are seen in lethal giant larvae (lgl) mutants where Brat and Prospero are not asymmetric. We have identified a molecular mechanism that may control self-renewal and prevent tumor formation in other stem cells as well.

  15. MicroRNA-106b regulates the tumor suppressor RUNX3 in laryngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Wang, Kai; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Chunming; Huang, Fuhui; Wen, Shuxin; Wang, Binquan

    2013-10-01

    Our study focuses on a set of laryngeal tumors that show reduced RUNX3 expression in the absence of transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor gene RUNX3 by aberrant methylation of CpG islands. We report that the loss of expression of RUNX3 correlates with up-regulation of miR-106b in human laryngeal carcinoma tissue. The downregulation of RUNX3 is mediated by miR-106b through binding of its 3'UTR. Moreover, miR-106b can promote the proliferation and invasion of laryngeal carcinoma cells by directly targeting RUNX3, and RUXN3 knockdown can abolish this phenotype. These results shed a new insight into the mechanism of miRNA regulation in laryngeal carcinoma.

  16. Aberrant regulation of miR-15b in human malignant tumors and its effects on the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ci; Wang, Guanyu; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Feihu; Zhang, Chunhui; Huang, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs encoded by the miR-15b/16-2 cluster act as tumor suppressors. Aberrant regulation of miR-15b in human malignant tumors is reportedly involved in cancer development, contributing to cell death, reduced proliferation, angiogenesis and metastasis resistance, metabolism reprogramming, genome instability, and tumor-associated inflammation. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms involved in regulating miR-15b expression in mammalian tumors and discuss the effects of miR-15b dysregulation on the hallmarks of cancer and highlight its role as a potentially valuable target for future cancer therapeutic strategies.

  17. Huaier extract suppresses breast cancer via regulating tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaming; Qi, Wenwen; Song, Xiaojin; Lv, Shangge; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qifeng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages in tumor microenvironment are mostly M2-polarized - and have been reported to promote tumorigenesis, which are also defined as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Here, we examined the regulatory effects of Huaier extract on TAMs using RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell line. Our data demonstrated that Huaier extract could inhibit the infiltration of macrophages into tumor microenvironment in a dose-dependent manner. By performing RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and phagocytosis assay, we were able to find that Huaier extract could regulate the polarization of macrophages, with decreased M2-polarization and increased phagocytosis of RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, we identified that Huaier extract could suppress macrophages-induced angiogenesis by using HUVEC migration assay, tube formation and chorioallantoic membrane assay. Additionally, western blotting showed decreased expression of MMP2, MMP9 and VEGF with the use of Huaier extract. Finally, we found that Huaier extract could inhibit M2-macrophages infiltration and angiogenesis through treating 4T1 tumor bearing mice with Huaier extract. Our study revealed a novel mechanism of the anti-tumor effect of Huaier extract which inhibited angiogenesis by targeting TAMs. These findings provided that Huaier was a promising drug for clinical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26831282

  18. Regulation of Mammary Tumor Formation and Lipid Biosynthesis by Spot14

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    metabolism and altering the way they use the Citric Acid cycle in the mitochondria, tumor cells also increase de novo fatty acid synthesis. This is thought...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Spot14 (S14), encoded by the THRSP gene, regulates de novo fatty acid synthesis in the liver, adipose...and lactating mammary gland. S14 has recently been shown to stimulate FASN activity, increasing the synthesis of medium chain fatty acids in mammary

  19. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    results in decreased latency of tumor formation in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice (Wnt1-Tg) (7). Stem cell renewal is a tightly regulated process ...luminal epithelial (ductal and alveolar ) and myoepithelial cells (6). Self-renewal is an intrinsic property of stem cells that allow their m plate...are in the process of collecti aintenance and propagation. A mammosphere assay has been developed based on the ability of a small population of

  20. Regulation of tumor growth by circulating full-length chromogranin A

    PubMed Central

    Gasparri, Anna; Sacchi, Angelina; Colombo, Barbara; Fiocchi, Martina; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Tacchetti, Carlo; Sen, Suvajit; Borges, Ricardo; Dondossola, Eleonora; Esposito, Antonio; Mahata, Sushil K.; Corti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA), a neuroendocrine secretory protein, and its fragments are present in variable amounts in the blood of normal subjects and cancer patients. We investigated whether circulating CgA has a regulatory function in tumor biology and progression. Systemic administration of full-length CgA, but not of fragments lacking the C-terminal region, could reduce tumor growth in murine models of fibrosarcoma, mammary adenocarcinoma, Lewis lung carcinoma, and primary and metastatic melanoma, with U-shaped dose-response curves. Tumor growth inhibition was associated with reduction of microvessel density and blood flow in neoplastic tissues. Neutralization of endogenous CgA with antibodies against its C-terminal region (residues 410-439) promoted tumor growth. Structure-function studies showed that the C-terminal region of CgA contains a bioactive site and that cleavage of this region causes a marked loss of anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor potency. Mechanistic studies showed that full-length CgA could induce, with a U-shaped dose-response curve, the production of protease nexin-1 in endothelial cells, a serine protease inhibitor endowed of anti-angiogenic activity. Gene silencing or neutralization of protease nexin-1 with specific antibodies abolished both anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects of CgA. These results suggest that circulating full-length CgA is an important inhibitor of angiogenesis and tumor growth, and that cleavage of its C-terminal region markedly reduces its activity. Pathophysiological changes in CgA blood levels and/or its fragmentation might regulate disease progression in cancer patients. PMID:27683038

