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Sample records for regulatory cells inhibit

  1. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  2. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-02-26

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions.

  3. Interleukin-4 Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Differentiation through Regulating CD103+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lei; Chen, Jie; Zhang, Hongwei; Duan, Lihua

    2017-01-01

    CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) have been shown to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) through educating regulatory T (Treg) cells differentiation. However, the mechanism of CD103+ DCs subsets differentiation remains elusive. Interleukin (IL)-4 is a pleiotropic cytokine that is upregulated in certain types of inflammation, including IBDs and especially ulcerative colitis. However, the precise role of IL-4 in the differentiation of CD103+ DCs subpopulation remains unknown. In this study, we observed a repressive role of IL-4 on the CD103+ DCs differentiation in both mouse and human. High-dose IL-4 inhibited the CD103+ DC differentiation. In comparison to CD103− DCs, CD103+ DCs expressed high levels of the co-stimulatory molecules and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Interestingly, IL-4 diminished IDO expression on DCs in a dose-dependent manner. Besides, high-dose IL-4-induced bone marrow-derived DCs, and monocyte-derived DCs revealed mature DCs profiles, characterized by increased co-stimulatory molecules and decreased pinocytotic function. Furthermore, DCs generated under low concentrations of IL-4 favored Treg cells differentiation, which depend on IDO produced by CD103+ DCs. Consistently, IL-4 also reduced the frequency of CD103+ DC in vivo. Thus, we here demonstrated that the cytokine IL-4 involved in certain types of inflammatory diseases by orchestrating the functional phenotype of CD103+ DCs subsets. PMID:28316599

  4. Azacytidine Treatment Inhibits the Progression of Herpes Stromal Keratitis by Enhancing Regulatory T Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Siva Karthik; Reddy, Pradeep B J; Bhela, Siddheshvar; Jaggi, Ujjaldeep; Gimenez, Fernanda; Rouse, Barry T

    2017-04-01

    Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) sets off an inflammatory reaction in the cornea which leads to both virus clearance and chronic lesions that are orchestrated by CD4 T cells. Approaches that enhance the function of regulatory T cells (Treg) and dampen effector T cells can be effective to limit stromal keratitis (SK) lesion severity. In this report, we explore the novel approach of inhibiting DNA methyltransferase activity using 5-azacytidine (Aza; a cytosine analog) to limit HSV-1-induced ocular lesions. We show that therapy begun after infection when virus was no longer actively replicating resulted in a pronounced reduction in lesion severity, with markedly diminished numbers of T cells and nonlymphoid inflammatory cells, along with reduced cytokine mediators. The remaining inflammatory reactions had a change in the ratio of CD4 Foxp3(+) Treg to effector Th1 CD4 T cells in ocular lesions and lymphoid tissues, with Treg becoming predominant over the effectors. In addition, compared to those from control mice, Treg from Aza-treated mice showed more suppressor activity in vitro and expressed higher levels of activation molecules. Additionally, cells induced in vitro in the presence of Aza showed epigenetic differences in the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) of Foxp3 and were more stable when exposed to inflammatory cytokines. Our results show that therapy with Aza is an effective means of controlling a virus-induced inflammatory reaction and may act mainly by the effects on Treg.IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infection has been shown to initiate an inflammatory reaction in the cornea that leads to tissue damage and loss of vision. The inflammatory reaction is orchestrated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting Th1 cells, and regulatory T cells play a protective role. Hence, novel therapeutics that can rebalance the ratio of regulatory T cells to effectors are a relevant issue. This study opens up a new avenue in treating HSV-induced SK lesions by

  5. p38 MAPK-inhibited dendritic cells induce superior antitumor immune responses and overcome regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Siqing; Hong, Bangxing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Haiyan; Zheng, Yuhuan; Yang, Jing; Davis, Richard E.; Qian, Jianfei; Hou, Jian; Yi, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising method but so far has demonstrated limited clinical benefits. Regulatory T cells (Treg) represent a major obstacle to cancer immunotherapy approaches. Here we show that inhibiting p38 MAPK during DC differentiation enables DCs to activate tumor-specific effector T cells (Teff), inhibiting the conversion of Treg and compromising Treg inhibitory effects on Teff. Inhibition of p38 MAPK in DCs lowers expression of PPARγ, activating p50 and upregulation of OX40L expression in DCs. OX40L/OX40 interactions between DCs and Teff and/or Treg are critical for priming effective and therapeutic antitumor responses. Similarly, p38 MAPK inhibition also augments the T cell-stimulatory capacity of human monocyte-derived DCs in the presence of Treg. These findings contribute to ongoing efforts to improve DC-based immunotherapy in human cancers. PMID:24957461

  6. Requirements for efficient cell-type proportioning: regulatory timescales, stochasticity and lateral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, B; Kaneko, K

    2016-05-11

    The proper functioning of multicellular organisms requires the robust establishment of precise proportions between distinct cell types. This developmental differentiation process typically involves intracellular regulatory and stochastic mechanisms to generate cell-fate diversity as well as intercellular signaling mechanisms to coordinate cell-fate decisions at tissue level. We thus surmise that key insights about the developmental regulation of cell-type proportion can be captured by the modeling study of clustering dynamics in population of inhibitory-coupled noisy bistable systems. This general class of dynamical system is shown to exhibit a very stable two-cluster state, but also metastability, collective oscillations or noise-induced state hopping, which can prevent from timely and reliably reaching a robust and well-proportioned clustered state. To circumvent these obstacles or to avoid fine-tuning, we highlight a general strategy based on dual-time positive feedback loops, such as mediated through transcriptional versus epigenetic mechanisms, which improves proportion regulation by coordinating early and flexible lineage priming with late and firm commitment. This result sheds new light on the respective and cooperative roles of multiple regulatory feedback, stochasticity and lateral inhibition in developmental dynamics.

  7. Requirements for efficient cell-type proportioning: regulatory timescales, stochasticity and lateral inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuty, B.; Kaneko, K.

    2016-04-01

    The proper functioning of multicellular organisms requires the robust establishment of precise proportions between distinct cell types. This developmental differentiation process typically involves intracellular regulatory and stochastic mechanisms to generate cell-fate diversity as well as intercellular signaling mechanisms to coordinate cell-fate decisions at tissue level. We thus surmise that key insights about the developmental regulation of cell-type proportion can be captured by the modeling study of clustering dynamics in population of inhibitory-coupled noisy bistable systems. This general class of dynamical system is shown to exhibit a very stable two-cluster state, but also metastability, collective oscillations or noise-induced state hopping, which can prevent from timely and reliably reaching a robust and well-proportioned clustered state. To circumvent these obstacles or to avoid fine-tuning, we highlight a general strategy based on dual-time positive feedback loops, such as mediated through transcriptional versus epigenetic mechanisms, which improves proportion regulation by coordinating early and flexible lineage priming with late and firm commitment. This result sheds new light on the respective and cooperative roles of multiple regulatory feedback, stochasticity and lateral inhibition in developmental dynamics.

  8. Regulatory T Cell Modulation by CBP/EP300 Bromodomain Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Srimoyee; Taylor, Alexander; Chin, Melissa; Huang, Hon-Ren; Conery, Andrew R.; Mertz, Jennifer A.; Salmeron, Andres; Dakle, Pranal J.; Mele, Deanna; Cote, Alexandre; Jayaram, Hari; Setser, Jeremy W.; Poy, Florence; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; DeAlmeida-Nagata, Denise; Sandy, Peter; Hatton, Charlie; Romero, F. Anthony; Chiang, Eugene; Reimer, Thornik; Crawford, Terry; Pardo, Eneida; Watson, Venita G.; Tsui, Vickie; Cochran, Andrea G.; Zawadzke, Laura; Harmange, Jean-Christophe; Audia, James E.; Bryant, Barbara M.; Cummings, Richard T.; Magnuson, Steven R.; Grogan, Jane L.; Bellon, Steve F.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Sims, Robert J.; Lora, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent modification of histones is a fundamental mechanism of regulated gene expression in eukaryotes, and interpretation of histone modifications is an essential feature of epigenetic control. Bromodomains are specialized binding modules that interact with acetylated histones, linking chromatin recognition to gene transcription. Because of their ability to function in a domain-specific fashion, selective disruption of bromodomain:acetylated histone interactions with chemical probes serves as a powerful means for understanding biological processes regulated by these chromatin adaptors. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of potent and selective small molecule inhibitors for the bromodomains of CREBBP/EP300 that engage their target in cellular assays. We use these tools to demonstrate a critical role for CREBBP/EP300 bromodomains in regulatory T cell biology. Because regulatory T cell recruitment to tumors is a major mechanism of immune evasion by cancer cells, our data highlight the importance of CREBBP/EP300 bromodomain inhibition as a novel, small molecule-based approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27056325

  9. Tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells inhibit endogenous cytotoxic T cell responses to lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Anusha-Preethi; Johansson, Magnus; Ruffell, Brian; Beltran, Adam; Lau, Jonathan; Jablons, David M.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Immune cells comprise a substantial proportion of the tumor mass in human non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), but the precise composition and significance of this infiltration is unclear. Herein we examined immune complexity of human NSCLC as well as NSCLC developing in CC10-TAg transgenic mice, and revealed that CD4+ T lymphocytes represent the dominant population of CD45+ immune cells, and relative to normal lung tissue, CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly increased as a proportion of total CD4+ cells. To assess the functional significance of increased Treg cells, we evaluated CD8+ T cell-deficient/CC10-TAg mice and revealed that CD8+ T cells significantly controlled tumor growth with anti-tumor activity that was partially repressed by Treg cells. However, while treatment with anti-CD25 depleting mAb as monotherapy preferentially depleted Tregs and improved CD8+ T cell-mediated control of tumor progression during early tumor development, similar monotherapy was ineffective at later stages. Since mice bearing early NSCLC treated with anti-CD25 mAb exhibited increased tumor cell death associated with infiltration by CD8+ T cells expressing elevated levels of granzyme A, granzyme B, perforin and interferon-γ, we therefore evaluated carboplatin combination therapy resulting in a significantly extended survival beyond that observed with chemotherapy alone, indicating that Treg depletion in combination with cytotoxic therapy may be beneficial as a treatment strategy for advanced NSCLC. PMID:23851682

  10. Regulatory T Cells from Colon Cancer Patients Inhibit Effector T-cell Migration through an Adenosine-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Patrik; Stenstad, Hanna; Langenes, Veronica; Ahlmanner, Filip; Theander, Lisa; Ndah, Tapuka Gordon; Fredin, Kamilla; Börjesson, Lars; Gustavsson, Bengt; Bastid, Jérémy; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne

    2016-03-01

    T cell-mediated immunity is a major component of antitumor immunity. In order to be efficient, effector T cells must leave the circulation and enter into the tumor tissue. Regulatory T cells (Treg) from gastric cancer patients, but not from healthy volunteers, potently inhibit migration of conventional T cells through activated endothelium. In this study, we compared T cells from colon cancer patients and healthy donors to determine the mechanisms used by Tregs from cancer patients to inhibit conventional T-cell migration. Our results showed that circulating Tregs from cancer patients expressed high levels of CD39, an ectoenzyme mediating hydrolysis of ATP to AMP, as a rate-determining first step in the generation of immunosuppressive adenosine. Tumor-associated Tregs expressed even more CD39, and we therefore examined the importance of adenosine in Treg-mediated inhibition of T-cell transendothelial migration in vitro. Exogenous adenosine significantly reduced migration of conventional T cells from healthy volunteers, and blocking either adenosine receptors or CD39 enzymatic activity during transmigration restored the ability of conventional T cells from cancer patients to migrate. Adenosine did not directly affect T cells or endothelial cells, but reduced the ability of monocytes to activate the endothelium. Taken together, our results indicate that Treg-derived adenosine acts on monocytes and contributes to reduced transendothelial migration of effector T cells into tumors. This effect of Tregs is specific for cancer patients, and our results indicate that Tregs may affect not only T-cell effector functions but also their migration into tumors.

  11. Regulatory T-Cell Augmentation or Interleukin-17 Inhibition Prevents Calcineurin Inhibitor-Induced Hypertension in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chiasson, Valorie L; Pakanati, Abhinandan R; Hernandez, Marcos; Young, Kristina J; Bounds, Kelsey R; Mitchell, Brett M

    2017-07-01

    The immunosuppressive calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus alter T-cell subsets and can cause hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and renal toxicity. We and others have reported that cyclosporine A and tacrolimus decrease anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells and increase proinflammatory interleukin-17-producing T cells; therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of these effects using noncellular therapies would prevent the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and renal glomerular injury induced by calcineurin inhibitor therapy. Daily treatment of mice with cyclosporine A or tacrolimus for 1 week significantly decreased CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in the spleen and lymph nodes, as well as induced hypertension, vascular injury and dysfunction, and glomerular mesangial expansion in mice. Daily cotreatment with all-trans retinoic acid reported to increase regulatory T cells and decrease interleukin-17-producing T cells, prevented all of the detrimental effects of cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. All-trans retinoic acid also increased regulatory T cells and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in genetically modified mice that phenocopy calcineurin inhibitor-treated mice (FKBP12-Tie2 knockout). Treatment with an interleukin-17-neutralizing antibody also increased regulatory T-cell levels and prevented the hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and glomerular injury in cyclosporine A-treated and tacrolimus-treated mice and FKBP12-Tie2 knockout mice, whereas an isotype control had no effect. Augmenting regulatory T cells and inhibiting interleukin-17 signaling using noncellular therapies prevents the cardiovascular and renal toxicity of calcineurin inhibitors in mice. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Insulin inhibits IL-10-mediated regulatory T cell function: implications for obesity.

    PubMed

    Han, Jonathan M; Patterson, Scott J; Speck, Madeleine; Ehses, Jan A; Levings, Megan K

    2014-01-15

    Chronic inflammation is known to promote metabolic dysregulation in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Although the precise origin of the unchecked inflammatory response in obesity is unclear, it is known that overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells affects metabolism. For example, TNF-α contributes to the inability of cells to respond to insulin and to the increase in levels of insulin. Whether this hyperinsulinemia itself is part of a feedback loop that affects the progression of chronic adipose inflammation is unknown. In this article, we show that regulatory T cells (Tregs) express the insulin receptor, and that high levels of insulin impair the ability of Tregs to suppress inflammatory responses via effects on the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. Insulin activated AKT signaling in Tregs, leading to inhibition of both IL-10 production and the ability of Tregs to suppress the production of TNF-α by macrophages in a contact-independent manner. The effect of insulin on Treg suppression was limited to IL-10 production and it did not alter the expression of other proteins associated with Treg function, including CTLA-4, CD39, and TGF-β. In a model of diet-induced obesity, Tregs from the visceral adipose tissue of hyperinsulinemic, obese mice showed a similar specific decrease in IL-10 production, as well as a parallel increase in production of IFN-γ. These data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of obesity-associated inflammation via a previously unknown effect of insulin on the IL-10-mediated function of Tregs.

  13. Human Prostate Tumor Antigen-Specific CD8+ Regulatory T Cells are Inhibited by CTLA-4 or IL-35 Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Brian M.; Jankowska-Gan, Ewa; Becker, Jordan T.; Vignali, Dario A.A.; Burlingham, William J.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells play important roles in cancer development and progression by limiting the generation of innate and adaptive anti-tumor immunity. We hypothesized that in addition to natural CD4+CD25+ Tregs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, tumor antigen-specific regulatory T cells interfere with the detection of anti-tumor immunity following immunotherapy. Using samples from prostate cancer patients immunized with a DNA vaccine encoding prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and a trans-vivo delayed type hypersensitivity (tvDTH) assay, we found that the detection of PAP-specific effector responses following immunization was prevented by the activity of PAP-specific regulatory cells. These regulatory cells were CD8+CTLA-4+, and their suppression was relieved by blockade of CTLA-4, but not IL-10 or TGF-β. Moreover, antigen-specific CD8+ regulatory T cells were detected prior to immunization in the absence of PAP-specific effector responses. These PAP-specific CD8+CTLA-4+ suppressor T cells expressed IL-35, which was decreased following blockade of CTLA-4, and inhibition of either CTLA-4 or IL-35 reversed PAP-specific suppression of tvDTH response. PAP-specific CD8+CTLA-4+ T cells also suppressed T-cell proliferation in an IL-35-dependent, contact-independent fashion. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel population of CD8+CTLA-4+ IL-35-secreting tumor antigen-specific regulatory T cells arise spontaneously in some prostate cancer patients, persist during immunization, and can prevent the detection of antigen-specific effector responses by an IL-35-dependent mechanism. PMID:23152566

  14. IL-21 restricts T follicular regulatory T cell proliferation through Bcl-6 mediated inhibition of responsiveness to IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Jandl, Christoph; Liu, Sue M.; Cañete, Pablo F.; Warren, Joanna; Hughes, William E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Webster, Kylie; Craig, Maria E.; Uzel, Gulbu; Dent, Alexander; Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Sprent, Jonathan; King, Cecile

    2017-01-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells control the magnitude and specificity of the germinal centre reaction, but how regulation is contained to ensure generation of high-affinity antibody is unknown. Here we show that this balance is maintained by the reciprocal influence of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. The number of IL-2-dependent FoxP3+ regulatory T cells is increased in the peripheral blood of human patients with loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R). In mice, IL-21:IL-21R interactions influence the phenotype of T follicular cells, reducing the expression of CXCR4 and inhibiting the expansion of Tfr cells after T-cell-dependent immunization. The negative effect of IL-21 on Tfr cells in mice is cell intrinsic and associated with decreased expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25). Bcl-6, expressed in abundance in Tfr cells, inhibits CD25 expression and IL-21-mediated inhibition of CD25 is Bcl-6 dependent. These findings identify a mechanism by which IL-21 reinforces humoral immunity by restricting Tfr cell proliferation. PMID:28303891

  15. IL-21 restricts T follicular regulatory T cell proliferation through Bcl-6 mediated inhibition of responsiveness to IL-2.

    PubMed

    Jandl, Christoph; Liu, Sue M; Cañete, Pablo F; Warren, Joanna; Hughes, William E; Vogelzang, Alexis; Webster, Kylie; Craig, Maria E; Uzel, Gulbu; Dent, Alexander; Stepensky, Polina; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Sprent, Jonathan; King, Cecile

    2017-03-17

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells control the magnitude and specificity of the germinal centre reaction, but how regulation is contained to ensure generation of high-affinity antibody is unknown. Here we show that this balance is maintained by the reciprocal influence of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. The number of IL-2-dependent FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells is increased in the peripheral blood of human patients with loss-of-function mutations in the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R). In mice, IL-21:IL-21R interactions influence the phenotype of T follicular cells, reducing the expression of CXCR4 and inhibiting the expansion of Tfr cells after T-cell-dependent immunization. The negative effect of IL-21 on Tfr cells in mice is cell intrinsic and associated with decreased expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25). Bcl-6, expressed in abundance in Tfr cells, inhibits CD25 expression and IL-21-mediated inhibition of CD25 is Bcl-6 dependent. These findings identify a mechanism by which IL-21 reinforces humoral immunity by restricting Tfr cell proliferation.

  16. Lactose inhibits regulatory T-cell-mediated suppression of effector T-cell interferon-γ and IL-17 production.

    PubMed

    Paasela, Monika; Kolho, Kaija-Leena; Vaarala, Outi; Honkanen, Jarno

    2014-12-14

    Our interest in lactose as an immunomodulatory molecule results from studies showing that lactose binds to galectin-9, which has been shown to have various regulatory functions in the immune system including regulation of T-cell responses. Impaired regulation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 type immune responses and dysfunction of regulatory T cells (Treg) have been implicated in many human immune-mediated diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of lactose on immune regulation using co-cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived Treg and effector T cells (Teff) obtained from twenty healthy adults. Treg, i.e. CD4+CD25+CD127-, were isolated from PBMC by immunomagnetic separation. The fraction of CD4+CD127- cells that was depleted of CD25+ cells was used as Teff. Treg and Teff at a ratio 1:5 were activated and the effects of lactose on the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 were analysed using ELISA for protein and quantitative RT-PCR for mRNA. Treg down-regulated the secretion of both IFN-γ (8.8-3.9 ng/ml, n 20, P= 0.003) and IL-17 (0.83-0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.04) in co-cultures, while in the presence of lactose the levels of secreted IFN-γ and IL-17 remained high and no down-regulation was observed (16.4 v. 3.99 ng/ml, n 20, P< 0.0001, and 0.74 v. 0.64 ng/ml, n 15, P= 0.005, respectively). We showed that lactose inhibits human Treg-mediated suppression of Th1 and Th17 immune responses in vitro.

  17. [Regulatory T cells].

    PubMed

    Marinić, Igor; Gagro, Alenka; Rabatić, Sabina

    2006-12-01

    Regulatory T-cells are a subset of T cells that have beene extensively studied in modern immunology. They are important for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, and have an important role in various clinical conditions such as allergy, autoimmune disorders, tumors, infections, and in transplant medicine. Basically, this population has a suppressive effect on the neighboring immune cells, thus contributing to the local modulation and control of immune response. There are two main populations of regulatory T cells - natural regulatory T cells, which form a distinct cellular lineage, develop in thymus and perform their modulatory action through direct intercellular contact, along with the secreted cytokines; and inducible regulatory T cells, which develop in the periphery after contact with the antigen that is presented on the antigen presenting cell, and their primary mode of action is through the interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-alpha) cytokines. Natural regulatory T cells are activated through T cell receptor after contact with specific antigen and inhibit proliferation of other T cells in an antigen independent manner. One of the major difficulties in the research of regulatory T cells is the lack of specific molecular markers that would identify these cells. Natural regulatory T cells constitutively express surface molecule CD25, but many other surface and intracellular molecules (HLA-DR, CD122, CD45RO, CD62, CTLA-4, GITR, PD-1, Notch, FOXP3, etc.) are being investigated for further phenotypic characterization of these cells. Because regulatory T cells have an important role in establishing peripheral tolerance, their importance is manifested in a number of clinical conditions. In the IPEX syndrome (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy and enteropathy, X-linked), which is caused by mutation in Foxp3 gene that influences the development and function of regulatory T cells, patients develop severe autoimmune reactions that

  18. Icilin inhibits E2F1-mediated cell cycle regulatory programs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghoon; Chun, Jung Nyeo; Kim, Su-Hwa; So, Insuk; Jeon, Ju-Hong

    2013-11-29

    Aberrant expression of cell cycle regulators have been implicated in prostate cancer development and progression. Therefore, understanding transcriptional networks controlling the cell cycle remain a challenge in the development of prostate cancer treatment. In this study, we found that icilin, a super-cooling agent, down-regulated the expression of cell cycle signature genes and caused G1 arrest in PC-3 prostate cancer cells. With reverse-engineering and an unbiased interrogation of a prostate cancer-specific regulatory network, master regulator analysis discovered that icilin affected cell cycle-related transcriptional modules and identified E2F1 transcription factor as a target master regulator of icilin. Experimental analyses confirmed that icilin reduced the activity and expression levels of E2F1. These results demonstrated that icilin inactivates a small regulatory module controlling the cell cycle in prostate cancer cells. Our study might provide insight into the development of cell cycle-targeted cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring the frequency and function of regulatory T cells and summary of the approaches currently used to inhibit regulatory T cells in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Camisaschi, Chiara; Tazzari, Marcella; Rivoltini, Licia; Castelli, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T lymphocytes that in humans represent less than the 10 % of circulating CD4(+) T cells. Treg are specialized in the inhibition of the immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. Several lines of evidence clearly documented the role of Treg in restraining antitumor immune responses. For this reason, antitumor immunotherapy approaches have been recently associated with drug treatments aimed at depleting Treg or blocking their functions. A summary of the currently used in vivo approaches to limit Treg expansion in cancer patients is here provided.A comprehensive phenotypic and functional monitoring of Treg is crucial for the precise assessment of the effects that these different drug treatments exert on Treg. In this chapter, we will provide guidelines for an accurate ex vivo identification of human Treg. Due to the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity, intrinsic plasticity, and the lack of a unique marker exclusively expressed by human Treg, the clear-cut identification of this T cell subset requires the expert usage of multiparametric flow cytometry analysis (FACS). In this view, a combination of phenotypic and functional assessment of Treg is mandatory. In this chapter, we will describe the most reliable methods to identify and monitor the modulation of human Treg in patients undergoing immunological or drug-based treatments. Protocols to measure ex vivo the suppressive functions of Treg are also provided.

  20. Adaptive immunity to leukemia is inhibited by cross-reactive induced regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Manlove, Luke S.; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Williams, Richard T.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific antigen that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL+ leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL+ leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC-II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4+ T cells. Naïve mice harbored a small population of BCR-ABL-specific T cells that proliferated modestly upon immunization. The small number of naïve BCR-ABL specific T cells was due to negative selection in the thymus, which depleted BCR-ABL specific T cells. Consistent with this observation, we saw that BCR-ABL specific T cells were cross-reactive with an endogenous peptide derived from ABL. Despite this cross-reactivity, the remaining population of BCR-ABL reactive T cells proliferated upon immunization with the BCR-ABL fusion peptide and adjuvant. In response to BCR-ABL+ leukemia, BCR-ABL specific T cells proliferated and converted into regulatory T cells (Treg cells), a process that was dependent on cross-reactivity with self-antigen, TGFβ1, and MHC-II antigen presentation by leukemic cells. Treg cells were critical for leukemia progression in C57Bl/6 mice, as transient Treg cell ablation led to extended survival of leukemic mice. Thus, BCR-ABL+ leukemia actively suppresses anti-leukemia immune responses by converting cross-reactive leukemia-specific T cells into Treg cells. PMID:26378075

  1. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  2. Inhibition of cell adhesion by xARVCF indicates a regulatory function at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Reintsch, Wolfgang E; Mandato, Craig A; McCrea, Pierre D; Fagotto, François

    2008-09-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of cadherins is thought to regulate the strength and dynamics of cell-cell adhesion. Part of its regulatory activity has been attributed to a membrane-proximal region, the juxtamembrane domain (JMD), and its interaction with members of the p120 catenin subfamily. We show that titration of xARVCF, a member of this family, to the plasma membrane disrupts adhesion in the early embryo. Adhesion can be restored by coexpression of constitutively active Rac, suggesting that intracellular signaling is the primary cause in the loss of adhesion phenotype. Our observations suggest that the recruitment of p120 type catenins to the plasma membrane by the cadherin cytoplasmic tail may create protein complexes, which actively modulate the adhesion "status" of embryonic cells.

  3. Forkhead transcription factor 1 inhibits endometrial cancer cell proliferation via sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Zhang, Lili; Sun, Hengzi; Lv, Qingtao; Qiu, Chunping; Che, Xiaoxia; Liu, Zhiming; Jiang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with endometrial cancer (EC) has increased in recent years. Regarded as a tumor suppressor, forkhead transcription factor 1 (FOXO1) has various biological activities and participates in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and differentiation. Notably, FOXO1 also functions in the regulation of lipogenesis and energy metabolism. Lipogenesis is a feature of cancer and is upregulated in EC. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) is a transcription factor that is also able to regulate lipogenesis. Increased expression of SREBP1 is directly correlated with malignant transformation of tumors. A previous study demonstrated that SREBP1 was highly expressed in EC and directly resulted in tumorigenesis. However, the association between FOXO1 and SREBP1 in EC is not clear. In the present study, lentiviruses overexpressing FOXO1 were used in cell transfection and transduction. Cell viability assays demonstrated that the overexpression of FOXO1 was able to suppress cell proliferation significantly in Ishikawa and AN3 CA cell lines. In addition, FOXO1 overexpression significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion ability in vitro. In xenograft models, overexpression of FOXO1 suppressed cell tumorigenesis, and western blot analysis demonstrated that SREBP1 expression was markedly reduced in the FOXO1-overexpressing cells. It may therefore be concluded that FOXO1 is able to inhibit the proliferative capacity of cells in vitro and in vivo, in addition to the migratory and invasive capacities in vitro by directly targeting SREBP1. PMID:28356952

  4. Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claire; Powrie, Fiona

    2004-08-01

    Regulatory T (TR) cells are a subset of T cells that function to control immune responses. Different populations of TR cells have been described, including thymically derived CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells and Tr1 cells induced in the periphery through exposure to antigen. A transcription factor, Foxp3, has been identified that is essential for CD4(+)CD25+ TR cell development and function. There is now evidence that transforming growth factor-beta might play a role in this pathway. CD4(+)CD25+ TR cells proliferate extensively in vivo in an antigen-specific manner, and can respond to both self and foreign peptides. By suppressing excessive immune responses, TR cells play a key role in the maintenance of self-tolerance, thus preventing autoimmune disease, as well as inhibiting harmful inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease.

  5. Low-dose rapamycin treatment increases the ability of human regulatory T cells to inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hester, J; Schiopu, A; Nadig, S N; Wood, K J

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are currently being tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in cell and solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin has been shown to preferentially promote T(reg) expansion. Here, we hypothesized that adjunctive rapamycin therapy might potentiate the ability of ex vivo expanded human T(reg) to inhibit vascular allograft rejection in a humanized mouse model of arterial transplantation. We studied the influence of combined treatment with low-dose rapamycin and subtherapeutic T(reg) numbers on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) in human arterial grafts transplanted into immunodeficient BALB/cRag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) mice reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In addition, we assessed the effects of the treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of naïve/effector T cells. The combined therapy efficiently suppressed T-cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Neointima formation in the human arterial allografts was potently inhibited compared with each treatment alone. Interestingly, CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T lymphocytes were sensitive to T(reg) and rapamycin-induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data support the concept that rapamycin can be used as an adjunctive therapy to improve efficacy of T(reg)-based immunosuppressive protocols in clinical practice. By inhibiting TA, T(reg) and rapamycin may prevent chronic transplant dysfunction and improve long-term allograft survival.

  6. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Methionine enkephalin (MENK) inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. CD56brightCD16- NK Cells Produce Adenosine through a CD38-Mediated Pathway and Act as Regulatory Cells Inhibiting Autologous CD4+ T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Chiesa, Sabrina; Imperatori, Andrea; Zanellato, Silvia; Mortara, Lorenzo; Gattorno, Marco; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies suggested that human CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells may play a role in the regulation of the immune response. Since the mechanism(s) involved have not yet been elucidated, in the present study we have investigated the role of nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes that regulate the extracellular balance of nucleotides/nucleosides and produce the immunosuppressive molecule adenosine (ADO). Peripheral blood CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells expressed similar levels of CD38. CD39, CD73, and CD157 expression was higher in CD56(bright)CD16(-) than in CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD57 was mostly expressed by CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD203a/PC-1 expression was restricted to CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells produce ADO and inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such inhibition was 1) reverted pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a CD38 inhibitor and 2) increased pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a nucleoside transporter inhibitor, which increase extracellular ADO concentration. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from the synovial fluid of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients failed to inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such functional impairment could be related to 1) the observed reduced CD38/CD73 expression, 2) a peculiar ADO production kinetics, and 3) a different expression of ADO receptors. In contrast, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from inflammatory pleural effusions display a potent regulatory activity. In conclusion, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells act as "regulatory cells" through ADO produced by an ectoenzymes network, with a pivotal role of CD38. This function may be relevant for the modulation of the immune response in physiological and pathological conditions, and it could be impaired during autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.

  9. Modulating DNA methylation in activated CD8+ T cells inhibits regulatory T cell-induced binding of Foxp3 to the CD8+ T Cell IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle M; Akaronu, Nnenna; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Hood, Sylvia F; Fogle, Jonathan E

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) activated during the course of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection suppress CD8(+) CTL function in a TGF-β-dependent fashion, inhibiting IFN-γ and IL-2 production and inducing G1 cell-cycle arrest. In this article, we describe the molecular events occurring at the IL-2 promoter leading to suppression of IL-2 production. These experiments demonstrate that Foxp3 induced by lentivirus-activated Tregs in the CD8(+) target cells binds to the IL-2 promoter, actively repressing IL-2 transcription. We further demonstrate that the chronic activation of CD8(+) T cells during FIV infection results in chromatin remodeling at the IL-2 promoter, specifically, demethylation of CpG residues. These DNA modifications occur during active transcription and translation of IL-2; however, these changes render the IL-2 promoter permissive to Foxp3-induced transcriptional repression. These data help explain, in part, the seemingly paradoxical observations that CD8(+) T cells displaying an activation phenotype exhibit altered antiviral function. Further, we demonstrate that blocking demethylation of CpG residues at the IL-2 promoter inhibits Foxp3 binding, suggesting a potential mechanism for rescue and/or reactivation of CD8(+) T cells. Using the FIV model for lentiviral persistence, these studies provide a framework for understanding how immune activation combined with Treg-mediated suppression may affect CD8(+) T cell IL-2 transcription, maturation, and antiviral function.

  10. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation in vivo and incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine in vitro after follicle regulatory protein administration

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, K.E.; Montz, F.J.; Scott, L.; Condon, S.; Fujimori, K.; diZerega, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Follicle regulatory protein immunoreactivity and biologic activity were measured in ascites from a patient with juvenile granulosa cell tumor. Microscopic examination of immunohistochemical staining of a juvenile granulosa cell tumor with anti-follicle regulatory protein antisera showed homogeneous cytosolic expression of follicle regulatory protein throughout the tumor. Tumor cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. Partially purified follicle regulatory protein (50 micrograms/day) was then injected daily for 10 days, or for 25 days once the tumor became palpable. Treatment with follicle regulatory protein significantly slowed the rate of tumor growth with both treatments. To test the tissue specificity of the effect, a metastatic, well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma was also grown in nude mice. Follicle regulatory protein treatment did not alter the rate of tumor growth. An in vitro clonigenic assay confirmed these in vivo results. Partially purified follicle regulatory protein had a biphasic effect on the proliferation of juvenile granulosa tumor cell but did not affect the proliferation of endometrial adenocarcinoma cells. Clonigenic assays were performed on five ovarian adenocarcinomas passaged in vitro, and these tumor cells exhibited a biphasic response to follicle regulatory protein. Immunoneutralization studies showed that this biphasic response was due to impurities in the follicle regulatory protein preparations. The longer the exposure of the tumor cells to follicle regulatory protein, the greater the degree of inhibition of proliferation. In summary, administration of follicle regulatory protein slowed tumor growth through a direct effect on the tumor cell rather than an indirect effect on the hormonal or immune status of the host.

  11. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-04-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4(+) T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. © 2014 Bose Institute.

  12. Schisandrin B inhibits Th1/Th17 differentiation and promotes regulatory T cell expansion in mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaoyang; Guo, Min; Song, Guohua; Gao, Jiping; Zhang, Yinhong; Jing, Zhijie; Liu, Tianfu; Dong, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch-B), the most abundant active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis, has been proposed to have antioxidant, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Sch-B on differentiation of T helper cells (Th). Using mouse splenic lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro and ex vivo as inflammation models, we found that Sch-B significantly inhibited secretion of Th1 and Th17 related cytokines, such as IFN-γ and IL-17. In addition, we found that Sch-B suppressed the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into Th1 and Th17 cells, while promoted their differentiation into the regulatory T cells (Treg) in vitro. We further found that Sch-B suppressed transcription of Th1-related T-box transcription factor, T-bet, and Th17-related transcription factor, retinoid related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), while enhanced transcription of Treg-related transcription factor forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) in naive CD4+ T cells under Th cell polarization conditions. Furthermore, the effect of Sch-B on the T cell differentiation was abrogated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin. Taken together, we conclude that Sch-B can modulate differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into specific lineages of effector cells, which may have potential benefits for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection inhibits a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase and reduces T cell activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H.; Xiang, Jinhua; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Schmidt, Warren N.; Kaufman, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    Among human RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unusual in that it causes persistent infection in the majority of infected people. To establish persistence, HCV evades host innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies identified virus genome-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in HCV-infected cells; however, their biological significance during human HCV infection is unknown. One such vsRNA arising from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 coding region impairs T cell receptor (TCR) signaling by reducing expression of a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase (PTPRE) in vitro. Since TCR signaling is a critical first step in T cell activation, differentiation, and effector function, its inhibition may contribute towards HCV persistence in vivo. The effect of HCV infection on PTPRE expression in vivo has not been examined. Here, we found that PTPRE levels were significantly reduced in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from HCV-infected humans compared to uninfected controls. Loss of PTPRE expression impaired antigen-specific TCR signaling, and curative HCV therapy restored PTPRE expression in PBMCs; restoring antigen-specific TCR signaling defects. The extent of PTPRE expression correlated with the amount of sequence complementarity between the HCV E2 vsRNA and the PTPRE 3’ UTR target sites. Transfection of a hepatocyte cell line with full-length HCV RNA or with synthetic HCV vsRNA duplexes inhibited PTPRE expression, recapitulating the in vivo observation. Together, these data demonstrate that HCV infection reduces PTPRE expression in the liver and PBMCs of infected humans, and suggest that the HCV E2 vsRNA is a novel viral factor that may contribute towards viral persistence. PMID:28235043

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection inhibits a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase and reduces T cell activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H; Xiang, Jinhua; Mathahs, M Meleah; Schmidt, Warren N; Kaufman, Thomas M; Stapleton, Jack T

    2017-02-24

    Among human RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unusual in that it causes persistent infection in the majority of infected people. To establish persistence, HCV evades host innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies identified virus genome-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in HCV-infected cells; however, their biological significance during human HCV infection is unknown. One such vsRNA arising from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 coding region impairs T cell receptor (TCR) signaling by reducing expression of a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase (PTPRE) in vitro. Since TCR signaling is a critical first step in T cell activation, differentiation, and effector function, its inhibition may contribute towards HCV persistence in vivo. The effect of HCV infection on PTPRE expression in vivo has not been examined. Here, we found that PTPRE levels were significantly reduced in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from HCV-infected humans compared to uninfected controls. Loss of PTPRE expression impaired antigen-specific TCR signaling, and curative HCV therapy restored PTPRE expression in PBMCs; restoring antigen-specific TCR signaling defects. The extent of PTPRE expression correlated with the amount of sequence complementarity between the HCV E2 vsRNA and the PTPRE 3' UTR target sites. Transfection of a hepatocyte cell line with full-length HCV RNA or with synthetic HCV vsRNA duplexes inhibited PTPRE expression, recapitulating the in vivo observation. Together, these data demonstrate that HCV infection reduces PTPRE expression in the liver and PBMCs of infected humans, and suggest that the HCV E2 vsRNA is a novel viral factor that may contribute towards viral persistence.

  15. Anti-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-04-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells-termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)-that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells, including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), tryptophan 2,6-dioxygenase (TDO), programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), and forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). These proteins are highly expressed in professional antigen-presenting cells under various physiological conditions, such as inflammation and stress. Therefore, self-reactive T cells that recognize such targets may be activated due to the strong activation signal given by their cognate targets. The current review describes the existing knowledge regarding these self-reactive anti-Tregs, providing examples of antigen-specific anti-Tregs and discussing their possible roles in immune homeostasis and their potential future clinical applications.

  16. Suppression of complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor in vascular endothelial activation by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 action

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haimou; Qin, Gangjian; Liang, Gang; Li, Jinan; Chiu, Isaac; Barrington, Robert A.; Liu, Dongxu . E-mail: dxliu001@yahoo.com

    2007-07-13

    Increased expression of adhesion molecules by activated endothelium is a critical feature of vascular inflammation associated with the several diseases such as endotoxin shock and sepsis/septic shock. Our data demonstrated complement regulatory protein C1 inhibitor (C1INH) prevents endothelial cell injury. We hypothesized that C1INH has the ability of an anti-endothelial activation associated with suppression of expression of adhesion molecule(s). C1INH blocked leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayer in both static assay and flow conditions. In inflammatory condition, C1INH reduced vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression associated with its cytoplasmic mRNA destabilization and nuclear transcription level. Studies exploring the underlying mechanism of C1INH-mediated suppression in VCAM-1 expression were related to reduction of NF-{kappa}B activation and nuclear translocation in an I{kappa}B{alpha}-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects were associated with reduction of inhibitor I{kappa}B kinase activity and stabilization of the NF-{kappa}B inhibitor I{kappa}B. These findings indicate a novel role for C1INH in inhibition of vascular endothelial activation. These observations could provide the basis for new therapeutic application of C1INH to target inflammatory processes in different pathologic situations.

  17. Targeting regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Curiel, Tyler; Faget, Julien; Manuel, Manuarii; Caux, Christophe; Zou, Weiping

    2012-03-01

    Cancers express tumor-associated antigens that should elicit immune response to antagonize the tumor growth, but spontaneous immune rejection of established cancer is rare, suggesting an immunosuppressive environment hindering host antitumor immunity. Among the specific and active tumor-mediated mechanisms, CD4(+)CD25(high) T regulatory cells (Treg) are important mediators of active immune evasion in cancer. In this review, we will discuss Treg subpopulations and the mechanisms of their suppressive functions. Treg depletion improves endogenous antitumor immunity and the efficacy of active immunotherapy in animal models for cancer, suggesting that inhibiting Treg function could also improve the limited successes of human cancer immunotherapy. We will also discuss specific strategies for devising effective cancer immunotherapy targeting Treg.

  18. Endosulfan inhibiting the meiosis process via depressing expressions of regulatory factors and causing cell cycle arrest in spermatogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang-Zi; Zhang, Lian-Shuang; Wei, Jia-Liu; Ren, Li-Hua; Zhang, Jin; Jing, Li; Yang, Man; Wang, Ji; Sun, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Qing

    2016-10-01

    Endosulfan is a persistent organic pollutant and widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. It is present in air, water, and soil worldwide; therefore, it is a health risk affecting especially the reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of endosulfan in the reproductive system. To investigate the effect of endosulfan on meiosis process, 32 rats were divided into four groups, treated with 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg/day endosulfan, respectively, and sacrificed after the 21 days of treatments. Results show that endosulfan caused the reductions in sperm concentration and motility rate, which resulted into an increased in sperm abnormality rate; further, endosulfan induced downregulation of spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (Sohlh1) which controls the switch on meiosis in mammals, as well cyclin A1, cyclin-dependent kinases 1 (CDK1), and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2). In vitro, endosulfan induced G2/M phase arrest in the spermatogenic cell cycle and caused proliferation inhibition. Moreover, endosulfan induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in vivo and vitro. The results suggested that endosulfan could inhibit the start of meiosis by downregulating the expression of Sohlh1 and induce G2/M phase arrest of cell cycle by decreasing the expression of cyclin A1, CDK1, and CDK2 via oxidative damage, which inhibits the meiosis process, and therefore decrease the amount of sperm.

  19. Curcumin Inhibits CD4+ T Cell Activation, but Augments CD69 Expression and TGF-β1-Mediated Generation of Regulatory T Cells at Late Phase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Girak; Jang, Mi Seon; Son, Young Min; Seo, Min Ji; Ji, Sang Yun; Han, Seung Hyun; Jung, In Duk; Park, Yeong-Min; Jung, Hyun Jung; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2013-01-01

    Background Curcumin is a promising candidate for a natural medicinal agent to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. Although CD4+ T cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, whether curcumin directly regulates CD4+ T cells has not been definitively established. Here, we showed curcumin-mediated regulation of CD2/CD3/CD28-initiated CD4+ T cell activation in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Primary human CD4+ T cells were stimulated with anti-CD2/CD3/CD28 antibody-coated beads as an in vitro surrogate system for antigen presenting cell-T cell interaction and treated with curcumin. We found that curcumin suppresses CD2/CD3/CD28-initiated CD4+ T cell activation by inhibiting cell proliferation, differentiation and cytokine production. On the other hand, curcumin attenuated the spontaneous decline of CD69 expression and indirectly increased expression of CCR7, L-selectin and Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) at the late phase of CD2/CD3/CD28-initiated T cell activation. Curcumin-mediated up-regulation of CD69 at late phase was associated with ERK1/2 signaling. Furthermore, TGF-β1 was involved in curcumin-mediated regulation of T cell activation and late-phase generation of regulatory T cells. Conclusions/Significance Curcumin not merely blocks, but regulates CD2/CD3/CD28-initiated CD4+ T cell activation by augmenting CD69, CCR7, L-selectin and TGF-β1 expression followed by regulatory T cell generation. These results suggest that curcumin could directly reduce T cell-dependent inflammatory stress by modulating CD4+ T cell activation at multiple levels. PMID:23658623

  20. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  1. Sodium chloride inhibits the suppressive function of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amanda L.; Kitz, Alexandra; Wu, Chuan; Lowther, Daniel E.; Rodriguez, Donald M.; Vudattu, Nalini; Deng, Songyan; Herold, Kevan C.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Hafler, David A.