  1. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  2. Wilms' tumour: a systematic review of risk factors and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Anna; Heck, Julia E; Ribeiro, Karina Braga; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Buffler, Patricia; Hung, Rayjean J

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour comprises 95% of all renal cancers among children less than 15 years of age. The purpose of this review is to examine the existing literature on perinatal and environmental risk factors for Wilms' tumour. A search for epidemiological studies that examined risk factors for Wilms' tumour was undertaken in Medline, LILACS, ISI Web of Science and Dissertation Abstracts. A total of 37 studies, including 14 cohort, 21 case-control and 2 case-cohort studies, were identified that examined environmental and perinatal risk factors. Most studies were from Western Europe and North America, and among case-control studies, 16 used randomly selected population-based controls. We observed a significantly increased risk of Wilms' tumour with maternal exposure to pesticides prior to the child's birth (OR = 1.37 [95% CI 1.09, 1.73]), high birthweight (OR = 1.36 [95% CI 1.12, 1.64]) and preterm birth (OR = 1.44 [95% CI 1.14, 1.81]), although the results regarding pesticide exposure may be subject to publication bias (Egger's test, P = 0.09). Further analyses to adjust for the heterogeneity in the results for high birthweight and preterm birth did not statistically change the significance of the results. Additionally, an increased though not statistically significant risk of Wilms' tumour was associated with maternal hypertension (OR = 1.30 [95% CI 0.99, 1.72]), and, compared with the first born, being a second or later birth was associated with a significantly decreased risk (OR = 0.82 [95% CI 0.71, 0.95]). This review suggests a role for several perinatal and environmental risk factors in the aetiology of Wilms' tumour.

  3. A distinct innate lymphoid cell population regulates tumor-associated T cells.

    PubMed

    Crome, Sarah Q; Nguyen, Linh T; Lopez-Verges, Sandra; Yang, S Y Cindy; Martin, Bernard; Yam, Jennifer Y; Johnson, Dylan J; Nie, Jessica; Pniak, Michael; Yen, Pei Hua; Milea, Anca; Sowamber, Ramlogan; Katz, Sarah Rachel; Bernardini, Marcus Q; Clarke, Blaise A; Shaw, Patricia A; Lang, Philipp A; Berman, Hal K; Pugh, Trevor J; Lanier, Lewis L; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2017-03-01

    Antitumor T cells are subject to multiple mechanisms of negative regulation. Recent findings that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) regulate adaptive T cell responses led us to examine the regulatory potential of ILCs in the context of cancer. We identified a unique ILC population that inhibits tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from high-grade serous tumors, defined their suppressive capacity in vitro, and performed a comprehensive analysis of their phenotype. Notably, the presence of this CD56(+)CD3(-) population in TIL cultures was associated with reduced T cell numbers, and further functional studies demonstrated that this population suppressed TIL expansion and altered TIL cytokine production. Transcriptome analysis and phenotypic characterization determined that regulatory CD56(+)CD3(-) cells exhibit low cytotoxic activity, produce IL-22, and have an expression profile that overlaps with those of natural killer (NK) cells and other ILCs. NKp46 was highly expressed by these cells, and addition of anti-NKp46 antibodies to TIL cultures abrogated the ability of these regulatory ILCs to suppress T cell expansion. Notably, the presence of these regulatory ILCs in TIL cultures corresponded with a striking reduction in the time to disease recurrence. These studies demonstrate that a previously uncharacterized ILC population regulates the activity and expansion of tumor-associated T cells.

  4. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Cotter, Matthew J.; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V.; McCaffrey, Judith C.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47phox and gp91phox, compared to immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T-cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer. PMID:19380816

  5. Mechanism regulating reactive oxygen species in tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Cotter, Matthew J; Cheng, Pingyan; Cheng, Fendong; Kusmartsev, Sergei; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Padhya, Tapan; McCaffrey, Thomas V; McCaffrey, Judith C; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2009-05-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a major component of the immune suppressive network described in cancer and many other pathological conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that one of the major mechanisms of MDSC-induced immune suppression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. In this study, we observed a substantial up-regulation of ROS by MDSC in all of seven different tumor models and in patients with head and neck cancer. The increased ROS production by MDSC is mediated by up-regulated activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX2). MDSC from tumor-bearing mice had significantly higher expression of NOX2 subunits, primarily p47(phox) and gp91(phox), compared with immature myeloid cells from tumor-free mice. Expression of NOX2 subunits in MDSC was controlled by the STAT3 transcription factor. In the absence of NOX2 activity, MDSC lost the ability to suppress T cell responses and quickly differentiated into mature macrophages and dendritic cells. These findings expand our fundamental understanding of the biology of MDSC and may also open new opportunities for therapeutic regulation of these cells in cancer.

  6. Computational identification of a p38SAPK regulated transcription factor network required for tumor cell quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Alejandro P.; George, Ajish; Schewe, Denis; Bragado, Paloma; Iglesias, Bibiana V.; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Kourtidis, Antonis; Conklin, Douglas S.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2009-01-01

    The stress activated kinase p38 plays key roles in tumor suppression and induction of tumor cell dormancy. However, the mechanisms behind these functions remain poorly understood. Using computational tools we identified a transcription factor (TF) network regulated by p38α/β and required for human squamous carcinoma cell quiescence in vivo. We found that p38 transcriptionally regulates a core network of 46 genes that includes 16 TFs. Activation of p38 induced the expression of the TFs p53 and BHLHB3, while inhibiting c-Jun and FoxM1 expression. Further, induction of p53 by p38 was dependent on c-Jun downregulation. Accordingly, while RNAi downregulation of BHLHB3 or p53 interrupted tumor cell quiescence; downregulation of c-Jun or FoxM1 or overexpression of BHLHB3 in malignant cells mimicked the onset of quiescence. Our results identify components of the regulatory mechanisms driving p38-induced cancer cell quiescence. These may regulate dormancy of residual disease that usually precedes the onset of metastasis in many cancers. PMID:19584293

  7. The Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p63 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Stephen R.; Wu, Hong; Wang, Benfan; Abuetabh, Yasser; Sergi, Consolato; Leng, Roger P.

    2016-01-01

    The protein p63 has been identified as a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and is capable of inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or senescence. p63 has at least six isoforms, which can be divided into two major groups: the TAp63 variants that contain the N-terminal transactivation domain and the ΔNp63 variants that lack the N-terminal transactivation domain. The TAp63 variants are generally considered to be tumor suppressors involved in activating apoptosis and suppressing metastasis. ΔNp63 variants cannot induce apoptosis but can act as dominant negative inhibitors to block the function of TAp53, TAp73, and TAp63. p63 is rarely mutated in human tumors and is predominately regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This review focuses primarily on regulation of p63 by the ubiquitin E-3 ligase family of enzymes via ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and introduces a new key regulator of the p63 protein. PMID:27929429

  8. Regulation of IGF - mTOR signalling by miRNA in childhood adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    Doghman, Mabrouka; Wakil, Abeer EL; Cardinaud, Bruno; Thomas, Emilie; Wang, Jinling; Zhao, Wei; Peralta-Del Valle, Maria Helena C.; Figueiredo, Bonald C.; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Lalli, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act at the post-transcriptional level to control gene expression in virtually every biological process, including oncogenesis. Here we report the identification of a set of miRNAs that are differentially regulated in childhood adrenocortical tumors, including miR-99a and miR-100. Functional analysis of these miRNAs in adrenocortical tumor cell lines showed that they coordinately regulate expression of the IGF-mTOR-raptor signalling pathway through binding sites in their 3′ UTRs. In these cells, the active Ser2448-phosphorylated form of mTOR is present only in mitotic cells in association with the mitotic spindle and midbody in the G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Pharmacological inhibition of mTOR signalling by everolimus greatly reduces tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of regulation of mTOR signalling by miRNAs, and they lay the groundwork for clinical evaluation of mTOR pathway drugs for treatment of adrenocortical cancer. PMID:20484036

  9. miR-221/222 control luminal breast cancer tumor progression by regulating different targets.

    PubMed

    Dentelli, Patrizia; Traversa, Matteo; Rosso, Arturo; Togliatto, Gabriele; Olgasi, Cristina; Marchiò, Caterina; Provero, Paolo; Lembo, Antonio; Bon, Giulia; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Falcioni, Rita; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2014-01-01