    2015-01-01

    FOXP3+ Tregs are central for the maintenance of self-tolerance and can be defective in autoimmunity. In multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes, dysfunctional self-tolerance is partially mediated by a population of IFNγ-secreting Tregs. It was previously reported that increased NaCl concentrations promote the induction of proinflammatory Th17 cells and that high-salt diets exacerbate experimental models of autoimmunity. Here, we have shown that increasing NaCl, either in vitro or in murine models via diet, markedly impairs Treg function. NaCl increased IFNγ secretion in Tregs, and reducing IFNγ — either by neutralization with anti-IFNγ antibodies or shRNA-mediated knockdown — restored suppressive activity in Tregs. The heightened IFNγ secretion and loss of Treg function were mediated by the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK1). A high-salt diet also impaired human Treg function and was associated with the induction of IFNγ-secreting Tregs in a xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease model and in adoptive transfer models of experimental colitis. Our results demonstrate a putative role for an environmental factor that promotes autoimmunity by inducing proinflammatory responses in CD4 effector cells and Treg pathways. PMID:26524592

  2. Sodium chloride inhibits the suppressive function of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Amanda L; Kitz, Alexandra; Wu, Chuan; Lowther, Daniel E; Rodriguez, Donald M; Vudattu, Nalini; Deng, Songyan; Herold, Kevan C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Hafler, David A

    2015-11-02

    FOXP3+ Tregs are central for the maintenance of self-tolerance and can be defective in autoimmunity. In multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes, dysfunctional self-tolerance is partially mediated by a population of IFNγ-secreting Tregs. It was previously reported that increased NaCl concentrations promote the induction of proinflammatory Th17 cells and that high-salt diets exacerbate experimental models of autoimmunity. Here, we have shown that increasing NaCl, either in vitro or in murine models via diet, markedly impairs Treg function. NaCl increased IFNγ secretion in Tregs, and reducing IFNγ - either by neutralization with anti-IFNγ antibodies or shRNA-mediated knockdown - restored suppressive activity in Tregs. The heightened IFNγ secretion and loss of Treg function were mediated by the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK1). A high-salt diet also impaired human Treg function and was associated with the induction of IFNγ-secreting Tregs in a xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease model and in adoptive transfer models of experimental colitis. Our results demonstrate a putative role for an environmental factor that promotes autoimmunity by inducing proinflammatory responses in CD4 effector cells and Treg pathways.

  3. Arsenic trioxide inhibits lung metastasis of mouse colon cancer via reducing the infiltration of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hu, Xiang; Xu, Yingxin; Liu, Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on the infiltration of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the local lung metastasis of mouse colon cancer in vivo and the regulation of Tregs in cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs) in vitro. A high Tregs infiltration mouse colon cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of CT26 murine colon carcinoma cells. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, low-dose As2O3 group, and high-dose As2O3 group. For in vitro studies, CIKs were treated with vehicle control or 0.1, 1, or 5 μM As2O3. The level of Tregs was detected via flow cytometry, Foxp3 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the level of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), and the cytotoxic activity of As2O3-treated CIKs was assessed through a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. Obvious lung metastasis was observed 3 days after CT26 murine colon carcinoma cell injection. The numbers of Tregs in the lungs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice were significantly higher than those of the normal group (p < 0.01). As2O3 treatment increased the mouse weight as well as reduced the number of metastatic lung nodules and the lung/body weight ratio (p < 0.01). Moreover, As2O3 treatment significantly reduced the Tregs proportion and the Foxp3 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in metastatic lung tissues (p < 0.01). In vitro, As2O3 significantly reduced the Tregs proportion and the Foxp3 mRNA levels (p < 0.01) and significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of CIKs and the IFN-γ levels in the supernatant of cultured CIKs (p < 0.01). As2O3 might inhibit lung metastasis of colon cancer by reducing the local infiltration of Tregs and increase the cytotoxic activity of CIKs by suppressing Tregs.

  4. Inhibition of miR301 enhances Akt-mediated cell proliferation by accumulation of PTEN in nucleus and its effects on cell-cycle regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mayur V.; Shareef, Ahmad; Likus, Wirginia; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Ghavami, Saeid; Łos, Marek J.

    2016-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) represent an innovative class of genes that act as regulators of gene expression. Recently, the aberrant expression of several miRs has been associated with different types of cancers. In this study, we show that miR301 inhibition influences PI3K-Akt pathway activity. Akt overexpression in MCF7 and MDAMB468 cells caused downregulation of miR301 expression. This effect was confirmed by co-transfection of miR301-modulators in the presence of Akt. Cells overexpressing miR301-inhibitor and Akt, exhibited increased migration and proliferation. Experimental results also confirmed PI3K, PTEN and FoxF2 as regulatory targets for miR301. Furthermore, Akt expression in conjunction with miR301-inhibitor increased nuclear accumulation of PTEN, thus preventing it from downregulating the PI3K-signalling. In summary, our data emphasize the importance of miR301 inhibition on PI3K-Akt pathway-mediated cellular functions. Hence, it opens new avenues for the development of new anti-cancer agents preferentially targeting PI3K-Akt pathway. PMID:26967567

  5. Prostaglandin E2 Suppresses Antifungal Immunity by Inhibiting Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Function and Interleukin-17 Expression in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Patricia A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Janelsins, Brian M.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Williamson, Peter R.; Datta, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in mucosal host defense through production of the signature cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to enhance IL-17 production by mature Th17 cells. However, when present during Th17 differentiation, we found that PGE2 inhibited the transcription factor IRF4 and suppressed production of IL-17 but not IL-22. We show that IRF4 was required for IL-17 expression but inhibited IL-22 expression, highlighting the potential for discordant regulation of these two cytokines in Th17 cells. The pathogenic fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans, produces PGE2 and we found that it uses PGE2- and IRF4-dependent mechanisms to specifically inhibit induction of IL-17 during Th17 differentiation. Blockade of host PGE2 during infection led to increased IL-17 production from CD4+T cells and increased survival of mice. These findings suggest that host- or pathogen-derived PGE2 can act directly on Th17 cells during differentiation to inhibit IL-17-dependent anti-microbial responses. PMID:22464170

  6. Insights into the mechanism of FTY720 and compatibility with regulatory T cells for the inhibition of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Patricia A; Ehrhardt, Michael J; Lees, Christopher J; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Serody, Jonathan S; Brinkmann, Volker; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-11-01

    The immunomodulator FTY720 (FTY) has been shown to be beneficial in experimental models of organ transplantation and autoimmunity. We show that FTY significantly inhibited but did not prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in lethally irradiated or nonirradiated allogeneic recipients. Although most studies implicate prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs as the primary mechanism of action, our data indicate that FTY effects on the host are more likely to be responsible for GVHD inhibition. FTY reduced splenic CD11c+ cells by 50%, and similarly reduced CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responder frequencies in the spleen early after transplantation. Imaging of GFP+ effectors indicated that FTY modified donor effector T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs, but did not uniformly trap T cells in lymph nodes or prevent early effector migration to GVHD parenchymal target organs. Administration of FTY only prior to transplantation inhibited GVHD, indicating that the primary function of FTY may be targeted to host cells. FTY was additive with regulatory T cells for GVHD inhibition. FTY slightly impaired but did not abrogate a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect against C1498, a myeloid leukemia. Our data further define the mechanisms of action and provide insight as to the potential clinical uses of FTY in allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients.

  7. JAK inhibition induces silencing of T Helper cytokine secretion and a profound reduction in T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Clodagh; Kordasti, Shahram; Seidl, Thomas; Perez Abellan, Pilar; Thomas, Nicholas S B; Harrison, Claire N; McLornan, Donal P; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2015-10-01

    CD4(+) T cells maintain cancer surveillance and immune tolerance. Chronic inflammation has been proposed as a driver of clonal evolution in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), suggesting that T cells play an important role in their pathogenesis. Treatment with JAK inhibitors (JAKi) results in improvements in MPN-associated constitutional symptoms as well as reductions in splenomegaly. However, effects of JAKi on T cells in MPN are not well established and the baseline immune signature remains unclear. We investigated the frequency and function of CD4(+) T cell subsets in 50 MPN patients at baseline as well as during treatment with either ruxolitinib or fedratinib in a subset. We show that CD4(+)  CD127(low)  CD25(high)  FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells are reduced in MPN patients compared to healthy controls and that this decrease is even more pronounced following JAKi therapy. Moreover, we show that after 6 months of treatment the number of T helper (Th)-17 cells increased. We also describe a functional 'silencing' of T helper cells both in vivo and in vitro and a blockade of pro-inflammatory cytokines from these cells. This profound effect of JAKi on T cell function may underlay augmented rates of atypical infections that have been reported with use of these drugs.

  8. Immunoglobulin E signal inhibition during allergen ingestion leads to reversal of established food allergy and induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Oliver T; Noval Rivas, Magali; Zhou, Joseph S; Logsdon, Stephanie L; Darling, Alanna R; Koleoglou, Kyle J; Roers, Axel; Houshyar, Hani; Crackower, Michael A; Chatila, Talal A; Oettgen, Hans C

    2014-07-17

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are known for triggering immediate hypersensitivity reactions such as food anaphylaxis. In this study, we tested whether they might additionally function to amplify nascent antibody and T helper 2 (Th2) cell-mediated responses to ingested proteins and whether blocking IgE would modify sensitization. By using mice harboring a disinhibited form of the IL-4 receptor, we developed an adjuvant-free model of peanut allergy. Mast cells and IgE were required for induction of antibody and Th2-cell-mediated responses to peanut ingestion and they impaired regulatory T (Treg) cell induction. Mast-cell-targeted genetic deletion of the FcεRI signaling kinase Syk or Syk blockade also prevented peanut sensitization. In mice with established allergy, Syk blockade facilitated desensitization and induction of Treg cells, which suppressed allergy when transferred to naive recipients. Our study suggests a key role for IgE in driving Th2 cell and IgE responses while suppressing Treg cells in food allergy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of viral replication reduces regulatory T cells and enhances the antiviral immune response in chronic hepatitis B

    SciTech Connect

    Stoop, Jeroen N. . E-mail: j.n.stoop@erasmusmc.nl; Molen, Renate G. van der . E-mail: r.vandermolen@erasmusmc.nl; Kuipers, Ernst J. . E-mail: e.j.kuipers@erasmusmc.nl; Kusters, Johannes G. . E-mail: j.g.kusters@erasmusmc.nl; Janssen, Harry L.A. . E-mail: h.janssen@erasmusmc.nl

    2007-04-25

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a key role in the impaired immune response that is typical for a chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. To gain more insight in the mechanism that is responsible for this impaired immune response, the effect of viral load reduction resulting from treatment with the nucleotide analogue adefovir dipivoxil on the percentages of Treg and HBV-specific T-cell responses was analyzed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 12 patients were collected at baseline and during treatment. In parallel to the decline in viral load, we found a decline in circulating Treg, combined with an increase in HBV core antigen-specific IFN-{gamma} production and proliferation. The production of IL10 did not decrease during therapy. In conclusion, adefovir induced viral load reduction results in a decline of circulating Treg together with a partial recovery of the immune response.

  10. Selective ORAI1 inhibition ameliorates autoimmune CNS inflammation by suppressing effector but not regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Ulrike; Shaw, Patrick J.; Kozhaya, Lina; Subramanian, Raju; Gaida, Kevin; Unutmaz, Derya; McBride, Helen J.; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells is dependent on Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels formed by ORAI proteins. To investigate the role of ORAI1 in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and autoimmune diseases, we genetically and pharmacologically modulated ORAI1 function. Immunization of mice lacking Orai1 in T cells with MOG peptide resulted in attenuated severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The numbers of T cells and innate immune cells in the CNS of ORAI1-deficient animals were strongly reduced along with almost completely abolished production of IL-17, IFN-γ and GM-CSF despite only partially reduced Ca2+ influx. In Th1 and Th17 cells differentiated in vitro, ORAI1 was required for cytokine production but not the expression of Th1- and Th17-specific transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. The differentiation and function of induced iTreg cells, by contrast, was independent of ORAI1. Importantly, induced genetic deletion of Orai1 in adoptively transferred, MOG-specific T cells was able to halt EAE progression after disease onset. Likewise, treatment of wild-type mice with a selective CRAC channel inhibitor after EAE onset ameliorated disease. Genetic deletion of Orai1 and pharmacological ORAI1 inhibition reduced the leukocyte numbers in the CNS and attenuated Th1/Th17 cell-mediated cytokine production. In human CD4+ T cells, CRAC channel inhibition reduced the expression of IL-17, IFN-γ and other cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings support the conclusion that Th1 and Th17 cell function is particularly dependent on CRAC channels, which could be exploited as a therapeutic approach to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26673135

  11. Regulatory B cells inhibit cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity and elimination of infected CD4 T cells after in vitro reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Siewe, Basile; Wallace, Jennillee; Rygielski, Sonya; Stapleton, Jack T; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan

    2014-01-01

    During HIV infection, IL-10/IL-10 receptor and programmed death-1 (PD-1)/programmed death-1-ligand (PD-L1) interactions have been implicated in the impairment of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity. Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), attenuated anti-HIV CTL functions present a major hurdle towards curative measures requiring viral eradication. Therefore, deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired CTL is crucial before HIV viral eradication is viable. The generation of robust CTL activity necessitates interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APC), CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We have shown that in vitro, IL-10hiPD-L1hi regulatory B cells (Bregs) directly attenuate HIV-specific CD8+-mediated CTL activity. Bregs also modulate APC and CD4+ T cell function; herein we characterize the Breg compartment in uninfected (HIVNEG), HIV-infected "elite controllers" (HIVEC), ART-treated (HIVART), and viremic (HIVvir), subjects, and in vitro, assess the impact of Bregs on anti-HIV CTL generation and activity after reactivation of HIV latent reservoirs using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). We find that Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable IL-10 expression levels significantly higher than HIVNEG subjects, but significantly lower than HIVVIR subjects. Bregs from HIVEC and HIVART subjects exhibit comparable PD-L1 expression, significantly higher than in HIVVIR and HIVNEG subjects. SAHA-treated Breg-depleted PBMC from HIVEC and HIVART subjects, displayed enhanced CD4+ T-cell proliferation, significant upregulation of antigen-presentation molecules, increased frequency of CD107a+ and HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, associated with efficient elimination of infected CD4+ T cells, and reduction in integrated viral DNA. Finally, IL-10-R and PD-1 antibody blockade partially reversed Breg-mediated inhibition of CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Our data suggest that, possibly, via an IL-10 and PD-L1 synergistic mechanism; Bregs likely inhibit APC function

  12. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells. - Highlights: • We report a therapeutic potential of DMSO in autoimmune diabetes. • DMSO exhibits an immune modulatory effect. • DMSO treatment increases regulatory T cell differentiation. • The increase in STAT5 signaling pathway explains the effect of DMSO in Tregs.

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in non-obese diabetic mice by inducing differentiation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gu-Jiun; Sytwu, Huey-Kang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Yuan-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Yu, Chiao-Chi; Chang, Hao-Ming; Chan, De-Chuan; Huang, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-15

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is caused by the destruction of insulin-producing β cells in pancreatic islets by autoimmune T cells. Islet transplantation has been established as an effective therapeutic strategy for T1D. However, the survival of islet grafts can be disrupted by recurrent autoimmunity. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a solvent for organic and inorganic substances and an organ-conserving agent used in solid organ transplantations. DMSO also exerts anti-inflammatory, reactive oxygen species scavenger and immunomodulatory effects and therefore exhibits therapeutic potential for the treatment of several human inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of DMSO in the inhibition of autoimmunity. We treated an animal model of islet transplantation (NOD mice) with DMSO. The survival of the syngeneic islet grafts was significantly prolonged. The population numbers of CD8, DC and Th1 cells were decreased, and regulatory T (Treg) cell numbers were increased in recipients. The expression levels of IFN-γ and proliferation of T cells were also reduced following DMSO treatment. Furthermore, the differentiation of Treg cells from naive CD4 T cells was significantly increased in the in vitro study. Our results demonstrate for the first time that in vivo DMSO treatment suppresses spontaneous diabetes and autoimmune recurrence in NOD mice by inhibiting the Th1 immune response and inducing the differentiation of Treg cells.

  14. A rare subset of skin-tropic regulatory T cells expressing Il10/Gzmb inhibits the cutaneous immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Vandenbon, Alexis; Honda, Tetsuya; Shand, Francis H. W.; Nakanishi, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Takeshi; Tomura, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) migrating from the skin to the draining lymph node (dLN) have a strong immunosuppressive effect on the cutaneous immune response. However, the subpopulations responsible for their inhibitory function remain unclear. We investigated single-cell gene expression heterogeneity in Tregs from the dLN of inflamed skin in a contact hypersensitivity model. The immunosuppressive genes Ctla4 and Tgfb1 were expressed in the majority of Tregs. Although Il10-expressing Tregs were rare, unexpectedly, the majority of Il10-expressing Tregs co-expressed Gzmb and displayed Th1-skewing. Single-cell profiling revealed that CD43+ CCR5+ Tregs represented the main subset within the Il10/Gzmb-expressing cell population in the dLN. Moreover, CD43+ CCR5+ CXCR3− Tregs expressed skin-tropic chemokine receptors, were preferentially retained in inflamed skin and downregulated the cutaneous immune response. The identification of a rare Treg subset co-expressing multiple immunosuppressive molecules and having tissue-remaining capacity offers a novel strategy for the control of skin inflammatory responses. PMID:27756896

  15. The synthetic peptide P111-136 derived from the C-terminal domain of heparin affin regulatory peptide inhibits tumour growth of prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP), also called pleiotrophin, is a heparin-binding, secreted factor that is overexpressed in several tumours and associated to tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The C-terminus part of HARP composed of amino acids 111 to 136 is particularly involved in its biological activities and we previously established that a synthetic peptide composed of the same amino acids (P111-136) was capable of inhibiting the biological activities of HARP. Here we evaluate the ability of P111-136 to inhibit in vitro and in vivo the growth of a human tumour cell line PC-3 which possess an HARP autocrine loop. Methods A total lysate of PC-3 cells was incubated with biotinylated P111-136 and pulled down for the presence of the HARP receptors in Western blot. In vitro, the P111-136 effect on HARP autocrine loop in PC-3 cells was determined by colony formation in soft agar. In vivo, PC-3 cells were inoculated in the flank of athymic nude mice. Animals were treated with P111-136 (5 mg/kg/day) for 25 days. Tumour volume was evaluated during the treatment. After the animal sacrifice, the tumour apoptosis and associated angiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In vivo anti-angiogenic effect was confirmed using a mouse Matrigel™ plug assay. Results Using pull down experiments, we identified the HARP receptors RPTPβ/ζ, ALK and nucleolin as P111-136 binding proteins. In vitro, P111-136 inhibits dose-dependently PC-3 cell colony formation. Treatment with P111-136 inhibits significantly the PC-3 tumour growth in the xenograft model as well as tumour angiogenesis. The angiostatic effect of P111-136 on HARP was also confirmed using an in vivo Matrigel™ plug assay in mice Conclusions Our results demonstrate that P111-136 strongly inhibits the mitogenic effect of HARP on in vitro and in vivo growth of PC-3 cells. This inhibition could be linked to a direct or indirect binding of this peptide to the HARP receptors (ALK, RPTP

  16. mTOR Inhibition and Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells Synergize to Promote Long-Term Graft Survival in Immunocompetent Recipients1

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Giorgio; Sumpter, Tina L.; Matta, Benjamin M.; Pillai, Mahesh; Corbitt, Natasha; Vodovotz, Yoram; Wang, Zhiliang; Thomson, Angus W.

    2010-01-01

    Minimization of immunosuppression and donor-specific tolerance to MHC-mismatched organ grafts are important clinical goals. The therapeutic potential of regulatory T cells (Treg) has been demonstrated, but conditions for optimizing their in vivo function post-transplant in nonlymphocyte-depleted hosts remain undefined. Herein, we address mechanisms through which inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (Rapa) (mTOR) synergizes with alloAg-specific Treg (AAsTreg), to permit long-term, donor-specific heart graft survival in immunocompetent hosts. Crucially, immature allogeneic dendritic cells (DC) allowed AAsTreg selection in vitro, with minimal expansion of unwanted (TH17) cells. The rendered Treg potently inhibited T cell proliferation in an Ag-specific manner. However, these AAsTreg remained unable to control T cells stimulated by allogeneic mature DC, – a phenomenon dependent on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In vivo, Rapa administration reduced danger-associated IL-6 production, T cell proliferation and graft infiltration. Based on these observation, AAsTreg were administered post-transplant (d7) in combination with a short course of Rapa and rendered >80% long-term (>150 d) graft survival, a result superior to that achieved with polyclonal Treg. Moreover, graft protection was alloAg-specific. Significantly, long-term graft survival was associated with alloreactive T cell anergy. These findings delineate combination of transient mTOR inhibition with appropriate AAsTreg selection as an effective approach to promote long-term organ graft survival. PMID:20007530

  17. IL-17A and IL-2-expanded regulatory T cells cooperate to inhibit Th1-mediated rejection of MHC II disparate skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Vokaer, Benoît; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lemaître, Philippe H; Spilleboudt, Chloé; Le Moine, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that regulatory T cells (Treg) promote Th17 differentiation. Based on this hypothesis, we tested the effect of IL-17A neutralization in a model of skin transplantation in which long-term graft survival depends on a strong in vivo Treg expansion induced by transient exogenous IL-2 administration. As expected, IL-2 supplementation prevented rejection of MHC class II disparate skin allografts but, surprisingly, not in IL-17A-deficient recipients. We attested that IL-17A was not required for IL-2-mediated Treg expansion, intragraft recruitment or suppressive capacities. Instead, IL-17A prevented allograft rejection by inhibiting Th1 alloreactivity independently of Tregs. Indeed, T-bet expression of naive alloreactive CD4+ T cells and the subsequent Th1 immune response was significantly enhanced in IL-17A deficient mice. Our results illustrate for the first time a protective role of IL-17A in CD4+-mediated allograft rejection process.

  18. Perfluorododecanoic acid-induced steroidogenic inhibition is associated with steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and reactive oxygen species in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhimin; Feng, Yixing; Wang, Jianshe; Zhang, Hongxia; Ding, Lina; Dai, Jiayin

    2010-04-01

    Perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA) can be detected in environmental matrices and human serum and has been shown to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis in rats. However, the mechanisms that are responsible for the toxic effects of PFDoA remain unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanism of steroidogenesis inhibition by PFDoA and to identify the molecular target of PFDoA in Leydig cells. The effects of PFDoA on steroid synthesis in Leydig cells were assessed by radioimmunoassay. The expression of key genes and proteins in steroid biosynthesis was determined by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels were determined using bioluminescence assays. PFDoA inhibited adenosine 3',5'-cyclophosphate (cAMP)-stimulated steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig tumor cells (mLTC-1) and primary rat Leydig cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, PFDoA (1-100 microM) did not exhibit effects on cell viability and cellular ATP levels in mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA inhibited steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) promoter activity and StAR expression at the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels but did not affect mRNA levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, or 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in cAMP-stimulated mLTC-1 cells. PFDoA treatment also resulted in increased levels of mitochondrial ROS and H(2)O(2). After excessive ROS and H(2)O(2) were eliminated in PFDoA-treated mLTC-1 cells by MnTMPyP (a superoxide dismutase analog), progesterone production was partially restored and StAR mRNA and protein levels were partially recovered. These data show that PFDoA inhibits steroidogenesis in cAMP-stimulated Leydig cells by reducing the expression of StAR through a model of action involving oxidative stress.

  19. Phospholipase A2 inhibits cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating regulatory T cells by the CD206 mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunseong; Lee, Hyojung; Lee, Gihyun; Jang, Hyunil; Kim, Sung-Su; Yoon, Heera; Kang, Geun-Hyung; Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-09-01

    Previously, we found that Foxp3-expressing CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells attenuate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury in mice and that bee venom and its constituent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) are capable of modulating Treg cells. Here we tested whether PLA2 could inhibit cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. As a result of treatment with PLA2, the population of Treg cells was significantly increased, both in vivo and in vitro. PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal tissue damage, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production upon cisplatin administration. These renoprotective effects were abolished by depletion of Treg cells. Furthermore, PLA2 bound to CD206 mannose receptors on dendritic cells, essential for the PLA2-mediated protective effects on renal dysfunction. Interestingly, PLA2 treatment increased the secretion of IL-10 in the kidney from normal mice. Foxp3(+)IL-10(+) cells and CD11c(+)IL-10(+) cells were increased by PLA2 treatment. The anticancer effects of repeated administrations of a low dose of cisplatin were not affected by PLA2 treatment in a tumor-bearing model. Thus, PLA2 may prevent inflammatory responses in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by modulating Treg cells and IL-10 through the CD206 mannose receptor.

  20. Regulatory T cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Rachel; Sansom, David M

    2013-12-01

    While the innate immune system has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD, a role for the acquired immune system is less well studied. The increasing recognition that COPD shares features with autoimmune disease has led to interest in a potential role for regulatory T cells, which are intimately involved in the control of autoimmunity. The suggestion that regulatory T cell numbers are increased in patients with COPD may indicate their dysfunction or resistance to suppression by target cells. Investigation of regulatory T cells may therefore be of importance in understanding the inflammation and tissue damage that occurs in patients with COPD who cease smoking.

  1. G-CSF-Induced Suppressor IL-10+ Neutrophils Promote Regulatory T Cells That Inhibit Graft-Versus-Host Disease in a Long-Lasting and Specific Way.

    PubMed

    Perobelli, Suelen Martins; Mercadante, Ana Carolina Terra; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Alves, Ana Paula Gregório; Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bonomo, Adriana

    2016-11-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) is the main complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and many efforts have been made to overcome this important limitation. We showed previously that G-CSF treatment generates low-density splenic granulocytes that inhibit experimental aGVHD. In this article, we show that aGVHD protection relies on incoming IL-10(+) neutrophils from G-CSF-treated donor spleen (G-Neutrophils). These G-Neutrophils have high phagocytic capacity, high peroxide production, low myeloperoxidase activity, and low cytoplasmic granule content, which accounts for their low density. Furthermore, they have low expression of MHC class II, costimulatory molecules, and low arginase1 expression. Also, they have low IFN-γ, IL-17F, IL-2, and IL-12 levels, with increased IL-10 production and NO synthase 2 expression. These features are in accordance with the modulatory capacity of G-Neutrophils on regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. In vivo, CD25(+) Treg depletion shortly after transplantation with splenic cells from G-CSF-treated donors blocks suppression of aGVHD, suggesting Treg involvement in the protection induced by the G-Neutrophils. The immunocompetence and specificity of the semiallogeneic T cells, long-term after the bone marrow transplant using G-Neutrophils, were confirmed by third-party skin graft rejection; importantly, a graft-versus-leukemia assay showed that T cell activity was maintained, and all of the leukemic cells were eliminated. We conclude that G-CSF treatment generates a population of activated and suppressive G-Neutrophils that reduces aGVHD in an IL-10- and Treg-dependent manner, while maintaining immunocompetence and the graft versus leukemia effect.

  2. In human alloreactive CD4⁺ T-cells, dichloroacetate inhibits aerobic glycolysis, induces apoptosis and favors differentiation towards the regulatory T-cell subset instead of effector T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Sounidaki, Maria; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    Although kidney transplantation is the best therapy for end-stage renal disease, rejection remains a concern, and currently available immunosuppressive agents contribute to morbidity and mortality. Thus, novel immunosuppressive drugs are required. Dichloroacetate (DCA) is already used in the treatment of congenital lactic acidosis and characterized by limited toxicity. As DCA inhibits aerobic glycolysis, which is a prerequisite for CD4+ T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector T-cells, its possible immunosuppressive role in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), a model of alloreactivity, was investigated. Glucose and lactate concentrations were measured in the supernatants, and cell proliferation was assessed immunoenzymatically. CD4+ T‑cells were then isolated from the MLRs and the expression of cleaved caspase‑3, various enzymes involved in glycolysis, and the signature transcription factors of CD4+ T‑cell subsets were evaluated by western blotting. In MLRs, DCA decreased glucose consumption and aerobic glycolysis, while it exerted a negligible effect on cell proliferation. In CD4+ T‑cells, DCA induced apoptosis, and decreased the expression of glucose trasporter‑1, hexokinase II, lactate dehydrogenase‑A and phosphorylated pyruvate dehydrogenase, while it increased total pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, DCA increased the expression of transcription factor forkhead box P3, whereas it decreased the expression of T‑box transcription factor TBX21, trans‑acting T-cell-specific transcription factor GATA‑3 and retinoic acid receptor related orphan receptor‑γt. In conclusion, in alloreactive CD4+ T‑cells, DCA inhibits aerobic glycolysis, induces apoptosis and favors differentiation towards the regulatory T‑cell subset. These characteristics render it a promising immunosuppressive agent in the field of transplantation.

  3. In vitro Exposure to the Herbicide Atrazine Inhibits T Cell Activation, Proliferation, and Cytokine Production and Significantly Increases the Frequency of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thueson, Lindsay E.; Emmons, Tiffany R.; Browning, Dianna L.; Kreitinger, Joanna M.; Shepherd, David M.; Wetzel, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells. PMID:25433234

  4. In vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine inhibits T cell activation, proliferation, and cytokine production and significantly increases the frequency of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Thueson, Lindsay E; Emmons, Tiffany R; Browning, Dianna L; Kreitinger, Joanna M; Shepherd, David M; Wetzel, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    The herbicide atrazine (2-chloro-4-[ethylamino]-6-[isopropylamino]-s-triazine) is the most common water contaminant in the United States. Atrazine is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor and is classified as an estrogen disrupting compound because it elevates estrogen levels via induction of the enzyme aromatase. Previous studies have shown that atrazine exposure alters the function of innate immune cells such as NK cells, DC, mast cells, and macrophages. In this study we have examined the impact of in vitro atrazine exposure on the activation, proliferation, and effector cytokine production by primary murine CD4(+) T lymphocytes. We found that atrazine exposure significantly inhibited CD4(+) T cell proliferation and accumulation as well as the expression of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the effects were more pronounced in cells from male animals. These effects were partially mimicked by pharmacological reagents that elevate intracellular cAMP levels and addition of exogenous rmIL-2 further inhibited proliferation and CD25 expression. Consistent with these findings, atrazine exposure during T cell activation resulted in a 2- to 5-fold increase in the frequency of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Helminth antigens enable CpG-activated dendritic cells to inhibit the symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis through Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Franco; Falcón, Cristian Roberto; Nuñez, Nicolás; Knubel, Carolina; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Bianco, Ismael; Maccioni, Mariana; Fretes, Ricardo; Triquell, María Fernanda; Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Cervi, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have the potential to control the outcome of autoimmunity by modulating the immune response. In this study, we tested the ability of Fasciola hepatica total extract (TE) to induce tolerogenic properties in CpG-ODN (CpG) maturated DC, to then evaluate the therapeutic potential of these cells to diminish the inflammatory response in collagen induced arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were injected with TE plus CpG treated DC (T/C-DC) pulsed with bovine collagen II (CII) between two immunizations with CII and clinical scores CIA were determined. The levels of CII-specific IgG2 and IgG1 in sera, the histological analyses in the joints, the cytokine profile in the draining lymph node (DLN) cells and in the joints, and the number, and functionality of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) were evaluated. Vaccination of mice with CII pulsed T/C-DC diminished the severity and incidence of CIA symptoms and the production of the inflammatory cytokine, while induced the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The therapeutic effect was mediated by Treg cells, since the adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+ T cells, inhibited the inflammatory symptoms in CIA. The in vitro blockage of TGF-β in cultures of DLN cells plus CII pulsed T/C-DC inhibited the expansion of Treg cells. Vaccination with CII pulsed T/C-DC seems to be a very efficient approach to diminish exacerbated immune response in CIA, by inducing the development of Treg cells, and it is therefore an interesting candidate for a cell-based therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  6. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    PubMed

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (TFH) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of TFH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on TFH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate TFH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing TFH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138(+) plasma and IgD(-)CD27(+) memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented TFH cell development. Added to TFH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3(+)CXCR5(+)PD-1(+) follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on TFH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control TFH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the TFH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the TFH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yarkoni, Shai

    2008-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in tolerance to self-antigens and tissue grafts, and suppression of autoimmune reactions. These cells modulate the intensity and quality of immune reactions through attenuation of the cytolytic activities of reactive immune cells. Treg cells operate primarily at the site of inflammation where they modulate the immune reaction through three major mechanisms: a) direct killing of cytotoxic cells through cell-to-cell contact, b) inhibition of cytokine production by cytotoxic cells, in particular interleukin-2, c) direct secretion of immunomodulatory cytokines, in particular TGF-beta and interleukin-10. In addition to differential contributions of these mechanisms under variable inflammatory conditions, mechanistic complexity and diversity evolves from the diverse tasks performed by various Treg cell subsets in different stages of the immune reaction. Here we attempt to integrate the current experimental evidence to delineate the major suppressive pathways of Treg cells.

  8. Regulatory myeloid cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, Brian R; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-02-27

    Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages, regulatory dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents, and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity after RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and to promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and to usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin.

  9. Lipid extract of Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kutzing, a blue-green alga, inhibits the activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Blobaum, Kara R; Park, Young-Ki; Ehlers, Sarah J; Lu, Fan; Lee, Ji-Young

    2008-03-01

    Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (N. commune), a blue-green alga, has been used as both a food ingredient and in medicine for centuries. To determine the effect of N. commune on cholesterol metabolism, N. commune lipid extract was incubated at increasing concentrations (25-100 mg/L) with HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line. The addition of N. commune lipid extract markedly reduced mRNA abundance of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) and LDL receptor (LDLR) (P < 0.05), with a concomitant decrease in their protein expression (P < 0.001). Reduced HMGR activity by 90% with N. commune lipid extract confirmed the inhibitory role of N. commune in cholesterol synthesis (P < 0.006). To elucidate a molecular mechanism underlying the repression of HMGR and LDLR by N. commune lipid extract, expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (SREBP-2) was assessed. Whereas mRNA for SREBP-2 remained unchanged, SREBP-2 mature protein was reduced by N. commune (P < 0.009). In addition, N. commune lipid extract also decreased SREBP-1 mature protein by approximately 30% (P < 0.002) and reduced the expression of SREBP-1-responsive genes such as fatty acid synthase and stearoyl CoA desaturase 1 (SCD-1) (P < 0.05). Therefore, our results demonstrate that N. commune lipid extract inhibits the maturation process of both SREBP-1 and -2, resulting in a decrease in expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism.

  10. Inhibition of SOCS1−/− Lethal Auto-Inflammatory Disease Correlated to Enhanced Peripheral Foxp3+ Regulatory T cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Erin L.; Jager, Lindsey D.; Dabelic, Rea; Benitez, Patrick; Holdstein, Kaitlin; Lau, Kenneth; Haider, Mohammed I.; Johnson, Howard M.; Larkin, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    SOCS1−/− mice, which are lymphopenic, die less than 3 weeks after birth of a T cell mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by leukocyte infiltration and destruction of vital organs. Notably, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be particularly potent in inhibiting inflammation associated autoimmune diseases. We observed that SOCS1−/− mice were deficient in peripheral Tregs despite enhanced thymic development. The adoptive transfer of SOCS1 sufficient Tregs; CD4+ T lymphocytes; or administration of SOCS1-KIR, a peptide that partially restores SOCS1 function, mediated a statistically significant, but short-term survival of SOCS1−/− mice. However, the adoptive transfer of SOCS1 sufficient CD4+ T lymphocytes, combined with the administration of SOCS1-KIR, resulted in a significant increase in the survival of SOCS1−/− mice both short term and long term, where 100 percent death occurred by day 18 in the absence of treatment. Moreover, the CD4+/SOCS1-KIR combined therapy resulted in decreased leukocytic organ infiltration, reduction of serum IFNγ, and enhanced peripheral accumulation of Foxp3+ Tregs in treated mice. These data show that CD4+/SOCS1-KIR combined treatment can synergistically promote the long-term survival of peri-natal lethal SOCS1−/− mice. In addition, these results strongly suggest that SOCS1 contributes to the stability of the Foxp3+ Treg peripheral population under conditions of strong pro-inflammatory environments. PMID:21788442

  11. Inhibition of Regulatory Volume Decrease Enhances the Cytocidal Effect of Hypotonic Shock in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kudou, Michihiro; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Konishi, Hirotaka; Morimura, Ryo; Komatsu, Shuhei; Ikoma, Hisashi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hosogi, Shigekuni; Nakahari, Takashi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-01-01

    Background : Hypotonic shock induces cytocidal effects through cell rupture, and cancer therapy based on this mechanism has been clinically administered to hepatocellular carcinoma patients. We herein investigated the effectiveness of hypotonic shock combined with the inhibition of regulatory volume decrease as cancer therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods : Morphological changes in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were observed under a differential interference contrast microscope connected to a high-speed digital video camera. Cell volume changes under hypotonic shock with or without chloride, potassium, or water channel blockers were observed using a high-resolution flow cytometer. In order to investigate cytocidal effects, the number of surviving cells was compared after exposure to hypotonic solution with and without each channel blocker (re-incubation experiment). Results : Video recordings showed that cells exposed to distilled water rapidly swelled and then ruptured. Cell volume measurements revealed regulatory volume decrease under mild hypotonic shock, whereas severe hypotonic shock increased the number of broken fragments as a result of cell rupture. Moreover, regulatory volume decrease was inhibited in cells treated with each channel blocker. Re-incubation experiments showed the cytocidal effects of hypotonic shock in cells exposed to hypotonic solution, and additional treatments with each channel blocker enhanced these effects. Conclusion : The inhibition of regulatory volume decrease with chloride, potassium, or water channel blockers may enhance the cytocidal effects of hypotonic shock in hepatocellular carcinoma. Hypotonic shock combined with the inhibition of regulatory volume decrease was a more effective therapy than hypotonic shock alone.

  12. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-01-01

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments. PMID:27144583

  13. Ultraviolet B Exposure Inhibits Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Mice by Expanding CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Naoto; Yamashita, Tomoya; Mizoguchi, Taiji; Emoto, Takuo; Amin, Hilman Zulkifli; Yodoi, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takuya; Kasahara, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Naofumi; Tabata, Tokiko; Kitano, Naoki; Fukunaga, Atsushi; Nishigori, Chikako; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-08-31

    Pathogenic immune responses are known to play an important role in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation has been demonstrated to have therapeutic potential not only for cutaneous diseases but also for systemic inflammatory diseases in mice by suppressing immunoinflammatory responses. We investigated the effect of UVB irradiation on experimental AAA. We used an angiotensin II-induced AAA model in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a high-cholesterol diet. Mice aged 10 weeks were irradiated with 5 kJ/m(2) UVB once weekly for 6 weeks (UVB-irradiated, n=38; nonirradiated, n=42) and were euthanized for evaluation of AAA formation at 16 weeks. Overall, 93% of angiotensin II-infused mice developed AAA, with 60% mortality possibly because of aneurysm rupture. UVB irradiation significantly decreased the incidence (66%) and mortality (29%) of AAA (P=0.004 and P=0.006, respectively). UVB-irradiated mice had significantly smaller diameter AAA (P=0.008) and fewer inflammatory cells in the aortic aneurysm tissue than nonirradiated mice, along with systemic expansion of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and decreased effector CD4(+)CD44(high)CD62L(low) T cells in para-aortic lymph nodes. Genetic depletion of regulatory T cells abrogated these beneficial effects of UVB treatment, demonstrating a critical role of regulatory T cells. Our data suggest that UVB-dependent expansion of regulatory T cells has beneficial effects on experimental AAA and may provide a novel strategy for the treatment of AAA. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Adipocytes as immune regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A.; Klein, Richard L.; Levingston, Corinne A.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state and adipocytes are capable of contributing to this inflammation by their production of inflammatory mediators. The present study used fibroblast-derived adipocytes and normal spleen cells as a model to determine if adipocytes can also serve as immune regulatory cells by modulating the functions of conventional immune cells. Media conditioned by the adipocytes stimulated release of the Th1-type cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ and GM-CSF from cultures of normal spleen cells. The adipocytes also stimulated spleen cell release of inhibitory cytokines, although to varying degrees. This included IL-10, IL-13 and, to a lesser extent, IL-4. Spleen cell production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IL-9 was stimulated by adipocytes, although production of the Th17-derived cytokine, IL-17, was not stimulated. The adipocyte-conditioned medium did not stimulate production of predominantly monocytes-derived chemokines CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, but stimulated production of the predominantly T-cell-derived chemokine CCL5. In all cases where cytokine/chemokine production from spleen cells was stimulated by adipocytes, it was to a far greater level than was produced by the adipocytes themselves. Studies initiated to determine the identity of the adipocyte-derived mediators showed that the spleen cell modulation could not be attributed to solely adiponectin or leptin. Studies to determine the source of some of the cytokines whose production was stimulated by adipocytes showed that expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was not increased in either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell. When the splenic T-cells were examined for IFN-γ, the adipocyte stimulation of IFN-γ was within CD8+ T-cells, not CD4+ T-cells. These studies show that adipocytes may be able to serve as immune regulatory cells to stimulate conventional immune cells to release a spectrum of immune mediators. PMID:23587489

  15. PDGF upregulates CLEC-2 to induce T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Ganguly, Sreerupa; Hajian, Pega; Cao, Jia-Ning; Agrawal, Anshu

    2015-10-06

    The effect of platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) on immune cells is not elucidated. Here, we demonstrate PDGF inhibited the maturation of human DCs and induced IL-10 secretion. Culture of PDGF-DCs with T cells induced the polarization of T cells towards FoxP3 expressing T regulatory cells that secreted IL-10. Gene expression studies revealed that PDGF induced the expression of C-type lectin like receptor member 2, (CLEC-2) receptor on DCs. Furthermore, DCs transfected with CLEC-2 induced T regulatory cells in DC-T cell co-culture. CLEC-2 is naturally expressed on platelets. Therefore, to confirm whether CLEC-2 is responsible for inducing the T regulatory cells, T cells were cultured with either CLEC-2 expressing platelets or soluble CLEC-2. Both conditions resulted in the induction of regulatory T cells. The generation of T regulatory cells was probably due to the binding of CLEC-2 with its ligand podoplanin on T cells, since crosslinking of podoplanin on the T cells also resulted in the induction of T regulatory cells. These data demonstrate that PDGF upregulates the expression of CLEC-2 on cells to induce T regulatory cells.

  16. Testosterone replacement effectively inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis in rats: evidence for a direct role of testosterone on regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Fijak, Monika; Schneider, Eva; Klug, Jörg; Bhushan, Sudhanshu; Hackstein, Holger; Schuler, Gerhard; Wygrecka, Malgorzata; Gromoll, Jörg; Meinhardt, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Despite the immune-privileged status of the male genital tract, infection and inflammation of the male genital tract are important etiological factors in male infertility. A common observation in clinical and experimental orchitis as well as in systemic infection and inflammation are decreased levels of testosterone. Emerging data point to an immunosuppressive role of testosterone. In our study, we substituted testosterone levels in experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) in rat by s.c. testosterone implants. EAO development was reduced to 17% when animals were treated with low-dose testosterone implants (3 cm long, EAO+T3) and to 33% when rats were supplied with high-dose testosterone implants (24 cm, EAO+T24) compared with 80% of animals developing disease in the EAO control group. In the testis, testosterone replacement in EAO animals prevented the accumulation of macrophages and significantly reduced the number of CD4(+) T cells with a strong concomitant increase in the number of regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)) compared with EAO control. In vitro testosterone treatment of naive T cells led to an expansion of the regulatory T cell subset with suppressive activity and ameliorated MCP-1-stimulated chemotaxis of T lymphocytes in a Transwell assay. Moreover, expression of proinflammatory mediators such as MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the testis and secretion of Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-2 by mononuclear cells isolated from testicular draining lymph nodes were decreased in the EAO+T3 and EAO+T24 groups. Thus, our study shows an immunomodulatory and protective effect of testosterone substitution in the pathogenesis of EAO and suggests androgens as a new factor in the differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  17. Immunometabolism of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Ryan; Priyadharshini, Bhavana; Turka, Laurence A

    2016-01-01

    The bidirectional interaction between the immune system and whole-body metabolism has been well recognized for many years. Via effects on adipocytes and hepatocytes, immune cells can modulate whole-body metabolism (in metabolic syndromes such as type 2 diabetes and obesity) and, reciprocally, host nutrition and commensal-microbiota-derived metabolites modulate immunological homeostasis. Studies demonstrating the metabolic similarities of proliferating immune cells and cancer cells have helped give birth to the new field of immunometabolism, which focuses on how the cell-intrinsic metabolic properties of lymphocytes and macrophages can themselves dictate the fate and function of the cells and eventually shape an immune response. We focus on this aspect here, particularly as it relates to regulatory T cells. PMID:27196520

  18. T regulatory cells in xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Muller, Yannick D; Golshayan, Déla; Ehirchiou, Driss; Wekerle, Thomas; Seebach, Jörg D; Bühler, Leo H

    2009-01-01

    The role of T regulatory cells (Treg) in the induction and maintenance of allograft tolerance is being studied to a great extent. In contrast, little is known on their potential to prevent graft rejection in the field of xenotransplantation, where acute vascular rejection mediated by cellular and humoral mechanisms and thrombotic microangiopathy still prevents long-term graft survival. In this regard, the induction of donor-specific tolerance through isolation and expansion of xenoantigen-specific recipient Treg is currently becoming a focus of interest. This review will summarize the present knowledge concerning Treg and their potential use in xenotransplantation describing in particular CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, CD8(+)CD28(-) Treg, double negative CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, and natural killer Treg. Although only studied in vitro so far, human CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg is currently the best characterized subpopulation of regulatory cells in xenotransplantation. CD8(+)CD28(-) Treg and double negative CD4(-)CD8(-) Treg also seem to be implicated in tolerance maintenance of xenografts. Finally, one study revealing a role for natural killer CD4(+)Valpha14(+) Treg in the prolongation of xenograft survival needs further confirmation. To our opinion, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg are a promising candidate to protect xenografts. In contrast to cadaveric allotransplantation, the donor is known prior to xenotransplantation. This advantage allows the expansion of recipient Treg in a xenoantigen specific manner before transplantation.

  19. Cord blood CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells fail to inhibit cord blood NK cell functions due to insufficient production and expression of TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liqing; Tanaka, Shigeki; Bonno, Motoki; Ido, Masaru; Kawai, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2014-07-01

    Although CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg (Treg) cells are known to modulate NK cell functions, the modulation mechanism of these cells in cord blood has not been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism whereby cord blood Treg cells modulate cord NK cells. By performing various cultures of purified NK cells with or without autologous Treg cells, diminished inhibitory effects of cord Treg cells towards cord NK cell functions, including activation, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity, were observed. We also observed lower secretion of sTGF-beta1 and lower expression of mTGF-beta1 by cord Treg cells than by adult Treg cells. These data revealed the capability of adult Treg cells to suppress rhIL-2-stimulated NK cell function by TGF-beta1, both membrane-bound and soluble types. The reduced inhibitory capabilities of cord Treg cells compared with adult Treg cells is thought to be due to insufficient expression of TGF-beta1.

  20. The potential role of functional inhibition of T regulatory cells by anti-TGFβ antibody in photodynamic therapy of renal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been shown to be an effective locally ablative anti-cancer treatment that has the additional advantage of inducing tumor-directed immune response. We hypothesized that PDT could be combined with anti-transforming growth factor (TGF) beta antibody that does not significantly affect the population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) but at the same time, has the potential to decrease the immunosuppressive effects of regulatory T-cells (Treg) mediated by TGF beta. This hypothesis was tested with aTGF-beta antibody combined with BPD-mediated PDT in a BALB/c renal cell carcinoma model. Evidence of positive benefits of the combination therapy over individual treatments alone was obtained.

  1. Inhibition of NF-κB by a PXR-dependent pathway mediates counter-regulatory activities of rifaximin on innate immunity in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Renga, Barbara; Palladino, Giuseppe; Claudio, D'Amore; Ricci, Patrizia; Distrutti, Eleonora; Barbanti, Miriam; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-10-01

    A dysregulated interaction between intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and components of innate immunity is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel diseases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed oral antimicrobial agent increasingly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases that has been demonstrated to act as a gut-specific ligand for the human nuclear receptor pregnane-X receptor (PXR). In the present study we investigated, whether activation of PXR in IEC by rifaximin, emanates counter-regulatory signals and modulates the expression of cytokines or chemokines mechanistically involved in dysregulated intestinal immune homeostasis documented in inflammatory bowel diseases. Our results demonstrate that primary IEC express PXR that regulate the pattern of cytokines and chemokines expressed. PXR silencing decreases TGF-β and IP-10 while increases the expression of TNF-α, IL-8, Rantes and increase the production of PGE2. This pattern is further exacerbated by treating anti-PXR siRNA cells with bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Exposure to rifaximin caused a robust attenuation of generation of inflammatory mediators caused by LPS and increased the generation of TGF-β. PXR silencing completely abrogated these anti-inflammatory effects of rifaximin. By Western blot analysis we found that rifaximin abrogates the binding of NF-κB caused by LPS. Finally, exposure of human colon biopsies from inflammatory bowel diseases patients to rifaximin reduced mRNA levels of IL-8, Rantes, MIP-3α and TNFα induced by LPS. Collectively, these data establish that rifaximin exerts counter-regulatory activities at the interface between enteric bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells. The ability of rifaximin to activate PXR contributes to the maintenance of the intestinal immune homeostasis.

  2. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells delay islet allograft rejection via inhibiting islet-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production in CD34+ stem cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo.

  3. Ex Vivo Expanded Human Regulatory T Cells Delay Islet Allograft Rejection via Inhibiting Islet-Derived Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Production in CD34+ Stem Cells-Reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fang; Ma, Liang; Zhao, Min; Huang, Guocai; Mirenda, Vincenzo; Dorling, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disease caused by immune-mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β cells of the pancreas. Near complete dependence on exogenous insulin makes T1DM very difficult to control, with the result that patients are exposed to high blood glucose and risk of diabetic complications and/or intermittent low blood glucose that can cause unconsciousness, fits and even death. Allograft transplantation of pancreatic islets restores normoglycemia with a low risk of surgical complications. However, although successful immediately after transplantation, islets are progressively lost, with most of the patients requiring exogenous insulin within 2 years post-transplant. Therefore, there is an urgent requirement for the development of new strategies to prevent islet rejection. In this study, we explored the importance of human regulatory T cells in the control of islets allograft rejection. We developed a pre-clinical model of human islet transplantation by reconstituting NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice with cord blood-derived human CD34+ stem cells and demonstrated that although the engrafted human immune system mediated the rejection of human islets, their survival was significantly prolonged following adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded human Tregs. Mechanistically, Tregs inhibited the infiltration of innate immune cells and CD4+ T cells into the graft by down-regulating the islet graft-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Our findings might contribute to the development of clinical strategies for Treg therapy to control human islet rejection. We also show for the first time that CD34+ cells-reconstituted NOD-scid IL2rγnull mouse model could be beneficial for investigating human innate immunity in vivo. PMID:24594640

  4. Adoptive transfer of T regulatory cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in fetal brain tissue in a late-pregnancy preterm birth mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Xiao, Mi; Chen, Ru-Juan; Lin, Xiao-Jie; Siddiq, Muhammad; Liu, Li

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of regulatory T cells (Tregs) on the inflammation resulting from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in prenatal brain tissue, Tregs isolated from pregnant mice were transferred into model mice, and the expression levels of fork head family transcription factor (Foxp3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CD68 (a marker of microglia), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) were assessed in the fetal brain tissue. Foxp3, IL-6, and TLR-4 expression were detected by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot; CD68 expression level was detected using immunochemical analysis. Foxp3, IL-6, TLR-4, and CD68 expressions in fetal brain were significantly induced by maternal LPS administration, and the increased expression levels were markedly reduced by adoptive transfer of Tregs. Maternal LPS exposure significantly induced inflammation in perinatal brain tissue, and Tregs negatively regulated this LPS-induced inflammation.

  5. The core regulatory network in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sun; Kim, Dongsan; Kang, Nam Sook; Kim, Jeong-Rae

    2017-03-04

    In order to discover the common characteristics of various cell types in the human body, many researches have been conducted to find the set of genes commonly expressed in various cell types and tissues. However, the functional characteristics of a cell is determined by the complex regulatory relationships among the genes rather than by expressed genes themselves. Therefore, it is more important to identify and analyze a core regulatory network where all regulatory relationship between genes are active across all cell types to uncover the common features of various cell types. Here, based on hundreds of tissue-specific gene regulatory networks constructed by recent genome-wide experimental data, we constructed the core regulatory network. Interestingly, we found that the core regulatory network is organized by simple cascade and has few complex regulations such as feedback or feed-forward loops. Moreover, we discovered that the regulatory links from genes in the core regulatory network to genes in the peripheral regulatory network are much more abundant than the reverse direction links. These results suggest that the core regulatory network locates at the top of regulatory network and plays a role as a 'hub' in terms of information flow, and the information that is common to all cells can be modified to achieve the tissue-specific characteristics through various types of feedback and feed-forward loops in the peripheral regulatory networks. We also found that the genes in the core regulatory network are evolutionary conserved, essential and non-disease, non-druggable genes compared to the peripheral genes. Overall, our study provides an insight into how all human cells share a common function and generate tissue-specific functional traits by transmitting and processing information through regulatory network.

  6. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits expression of receptors for T cell regulatory cytokines and their downstream signaling in mouse CD4+ T cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously showed a suppressive effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on T cell cycling and expansion as well as a paradoxical effect on IL-2 levels (up-regulating) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)alpha expression (down-regulating). Thus, in the current study we tested the hypothesis that EGCG aff...

  7. 1-Methyl-tryptophan attenuates regulatory T cells differentiation due to the inhibition of estrogen-IDO1-MRC2 axis in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunyan; Mei, Jie; Tang, Lingli; Liu, Yukai; Li, Dajin; Li, Mingqing; Zhu, Xiaoyong

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells contribute to the local dysfunctional immune environment in endometriosis, an estrogen-dependent gynecological disease, which affects the function of ectopic endometrial tissue clearance by the immune system. The reason for the high percentage of peritoneal Treg in endometriosis patients is unknown. Here, we show that the proportion of peritoneal Treg cells increases as endometriosis progresses. To determine the probable mechanism, we established a naive T cell-macrophage-endometrial stromal cell (ESC) co-culture system to mimic the peritoneal cavity microenvironment. After adding 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT), a specific inhibitor of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1), to the co-culture system, we found that the differentiation of Treg cells, mainly IL-10+ Treg cells, decreased. Therefore, 1-MT-pretreated ESCs-educated Treg cells performed impaired suppressive function. Moreover, estrogen promoted the differentiation of Treg cells by elevating IDO1 expression in the ectopic lesion. Subsequently, we examined mannose receptor C, type 2 (MRC2), which is an up-stream molecule of IL-10, by bioinformatics analysis and real-time PCR validation. MRC2 expression in ectopic ESCs was notably lower than that in normal ESCs, which further negatively regulated the expression of IDO1 and Ki-67 in ESCs. Furthermore, MRC2 is required for Treg differentiation in the ectopic lesion, especially that for CD4high Treg. Therefore, MRC2-silenced ESCs-educated Treg manifested a stronger suppressive function in vitro. Consistently, the percentage of Treg increased when MRC2-shRNA was administered in the peritoneal cavity of endometriosis-disease mice model. Besides, 1-MT improved the condition of endometriosis, in terms of reducing the number and weight of total ectopic lesions in vivo. These results indicate that the estrogen-IDO1-MRC2 axis participates in the differentiation and function of Treg and is involved in the development of endometriosis. Thus

  8. Inhibition of the JAK/STAT Signaling Pathway in Regulatory T Cells Reveals a Very Dynamic Regulation of Foxp3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Jérémie D.; Burlion, Aude; Zaragoza, Bruno; Sendeyo, Kélhia; Polansky, Julia K.; Huehn, Jochen; Piaggio, Eliane; Salomon, Benoit L.

    2016-01-01

    The IL-2/JAK3/STAT-5 signaling pathway is involved on the initiation and maintenance of the transcription factor Foxp3 in regulatory T cells (Treg) and has been associated with demethylation of the intronic Conserved Non Coding Sequence-2 (CNS2). However, the role of the JAK/STAT pathway in controlling Foxp3 in the short term has been poorly investigated. Using two different JAK/STAT pharmacological inhibitors, we observed a detectable loss of Foxp3 after 10 min. of treatment that affected 70% of the cells after one hour. Using cycloheximide, a general inhibitor of mRNA translation, we determined that Foxp3, but not CD25, has a high turnover in IL-2 stimulated Treg. This reduction was correlated with a rapid reduction of Foxp3 mRNA. This loss of Foxp3 was associated with a loss in STAT-5 binding to the CNS2, which however remains demethylated. Consequently, Foxp3 expression returns to normal level upon restoration of basal JAK/STAT signaling in vivo. Reduced expression of several genes defining Treg identity was also observed upon treatment. Thus, our results demonstrate that Foxp3 has a rapid turn over in Treg partly controlled at the transcriptional level by the JAK/STAT pathway. PMID:27077371

  9. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells after treatment with paeoniflorin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yingxi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; He, Jinghua; Qiang, Zhaoyan; Tong, Jingzhi; Sun, Ke; Ding, Wen; Kang, Yi; Li, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells are a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction diseases. Paeoniflorin, a bioactive glucoside extracted from the Chinese herb white paeony root, has been shown to be effective at inhibiting the maturation and immunostimulatory function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. However, whether paeoniflorin can program conventional dendritic cells toward regulatory dendritic cells and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. Here, our study demonstrates that paeoniflorin can induce the production of regulatory dendritic cells from human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not from mature dendritic cells, thereby demonstrating the potential of paeoniflorin as a specific immunosuppressive drug with fewer complications and side effects. These regulatory dendritic cells treated with paeoniflorin exhibited high CD11b/c and low CD80, CD86 and CD40 expression levels as well as enhanced abilities to capture antigen and promote the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and reduced abilities to migrate and promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, which is associated with the upregulation of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-mediated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression. Collectively, paeoniflorin could program immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and imDCs stimulated with LPS toward a regulatory DC fate by upregulating the endogenous TGF-β-mediated IDO expression level, thereby demonstrating its potential as a specific immunosuppressive drug.

  10. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Rui, Ke; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    B cells are generally considered to be positive regulators of the immune response because of their capability to produce antibodies, including autoantibodies. The production of antibodies facilitates optimal CD4+ T-cell activation because B cells serve as antigen-presenting cells and exert other modulatory functions in immune responses. However, certain B cells can also negatively regulate the immune response by producing regulatory cytokines and directly interacting with pathogenic T cells via cell-to-cell contact. These types of B cells are defined as regulatory B (Breg) cells. The regulatory function of Breg cells has been demonstrated in mouse models of inflammation, cancer, transplantation, and particularly in autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the recent advances that lead to the understanding of the development and function of Breg cells and the implications of B cells in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23292280

  11. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody enhances the protective efficacy of Schistosoma japonicum GST vaccine via inhibition of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chun-Lian; Yang, Jin; Cheng, Liang-Yu; Cheng, Lan-Fang; Liu, Zhi-Ming

    2017-08-21

    The effect of anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD25 mAb) on the protection efficacy of Schistosoma japonicum 26 kDa GST (glutathione-S-transferase) vaccine was evaluated. Mice were immunized with GST before infection with S. japonicum cercariae and then injected with anti-CD25 mAb. The worm reduction rate was promoted from 24.18% in mice with GST immunization to 47.09% in mice with GST plus anti-CD25 mAb. Compared with the control group, the percentages of splenic CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) were significantly lower after administration of anti-CD25 mAb; meanwhile, elevated levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 were secreted by splenocytes. These results indicate that the poor protective efficacy of the GST vaccine against S. japonicum results from the presence of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs, while anti-CD25 mAb can partially block CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and thus enhance the protective efficacy of the GST vaccine.

  12. Baicalin, a natural compound, promotes regulatory T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji; Yang, Xue; Li, Ming

    2012-05-16

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue injury. The development of these T(reg) cells is controlled by the regulator protein Foxp3, which can be enhanced by the in vitro activation of Foxp3 in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta. However, little is known about alternative methods, such as the use of natural products, for controlling Foxp3-mediated T(reg) cell differentiation. HEK 293 T cells were transfected with Foxp3 expression plasmid, and then treated with different compounds, Foxp3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. CD4(+)CD25(-)T cells were stimulated with Baicalin, Foxp3 protein expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the regulatory function of T cells stimulated with Baicalin was detected by the carboxyfluorescien succinimidyl ester. We demonstrated that Baicalin, a compound isolated from the Chinese herb Huangqin, induced Foxp3 protein expression in cultured T cells, promoted T(reg) cell differentiation and regulatory activity. Our data also indicated that Baicalin restored Foxp3 expression following its initial interleukin-6-mediated inhibition and induced Foxp3 expression in vitro. These data suggest that Baicalin may promote T(reg) cell differentiation and regulatory activity and may serve as a promising natural immunosuppressive compound for treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  13. Baicalin, a natural compound, promotes regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibit autoimmunity and protect against tissue injury. The development of these Treg cells is controlled by the regulator protein Foxp3, which can be enhanced by the in vitro activation of Foxp3 in the presence of transforming growth factor-beta. However, little is known about alternative methods, such as the use of natural products, for controlling Foxp3-mediated Treg cell differentiation. Method HEK 293 T cells were transfected with Foxp3 expression plasmid, and then treated with different compounds, Foxp3 mRNA expression was determined by real-time RT-PCR. CD4+CD25-T cells were stimulated with Baicalin, Foxp3 protein expression were analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the regulatory function of T cells stimulated with Baicalin was detected by the carboxyfluorescien succinimidyl ester. Results We demonstrated that Baicalin, a compound isolated from the Chinese herb Huangqin, induced Foxp3 protein expression in cultured T cells, promoted Treg cell differentiation and regulatory activity. Our data also indicated that Baicalin restored Foxp3 expression following its initial interleukin-6-mediated inhibition and induced Foxp3 expression in vitro. Conclusions These data suggest that Baicalin may promote Treg cell differentiation and regulatory activity and may serve as a promising natural immunosuppressive compound for treating autoimmune inflammatory diseases. PMID:22591709

  14. Regulatory T cells and vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24h of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12-16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at 7 months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic "balance" between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance.

  15. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  16. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  17. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  18. CD4+ regulatory T cell responses induced by T cell vaccination in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jian; Zang, Ying C. Q.; Nie, Hong; Zhang, Jingwu Z.

    2006-01-01

    Immunization with irradiated autologous T cells (T cell vaccination) is shown to induce regulatory T cell responses that are poorly understood. In this study, CD4+ regulatory T cell lines were generated from patients with multiple sclerosis that received immunization with irradiated autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells. The resulting CD4+ regulatory T cell lines had marked inhibition on autologous myelin basic protein-reactive T cells and displayed two distinctive patterns distinguishable by the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 and cytokine profile. The majority of the T cell lines had high Foxp3 expression and secreted both IFN-γ and IL-10 as compared with the other pattern characteristic of low Foxp3 expression and predominant production of IL-10 but not IFN-γ. CD4+ regulatory T cell lines of both patterns expressed CD25 and reacted with activated autologous T cells but not resting T cells, irrespective of antigen specificity of the target T cells. It was evident that they recognized preferentially a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 61–73 of the IL-2 receptor α chain. T cell vaccination correlated with increased Foxp3 expression and T cell reactivity to peptide 61–73. The findings have important implications in the understanding of the role of CD4+ regulatory T cell response induced by T cell vaccination. PMID:16547138

  19. Special regulatory T cell review: How I became a T suppressor/regulatory cell maven

    PubMed Central

    Shevach, Ethan M

    2008-01-01

    I have briefly reviewed the factors that motivated me to change my views about the existence and importance of suppressor/regulatory T cells and to devote the majority of my laboratory efforts to this newly revitalized area of immunologic research. I am optimistic that manipulation of regulatory T-cell function will shortly be applicable to the clinic. PMID:18154610

  20. Interleukin-35 induces regulatory B cells that suppress autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M; Mahdi, Rashid M; Dolinska, Monika B; Sergeev, Yuri V; Wingfield, Paul T; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E

    2014-06-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing regulatory B (Breg) cells suppress autoimmune disease, and increased numbers of Breg cells prevent host defense to infection and promote tumor growth and metastasis by converting resting CD4(+) T cells to regulatory T (Treg) cells. The mechanisms mediating the induction and development of Breg cells remain unclear. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg cells and promotes their conversion to a Breg subset that produces IL-35 as well as IL-10. Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), and mice lacking IL-35 (p35 knockout (KO) mice) or defective in IL-35 signaling (IL-12Rβ2 KO mice) produced less Breg cells endogenously or after treatment with IL-35 and developed severe uveitis. Adoptive transfer of Breg cells induced by recombinant IL-35 suppressed EAU when transferred to mice with established disease, inhibiting pathogenic T helper type 17 (TH17) and TH1 cells while promoting Treg cell expansion. In B cells, IL-35 activates STAT1 and STAT3 through the IL-35 receptor comprising the IL-12Rβ2 and IL-27Rα subunits. As IL-35 also induced the conversion of human B cells into Breg cells, these findings suggest that IL-35 may be used to induce autologous Breg and IL-35(+) Breg cells and treat autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

  1. Transgenic expression of TGF-beta on thyrocytes inhibits development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis and increases regulatory T cells in thyroids of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiguang; Fang, Yujiang; Sharp, Gordon C; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic NOD.H-2h4 mice expressing TGF-beta under control of the thyroglobulin promoter were generated to assess the role of TGF-beta in the development of thyrocyte hyperplasia. In contrast to nontransgenic littermates, which develop lymphocytic spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (L-SAT), all TGF-beta transgenic (Tg) mice given NaI water for 2-7 mo developed thyroid lesions characterized by severe thyroid epithelial cell hyperplasia and proliferation, with fibrosis and less lymphocyte infiltration than in nontransgenic mice. Most Tg mice produced less anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody than did wild type (WT) mice. T cells from Tg and WT mice were equivalent in their ability to induce L-SAT after transfer to SCID or TCRalpha(-/-) mice. WT lymphocytes could transfer experimental autoimmune thyroiditis or L-SAT to Tg mice, indicating that the transgenic environment did not prevent migration of lymphocytes to the thyroid. Thyroids of Tg mice had higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with nontransgenic WT mice. Transient depletion of Tregs by anti-CD25 resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into thyroids of transgenic mice. Treg depletion also resulted in increased anti-mouse thyroglobulin autoantibody responses and increased expression of IFN-gamma and IFN-gamma-inducible chemokines in thyroids of Tg mice. The results suggest that spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis is inhibited in mice expressing transgenic TGF-beta on thyrocytes, at least in part, because there is an increased frequency of Tregs in their thyroids.

  2. T Regulatory Cells and Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gorantla, Vijay S.; Schneeberger, Stefan; Brandacher, Gerald; Sucher, Robert; Zhang, Dong; Lee, Andrew; Zheng, Xin Xiao

    2010-01-01

    Despite the development of successful immunosuppression protocols and tremendous improvement in short-term graft survival rates, the problem of chronic graft loss remains the bane of clinical transplantation. The induction and maintenance of transplantation tolerance is the “Holy grail” of transplantation. The recent identification and characterization of regulatory T cells (T regs) has opened up exciting opportunities for tolerance induction, immunotherapy and immunomodulation in transplantation. This review focuses on current understanding of regulatory T cells and their role in transplantation tolerance. PMID:20541385

  3. Soy milk digestion extract inhibits progression of prostate cancer cell growth via regulation of prostate cancer‑specific antigen and cell cycle-regulatory genes in human LNCaP cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-Hee; Shin, Hee-Chang; Oh, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyun-Hee; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-08-01

    Soy milk, which is produced from whole soybeans, contains a variety of biologically active components. Isoflavones are a class of soy-derived phytoestrogens with beneficial effects, among which genistein (GEN) has been previously indicated to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The present study evaluated the effects of soy milk digestion extract (SMD) on the progression of prostate cancer via the estrogen receptor (ER)β in human LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To evaluate the effects of SMD (daizein, 1.988 mg/100g, glycitein, 23.537 mg/100 g and GEN, 0.685 mg/100g) on cell proliferation, LNCaP cells were cultured in media containing vehicle (0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide), 17β‑estradiol (E2; 2.7x10‑7 mg/ml), GEN (2.7x10-2 mg/ml) of SMD (total aglycon concentration, 0.79 mg/ml), after which the cell viability was examined using an MTT assay. The cell viability was significantly elevated by E2 (by 45±0.18%), while it was markedly reduced by GEN (73.2±0.03%) or SMD (74.8±0.09%). Semi‑quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the mRNA expression levels of target genes, including ERβ, prostate cancer‑specific antigen (PSA) and cell cycle regulators p21, Cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4. The expression of ERβ was almost completely diminished by E2, whereas it was significantly elevated by SMD. In addition, the expression levels of PSA were considerably reduced by SMD. The expression of p21 was significantly elevated by SMD, while it was markedly reduced by E2. Of note, the expression levels of Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were considerably elevated by E2, while being significantly reduced by GEN and SMD. All of these results indicated that SMD may inhibit the proliferation of human prostate cancer cells via regulating the expression of ERβ, PSA, p21, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in an ER-dependent manner.

  4. CD4+CD25+ T Regulatory Cells Inhibit CD8+ IFN-γ Production During Acute and Chronic FIV Infection Utilizing a Membrane TGF-β-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fogle, Jonathan E.; Mexas, Angela M.; Tompkins, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract CD8+ lymphocytes are critical to the control and elimination of viral pathogens. Impaired CD8+ responses are well recognized in lentiviral infections; however, the mechanisms underlying CD8+ impairment remain elusive. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for human AIDS, we reported previously that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells in both the acute and long-term, asymptomatic phase of infection are constitutively activated and suppress CD4+CD25– T cell responses. In the current study, we have demonstrated that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells suppress CD8+ responses to immune stimulation during both the acute and chronic, asymptomatic phase of FIV infection and that the mechanism of suppression may be mediated by membrane-associated TGF-β (mTGF-β) on CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes. Depletion of CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from lymph node suspensions significantly enhanced production of IFN-γ during the acute phase of infection and coculture of CD8+ lymphocytes with CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes resulted in suppression of CD8+ IFN-γ during both the acute and chronic stages of infection. FACS analysis indicated that there was TGF-βRII upregulation on CD8+ cells from FIV+ cats during the acute and chronic stage of infection. In addition, there was upregulation of mTGF-β on the CD4+CD25+ subset in chronically infected cats. In support of activation of the TGF-β signaling pathway, Western blotting showed Smad 2 phosphorylation in CD8+ targets following CD4+CD25+/CD8+ coculture. These results demonstrate the suppressive effect CD4+CD25+ Treg cells have on the CD8+ immune response during the acute and chronic stages of FIV infection and suggest that the mechanism of suppression may be mediated by mTGF-β. PMID:20156102

  5. CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells inhibit CD8(+) IFN-gamma production during acute and chronic FIV infection utilizing a membrane TGF-beta-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fogle, Jonathan E; Mexas, Angela M; Tompkins, Wayne A; Tompkins, Mary B

    2010-02-01

    CD8(+) lymphocytes are critical to the control and elimination of viral pathogens. Impaired CD8(+) responses are well recognized in lentiviral infections; however, the mechanisms underlying CD8(+) impairment remain elusive. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model for human AIDS, we reported previously that CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in both the acute and long-term, asymptomatic phase of infection are constitutively activated and suppress CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell responses. In the current study, we have demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells suppress CD8(+) responses to immune stimulation during both the acute and chronic, asymptomatic phase of FIV infection and that the mechanism of suppression may be mediated by membrane-associated TGF-beta (mTGF-beta) on CD4(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes from lymph node suspensions significantly enhanced production of IFN-gamma during the acute phase of infection and coculture of CD8(+) lymphocytes with CD4(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes resulted in suppression of CD8(+) IFN-gamma during both the acute and chronic stages of infection. FACS analysis indicated that there was TGF-betaRII upregulation on CD8(+) cells from FIV(+) cats during the acute and chronic stage of infection. In addition, there was upregulation of mTGF-beta on the CD4(+)CD25(+) subset in chronically infected cats. In support of activation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway, Western blotting showed Smad 2 phosphorylation in CD8(+) targets following CD4(+)CD25(+)/CD8(+) coculture. These results demonstrate the suppressive effect CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells have on the CD8(+) immune response during the acute and chronic stages of FIV infection and suggest that the mechanism of suppression may be mediated by mTGF-beta.

  6. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M. James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer. PMID:28275095

  7. BAP1 inhibits the ER stress gene regulatory network and modulates metabolic stress response.

    PubMed

    Dai, Fangyan; Lee, Hyemin; Zhang, Yilei; Zhuang, Li; Yao, Hui; Xi, Yuanxin; Xiao, Zhen-Dong; You, M James; Li, Wei; Su, Xiaoping; Gan, Boyi

    2017-03-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is classically linked to metabolic homeostasis via the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), which is instructed by multiple transcriptional regulatory cascades. BRCA1 associated protein 1 (BAP1) is a tumor suppressor with de-ubiquitinating enzyme activity and has been implicated in chromatin regulation of gene expression. Here we show that BAP1 inhibits cell death induced by unresolved metabolic stress. This prosurvival role of BAP1 depends on its de-ubiquitinating activity and correlates with its ability to dampen the metabolic stress-induced UPR transcriptional network. BAP1 inhibits glucose deprivation-induced reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion, two cellular events contributing to the ER stress-induced cell death. In line with this, Bap1 KO mice are more sensitive to tunicamycin-induced renal damage. Mechanically, we show that BAP1 represses metabolic stress-induced UPR and cell death through activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and reveal that BAP1 binds to ATF3 and CHOP promoters and inhibits their transcription. Taken together, our results establish a previously unappreciated role of BAP1 in modulating the cellular adaptability to metabolic stress and uncover a pivotal function of BAP1 in the regulation of the ER stress gene-regulatory network. Our study may also provide new conceptual framework for further understanding BAP1 function in cancer.

  8. Minocycline promotes the generation of dendritic cells with regulatory properties

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Lee, Jae-Hee; Park, Young-Jun; Song, Sukgil; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-01-01

    Minocycline, which has long been used as a broad-spectrum antibiotic, also exhibits non-antibiotic properties such as inhibition of inflammation and angiogenesis. In this study, we show that minocycline significantly enhances the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow (BM) cells when used together with GM-CSF and IL-4. DCs generated from BM cells in the presence of minocycline (Mino-DCs) demonstrate the characteristics of regulatory DCs. Compared with control DCs, Mino-DCs are resistant to subsequent maturation stimuli, impaired in MHC class II-restricted exogenous Ag presentation, and show decreased cytokine secretion. Mino-DCs also show decreased ability to prime allogeneic-specific T cells, while increasing the expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, pretreatment with MOG35-55 peptide-pulsed Mino-DCs ameliorates clinical signs of experimental autoimmune encephalitis induced by MOG peptide injection. Our study identifies minocycline as a new pharmacological agent that could be potentially used to increase the production of regulatory DCs for cell therapy to treat autoimmune disorders, allergy, and transplant rejection. PMID:27463004

  9. Regulatory T cells in Allergic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Chatila, Talal A.

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of allergic diseases entails an ineffective tolerogenic immune response towards allergens. Regulatory T cells (TReg) cells play a key role in sustaining immune tolerance to allergens, yet mechanisms by which TReg cells fail to maintain tolerance in allergic diseases are not well understood. We review current concepts and established mechanisms regarding how TReg cells regulate different components of allergen-triggered immune responses to promote and maintain tolerance. We will also discuss more recent advances that emphasize the “dual” functionality of TReg cells in allergic diseases: how TReg cells are essential in promoting tolerance to allergens but also how a pro-allergic inflammatory environment can skew TReg cells towards a pathogenic phenotype that aggravates and perpetuates disease. These advances highlight opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies that aim to re-establish tolerance in chronic allergic diseases by promoting TReg cell and stability function. PMID:27596705

  10. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Larson, Ryan P; Shafiani, Shahin; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2013-01-01

    The immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) must be tightly regulated to mount a sufficient response to limit bacterial growth and dissemination while avoiding excessive inflammation that could damage host tissues. A wide variety of cell types, cell surface molecules, and cytokines are likely to contribute to this regulation, but recent studies have revealed that a subset of CD4 T cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3, called regulatory T (reg) cells, play a critical role [1-3]. Although the first reports of T reg cells in tuberculosis (TB) occurred only recently (i.e., 2006) [4, 5], we have already gained many insights into their activity during TB. While it is likely that T reg cells do play some beneficial roles by preventing inflammation-mediated damage to host tissues during TB, this aspect of their function has not been well studied to date. What is clear, however, is that during the initial T cell response to Mtb infection, Mtb induces the expansions of T reg cells that delay the onset of adaptive immunity, suggesting that Mtb has hijacked T reg cell-mediated immune suppression to allow it to replicate unabated in the lung until T cells finally arrive [6]. In this chapter, we will first provide an overview of the delayed T cell response to Mtb and a brief introduction to regulatory T cells. We will then review what is known about T reg cells from observations in human populations, discuss mechanistic insights revealed in the mouse model, and speculate about the relevance of this understanding for future efforts to prevent and treat TB.

  11. Regulatory T cells and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Paust, Silke; Cantor, Harvey

    2005-04-01

    Although T-cell clones bearing T-cell receptors with high affinity for self-peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) products are generally eliminated in the thymus (recessive tolerance), the peripheral T-cell repertoire remains strongly biased toward self-peptide MHC complexes and includes autoreactive T cells. A search for peripheral T cells that might exert dominant inhibitory effects on autoreactivity has implicated a subpopulation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells called regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here, we discuss the role of cytokines and costimulatory molecules in the generation, maintenance, and function of Tregs. We also summarize evidence for the involvement of Tregs in controlling autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Last, we discuss our recent definition of the potential role of B7 expressed on activated T-effector cells as a target molecule for Treg-dependent suppression. These observations suggest that the engagement of B7 on effector T cells transmits an inhibitory signal that blocks or attenuates effector T-cell function. We restrict our comments to the suppression mediated by cells within the CD4 lineage; the impact of the cells within the CD8 lineage that may suppress via engagement of Qa-1 on effector T cells is not addressed in this review.

  12. The PDL1-PD1 axis converts human TH1 cells into regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Shoba; Mangus, Courtney W; Wang, James C M; Wei, Fang; He, Alice; Kapoor, Veena; Foley, Jason E; Massey, Paul R; Felizardo, Tania C; Riley, James L; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Medin, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Daniel H

    2011-11-30

    Immune surveillance by T helper type 1 (T(H)1) cells is not only critical for the host response to tumors and infection, but also contributes to autoimmunity and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after transplantation. The inhibitory molecule programmed death ligand 1 (PDL1) has been shown to anergize human T(H)1 cells, but other mechanisms of PDL1-mediated T(H)1 inhibition such as the conversion of T(H)1 cells to a regulatory phenotype have not been well characterized. We hypothesized that PDL1 may cause T(H)1 cells to manifest differentiation plasticity. Conventional T cells or irradiated K562 myeloid tumor cells overexpressing PDL1 converted TBET(+) T(H)1 cells into FOXP3(+) regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in vivo, thereby preventing human-into-mouse xenogeneic GVHD (xGVHD). Either blocking PD1 expression on T(H)1 cells by small interfering RNA targeting or abrogation of PD1 signaling by SHP1/2 pharmacologic inhibition stabilized T(H)1 cell differentiation during PDL1 challenge and restored the capacity of T(H)1 cells to mediate lethal xGVHD. PD1 signaling therefore induces human T(H)1 cells to manifest in vivo plasticity, resulting in a T(reg) phenotype that severely impairs cell-mediated immunity. Converting human T(H)1 cells to a regulatory phenotype with PD1 signaling provides a potential way to block GVHD after transplantation. Moreover, because this conversion can be prevented by blocking PD1 expression or pharmacologically inhibiting SHP1/2, this pathway provides a new therapeutic direction for enhancing T cell immunity to cancer and infection.

  13. Follicular regulatory T cells impair follicular T helper cells in HIV and SIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Miller, Shannon M.; Folkvord, Joy M.; Kimball, Abigail; Chamanian, Mastooreh; Meditz, Amie L.; Arends, Tessa; McCarter, Martin D.; Levy, David N.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Skinner, Pamela J.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) exploit follicular lymphoid regions by establishing high levels of viral replication and dysregulating humoral immunity. Follicular regulatory T cells (TFR) are a recently characterized subset of lymphocytes that influence the germinal centre response through interactions with follicular helper T cells (TFH). Here, utilizing both human and rhesus macaque models, we show the impact of HIV and SIV infection on TFR number and function. We find that TFR proportionately and numerically expand during infection through mechanisms involving viral entry and replication, TGF-β signalling, low apoptosis rates and the presence of regulatory dendritic cells. Further, TFR exhibit elevated regulatory phenotypes and impair TFH functions during HIV infection. Thus, TFR contribute to inefficient germinal centre responses and inhibit HIV and SIV clearance. PMID:26482032

  14. Roundup inhibits steroidogenesis by disrupting steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L P; McCormick, C; Martin, C; Stocco, D M

    2000-01-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that many currently used pesticides have the capacity to disrupt reproductive function in animals. Although this reproductive dysfunction is typically characterized by alterations in serum steroid hormone levels, disruptions in spermatogenesis, and loss of fertility, the mechanisms involved in pesticide-induced infertility remain unclear. Because testicular Leydig cells play a crucial role in male reproductive function by producing testosterone, we used the mouse MA-10 Leydig tumor cell line to study the molecular events involved in pesticide-induced alterations in steroid hormone biosynthesis. We previously showed that the organochlorine insecticide lindane and the organophosphate insecticide Dimethoate directly inhibit steroidogenesis in Leydig cells by disrupting expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein. StAR protein mediates the rate-limiting and acutely regulated step in steroidogenesis, the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) enzyme initiates the synthesis of all steroid hormones. In the present study, we screened eight currently used pesticide formulations for their ability to inhibit steroidogenesis, concentrating on their effects on StAR expression in MA-10 cells. In addition, we determined the effects of these compounds on the levels and activities of the P450scc enzyme (which converts cholesterol to pregnenolone) and the 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) enzyme (which converts pregnenolone to progesterone). Of the pesticides screened, only the pesticide Roundup inhibited dibutyryl [(Bu)(2)]cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in MA-10 cells without causing cellular toxicity. Roundup inhibited steroidogenesis by disrupting StAR protein expression, further demonstrating the susceptibility of StAR to environmental pollutants. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7

  15. Harnessing Regulatory T cells to Suppress Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Alison N.; Hansbro, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in maintaining the homeostatic balance of immune responses. Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways that is driven by dysregulated immune responses toward normally innocuous antigens. Individuals with asthma have fewer and less functional Tregs, which may lead to uncontrolled effector cell responses and promote proasthmatic responses of T helper type 2, T helper 17, natural killer T, antigen-presenting, and B cells. Tregs have the capacity to either directly or indirectly suppress these responses. Hence, the induced expansion of functional Tregs in predisposed or individuals with asthma is a potential approach for the prevention and treatment of asthma. Infection by a number of micro-organisms has been associated with reduced prevalence of asthma, and many infectious agents have been shown to induce Tregs and reduce allergic airways disease in mouse models. The translation of the regulatory and therapeutic properties of infectious agents for use in asthma requires the identification of key modulatory components and the development and trial of effective immunoregulatory therapies. Further translational and clinical research is required for the induction of Tregs to be harnessed as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. PMID:20097830

  16. Regulatory T cells: history and perspective.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2011-01-01

    Despite the skepticism that once prevailed among immunologists, it is now widely accepted that the normal immune system harbors a T-cell population, called regulatory T cells (Treg cells), specialized for immune suppression. It was first shown that depletion of a T-cell subpopulation from normal rodents produced autoimmune disease. Search for a molecular marker specific for such autoimmune-preventive Treg cells has revealed that the majority, if not all, of them constitutively express the CD25 molecule as depletion of CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells spontaneously evokes autoimmune disease in otherwise normal rodents. The expression of CD25 by Treg cells has made it possible to delineate their developmental pathways, in particular their thymic development, and establish simple in vitro assay for assessing their suppressive activity. The marker and the in vitro assay have helped to identify human Treg cells with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics. Recent efforts have shown that natural Treg cells specifically express the transcription factor Foxp3 and that mutations of the Foxp3 gene produce a variety of immunological diseases in humans and rodents. Specific expression of Foxp3 in natural Treg cells has enabled their functional and developmental characterization by genetic approach. These studies altogether have provided firm evidence for Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) Treg cells as an indispensable cellular constituent of the normal immune system for establishing and maintaining immunologic self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Treg cells are now within the scope of clinical use to treat immunological diseases and control physiological and pathological immune responses.

  17. Regulatory T cells and skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schiaffino, Stefano; Pereira, Marcelo G; Ciciliot, Stefano; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2017-02-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration results from the activation and differentiation of myogenic stem cells, called satellite cells, located beneath the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Inflammatory and immune cells have a crucial role in the regeneration process. Acute muscle injury causes an immediate transient wave of neutrophils followed by a more persistent infiltration of M1 (proinflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory/proregenerative) macrophages. New studies show that injured muscle is also infiltrated by a specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells, which control both the inflammatory response, by promoting the M1-to-M2 switch, and the activation of satellite cells. Treg cells accumulate in injured muscle in response to specific cytokines, such as IL-33, and promote muscle growth by releasing growth factors, such as amphiregulin. Muscle repair during aging is impaired due to reduced number of Treg cells and can be enhanced by IL-33 supplementation. Migration of Treg cells could also contribute to explain the effect of heterochronic parabiosis, whereby muscle regeneration of aged mice can be improved by a parabiotically linked young partners. In mdx dystrophin-deficient mice, a model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy, muscle injury, and inflammation is mitigated by expansion of the Treg-cell population but exacerbated by Treg-cell depletion. These findings support the notion that immunological mechanisms are not only essential in the response to pathogenic microbes and tumor cells but also have a wider homeostatic role in tissue repair, and open new perspectives for boosting muscle growth in chronic muscle disease and during aging.

  18. Visualizing regulatory T cell control of autoimmune responses in nonobese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qizhi; Adams, Jason Y; Tooley, Aaron J; Bi, Mingying; Fife, Brian T; Serra, Pau; Santamaria, Pere; Locksley, Richard M; Krummel, Matthew F; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo mechanism of regulatory T cell (Treg cell) function in controlling autoimmunity remains controversial. Here we have used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to analyze lymph node priming of diabetogenic T cells and to delineate the mechanisms of Treg cell control of autoimmunity in vivo. Islet antigen–specific CD4+CD25− T helper cells (TH cells) and Treg cells swarmed and arrested in the presence of autoantigens. These TH cell activities were progressively inhibited in the presence of increasing numbers of Treg cells. There were no detectable stable associations between Treg and TH cells during active suppression. In contrast, Treg cells directly interacted with dendritic cells bearing islet antigen. Such persistent Treg cell–dendritic cell contacts preceded the inhibition of TH cell activation by dendritic cells, supporting the idea that dendritic cells are central to Treg cell function in vivo. PMID:16311599

  19. Memory Antitumor T-Cells Resist Inhibition by Immune Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhua; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Bergman, Ira

    2015-09-01

    Cancer immune therapy is difficult partly because several classes of suppressor cells, including regulatory T-cells and macrophage-derived suppressor cells, inhibit the antitumor T-cell response. We used treatment studies of implanted tumors in mice to demonstrate that the same inhibitory cells that abrogated an acute therapeutic T-cell response to established tumor did not inhibit the therapeutic response produced by memory T-cells. Generating antitumor memory T-cells may be a highly potent strategy against cancer with late developing metastases. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Regulatory Circuits Controlling Vascular Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Sallam, Tamer; Cheng, Henry; Demer, Linda L.; Tintut, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and aging. Such abnormal calcium deposition occurs in medial and/or intimal layers of blood vessels as well as in cardiac valves. Once considered a passive and inconsequential finding, the presence of calcium deposits in the vasculature is widely accepted as a predictor of increased morbidity and mortality. Recognition of the importance of vascular calcification in health is driving research into mechanisms that govern its development, progression, and regression. Diverse, but highly interconnected factors, have been implicated, including disturbances in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and mineral and hormonal balances, which can lead to formation of osteoblast-like cells in the artery wall. A tight balance of procalcific and anticalcific regulators dictates the extent of disease. In this review, we focus on the main regulatory circuits modulating vascular cell calcification. PMID:23269436

  1. Role of Regulatory Cells in Oral Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyniak, Marcin; O'Mahony, Liam

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is continuously exposed to great amounts of different antigens from both food and intestinal microbes. Immune tolerance to these antigens is very important for intestinal and systemic immune homeostasis. Oral tolerance is a specific type of peripheral tolerance induced by exposure to antigen via the oral route. Investigations on the role of intestinal immune system in preventing hypersensitivity reactions to innocuous dietary and microbial antigens have been intensively performed during the last 2 decades. In this review article, we discuss how food allergens are recognized by the intestinal immune system and draw attention to the role of regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells in the establishment of oral tolerance and tolerogenic features of intestinal dendritic cells. We also emphasize the potential role of tonsils in oral tolerance induction because of their anatomical location, cellular composition, and possible usage to develop novel ways of specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:28102055

  2. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  3. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4+ T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4low CD25high), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4low CD25high phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4low Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4+ and CD4− lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin. PMID:19016909

  4. Human CD4low CD25high regulatory T cells indiscriminately kill autologous activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Bryl, Ewa; Daca, Agnieszka; Jóźwik, Agnieszka; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2009-09-01

    The interest of the scientific community in regulatory CD4(+) T cells has reached an enormously high level. Common agreement is that they inhibit not only the proliferation of CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, but also the activities of natural killer cells and macrophages. However, very important issues concerning actual mechanism(s) and specificity of the action of regulatory T cells (Tregs) upon responder cells are still unsolved or vague. The best known marker for Tregs is the expression of transcription factor FoxP3, widely used for their enumeration. It is known that FoxP3 inhibits cytokine production so the most probable action of Tregs is direct. However, FoxP3 expression cannot be used for functional studies in humans. Therefore we identified human peripheral blood Tregs as a distinct, very well-defined population of peripheral blood T cells with reduced CD4 and high CD25 expression (CD4(low) CD25(high)), which fulfils the current phenotypic criteria identifying the Tregs by simultaneously expressing high amounts of FoxP3. We conclude that the definition of a CD4(low) CD25(high) phenotype is enough to unambiguously detect and study the regulatory function of these cells. On the functional level, the CD4(low) Tregs are able to non-specifically suppress the proliferation of autologous, previously polyclonally activated CD4(+) and CD4(-) lymphocytes and to kill them by direct contact, probably utilizing intracellular granzyme B and perforin.

  5. Regulatory T cells require TCR signaling for their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amanda M; Lu, Wen; Sindhava, Vishal J; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K; Yang, Enjun; Riese, Matthew J; Maltzman, Jonathan S; Jordan, Martha S; Kambayashi, Taku

    2015-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells that maintain immune tolerance in part by their ability to inhibit the proliferation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconvs). The role of the TCR and the downstream signaling pathways required for this suppressive function of Tregs are not fully understood. To yield insight into how TCR-mediated signals influence Treg suppressive function, we assessed the ability of Tregs with altered TCR-mediated signaling capacity to inhibit Tconv proliferation. Mature Tregs deficient in Src homology 2 domain containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76), an adaptor protein that nucleates the proximal signaling complex downstream of the TCR, were unable to inhibit Tconv proliferation, suggesting that TCR signaling is required for Treg suppressive function. Moreover, Tregs with defective phospholipase C γ (PLCγ) activation due to a Y145F mutation of SLP-76 were also defective in their suppressive function. Conversely, enhancement of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling downstream of PLCγ by genetic ablation of a negative regulator of diacylglycerol kinase ζ increased the suppressive ability of Tregs. Because SLP-76 is also important for integrin activation and signaling, we tested the role of integrin activation in Treg-mediated suppression. Tregs lacking the adaptor proteins adhesion and degranulation promoting adapter protein or CT10 regulator of kinase/CT10 regulator of kinase-like, which are required for TCR-mediated integrin activation, inhibited Tconv proliferation to a similar extent as wild-type Tregs. Together, these data suggest that TCR-mediated PLCγ activation, but not integrin activation, is required for Tregs to inhibit Tconv proliferation.