    α6β4 integrin is an adhesion molecule for laminin receptors involved in tumor progression. We present a link between β4 integrin expression and miR-221/222 in the most prevalent human mammary tumor: luminal invasive carcinomas (Lum-ICs). Using human primary tumors that display different β4 integrin expression and grade, we show that miR-221/222 expression inversely correlates with tumor proliferating index, Ki67. Interestingly, most high-grade tumors express β4 integrin and low miR-221/222 levels. We ectopically transfected miR-221/222 into a human-derived mammary tumor cell line that recapitulates the luminal subtype to investigate whether miR-221/222 regulates β4 expression. We demonstrate that miR-221/222 overexpression results in β4 expression downregulation, breast cancer cell proliferation, and invasion inhibition. The role of miR-221/222 in driving β4 integrin expression is also confirmed via mutating the miR-221/222 seed sequence for β4 integrin 3'UTR. Furthermore, we show that these 2 miRNAs are also key breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion regulators, via the post-transcriptional regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) and of a disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM-17). We further confirm these data by silencing ADAM-17, using a dominant-negative or an activated STAT5A form. miR-221/222-driven β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 did not occur in MCF-10A cells, denoted "normal" breast epithelial cells, indicating that the mechanism is cancer cell-specific.   These results provide the first evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism that regulates β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 expression, thus controlling breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Pre-miR-221/222 use in the aggressive luminal subtype may be a powerful therapeutic anti-cancer strategy.

  10. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... excessively in the body. Normally, the body controls cell growth and division. New cells are created to replace ... room for healthy replacements. If the balance of cell growth and death is disturbed, a tumor may form. ...

  11. Copper Transporter 2 Regulates Endocytosis and Controls Tumor Growth and Sensitivity to Cisplatin In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Brian G.; Larson, Christopher A.; Adams, Preston L.; Abada, Paolo B.; Pesce, Catherine E.; Safaei, Roohangiz

    2011-01-01

    Copper transporter 2 (CTR2) is one of the four copper transporters in mammalian cells that influence the cellular pharmacology of cisplatin and carboplatin. CTR2 was knocked down using a short hairpin RNA interference. Robust expression of CTR2 was observed in parental tumors grown in vivo, whereas no staining was found in the tumors formed from cells in which CTR2 had been knocked down. Knockdown of CTR2 reduced growth rate by 5.8-fold, increased the frequency of apoptotic cells, and decreased the vascular density, but it did not change copper content. Knockdown of CTR2 increased the tumor accumulation of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) [cisplatin (cDDP)] by 9.1-fold and greatly increased its therapeutic efficacy. Because altered endocytosis has been implicated in cDDP resistance, uptake of dextran was used to quantify the rate of macropinocytosis. Knockdown of CTR2 increased dextran uptake 2.5-fold without reducing exocytosis. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with either amiloride or wortmannin blocked the increase in macropinocytosis mediated by CTR2 knockdown. Stimulation of macropinocytosis by platelet-derived growth factor coordinately increased dextran and cDDP uptake. Knockdown of CTR2 was associated with activation of the Rac1 and cdc42 GTPases that control macropinocytosis but not activation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway. We conclude that CTR2 is required for optimal tumor growth and that it is an unusually strong regulator of cisplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity. CTR2 regulates the transport of cDDP in part through control of the rate of macropinocytosis via activation of Rac1 and cdc42. Selective knockdown of CTR2 in tumors offers a strategy for enhancing the efficacy of cDDP. PMID:20930109

  12. Copper transporter 2 regulates endocytosis and controls tumor growth and sensitivity to cisplatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Blair, Brian G; Larson, Christopher A; Adams, Preston L; Abada, Paolo B; Pesce, Catherine E; Safaei, Roohangiz; Howell, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    Copper transporter 2 (CTR2) is one of the four copper transporters in mammalian cells that influence the cellular pharmacology of cisplatin and carboplatin. CTR2 was knocked down using a short hairpin RNA interference. Robust expression of CTR2 was observed in parental tumors grown in vivo, whereas no staining was found in the tumors formed from cells in which CTR2 had been knocked down. Knockdown of CTR2 reduced growth rate by 5.8-fold, increased the frequency of apoptotic cells, and decreased the vascular density, but it did not change copper content. Knockdown of CTR2 increased the tumor accumulation of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) [cisplatin (cDDP)] by 9.1-fold and greatly increased its therapeutic efficacy. Because altered endocytosis has been implicated in cDDP resistance, uptake of dextran was used to quantify the rate of macropinocytosis. Knockdown of CTR2 increased dextran uptake 2.5-fold without reducing exocytosis. Inhibition of macropinocytosis with either amiloride or wortmannin blocked the increase in macropinocytosis mediated by CTR2 knockdown. Stimulation of macropinocytosis by platelet-derived growth factor coordinately increased dextran and cDDP uptake. Knockdown of CTR2 was associated with activation of the Rac1 and cdc42 GTPases that control macropinocytosis but not activation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway. We conclude that CTR2 is required for optimal tumor growth and that it is an unusually strong regulator of cisplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity. CTR2 regulates the transport of cDDP in part through control of the rate of macropinocytosis via activation of Rac1 and cdc42. Selective knockdown of CTR2 in tumors offers a strategy for enhancing the efficacy of cDDP.

  13. ROCK has a crucial role in regulating prostate tumor growth through interaction with c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; He, J; Xu, Y; Liu, S

    2014-12-04

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) has an essential role in governing cell morphology and motility, and increased ROCK activity contributes to cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Burgeoning data suggest that ROCK is also involved in the growth regulation of tumor cells. However, thus far, the molecular mechanisms responsible for ROCK-governed tumor cell growth have not been clearly elucidated. Here we showed that inhibition of ROCK kinase activity, either by a selective ROCK inhibitor Y27632 or by specific ROCK small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, attenuated not only motility but also the proliferation of PC3 prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, mechanistic investigation revealed that ROCK endowed cancer cells with tumorigenic capability, mainly by targeting c-Myc. ROCK could increase the transcriptional activity of c-Myc by promoting c-Myc protein stability, and ROCK inhibition reduced c-Myc-mediated expression of mRNA targets (such as HSPC111) and microRNA targets (such as miR-17-92 cluster). We provided evidence demonstrating that ROCK1 directly interacted with and phosphorylated c-Myc, resulting in stabilization of the protein and activation of its transcriptional activity. Suppression of ROCK-c-Myc downstream molecules, such as c-Myc-regulated miR-17, also impaired tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In addition, c-Myc was shown to exert a positive feedback regulation on ROCK by increasing RhoA mRNA expression. Therefore, inhibition of ROCK and its stimulated signaling might prove to be a promising strategy for restraining tumor progression in prostate cancer.

  14. Identifying the ubiquitin ligase complex that regulates the NF1 tumor suppressor and Ras

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Pablo E.; Cichowski, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The NF1 tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, is a negative regulator of Ras. Neurofibromin is dynamically regulated by the proteasome and its degradation and re-expression are essential for maintaining appropriate levels of Ras-GTP. Like p53, NF1/neurofibromin can be inactivated in cancer by both mutations and excessive proteasomal destruction; however, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this latter process. Here we show that a Cullin 3 (Cul3)/KBTBD7 complex controls both the regulated proteasomal degradation of neurofibromin and the pathogenic destabilization of neurofibromin in glioblastomas. Importantly RNAi-mediated Cul3 ablation and a dominant-negative Cul3 directly stabilize neurofibromin, suppress Ras and ERK, and inhibit proliferation in an NF1-dependent manner. Moreover, in glioblastomas where neurofibromin is chronically destabilized, Cul3 inhibition re-stabilizes the protein and suppresses tumor development. Collectively these studies demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for Cul3 in regulating Ras and provide a molecular framework that can be exploited to develop potential cancer therapies. PMID:23661552

  15. PPARα regulates tumor cell proliferation and senescence via a novel target gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yixin; Wang, Yongtao; Huang, Yaoyao; Zeng, Hang; Hu, Bingfang; Guan, Lihuan; Zhang, Huizhen; Yu, Ai-Ming; Johnson, Caroline H; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2017-03-03

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), an enzyme located in the outer mitochondria membrane, has a crucial role in fatty acid transport and oxidation. It is also involved in cell proliferation and is a potential driver for cancer cell senescence. However, its upstream regulatory mechanism is unknown. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates lipid metabolism and tumor progression. The current study aimed to elucidate whether and how PPARα regulates CPT1C and then affects cancer cell proliferation and senescence. Here, for the first time we report that PPARα directly activated CPT1C transcription and CPT1C was a novel target gene of PPARα, as revealed by dual-luciferase reporter and ChIP assays. Moreover, regulation of CPT1C by PPARα was p53-independent. We further confirmed that depletion of PPARα resulted in low CPT1C expression and then inhibited proliferation and induced senescence of MDA-MB-231 and PANC-1 tumor cell lines in a CPT1C dependent manner, while forced PPARα overexpression promoted cell proliferation and reversed cellular senescence. Taken together, these results indicate that CPT1C is a novel PPARα target gene that regulates cancer cell proliferation and senescence. The PPARα-CPT1C axis may be a new target for the intervention of cancer cellular proliferation and senescence.