  6. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Doerthe

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  7. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  8. Regulatory Roles of Anoctamin-6 in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Juni; Leung, Chi-Ting; Li, Ang; Peterson-Yantorno, Kim; Ouyang, Huan; Stamer, W. Daniel; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Trabecular meshwork (TM) cell volume is a determinant of aqueous humor outflow resistance, and thereby IOP. Regulation of TM cell volume depends on chloride ion (Cl−) release through swelling-activated channels (ICl,Swell), whose pore is formed by LRRC8 proteins. Chloride ion release through swelling-activated channels has been reported to be regulated by calcium-activated anoctamins, but this finding is controversial. Particularly uncertain has been the effect of anoctamin Ano6, reported as a Ca2+-activated Cl− (CaCC) or cation channel in other cells. The current study tested whether anoctamin activity modifies volume regulation of primary TM cell cultures and cell lines. Methods Gene expression was studied with quantitative PCR, supplemented by reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western immunoblots. Currents were measured by ruptured whole-cell patch clamping and volume by electronic cell sizing. Results Primary TM cell cultures and the TM5 and GTM3 cell lines expressed Ano6 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher than the other anoctamin CaCCs (Ano1 and Ano2). Ionomycin increased cell Ca2+ and activated macroscopic currents conforming to CaCCs in other cells, but displayed significantly more positive mean reversal potentials (+5 to +12 mV) than those displayed by ICl,Swell (−14 to −21 mV) in the same cells. Nonselective CaCC inhibitors (tannic acid>CaCCinh−A01) and transient Ano6 knockdown strongly inhibited ionomycin-activated currents, ICl,Swell and the regulatory volume response to hyposmotic swelling. Conclusions Ionomycin activates CaCCs associated with net cation movement in TM cells. These currents, ICl,Swell, and cell volume are regulated by Ano6. The findings suggest a novel clinically-relevant approach for altering cell volume, and thereby outflow resistance, by targeting Ano6. PMID:28125837

  9. Function and mechanism by which interferon regulatory factor-1 inhibits oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, FEI-FEI; JIANG, GUAN; XU, KERUI; ZHENG, JUN-NIAN

    2013-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechnisms by which interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 inhibits oncogenesis. IRF-1 is associated with regulation of interferon α and β transcription. In addition, numerous clinical studies have indicated that IRF-1 gene deletion or rearrangement correlates with development of specific forms of human cancer. IRF-1 has been revealed to exhibit marked functional diversity in the regulation of oncogenesis. IRF-1 activates a set of target genes associated with regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and the immune response. The role of IRF-1 in the regulation of various types of human tumor has important implications for understanding the susceptibility and progression of cancer. In addition, an improved understanding of the role of IRF-1 in the pathological processes that lead to human malignant diseases may aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23420765

  10. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  11. Regulatory Functions of Natural Killer Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Wiendl, Heinz; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Kerlero de Rosbo, Nicole; Uccelli, Antonio; Laroni, Alice

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that natural killer (NK) cells exhibit regulatory features. Among them, CD56bright NK cells have been suggested to play a major role in controlling T cell responses and maintaining homeostasis. Dysfunction in NK cell-mediated regulatory features has been recently described in untreated multiple sclerosis (MS), suggesting a contribution to MS pathogenesis. Moreover, biological disease-modifying treatments effective in MS apparently enhance the frequencies and/or regulatory function of NK cells, further pointing toward an immunoprotective role of NK cells in MS. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the regulatory functions of NK cells, based on their interactions with other cells belonging to the innate compartment, as well as with adaptive effector cells. We review the more recent data reporting disruption of NK cell/T cell interactions in MS and discuss how disease-modifying treatments for MS affect NK cells. PMID:28066417

  12. Similarity in gene-regulatory networks suggests that cancer cells share characteristics of embryonic neural cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zan; Lei, Anhua; Xu, Liyang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Yonglong; Zhang, Xuena; Gao, Yan; Yang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Min; Cao, Ying

    2017-08-04

    Cancer cells are immature cells resulting from cellular reprogramming by gene misregulation, and redifferentiation is expected to reduce malignancy. It is unclear, however, whether cancer cells can undergo terminal differentiation. Here, we show that inhibition of the epigenetic modification enzyme enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), histone deacetylases 1 and 3 (HDAC1 and -3), lysine demethylase 1A (LSD1), or DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), which all promote cancer development and progression, leads to postmitotic neuron-like differentiation with loss of malignant features in distinct solid cancer cell lines. The regulatory effect of these enzymes in neuronal differentiation resided in their intrinsic activity in embryonic neural precursor/progenitor cells. We further found that a major part of pan-cancer-promoting genes and the signal transducers of the pan-cancer-promoting signaling pathways, including the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) mesenchymal marker genes, display neural specific expression during embryonic neurulation. In contrast, many tumor suppressor genes, including the EMT epithelial marker gene that encodes cadherin 1 (CDH1), exhibited non-neural or no expression. This correlation indicated that cancer cells and embryonic neural cells share a regulatory network, mediating both tumorigenesis and neural development. This observed similarity in regulatory mechanisms suggests that cancer cells might share characteristics of embryonic neural cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulatory T cells in experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2006-08-01

    During the past 10 years, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have been extensively studied for their function in autoimmune disease. This review summarizes the evidence for a role of Treg in suppression of innate and adaptive immune responses in experimental models of autoimmunity including arthritis, colitis, diabetes, autoimmune encephalomyelitis, lupus, gastritis, oophoritis, prostatitis, and thyroiditis. Antigen-specific activation of Treg, but antigen-independent suppressive function, emerges as a common paradigm derived from several disease models. Treg suppress conventional T cells (Tcon) by direct cell contact in vitro. However, downmodulation of dendritic cell function and secretion of inhibitory cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta might underlie Treg function in vivo. The final outcome of autoimmunity vs tolerance depends on the balance between stimulatory signals (Toll-like receptor engagement, costimulation, and antigen dose) and inhibitory signals from Treg. Whereas most experimental settings analyze the capacity of Treg to prevent onset of autoimmune disease, more recent efforts indicate successful treatment of ongoing disease. Thus, Treg are on the verge of moving from experimental animal models into clinical applications in humans.

  14. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients. ©2014 AACR.

  15. Modifications to the algal growth inhibition test for use as a regulatory assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, S.W.; Fleming, K.L.; Korthals, E.T.; Searle, G.; Reynolds, L.; Karner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Biological assays using aquatic invertebrates and fish do not necessarily predict protection levels for primary producers such as algae and aquatic macrophytes. State regulatory programs may not be protecting the environment from many phytotoxic compounds. Recent modifications of the US Environmental Protection Agency's algal test were evaluated for their potential use as a regulatory assay. Primary goals of this investigation were to downsize the algal assay and to evaluate various methods of automation. Disposable microplates with 2-ml sample wells were evaluated as an alternative testing chamber for the 96-h growth inhibition test with Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly known as Selenastrum capricornutum). The authors compared the standardized Erlenmeyer {reg_sign} flask test to the microplate test using CuCl{sub 2}, NaCl, phenol, ZnCl{sub 2}, and a surfactant. They noted improved control performance with the microplate test, whereas median inhibitory concentration values were similar for both methods. Other procedures they addressed included the use of EDTA, filtration of samples, and the effect of colored samples on algal growth. They also evaluated growth estimates by comparing manual cell counting to more automated growth estimates using fluorescence and absorbance endpoints. The use of fluorescence and absorbance measurements demonstrated reductions in replicate variability over manual counting and may offer time-saving alternatives for laboratory analysts.

  16. The Molecular Mechanisms of Regulatory T Cell Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Zheng, Lixin; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T lymphocytes, known as regulatory T cells or Tregs, have been proposed to be a lineage of professional immune suppressive cells that exclusively counteract the effects of the immunoprotective “helper” and “cytotoxic” lineages of T lymphocytes. Here we discuss new concepts on the mechanisms and functions of Tregs. There are several key points we emphasize: 1. Tregs exert suppressive effects both directly on effector T cells and indirectly through antigen-presenting cells; 2. Regulation can occur through a novel mechanism of cytokine consumption to regulate as opposed to the usual mechanism of cytokine/chemokine production; 3. In cases where CD4+ effector T cells are directly inhibited by Tregs, it is chiefly through a mechanism of lymphokine withdrawal apoptosis leading to polyclonal deletion; and 4. Contrary to the current view, we discuss new evidence that Tregs, similar to other T-cells lineages, can promote protective immune responses in certain infectious contexts (Chen et al., 2011; Pandiyan et al., 2011). Although these points are at variance to varying degrees with the standard model of Treg behavior, we will recount developing findings that support these new concepts. PMID:22566849

  17. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  18. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    PubMed Central

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Immunotherapy (IT) could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease although successful integration of IT into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of anti-tumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. MATERIALS and METHODS Tregs were identified as a CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ lymphocyte subset and their fate followed in a murine TRAMP-C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without radiation therapy. RESULTS CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Treg cells increased in immune organs following local leg or whole body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase following leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Tregs being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Tregs, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. CONCLUSIONS We conclude that Tregs are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation. PMID:21093169

  19. Bovine γδ T Cells Are a Major Regulatory T Cell Subset

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Jayne; Taylor, Geraldine; Smith, Adrian L.; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In humans and mice, γδ T cells represent <5% of the total circulating lymphocytes. In contrast, the γδ T cell compartment in ruminants accounts for 15–60% of the total circulating mononuclear lymphocytes. Despite the existence of CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ T cells in the bovine system, these are neither anergic nor suppressive. We present evidence showing that bovine γδ T cells are the major regulatory T cell subset in peripheral blood. These γδ T cells spontaneously secrete IL-10 and proliferate in response to IL-10, TGF-β, and contact with APCs. IL-10–expressing γδ T cells inhibit Ag-specific and nonspecific proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. APC subsets expressing IL-10 and TFG-β regulate proliferation of γδ T cells producing IL-10. We propose that γδ T cells are a major regulatory T cell population in the bovine system. PMID:24890724

  20. Purification and stability characterization of a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Previous attempts to physically separate the cell cycle inhibitory and protease activities in preparations of a purified cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor were largely unsuccessful. Gradient elution of the inhibitor preparation from a DEAE HPLC column separated the cell growth inhibitor from the protease, and the two activities have been shown to be distinct and non-overlapping. The additional purification increased the specific biological activity of the CeReS preparation by approximately two-fold. The major inhibitory fraction that eluted from the DEAE column was further analyzed by tricine-SDS-PAGE and microbore reverse phase HPLC and shown to be homogeneous in nature. Two other fractions separated by DEAE HPLC, also devoid of protease activity, were shown to be inhibitory to cell proliferation and most likely represented modified relatives of the CeReS inhibitor. The highly purified CeReS was chemically characterized for amino acid and carbohydrate composition and the role of the carbohydrate in cell proliferation inhibition, stability, and protease resistance was assessed.

  1. Purification and stability characterization of a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide inhibitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Previous attempts to physically separate the cell cycle inhibitory and protease activities in preparations of a purified cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor were largely unsuccessful. Gradient elution of the inhibitor preparation from a DEAE HPLC column separated the cell growth inhibitor from the protease, and the two activities have been shown to be distinct and non-overlapping. The additional purification increased the specific biological activity of the CeReS preparation by approximately two-fold. The major inhibitory fraction that eluted from the DEAE column was further analyzed by tricine-SDS-PAGE and microbore reverse phase HPLC and shown to be homogeneous in nature. Two other fractions separated by DEAE HPLC, also devoid of protease activity, were shown to be inhibitory to cell proliferation and most likely represented modified relatives of the CeReS inhibitor. The highly purified CeReS was chemically characterized for amino acid and carbohydrate composition and the role of the carbohydrate in cell proliferation inhibition, stability, and protease resistance was assessed.

  2. Nigericin inhibits accumulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein but not steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    King, S R; Walsh, L P; Stocco, D M

    2000-08-30

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein mediates the delivery of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the cholesterol side chain cleavage complex converts it to pregnenolone. While the mechanism by which this mitochondrial protein acts is poorly understood, one component of the mitochondrial electrochemical gradient, the electrochemical potential (DeltaPsi), appears to be essential. In this study, the importance of the other component, the proton gradient (DeltapH), was examined. Disruption of DeltapH with the electroneutral K(+)/H(+) exchanger, nigericin, had no effect on steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells at concentrations which significantly reduced StAR protein levels. These data indicate for the first time in true steroidogenic cells, that StAR can act prior to being fully imported into the mitochondria and are consistent with observations made in COS-1 cells using mutant forms of StAR. These results support the hypothesis that a DeltaPsi-dependent factor is required for StAR activity and demonstrate that nigericin is the first compound described, capable of inhibiting StAR accumulation without affecting steroidogenesis.

  3. Inhibition of Non-flux-Controlling Enzymes Deters Cancer Glycolysis by Accumulation of Regulatory Metabolites of Controlling Steps

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Hernández, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S.; Del Mazo-Monsalvo, Isis; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis provides precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules and may contribute to the ATP supply required for the constant and accelerated cellular duplication in cancer cells. In consequence, inhibition of glycolysis has been reiteratively considered as an anti-cancer therapeutic option. In previous studies, kinetic modeling of glycolysis in cancer cells allowed the identification of the main steps that control the glycolytic flux: glucose transporter, hexokinase (HK), hexose phosphate isomerase (HPI), and glycogen degradation in human cervix HeLa cancer cells and rat AS-30D ascites hepatocarcinoma. It was also previously experimentally determined that simultaneous inhibition of the non-controlling enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and enolase (ENO) brings about significant decrease in the glycolytic flux of cancer cells and accumulation of intermediate metabolites, mainly fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru1,6BP), and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), which are inhibitors of HK and HPI, respectively. Here it was found by kinetic modeling that inhibition of cancer glycolysis can be attained by blocking downstream non flux-controlling steps as long as Fru1,6BP and DHAP, regulatory metabolites of flux-controlling enzymes, are accumulated. Furthermore, experimental results and further modeling showed that oxamate and iodoacetate inhibitions of PYK, ENO, and glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), but not of LDH and phosphoglycerate kinase, induced accumulation of Fru1,6BP and DHAP in AS-30D hepatoma cells. Indeed, PYK, ENO, and GAPDH exerted the highest control on the Fru1,6BP and DHAP concentrations. The high levels of these metabolites inhibited HK and HPI and led to glycolytic flux inhibition, ATP diminution, and accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal. Hence, the anticancer effects of downstream glycolytic inhibitors are very likely mediated by this mechanism. In parallel, it was also found that uncompetitive inhibition of the

  4. Inhibition of Non-flux-Controlling Enzymes Deters Cancer Glycolysis by Accumulation of Regulatory Metabolites of Controlling Steps.

    PubMed

    Marín-Hernández, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Del Mazo-Monsalvo, Isis; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Glycolysis provides precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules and may contribute to the ATP supply required for the constant and accelerated cellular duplication in cancer cells. In consequence, inhibition of glycolysis has been reiteratively considered as an anti-cancer therapeutic option. In previous studies, kinetic modeling of glycolysis in cancer cells allowed the identification of the main steps that control the glycolytic flux: glucose transporter, hexokinase (HK), hexose phosphate isomerase (HPI), and glycogen degradation in human cervix HeLa cancer cells and rat AS-30D ascites hepatocarcinoma. It was also previously experimentally determined that simultaneous inhibition of the non-controlling enzymes lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and enolase (ENO) brings about significant decrease in the glycolytic flux of cancer cells and accumulation of intermediate metabolites, mainly fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (Fru1,6BP), and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), which are inhibitors of HK and HPI, respectively. Here it was found by kinetic modeling that inhibition of cancer glycolysis can be attained by blocking downstream non flux-controlling steps as long as Fru1,6BP and DHAP, regulatory metabolites of flux-controlling enzymes, are accumulated. Furthermore, experimental results and further modeling showed that oxamate and iodoacetate inhibitions of PYK, ENO, and glyceraldehyde3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), but not of LDH and phosphoglycerate kinase, induced accumulation of Fru1,6BP and DHAP in AS-30D hepatoma cells. Indeed, PYK, ENO, and GAPDH exerted the highest control on the Fru1,6BP and DHAP concentrations. The high levels of these metabolites inhibited HK and HPI and led to glycolytic flux inhibition, ATP diminution, and accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal. Hence, the anticancer effects of downstream glycolytic inhibitors are very likely mediated by this mechanism. In parallel, it was also found that uncompetitive inhibition of the

  5. Regulatory T Cell Immunotherapy in Immune-Mediated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pierini, Antonio; Schneidawind, Dominik; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Negrin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Broad clinical interest rapidly followed the recent discovery of different subpopulations of T cells that have immune regulatory properties and a number of studies have been conducted aiming to dissect the translational potential of these promising cells. In this review we will focus on forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) positive regulatory T cells, T regulatory type 1 cells and invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT). We will analyze their ability to correct immune dysregulation in animal models of immune mediated diseases and we will examine the first clinical approaches where these cells have been directly or indirectly employed. We will discuss successes, challenges and limitations that rose in the road to the clinical use of regulatory T cells. PMID:26779417

  6. Regulatory T Cells in Skin Facilitate Epithelial Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Niwa; Zirak, Bahar; Rodriguez, Robert Sanchez; Pauli, Mariela L; Truong, Hong-An; Lai, Kevin; Ahn, Richard; Corbin, Kaitlin; Lowe, Margaret M; Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Taravati, Keyon; Tan, Madeleine R; Ricardo-Gonzalez, Roberto R; Nosbaum, Audrey; Bertolini, Marta; Liao, Wilson; Nestle, Frank O; Paus, Ralf; Cotsarelis, George; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2017-06-01

    The maintenance of tissue homeostasis is critically dependent on the function of tissue-resident immune cells and the differentiation capacity of tissue-resident stem cells (SCs). How immune cells influence the function of SCs is largely unknown. Regulatorycells (Tregs) in skin preferentially localize to hair follicles (HFs), which house a major subset of skin SCs (HFSCs). Here, we mechanistically dissect the role of Tregs in HF and HFSC biology. Lineage-specific cell depletion revealed that Tregs promote HF regeneration by augmenting HFSC proliferation and differentiation. Transcriptional and phenotypic profiling of Tregs and HFSCs revealed that skin-resident Tregs preferentially express high levels of the Notch ligand family member, Jagged 1 (Jag1). Expression of Jag1 on Tregs facilitated HFSC function and efficient HF regeneration. Taken together, our work demonstrates that Tregs in skin play a major role in HF biology by promoting the function of HFSCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PD-1 controls Lymph Node and Blood T Follicular Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Peter T.; Francisco, Loise M.; Carman, Christopher V.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2013-01-01

    Newly defined CD4+CXCR5+FoxP3+ T Follicular Regulatory (TFR) cells inhibit CD4+CXCR5+FoxP3− T Follicular Helper (TFH)-mediated humoral immunity. Although PD-1 is expressed by both cell types, the role of this inhibitory receptor on TFR differentiation is unknown. Here we show that PD-1/PD-L1 deficient mice have increased lymph node TFR cells, which have enhanced suppressive capacity. We also find substantial populations of TFR cells in mouse blood, and demonstrate that blood TFR cells home to lymph nodes and potently inhibit TFH cells in vivo. Blood TFR cells require CD28 and ICOS signaling, but are inhibited by PD-1/PD-L1. These findings reveal novel mechanisms by which the PD-1 pathway regulates antibody production and helps to reconcile inconsistencies surrounding the role of this pathway in humoral immunity. PMID:23242415

  8. Suppression of immune regulatory cells with combined therapy of celecoxib and sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qi; Guo, Jianming; Wang, Guomin; Chu, Yiwei; Hu, Xiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Objective To observe the the potential benefit of sunitinib in combination with cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) inhibitor in renal cell carcinoma therapy. Methods 769-p cell lines were treated with sunitinib, celecoxib, or in combination at different concentrations respectively. We investigated the expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 769-p and cell proliferation in vitro. BALB/c mice implanted with Renca cells were divided into 4 groups and administered orally by gavage with sunitinib, COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) monotherapy or combination, and PBS respectively. Tumor growth and animal survival were observed. The myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) in peripheral blood and spleen were determined by flow cytometry. The MDSCs protein was extracted for STAT3 analysis by western blot. Results 769-p cell lines were suppressed in a dose and time-dependent manner. The expression of GM-CSF was substantially inhibited by celecoxib and sunitinib. Combination of sunitinib and celecoxib in vivo could effectively reduce the MDSCs than those in control group. Meanwhile, the CD4+ lymphocytes were strongly increased and the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in MDSCs were significantly reduced. Conclusion Combination therapy with sunitinib and celecoxib intensified the curative effects to renal cell carcinoma by suppressing immune regulatory cells. PMID:27926489

  9. Autocrine IFNγ Controls the Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C.; Han, Mei; Vanama, Ramesh; Joe, Betty; Kim, Edward Y.; Zhao, Fei Linda; Jeon, Caroline; Adeyi, Oyedele; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    TCRαβ+ CD4−CD8−NK− double negative T cells (DN T cells) can act as regulatory T cells to inhibit allograft rejection and autoimmunity. Their role in graft-versus-host disease and mechanisms of suppression remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DN T cells can inhibit CD4+ T cell-mediated GVHD in a semi-allogeneic model of bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, we present evidence of a novel autocrine IFNγ signaling pathway in Fas-deficient C57BL/6.lpr (B6.lpr) DN T cells. B6.lpr DN T cells lacking IFNγ or its receptor were impaired in their ability to suppress syngeneic CD4+ T cells responding to alloantigen stimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Autocrine IFNγ signaling was required for sustained B6.lpr DN T cell IFNγ secretion in vivo and for upregulation of surface Fas ligand expression during TCR stimulation. Fas ligand (FasL) expression by B6.lpr DN T cells permitted lysis of activated CD4+ T cells and was required for suppression of GVHD. Collectively, our data indicate that DN T cells can inhibit GVHD and that IFNγ plays a critical autocrine role in controlling the regulatory function of B6.lpr DN T cells. PMID:23077665

  10. Inhibition of Protein Kinase Akt1 by Apoptosis Signal-regulating Kinase-1 (ASK1) Is Involved in Apoptotic Inhibition of Regulatory Volume Increase*

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyam, Muthangi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Mohri, Tatsuma; Okada, Yasunobu

    2010-01-01

    Most animal cell types regulate their cell volume after an osmotic volume change. The regulatory volume increase (RVI) occurs through uptake of NaCl and osmotically obliged water after osmotic shrinkage. However, apoptotic cells undergo persistent cell shrinkage without showing signs of RVI. Persistence of the apoptotic volume decrease is a prerequisite to apoptosis induction. We previously demonstrated that volume regulation is inhibited in human epithelial HeLa cells stimulated with the apoptosis inducer. Here, we studied signaling mechanisms underlying the apoptotic inhibition of RVI in HeLa cells. Hypertonic stimulation was found to induce phosphorylation of a Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt (protein kinase B). Shrinkage-induced Akt activation was essential for RVI induction because RVI was suppressed by an Akt inhibitor, expression of a dominant negative form of Akt, or small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Akt1 (but not Akt2). Staurosporine, tumor necrosis factor-α, or a Fas ligand inhibited both RVI and hypertonicity-induced Akt activation in a manner sensitive to a scavenger for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Any of apoptosis inducers also induced phosphorylation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in a ROS-dependent manner. Suppression of (ASK1) expression blocked the effects of apoptosis, in hypertonic conditions, on both RVI induction and Akt activation. Thus, it is concluded that in human epithelial cells, shrinkage-induced activation of Akt1 is involved in the RVI process and that apoptotic inhibition of RVI is caused by inhibition of Akt activation, which results from ROS-mediated activation of ASK1. PMID:20048146

  11. T follicular regulatory cells in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Maceiras, Ana Raquel; Fonseca, Valter R; Agua-Doce, Ana; Graca, Luis

    2017-09-01

    It has long been known that CD4 T cells are necessary to provide help to B cells, triggering a germinal centre (GC) reaction where affinity maturation and isotype switching occur. However, the nature of the dedicated CD4 helper T cells, known as T follicular helper (Tfh), was only recently described. Here, we review the biology and function of the recently described T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells, another CD4 T-cell population also found within GCs but with regulatory function and characteristics. Tfr cells have been identified in mice and humans as simultaneously presenting characteristics of T follicular cells (namely CXCR5 expression) and regulatory T cells (including Foxp3 expression). These Tfr cells have been implicated in the regulation of the magnitude of the GC reaction, as well as in protection from immune-mediated pathology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The water soluble ruthenium(II) organometallic compound [Ru(p-cymene)(bis(3,5 dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)methane)Cl]Cl suppresses triple negative breast cancer growth by inhibiting tumor infiltration of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Montani, Maura; Pazmay, Gretta V Badillo; Hysi, Albana; Lupidi, Giulio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Gambini, Valentina; Tilio, Martina; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Ferraro, Stefano; Iezzi, Manuela; Marchini, Cristina; Amici, Augusto

    2016-05-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favorable toxicity and clearance properties. Here, we show that the ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(p-cymene)(bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)methane)Cl]Cl (UNICAM-1) exhibits potent in vivo antitumor effects. When administered as four-dose course, by repeating a single dose (52.4mgkg-1) every three days, UNICAM-1 significantly reduces the growth of A17 triple negative breast cancer cells transplanted into FVB syngeneic mice. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that UNICAM-1 is rapidly eliminated from kidney, liver and bloodstream thanks to its high hydrosolubility, exerting excellent therapeutic activity with minimal side effects. Immunohistological analysis revealed that the efficacy of UNICAM-1, mainly relies on its capacity to reverse tumor-associated immune suppression by significantly reducing the number of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells. Therefore, UNICAM-1 appears very promising for the treatment of TNBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulatory T Cells in Autoimmune and Viral Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Pascal; Lamarre, Alain

    2015-01-01

    In both autoimmune liver disease and chronic viral hepatitis, the injury results from an immune-mediated cytotoxic T cell response to liver cells. As such, it is not surprising that CD4(+) regulatory T cells, a key regulatory population of T cells able to curb immune responses, could be involved in both autoimmune hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis. The liver can induce the conversion of naïve CD4(+) T cells to CD4(+) regulatory T cells and induce tolerance to locally expressed antigens. This tolerance mechanism is carefully regulated in physiological conditions but any imbalance could be pathological. An overly tolerant immune response can lead to chronic infections while an overreactive and unbridled immune response can lead to autoimmune hepatitis. With the recent advent of monoclonal antibodies able to target regulatory T cells (daclizumab) and improve immune responses and several ongoing clinical trials analysing the impact of regulatory T cell infusion on autoimmune liver disease or liver transplant tolerance, modulation of immunological tolerance through CD4(+) regulatory T cells could be a key element of future immunotherapies for several liver diseases allowing restoring the balance between proper immune responses and tolerance.  .

  14. Regulatory T Cells and Their Role in Animal Disease.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, T

    2016-07-01

    In humans and mouse models, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells are known to control all aspects of immune responses. However, only limited information exists on these cells' role in diseases of other animals. In this review, we cover the most important features and different types of regulatory T cells, which include those that are thymus-derived and peripherally induced, the mechanisms by which they control immune responses by targeting effector T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and most important, their role in animal health and diseases including cancer, infections, and other conditions such as hypersensitivities and autoimmunity. Although the literature regarding regulatory T cells in domestic animal species is still limited, multiple articles have recently emerged and are discussed. Moreover, we also discuss the evidence suggesting that regulatory T cells might limit the magnitude of effector responses, which can have either a positive or negative result, depending on the context of animal and human disease. In addition, the issue of plasticity is discussed because plasticity in regulatory T cells can result in the loss of their protective function in some microenvironments during disease. Lastly, the manipulation of regulatory T cells is discussed in assessing the possibility of their use as a treatment in the future. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Proceedings: international regulatory considerations on development pathways for cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Feigal, Ellen G; Tsokas, Katherine; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Zhang, Jiwen; Priest, Catherine; Pearce, Jonathan; Mount, Natalie

    2014-08-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field that faces novel scientific and regulatory challenges. In September 2013, the International Workshop on Regulatory Pathways for Cell Therapies was convened to discuss the nature of these challenges and potential solutions and to highlight opportunities for potential convergence between different regulatory bodies that might assist the field's development. The workshop discussions generated potentially actionable steps in five main areas that could mitigate cell therapy development pathway risk and accelerate moving promising therapies to patients. These included the need for convergence of regulatory guidelines on donor eligibility and suitability of lines for use in clinical trials and subsequent commercialization for cell therapies to move forward on a global basis; the need to challenge and encourage investigators in the regenerative medicine field to share information and provide examples of comparability studies related to master cell banks; the need for convergence of guidelines across regulatory jurisdictions on requirements for tumorigenicity studies, based on particular cell types and on biodistribution studies; the need to increase transparency in sharing clinical trial information more broadly and disseminating results more rapidly; and the need to establish a forum for sharing the experiences of various approaches being developed to expedite regulatory approvals and access for patients to innovative cell and regenerative therapies in the different regulatory jurisdictions and to assess their potential strengths and weaknesses. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Proceedings: International Regulatory Considerations on Development Pathways for Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Tsokas, Katherine; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Zhang, Jiwen; Priest, Catherine; Pearce, Jonathan; Mount, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving field that faces novel scientific and regulatory challenges. In September 2013, the International Workshop on Regulatory Pathways for Cell Therapies was convened to discuss the nature of these challenges and potential solutions and to highlight opportunities for potential convergence between different regulatory bodies that might assist the field’s development. The workshop discussions generated potentially actionable steps in five main areas that could mitigate cell therapy development pathway risk and accelerate moving promising therapies to patients. These included the need for convergence of regulatory guidelines on donor eligibility and suitability of lines for use in clinical trials and subsequent commercialization for cell therapies to move forward on a global basis; the need to challenge and encourage investigators in the regenerative medicine field to share information and provide examples of comparability studies related to master cell banks; the need for convergence of guidelines across regulatory jurisdictions on requirements for tumorigenicity studies, based on particular cell types and on biodistribution studies; the need to increase transparency in sharing clinical trial information more broadly and disseminating results more rapidly; and the need to establish a forum for sharing the experiences of various approaches being developed to expedite regulatory approvals and access for patients to innovative cell and regenerative therapies in the different regulatory jurisdictions and to assess their potential strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25038248

  17. Unifying roles for regulatory T cells and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Rao, Varada P.; Olipitz, Werner; Taylor, Christie L.; Jackson, Erin A.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Lee, Chung-Wei; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Fox, James G.; Ge, Zhongming; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Activities of CD4+ regulatory (TREG) cells restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. Roles for TREG cells in inflammation-associated cancers, however, are paradoxical. It is widely believed that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer responses. However, we demonstrate here that TREG cells also function to reduce cancer risk throughout the body by efficiently downregulating inflammation arising from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Building on a “hygiene hypothesis” model in which GI infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce immune-mediated diseases, here we show that gut bacteria-triggered TREG may function to inhibit cancer even in extraintestinal sites. Ability of bacteria-stimulated TREG to suppress cancer depends on interleukin (IL)-10, which serves to maintain immune homeostasis within bowel and support a protective antiinflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under proinflammatory conditions, TREG may fail to provide antiinflammatory protection and instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process; a cancer state that is reversible by downregulation of inflammation. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10 and TREG-mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated IL-6 and IL-17 and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data unify seemingly divergent disease processes such as autoimmunity and cancer and help explain the paradox of TREG and inflammation in cancer. Enhancing protective TREG functions may promote healthful longevity and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:19795459

  18. In dialyzed squid axons oxidative stress inhibits the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger by impairing the Cai2+-regulatory site.

    PubMed

    DiPolo, Reinaldo; Beaugé, Luis

    2011-09-01

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, a major mechanism by which cells extrude calcium, is involved in several physiological and physiopathological interactions. In this work we have used the dialyzed squid giant axon to study the effects of two oxidants, SIN-1-buffered peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), on the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the absence and presence of MgATP upregulation. The results show that oxidative stress induced by peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide inhibits the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger by impairing the intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+))-regulatory sites, leaving unharmed the intracellular Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-transporting sites. This effect is efficiently counteracted by the presence of MgATP and by intracellular alkalinization, conditions that also protect H(i)(+) and (H(i)(+) + Na(i)(+)) inhibition of Ca(i)(2+)-regulatory sites. In addition, 1 mM intracellular EGTA reduces oxidant inhibition. However, once the effects of oxidants are installed they cannot be reversed by either MgATP or EGTA. These results have significant implications regarding the role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in response to pathological conditions leading to tissue ischemia-reperfusion and anoxia/reoxygenation; they concur with a marked reduction in ATP concentration, an increase in oxidant production, and a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that seems to be the main factor responsible for cell damage.

  19. Roles for Inflammation and Regulatory T Cells in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Risk for developing cancer rises substantially as a result of poorly regulated inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacterial infections. Anti-inflammatory CD4+ regulatory cells (TREG) function to restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. It seems logical that TREG cells would function to reduce risk of inflammation-associated cancer in the bowel by down-regulating inflammation. It is widely believed, however, that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer inflammatory responses. Thus roles for inflammation, TREG cells, and gut bacteria in cancer are paradoxical and are the subject of controversy. Our accumulated data build upon the “hygiene hypothesis” model in which gastrointestinal (GI) infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce inflammation-associated diseases. Ability of TREG to inhibit or suppress cancer depends upon gut bacteria and IL-10, which serve to maintain immune balance and a protective anti-inflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under poorly regulated pro-inflammatory conditions, TREG fail to inhibit and may instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process, a cancer state that is reversible by down-regulation of inflammation and interleukin (IL)-6. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10– and TREG–mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated inflammation and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data help explain the paradox of inflammation and TREG in cancer and indicate that targeted stimulation of TREG may promote health and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:20019355

  20. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    PubMed

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    studies demonstrated that regulatory T cells completely abolished the tPA-induced elevation of MMP9 and CCL2 after stroke. Using MMP9 and CCL2 knockout mice, we discovered that both molecules partially contributed to the protective actions of regulatory T cells. In an in vitro endothelial cell-based model of the blood-brain barrier, we confirmed that regulatory T cells inhibited tPA-induced endothelial expression of CCL2 and preserved blood-brain barrier integrity after an ischaemic challenge. Lentivirus-mediated CCL2 knockdown in endothelial cells completely abolished the blood-brain barrier protective effect of regulatory T cells in vitro. Altogether, our studies suggest that regulatory T cell adoptive transfer may alleviate thrombolytic treatment-induced haemorrhage in stroke victims. Furthermore, regulatory T cell-afforded protection in the tPA-treated stroke model is mediated by two inhibitory mechanisms involving CCL2 and MMP9. Thus, regulatory T cell adoptive transfer may be useful as a cell-based therapy to improve the efficacy and safety of thrombolytic treatment for ischaemic stroke. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  2. Loss of Functionally Redundant p38 Isoforms in T Cells Enhances Regulatory T Cell Induction*

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Morisada; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Petrova, Tsvetana; Ritprajak, Patcharee; Sutavani, Ruhcha V.; Jiménez-Andrade, Guillermina Yanek; Sano, Yasuyo; Choo, Min-Kyung; Seavitt, John; Venigalla, Ram K. C.; Otsu, Kinya; Georgopoulos, Katia; Arthur, J. Simon C.; Park, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved protein kinase p38 mediates innate resistance to environmental stress and microbial infection. Four p38 isoforms exist in mammals and may have been co-opted for new roles in adaptive immunity. Murine T cells deficient in p38α, the ubiquitously expressed p38 isoform, showed no readily apparent cell-autonomous defects while expressing elevated amounts of another isoform, p38β. Mice with T cells simultaneously lacking p38α and p38β displayed lymphoid atrophy and elevated Foxp3+ regulatory T cell frequencies. Double deficiency of p38α and p38β in naïve CD4+ T cells resulted in an attenuation of MAPK-activated protein kinase (MK)-dependent mTOR signaling after T cell receptor engagement, and enhanced their differentiation into regulatory T cells under appropriate inducing conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of the p38-MK-mTOR signaling module produced similar effects, revealing potential for therapeutic applications. PMID:28011639

  3. Regulatory T cells: present facts and future hopes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christian; Stoll, Sabine; Bopp, Tobias; Schmitt, Edgar; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2006-09-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and several subsets of induced suppressor T cells are key players of the immune tolerance network and control the induction and effector phase of our immunological defense system. These T cell populations actively control the properties of other immune cells by suppressing their functional activity to prevent autoimmunity and transplant rejection but also influence the immune response to allergens as well as against tumor cells and pathogens. Even though we are far from completely understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that manage the different regulatory T cell populations, increasing evidence exists about their functional importance. The knowledge on their induction and activation opens the possibility for their selective manipulation in vivo as an attractive approach for an immunotherapy of unwanted immune responses. This review summarizes this knowledge and discusses the potential of regulatory T cells for novel immunointervention strategies in the future.

  4. The regulatory sciences for stem cell-based medicinal products.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bao-Zhu; Wang, Junzhi

    2014-06-01

    Over the past few years, several new achievements have been made from stem cell studies, many of which have moved up from preclinical stages to early, or from early to middle or late, stages thanks to relatively safe profile and preliminary evidence of effectiveness. Moreover, some stem cell-based products have been approved for marketing by different national regulatory authorities. However, many critical issues associated mainly with incomplete understanding of stem cell biology and the relevant risk factors, and lack of effective regulations still exist and need to be urgently addressed, especially in countries where establishment of appropriate regulatory system just commenced. More relevantly, the stem cell regulatory sciences need to be established or improved to more effectively evaluate quality, safety and efficacy of stem cell products, and for building up the appropriate regulatory framework. In this review, we summarize some new achievements in stem cell studies, especially the preclinical and clinical studies, the existing regulations, and the associated challenges, and we then propose some considerations for improving stem cell regulatory sciences with a goal of promoting the steadfast growth of the well-regulated stem cell therapies abreast of evolvement of stem cell sciences and technologies.

  5. How tolerogenic dendritic cells induce regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Roberto A.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery by Steinman and Cohn in 1973, dendritic cells (DCs) have become increasingly recognized for their crucial role as regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are exquisitely adept at acquiring, processing and presenting antigens to T cells. They also adjust the context (and hence the outcome) of antigen presentation in response to a plethora of environmental inputs that signal the occurence of pathogens or tissue damage. Such signals generally boost DC maturation, which promotes their migration from peripheral tissues into and within secondary lymphoid organs and their capacity to induce and regulate effector T cell responses. Conversely, more recent observations indicate that DCs are also crucial to ensure immunological peace. Indeed, DCs constantly present innocuous self and non-self antigens in a fashion that promotes tolerance, at least in part, through the control of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are specialized T cells that exert their immuno-suppressive function through a variety of mechanisms affecting both DCs and effector cells. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between tolerogenic DCs and Tregs. PMID:21056730

  6. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang Zhang, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  7. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells isolated from helminth-infected mice enhanced T regulatory cell responses in airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-Y; Li, L-Y; Yang, X-Z; Li, J; Zhong, G; Wang, J; Li, L-J; Ji, B; Wu, Z-Q; Liu, H; Yang, X; Liu, P-M

    2011-10-01

    Our and others' previous studies have shown that Schistosoma japonicum (SJ) infection can inhibit allergic reactions. Moreover, we found that adoptive transfer of dendritic cells (DCs) from inhibited mice showed a similar inhibitory effect on allergy, suggesting a critical role of DCs in SJ-infected mediated inhibition of allergy. In this study, we further examined the mechanism by which DCs contribute to inhibition of allergy. Our results showed that DCs from SJ-infected mice (SJDCs) produced significantly higher levels of IL-10 compared to those from naive control mice (NDCs). Adoptive transfer of SJDCs, unlike NDCs, significantly increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+IL-10+ T cells regulatory T-cell responses in vivo. This was correlated with significantly reduced production of IL-4 and IL-5 by CD4+ T cells, eotaxin in lung tissues and reduced airway allergic inflammation in the SJDC recipients following allergen sensitization and challenge. These data suggest that helminth infection may induce tolerogenic DCs that can inhibit the development of airway allergic inflammation through enhancing T regulatory cell responses.

  8. Extracellular NAD(+): a danger signal hindering regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Adriouch, Sahil; Haag, Friedrich; Boyer, Olivier; Seman, Michel; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2012-11-01

    Endogenous danger signals released during cell damage contribute to alert the immune system. Typically, their release results in the activation and maturation of innate immune cells, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, extracellular NAD(+) stimulates immune responses by hindering regulatory T cells (Tregs), and could, therefore, represent the prototype of a new category of danger signals.

  9. Regulatory T cells - a brief history and perspective.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shimon; Wing, Kajsa; Miyara, Makoto

    2007-11-01

    It is now widely accepted that the normal immune system harbors a regulatory T-cell population specialized for immune suppression. It was found initially that some CD4(+) T cells in normal animals were capable of suppressing autoimmunity. Characterization of this autoimmune-suppressive CD4(+) T cell population revealed that they constitutively expressed the CD25 molecule, which made it possible to distinguish them from other T cells, delineate their developmental pathways, in particular their thymic development, and characterize their potent in vivo and in vitro immunosuppressive activity. The marker also helped to identify human regulatory T cells with similar functional and phenotypic characteristics. Recent studies have shown that CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells specifically express the transcription factor Foxp3. Genetic anomaly of Foxp3 causes autoimmune and inflammatory disease in rodents and humans through affecting the development and function of CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells. These findings at the cellular and molecular levels altogether provide firm evidence for Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells as an indispensable cellular constituent of the normal immune system and for their crucial roles in establishing and maintaining immunologic self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. They can be exploited for clinical use to treat immunological diseases and control physiological and pathological immune responses.

  10. Regulatory T Cells Suppress Natural Killer Cell Immunity in Patients With Human Cervical Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Chun; Li, Chao-Hsu; Chu, Ling-Hui; Huang, Pei-Shen; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Huang, Su-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    To determine the functional attributes of CD4 CD25 regulatory T (Treg) cells by suppressing natural killer (NK) cell activity in human cervical cancer (CC). Triple-color flow cytometry was used to study the phenotypic expression of CD4 CD25 Treg cells and NK cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). In vitro coculture assays were performed to illustrate the cytokine immunoregulations between Treg cells and NK cells. Significantly lower expression ratio of NK cells and higher expression ratio of Treg cells in TILs than PBLs were found. The NK cells displayed significantly higher expression ratio of inhibitory NK receptors (CD158a, CD158b, and NKG2A) and lower expression ratio of activating NK receptors (NKG2D, NKp46, and NKp30) as well as perforin in TILs than PBLs, suggesting the suppressed cytotoxicity of the NK cells in the CC tumor milieu. The expression ratio of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on Treg cells as well as TGF-βRII on Treg cells and NK cells was significantly higher in TILs than PBLs. Further functional in vitro assays demonstrated that NK cell function was suppressed by Treg cells, mimicking the inhibition of TGF-β on NK cells, and interleukin-2/interleukin-15 stimulation was able to restore the NK cell activity. These findings indicate that Treg cells in TILs may abrogate NK cell cytotoxicity through TGF-β pathway, and therefore, Treg cell elimination may enhance NK cell activity and be a novel therapeutic strategy for CC.

  11. Characterization of peripheral regulatory CD4+ T cells that prevent diabetes onset in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lepault, F; Gagnerault, M C

    2000-01-01

    The period that precedes onset of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus corresponds to an active dynamic state in which pathogenic autoreactive T cells are kept from destroying beta cells by regulatory T cells. In prediabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, CD4+ splenocytes were shown to prevent diabetes transfer in immunodeficient NOD recipients. We now demonstrate that regulatory splenocytes belong to the CD4+ CD62Lhigh T cell subset that comprises a vast majority of naive cells producing low levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and no IL-4 and IL-10 upon in vitro stimulation. Consistently, the inhibition of diabetes transfer was not mediated by IL-4 and IL-10. Regulatory cells homed to the pancreas and modified the migration of diabetogenic to the islets, which resulted in a decreased insulitis severity. The efficiency of CD62L+ T cells was dose dependent, independent of sex and disease prevalence. Protection mechanisms did not involve the CD62L molecule, an observation that may relate to the fact that CD4+ CD62Lhigh lymph node cells were less potent than their splenic counterparts. Regulatory T cells were detectable after weaning and persist until disease onset, sustaining the notion that diabetes is a late and abrupt event. Thus, the CD62L molecule appears as a unique marker that can discriminate diabetogenic (previously shown to be CD62L-) from regulatory T cells. The phenotypic and functional characteristics of protective CD4+ CD62L+ cells suggest they are different from Th2-, Tr1-, and NK T-type cells, reported to be implicated in the control of diabetes in NOD mice, and may represent a new immunoregulatory population.

  12. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-12-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2(-/-) B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2(-/-) mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs.