  16. In vivo photolabeling of tumor-infiltrating cells reveals highly regulated egress of T-cell subsets from tumors

    PubMed Central

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Hampton, Henry R.; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Immune therapy is rapidly gaining prominence in the clinic as a major weapon against cancer. Whereas much attention has been focused on the infiltration of tumors by immune cells, the subsequent fate of these infiltrates remains largely unexplored. We therefore established a photoconversion-based model that allowed us to label tumor-infiltrating immune cells and follow their migration. Using this system, we identified a population of tumor-experienced cells that emigrate from primary tumors to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatic vessels. Although the majority of tumor-infiltrating cells were myeloid, T cells made up the largest population of tumor-egressing leukocytes. Strikingly, the subset composition of tumor-egressing T cells was greatly skewed compared with those that had infiltrated the tumor and those resident in the draining lymph node. Some T-cell subsets such as CD8+ T cells emigrated more readily; others including CD4−CD8− T cells were preferentially retained, suggesting that specific mechanisms guide immune cell egress from tumors. Furthermore, tumor-egressing T cells were more activated and displayed enhanced effector function in comparison with their lymph node counterparts. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating T cells migrate to distant secondary tumors and draining lymph nodes, highlighting a mechanism whereby tumor-experienced effector T cells may mediate antitumor immunity at metastatic sites. Thus, our results provide insights into migration and function of tumor-infiltrating immune cells and the role of these cells in tumor immunity outside of primary tumor deposits. PMID:28507145

  17. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  18. IRF5 is a novel regulator of CXCL13 expression in breast cancer that regulates CXCR5(+) B- and T-cell trafficking to tumor-conditioned media.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Erica Maria; De, Saurav; Weiss, Ryan; Feng, Di; Hall, Kelly; Kilic, Sarah; Bhanot, Gyan; Ganesan, Shridar; Ran, Sophia; Barnes, Betsy J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies using prognostic and predictive signatures have shown that an immune signal emanating from whole tumors reflects the level of immune cell infiltration--a high immune signal linked to improved outcome. Factors regulating immune cell trafficking to the tumor, however, are not known. Previous work has shown that expression of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a critical immune regulator, is lost in ~80% of invasive ductal carcinomas examined. We postulated that IRF5-positive and -negative breast tumors would differentially regulate immune cell trafficking to the tumor. Using a focused tumor inflammatory array, differences in cytokine and chemokine expression were examined between IRF5-positive and -negative MDA-MB-231 cells grown in three-dimensional culture. A number of cytokines/chemokines were found to be dysregulated between cultures. CXCL13 was identified as a direct target of IRF5 resulting in the enhanced recruitment of B and T cells to IRF5-positive tumor-conditioned media. The ability of IRF5 to regulate mediators of cell migration was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, small interfering RNA knockdown and immunofluorescence staining of human breast tumor tissues. Analysis of primary immune cell subsets revealed that IRF5 specifically recruits CXCR5(+) B and T cells to the tumor; CXCR5 is the receptor for CXCL13. Analysis of primary breast tumor tissues revealed a significant correlation between IRF5 and CXCL13 expression providing clinical relevance to the study. Together, these data support that IRF5 directly regulates a network of genes that shapes a tumor immune response and may, in combination with CXCL13, serve as a novel prognostic marker for antitumor immunity.

  19. Transcription factor Wilms’ tumor 1 regulates developmental RNAs through 3′ UTR interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bharathavikru, Ruthrothaselvi; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Aitken, Stuart; Slight, Joan; Artibani, Mara; Hohenstein, Peter; Tollervey, David; Hastie, Nick

    2017-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor 1 (WT1) is essential for the development and homeostasis of multiple mesodermal tissues. Despite evidence for post-transcriptional roles, no endogenous WT1 target RNAs exist. Using RNA immunoprecipitation and UV cross-linking, we show that WT1 binds preferentially to 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of developmental targets. These target mRNAs are down-regulated upon WT1 depletion in cell culture and developing kidney mesenchyme. Wt1 deletion leads to rapid turnover of specific mRNAs. WT1 regulates reporter gene expression through interaction with 3′ UTR-binding sites. Combining experimental and computational analyses, we propose that WT1 influences key developmental and disease processes in part through regulating mRNA turnover. PMID:28289143

  20. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-01-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the ‘Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism. PMID:25012504

  1. Tumor suppressor WWOX regulates glucose metabolism via HIF1α modulation.

    PubMed

    Abu-Remaileh, M; Aqeilan, R I

    2014-11-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) encodes a tumor suppressor that is frequently lost in many cancer types. Wwox-deficient mice develop normally but succumb to a lethal hypoglycemia early in life. Here, we identify WWOX as a tumor suppressor with emerging role in regulation of aerobic glycolysis. WWOX controls glycolytic genes' expression through hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) regulation. Specifically, WWOX, via its first WW domain, physically interacts with HIF1α and modulates its levels and transactivation function. Consistent with this notion, Wwox-deficient cells exhibited increased HIF1α levels and activity and displayed increased glucose uptake. Remarkably, WWOX deficiency is associated with enhanced glycolysis and diminished mitochondrial respiration, conditions resembling the 'Warburg effect'. Furthermore, Wwox-deficient cells are more tumorigenic and display increased levels of GLUT1 in vivo. Finally, WWOX expression is inversely correlated with GLUT1 levels in breast cancer samples highlighting WWOX as a modulator of cancer metabolism. Our studies uncover an unforeseen role for the tumor-suppressor WWOX in cancer metabolism.

  2. Keratin-dependent regulation of Aire and gene expression in skin tumor keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Ryan P; DePianto, Daryle J; Jacob, Justin T; Han, Minerva C; Chung, Byung-Min; Batazzi, Adriana S; Poll, Brian G; Guo, Yajuan; Han, Jingnan; Ong, SuFey; Zheng, Wenxin; Taube, Janis M; Čiháková, Daniela; Wan, Fengyi; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2015-08-01

    Expression of the intermediate filament protein keratin 17 (K17) is robustly upregulated in inflammatory skin diseases and in many tumors originating in stratified and pseudostratified epithelia. We report that autoimmune regulator (Aire), a transcriptional regulator, is inducibly expressed in human and mouse tumor keratinocytes in a K17-dependent manner and is required for timely onset of Gli2-induced skin tumorigenesis in mice. The induction of Aire mRNA in keratinocytes depends on a functional interaction between K17 and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein hnRNP K. Further, K17 colocalizes with Aire protein in the nucleus of tumor-prone keratinocytes, and each factor is bound to a specific promoter region featuring an NF-κB consensus sequence in a relevant subset of K17- and Aire-dependent proinflammatory genes. These findings provide radically new insight into keratin intermediate filament and Aire function, along with a molecular basis for the K17-dependent amplification of inflammatory and immune responses in diseased epithelia.

  3. Versatile in vivo regulation of tumor phenotypes by dCas9-mediated transcriptional perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Christian J.; Bruno, Peter M.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted transcriptional regulation is a powerful tool to study genetic mediators of cellular behavior. Here, we show that catalytically dead Cas9 (dCas9) targeted to genomic regions upstream or downstream of the transcription start site allows for specific and sustainable gene-expression level alterations in tumor cells in vitro and in syngeneic immune-competent mouse models. We used this approach for a high-coverage pooled gene-activation screen in vivo and discovered previously unidentified modulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response. Moreover, by using dCas9 linked to an activation domain, we can either enhance or suppress target gene expression simply by changing the genetic location of dCas9 binding relative to the transcription start site. We demonstrate that these directed changes in gene-transcription levels occur with minimal off-target effects. Our findings highlight the use of dCas9-mediated transcriptional regulation as a versatile tool to reproducibly interrogate tumor phenotypes in vivo. PMID:27325776

  4. Evidence for Ca2+-Regulated ATP Release in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Erik; Berglund, David; Akcakaya, Pinar; Ghaderi, Mehran; Daré, Elisabetta; Berggren, Per-Olof; Köhler, Martin; Aspinwall, Craig A.; Lui, Weng-Onn; Zedenius, Jan; Larsson, Catharina; Bränström, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are thought to originate from the electrically active pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the presence of synaptic-like vesicles and proteins involved in cell secretion it remains unclear whether GIST cells possess regulated release mechanisms. The GIST tumor cell line GIST882 was used as a model cell system, and stimulus-release coupling was investigated by confocal microscopy of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), flow cytometry, and luminometric measurements of extracellular ATP. We demonstrate that GIST cells have an intact intracellular Ca2+-signaling pathway that regulates ATP release. Cell viability and cell membrane integrity was preserved, excluding ATP leakage due to cell death and suggesting active ATP release. The stimulus-secretion signal transduction is at least partly dependent on Ca2+ influx since exclusion of extracellular Ca2+ diminishes the ATP release. We conclude that measurements of ATP release in GISTs may be a useful tool for dissecting the signal transduction pathway, mapping exocytotic components, and possibly for the development and evaluation of drugs. Additionally, release of ATP from GISTs may have importance for tumor tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance escape. PMID:23499741

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate T Cell Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinfeng; Song, Mengjia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by cellular metabolism play an important role as signaling messengers in immune system. ROS elevated in the tumor microenvironment are associated with tumor-induced immunosuppression. T cell-based therapy has been recently approved to be effective for cancer treatment. However, T cells often become dysfunctional after reaching the tumor site. It has been reported that ROS participate extensively in T cells activation, apoptosis, and hyporesponsiveness. The sensitivity of T cells to ROS varies among different subsets. ROS can be regulated by cytokines, amino acid metabolism, and enzymatic activity. Immunosuppressive cells accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and induce apoptosis and functional suppression of T cells by producing ROS. Thus, modulating the level of ROS may be important to prolong survival of T cells and enhance their antitumor function. Combining T cell-based therapy with antioxidant treatment such as administration of ROS scavenger should be considered as a promising strategy in cancer treatment, aiming to improve antitumor T cells immunity. PMID:27547291

  6. Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates glycolysis stimulated by hypoxia through its target RRAD