  13. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  14. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  15. The role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenyu; Gong, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Hu, Zhen; Wu, Gaojue; Tang, Xuejun; Peng, Xiaobin; Tang, Shuan; Meng, Miao; Feng, Hui

    2017-04-01

    The past decade has provided striking insights into a newly identified subset of B cells known as regulatory B cells (Bregs). In addition to producing antibody, Bregs also regulate diseases via cytokine production and antigen presentation. This subset of B cells has protective and potentially therapeutic effects. However, the particularity of Bregs has caused some difficulties in conducting research on their roles. Notably, human B10 cells, which are Bregs that produce interleukin 10, share phenotypic characteristics with other previously defined B cell subsets, and currently, there is no known surface phenotype that is unique to B10 cells. An online search was performed in the PubMed and Web of Science databases for articles published providing evidences on the role of regulatory B cells in digestive system diseases. Abundant evidence has demonstrated that Bregs play a regulatory role in inflammatory, autoimmune, and tumor diseases, and regulatory B cells play different roles in different diseases, but future work needs to determine the mechanisms by which Bregs are activated and how these cells affect their target cells.

  16. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strain Induces a Heme Oxygenase Dependent Increase in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Khalil; Kandiah, Nalaayini; Chau, Jessie; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. PMID:23077634

  17. Regulatory T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tower, Clare; Mathen, Stephy; Crocker, Ian; Bruce, Ian N

    2013-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic multisystem autoimmune disorder that predominantly affects women of reproductive age. As clinical outcomes improve, pregnancy in these women is becoming more common. Although epidemiological data have documented an improvement in the prognosis of pregnancy in these women over recent years, they are still at significantly increased risk of pregnancy complications, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, pre-eclampsia and impaired foetal growth. The pathogenesis of SLE involves marked immune dysfunction, and in particular, the function of immunosuppressive elements of the immune system is impaired, including regulatory T-cell function. Because regulatory T cells are likely to be the key cell-modulating feto-maternal tolerance, this review overviews the possibility that regulatory T-cell impairments contribute to pregnancy pathology in women with SLE and contribute to the clinical challenge of managing these women during pregnancy.

  18. Regulatory T cells protect from autoimmune arthritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Suano, Alba; Kallikourdis, Marinos; Sarris, Milka; Betz, Alexander G

    2012-05-01

    Pregnancy frequently has a beneficial effect on the autoimmune disease Rheumatoid Arthritis, ranging from improvement in clinical symptoms to complete remission. Despite decades of study, a mechanistic explanation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that an analogous pregnancy-induced remission can be observed in a mouse model of arthritis. We demonstrate that during pregnancy mice are protected from collagen-induced arthritis, but are still capable of launching normal immune responses to influenza infections. We examine the role of regulatory T (T(R)) cells in this beneficial effect. T(R) cells are essential for many aspects of immune tolerance, including the suppression of autoimmune responses. Remarkably, transfer of regulatory T cells from pregnant 'protected' mice was sufficient to confer protection to non-pregnant mice. These results suggest that regulatory T cells are responsible for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of arthritis.

  19. Enhanced suppressor function of TIM-3+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gautron, Anne-Sophie; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; de Marcken, Marine; Hafler, David A

    2014-09-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3) is an Ig-superfamily member expressed on IFN-γ-secreting Th1 and Tc1 cells and was identified as a negative regulator of immune tolerance. TIM-3 is expressed by a subset of activated CD4(+) T cells, and anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation increases both the level of expression and the number of TIM-3(+) T cells. In mice, TIM-3 is constitutively expressed on natural regulatory T (Treg) cells and has been identified as a regulatory molecule of alloimmunity through its ability to modulate CD4(+) T-cell differentiation. Here, we examined TIM-3 expression on human Treg cells to determine its role in T-cell suppression. In contrast to mice, TIM-3 is not expressed on Treg cells ex vivo but is upregulated after activation. While TIM-3(+) Treg cells with increased gene expression of LAG3, CTLA4, and FOXP3 are highly efficient suppressors of effector T (Teff) cells, TIM-3(-) Treg cells poorly suppressed Th17 cells as compared with their suppression of Th1 cells; this decreased suppression ability was associated with decreased STAT-3 expression and phosphorylation and reduced gene expression of IL10, EBI3, GZMB, PRF1, IL1Rα, and CCR6. Thus, our results suggest that TIM-3 expression on Treg cells identifies a population highly effective in inhibiting pathogenic Th1- and Th17-cell responses.

  20. Interleukin 35 Rescues Regulatory B Cell Function, but the Effect Is Dysregulated in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoxuan; Qin, Chengyong

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-time inflammatory condition arising from aberrant immune activation in the colon and the rectum. Interleukin (IL)-35 plays critical roles in autoimmune disorders. In this study, we explored the pathways of IL-35 in affecting UC. First, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from UC patients were obtained. Pretreating PBMCs with IL-35 resulted in significantly elevated IL-10 production from whole PBMCs as well as B cells, whereas pretreating PBMCs with IL-12 or IL-27 did not demonstrate a similar effect. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8(+) T cells, but did not inhibit the proliferation of B cells. IL-35-mediated IL-10 secretion in B cells did not require the presence of Treg cells. After treatment with IL-35, B cells from UC patients presented significantly enhanced regulatory function, characterized by inhibiting cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion from autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which was dependent on IL-10 signaling. However, IL-35-treatment did not demonstrate an effect on regulating IL-5 and IL-13 responses. These discoveries identified a Th1, Th17, and CD8(+) T cell-targeting role of IL-35 in UC patients. Next, we examined the IL-35 expression in the intestinal mucosal in UC patients. Data showed that both noninflamed and inflamed tissues from UC patients presented significantly lower IL-35 secretion compared to healthy control tissues, which was associated with suppressed p35 transcription. UC patients with higher IL-35 also presented higher IL-10 secretion in gut mucosa. Together, our study identified that IL-35 could mediate anti-inflammatory function through promoting regulatory B cell functions, but this effect was suppressed in UC patients.

  1. Introduction: characterization and functions of human T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Romagnani, Sergio

    2005-06-01

    The field of human T regulatory (Treg) cells is a rapidly progressing, but still confused field of immunology. The effects of dendritic cell (DC) manipulation in Treg generation and the main features of human "natural" Treg cells, as well as of different populations of adaptive Treg subsets, are still partially unclear. However, it is clear that Treg cells play an important role in human diseases, such as autoimmune disorders, allergy, HIV infection, tumors and graft-versus-host disease.

  2. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  3. Immune modulation of inflammatory conditions: regulatory T cells for treatment of GvHD.

    PubMed

    Haase, Doreen; Starke, Mireille; Puan, Kia Joo; Lai, Tuck Siong; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2012-09-01

    The immune system is a highly balanced network of different cell types. This balance is disturbed in the setting of organ or stem cell transplantation, which can lead to graft rejection or "Graft versus host disease" (GvHD). Conventional pharmacological treatment by broad immune suppression is restricted by dose-limiting side effects. A novel strategy for prevention and control is cell therapy. This applies particularly to GvHD. A number of phase I trials have already been launched. The most appropriate cell type appears to be the regulatory T (Treg) cell as it is a natural "suppressor" of the immune system. Treg cells are able to inhibit various effector cells including CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, the main drivers of GvHD. Like other T cells, also Treg cells can be divided into naïve and memory-type cells. We have previously identified effector/memory Treg cells (T(REM)), the regulatory counterparts of CD4+ effector/memory T cells (T(EM)). T(REM) may be particularly suited to inhibit proinflammatory reactions in peripheral tissues as they express the chemokine receptor CCR6, a feature they share with proinflammatory Th17 cells. As specific marker, they also express CD39 but lack the expression of CD49d and CD127. We could show that a simple depletion of CD49d and CD127 expressing cells yields a population of "untouched" Treg cells that is highly pure and largely consist of highly suppressive T(REM) cells. Mouse models have confirmed the efficacy of Treg cells in controlling GvHD but the translation has been lagging. First clinical trials suggesting safety of adoptive Treg transfer increase the need for methods that allow obtaining clinical-grade Treg cells in sufficient amounts. The new approach may therefore provide a promising new alternative to facilitate a simple access to these cells.

  4. A distinct subpopulation of CD25(-) T-follicular regulatory cells localizes in the germinal centers.

    PubMed

    Wing, James Badger; Kitagawa, Yohko; Locci, Michela; Hume, Hannah; Tay, Christopher; Morita, Takayoshi; Kidani, Yujiro; Matsuda, Kyoko; Inoue, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Crotty, Shane; Coban, Cevayir; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2017-08-01

    T-follicular helper (Tfh) cells differentiate through a multistep process, culminating in germinal center (GC) localized GC-Tfh cells that provide support to GC-B cells. T-follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells have critical roles in the control of Tfh cells and GC formation. Although Tfh-cell differentiation is inhibited by IL-2, regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation and survival depend on it. Here, we describe a CD25(-) subpopulation within both murine and human PD1(+)CXCR5(+)Foxp3(+) Tfr cells. It is preferentially located in the GC and can be clearly differentiated from CD25(+) non-GC-Tfr, Tfh, and effector Treg (eTreg) cells by the expression of a wide range of molecules. In comparison to CD25(+) Tfr and eTreg cells, CD25(-) Tfr cells partially down-regulate IL-2-dependent canonical Treg features, but retain suppressive function, while simultaneously up-regulating genes associated with Tfh and GC-Tfh cells. We suggest that, similar to Tfh cells, Tfr cells follow a differentiation pathway generating a mature GC-localized subpopulation, CD25(-) Tfr cells.

  5. Interleukin-35 Induces Regulatory B Cells that Suppress CNS Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren-Xi; Yu, Cheng-Rong; Dambuza, Ivy M.; Mahdi, Rashid M.; Dolinska, Monika; Sergeey, Yuri V.; Wingfield, Paul T.; Kim, Sung-Hye; Egwuagu, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 10-producing regulatory B-cells (Breg-cells) suppress autoimmune diseases while aberrant elevation of Breg-cells prevents sterilizing immunity, promotes carcinogenesis and cancer metastasis by converting resting CD4+ T-cells to regulatory T-cells (Tregs). It is therefore of interest to discover factors that induce Breg-cells. Here we show that IL-35 induces Breg-cells in-vivo and promotes their conversion to a unique Breg subset that produces IL-35 (IL-35+Breg). Treatment of mice with IL-35 conferred protection from uveitis and mice lacking IL-35 or defective in IL-35-signaling produced less Breg-cells and developed severe uveitis. Ex-vivo generated Breg-cells also suppressed uveitis by inhibiting pathogenic Th17/Th1 while promoting Tregs expansion. We further show that IL-35 induced the conversion of human B-cells into Breg-cells and suppressed uveitis by activating STAT1/STAT3 through IL-35-Receptor comprising IL-12Rβ2/IL-27Rα subunits. Discovery that IL-35 converts human B-cells into Breg-cells, allows ex-vivo production of autologous Breg-cells for immunotherapy and investigating Breg/IL-35+Breg cells roles in autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:24743305

  6. The Role of Regulatory T Cells in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    There has been an explosion of literature focusing on the role of regulatory T (Treg) cells in cancer immunity. It is becoming increasingly clear that Treg cells play an active and significant role in the progression of cancer, and have an important role in suppressing tumor-specific immunity. Thus, there is a clear rationale for developing clinical strategies to diminish their regulatory influences, with the ultimate goal of augmenting antitimor immunity. Therefore, manipulation of Treg cells represent new strategies for cancer treatment. In this Review, I will summarize and review the explosive recent studies demonstrating that Treg cells are increased in patients with malignancies and restoration of antitumor immunity in mice and humans by depletion or reduction of Treg cells. In addition, I will discuss both the prognostic value of Treg cells in tumor progression in tumor-bearing hosts and the rationale for strategies for therapeutic vaccination and immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells with drugs and microRNA. PMID:20157609

  7. Critical evaluation of regulatory T cells in autoimmunity: are the most potent regulatory specificities being ignored?

    PubMed

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina

    2008-09-01

    The identification of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells as natural regulators of immunity in the periphery and tissues has stimulated tremendous interest in developing therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases. In this review, the site of origin, antigen specificity, homing markers and cytokine profiles of Treg cells were evaluated in autoimmune colitis and type 1 diabetes, two examples in which Treg cells were effective as therapy. These studies were compared with studies of Treg cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis, where successful therapy has not yet been achieved. Antigen-specific Treg cells appear to have more potent activity than polyclonal Treg cells and therefore hold more promise as therapeutic agents. However, Treg cells specific for the pathogenic T effector cells themselves have largely been overlooked and deserve consideration in future studies.

  8. Emerging role of regulatory T cells in gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ou; Furlan-Freguia, Christian; Arruda, Valder R; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-10-01

    Induction and maintenance of immune tolerance to therapeutic transgene products are key requirements for successful gene replacement therapies. Gene transfer may also be used to specifically induce immune tolerance and thereby augment other types of therapies. Similarly, gene therapies for treatment of autoimmune diseases are being developed in order to restore tolerance to self-antigens. Regulatory T cells have emerged as key players in many aspects of immune tolerance, and a rapidly increasing body of work documents induction and/or activation of regulatory T cells by gene transfer. Regulatory T cells may suppress antibody formation and cytotoxic T cell responses and may be critical for immune tolerance to therapeutic proteins. In this regard, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells have been identified as important components of tolerance in several gene transfer protocols, including hepatic in vivo gene transfer. Augmentation of regulatory T cell responses should be a promising new tool to achieve tolerance and avoid immune-mediated rejection of gene therapy. During the past decade, it has become obvious that immune regulation is an important and integral component of tolerance to self-antigens and of many forms of induced tolerance. Gene therapy can only be successful if the immune system does not reject the therapeutic transgene product. Recent studies provide a rapidly growing body of evidence that regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are involved and often play a crucial role in tolerance to proteins expressed by means of gene transfer. This review seeks to provide an overview of these data and their implications for gene therapy.

  9. [The Role of Regulatory T-cells in Antitumor Immune Response].

    PubMed

    Klabusay, M

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-lymphocytes (Treg) are essential for regulation of immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmune disease development. Regulatory T-cells prevent the onset of autoimmune diseases; they keep immune homeostasis and modulate immune response during infection. Their activity is precisely controlled. Regulatory T-cells belong to one group of immune cells, which can support tumor survival and growth. They realize their function through inhibition of effector T-cells and by regulation of tumor microenvironment through production of various soluble factors. Many publications have proven that the amount of Treg cells is elevated in both solid tumors and in hematologic malignancies. Nevertheless, little is known about mechanisms, which allow increase and maintenance of elevated Treg cells in cancer patients. In this review, we will focus, among others, on the description of function and phenotype of Treg cells, their modulation of humoral immune response and interaction with cancer stem cells. Current development of modern tumor immunotherapy allows new possibilities of influencing Treg cells function.

  10. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  11. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-12-24

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting.

  12. T regulatory cells and B cells cooperate to form a regulatory loop that maintains gut homeostasis and suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Ray, A; Jiang, X; Wang, J-y; Basu, S; Liu, X; Qian, T; He, R; Dittel, B N; Chu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and B cells present in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) are both implicated in the resolution of colitis. However, how the functions of these cells are coordinated remains elusive. We used the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model combined with gene-modified mice to monitor the progression of colitis, and simultaneously examine the number of Tregs and B cells, and the production of IgA antibodies. We found that DSS-treated mice exhibited more severe colitis in the absence of B cells, and that the adoptive transfer of B cells attenuated the disease. Moreover, the transfer of IL-10−/− B cells also attenuated colitis, suggesting that B cells inhibited colitis through an interleukin-10 (IL-10)-independent pathway. Furthermore, antibody depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbated colitis. Intriguingly, the number of GALT Tregs in B cell-deficient mice was significantly decreased during colitis and the adoptive transfer of B cells into these mice restored the Treg numbers, indicating that B cells contribute to Treg homeostasis. We also found that B cells induced the proliferation of Tregs that in turn promoted B-cell differentiation into IgA-producing plasma cells. These results demonstrate that B cells and Tregs interact and cooperate to prevent excessive immune responses that can lead to colitis. PMID:25807185

  13. Follicular regulatory T cells control humoral autoimmunity via NFAT2-regulated CXCR5 expression.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Müller, Gerd; Stauss, Dennis; Dietz, Lena; Klein-Hessling, Stefan; Serfling, Edgar; Lipp, Martin; Berberich, Ingolf; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2014-03-10

    Maturation of high-affinity B lymphocytes is precisely controlled during the germinal center reaction. This is dependent on CD4(+)CXCR5(+) follicular helper T cells (TFH) and inhibited by CD4(+)CXCR5(+)Foxp3(+) follicular regulatory T cells (TFR). Because NFAT2 was found to be highly expressed and activated in follicular T cells, we addressed its function herein. Unexpectedly, ablation of NFAT2 in T cells caused an augmented GC reaction upon immunization. Consistently, however, TFR cells were clearly reduced in the follicular T cell population due to impaired homing to B cell follicles. This was TFR-intrinsic because only in these cells NFAT2 was essential to up-regulate CXCR5. The physiological relevance for humoral (auto-)immunity was corroborated by exacerbated lupuslike disease in the presence of NFAT2-deficient TFR cells.

  14. Haspin has Multiple Functions in the Plant Cell Division Regulatory Network.

    PubMed

    Kozgunova, Elena; Suzuki, Takamasa; Ito, Masaki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kurihara, Daisuke

    2016-04-01

    Progression of cell division is controlled by various mitotic kinases. In animal cells, phosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3 by the kinase Haspin (haploid germ cell-specific nuclear protein kinase) promotes centromeric Aurora B localization to regulate chromosome segregation. However, less is known about the function of Haspin in regulatory networks in plant cells. Here, we show that inhibition of Haspin with 5-iodotubercidin (5-ITu) in Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells delayed chromosome alignment. Haspin inhibition also prevented the centromeric localization of Aurora3 kinase (AUR3) and disrupted its function. This suggested that Haspin plays a role in the specific positioning of AUR3 on chromosomes in plant cells, a function conserved in animals. The results also indicated that Haspin and AUR3 are involved in the same pathway, which regulates chromosome alignment during prometaphase/metaphase. Remarkably, Haspin inhibition by 5-ITu also led to a severe cytokinesis defect, resulting in binuclear cells with a partially formed cell plate. The 5-ITu treatment did not affect microtubules, AUR1/2 or the NACK-PQR pathway; however, it did alter the distribution of actin filaments on the cell plate. Together, these results suggested that Haspin has several functions in regulating cell division in plant cells: in the localization of AUR3 on centromeres and in regulating late cell plate expansion during cytokinesis.

  15. Arecoline suppresses HaCaT cell proliferation through cell cycle regulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhong-Su; Li, Ming; Gao, Feng; Peng, Jie-Ying; Xiao, Hai-Bo; Dai, Li-Xia; Lin, Shi-Rong; Zhang, Rui; Jin, Long-Yu

    2013-06-01

    Betel nut chewing is the most common cause of oral submucous fibrosis (OSF). Arecoline is the main component of the betel nut, and is associated with the occurrence and development of OSF through cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and DNA damage. Similar types of stimuli elicit differential responses in different cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of arecoline on the HaCaT epithelial and Hel fibroblast cell lines. The data showed that arecoline affected HaCaT cell morphology. MTT assay revealed that arecoline suppressed HaCaT cell proliferation. Furthermore, we found that arecoline induced the cell cycle arrest of HaCaT cells. In comparison with the untreated control cells, following treatment with ≥75 µg/ml arecoline an increased percentage of HaCaT cells remained at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, accompanied by a reduced percentage of cells in the S phase. However, arecoline treatment did not significantly alter Hel cell cycle distribution. In the HaCaT epithelial cells, arecoline downregulated expression of the G1/S phase regulatory proteins cyclin D1, CDK4, CDK2, E2F1 as determined by reverse transcription-PCR analysis and western blotting. In summary, arecoline inhibits HaCaT epithelial cell proliferation and survival, in a dose-dependent manner, and cell cycle arrest in the G1/S phase, while this is not obvious in the Hel fibroblast cells. Potentially, our findings may aid in the prevention of arecoline-associated human OSF.

  16. SHARPIN controls regulatory T cells by negatively modulating the T cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-seung; Lopez, Justine; Lee, Jeeho; Liao, Lujian; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2016-01-01

    SHARPIN forms a linear-ubiquitin-chain-assembly complex that promotes signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB. SHARPIN deficiency leads to progressive multi-organ inflammation and immune system malfunction, but how SHARPIN regulates T cell responses is unclear. Here we found that SHARPIN deficiency resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of and defective function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Transfer of SHARPIN-sufficient Treg cells into SHARPIN-deficient mice considerably alleviated their systemic inflammation. SHARPIN-deficient T cells displayed enhanced proximal signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) without an effect on the activation of NF-κB. SHARPIN conjugated with Lys63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains, which led to inhibition of the association of TCRζ with the signaling kinase Zap70; this affected the generation of Treg cells. Our study therefore identifies a role for SHARPIN in TCR signaling whereby it maintains immunological homeostasis and tolerance by regulating Treg cells. PMID:26829767

  17. Movement of regulatory RNA between animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies suggest that RNA can move from one cell to another and regulate genes through specific base-pairing. Mechanisms that modify or select RNA for secretion from a cell are unclear. Secreted RNA can be stable enough to be detected in the extracellular environment and can enter the cytosol of distant cells to regulate genes. Mechanisms that import RNA into the cytosol of an animal cell can enable uptake of RNA from many sources including other organisms. This role of RNA is akin to that of steroid hormones, which cross cell membranes to regulate genes. The potential diagnostic use of RNA in human extracellular fluids has ignited interest in understanding mechanisms that enable the movement of RNA between animal cells. Genetic model systems will be essential to gain more confidence in proposed mechanisms of RNA transport and to connect an extracellular RNA with a specific biological function. Studies in the worm C. elegans and in other animals have begun to reveal parts of this novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Here, I summarize the current state of this nascent field, highlight the many unknowns, and suggest future directions. PMID:26138457

  18. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  19. Exploring a regulatory role for mast cells: 'MCregs'?

    PubMed

    Frossi, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Tripodo, Claudio; Pucillo, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    Regulatory cells can mould the fate of the immune response by direct suppression of specific subsets of effector cells, or by redirecting effectors against invading pathogens and infected or neoplastic cells. These functions have been classically, although not exclusively, ascribed to different subsets of T cells. Recently, mast cells have been shown to regulate physiological and pathological immune responses, and thus to act at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity assuming different functions and behaviors at discrete stages of the immune response. Here, we focus on these poorly defined, and sometimes apparently conflicting, functions of mast cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulatory T Cells in Hepatitis B and C Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are hepatotropic viruses that establish chronic persistent infection by effectively escaping the host immune response and can cause immune-mediated liver injury. It has recently become apparent that regulatory T (Treg) cells, specifically CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, modulate viral diseases by suppressing antiviral immune responses and regulating inflammatory host injury. The roles of Treg cells in HBV and HCV infections range from suppressing antiviral T cell responses to protecting the liver from immune-mediated damage. This review describes Treg cells and subpopulations and focuses on the roles of these cells in HBV and HCV infections. PMID:28035208

  1. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders.

  2. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  3. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells.

    PubMed

    Audo, Rachel; Hua, Charlotte; Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells.

  4. Phosphatidylserine Outer Layer Translocation Is Implicated in IL-10 Secretion by Human Regulatory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, Michael; Combe, Bernard; Morel, Jacques; Daien, Claire I.

    2017-01-01

    B cells can have a regulatory role, mainly mediated by interleukin 10 (IL-10). IL-10 producing B cells (B10 cells) cells remain to be better characterized. Annexin V binds phosphatidylserine (PS), which is externalized during apoptosis. Previous works suggested that B10 cells are apoptotic cells since they bind Annexin V. Others showed that Annexin V binding could also be expressed on viable B cells. We aimed to explore if PS exposure can be a marker of B10 cells and if PS exposure has a functional role on B cell IL-10 production in healthy subjects. We found that B10 cells were significantly more often Annexin V+ than IL-10 non-producing B cells. After CpG activation, Annexin V+ B cells differentiated more often into B10 cells than Annexin Vneg B cells. Cell death and early apoptosis were similar between Annexin V+ and Annexin Vneg B cells. PS blockage, using biotinylated AnV and glyburide, decreased B10 cell differentiation. This study showed that B10 cells have an increased PS exposure independently of any apoptotic state. B cells exposing PS differentiate more into B10 cells whereas PS blockage inhibits B10 cells generation. These results strongly suggest a link between PS exposure and B10 cells. PMID:28072868

  5. Inducible CD4+LAP+ Foxp3 negative Regulatory T cells Suppress Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Mehta, Amit K.; Choi, Heonsik; Croft, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) play a critical role in the maintenance of airway tolerance. We report here that inhaled soluble antigen induces not only adaptive Foxp3+ Treg but also a regulatory population of CD4+ T cells in the lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes that express latency-associated peptide (LAP) on their cell surface but do not express Foxp3. Blocking the cytokines IL-10 or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prevented the generation of the LAP+ Treg and Foxp3+ Treg cells in vivo, and the LAP+ Treg could also be generated concomitantly with Foxp3+ Treg in vitro by culturing naïve CD4+ T cells with antigen and exogenous TGF-β. The LAP+ Treg cells strongly suppressed naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation, and transfer of sorted OVA-specific LAP+ Treg cells in vivo inhibited allergic eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine expression in the lung, either when present at the time of Th2 sensitization or when injected after Th2 cells were formed. Furthermore, inflammatory innate stimuli from house dust mite (HDM) extract, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 (Nod2) ligand, and lipopolysacchride (LPS), that are sufficient for blocking airway tolerance, strongly decreased the induction of LAP+ Treg cells. Taken together, we conclude that inducible antigen-specific LAP+ Treg cells can suppress asthmatic lung inflammation and constitute a mediator of airway tolerance together with Foxp3+ Treg cells. PMID:22079987

  6. Controlling the frontier: regulatory T-cells and intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bollrath, Julia; Powrie, Fiona M

    2013-11-30

    The intestine represents one of the most challenging sites for the immune system as immune cells must be able to mount an efficient response to invading pathogens while tolerating the large number and diverse array of resident commensal bacteria. Foxp3(+) regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a non-redundant role at maintaining this balance. At the same time Treg cell differentiation and function can be modulated by the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we will discuss effector mechanisms of Treg cells in the intestine and how these cells can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunopathogenesis In Autism: Regulatory T Cells and Autoimmunity In Neurodevelopment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    which suggests impacts to regulatory T cells (Tregs). Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sultanate (PFOS) are widespread environmental...The emerging contaminants perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are environmentally pervasive and have been associated...Specific Aim #2: To determine the effects of developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on

  8. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls regulatory CD4+ T cell function.

    PubMed

    Pot, Caroline

    2012-05-31

    The ligand activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been studied for many decades in toxicology as the ligand for the environmental contaminant dioxin. However, AhR has recently emerged as a critical physiological regulator of immune responses affecting both innate and adaptive systems, and several AhR ligands with different pharmacological profiles have recently been studied. The current review discusses new insights into the role of AhR signalling and AhR ligands on the regulation of the immune system, with a focus on regulatory T cells which maintain immune tolerance. Notably, AhR is expressed and modulates the development of two induced regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets, the forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) and the IL-10-secreting type 1 regulatory T (T(R)1) cells, through different signalling pathways. We will finally discuss how AhR ligands could be exploited to alleviate human autoimmune diseases. Clearly, drugs targeted against AhR should promote the development of new strategies to fight against autoimmune diseases.

  9. The expanding universe of regulatory T cell subsets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Thomas F

    2007-08-01

    Evidence has indicated that failed antitumor immunity is dominated by immunosuppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Immunity, Peng et al. (2007) add to this list by describing tumor-infiltrating gammadelta T cells that have regulatory function.

  10. Finding Balance: T cell Regulatory Receptor Expression during Aging.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Mary M; Qi, Qian; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2011-10-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of changes to immune responsiveness. Reduced protection against infection, reduced responses to vaccination and increased risk of autoimmunity are all hallmarks of advanced age. Here we consider how changes in the expression of regulatory receptors on the T cell surface contribute to altered immunity during aging.

  11. Borna disease virus nucleoprotein inhibits type I interferon induction through the interferon regulatory factor 7 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wuqi; Kao, Wenping; Zhai, Aixia; Qian, Jun; Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Yunlong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Fengmin

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •IRF7 nuclear localisation was inhibited by BDV persistently infected. •BDV N protein resistant to IFN induction both in BDV infected OL cell and N protein plasmid transfected OL cell. •BDV N protein is related to the inhibition of IRF7 nuclear localisation. -- Abstract: The expression of type I interferon (IFN) is one of the most potent innate defences against viral infection in higher vertebrates. Borna disease virus (BDV) establishes persistent, noncytolytic infections in animals and in cultured cells. Early studies have shown that the BDV phosphoprotein can inhibit the activation of type I IFN through the TBK1–IRF3 pathway. The function of the BDV nucleoprotein in the inhibition of IFN activity is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated IRF7 activation and increased IFN-α/β expression in a BDV-persistently infected human oligodendroglia cell line following RNA interference-mediated BDV nucleoprotein silencing. Furthermore, we showed that BDV nucleoprotein prevented the nuclear localisation of IRF7 and inhibited endogenous IFN induction by poly(I:C), coxsackie virus B3 and IFN-β. Our findings provide evidence for a previously undescribed mechanism by which the BDV nucleoprotein inhibits type I IFN expression by interfering with the IRF7 pathway.

  12. Postnatal paucity of regulatory T cells and control of NK cell activation in experimental biliary atresia

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Alexander G.; Saxena, Vijay; Shivakumar, Pranavkumar; Sabla, Gregg E.; Simmons, Julia; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Although recent studies have identified important roles for T and NK cells in the pathogenesis of biliary atresia (BA), the mechanisms by which susceptibility to bile duct injury is restricted to the neonatal period are unknown. Methods We characterised hepatic regulatory T cells (Tregs) by flow cytometry in two groups of neonatal mice challenged with rhesus rotavirus (RRV) at day 7 (no ductal injury) or day 1 of life (resulting in BA), determined the functional interaction with effector cells in co-culture assays, and examined the effect of adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells on the BA phenotype. Results While day 7 RRV infection increased hepatic Tregs (Foxp3+ CD4+ CD25+) by 10-fold within 3 days, no increase in Tregs occurred at this time point following infection on day 1. In vitro, Tregs effectively suppressed NK cell activation by hepatic dendritic cells and decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNFα and IL-15, following RRV infection. In vivo, adoptive transfer of CD4+ cells prior to RRV inoculation led to increased survival, improved weight gain, decreased population of hepatic NK cells, and persistence of donor Tregs in the liver. Conclusions 1) The liver is devoid of Tregs early after perinatal RRV infection; 2) Tregs suppress DC-dependent activation of naive NK cells in vitro, and Treg-containing CD4+ cells inhibit hepatic NK cell expansion in vivo. Thus, the postnatal absence of Tregs may be a key factor that allows hepatic DCs to act unopposed in NK cell activation during the initiation of neonatal bile duct injury. PMID:20347178

  13. Comparison of circulating and intratumoral regulatory T cells in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Asma, Gati; Amal, Gorrab; Raja, Marrakchi; Amine, Derouiche; Mohammed, Chebil; Amel, Ben Ammar Elgaaied

    2015-05-01

    The clear evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) exists in the tumor microenvironment raises the question why renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progresses. Numerous studies support the implication of CD4(+)CD25(high) regulatory T (Treg) cells in RCC development. We aimed in this study to characterize the phenotype and function of circulating and intratumoral Treg cells of RCC patient in order to evaluate their implication in the inhibition of the local antitumor immune response. Our results demonstrate that the proportion of Treg in TIL was, in average, similar to that found in circulating CD4(+) T cells of patients or healthy donors. However, intratumoral Treg exhibit a marked different phenotype when compared with the autologous circulating Treg. A higher CD25 mean level, HLA-DR, Fas, and GITR, and a lower CD45RA expression were observed in intratumoral Treg, suggesting therefore that these cells are effector in the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, intratumoral Treg showed a higher inhibitory function on autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when compared with circulating Treg that may be explained by an overexpression of FoxP3 transcription factor. These findings suggest that intratumoral Treg could be major actors in the impairment of local antitumor immune response for RCC patients.

  14. CD101 inhibits the expansion of colitogenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Regina; Dornhoff, Heike; Baier, Julia L.C.; Purtak, Martin; Opoka, Robert; Koller, Anna Katharina; Atreya, Raya; Rau, Tilman T.; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Bogdan, Christian; Mattner, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    CD101 exerts negative-costimulatory effects in vitro, but its function in vivo remains poorly defined. CD101 is abundantly expressed on lymphoid and myeloid cells in intestinal tissues, but absent from naïve splenic T cells. Here, we assessed the impact of CD101 on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using a T cell transfer model of chronic colitis, we found that in recipients of naïve T cells from CD101+/+ donors up to 30% of the recovered lymphocytes expressed CD101, correlating with an increased IL-2-mediated FoxP3-expression. Transfer of CD101−/− T cells caused more severe colitis and was associated with an expansion of IL-17-producing T cells and an enhanced expression of IL-2Rα/β independently of FoxP3. The co-transfer of naïve and regulatory T cells (Treg) protected most effectively from colitis, when both donor and recipient mice expressed CD101. While the expression of CD101 on T cells was sufficient for Treg-function and the inhibition of T cell proliferation, sustained IL-10-production required additional CD101-expression by myeloid cells. Finally, in patients with IBD a reduced CD101-expression on peripheral and intestinal monocytes and CD4+ T cells correlated with enhanced IL-17-production and disease activity. Thus, CD101-deficiency is a novel marker for progressive colitis and potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26813346

  15. Generation and identification of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells

    PubMed Central

    Biragyn, Arya; Lee-Chang, Catalina; Bodogai, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Bregs in cancer remains poorly understood despite their well-documented regulation of responses to the self and protection from harmful autoimmunity. We recently discovered a unique regulatory B cell subset evoked by breast cancer to mediate protection of metastasizing cancer cells. These results together with the wealth of findings of the last 40 years on B cells in tumorigenesis suggest the existence of additional cancer Bregs modulating anticancer responses. To facilitate the search for them, here we provide our detailed protocol for the characterization and generation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells. Wherever applicable, we also discuss nuances and uniqueness of a Breg study in cancer to warn potential pitfalls. PMID:25015287

  16. Reciprocity between Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells: Relevance to Polarized Immunity in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Soumi; Khaitan, Binod Kumar; Joshi, Beenu; Sengupta, Utpal; Nautiyal, Arvind Kumar; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous or borderline lepromatous leprosy (LL/BL) patients in contrast to tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid type (TT/BT) patients. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by strong Th1-type cell response with localized lesions whereas lepromatous leprosy is hallmarked by its selective Mycobacterium leprae specific T cell anergy leading to disseminated and progressive disease. FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases also dampen proinflammatory T cells that include T helper 17 (Th17) cells. This study is aimed at evaluating the role of Treg cells in influencing other effector T cells and its relationship with the cytokine polarized state in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from of BT/TT (n = 15) and BL/LL (n = 15) patients were stimulated with M. leprae antigen (WCL) in presence of golgi transport inhibitor monensin for FACS based intracellular cytokine estimation. The frequency of Treg cells showed >5-fold increase in BL/LL in comparison to BT/TT and healthy contacts. These cells produced suppressive cytokine, IL-10 in BL/LL as opposed to BT/TT (p = 0.0200) indicating their suppressive function. The frequency of Th17 cells (CD4, CD45RO, IL-17) was, however, higher in BT/TT. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) was also found between IL-10 of Treg cells and IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL. Blocking IL-10/TGF-β restored the IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL patients. Simultaneously, presence of Th17 related cytokines (TGF-β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23) decreased the number of FoxP3+ Treg cells concomitantly increasing IL-17 producing CD4+ cells in lepromatous leprosy. Higher frequency of Programmed Death-1/PD-1+ Treg cells and its ligand, PDL-1 in antigen presenting cells (APCs) was found in BL/LL patients. Inhibition of this pathway led to rescue of IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T cells

  17. Reciprocity between Regulatory T Cells and Th17 Cells: Relevance to Polarized Immunity in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Sadhu, Soumi; Khaitan, Binod Kumar; Joshi, Beenu; Sengupta, Utpal; Nautiyal, Arvind Kumar; Mitra, Dipendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    T cell defect is a common feature in lepromatous or borderline lepromatous leprosy (LL/BL) patients in contrast to tuberculoid or borderline tuberculoid type (TT/BT) patients. Tuberculoid leprosy is characterized by strong Th1-type cell response with localized lesions whereas lepromatous leprosy is hallmarked by its selective Mycobacterium leprae specific T cell anergy leading to disseminated and progressive disease. FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Treg) which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance, preventing autoimmune diseases and limiting chronic inflammatory diseases also dampen proinflammatory T cells that include T helper 17 (Th17) cells. This study is aimed at evaluating the role of Treg cells in influencing other effector T cells and its relationship with the cytokine polarized state in leprosy patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from of BT/TT (n = 15) and BL/LL (n = 15) patients were stimulated with M. leprae antigen (WCL) in presence of golgi transport inhibitor monensin for FACS based intracellular cytokine estimation. The frequency of Treg cells showed >5-fold increase in BL/LL in comparison to BT/TT and healthy contacts. These cells produced suppressive cytokine, IL-10 in BL/LL as opposed to BT/TT (p = 0.0200) indicating their suppressive function. The frequency of Th17 cells (CD4, CD45RO, IL-17) was, however, higher in BT/TT. Significant negative correlation (r = -0.68, P = 0.03) was also found between IL-10 of Treg cells and IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL. Blocking IL-10/TGF-β restored the IL-17+ T cells in BL/LL patients. Simultaneously, presence of Th17 related cytokines (TGF-β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-23) decreased the number of FoxP3+ Treg cells concomitantly increasing IL-17 producing CD4+ cells in lepromatous leprosy. Higher frequency of Programmed Death-1/PD-1+ Treg cells and its ligand, PDL-1 in antigen presenting cells (APCs) was found in BL/LL patients. Inhibition of this pathway led to rescue of IFN-γ and IL-17 producing T cells

  18. De novo fatty acid synthesis controls the fate between regulatory T and T helper 17 cells.

    PubMed

    Berod, Luciana; Friedrich, Christin; Nandan, Amrita; Freitag, Jenny; Hagemann, Stefanie; Harmrolfs, Kirsten; Sandouk, Aline; Hesse, Christina; Castro, Carla N; Bähre, Heike; Tschirner, Sarah K; Gorinski, Nataliya; Gohmert, Melanie; Mayer, Christian T; Huehn, Jochen; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Müller, Rolf; Lochner, Matthias; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17)-secreting T cells of the T helper 17 (TH17) lineage play a pathogenic role in multiple inflammatory and autoimmune conditions and thus represent a highly attractive target for therapeutic intervention. We report that inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) restrains the formation of human and mouse TH17 cells and promotes the development of anti-inflammatory Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. We show that TH17 cells, but not Treg cells, depend on ACC1-mediated de novo fatty acid synthesis and the underlying glycolytic-lipogenic metabolic pathway for their development. Although TH17 cells use this pathway to produce phospholipids for cellular membranes, Treg cells readily take up exogenous fatty acids for this purpose. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition or T cell-specific deletion of ACC1 not only blocks de novo fatty acid synthesis but also interferes with the metabolic flux of glucose-derived carbon via glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In vivo, treatment with the ACC-specific inhibitor soraphen A or T cell-specific deletion of ACC1 in mice attenuates TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Our results indicate fundamental differences between TH17 cells and Treg cells regarding their dependency on ACC1-mediated de novo fatty acid synthesis, which might be exploited as a new strategy for metabolic immune modulation of TH17 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  19. The two faces of regulatory T cells in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blatner, Nichole R; Gounari, Fotini; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that expand in human colon cancer express retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and exert potent T-cell suppressive functions while mediating pro-inflammatory effects. Similar Tregs expand and drive a vicious cycle of inflammation in murine polyposis. Targeting RORγt in Tregs interrupts such a cycle and protects mice against polyposis, suggesting that a similar intervention may provide therapeutic benefits to colon cancer patients. PMID:23762787

  20. [Regulatory T cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Limón-Camacho, Leonardo; Solleiro-Villavicencio, Helena; Pupko-Sissa, Ilana; Lascurain, Ricardo; Vargas-Rojas, María Inés

    2013-01-01

    Exposition to tobacco smoke has been established as the main risk factor to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by inducing inflammation of the airways. Several cell populations participate in this inflammatory process. It has been accepted that a maladaptive modulation of inflammatory responses plays a critical role in the development of the disease. Regulatory T cells (Treg) are a subset of T CD4(+) lymphocytes that modulate the immune response through secretion of cytokines. The role of the Treg cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is not clearly known, that is why it is important to focus in understanding their participation in the pathogenesis of the disease. To elaborate a systematic review of original articles in which we could describe Treg cells (their ontogeny, mechanisms of action) and their role in COPD, we made a systematic literature search in some data bases (MEDLINE, AMED, PubMed and Scielo) looking through the next keywords: "COPD and Regulatory T cells/EPOC y células T reguladoras", «Inflammation and COPD/Inflamación y EPOC», «Regulatory T cells/Células T reguladoras». We included basic science articles, controlled and non-controlled clinical trials, meta-analysis and guides. From this search we conclude that Treg cells are a subpopulation of T CD4(+) lymphocytes and their major functions are the suppression of immune responses and the maintenance of tolerance to self-antigens. A disruption in the regulatory mechanisms of the Treg cells leads to the development and perpetuation of inflammation in COPD. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages induce regulatory T cells and protect against adriamycin nephrosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Dong; Sun, Yan; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Zheng, Guoping; Tan, Thian Kui; Ince, Jon; Alexander, Stephen I; Harris, David C H

    2010-06-01

    IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages, a subset of activated macrophages, produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that they may protect against inflammation-mediated injury. Here, macrophages modified ex vivo by IL-10/TGF-beta (IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2) significantly attenuated renal inflammation, structural injury, and functional decline in murine adriamycin nephrosis (AN). These cells deactivated effector macrophages and inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation. IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2 expressed high levels of the regulatory co-stimulatory molecule B7-H4, induced regulatory T cells from CD4+CD25- T cells in vitro, and increased the number of regulatory T cells in lymph nodes draining the kidneys in AN. The phenotype of IL-10/TGF-beta Mu2 did not switch to that of effector macrophages in the inflamed kidney, and these cells did not promote fibrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that IL-10/TGF-beta-modified macrophages effectively protect against renal injury in AN and may become part of a therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammatory disease.

  2. Angiopoietin1 Inhibits Mast Cell Activation and Protects against Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Tao; Liu, Yi-Nan; He, Qi-Hua; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Bai, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Since morbidity and mortality rates of anaphylaxis diseases have been increasing year by year, how to prevent and manage these diseases effectively has become an important issue. Mast cells play a central regulatory role in allergic diseases. Angiopoietin1 (Ang-1) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting vascular permeability, leukocyte migration and cytokine production. However, Ang-1's function in mast cell activation and anaphylaxis diseases is unknown. The results of our study suggest that Ang-1 decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production of mast cells by suppressing IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Ang-1 also strongly inhibited compound 48/80 induced and FcεRI-mediated mast cells degranulation by decreasing intracellular calcium levels in vitro. In vivo lentivirus-mediated delivery of Ang-1 in mice exhibited alleviated leakage in IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). Furthermore, exogenous Ang-1 intervention treatment prevented mice from compound 48/80-induced mesentery mast cell degranulation, attenuated increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, relieved lung injury, and improved survival in anaphylaxis shock. The results of our study reveal, for the first time, the important role of Ang-1 in the activation of mast cells, and identify a therapeutic effect of Ang-1 on anaphylaxis diseases. PMID:24586553

  3. Regulatory mechanisms of helper T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Bhanu P.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) family consists of six cytokines in mammals. Among them, IL-17 and IL-17F are expressed by a novel subset of CD4+ helper T (Th) cells and play critical function in inflammation and autoimmunity. On the other hand, IL-17E, also called IL-25, has been associated with allergic responses. Here we summarize recent work by us as well as other investigators in understanding the regulation and function of these three cytokines. From these studies, IL-17 family cytokines may serve as novel targets for pharmaceutical intervention of immune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:18280574

  4. Regulatory immune cells and functions in autoimmunity and transplantation immunology.

    PubMed

    Papp, Gabor; Boros, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Szodoray, Peter; Zeher, Margit

    2017-03-07

    In physiological circumstances, various tolerogenic mechanisms support the protection of self-structures during immune responses. However, quantitative and/or qualitative changes in regulatory immune cells and mediators can evoke auto-reactive immune responses, and upon susceptible genetic background, along with the presence of other concomitant etiological factors, autoimmune disease may develop. In transplant immunology, tolerogenic mechanisms are also critical, since the balance between of alloantigen-reactive effector cells and the regulatory immune cells will ultimately determine whether a graft is accepted or rejected. Better understanding of the immunological tolerance and the potential modulations of immune regulatory processes are crucial for developing effective therapies in autoimmune diseases as well as in organ transplantation. In this review, we focus on the novel insights regarding the impaired immune regulation and other relevant factors contributing to the development of auto-reactive and graft-reactive immune responses in autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection, respectively. We also address some promising approaches for modification of immune-regulatory processes and tolerogenic mechanisms in autoimmunity and solid organ transplantation, which may be beneficial in future therapeutic strategies.

  5. Direct-to-Consumer Stem Cell Marketing and Regulatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is a large, poorly regulated international market of putative stem cell products, including transplants of processed autologous stem cells from various tissues, cell processing devices, cosmetics, and nutritional supplements. Despite the absence of rigorous scientific research in the form of randomized clinical trials to support the routine use of such products, the market appears to be growing and diversifying. Very few stem cell biologics have passed regulatory scrutiny, and authorities in many countries, including the United States, have begun to step up their enforcement activities to protect patients and the integrity of health care markets. PMID:23934911

  6. Direct-to-consumer stem cell marketing and regulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sipp, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    There is a large, poorly regulated international market of putative stem cell products, including transplants of processed autologous stem cells from various tissues, cell processing devices, cosmetics, and nutritional supplements. Despite the absence of rigorous scientific research in the form of randomized clinical trials to support the routine use of such products, the market appears to be growing and diversifying. Very few stem cell biologics have passed regulatory scrutiny, and authorities in many countries, including the United States, have begun to step up their enforcement activities to protect patients and the integrity of health care markets.

  7. T Regulatory Cell Biology in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Alroqi, Fayhan J; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the transcription factor forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) play an essential role in enforcing immune tolerance to self tissues, regulating host-commensal flora interaction, and facilitating tissue repair. Their deficiency and/or dysfunction trigger unbridled autoimmunity and inflammation. A growing number of monogenic defects have been recognized that adversely impact Treg cell development, differentiation, and/or function, leading to heritable diseases of immune dysregulation and autoimmunity. In this article, we review recent insights into Treg cell biology and function, with particular attention to lessons learned from newly recognized clinical disorders of Treg cell deficiency.

  8. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD39(high) human regulatory B cells (Breg).

    PubMed

    Figueiró, F; Muller, L; Funk, S; Jackson, E K; Battastini, A M O; Whiteside, T L

    2016-02-01

    CD39 and CD73 are key enzymes in the adenosine (ADO) pathway. ADO modulates pathophysiological responses of immune cells, including B cells. It has recently emerged that a subpopulation of ADO-producing CD39(+)CD73(+) B cells has regulatory properties. Here, we define the CD39(high) subset of these cells as the major contributor to the regulatory network operated by human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells were sorted into CD39(neg), CD39(inter) and CD39(high) subsets. The phenotype, proliferation and IL-10 secretion by these B cells were studied by flow cytometry. 5'-AMP and ADO levels were measured by mass spectrometry. Agonists or antagonists of A1R, A2AR and A3R were used to study ADO-receptor signaling in B cells. Inhibition of effector T-cell (Teff) activation/proliferation by B cells was assessed in co-cultures. Cytokine production was measured by Luminex. Upon in vitro activation and culture of B cells, the subset of CD39(high) B cells increased in frequency (p < 0.001). CD39(high) B cells upregulated CD73 expression, proliferated (approximately 40% of CD39(high) B cells were Ki-67(+) and secreted fold-2 higher IL-10 and ADO levels than CD39(neg) or CD39(inter) B cells. CD39(high) B cells co-cultured with autologous Teff suppressed T-cell activation/proliferation and secreted elevated levels of IL-6 and IL-10. The A1R and A2AR agonists promoted expansion and functions of CD39(high) B cells. CD39 ectonucleotidase is upregulated in a subset of in vitro-activated B cells which utilize ADO and IL-10 to suppress Teff functions. Proliferation and functions of these CD39(high) B cells are regulated by A1R- and A2AR-mediated autocrine signaling.

  9. Dynamics of gene regulatory networks with cell division cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luonan; Wang, Ruiqi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2004-07-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and analyzing the nonlinear dynamics of gene regulatory networks with the consideration of a cell division cycle with duplication process of DNA , in particular for switches and oscillators of synthetic networks. We derive two models that may correspond to the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, respectively. A biologically plausible three-gene model ( lac,tetR , and cI ) and a repressilator as switch and oscillator examples are used to illustrate our theoretical results. We show that the cell cycle may play a significant role in gene regulation due to the nonlinear dynamics of a gene regulatory network although gene expressions are usually tightly controlled by transcriptional factors.

  10. Antagonists of alcohol inhibition of cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Wilkemeyer, Michael F.; Sebastian, Anita B.; Smith, Sherri A.; Charness, Michael E.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that alcohols act within specific binding pockets of selective neural proteins; however, antagonists at these sites have not been identified. 1-Alcohols from methanol through 1-butanol inhibit with increasing potency the cell–cell adhesion mediated by the immunoglobulin cell adhesion molecule L1. An abrupt cutoff exists after 1-butanol, with 1-pentanol and higher 1-alcohols showing no effect. Here, we demonstrate surprisingly strict structural requirements for alcohol inhibition of cell–cell adhesion in L1-transfected NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and in NG108–15 neuroblastoma × glioma hybrid cells treated with BMP-7, an inducer of L1 and neural cell adhesion molecule. The target site discriminates the tertiary structure of straight-chain and branched-chain alcohols and appears to comprise both a hydrophobic binding site and an adjacent hydrophilic allosteric site. Modifications to the 2- and 3-carbon positions of 1-butanol increased potency, whereas modifications that restrict movement about the 4-carbon abolished activity. The effects of ethanol and 1-butanol on cell–cell adhesion were antagonized by 1-pentanol (IC50 = 715 μM) and 1-octanol (IC50 = 3.6 μM). Antagonism by 1-octanol was complete, reversible, and noncompetitive. 1-Octanol also antagonized ethanol inhibition of BMP-7 morphogenesis in NG108–15 cells. 1-Octanol and related compounds may prove useful in dissecting the role of altered cell adhesion in ethanol-induced injury of the nervous system. PMID:10725368

  11. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking.

  12. Regulatory B Cells in Pregnancy: Lessons from Autoimmunity, Graft Tolerance, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Genuino, Ruth Marian; Diener, Kerrilyn R

    2017-01-01

    The success of pregnancy is contingent on the maternal immune system recognizing and accommodating a growing semi-allogeneic fetus. Specialized subsets of lymphocytes capable of negative regulation are fundamental in this process, and include the regulatory T cells (Tregs) and potentially, regulatory B cells (Bregs). Most of our current understanding of the immune regulatory role of Bregs comes from studies in the fields of autoimmunity, transplantation tolerance, and cancer biology. Bregs control autoimmune diseases and can elicit graft tolerance by inhibiting the differentiation of effector T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), and activating Tregs. Furthermore, in cancer, Bregs are hijacked by neoplastic cells to promote tumorigenesis. Pregnancy therefore represents a condition that reconciles these fields-mechanisms must be in place to ensure maternal immunological tolerance throughout gravidity to allow the semi-allogeneic fetus to grow within. Thus, the mechanisms underlying Breg activities in autoimmune diseases, transplantation tolerance, and cancer may take place during pregnancy as well. In this review, we discuss the potential role of Bregs as guardians of pregnancy and propose an endocrine-modulated feedback loop highlighting the Breg-Treg-tolerogenic DC interface essential for the induction of maternal immune tolerance.

  13. Regulatory B Cells in Pregnancy: Lessons from Autoimmunity, Graft Tolerance, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Genuino, Ruth Marian; Diener, Kerrilyn R.

    2017-01-01

    The success of pregnancy is contingent on the maternal immune system recognizing and accommodating a growing semi-allogeneic fetus. Specialized subsets of lymphocytes capable of negative regulation are fundamental in this process, and include the regulatory T cells (Tregs) and potentially, regulatory B cells (Bregs). Most of our current understanding of the immune regulatory role of Bregs comes from studies in the fields of autoimmunity, transplantation tolerance, and cancer biology. Bregs control autoimmune diseases and can elicit graft tolerance by inhibiting the differentiation of effector T cells and dendritic cells (DCs), and activating Tregs. Furthermore, in cancer, Bregs are hijacked by neoplastic cells to promote tumorigenesis. Pregnancy therefore represents a condition that reconciles these fields—mechanisms must be in place to ensure maternal immunological tolerance throughout gravidity to allow the semi-allogeneic fetus to grow within. Thus, the mechanisms underlying Breg activities in autoimmune diseases, transplantation tolerance, and cancer may take place during pregnancy as well. In this review, we discuss the potential role of Bregs as guardians of pregnancy and propose an endocrine-modulated feedback loop highlighting the Breg–Treg–tolerogenic DC interface essential for the induction of maternal immune tolerance. PMID:28261223

  14. Roscovitine regulates invasive breast cancer cell (MDA-MB231) proliferation and survival through cell cycle regulatory protein cdk5.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, Shaun; Sharma, Mahesh C

    2007-02-01

    Roscovitine, a purine analogue, has been considered for the treatment of cancer. Anti-cancer therapeutic efficacy is being evaluated in clinical trials. However, the mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, cyclic-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) proved to be a molecular target for roscovitine-triggered apoptosis for highly invasive breast cancer cell death. Because our previous studies have shown a potential role of cdk5 in endothelial cell proliferation/apoptosis [Sharma, M.R., Tuszynski, G.P., Sharma, M.C. (2004). Angiostatin-induced inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation/apoptosis is associated with the down-regulation of cell cycle regulatory protein cdk5. J. Cell Biochem. 91, 398-409], here we not only demonstrate first that Cdk5, p35, and p25 proteins were all expressed in invasive breast cancer cells MDA-MB231 but also showed that cdk5 expression regulates MDA-MB231 cell proliferation. In addition, potent mitogen bFGF up-regulates cdk5 expression. Roscovitine specifically inhibits cdk5 expression/activity in a dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of MDA-MB231 cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. By contrast, the roscovitine analog olomoucine, a specific inhibitor of cdk4, failed to affect MDA-MB231 cell proliferation and apoptosis which implies the specific involvement of cdk5 in roscovitine-triggered cell death/proliferation. Additionally, roscovitine-mediated inhibition of proliferation is irreversible. These data suggest that cdk5 may have a significant role in the regulation of breast cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and extend beyond its role in neurogenesis. These results suggest that Cdk5 is a novel player in roscovitine-triggered breast cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, therefore, may be a potential therapeutic target.

  15. Graded Foxo1 Activity in Regulatory T Cells Differentiates Tumor Immunity from Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chong T.; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance1-5; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumor immune responses6-8. Compared to resting phenotype Treg (rTreg) cells in the secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues including solid tumors exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype9-11. However, aTreg cell function and whether its generation can be manipulated to promote tumor immunity without evoking autoimmunity are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases12,13, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg cell-mediated immune tolerance. We found that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. Transcriptome analysis revealed that aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression and enhanced Foxo1 phosphorylation at sites of the Akt kinase. Treg cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and depleted aTreg cells, causing CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumor-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumor-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the generation of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8+ T cell responses; and the Foxo signaling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to preferentially break tumor immune tolerance. PMID:26789248

  16. Role of IL-10-producing regulatory B cells in modulating T-helper cell immune responses during silica-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangwei; Dai, Wujing; Li, Chao; Lu, Xiaowei; Chen, Ying; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis, which are seriously harmful to human health. Previous research demonstrated that uncontrolled T-helper (Th) cell immune responses were involved in the pathogenesis of silicosis. Lymphocytes also are reported to have important roles. Existing studies on lymphocyte regulation of Th immune responses were limited to T cells, such as the regulatory T (Treg) cell, which could negatively regulate inflammation and promote the process of silicosis. However, other regulatory subsets in silicosis have not been investigated in detail, and the mechanism of immune homeostasis modulation needs further exploration. Another regulatory lymphocyte, the regulatory B cell, has recently drawn increasing attention. In this study, we comprehensively showed the role of IL-10-producing regulatory B cell (B10) in a silicosis model of mice. B10 was inducible by silica instillation. Insufficient B10 amplified inflammation and attenuated lung fibrosis by promoting the Th1 immune response. Insufficient B10 clearly inhibited Treg and decreased the level of IL-10. Our study indicated that B10 could control lung inflammation and exacerbate lung fibrosis by inhibiting Th1 response and modulating the Th balance. The regulatory function of B10 could be associated with Treg induction and IL-10 secretion. PMID:27354007

  17. Memory CD4+ T cells are suppressed by CD8+ regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xin; Cheng, Qi; Liang, Huifang; Zhao, Jianping; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Tomlinson, Stephen; Chen, Lin; Atkinson, Carl; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute graft rejection mediated by alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells is a major obstacle to transplantation tolerance. It has been reported that CD8+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) have the ability to induce graft tolerance by restraining the function of activated CD4+ T cells, but not including memory T cells. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of CD8+ Tregs on alloreactive memory CD4+ T cells. Methods: We detected Qa-1 expression and performed proliferative assay on memory CD4+ T cells. All memory CD4+ T cells were purified from mice receiving skin allografts. We performed inhibitory and cytotoxic assays on CD8+ Tregs, which were isolated from a T cell vaccination mouse model, and IL-2, IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were measured in co-culture supernatants by ELISA. To confirm CD8+ Tregs inhibition of memory CD4+ T cells in-vivo, we utilized a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Results: Memory CD4+ T cells mediated acute allograft rejection, and CD8+ Tregs suppressed the proliferation of memory CD4+ T cells. In vitro, memory CD4+ T cells were inhibited and lysed by CD8+ Tregs. There was a positive correlation between IFN-γ levels, and cell lysis rate induced by CD8+ Tregs. In-vivo studies demonstrated CD8+ Tregs prolonged graft survival times, by inhibiting CD4+ memory T cells, through a Qa-1-peptide-TCR pathway. Conclusions: CD8+ Tregs inhibit CD4+ memory T cell-mediated acute murine cardiac allograft rejection, and further prolong graft survival times. These results provide new insights into immune regulation of organ rejection. PMID:28123634

  18. Generation and Function of Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Erica G.; Williams, Calvin B.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential to the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses. There are two major subsets of Treg cells, “natural” Treg (nTreg) cells that develop in the thymus, and “induced” Treg (iTreg) cells that arise in the periphery from CD4+ Foxp3− conventional T cells and can be generated in vitro. Previous work has established that both subsets are required for immunological tolerance. Additionally, in vitro-derived iTreg cells can reestablish tolerance in situations where Treg cells are decreased or defective. This review will focus on iTreg cells, drawing comparisons to nTreg cells when possible. We discuss the molecular mechanisms of iTreg cell induction, both in vivo and in vitro, review the Foxp3-dependent and -independent transcriptional landscape of iTreg cells, and examine the proposed suppressive mechanisms utilized by each Treg cell subset. We also compare the T cell receptor repertoire of the Treg cell subsets, discuss inflammatory conditions where iTreg cells are generated or have been used for treatment, and address the issue of iTreg cell stability. PMID:23801990

  19. Apigenin inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuai; Zhu, Yi; Li, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xiao; Liang, Zhen; Li, Shi-Qi; Xu, Xin; Chen, Hong; Liu, Ben; Zheng, Xiang-Yi; Xie, Li-Ping

    2017-03-21

    Apigenin, a natural flavonoid found in vegetables and fruits, has antitumor activity in several cancer types. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of action of apigenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. We found that apigenin suppressed ACHN, 786-0, and Caki-1 RCC cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. A comet assay suggested that apigenin caused DNA damage in ACHN cells, especially at higher doses, and induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest through ATM signal modulation. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated p53 knockdown showed that apigenin-induced apoptosis was likely p53 dependent. Apigenin anti-proliferative effects were confirmed in an ACHN cell xenograft mouse model. Apigenin treatment reduced tumor growth and volume in vivo, and immunohistochemical staining revealed lower Ki-67 indices in tumors derived from apigenin-treated mice. These findings suggest that apigenin exposure induces DNA damage, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, p53 accumulation and apoptosis, which collectively suppress ACHN RCC cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Given its antitumor effects and low in vivo toxicity, apigenin is a highly promising agent for treatment of RCC.

  20. Subsets of human natural killer cells and their regulatory effects

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells have distinct functions as NKtolerant, NKcytotoxic and NKregulatory cells and can be divided into different subsets based on the relative expression of the surface markers CD27 and CD11b. CD27+ NK cells, which are abundant cytokine producers, are numerically in the minority in human peripheral blood but constitute the large population of NK cells in cord blood, spleen, tonsil and decidua tissues. Recent data suggest that these NK cells may have immunoregulatory properties under certain conditions. In this review, we will focus on these new NK cell subsets and discuss how regulatory NK cells may serve as rheostats or sentinels in controlling inflammation and maintaining immune homeostasis in various organs. PMID:24303897

  1. Gene regulatory networks governing haematopoietic stem cell development and identity.

    PubMed

    Pimanda, John E; Göttgens, Berthold

    2010-01-01

    Development can be viewed as a dynamic progression through regulatory states which characterise the various cell types within a given differentiation cascade. To understand the progression of regulatory states that define the origin and subsequent development of haematopoietic stem cells, the first imperative is to understand the ontogeny of haematopoiesis. We are fortunate that the ontogeny of blood development is one of the best characterized mammalian developmental systems. However, the field is still in its infancy with regard to the reconstruction of gene regulatory networks and their interactions with cell signalling cascades that drive a mesodermal progenitor to adopt the identity of a haematopoietic stem cell and beyond. Nevertheless, a framework to dissect these networks and comprehend the logic of its circuitry does exist and although they may not as yet be available, a sense for the tools that will be required to achieve this aim is also emerging. In this review we cover the fundamentals of network architecture, methods used to reconstruct networks, current knowledge of haematopoietic and related transcriptional networks, current challenges and future outlook.

  2. Regulatory T cells as therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Esensten, Jonathan H.; Wofsy, David; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TREG) are a subset of CD4+ T cells with a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity. Whether defects in TREG contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unclear. However, a variety of approved and experimental drugs for RA may work, in part, by promoting the function or increasing numbers of TREG. Furthermore, animal studies demonstrate that direct injection of TREG ameliorates a wide range of experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Thus, cell-based therapy with TREG has the potential to produce durable disease remission in patients with RA. PMID:19798031

  3. TRAF3 regulates the effector function of regulatory T cells and humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Hoon; Hu, Hongbo; Jin, Jin; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Xiao, Yichuan; Gilbert, Brian E.; Brink, Robert; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control different aspects of immune responses, but how the effector functions of Treg cells are regulated is incompletely understood. Here we identified TNF receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) as a regulator of Treg cell function. Treg cell–specific ablation of TRAF3 impaired CD4 T cell homeostasis, characterized by an increase in the Th1 type of effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the ablation of TRAF3 in Treg cells resulted in increased antigen-stimulated activation of follicular T helper cells (TFH cells), coupled with heightened formation of germinal centers and production of high-affinity IgG antibodies. Although the loss of TRAF3 did not reduce the overall frequency of Treg cells, it attenuated the antigen-stimulated production of follicular Treg cells (TFR cells). TRAF3 signaling in Treg cells was required to maintain high level expression of inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), which in turn was required for TFR cell generation and inhibition of antibody responses. These findings establish TRAF3 as a mediator of Treg cell function in the regulation of antibody responses and suggest a role for TRAF3 in mediating ICOS expression in Treg cells. PMID:24378539

  4. Single-cell chromatin accessibility reveals principles of regulatory variation.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Jason D; Wu, Beijing; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Ruff, Dave; Gonzales, Michael L; Snyder, Michael P; Chang, Howard Y; Greenleaf, William J

    2015-07-23

    Cell-to-cell variation is a universal feature of life that affects a wide range of biological phenomena, from developmental plasticity to tumour heterogeneity. Although recent advances have improved our ability to document cellular phenotypic variation, the fundamental mechanisms that generate variability from identical DNA sequences remain elusive. Here we reveal the landscape and principles of mammalian DNA regulatory variation by developing a robust method for mapping the accessible genome of individual cells by assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) integrated into a programmable microfluidics platform. Single-cell ATAC-seq (scATAC-seq) maps from hundreds of single cells in aggregate closely resemble accessibility profiles from tens of millions of cells and provide insights into cell-to-cell variation. Accessibility variance is systematically associated with specific trans-factors and cis-elements, and we discover combinations of trans-factors associated with either induction or suppression of cell-to-cell variability. We further identify sets of trans-factors associated with cell-type-specific accessibility variance across eight cell types. Targeted perturbations of cell cycle or transcription factor signalling evoke stimulus-specific changes in this observed variability. The pattern of accessibility variation in cis across the genome recapitulates chromosome compartments de novo, linking single-cell accessibility variation to three-dimensional genome organization. Single-cell analysis of DNA accessibility provides new insight into cellular variation of the 'regulome'.

  5. Myeloid derived suppressor cells promote cross-tolerance in B cell lymphoma by expanding regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Paolo; Mgebroff, Stephanie; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-induced T cell tolerance is a major mechanism that facilitates tumor progression and limits the efficacy of immune therapeutic interventions. Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in the induction of tolerance to tumor antigens yet the precise mechanisms regulating its induction in vivo remain to be elucidated. Using the A20 B cell lymphoma model, here we identify myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) as the tolerogenic APCs capable of antigen uptake and presentation to tumor-specific Tregs. MDSC-mediated Treg induction requires arginase but is TGFβ independent. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of MDSC function respectively with NOHA or sildenafil abrogates Treg proliferation and tumor-induced tolerance in antigen specific T cells. These findings establish a role for MDSCs in antigen-specific tolerance induction through preferential antigen uptake mediating the recruitment and expansion of Tregs. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions such as in vivo phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5)-inhibition which effectively abrogate the immunosuppressive role of MDSCs and reduce Treg numbers, may play a critical role in delaying and/or reversing tolerance induction. PMID:18593947

  6. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  7. Prolonged acceptance of skin grafts induced by B cells places regulatory T cells on the histopathology scene

    PubMed Central

    Langier, S.; Galvani, R.G.; Alves, A.P.G.; Fidelis, R.; Nunes, P.H.C.; Silva, M.H.; Castilho, L.R.; Monteiro, J.P.; Bonomo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The participation of regulatory T (Treg) cells in B cell-induced T cell tolerance has been claimed in different models. In skin grafts, naive B cells were shown to induce graft tolerance. However, neither the contribution of Treg cells to B cell-induced skin tolerance nor their contribution to the histopathological diagnosis of graft acceptance has been addressed. Here, using male C57BL/6 naive B cells to tolerize female animals, we show that skin graft tolerance is dependent on CD25+ Treg cell activity and independent of B cell-derived IL-10. In fact, B cells from IL-10-deficient mice were able to induce skin graft tolerance while Treg depletion of the host inhibited 100% graft survival. We questioned how Treg cell-mediated tolerance would impact on histopathology. B cell-tolerized skin grafts showed pathological scores as high as a rejected skin from naive, non-tolerized mice due to loss of skin appendages, reduced keratinization and mononuclear cell infiltrate. However, in tolerized mice, 40% of graft infiltrating CD4+ cells were FoxP3+ Treg cells with a high Treg:Teff (effector T cell) ratio (6:1) as compared to nontolerized mice where Tregs comprise less than 8% of total infiltrating CD4 cells with a Treg:Teff ratio below 1:1. These results render Treg cells an obligatory target for histopathological studies on tissue rejection that may help to diagnose and predict the outcome of a transplanted organ. PMID:22641417

  8. Retinoic acid from retinal pigment epithelium induces T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Yuko; Sugita, Sunao; Keino, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yukiko; Imai, Ayano; Horie, Shintaro; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    Primary cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells can convert T cells into T regulatory cells (Tregs) through inhibitory factor(s) including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) in vitro. Retinoic acid (RA) enhances induction of CD4(+) Tregs in the presence of TGFβ. We investigated whether RA produced by RPE cells can promote generation of Tregs. We found that in vitro, RA-treated T cells expressed high levels of Foxp3 in the presence of recombinant TGFβ. In GeneChip analysis, cultured RPE cells constitutively expressed RA-associated molecules such as RA-binding proteins, enzymes, and receptors. RPE from normal mice, but not vitamin A-deficient mice, contained significant levels of TGFβ. RPE-induced Tregs from vitamin A-deficient mice failed to suppress activation of target T cells. Only a few Foxp3(+) T cells were found in intraocular cells from vitamin A-deficient experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) mice, whereas expression was higher in cells from normal EAU mice. RA receptor antagonist-pretreated or RA-binding protein-siRNA-transfected RPE cells failed to convert CD4(+) T cells into Tregs. Our data support the hypothesis that RPE cells produce RA, thereby enabling bystander T cells to be converted into Tregs through TGFβ promotion, which can then participate in the establishment of immune tolerance in the eye.

  9. Inhibition of cell-cell binding by lipid assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Nagy, Jon O.; Bargatze, Robert F.

    2001-05-22

    This invention relates generally to the field of therapeutic compounds designed to interfere between the binding of ligands and their receptors on cell surface. More specifically, it provides products and methods for inhibiting cell migration and activation using lipid assemblies with surface recognition elements that are specific for the receptors involved in cell migration and activation.

  10. Cerebral regulatory T cells restrain microglia/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Winters, Ali; Yang, Shao-Hua; Jin, Kunlin

    2014-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)+ regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain the immune tolerance and prevent inflammatory responses in the periphery. However, the presence of Treg cells in the central nervous system under steady state has not been studied. Here, for the first time, we show a substantial TCRαβ+CD4+Foxp3+ T-cell population (cerebral Treg cells) in the normal rat cerebrum, constituting more than 15% of the cerebral CD4+ T-cell compartment. Cerebral Treg cells showed an activated/memory phenotype and expressed many Treg-cell signature genes at higher levels than peripheral Treg cells. Consistent with their activated/memory phenotype, cerebral Treg cells robustly restrained the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of brain microglia/macrophages, suggesting a role in maintaining the cerebral homeostasis by inhibiting the neuroinflammation. In addition, brain astrocytes were the helper cells that sustained Foxp3 expression in Treg cells through IL-2/STAT5 signaling, showing that the interaction between astrocytes and Treg cells contributes to the maintenance of Treg-cell identity in the brain. Taken together, our work represents the first study to characterize the phenotypic and functional features of Treg cells in the normal rat cerebrum. Our data have provided a novel insight for the contribution of Treg cells to the immunosurveillance and immunomodulation in the cerebrum under steady state. PMID:25329858

  11. Regulatory B cells contribute to the impaired antitumor immunity in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Jin, Yangqiu; Tian, Yinpu; Zhang, Huiyuan; Wu, Jie; Lu, Wei; Lu, Xiaofen

    2016-05-01

    Multiple factors in the tumor microenvironment were found to inhibit antitumor adaptive immune responses, allowing tumor persistence and growth. In this study, ascites from ovarian cancer patients were collected. We observed that a population of interleukin-10(+) B (IL-10(+) B) cells was preferentially enriched in the ascites. This population was associated with naive B cell phenotype or IgM or class-switched memory B cell phenotypes. The frequencies of IL-10(+) B cells were negatively correlated with the frequencies of interferon gamma-producing (IFN-g(+)) CD8(+) T cells and were positively correlated with the frequencies of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells. To examine whether increased IL-10(+) B cells in ascites could directly result in increased suppression of IFN-g production by CD8(+) T cells, we cocultured CD8(+) T cells with autologous blood B cells or ascitic B cells and found that CD8(+) T cells cocultured with ascitic B cells demonstrated significantly suppressed IFN-g production. This suppression was in part mediated by IL-10 as well as low CD80/CD86 expression, since depletion of IL-10 and stimulation of CD28 partially reverted IL-10(+) B cell-mediated suppression. Together, these data demonstrated an additional regulatory mechanism in the tumor microenvironment, which utilizes IL-10(+) B cells.

  12. The companions: regulatory T cells and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eghtesad, Saman; Morel, Penelope A; Clemens, Paula R

    2009-01-01

    Undesired immunological responses to products of therapeutic gene replacement have been obstacles to successful gene therapy. Understanding such responses of the host immune system to achieve immunological tolerance to a transferred gene product is therefore crucial. In this article, we review relevant studies of immunological responses to gene replacement therapy, the role of immunological tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in down-regulating the unwanted immune responses, and the interrelationship of the two topics. PMID:19368560

  13. Regulatory T Cell-Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0244 TITLE: Regulatory T Cell -Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival...2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Regulatory T Cell -Enriching Microparticles for Promoting Vascularized Composite Allotransplant Survival...Regulatory T Cell , CTA, Transplant, Biomimetic 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  14. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  15. Chromogranin A transcription and gene expression in Folliculostellate (TtT/GF) cells inhibit cell growth.

    PubMed

    Stilling, Gail A; Bayliss, Jill M; Jin, Long; Zhang, Heyu; Lloyd, Ricardo V

    2005-01-01

    Folliculostellate (FS) cells are present in the anterior pituitary and have important regulatory functions including controlling hormone release from other anterior pituitary cells. FS cells do not usually express neuroendocrine genes such as chromogranin A (CgA). We analyzed transcriptional regulation and gene expression in the TtT/GF FS cell line to better understand the role of FS cells in anterior pituitary function. After transient transfection with a human (h) CgA promoter sequence linked to a luciferase reporter, there was basal level of transcriptional activity, which was two- to fourfold less than that observed in the anterior pituitary neuroendocrine cell lines HP75 and GH3. The transcriptional activity was decreased in all cell lines when a mutant hCgA promoter cyclic AMP response element (CRE) was used for transfection. Sodium butyrate treatment increased the transcriptional activity in all cell lines, but remained two- to fourfold higher in the HP75 and GH3 cell lines than in the TtT/GF cells. Stable transfection of a plasmid expressing bovine (b) CgA in the TtT/GF cells led to inhibition of cell growth as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation, Ki-67 labeling index, and growth curve analysis. CgA protein and mRNA could be readily demonstrated in the cloned cells but not in the parental cell line or vector control cells. When the CgA expressing cloned cells were injected into SCID mice, there was a decrease in the rate of tumor growth compared to the vector control in vivo. These results indicate that the TtT/GF FS cells are fibroblast-like compared to the neuroendocrine anterior pituitary secretory cells when analyzed by transcriptional activity with a transiently transfected CgA promoter. In TtT/GF cells with a stably transfected bCgA plasmid, CgA has a direct regulatory effect on tumor cell proliferation.

  16. Rosiglitazone inhibits cell proliferation by inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ADPKD cyst-lining epithelia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yawei; Dai, Bing; Fu, Lili; Jia, Jieshuang; Mei, Changlin

    2010-06-01

    Abnormal proliferation is an important pathological feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Many drugs inhibiting cell proliferation have been proved to be effective in slowing the disease progression in ADPKD. Recent evidence has suggested that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) ligands have anti-neoplasm effects through inhibiting cell growth and inducing cell apoptosis in various cancer cells. In the present study, we examined the expression of PPARgamma in human ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line, and found that the expression of PPARgamma was greater in ADPKD kidney tissues and cyst-lining epithelial cell line than in normal kidney tissues and human kidney cortex (HKC) cell line. Rosiglitazone inhibited significantly proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These effects were diminished by GW9662, a specific PPARgamma antagonist. Cell cycle analysis showed a G0/G1 arrest in human ADPKD cyst-lining epithelial cells with rosiglitazone treatment. Analysis of cell cycle regulatory proteins revealed that rosiglitazone decreased the protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, pRb, cyclin D1, cyclin D2 and Cdk4 but increased the levels of p21 and p27 in a dose-dependent manner. Rosiglitazone also induced apoptosis in cyst-lining epithelial cells, which was correlated with increased bax expression and decreased bcl-2 expression. These results suggest PPARgamma agonist might serve as a promising drug for the treatment of ADPKD.

  17. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  18. IL-17+ regulatory T cells in the microenvironments of chronic inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kryczek, Ilona; Wu, Ke; Zhao, Ende; Wei, Shuang; Vatan, Linhua; Szeliga, Wojciech; Huang, Emina; Greenson, Joel; Chang, Alfred; Roliński, Jacek; Radwan, Piotr; Fang, Jingyuan; Wang, Guobin; Zou, Weiping

    2011-04-01

    Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibit immune responses and temper inflammation. IL-17(+)CD4(+) T (Th17) cells mediate inflammation of autoimmune diseases. A small population of IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells has been observed in peripheral blood in healthy human beings. However, the biology of IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells remains poorly understood in humans. We investigated their phenotype, cytokine profile, generation, and pathological relevance in patients with ulcerative colitis. We observed that high levels of IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells were selectively accumulated in the colitic microenvironment and associated colon carcinoma. The phenotype and cytokine profile of IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells was overlapping with Th17 and Treg cells. Myeloid APCs, IL-2, and TGF-β are essential for their induction from memory CCR6(+) T cells or Treg cells. IL-17(+)Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells functionally suppressed T cell activation and stimulated inflammatory cytokine production in the colitic tissues. Our data indicate that IL-17(+)Foxp3(+) cells may be "inflammatory" Treg cells in the pathological microenvironments. These cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis through inducing inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting local T cell immunity, and in turn may mechanistically link human chronic inflammation to tumor development. Our data therefore challenge commonly held beliefs of the anti-inflammatory role of Treg cells and suggest a more complex Treg cell biology, at least in the context of human chronic inflammation and associated carcinoma.

  19. Inhibition of miR-29c promotes proliferation, and inhibits apoptosis and differentiation in P19 embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Song, Guixian; Liu, Ming; Qian, Lingmei; Wang, Lihua; Gu, Haitao; Shen, Yahui

    2016-03-01

    In our previous study, the upregulation of microRNA (miR)-29c was identified in the mother of a fetus with a congenital heart defect. However, the functional and regulatory mechanisms of miR‑29c in the development of the heart remain to be elucidated. In the present study, the role and mechanism of miR‑29c inhibition in heart development were investigated in an embryonic carcinoma cell model. Inhibition of miR‑29c promoted proliferation, and suppressed the apoptosis and differentiation of P19 cells. It was also demonstrated that Wingless‑related MMTV integration site 4 (Wnt4) was a target of miR‑29c, determined using bioinformatic analysis combined with luciferase assays. The inhibition of miR‑29c stimulated the WNT4/β‑catenin pathway, promoting proliferation of the P19 cells, but suppressing their differentiation into cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR‑29c promoted the expression of B cell lymphoma‑2 and inhibited cell apoptosis. These results demonstrate the significance of miR‑29c in the process of cardiac development and suggest that miR-29c dysregulation may be associated with the occurrence of CHD. Thus, miR-29c may have therapeutic potential in the future.

  20. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; Turco, G.; Toal, T. W.; Gaudinier, A.; Young, N. F.; Trabucco, G. M.; Veling, M. T.; Lamothe, R.; Handakumbura, P. P.; Xiong, G.; Wang, C.; Corwin, J.; Tsoukalas, A.; Zhang, L.; Ware, D.; Pauly, M.; Kliebenstein, D. J.; Dehesh, K.; Tagkopoulos, I.; Breton, G.; Pruneda-Paz, J. L.; Ahnert, S. E.; Kay, S. A.; Hazen, S. P.; Brady, S. M.

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  1. Control of experimental inflammatory bowel disease by regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Asseman, C; Fowler, S; Powrie, F

    2000-10-01

    A helper T cell type 1-mediated colitis driven by enteric bacteria develops in severe combined immunodeficient mice after transfer of CD45RB(high)CD4(+) T cells. Development of disease can be prevented by cotransfer of the reciprocal CD45RB(low) subset. Analysis of the mechanism of immune suppression transferred by CD45RB(low)CD4(+) cells revealed essential roles for both IL-10 and TGF-beta. These data indicate that a functionally specialized population of regulatory T (Treg) cells exists in normal mice and that these can prevent the development of pathogenic responses toward commensal bacteria. The role of Treg cells in the control of the immune response is discussed.

  2. Transcriptional Regulatory Networks for CD4 T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response by secreting cytokines to activate target cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into at least four subsets, Th1, Th2, Th17, and inducible regulatory T cells, each with unique functions for pathogen elimination. The differentiation of these subsets is induced in response to cytokine stimulation, which is translated into Stat activation, followed by induction of master regulator transcription factors. In addition to these factors, multiple other transcription factors, both subset specific and shared, are also involved in promoting subset differentiation. This review will focus on the network of transcription factors that control CD4+ T cell differentiation. PMID:24839135

  3. Oct4 Targets Regulatory Nodes to Modulate Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Pearl A.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Rudnicki, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1) is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain ‘ES’ have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer. PMID:17579724

  4. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  5. Expression of natural killer cell regulatory microRNA by uveal melanoma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Kooshki, Mitra; Aldrich, Wayne; Varghai, Daniel; Zborowski, Maciej; Singh, Arun D; Triozzi, Pierre L

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are implicated in the control of metastasis in uveal melanoma, a process that has been ascribed to its cancer stem cell subpopulation. NK cell activation is regulated by specific microRNA (miR). The NK cell sensitivity and regulatory miR production of uveal melanoma cancer stem cells was examined. Cancer stem cells enriched from aggressively metastatic MUM2B uveal melanoma cells by selecting CD271(+) cells or propagating as non-adherent spheres in stem-cell supportive were more resistant to NK cell cytolysis than cancer stem cells enriched from less aggressively metastatic OCM1 uveal melanoma cells. Both MUM2B and OCM1 cells expressed and secreted NK cell regulatory miRs, including miR 146a, 181a, 20a, and 223. MUM2B cells expressed and secreted miR-155; OCM1 cells did not. Transfecting MUM2B cells with anti-miR-155 increased NK cell sensitivity. CD271(+) cells were identified in the blood of patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and were characterized by low expression of melanocyte differentiation determinants and by the ability to form non-adherent spheres in stem-cell supportive media. These cells also expressed NK cell regulatory miRs, including miR-155. These results indicate that uveal melanoma cancer stem cells can vary in their sensitivity to NK cell lysis and their expression of NK cell regulatory miRs. Circulating CD271(+) cells from patients with metastatic uveal melanoma manifest cancer stem cell features and express miRs associated with NK cell suppression, including miR-155, that may contribute to metastatic progression.

  6. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4(+) T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection.

  7. Genomic definition of multiple ex vivo regulatory T cell subphenotypes.

    PubMed

    Feuerer, Markus; Hill, Jonathan A; Kretschmer, Karsten; von Boehmer, Harald; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2010-03-30

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells that express the Foxp3 transcription factor are essential for lymphoid homeostasis and immune tolerance to self. Other nonimmunological functions of Treg cells, such as controlling metabolic function in adipose tissue, are also emerging. Treg cells originate primarily in the thymus, but can also be elicited from conventional T cells by in vivo exposure to low-dose antigen or homeostatic expansion or by activation in the presence of TGFbeta in vitro. Treg cells are characterized by a distinct transcriptional signature controlled in part, but not solely, by Foxp3. For a better perspective on transcriptional control in Treg cells, we compared gene expression profiles of a broad panel of Treg cells from various origins or anatomical locations. Treg cells generated by different means form different subphenotypes and were identifiable by particular combinations of transcripts, none of which fully encompassed the entire Treg signature. Molecules involved in Treg cell effector function, chemokine receptors, and the transcription factors that control them were differentially represented in these subphenotypes. Treg cells from the gut proved dissimilar to cells elicited by exposure to TGFbeta in vitro, but instead they resembled a CD103(+)Klrg1(+) subphenotype preferentially generated in response to lymphopenia.

  8. Breaking immune tolerance by targeting Foxp3+ regulatory T cells mitigates Alzheimer's disease pathology

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Kuti; Rosenzweig, Neta; Kertser, Alexander; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; Sharif, Alaa Mohammad; Spinrad, Amit; Tsitsou-Kampeli, Afroditi; Sarel, Ayelet; Cahalon, Liora; Schwartz, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which chronic neuroinflammation contributes to disease escalation. Nevertheless, while immunosuppressive drugs have repeatedly failed in treating this disease, recruitment of myeloid cells to the CNS was shown to play a reparative role in animal models. Here we show, using the 5XFAD AD mouse model, that transient depletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), or pharmacological inhibition of their activity, is followed by amyloid-β plaque clearance, mitigation of the neuroinflammatory response and reversal of cognitive decline. We further show that transient Treg depletion affects the brain's choroid plexus, a selective gateway for immune cell trafficking to the CNS, and is associated with subsequent recruitment of immunoregulatory cells, including monocyte-derived macrophages and Tregs, to cerebral sites of plaque pathology. Our findings suggest targeting Treg-mediated systemic immunosuppression for treating AD. PMID:26284939

  9. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology.

  10. CNS accumulation of regulatory B cells is VLA-4-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Sagan, Sharon A.; Winger, Ryan C.; Spencer, Collin M.; Bernard, Claude C.A.; Sobel, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) on regulatory B cells (Breg) in CNS autoimmune disease. Methods: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in mice selectively deficient for VLA-4 on B cells (CD19cre/α4f/f) by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide (p)35–55 or recombinant human (rh) MOG protein. B-cell and T-cell populations were examined by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Breg were evaluated by intracellular IL-10 staining of B cells and, secondly, by coexpression of CD1d and CD5. Results: As previously reported, EAE was less severe in B-cell VLA-4-deficient vs control CD19cre mice when induced by rhMOG, a model that is B-cell-dependent and leads to efficient B-cell activation and antibody production. Paradoxically, B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice developed more severe clinical disease than control mice when EAE was induced with MOG p35-55, a B-cell-independent encephalitogen that does not efficiently activate B cells. Peripheral T-cell and humoral immune responses were not altered in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice. In MOG p35-55-induced EAE, B-cell VLA-4 deficiency reduced CNS accumulation of B but not T cells. Breg were detected in the CNS of control mice with MOG p35-55-induced EAE. However, more severe EAE in B-cell VLA-4-deficient mice was associated with virtual absence of CNS Breg. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that CNS accumulation of Breg is VLA-4-dependent and suggest that Breg may contribute to regulation of CNS autoimmunity in situ. These observations underscore the need to choose the appropriate encephalitogen when studying how B cells contribute to pathogenesis or regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:27027096

  11. Immune regulation by T regulatory cells in HBV related Inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Trehanpati, Nirupama; Vyas, Ashish Kumar

    2017-01-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of cancer death and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the commonest causes in Asians countries. India has the second largest pool after China for hepatitis B infected subjects. HBV clearance is T cell dependent and one of the reason for T cells hypo responsiveness is due to mass production of Tregs through activation of Notch signaling, which suppressCD4/CD8 T cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important to maintain cellular homeostasis; however during viral infection increase of Tregs is inversely proportional to HBV DNA titers. Tregs exert their suppressive effect either via cell to cell contact or through release of IL-2, IL-10, TGF-β, IL-35. In CHBV infection, PD1 pathway also gets activated and is involved in promoting tolerance.However with Tregs induction, virus specific T cell responses also get decreased. Circulatory and intra-tumoral Tregs promote development of HBV specific HCC more by decreasing and impairing the effector functions of CD8 T cells. Anti-viral therapies and PD1 blockade strategy had shown the inhibition of Tregs and reduction in HBV DNA. However, inhibition of HBV specific Tregs is major challenge for future therapies. New cytokine blockade therapies have emerged as potential therapeutic potentials. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Inducible CD4+LAP+Foxp3- regulatory T cells suppress allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; So, Takanori; Mehta, Amit K; Choi, Heonsik; Croft, Michael

    2011-12-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of airway tolerance. We report that inhaled soluble Ag induces adaptive Foxp3(+) Tregs, as well as a regulatory population of CD4(+) T cells in the lungs and lung-draining lymph nodes that express latency-associated peptide (LAP) on their cell surface but do not express Foxp3. Blocking the cytokine IL-10 or TGF-β prevented the generation of LAP(+) Tregs and Foxp3(+) Tregs in vivo, and the LAP(+) Tregs could also be generated concomitantly with Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro by culturing naive CD4(+) T cells with Ag and exogenous TGF-β. The LAP(+) Tregs strongly suppressed naive CD4(+) T cell proliferation, and transfer of sorted OVA-specific LAP(+) Tregs in vivo inhibited allergic eosinophilia and Th2 cytokine expression in the lung, either when present at the time of Th2 sensitization or when injected after Th2 cells were formed. Furthermore, inflammatory innate stimuli from house dust mite extract, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2 ligand, and LPS, which are sufficient for blocking airway tolerance, strongly decreased the induction of LAP(+) Tregs. Taken together, we concluded that inducible Ag-specific LAP(+) Tregs can suppress asthmatic lung inflammation and constitute a mediator of airway tolerance together with Foxp3(+) Tregs.

  13. TIM-1 signaling is required for maintenance and induction of regulatory B cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, M Y; Ding, Q; Brooks, C R; Xiao, S; Workman, C J; Vignali, D A A; Ueno, T; Padera, R F; Kuchroo, V K; Najafian, N; Rothstein, D M

    2015-04-01

    Apart from their role in humoral immunity, B cells can exhibit IL-10-dependent regulatory activity (Bregs). These regulatory subpopulations have been shown to inhibit inflammation and allograft rejection. However, our understanding of Bregs has been hampered by their rarity, lack of a specific marker, and poor insight into their induction and maintenance. We previously demonstrated that T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain-1 (TIM-1) identifies over 70% of IL-10-producing B cells, irrespective of other markers. We now show that TIM-1 is the primary receptor responsible for Breg induction by apoptotic cells (ACs). However, B cells that express a mutant form of TIM-1 lacking the mucin domain (TIM-1(Δmucin) ) exhibit decreased phosphatidylserine binding and are unable to produce IL-10 in response to ACs or by specific ligation with anti-TIM-1. TIM-1(Δmucin) mice also exhibit accelerated allograft rejection, which appears to be due in part to their defect in both baseline and induced IL-10(+) Bregs, since a single transfer of WT TIM-1(+) B cells can restore long-term graft survival. These data suggest that TIM-1 signaling plays a direct role in Breg maintenance and induction both under physiological conditions (in response to ACs) and in response to therapy through TIM-1 ligation. Moreover, they directly demonstrate that the mucin domain regulates TIM-1 signaling.

  14. Second-generation histone deacetylase 6 inhibitors enhance the immunosuppressive effects of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Kalin, Jay H; Butler, Kyle V; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-01-26

    Second-generation Tubastatin A analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit selectively histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6). Substitutions to the carboline cap group were well-tolerated with substitution at the 2-position of both β- and γ-carbolines being optimal for HDAC6 activity and selectivity. Some compounds in this series were determined to have subnanomolar activity at HDAC6 with more than 7000 fold selectivity for HDAC6 versus HDAC1. Selected compounds were then evaluated for their ability to augment the immunosuppressive effect of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. All compounds tested were found to enhance the ability of regulatory T cells to inhibit the mitotic division of effector T cells both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that further investigation into the use of these compounds for the treatment of autoimmune disorders is warranted.