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Liang, Yingjian; Lin, Meihua; Liu, Jia; Chan, Chang S.; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells display enhanced glycolysis to meet their energetic and biosynthetic demands even under normal oxygen concentrations. Recent studies have revealed that tumor suppressor p53 represses glycolysis under normoxia as a novel mechanism for tumor suppression. As the common microenvironmental stress for tumors, hypoxia drives the metabolic switch from the oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, which is crucial for survival and proliferation of cancer cells under hypoxia. The p53's role and mechanism in regulating glycolysis under hypoxia is poorly understood. Here, we found that p53 represses hypoxia-stimulated glycolysis in cancer cells through RRAD, a newly-identified p53 target. RRAD expression is frequently decreased in lung cancer. Ectopic expression of RRAD greatly reduces glycolysis whereas knockdown of RRAD promotes glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, RRAD represses glycolysis mainly through inhibition of GLUT1 translocation to the plasma membrane. Under hypoxic conditions, p53 induces RRAD, which in turn inhibits the translocation of GLUT1 and represses glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Blocking RRAD by siRNA greatly abolishes p53's function in repressing glycolysis under hypoxia. Taken together, our results revealed an important role and mechanism of p53 in antagonizing the stimulating effect of hypoxia on glycolysis, which contributes to p53's function in tumor suppression. PMID:25114038

  7. Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates glycolysis stimulated by hypoxia through its target RRAD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Wu, Rui; Liang, Yingjian; Lin, Meihua; Liu, Jia; Chan, Chang S; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2014-07-30

    Cancer cells display enhanced glycolysis to meet their energetic and biosynthetic demands even under normal oxygen concentrations. Recent studies have revealed that tumor suppressor p53 represses glycolysis under normoxia as a novel mechanism for tumor suppression. As a common microenvironmental stress for tumors, hypoxia drives the metabolic switch from the oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, which is crucial for survival and proliferation of cancer cells under hypoxia. The p53's role and mechanism in regulating glycolysis under hypoxia is poorly understood. Here, we found that p53 represses hypoxia-stimulated glycolysis in cancer cells through RRAD, a newly-identified p53 target. RRAD expression is frequently decreased in lung cancer. Ectopic expression of RRAD greatly reduces glycolysis whereas knockdown of RRAD promotes glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, RRAD represses glycolysis mainly through inhibition of GLUT1 translocation to the plasma membrane. Under hypoxic conditions, p53 induces RRAD, which in turn inhibits the translocation of GLUT1 and represses glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Blocking RRAD by siRNA greatly abolishes p53's function in repressing glycolysis under hypoxia. Taken together, our results revealed an important role and mechanism of p53 in antagonizing the stimulating effect of hypoxia on glycolysis, which contributes to p53's function in tumor suppression.

  8. MicroRNAs Targeting Oncogenes Are Down-Regulated in Pancreatic Malignant Transformation from Benign Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Long R.; Frampton, Adam E.; Jacob, Jimmy; Pellegrino, Loredana; Krell, Jonathan; Giamas, Georgios; Tsim, Nicole; Vlavianos, Panagiotis; Cohen, Patrizia; Ahmad, Raida; Keller, Andreas; Habib, Nagy A.; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiles have been described in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but these have not been compared with pre-malignant pancreatic tumors. We wished to compare the miRNA expression signatures in pancreatic benign cystic tumors (BCT) of low and high malignant potential with PDAC, in order to identify miRNAs deregulated during PDAC development. The mechanistic consequences of miRNA dysregulation were further evaluated. Methods Tissue samples were obtained at a tertiary pancreatic unit from individuals with BCT and PDAC. MiRNA profiling was performed using a custom microarray and results were validated using RT-qPCR prior to evaluation of miRNA targets. Results Widespread miRNA down-regulation was observed in PDAC compared to low malignant potential BCT. We show that amongst those miRNAs down-regulated, miR-16, miR-126 and let-7d regulate known PDAC oncogenes (targeting BCL2, CRK and KRAS respectively). Notably, miR-126 also directly targets the KRAS transcript at a “seedless” binding site within its 3′UTR. In clinical specimens, miR-126 was strongly down-regulated in PDAC tissues, with an associated elevation in KRAS and CRK proteins. Furthermore, miR-21, a known oncogenic miRNA in pancreatic and other cancers, was not elevated in PDAC compared to serous microcystic adenoma (SMCA), but in both groups it was up-regulated compared to normal pancreas, implicating early up-regulation during malignant change. Conclusions Expression profiling revealed 21 miRNAs down-regulated in PDAC compared to SMCA, the most benign lesion that rarely progresses to invasive carcinoma. It appears that miR-21 up-regulation is an early event in the transformation from normal pancreatic tissue. MiRNA expression has the potential to distinguish PDAC from normal pancreas and BCT. Mechanistically the down-regulation of miR-16, miR-126 and let-7d promotes PDAC transformation by post-transcriptional up-regulation of crucial PDAC oncogenes. We show