  15. FcRγ Controls the Fas-Dependent Regulatory Function of Lymphoproliferative Double Negative T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Juvet, Stephen C.; Thomson, Christopher W.; Kim, Edward Y.; Han, Mei; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and lymphoproliferation (LPR) mice are deficient in Fas, and accumulate large numbers of αβ-TCR+, CD4−, CD8− double negative (DN) T cells. The function of these DN T cells remains largely unknown. The common γ subunit of the activating Fc receptors, FcRγ, plays an important role in mediating innate immune responses. We have shown previously that a significant proportion of DN T cells express FcRγ, and that this molecule is required for TCR transgenic DN T cells to suppress allogeneic immune responses. Whether FcRγ plays a critical role in LPR DN T cell-mediated suppression of immune responses to auto and allo-antigens is not known. Here, we demonstrated that FcRγ+, but not FcRγ− LPR DN T cells could suppress Fas+ CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro and attenuated CD4+ T cell-mediated graft-versus host disease. Although FcRγ expression did not allow LPR DN T cells to inhibit the expansion of Fas-deficient cells within the LPR context, adoptive transfer of FcRγ+, but not FcRγ−, DN T cells inhibited lymphoproliferation in generalized lymphoproliferative disease (GLD) mice. Furthermore, FcRγ acted in a cell-intrinsic fashion to limit DN T cell accumulation by increasing the rate of apoptosis in proliferated cells. These results indicate that FcRγ can confer Fas-dependent regulatory properties on LPR DN T cells, and suggest that FcRγ may be a novel marker for functional DN Tregs. PMID:23762329

  16. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe; Xu, Qiang

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  17. Regulatory T cells negatively affect IL-2 production of effector T cells through CD39/adenosine pathway in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Seddiki, Nabila; Yatim, Ahmad; Carriere, Matthieu; Hulin, Anne; Younas, Mehwish; Ghadimi, Elnaz; Kök, Ayrin; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Tremblay, Alain; Sévigny, Jean; Lelievre, Jean-Daniel; Levy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Regulatory T cells suppress IL-2 production of effector CD4+ T cells in pathological conditions are unclear. A subpopulation of human Treg expresses the ectoenzyme CD39, which in association with CD73 converts ATP/ADP/AMP to adenosine. We show here that Treg/CD39+ suppress IL-2 expression of activated CD4+ T-cells more efficiently than Treg/CD39-. This inhibition is due to the demethylation of an essential CpG site of the il-2 gene promoter, which was reversed by an anti-CD39 mAb. By recapitulating the events downstream CD39/adenosine receptor (A2AR) axis, we show that A2AR agonist and soluble cAMP inhibit CpG site demethylation of the il-2 gene promoter. A high frequency of Treg/CD39+ is associated with a low clinical outcome in HIV infection. We show here that CD4+ T-cells from HIV-1 infected individuals express high levels of A2AR and intracellular cAMP. Following in vitro stimulation, these cells exhibit a lower degree of demethylation of il-2 gene promoter associated with a lower expression of IL-2, compared to healthy individuals. These results extend previous data on the role of Treg in HIV infection by filling the gap between expansion of Treg/CD39+ in HIV infection and the suppression of CD4+ T-cell function through inhibition of IL-2 production.

  18. The split personality of regulatory T cells in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu F; Weiss, Laurence

    2013-01-03

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) participate in responses to various chronic infections including HIV. HIV infection is associated with a progressive CD4 lymphopenia and defective HIV-specific CD8 responses known to play a key role in the control of viral replication. Persistent immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and is involved in disease progression independent of viral load. The consequences of Treg expansion, observed in HIV infection, could be either beneficial, by suppressing generalized T-cell activation, or detrimental, by weakening HIV-specific responses and thus contributing to viral persistence. The resulting balance between Tregs contrasting outcomes might have critical implications in pathogenesis. Topics covered in this review include HIV-induced alterations of Tregs, Treg cell dynamics in blood and tissues, Treg-suppressive function, and the relationship between Tregs and immune activation. This review also provides a focus on the role of CD39(+) Tregs and other regulatory cell subsets. All these issues will be explored in different situations including acute and chronic infection, antiretroviral treatment-mediated viral control, and spontaneous viral control. Results must be interpreted with regard to both the Treg definition used in context and to the setting of the disease in an attempt to draw clearer conclusions from the apparently conflicting results.

  19. CTLA-4 (CD152) controls homeostasis and suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Paula; Knieke, Karin; Hegel, J Kolja E; Quandt, Dagmar; Burmester, Gerd-R; Hoff, Holger; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (known as Treg cells) suppress unwanted and autoreactive T cell responses. Treg cells express the costimulatory molecule CTLA-4 intracellularly, but the mechanisms by which Treg cells exploit CTLA-4 signaling remain unclear. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of CTLA-4 in controlling the homeostasis and suppressive function of Treg cells. Murine Treg cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for coexpression of CTLA-4 and typical Treg cell-expressed molecules, and the influence of CTLA-4 on T cell proliferation, suppression, and apoptosis was investigated by in vitro assays. To analyze the importance of CTLA-4 in Treg cell-mediated suppression in vivo, wild-type Treg cells were transferred into CTLA-4-deficient mice displaying lymphoproliferation, and survival was monitored over time. A strong correlation between expression of forkhead box P3 and ex vivo expression of CTLA-4 in Treg cells was observed. Inhibition of CTLA-4 signaling in Treg cells during in vitro stimulation increased cell cycling and led to enhanced activation-induced cell death (AICD), which was mediated by CD95/CD95 ligand-induced activation of caspases. Blockade of CTLA-4 signaling resulted in impairment of the suppressive capacity of Treg cells. Despite these effects, high amounts of Treg cells persisted in CTLA-4-deficient mice. Results of transfer experiments in CTLA-4-deficient mice showed that the mice had a significantly prolonged lifespan when CTLA-4-competent Treg cells were injected. Expression of CTLA-4 on Treg cells serves to control T cell proliferation, to confer resistance against AICD, and to maintain the suppressive function of Treg cells.

  20. Hypoxic culture conditions enhance the generation of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Bigot, Jérémy; Da Rocha, Sylvie; Corre, Guillaume; Boisgerault, Florence; Paldi, Andràs; Galy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The generation of large amounts of induced CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (iTreg) cells is of great interest for several immunotherapy applications, therefore a better understanding of signals controlling iTreg cell differentiation and expansion is required. There is evidence that oxidative metabolism may regulate several key signalling pathways in T cells. This prompted us to investigate the effects of oxygenation on iTreg cell generation by comparing the effects of atmospheric (21%) or of low (5%) O2 concentrations on the phenotype of bead-stimulated murine splenic CD4+ T cells from Foxp3-KI-GFP T-cell receptor transgenic mice. The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species was shown to play a major role in the generation of iTreg cells, a process characterized by increased levels of Sirt1, PTEN and Glut1 on the committed cells, independently of the level of oxygenation. The suppressive function of iTreg cells generated either in atmospheric or low oxygen levels was equivalent. However, greater yields of iTreg cells were obtained under low oxygenation, resulting from a higher proliferative rate of the committed Treg cells and higher levels of Foxp3, suggesting a better stability of the differentiation process. Higher expression of Glut1 detected on iTreg cells generated under hypoxic culture conditions provides a likely explanation for the enhanced proliferation of these cells as compared to those cultured under ambient oxygen. Such results have important implications for understanding Treg cell homeostasis and developing in vitro protocols for the generation of Treg cells from naive T lymphocytes. PMID:25243909

  1. IL-33 induces both regulatory B cells and regulatory T cells in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Xu, Ying; Zhu, Chunyu; Zhao, Jian; Meng, Xinrui; Chen, Siyao; Wang, Tianqi; Li, Xue; Zhang, Li; Lu, Changlong; Liu, Hongsheng; Sun, Xun

    2017-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-33 is a member of the IL-1 family. Serum levels of IL-33 are increased in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), suggesting that IL-33 is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD, although its role is not clear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-33 in the regulation of T-helper (Th) cell and B cell responses in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Here, we showed that IL-33-treated mice were susceptible to DSS-induced colitis as compared with PBS-treated mice. The production of spontaneous inflammatory cytokines production by macrophages or dendritic cells (DC) in MLN significantly increased, and the responses of Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg) and regulatory B cells (Breg) were markedly upregulated, while Th1 responses were significantly downregulated in MLN of IL-33-treated mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results demonstrate that IL-33 contributes to the pathogenesis of DSS-induced colitis in mice by promoting Th2 responses, but suppressing Th1 responses, in MLN. Moreover, IL-33 treatment increased Breg and Treg responses in MLN in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Therefore, modulation of IL-33/ST2 signaling is implicated as a novel biological therapy for inflammatory diseases associated with Th1 responses.

  2. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L.; Neuhaus, Isaac M.; Yu, Siegrid S.; Arron, Sarah T.; Harris, Hobart W.; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A.; Sverdrup, Francis M.; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C.; Johnson, David S.; Meyer, Everett H.; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G.; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C.; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y.; McGrath, Mary H.; Alvarado, Michael D.; Ludwig, Connor H.; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M.; Gratz, Iris K.; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease. PMID:24509084

  3. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Memory regulatory T cells reside in human skin.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Pauli, Mariela L; Neuhaus, Isaac M; Yu, Siegrid S; Arron, Sarah T; Harris, Hobart W; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Anthony, Bryan A; Sverdrup, Francis M; Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth; MacKenzie, Tippi C; Johnson, David S; Meyer, Everett H; Löhr, Andrea; Hsu, Andro; Koo, John; Liao, Wilson; Gupta, Rishu; Debbaneh, Maya G; Butler, Daniel; Huynh, Monica; Levin, Ethan C; Leon, Argentina; Hoffman, William Y; McGrath, Mary H; Alvarado, Michael D; Ludwig, Connor H; Truong, Hong-An; Maurano, Megan M; Gratz, Iris K; Abbas, Abul K; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2014-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are characterized by expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, are a dynamic and heterogeneous population of cells that control immune responses and prevent autoimmunity. We recently identified a subset of Tregs in murine skin with properties typical of memory cells and defined this population as memory Tregs (mTregs). Due to the importance of these cells in regulating tissue inflammation in mice, we analyzed this cell population in humans and found that almost all Tregs in normal skin had an activated memory phenotype. Compared with mTregs in peripheral blood, cutaneous mTregs had unique cell surface marker expression and cytokine production. In normal human skin, mTregs preferentially localized to hair follicles and were more abundant in skin with high hair density. Sequence comparison of TCRs from conventional memory T helper cells and mTregs isolated from skin revealed little homology between the two cell populations, suggesting that they recognize different antigens. Under steady-state conditions, mTregs were nonmigratory and relatively unresponsive; however, in inflamed skin from psoriasis patients, mTregs expanded, were highly proliferative, and produced low levels of IL-17. Taken together, these results identify a subset of Tregs that stably resides in human skin and suggest that these cells are qualitatively defective in inflammatory skin disease.

  5. Regulatory pathways coordinating cell cycle progression in early Xenopus development.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Villa, Linda M; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Finkielstein, Carla V

    2011-01-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is used extensively as a model organism for studying both cell development and cell cycle regulation. For over 20 years now, this model organism has contributed to answering fundamental questions concerning the mechanisms that underlie cell cycle transitions--the cellular components that synthesize, modify, repair, and degrade nucleic acids and proteins, the signaling pathways that allow cells to communicate, and the regulatory pathways that lead to selective expression of subsets of genes. In addition, the remarkable simplicity of the Xenopus early cell cycle allows for tractable manipulation and dissection of the basic components driving each transition. In this organism, early cell divisions are characterized by rapid cycles alternating phases of DNA synthesis and division. The post-blastula stages incorporate gap phases, lengthening progression, and allowing more time for DNA repair. Various cyclin/Cdk complexes are differentially expressed during the early cycles with orderly progression being driven by both the combined action of cyclin synthesis and degradation and the appropriate selection of specific substrates by their Cdk components. Like other multicellular organisms, chief developmental events in early Xenopus embryogenesis coincide with profound remodeling of the cell cycle, suggesting that cell proliferation and differentiation events are linked and coordinated through crosstalk mechanisms acting on signaling pathways involving the expression of cell cycle control genes.

  6. Membrane-bound Dickkopf-1 in Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells suppresses T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis.

    PubMed

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Park, Jong-Hyun; Henegariu, Octavian; Yilmaz, Saliha; Hao, Liming; Bothwell, Alfred L M

    2017-10-01

    Induction of tolerance is a key mechanism to maintain or to restore immunological homeostasis. Here we show that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells use Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) to regulate T-cell-mediated tolerance in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis model. Treg cells from DKK-1 hypomorphic doubleridge mice failed to control CD4(+) T-cell proliferation, resulting in CD4 T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. Thymus-derived Treg cells showed a robust expression of DKK-1 but not in naive or effector CD4 T cells. DKK-1 expression in Foxp3(+) Treg cells was further increased upon T-cell receptor stimulation in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Foxp3(+) Treg cells expressed DKK-1 in the cell membrane and the functional inhibition of DKK-1 using DKK-1 monoclonal antibody abrogated the suppressor function of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. DKK-1 expression was dependent on de novo protein synthesis and regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway but not by the canonical Wnt pathway. Taken together, our results highlight membrane-bound DKK-1 as a novel Treg-derived mediator to maintain immunological tolerance in T-cell-mediated autoimmune colitis. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sunyoung; Lim, Hyun Ju; Jackson, John D; Atala, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM) were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers. PMID:24555015

  8. Fentanyl inhibits the invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells via inhibiting the negative regulation of Ets-1 on BANCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-xiang; Xin, Wen-qi; Ma, Chuan-gen

    2015-09-25

    Recent studies have shown the potential anti-tumor effect of fentanyl on colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its underling mechanism is still unclear. Since studies indicates the abnormal expression of transcription factor Ets-1 and BRAF-activated lncRNA (BANCR) in CRC progress, the relationship between Ets-1 and BANCR was investigated here to illustrate the fentanyl-induced mechanism on CRC in vitro. The expression levels of Ets-1 and BANCR were first detected in fentanyl-treated CRC cells. The interaction between Ets-1 and BANCR promoter was verified with chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, as well as corresponding acetylation of histones. The regulation of Ets-1 on BANCR expression was confirmed through luciferase assays and RT-PCR analysis. And, cell clone formation, cell migration and invasion were observed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of fentanyl. Ets-1 overexpression or co-overexpression with BANCR was further performed by plasmids transfection to show the regulatory role of Ets-1 in fentanyl-induced mechanism. Fentanyl induced BANCR upregulation and Ets-1 downregulation in CRC cells. Further studies showed that Ets-1 negatively regulated BANCR expression via the deacetylation of histones H3 within BANCR promoter. Moreover, fentanyl induced less cell clone formation, as well as inhibited cell migration and invasion in vitro, while Ets-1 overexpression inhibited fentanyl-induced effects that could be reversed by BANCR co-overexpression. Fentanyl showed anti-tumor like effects on CRC cells, including less cell clone formation and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the regulatory role of Ets-1 on BANCR influenced fentanyl-induced mechanism, indicating their potential application in the therapeutic treatment of CRC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exacerbation of Endometriosis Due To Regulatory T-Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukiko; Mori, Taisuke; Ito, Fumitake; Koshiba, Akemi; Takaoka, Osamu; Kataoka, Hisashi; Maeda, Eiko; Okimura, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takahide; Kitawaki, Jo

    2017-09-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with altered immune response to endometrial cells facilitating the implantation and proliferation of ectopic endometrial tissues. Although regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in T cell-mediated immune response and development of immune disorders, their significance in endometriosis remains to be elucidated. Recently, CD4+CD45RA- forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3)hi T cells, activated Treg cells, have been identified as a functionally true suppressive population of Treg cells. To investigate the role of Treg cells in endometriosis. Three Treg cell fractions (resting Treg cells, activated Treg cells, and non-Treg cells) were examined using flow cytometry in the endometrioma, endometrium, peritoneal fluid, and peripheral blood obtained from women with (n = 27) and without (n = 28) endometriosis. A mouse model of endometriosis was made in Foxp3tm3Ayr/J (Foxp3DTR) C57BL/6 Treg cell-depleted mice (n = 28). In women with endometrioma, the proportion of activated Treg cells in the endometrioma and the endometrium, but not in the peritoneal fluid or peripheral blood, was significantly decreased compared with that in women without endometriosis. In Foxp3DTR/diphtheria toxin mice, the number and weight of endometriotic lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels and angiogenetic factors were significantly increased compared with those in control mice. Treg cell deficiency exaggerates local inflammation and angiogenesis and simultaneously facilitates the attachment and growth of endometrial implants. The findings provide an insight into dysregulated immune response for the pathogenesis and development.

  10. Caerulomycin A inhibits Th2 cell activity: a possible role in the management of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kujur, Weshely; Gurram, Rama Krishna; Haleem, Nazia; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Caerulomycin A induces regulatory T cells differentiation by suppressing Th1 cells activity. The role of regulatory T cells is well established in suppressing the function of Th2 cells. Th2 cells are known to inflict the induction of the activation of asthma. Consequently, in the present study, we monitored the influence of Caerulomycin A in inhibiting the activity of Th2 cells and its impact in recuperating asthma symptoms. Interestingly, we observed that Caerulomycin A significantly suppressed the differentiation of Th2 cells, as evidenced by downregulation in the GATA-3 expression. Further, decline in the levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines and IgE was noted in the animals suffering from asthma. Furthermore, we noticed substantial suppression in the inflammatory response and number of eosinophils in the lungs. In essence, this study signifies an important therapeutic role of Caerulomycin A in asthma. PMID:26481184

  11. The mechanism of potent GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine: requirement of the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Kolinsky, Monica A; Gross, Steven S

    2004-09-24

    Inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) has been used as a selective tool to assess the role of de novo synthesis of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH4) in a biological system. Toward this end, 2,4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) has been used as the prototypical GTPCH inhibitor. Using a novel real-time kinetic microplate assay for GTPCH activity and purified prokaryote-expressed recombinant proteins, we show that potent inhibition by DAHP is not the result of a direct interaction with GTPCH. Rather, inhibition by DAHP in phosphate buffer occurs via an indirect mechanism that requires the presence of GTPCH feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). Notably, GFRP was previously discovered as the essential factor that reconstitutes inhibition of pure recombinant GTPCH by the pathway end product BH4. Thus, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by engaging the endogenous feedback inhibitory system. We further demonstrate that L-Phe fully reverses the inhibition of GTPCH by DAHP/GFRP, which is also a feature in common with inhibition by BH4/GFRP. These findings suggest that DAHP is not an indiscriminate inhibitor of GTPCH in biological systems; instead, it is predicted to preferentially attenuate GTPCH activity in cells that most abundantly express GFRP and/or contain the lowest levels of L-Phe.

  12. Human Herpesvirus 8 Interferon Regulatory Factor-Mediated BH3-Only Protein Inhibition via Bid BH3-B Mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Sandford, Gordon; Nicholas, John

    2012-01-01

    Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of host cells. For HHV-8, viral interferon regulatory factor-1 (vIRF-1) contributes to this process in part via inhibitory interactions with BH3-only protein (BOP) Bim, recently identified as an interaction partner of vIRF-1. Here we recognize that the Bim-binding domain (BBD) of vIRF-1 resembles a region (BH3-B) of Bid, another BOP, which interacts intramolecularly with the functional BH3 domain of Bid to inhibit it pro-apoptotic activity. Indeed, vIRF-1 was found to target Bid in addition to Bim and to interact, via its BBD region, with the BH3 domain of each. In functional assays, BBD could substitute for BH3-B in the context of Bid, to suppress Bid-induced apoptosis in a BH3-binding-dependent manner, and vIRF-1 was able to protect transfected cells from apoptosis induced by Bid. While vIRF-1 can mediate nuclear sequestration of Bim, this was not the case for Bid, and inhibition of Bid and Bim by vIRF-1 could occur independently of nuclear localization of the viral protein. Consistent with this finding, direct BBD-dependent inactivation by vIRF-1 of Bid-induced mitochondrial permeabilization was demonstrable in vitro and isolated BBD sequences were also active in this assay. In addition to Bim and Bid BH3 domains, BH3s of BOPs Bik, Bmf, Hrk, and Noxa also were found to bind BBD, while those of both pro- and anti-apoptotic multi-BH domain Bcl-2 proteins were not. Finally, the significance of Bid to virus replication was demonstrated via Bid-depletion in HHV-8 infected cells, which enhanced virus production. Together, our data demonstrate and characterize BH3 targeting and associated inhibition of BOP pro-apoptotic activity by vIRF-1 via Bid BH3-B mimicry, identifying a novel mechanism of viral evasion from host cell defenses. PMID:22685405

  13. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8(+) T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion.

  14. PKC-Theta in Regulatory and Effector T-cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Brezar, Vedran; Tu, Wen Juan; Seddiki, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teffs) or regulatory (Tregs) T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ) to the immunological synapse (IS) is instrumental for the formation of signaling complexes, which ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the IS where its formation induces altered signaling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance. This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs. PMID:26528291

  15. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  16. Inhibition of steroidogenesis in Leydig cells by Müllerian-inhibiting substance.

    PubMed

    Fynn-Thompson, Eric; Cheng, Henry; Teixeira, Jose

    2003-12-15

    Müllerian-inhibiting substance (MIS), a member of the transforming growth factor-beta family of cytokines that signal through a heteromeric complex of single-transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors, is required for Müllerian duct regression and normal reproductive tract development in the male embryo. However, the continued expression of MIS at high levels in males until puberty and its induction in females after birth suggested other roles for MIS. Additionally, Leydig cell development and steroidogenic capacity and ovarian follicle recruitment were abnormal in MIS-knockout or MIS-overexpressing mice. We have shown that MIS inhibits the cAMP-induced expression of cytochrome P450 C17alpha-hydroxylase/C17-20 lyase (Cyp17) mRNA both in vitro and in vivo. Our current efforts are to understand the molecular mechanisms regulating both MIS type II receptor (MISRII) expression and its signaling in rodent Leydig cell lines. MISRII expression in R2C cells requires both steroidogenic factor-1 and an unknown protein to bind to its proximal promoter in the context of 1.6 kb 5'-flanking DNA. When bound by MIS, signaling by the receptor in MA-10 cells blocks the protein kinase A-mediated induction of Cyp17 expression by a cAMP regulatory element-binding protein independent mechanism. We continue to investigate the molecular mechanisms of MISRII expression and possible interactions between MIS-regulated SMAD activation and cAMP signaling. These studies will provide a better understanding of the role played by MIS during postnatal life.

  17. Transcriptional Regulatory Network for the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chao; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) have expanded our knowledge about the innate arm of the immune system. Helper-like ILCs share both the “innate” feature of conventional natural killer (cNK) cells and the “helper” feature of CD4+ T helper (Th) cells. With this combination, helper-like ILCs are capable of initiating early immune responses similar to cNK cells, but via secretion of a set of effector cytokines similar to those produced by Th cells. Although many studies have revealed the functional similarity between helper-like ILCs and Th cells, some aspects of ILCs including the development of this lineage remain elusive. It is intriguing that the majority of transcription factors involved in multiple stages of T cell development, differentiation, and function also play critical roles during ILC development. Regulators such as Id2, GATA-3, Nfil3, TOX, and TCF-1 are expressed and function at various stages of ILC development. In this review, we will summarize the expression and functions of these transcription factors shared by ILCs and Th cells. We will also propose a complex transcriptional regulatory network for the lineage commitment of ILCs. PMID:26379372

  18. T regulatory cells distinguish two types of primary hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Mirocha, S; Elagin, R B; Salamat, S; Jaume, J C

    2009-03-01

    Numerous cases of primary hypophysitis have been described over the past 25 years with, however, little insight into the cause(s) of this disease. In order to guide treatment, a better understanding of the pathogenesis is needed. We studied the pathogenesis of primary hypophysitis by analysing systematically the immune response at the pituitary tissue level of consecutive cases of 'lymphocytic' hypophysitis who underwent pituitary biopsy. In order to investigate further the pathogenesis of their diseases we characterized two cases at clinical, cellular and molecular levels. We show here, for the first time, that lymphocytic hypophysitis probably encompasses at least two separate entities. One entity, in agreement with the classical description of lymphocytic hypophysitis, demonstrates an autoimmune process with T helper 17 cell dominance and lack of T regulatory cells. The other entity represents a process in which T regulatory cells seem to control the immune response, which may not be self- but foreign-targeted. Our data suggest that it may be necessary to biopsy suspected primary hypophysitis and to analyse pituitary tissue with immune markers to guide treatment. Based on our results, hypophysitis driven by an immune homeostatic process should not be treated with immunosuppression, while autoimmune-defined hypophysitis may benefit from it. We show here for the first time two different pathogenic processes classified under one disease type and how to distinguish them. Because of our findings, changes in current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches may need to be considered.

  19. Downregulation of key regulatory proteins in androgen dependent prostate tumor cells by oncolytic reovirus.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Saraf, Pooja; Meseke, Tyler; Miller, Cathy L

    2015-11-01

    As prostate tumor cell growth depends on hormones, androgen ablation is an effective therapy for prostate cancer (PCa). However, progression of PCa cells to androgen independent growth (castrate resistant prostate cancer, CRPC) results in relapse and mortality. Hypoxia, a microenvironment of low oxygen that modifies the activity of PCa regulatory proteins including the androgen receptor (AR), plays a critical role in progression to CRPC. Therapies targeting hypoxia and the AR may lengthen the time to CRPC progression thereby increasing survival time of PCa patients. Mammalian Orthoreovirus (MRV) has shown promise for the treatment of prostate tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we found that MRV infection induces downregulation of proteins implicated in CRPC progression, interferes with hypoxia-induced AR activity, and induces apoptosis in androgen dependent cells. This suggests MRV possesses traits that could be exploited to create novel therapies for the inhibition of progression to CRPC.

  20. A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V; Pauli, Mariela L; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K; Fischbach, Michael A; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2015-11-17

    The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications.

  1. A wave of regulatory T cells into neonatal skin mediates tolerance to commensal microbes

    PubMed Central

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C.; Vasquez, Kimberly S.; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V.; Pauli, Mariela L.; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K.; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J.; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K.; Fischbach, Michael A.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The skin is a site of constant dialogue between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required to establish immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions may have enduring health implications. PMID:26588783

  2. Development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Ghali, Joanna; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Wang, Ya; Sawyer, Andrew; Zhou, Jimmy Jianheng; Hapudeniya, Dhanushka A; Wang, Yiping; Cao, Qi; Zheng, Guoping; Harris, David C; Alexander, Stephen I

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as having a major role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing and limiting autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Tregs derive from the thymus and also develop peripherally. In this review, we discuss recent progress in our understanding of the basic mechanisms involved in Treg development and function in protecting against autoimmunity in the periphery, including thymic selection, peripheral induction and the many mechanisms of Treg suppression. Specifically in kidney disease, Tregs have been shown to play a role in limiting injury and may potentially have a therapeutic role.

  3. IL-27 controls the development of inducible regulatory T cells and Th17 cells via differential effects on STAT1.

    PubMed

    Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Fantini, Massimo C; Weigmann, Benno; Galle, Peter R; Neurath, Markus F

    2007-07-01

    IL-27 is an IL-12-related cytokine frequently present at sites of inflammation that can promote both anti- and pro-inflammatory immune responses. Here, we have analyzed the mechanisms how IL-27 may drive such divergent immune responses. While IL-27 suppressed the development of proinflammatory Th17 cells, a novel role for this cytokine in inhibiting the development of anti-inflammatory, inducible regulatory T cells (iTreg) was identified. In fact, IL-27 suppressed the development of adaptive, TGF-beta-induced Forkhead box transcription factor p3-positive (Foxp3(+)) Treg. Whereas the blockade of Th17 development was dependent on the transcription factor STAT1, the suppression of iTreg development was STAT1 independent, suggesting that IL-27 utilizes different signaling pathways to shape T cell-driven immune responses. Our data thus demonstrate that IL-27 controls the development of Th17 and iTreg cells via differential effects on STAT1.

  4. The Toxoplasma Centrocone Houses Cell Cycle Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Anatoli; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Kim, Kami; Suvorova, Elena S; White, Michael W

    2017-08-22

    Our knowledge of cell cycle regulatory mechanisms in apicomplexan parasites is very limited. In this study, we describe a novel Toxoplasma gondii factor that has a vital role in chromosome replication and the regulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear mitotic structures, and we named this factor ECR1 for essential for chromosome replication 1. ECR1 was discovered by complementation of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant that suffers lethal, uncontrolled chromosome replication at 40°C similar to a ts mutant carrying a defect in topoisomerase. ECR1 is a 52-kDa protein containing divergent RING and TRAF-Sina-like zinc binding domains that are dynamically expressed in the tachyzoite cell cycle. ECR1 first appears in the unique spindle compartment of the Apicomplexa (centrocone) of the nuclear envelope in early S phase and then in the nucleus in late S phase where it reaches maximum expression. Following nuclear division, but before daughter parasites separate from the mother parasite, ECR1 is downregulated and is absent in new daughter parasites. The proteomics of ECR1 identified interactions with the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation machinery and the minichromosome maintenance complex, and the loss of ECR1 led to increased stability of a key member of this complex, MCM2. ECR1 also forms a stable complex with the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-related kinase, Tgondii Crk5 (TgCrk5), which displays a similar cell cycle expression and localization during tachyzoite replication. Importantly, the localization of ECR1/TgCrk5 in the centrocone indicates that this Apicomplexa-specific spindle compartment houses important regulatory factors that control the parasite cell cycle.IMPORTANCE Parasites of the apicomplexan family are important causes of human disease, including malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Parasite growth is the underlying cause of pathogenesis, yet despite this importance, the molecular basis for parasite replication is poorly understood. Filling

  5. Platelets Inhibit Migration of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bulla, S C; Badial, P R; Silva, R C; Lunsford, K; Bulla, C

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumour cells is important for tumour growth and metastasis. Thrombocytopenia or antiplatelet treatment negatively impact on cancer metastasis, demonstrating potentially important roles for platelets in tumour progression. To our knowledge, there is no information regarding the role of platelets in cancer progression in dogs. This study was designed to test whether canine platelets affected the migratory behaviour of three canine osteosarcoma cell lines and to give insights of molecular mechanisms. Intact platelets, platelet lysate and platelet releasate inhibited the migration of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. Addition of blood leucocytes to the platelet samples did not alter the inhibitory effect on migration. Platelet treatment also significantly downregulated the transcriptional levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 genes. The interaction between canine platelets or molecules released during platelet activation and these tumour cell lines inhibits their migration, which suggests that canine platelets might antagonize metastasis of canine osteosarcoma. This effect is probably due to, at least in part, downregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Collagen scaffold microenvironments modulate cell lineage commitment for differentiation of bone marrow cells into regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yongxiang; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Yannan; Xiao, Zhifeng; Li, Jing; Cui, Yi; Han, Sufang; Wei, Jianshu; Chen, Bing; Han, Jin; Meng, Qingyuan; Hou, Xianglin; Luo, Jianxun; Dai, Jianwu; Jing, Zhizhong

    2017-01-01

    The microenvironment plays a pivotal role for cell survival and functional regulation, and directs the cell fate determination. The biological functions of DCs have been extensively investigated to date. However, the influences of the microenvironment on the differentiation of bone marrow cells (BMCs) into dendritic cells (DCs) are not well defined. Here, we established a 3D collagen scaffold microenvironment to investigate whether such 3D collagen scaffolds could provide a favourable niche for BMCs to differentiate into specialised DCs. We found that BMCs embedded in the 3D collagen scaffold differentiated into a distinct subset of DC, exhibiting high expression of CD11b and low expression of CD11c, co-stimulator (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) and MHC-II molecules compared to those grown in 2D culture. DCs cultured in the 3D collagen scaffold possessed weak antigen uptake ability and inhibited T-cell proliferation in vitro; in addition, they exhibited potent immunoregulatory function to alleviate allo-delay type hypersensitivity when transferred in vivo. Thus, DCs differentiated in the 3D collagen scaffold were defined as regulatory DCs, indicating that collagen scaffold microenvironments probably play an important role in modulating the lineage commitment of DCs and therefore might be applied as a promising tool for generation of specialised DCs. PMID:28169322

  7. T regulatory cells: an overview and intervention techniques to modulate allergy outcome

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Miller, Christopher WT; Kumaraguru, Uday

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulated immune response results in inflammatory symptoms in the respiratory mucosa leading to asthma and allergy in susceptible individuals. The T helper type 2 (Th2) subsets are primarily involved in this disease process. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence in support of T cells with regulatory potential that operates in non-allergic individuals. These regulatory T cells occur naturally are called natural T regulatory cells (nTregs) and express the transcription factor Foxp3. They are selected in the thymus and move to the periphery. The CD4 Th cells in the periphery can be induced to become regulatory T cells and hence called induced or adaptive T regulatory cells. These cells can make IL-10 or TGF-b or both, by which they attain most of their suppressive activity. This review gives an overview of the regulatory T cells, their role in allergic diseases and explores possible interventionist approaches to manipulate Tregs for achieving therapeutic goals. PMID:19284628

  8. Notch and TGFβ form a positive regulatory loop and regulate EMT in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiesi; Jain, Saket; Azad, Abul K; Xu, Xia; Yu, Hai Chuan; Xu, Zhihua; Godbout, Roseline; Fu, YangXin

    2016-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, the mechanisms that regulate EMT in EOC are not fully understood. Here, we report that activation of Notch1 induces EMT in EOC cells as evidenced by downregulation of E-cadherin and cytokeratins, upregulation of Slug and Snail, as well as morphological changes. Interestingly, activation of Notch1 increases TGFβ/Smad signaling by upregulating the expression of TGFβ and TGFβ type 1 receptor. Time course experiments demonstrate that inhibition of Notch by DAPT (a γ-secretase inhibitor) decreases TGFβ-induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads at late, but not at early, timepoints. These results suggest that Notch activation plays a role in sustaining TGFβ/Smad signaling in EOC cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch by DAPT decreases TGFβ induction of Slug and repression of E-cadherin and knockdown of Notch1 decreases TGFβ-induced repression of E-cadherin, indicating that Notch is required, at least in part, for TGFβ-induced EMT in EOC cells. On the other hand, TGFβ treatment increases the expression of Notch ligand Jagged1 and Notch target gene HES1 in EOC cells. Functionally, the combination of Notch1 activation and TGFβ treatment is more potent in promoting motility and migration of EOC cells than either stimulation alone. Taken together, our results indicate that Notch and TGFβ form a reciprocal positive regulatory loop and cooperatively regulate EMT and promote EOC cell motility and migration.

  9. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, L.G.; Wright, J.R.; Hawgood, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Venstrom, K.; Nellenbogen, J.

    1987-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of /sup 3/H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 ..mu..g/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC/sub 50/ of 0.1 ..mu..g/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 ..mu..g/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 100/sup 0/C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control.

  10. Negative transcriptional regulatory element that functions in embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ariizumi, K; Takahashi, H; Nakamura, M; Ariga, H

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned the polyomavirus mutant fPyF9, which persists in an episomal state in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells (K. Ariizumi and H. Ariga, Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:3920-3927, 1986). fPyF9 carries three copies of exogenous sequences, the prototype of which is a 21-base-pair repeat (box DNA), in the region of the enhancer B domain of wild-type polyomavirus DNA. The consensus sequence, GCATTCCATTGTT, is 13 base pairs long. The box DNA inserted into fPyF9 appeared to come from a cellular sequence and was present in many kinds of DNAs, including F9 chromosomal DNA. The biological function of box DNA was analyzed by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assays, using chimeric plasmids containing box DNA conjugated with simian virus 40 promoter elements. The results showed that box DNA repressed the activities both of the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer only in transfected undifferentiated F9 cells and not in differentiated LTK- cells. Box DNA functioned independently of orientation and position with respect to the promoter in an enhancerlike manner, although the effect of box DNA was opposite that of the enhancer. The XhoI linker insertion into the consensus sequences of box DNA abolished the repression activity, and the protein(s) recognizing the consensus sequences was identified only in F9 cells, not in L cells. These analyses suggest that box DNA may be a negative regulatory element that functions in undifferentiated cells. Images PMID:2550812

  11. Parasitic inhibition of cell death facilitates symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Pannebakker, Bart A; Loppin, Benjamin; Elemans, Coen P H; Humblot, Lionel; Vavre, Fabrice

    2007-01-02

    Symbiotic microorganisms have had a large impact on eukaryotic evolution, with effects ranging from parasitic to mutualistic. Mitochondria and chloroplasts are prime examples of symbiotic microorganisms that have become obligate for their hosts, allowing for a dramatic extension of suitable habitats for life. Out of the extraordinary diversity of bacterial endosymbionts in insects, most are facultative for their hosts, such as the ubiquitous Wolbachia, which manipulates host reproduction. Some endosymbionts, however, have become obligatory for host reproduction and/or survival. In the parasitoid wasp Asobara tabida the presence of Wolbachia is necessary for host oogenesis, but the mechanism involved is yet unknown. We show that Wolbachia influences programmed cell death processes (a host regulatory feature typically targeted by pathogens) in A. tabida, making its presence essential for the wasps' oocytes to mature. This suggests that parasite strategies, such as bacterial regulation of host apoptosis, can drive the evolution of host dependence, allowing for a swift transition from parasitism to mutualism.

  12. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Rong; Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC.

  13. FNC efficiently inhibits mantle cell lymphoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xixi; Peng, Bangan; Wang, Ning; Ma, Fang; Peng, Youmei; Wang, Qingduan; Chang, Junbiao

    2017-01-01

    FNC, 2'-deoxy-2'-β-fluoro-4'-azidocytidine, is a novel cytidine analogue, that has shown strong antiproliferative activity in human lymphoma, lung adenocarcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of FNC on mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and the underlying mechanisms. In in vitro experiments, cell viability was detected by the CCK8 assay, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and the expression of relative apoptosis proteins were detected by Western Blot. The in vivo antitumor effect of FNC was investigated in a SCID xenograft model. Finally, the mechanisms of action of FNC were assessed using a whole human genome expression profile chip. The data showed that FNC inhibited cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and FNC could induce apoptosis by the death recepter pathways in JeKo-1 cells and arrest the cell cycle in the G1/S or G2/M phase. Notably, FNC showed in vivo efficacy in mice bearing JeKo-1 xenograft tumors. Gene expression profile analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were mainly focused on the immune system process, cellular process and death. These findings implied that FNC may be a valuable therapeutic in mantle cell lymphoma and provided an experimental basis for the early clinical application of FNC. PMID:28333959

  14. Chloroquine Treatment Enhances Regulatory T Cells and Reduces the Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Thomé, Rodolfo; Moraes, Adriel S.; Bombeiro, André Luis; Farias, Alessandro dos Santos; Francelin, Carolina; da Costa, Thiago Alves; Di Gangi, Rosária; dos Santos, Leonilda Maria Barbosa; de Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues; Verinaud, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Background The modulation of inflammatory processes is a necessary step, mostly orchestrated by regulatory T (Treg) cells and suppressive Dendritic Cells (DCs), to prevent the development of deleterious responses and autoimmune diseases. Therapies that focused on adoptive transfer of Treg cells or their expansion in vivo achieved great success in controlling inflammation in several experimental models. Chloroquine (CQ), an anti-malarial drug, was shown to reduce inflammation, although the mechanisms are still obscure. In this context, we aimed to access whether chloroquine treatment alters the frequency of Treg cells and DCs in normal mice. In addition, the effects of the prophylactic and therapeutic treatment with CQ on Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an experimental model for human Multiple Sclerosis, was investigated as well. Methodology/Principal Findings EAE was induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35–55) peptide. C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally treated with chloroquine. Results show that the CQ treatment provoked an increase in Treg cells frequency as well as a decrease in DCs. We next evaluated whether prophylactic CQ administration is capable of reducing the clinical and histopathological signs of EAE. Our results demonstrated that CQ-treated mice developed mild EAE compared to controls that was associated with lower infiltration of inflammatory cells in the central nervous system CNS) and increased frequency of Treg cells. Also, proliferation of MOG35–55-reactive T cells was significantly inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Similar results were observed when chloroquine was administrated after disease onset. Conclusion We show for the first time that CQ treatment promotes the expansion of Treg cells, corroborating previous reports indicating that chloroquine has immunomodulatory properties. Our results also show that CQ treatment suppress the inflammation in the CNS of EAE

  15. Insulin-like growth factor 2 enhances regulatory T-cell functions and suppresses food allergy in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Song, Jiang-Ping; Wu, Yingying; Yan, Hao; Zhan, Zhengke; Yang, Litao; He, Weiyi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Qiu, Shuqi; Liu, Zhigang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2014-06-01

    The functions of regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in immunity, and the regulatory mechanisms of Treg cell activities are not fully understood yet. We sought to investigate the role of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 2 in the upregulation of Treg cell function. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) on T cells was assessed by using flow cytometry. Treg cell functions were evaluated by assessing the suppressor effect on proliferation of other effector T (Teff) cells. The effect of IGF2 on regulating Treg cell functions were evaluated with a cell-culture model and a food allergy mouse model. Expression of IGF2R was observed in more than 90% of murine and human Treg cells but in less than 10% of effector CD4(+) T cells. Activation of IGF2R and T-cell receptor induced marked Treg cell proliferation and release of TGF-β from Treg cells, which enhanced Treg cell immune suppressor effects on other Teff cell activities and allergic inflammation in the intestine. Activation of IGF2R enhances Treg cell functions in suppressing other Teff cell activities and inhibiting allergic inflammation in the intestine. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased regulatory T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Idris, Siti-Zuleha; Hassan, Norfarazieda; Lee, Le-Jie; Md Noor, Sabariah; Osman, Raudhawati; Abdul-Jalil, Marsitah; Nordin, Abdul-Jalil; Abdullah, Maha

    2016-05-01

    Regulation in adaptive immune response balances a fine line that prevents instigation of self-damage or fall into unresponsiveness permitting abnormal cell growth. Mechanisms that keep this balance in check include regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs consist of a small but heterogeneous population, which may be identified by the phenotype, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127-. The role of Tregs in pathogenesis of cancers is thus far supported by evidence of increased Tregs in various cancers and may contribute to poorer prognosis. Tregs may also be important in acute leukaemias. A review of the literature on Tregs in acute leukaemias was conducted and Tregs were determined in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (ALLs). Studies on Tregs in B-cell ALL are few and controversial. We observed a significantly increased percentage of Tregs (mean±SD, 9.72 ± 3.79% vs. 7.05 ± 1.74%; P = 0.047) in the bone marrow/peripheral blood of ALL (n = 17) compared to peripheral blood of normal controls (n = 35). A positive trend between Tregs and age (R = 0.474, P = 0.055, n = 17) implicates this factor of poor prognosis in B-cell ALL. Tregs in cancer are particularly significant in immunotherapy. The manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer has for a long time ignored regulatory mechanisms inducible or in place. In lymphoma studies, tumour-specific mechanisms that are unlike conventional methods in the induction of Tregs have been hypothesized. In addition, tumour-infiltrating Tregs may present different profiles from peripheral blood pictures. Tregs will continue to be dissected to reveal its mysteries and their impact on clinical significance.

  17. Progranulin Inhibits Human T Lymphocyte Proliferation by Inducing the Formation of Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kwack, Kyu Hwan

    2017-01-01

    We have examined the effect of progranulin (PGRN) on human T cell proliferation and its underlying mechanism. We show that PGRN inhibits the PHA-induced multiplication of T lymphocytes. It increases the number of iTregs when T lymphocytes are activated by PHA but does not do so in the absence of PHA. PGRN-mediated inhibition of T lymphocyte proliferation, as well as the induction of iTregs, was completely reversed by a TGF-β inhibitor or a Treg inhibitor. PGRN induced TGF-β secretion in the presence of PHA whereas it did not in the absence of PHA. Our findings indicate that PGRN suppresses T lymphocyte proliferation by enhancing the formation of iTregs from activated T lymphocytes in response to TGF-β. PMID:28194047

  18. Glioma-Derived ADAM10 Induces Regulatory B Cells to Suppress CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-sheng; Luo, Lun; Huang, Zhen-chao; Guo, Ying

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play an important role in the anti-tumor activities of the body. The dysfunction of CD8+ T cells in glioma is unclear. This study aims to elucidate the glioma cell-derived ADAM10 (A Disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10) in the suppression of CD8+ effector T cells by the induction of regulatory B cells. In this study, glioma cells were isolated from surgically removed glioma tissue and stimulated by Phorbol myristate acetage (PMA) in the culture. The levels of ADAM10 in the culture were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immune cells were assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that the isolated glioma cells express ADAM10, which was markedly up regulated after stimulated with PMA. The glioma-derived ADAM10 induced activated B cells to differentiate into regulatory B cells, the later suppressed CD8+ T cell proliferation as well as the induced regulatory T cells, which also showed the immune suppressor effect on CD8+ effector T cell proliferation. In conclusion, glioma cells produce ADAM10 to induce Bregs; the latter suppresses CD8+ T cells and induces Tregs. PMID:25127032

  19. A link between PDL1 and T regulatory cells in fetomaternal tolerance.

    PubMed

    Habicht, Antje; Dada, Shirine; Jurewicz, Mollie; Fife, Brian T; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Guleria, Indira

    2007-10-15

    Acceptance of the fetus expressing allogeneic paternal Ags by the mother is a physiologic model of transplantation tolerance. Various mechanisms contribute to fetal evasion from immune attack by maternal leukocytes. We have recently demonstrated that the inhibitory costimulatory molecule PDL1 plays a critical role in fetomaternal tolerance in that PDL1 blockade or deficiency resulted in decreased allogeneic fetal survival rates. CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs) have also been demonstrated to play an important role in fetomaternal tolerance. Since PDL1 is expressed on Tregs, we explored the interactions between PDL1 and Tregs in vivo in a mouse model of fetomaternal tolerance. Depletion of CD25(+) T cells abrogated the effect of anti-PDL1 Ab indicating that the effect of PDL1 is possibly mediated by CD25(+) Tregs. Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type but not PDL1-deficient mice into PDL1-deficient recipients significantly improved fetal survival. The frequency, phenotype and placental trafficking of Tregs from PDL1-deficient mice were similar to those of wild-type controls, but were defective in inhibiting alloreactive Th1 cells in vitro. This is the first report providing evidence for a link between PDL1 and T regulatory cells in mediating fetomaternal tolerance.

  20. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, J.; Yuan, J.; Chandrakar, A.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25low Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3+, CD25high, CD4+ Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3+CD25lowCD4+ T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance. PMID:26079467

  1. Glatiramer acetate inhibits degradation of collagen II by suppressing the activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Zhao, Huiqing; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu

    2014-06-06

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is considered to be the major one contributing to the process of development of osteoarthritis (OA).Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is an important transcriptional factor accounting for inflammation response induced by TNF-α. The physiological function of IRF-1 in OA is still unknown. In this study, we reported that the expression levels of IRF-1 in OA chondrocytes were significantly higher compared to those in normal chondrocytes, which was reversed by treatment with Glatiramer acetate (GA), a licensed clinical drug for treating patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). We also found that GA is able to attenuate the upregulation of IRF-1 induced by TNF-α. Matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP-13) is one of the downstream target genes of IRF-1, which can induce the degradation of collagen II. Importantly, our results indicated that GA suppressed the expression of MMP-13 as well as the degradation of collagen II. In addition, GA also suppressed TNF-α-induced production of NO and expression of iNOS. Finally, we found that the inhibition of STAT1 activation played a critical role in the inhibitory effects of GA on the induction of IRF-1 and MMP-13. These data suggest that GA might have a potential effect in therapeutic OA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex differences in regulatory cells in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Hilary A; Benedek, Gil; Liang, Jian; Nguyen, Ha; Kent, Gail; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Saugstad, Julie A; Offner, Halina

    2017-08-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States. Sex differences, including smaller infarcts in females and greater involvement of immune-mediated inflammation in males may affect the efficacy of immune-modulating interventions. To address these differences, we sought to identify distinct stroke-modifying mechanisms in female vs. male mice. The current study demonstrated smaller infarcts and increased levels of regulatory CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B10 cells as well as anti-inflammatory CD11b(+)CD206(+) microglia/macrophages in the ipsilateral vs. contralateral hemisphere of female but not male mice undergoing 60min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 96h of reperfusion. Moreover, female mice with MCAO had increased total spleen cell numbers but lower B10 levels in spleens. These results elucidate differing sex-dependent regulatory mechanisms that account for diminished stroke severity in females and underscore the need to test immune-modulating therapies for stroke in both males and females. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Statins as Modulators of Regulatory T-Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Peña, David A.; Gutierrez, Fredy R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Statins are pharmacological inhibitors of the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of cholesterol. Some recent experimental studies have shown that besides their effects on the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, statins may also have beneficial anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. On the other hand, the induction and activity of regulatory T cells (Treg) are key processes in the prevention of pathology during chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Hence, strategies oriented towards the therapeutic expansion of Tregs are gaining special attention among biomedical researchers. The potential effects of statins on the biology of Treg are of particular importance because of their eventual application as in vivo inducers of Treg in the treatment of multiple conditions. In this paper we review the experimental evidence pointing out to a potential effect of statins on the role of regulatory T cells in different conditions and discuss its potential clinical significance. PMID:24222935

  4. Stability and function of regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet.

    PubMed

    Levine, Andrew G; Medoza, Alejandra; Hemmers, Saskia; Moltedo, Bruno; Niec, Rachel E; Schizas, Michail; Hoyos, Beatrice E; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Dikiy, Stanislav; Fujisawa, Sho; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Treuting, Piper M; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2017-06-15

    Adaptive immune responses are tailored to different types of pathogens through differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into functionally distinct subsets of effector T cells (T helper 1 (TH1), TH2, and TH17) defined by expression of the key transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt, respectively. Regulatory T (Treg) cells comprise a distinct anti-inflammatory lineage specified by the X-linked transcription factor Foxp3 (refs 2, 3). Paradoxically, some activated Treg cells express the aforementioned effector CD4 T cell transcription factors, which have been suggested to provide Treg cells with enhanced suppressive capacity. Whether expression of these factors in Treg cells-as in effector T cells-is indicative of heterogeneity of functionally discrete and stable differentiation states, or conversely may be readily reversible, is unknown. Here we demonstrate that expression of the TH1-associated transcription factor T-bet in mouse Treg cells, induced at steady state and following infection, gradually becomes highly stable even under non-permissive conditions. Loss of function or elimination of T-bet-expressing Treg cells-but not of T-bet expression in Treg cells-resulted in severe TH1 autoimmunity. Conversely, following depletion of T-bet(-) Treg cells, the remaining T-bet(+) cells specifically inhibited TH1 and CD8 T cell activation consistent with their co-localization with T-bet(+) effector T cells. These results suggest that T-bet(+) Treg cells have an essential immunosuppressive function and indicate that Treg cell functional heterogeneity is a critical feature of immunological tolerance.

  5. Regulatory T cell-based therapies for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Benjamine; Graber, David J; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune disorders are long-term diseases that adversely affect the quality of life for patients, and they are one of the top ten leading causes of death. While each autoimmune disorder is unique, they all are caused by a breakdown of tolerance against endogenous proteins. This leads to auto-inflammatory events that promote the destruction of organs in a humoral and cellular immune mediated manner. Treatment options for autoimmunity can involve the use of chemical and biologic agents that suppress inflammation. While these treatment options for patients have shown to be beneficial in autoimmunity, they can result in patients being vulnerable to opportunistic infections. Newer therapies aim to identify methods to specifically block auto-inflammatory immune cells while allowing for an intact immune response to other antigens. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a subtype of the adoptive immune cell that is capable of suppressing inflammatory events in an antigen-specific manner, but they are often poorly functioning within autoimmune patients. Treg cells have been well characterized for their immune modulating capabilities and preclinical and early clinical studies support their therapeutic potential for antigen-specific immune suppression. This review will examine the current understanding of Treg cell function and the therapeutic potential of enhancing Treg cells in patients with inflammatory disorders.

  6. Induction of antigen-specific regulatory T lymphocytes by human dendritic cells expressing the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Haifa; Godot, Véronique; Maillot, Marie-Christine; Prejean, Maria Victoria; Cohen, Nicolas; Krzysiek, Roman; Lemoine, François M; Zou, Weiping; Emilie, Dominique

    2007-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) determine whether antigen presentation leads to immune activation or to tolerance. Tolerance-inducing DCs (also called regulatory DCs) act partly by generating regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The mechanism used by DCs to switch toward regulatory DCs during their differentiation is unclear. We show here that human DCs treated in vitro with glucocorticoids produce the glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ). Antigen presentation by GILZ-expressing DCs generates CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CTLA-4/CD152(+) and interleukin-10-producing Tregs inhibiting the response of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This inhibition is specific to the antigen presented, and only proliferating CD4(+) T lymphocytes express the Treg markers. Interleukin-10 is required for Treg induction by GILZ-expressing DCs. It is also needed for the suppressive function of Tregs. Antigen-presenting cells from patients treated with glucocorticoids generate interleukin-10-secreting Tregs ex vivo. These antigen-presenting cells produce GILZ, which is needed for Treg induction. Therefore, GILZ is critical for commitment of DCs to differentiate into regulatory DCs and to the generation of antigen-specific Tregs. This mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic effects of glucocorticoids.

  7. Induction of colonic regulatory T cells by indigenous Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Imaoka, Akemi; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Momose, Yoshika; Cheng, Genhong; Yamasaki, Sho; Saito, Takashi; Ohba, Yusuke; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Hori, Shohei; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Itoh, Kikuji; Honda, Kenya

    2011-01-21

    CD4(+) T regulatory cells (T(regs)), which express the Foxp3 transcription factor, play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Here, we show that in mice, T(regs) were most abundant in the colonic mucosa. The spore-forming component of indigenous intestinal microbiota, particularly clusters IV and XIVa of the genus Clostridium, promoted T(reg) cell accumulation. Colonization of mice by a defined mix of Clostridium strains provided an environment rich in transforming growth factor-β and affected Foxp3(+) T(reg) number and function in the colon. Oral inoculation of Clostridium during the early life of conventionally reared mice resulted in resistance to colitis and systemic immunoglobulin E responses in adult mice, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to autoimmunity and allergy.

  8. Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1991-08-14

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the biophysical and cellular mechanisms that control plant cell expansion. At present we are attempting to characterize the kinetics of the system(s) responsible for regulatory and compensatory behavior of growing cells and tissues. This work is significantly because it indicates that biochemical loosening and biophysical stress relaxation of the wall are part of a feedback loop controlling growth. This report briefly summarizes the efforts and results of the past 12 months. In large part, we have been trying to analyze the nature of growth rate noise,'' i.e. spontaneous and often erratic variations in growth rate. We are obtaining evidence that such noise'' is not random, but rather reveals an underlying growth mechanism with complex dynamics.

  9. Regulatory T cells in vitiligo: Implications for pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mitesh; Kemp, E Helen; Laddha, Naresh C; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Weetman, Anthony P; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a hypomelanotic autoimmune skin disease arising from a breakdown in immunological self-tolerance, which leads to aberrant immune responses against melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial to the development of self-tolerance and so are major foci in the study of autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo. This review will summarise recent findings concerning the role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. In addition, as antigen-specific Tregs are a potential route for the reinstatement of immune tolerance, new strategies that expand or induce de novo generation of Tregs and which are currently being investigated as therapies for other autoimmune diseases, will be discussed. These approaches will highlight the opportunities for Treg cell-based therapeutics in vitiligo.

  10. Special regulatory T cell review: The suppression problem!

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The concept of T-cell mediated suppression evolved more than 30 years ago. At that time it spawned many claims that have not stood the test of time. The rediscovery of suppression phenomena and regulatory T cells over the past 15 years created schizophrenic responses amongst immunologists. Some claimed that the new proponents of suppression were, once again, bringing immunology into disrepute, whilst others have embraced the field with great enthusiasm and novel approaches to clarification. Without faithful repetition of the “old” experiments, it is difficult to establish what was right and what was wrong. Nevertheless, immunologists must now accept that a good number of the old claims were overstated, and reflected poor scientific discipline. “I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know” Shakespeare. Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 2. PMID:18154612

  11. Special regulatory T cell review: The suppression problem!

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The concept of T-cell mediated suppression evolved more than 30 years ago. At that time it spawned many claims that have not stood the test of time. The rediscovery of suppression phenomena and regulatory T cells over the past 15 years created schizophrenic responses amongst immunologists. Some claimed that the new proponents of suppression were, once again, bringing immunology into disrepute, whilst others have embraced the field with great enthusiasm and novel approaches to clarification. Without faithful repetition of the "old" experiments, it is difficult to establish what was right and what was wrong. Nevertheless, immunologists must now accept that a good number of the old claims were overstated, and reflected poor scientific discipline. "I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know" Shakespeare. Julius Caesar Act 3, Scene 2.

  12. The protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 modulates the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iype, Tessy; Sankarshanan, Mohan; Mauldin, Ileana S.; Mullins, David W.; Lorenz, Ulrike

    2010-01-01

    The importance of regulatory T cells (Treg) for immune tolerance is well recognized, yet the signaling molecules influencing their suppressive activity are relatively poorly understood. Here, through in vivo studies and complementary ex vivo studies, we make several important observations. First, we identify the cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 as a novel ‘endogenous brake’ and modifier of the suppressive ability of Treg cells; consistent with this notion, loss of SHP-1 expression strongly augments the ability of Treg cells to suppress inflammation in a mouse model. Second, specific pharmacological inhibition of SHP-1 enzymatic activity via the cancer drug sodium stibogluconate (SSG) potently augmented Treg cell suppressor activity both in vivo and ex vivo. Finally, through a quantitative imaging approach, we directly demonstrate that Treg cells prevent the activation of conventional T cells, and that SHP-1-deficient Treg cells are more efficient suppressors. Collectively, our data reveal SHP-1 as a critical modifier of Treg cell function, and a potential therapeutic target for augmenting Treg cell-mediated suppression in certain disease states. PMID:20952680

  13. The regulatory mechanism of Tremella mesenterica on steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Wen; Lo, Hui-Chen; Yang, Jyuer-Ger; Chien, Chi-Hsien; Lee, Shi-Hsiung; Tseng, Chi-Yu; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2006-07-04

    Tremella mesenterica (TM), a yellow jelly mushroom, has been traditionally used as tonic food to improve body condition in Chinese society for a long time. We have previously demonstrated that TM reduced in vitro hCG-treated steroidogenesis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells without any toxicity effect. In the present study, the mechanism how TM suppressed hCG-treated steroidogenesis in MA-10 cells was investigated. MA-10 cells were treated with vehicle, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 50 ng/ml), or different reagents with or without TM to clarify the effects. TM significantly suppressed progesterone production with the presences of forskolin (10 and 100 microM) or dbcAMP (0.5 and 1mM), respectively, in MA-10 cells (p<0.05), which indicated that TM suppressed steroidogenesis after PKA activation along the signal pathway. Beyond our expectation, TM induced the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein with or without hCG treatments. However, TM profoundly decreased P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) enzyme activities without any influences on the expression of both enzymes. These inhibitions on steroidogenic enzyme activities might counteract the stimulation of StAR protein expression. In conclusion, results suggest that TM suppressed hCG-treated steroidogenesis in MA-10 cells by inhibiting PKA signal pathway and steroidogenic enzyme activities.

  14. P2X7 receptor promotes intestinal inflammation in chemically induced colitis and triggers death of mucosal regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Figliuolo, Vanessa R; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Safya, Hanaa; Nanini, Hayandra; Bernardazzi, Cláudio; Abalo, Alessandra; de Souza, Heitor S P; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Bobé, Pierre; Coutinho, Cláudia M L M; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2017-03-07

    P2X7 receptor activation contributes to inflammation development in different pathologies. We previously reported that the P2X7 receptor is over-expressed in the gut mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and that P2X7 inhibition protects against chemically induced colitis. Here, we investigated in detail the role of the P2X7 receptor in inflammatory bowel disease development, by treating P2X7 knockout (KO) and WT mice with two different (and established) colitis inductors. P2X7 KO mice were protected against gut inflammation induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid or oxazolone, with no weight loss or gut histological alterations after treatment. P2X7 receptor knockout induced regulatory T cell accumulation in the colon, as evaluated by qRT-PCR for FoxP3 expression and immunostaining for CD90/CD45RB(low). Flow cytometry analysis of mesenteric lymph node cells showed that P2X7 activation (by ATP) triggered regulatory T cell death. In addition, such cells from P2X7 KO mice expressed more CD103, suggesting increased migration of regulatory T cells to the colon (relative to the WT). Our results show that the P2X7 has a key role during inflammation development in inflammatory bowel disease, by triggering the death and retention in the mesenteric lymph nodes of regulatory T cells that would otherwise promote immune system tolerance in the gut.

  15. Regulatory T cells in patients with Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Schinnerling, Katina; Moos, Verena; Geelhaar, Anika; Allers, Kristina; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Friebel, Julian; Conrad, Kristina; Kühl, Anja A; Erben, Ulrike; Schneider, Thomas

    2011-10-15

    Classical Whipple's disease (CWD) is caused by chronic infection with Tropheryma whipplei that seems to be associated with an underlying immune defect. The pathognomonic hallmark of CWD is a massive infiltration of the duodenal mucosa with T. whipplei-infected macrophages that disperse systemically to many other organ systems. An alleviated inflammatory reaction and the absence of T. whipplei-specific Th1 reactivity support persistence and systemic spread of the pathogen. In this article, we hypothesized that regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are involved in immunomodulation in CWD, and we asked for the distribution, activation, and regulatory capacity of T(reg) in CWD patients. Whereas in the lamina propria of CWD patients before treatment numbers of T(reg) were increased, percentages in the peripheral blood were similar in CWD patients and healthy controls. However, peripheral T(reg) of CWD patients were more activated than those of controls. Elevated secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β in the duodenal mucosa of CWD patients indicated locally enhanced T(reg) activity. Enhanced CD95 expression on peripheral memory CD4(+) T cells combined with reduced expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A upon polyclonal stimulation by CD4(+) cells from untreated CWD patients further hinted to T(reg) activity-related exhaustion of effector CD4(+) T cells. In conclusion, increased numbers of T(reg) can be detected within the duodenal mucosa in untreated CWD, where huge numbers of T. whipplei-infected macrophages are present. Thus, T(reg) might contribute to the chronic infection and systemic spread of T. whipplei in CWD but in contrast prevent mucosal barrier defect by reducing local inflammation.

  16. Regulatory mechanism of Toona sinensis on mouse leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Poon, Song Ling; Leu, Sew-Fen; Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Liu, Ming-Yie; Huang, Bu-Miin

    2005-02-11

    Toona sinensis (TS), a kind of arbor, widely distributes nowadays in Asia. The leaves of TS have been used as an effective nutritious food in Chinese society for a long time. It was reported that Toona sinensis can induce apoptosis of cancer cells, reduce plasma glucose in diabetic rats, and improve lipolysis of differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocyte and its uptake of glucose. It has also been shown that TS may increase dynamic activity of human sperm. Thus, we are interested to investigate whether Toona sinensis has any effect on mouse Leydig cell testosterone production, which correlates to sperm activity. Primary mouse Leydig cells were purified to conduct the in vitro experiments. Different concentrations of crude Toona sinensis were added to primary mouse Leydig cells and the testosterone production was determined. The results showed that crude TS significantly inhibited both basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated testosterone productions in dose dependent manner, respectively (P<0.05). Crude TS also reduced the forskolin- and dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP)-stimulated testosterone production (P<0.05), which indicated that crude TS might affect protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway at the site after the formation of cyclic AMP. Moreover, TS inhibited Leydig cell steroidogenesis by suppressing the activity of steroidogenic enzymes including P450 side chain cleavage enzyme, 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase, 20 alpha-hydroxylase and 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (P<0.05). In summary, these results suggested that TS inhibited steroidogenesis by suppressing the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and the activities of steroidogenic enzymes in normal mouse Leydig cells.

  17. Resveratrol Inhibits Protein Translation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Cuesta, Eugenia; Boylan, Joan M.; Tatar, Marc; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that extends lifespan and healthspan in model organism. Despite extensive investigation, the biological processes mediating resveratrol's effects have yet to be elucidated. Because repression of translation shares many of resveratrol's beneficial effects, we hypothesized that resveratrol was a modulator of protein synthesis. We studied the effect of the drug on the H4-II-E rat hepatoma cell line. Initial studies showed that resveratrol inhibited global protein synthesis. Given the role of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in regulating protein synthesis, we examined the effect of resveratrol on mTOR signaling. Resveratrol inhibited mTOR self-phosphorylation and the phosphorylation of mTOR targets S6K1 and eIF4E-BP1. It attenuated the formation of the translation initiation complex eIF4F and increased the phosphorylation of eIF2α. The latter event, also a mechanism for translation inhibition, was not recapitulated by mTOR inhibitors. The effects on mTOR signaling were independent of effects on AMP-activated kinase or AKT. We conclude that resveratrol is an inhibitor of global protein synthesis, and that this effect is mediated through modulation of mTOR-dependent and independent signaling. PMID:22242130

  18. The Interaction between Regulatory T Cells and NKT Cells in the Liver: A CD1d Bridge Links Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tonya J.; Potter, James P.; Li, Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and natural killer T (NKT) cells are two distinct lymphocyte subsets that independently regulate hepatic adaptive and innate immunity, respectively. In the current study, we examine the interaction between Tregs and NKT cells to understand the mechanisms of cross immune regulation by these cells. Methods The frequency and function of Tregs were evaluated in wild type and NKT cell deficient (CD1dko) mice. In vitro lymphocyte proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed with NKT cells co-cultured with Tregs. The ability of Tregs to inhibit NKT cells in vivo was examined by adoptive transfer of Tregs in a model of NKT cell mediated hepatitis. Results CD1dko mice have a significant reduction in hepatic Tregs. Although, the Tregs from CD1dko mice remain functional and can suppress conventional T cells, their ability to suppress activation induced NKT cell proliferation and to promote NKT cell apoptosis is greatly diminished. These effects are CD1d dependent and require cell to cell contact. Adoptive transfer of Tregs inhibits NKT cell-mediated liver injury. Conclusions NKT cells promote Tregs, and Tregs inhibit NKT cells in a CD1d dependent manner requiring cell to cell contact. These cross-talk immune regulations provide a linkage between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22073248

  19. Heparin affin regulatory peptide/pleiotrophin negatively affects diverse biological activities in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Parthymou, Anastasia; Lampropoulou, Evgenia; Mikelis, Constantinos; Drosou, Georgia; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2008-01-01

    Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) or pleiotrophin seems to be involved in the progression of several tumors of diverse origin. In this study, we tried to determine the role of HARP in rat C6 glioma cells by using an antisense strategy for inhibition of HARP expression. Decrease of the expression of endogenous HARP in C6 cells (AS-C6 cells) significantly increased proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth of cells. Implantation of AS-C6 cells onto chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes resulted in a significant increase of tumor-induced angiogenesis compared with that induced by non-transfected or C6 cells transfected with the plasmid alone (PC-C6 cells). In the same line, conditioned medium from AS-C6 cells significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro compared with the effect of conditioned medium from C6 or PC-C6 cells. Interestingly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced C6 cell proliferation and migration, and SU1496, a selective inhibitor of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), blocked increased glioma cell growth, migration, and angiogenicity observed in AS-C6 cell cultures. The above results seem to be due to a direct interaction between HARP and VEGF in the culture medium of C6 and PC-C6 cells, while AS-C6 cells secreted comparable amounts of VEGF that do not interact with HARP. Collectively, these data suggest that HARP negatively affects diverse biological activities in C6 glioma cells, mainly due to binding of HARP to VEGF, which may sequester secreted VEGF from signalling through VEGFR2.

  20. Defect of regulatory T cells in patients with Omenn syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Barbara; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Moratto, Daniele; Sobacchi, Cristina; Marrella, Veronica; Imperatori, Laura; Vairo, Donatella; Plebani, Alessandro; Giliani, Silvia; Vezzoni, Paolo; Facchetti, Fabio; Porta, Fulvio; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Villa, Anna; Badolato, Raffaele

    2010-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by severe immunodeficiency and T-cell-mediated autoimmunity. The disease is caused by hypomorphic mutations in recombination-activating genes that hamper the process of Variable (V) Diversity (D) Joining (J) recombination, leading to the generation of autoreactive T cells. We have previously shown that in OS the expression of autoimmune regulator, a key factor governing central tolerance, is markedly reduced. Here, we have addressed the role of peripheral tolerance in the disease pathogenesis. We have analyzed forkhead box protein P3 (FOXP3) expression in peripheral blood T cells of 4 patients with OS and in lymphoid organs of 8 patients with OS and have tested the suppressive activity of sorted CD4(+) CD25(high) peripheral blood T cells in 2 of these patients. We have observed that CD4(+)CD25(high)T cells isolated ex vivo from patients with OS failed to suppress proliferation of autologous or allogenic CD4(+) responder T cells. Moreover, despite individual variability in the fraction of circulating FOXP3(+) CD4 cells in patients with OS, the immunohistochemical analysis of FOXP3 expression in lymph nodes and thymus of patients with OS demonstrated a severe reduction of this cell subset compared with control tissues. Overall, these results suggest a defect of regulatory T cells in OS leading to a breakdown of peripheral tolerance, which may actively concur to the development of autoimmune manifestations in the disease. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  2. Intravenous apoptotic spleen cell infusion induces a TGF-beta-dependent regulatory T-cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Kleinclauss, François M.; Perruche, Sylvain; Masson, Emeline; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Biichle, Sabeha; Remy-Martin, Jean-Paul; Ferrand, Christophe; Martin, Mael; Bittard, Hugues; Chalopin, Jean-Marc; Seilles, Estelle; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Apoptotic leukocytes are endowed with immunomodulatory properties that can be used to enhance hematopoietic engraftment and prevent graft-versus-host disease. This apoptotic cell-induced tolerogenic effect is mediated by host macrophages and not recipient dendritic cells or donor phagocytes present in the bone marrow graft as evidenced by selective cell depletion and trafficking experiments. Furthermore, apoptotic cell infusion is associated with TGF-β-dependent donor CD4+CD25+ T cell expansion. Such cells have a regulatory phenotype (CD62Lhigh and intracellular CTLA-4+), express high levels of Foxp3 mRNA and exert ex vivo suppressive activity through a cell-to-cell contact mechanism. In vivo CD25 depletion after apoptotic cell infusion prevents the apoptotic spleen cell-induced beneficial effects on engraftment and graft-versus-host disease occurrence. This highlights the role of regulatory T cells in the tolerogenic effect of apoptotic spleen cell infusion. This novel association between apoptosis and regulatory T cell expansion may also contribute to preventing deleterious auto-immune responses during normal turnover. PMID:15962005

  3. α-Lipoic acid (α-LA) inhibits the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) via SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Gao, Fuyu; Lin, Xiaoyan; Yu, Ruixiang; Zhao, Yong; Luan, Jingjie; Li, Hongyan; Song, Mingzhu

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), one of the most common joint disorders, is one of the leading causes of disability among the elderly. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, which is synthesized locally by synovial cells and chondrocytes, have been shown to play a critical role in sustaining cartilage damage in arthritis by creating an imbalance between cartilage degradation and the repair process. Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA), which is synthesized in animal and plant tissues, has demonstrated its protective effects in a variety of diseases. However, whether or not LA has a protective effect in OA is still unknown. In this study, we found that α-LA inhibits the IL-1β-induced increase in matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP-3) and matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP-13) expression and activity. Our data also demonstrate that interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) participates in the induction of MMP-3 and MMP-13. However, α-LA treatment did not change IRF-1 levels. Importantly, we found that α-LA increases SUMOylation of IRF-1, which attenuates IRF-1's transcriptional activity. Finally, we found that α-LA treatment leads to an increase in SUMO-1, but not in SUMO-2 or SUMO-3. Taken together, this study shows that α-LA exerts anti-inflammatory effects in an IL-1β-stimulated chondrocyte model, thereby suggesting a potential protective effect of α-LA in OA.

  4. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; He, C; Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-09-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders.

  6. Regulatory immune cells in regulation of intestinal inflammatory response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Y; Liu, Z

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal lumen harbors nearly 100 trillion commensal bacteria that exert crucial function for health. An elaborate balance between immune responses and tolerance to intestinal microbiota is required to maintain intestinal homeostasis. This process depends on diverse regulatory mechanisms, including both innate and adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the homeostasis between intestinal immune systems and microbiota has been shown to be associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in genetically susceptible populations. In this review, we discuss the recent progress reported in studies of distinct types of regulatory immune cells in the gut, including intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, regulatory B cells, alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, and innate lymphoid cells, and how dysfunction of this immune regulatory system contributes to intestinal diseases such as IBD. Moreover, we discuss the manipulation of these regulatory immune cells as a potential therapeutic method for management of intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:26080708

  7. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; ...

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated bymore » a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.« less

  8. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Buckner, Jane H.; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Herold, Kevan C.; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R.; Li, Kevin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S. Alice; Masiello, Lisa M.; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L.; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter; Tang, Qizhi

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo–expanded autologous CD4+CD127lo/−CD25+ polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 108 to 26 × 108 cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3+CD4+CD25hiCD127lo phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy–related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  9. Skin-derived TSLP systemically expands regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Leichner, Theresa M; Satake, Atsushi; Harrison, Victor Sanoe; Tanaka, Yukinori; Archambault, Angela S; Kim, Brian S; Siracusa, Mark C; Leonard, Warren J; Naji, Ali; Wu, Gregory F; Artis, David; Kambayashi, Taku

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4(+) T cells with suppressive function and are critical for limiting inappropriate activation of T cells. Hence, the expansion of Tregs is an attractive strategy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the skin possesses the remarkable capacity to systemically expand Treg numbers by producing thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) in response to vitamin D receptor stimulation. An ∼2-fold increase in the proportion and absolute number of Tregs was observed in mice treated topically but not systemically with the Vitamin D3 analog MC903. This expansion of Tregs was dependent on TSLP receptor signaling but not on VDR signaling in hematopoietic cells. However, TSLP receptor expression by Tregs was not required for their proliferation. Rather, skin-derived TSLP promoted Treg expansion through dendritic cells. Importantly, treatment of skin with MC903 significantly lowered the incidence of autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice and attenuated disease score in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, these data demonstrate that the skin has the remarkable potential to control systemic immune responses and that Vitamin D-mediated stimulation of skin could serve as a novel strategy to therapeutically modulate the systemic immune system for the treatment of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulatory Eosinophils Suppress T Cells Partly through Galectin-10.

    PubMed

    Lingblom, Christine; Andersson, Jennie; Andersson, Kerstin; Wennerås, Christine

    2017-06-15

    Eosinophils have the capacity to regulate the function of T cell subsets. Our aim was to test the hypothesis of the existence of a regulatory subset of eosinophils. Human eosinophils were incubated with T cells that were stimulated with allogeneic leukocytes or CD3/CD28 cross-linking. After 2 d of coculture, 11% of the eosinophils gained CD16 expression. A CD16(hi) subset of eosinophils, encompassing 1-5% of all eosinophils, was also identified in the blood of healthy subjects. FACS sorting showed that these CD16(hi) eosinophils were significantly stronger suppressors of T cell proliferation than were conventional CD16(neg) eosinophils. Human eosinophils contain stores of the immunoregulatory protein galectin-10. We found that Ab-mediated neutralization of galectin-10 partially abrogated the suppressive function of the eosinophils. Moreover, recombinant galectin-10 by itself was able to suppress T cell proliferation. Finally, we detected galectin-10-containing immune synapses between eosinophils and lymphocytes. To conclude, we describe a subset of suppressive eosinophils expressing CD16 that may escape detection because CD16-based negative selection is the standard procedure for the isolation of human eosinophils. Moreover, we show that galectin-10 functions as a T cell-suppressive molecule in eosinophils. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. Methyl-donor nutrients inhibit breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Park, Chung S; Cho, Kyongshin; Bae, Dong R; Joo, Nam E; Kim, Hyung H; Mabasa, Lawrence; Fowler, Andrea W

    2008-01-01

    Lipotropes (methyl group containing nutrients, including methionine, choline, folate, and vitamin B(12)) are dietary methyl donors and cofactors that are involved in one-carbon metabolism, which is important for genomic DNA methylation reactions and nucleic acid synthesis. One-carbon metabolism provides methyl groups for all biological methylation pathways and is highly dependent on dietary supplementation of methyl nutrients. Nutrition is an important determinant of breast cancer risk and tumor behavior, and dietary intervention may be an effective approach to prevent breast cancer. Apoptosis is important for the regulation of homeostasis and tumorigenesis. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 may be a regulatory target in cancer therapy; controlling or modulating its expression may be a therapeutic strategy against breast cancer. In this study, the effects of lipotrope supplementation on the growth and death of human breast cancer cell lines T47D and MCF-7 were examined and found to inhibit growth of both T47D and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, the ratios of apoptotic cells to the total number of cells were approximately 44% and 34% higher in the lipotrope-supplemented treatments of T47D and MCF-7 cancer cells, respectively, compared with the control treatments. More importantly, Bcl-2 protein expression was decreased by approximately 25% from lipotrope supplementation in T47D cells, suggesting that lipotropes can induce breast cancer cell death by direct downregulation of Bcl-2 protein expression. Cancer treatment failure is often correlated with Bcl-2 protein upregulation. These data may be useful in the development of effective nutritional strategies to prevent and reduce breast cancer in humans.

  12. Follicular Regulatory CD8 T Cells Impair the Germinal Center Response in SIV and Ex Vivo HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Folkvord, Joy M.; Levy, David N.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Connick, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    During chronic HIV infection, viral replication is concentrated in secondary lymphoid follicles. Cytotoxic CD8 T cells control HIV replication in extrafollicular regions, but not in the follicle. Here, we show CXCR5hiCD44hiCD8 T cells are a regulatory subset differing from conventional CD8 T cells, and constitute the majority of CD8 T cells in the follicle. This subset, CD8 follicular regulatory T cells (CD8 TFR), expand in chronic SIV infection, exhibit enhanced expression of Tim-3 and IL-10, and express less perforin compared to conventional CD8 T cells. CD8 TFR modestly limit HIV replication in follicular helper T cells (TFH), impair TFH IL-21 production via Tim-3, and inhibit IgG production by B cells during ex vivo HIV infection. CD8 TFR induce TFH apoptosis through HLA-E, but induce less apoptosis than conventional CD8 T cells. These data demonstrate that a unique regulatory CD8 population exists in follicles that impairs GC function in HIV infection. PMID:27716848

  13. Regulatory issues in cell-based therapy for clinical purposes.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Tabera, Jaime; Vilarrodona, Anna; Trias, Esteve

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development in the fields of cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology, and bioengineering medicine has brought new, highly innovative treatments and medicinal products, some of which contain viable cells and tissues associated with scaffolds and devices. These new cell-based therapy approaches in regenerative medicine have great potential for use in the treatment of a number of diseases that at present cannot be managed effectively. Given the unique challenges associated with the development of human cell-based medicinal products, great care is required in the development of procedures, practices, and regulation. In cell therapy, appropriate methodologies in the areas of production, reproducibility, maintenance, and delivery are essential for accurate definition and reliable assurance of the suitability and quality of the final products. Recently, the official European Community agencies (EMA) and the relevant authority in the USA (FDA) have made significant efforts to establish regulatory guidance for use in the application of the cell-based therapies for human patients. The guidelines surrounding cell-based therapy take into account the current legislation, but focus less on the heterogeneity and requirements of individual human cell-based products, including specific combination products and applications. When considering guidelines and regulation, a risk assessment approach is an effective method of identifying priority areas for the development of human cell-based medicinal products. Additionally, effective design and thorough validation of the manufacturing process in line with existing Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and quality control regimes and a program that ensures the traceability and biovigilance of the final products are also all essential elements to consider. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Regulatory T-cell vaccination independent of auto-antigen.

    PubMed

    Pascual, David W; Yang, Xinghong; Holderness, Kathryn; Jun, SangMu; Maddaloni, Massimo; Kochetkova, Irina

    2014-03-14

    To date, efforts to treat autoimmune diseases have primarily focused on the disease symptoms rather than on the cause of the disease. In large part, this is attributed to not knowing the responsible auto-antigens (auto-Ags) for driving the self-reactivity coupled with the poor success of treating autoimmune diseases using oral tolerance methods. Nonetheless, if tolerogenic approaches or methods that stimulate regulatory T (Treg) cells can be devised, these could subdue autoimmune diseases. To forward such efforts, our approach with colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) fimbriae is to establish bystander immunity to ultimately drive the development of auto-Ag-specific Treg cells. Using an attenuated Salmonella vaccine expressing CFA/I fimbriae, fimbriae-specific Treg cells were induced without compromising the vaccine's capacity to protect against travelers' diarrhea or salmonellosis. By adapting the vaccine's anti-inflammatory properties, it was found that it could also dampen experimental inflammatory diseases resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis. Because of this bystander effect, disease-specific Treg cells are eventually induced to resolve disease. Interestingly, this same vaccine could elicit the required Treg cell subset for each disease. For MS-like disease, conventional CD25(+) Treg cells are stimulated, but for arthritis CD39(+) Treg cells are induced instead. This review article will examine the potential of treating autoimmune diseases without having previous knowledge of the auto-Ag using an innocuous antigen to stimulate Treg cells via the production of transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10.

  15. Decoding the Regulatory Network for Blood Development from Single-Cell Gene Expression Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haghverdi, Laleh; Lilly, Andrew J.; Tanaka, Yosuke; Wilkinson, Adam C.; Buettner, Florian; Macaulay, Iain C.; Jawaid, Wajid; Diamanti, Evangelia; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Piterman, Nir; Kouskoff, Valerie; Theis, Fabian J.; Fisher, Jasmin; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the use of diffusion maps and network synthesis from state transition graphs to better understand developmental pathways from single cell gene expression profiling. We map the progression of mesoderm towards blood in the mouse by single-cell expression analysis of 3,934 cells, capturing cells with blood-forming potential at four sequential developmental stages. By adapting the diffusion plot methodology for dimensionality reduction to single-cell data, we reconstruct the developmental journey to blood at single-cell resolution. Using transitions between individual cellular states as input, we develop a single-cell network synthesis toolkit to generate a computationally executable transcriptional regulatory network model that recapitulates blood development. Model predictions were validated by showing that Sox7 inhibits primitive erythropoiesis, and that Sox and Hox factors control early expression of Erg. We therefore demonstrate that single-cell analysis of a developing organ coupled with computational approaches can reveal the transcriptional programs that control organogenesis. PMID:25664528

  16. Immunoevasive Pericytes From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Preferentially Modulate Induction of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Domev, Hagit; Milkov, Irina; Dar, Ayelet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated microvessel-residing pericytes and pericytes from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics and therapeutic properties. Despite growing interest in pericyte-based stem cell therapy, their immunogenicity and immunomodulatory effects on nonactivated T cells are still poorly defined, in particular those of vasculogenic hPSC pericytes. We found that tissue-embedded and unstimulated cultured hPSC- or tissue-derived pericytes constitutively expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and the inhibitory programmed cell death-ligand 1/2 (PD-L1/2) molecules but not MHC class II or CD80/CD86 costimulatory molecules. Pretreatment with inflammatory mediators failed to induce an antigen-presenting cell-like phenotype in stimulated pericytes. CD146+ pericytes from hPSCs did not induce activation and proliferation of allogeneic resting T cells independent of interferon (IFN)-γ prestimulation, similarly to pericytes from human brain or placenta. Instead, pericytes mediated a significant increase in the frequency of allogeneic CD25highFoxP3+ regulatory T cells when cocultured with nonactivated peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, when peripheral blood CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) were depleted from isolated CD3+ T cells, pericytes preferentially induced de novo formation of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+CD127−, suppressive regulatory T cells. Constitutive expression of PD-L1/2 and secretion of transforming growth factor-β by hPSC pericytes directly regulated generation of pericyte-induced Tregs. Pericytes cotransplanted into immunodeficient mice with allogeneic CD25− T cells maintained a nonimmunogenic phenotype and mediated the development of functional regulatory T cells. Together, these findings reveal a novel feature of pericyte-mediated immunomodulation distinguished from immunosuppression, shared by native tissue pericytes and hPSC pericytes, and support the notion that pericytes can be applied for

  17. A major role for myeloid-derived suppressor cells and a minor role for regulatory T cells in immunosuppression during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Tebartz, Christina; Horst, Sarah Anita; Sparwasser, Tim; Huehn, Jochen; Beineke, Andreas; Peters, Georg; Medina, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause difficult-to-treat chronic infections. We recently reported that S. aureus chronic infection was associated with a profound inhibition of T cell responses. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for the suppression of T cell responses during chronic S. aureus infection. Using in vitro coculture systems, as well as in vivo adoptive transfer of CFSE-labeled OT-II cells, we demonstrated the presence of immunosuppressive mechanisms in splenocytes of S. aureus-infected mice that inhibited the response of OT-II cells to cognate antigenic stimulation. Immunosuppression was IL-10/TGF-β independent but required cell-cell proximity. Using DEREG and Foxp3(gfp) mice, we demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells contributed, but only to a minor degree, to bystander immunosuppression. Neither regulatory B cells nor tolerogenic dendritic cells contributed to immunosuppression. Instead, we found a significant expansion of granulocytic (CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(low)) and monocytic (CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(high)) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in chronically infected mice, which exerted a strong immunosuppressive effect on T cell responses. Splenocytes of S. aureus-infected mice lost most of their suppressive activity after the in vivo depletion of MDSC by treatment with gemcitabine. Furthermore, a robust negative correlation was observed between the degree of T cell inhibition and the number of MDSC. An increase in the numbers of MDSC in S. aureus-infected mice by adoptive transfer caused a significant exacerbation of infection. In summary, our results indicate that expansion of MDSC and, to a minor degree, of regulatory T cells in S. aureus-infected mice may create an immunosuppressive environment that sustains chronic infection.

  18. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  19. Tissue-specific gene expression in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells employing calcitonin regulatory elements and AAV vectors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Altmann, A; Grimm, D; Kleinschmidt, J A; Schilling, T; Germann, C; Haberkorn, U

    2001-07-01

    Calcitonin (CT), the major secretory product of the C cell, is also expressed in C-cell-derived neoplasia. To investigate the role of the CT gene regulatory sequence in tissue-specific gene expression, the genes coding for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) and for the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) regulated by the CT promoter (rAAV/CT266tkneo), the CT promoter/enhancer element (rAAV/CTenhtkneo), or the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (rAAV/CMVtkneo) were transduced by recombinant adenoassociated viral (AAV) vectors into the medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell lines TT and hMTC and into HeLa cells as controls. In TT cell lines and hMTC cell lines transiently infected by the rAAV/CT266tkneo viruses, a significant increase in (3)H ganciclovir uptake was observed. Upon ganciclovir treatment, TT cells infected by rAAV/CT266tkneo revealed a significant growth inhibition, which was less tissue-specific because HeLa cells were also affected by these particles (74.5%). In contrast, a minor but more tissue-specific growth inhibition (33.6%) was observed for TT cells after transient infection with the rAAV/CTenhtkneo particles. Employing EGFP controlled by CMV promoter and the individual CT regulatory sequences for transduction by rAAV particles, similar results were obtained indicating that both the CT promoter and enhancer element are required for tissue-specific gene expression in MTC.

  20. Barbiturates directly inhibit the calmodulin/calcineurin complex: a novel mechanism of inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Humar, Matjaz; Pischke, Soeren E; Loop, Torsten; Hoetzel, Alexander; Schmidt, Rene; Klaas, Christoph; Pahl, Heike L; Geiger, Klaus K; Pannen, Benedikt H J

    2004-02-01

    Barbiturates are frequently used for the treatment of intracranial hypertension after brain injury but their application is associated with a profound increase in the infection rate. The mechanism of barbiturate-induced failure of protective immunity is still unknown. We provide evidence that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), an essential transcription factor in T cell activation, is a target of barbiturate-mediated immunosuppression in human T lymphocytes. Treatment of primary CD3+ lymphocytes with barbiturates inhibited the PMA and ionomycin induced increase in DNA binding of NFAT, whereas the activity of other transcription factors, such as Oct-1, SP-1, or the cAMP response element-binding protein, remained unaffected. Moreover, barbiturates suppressed the expression of a luciferase reporter gene under control of NFAT (stably transfected Jurkat T cells), and of the cytokine genes interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma that contain functional binding motifs for NFAT within their regulatory promotor domains (human peripheral blood CD3+ lymphocytes). Neither GABA receptor-initiated signaling nor direct interactions of barbiturates with nuclear proteins affected the activity of NFAT. In contrast, barbiturates suppressed the calcineurin-dependent dephosphorylation of NFAT in intact T cells and also inhibited the enzymatic activity of calcineurin in a cell-free system, excluding upstream regulation. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of direct inhibition of the calcineurin/calmodulin complex that may explain some of the known immunosuppressive effects associated with barbiturate treatment.

  1. Regulatory T Cells in γ Irradiation-Induced Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Hugh I.; Puig, Montserrat; Grajkowska, Lucja T.; Tsuji, Kazuhide; Lee, Jay P.; Mason, Karen P.; Verthelyi, Daniela; Rosenberg, Amy S.

    2012-01-01

    Sublethal total body γ irradiation (TBI) of mammals causes generalized immunosuppression, in part by induction of lymphocyte apoptosis. Here, we provide evidence that a part of this immune suppression may be attributable to dysfunction of immune regulation. We investigated the effects of sublethal TBI on T cell memory responses to gain insight into the potential for loss of vaccine immunity following such exposure. We show that in mice primed to an MHC class I alloantigen, the accelerated graft rejection T memory response is specifically lost several weeks following TBI, whereas identically treated naïve mice at the same time point had completely recovered normal rejection kinetics. Depletion in vivo with anti-CD4 or anti-CD25 showed that the mechanism involved cells consistent with a regulatory T cell (T reg) phenotype. The loss of the T memory response following TBI was associated with a relative increase of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ expressing T regs, as compared to the CD8+ T effector cells requisite for skin graft rejection. The radiation-induced T memory suppression was shown to be antigen-specific in that a third party ipsilateral graft rejected with normal kinetics. Remarkably, following the eventual rejection of the first MHC class I disparate skin graft, the suppressive environment was maintained, with markedly prolonged survival of a second identical allograft. These findings have potential importance as regards the immunologic status of T memory responses in victims of ionizing radiation exposure and apoptosis-inducing therapies. PMID:22723935

  2. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells abrogate plasmablast formation and induce regulatory B cells independently of T helper cells.

    PubMed

    Franquesa, M; Mensah, F K; Huizinga, R; Strini, T; Boon, L; Lombardo, E; DelaRosa, O; Laman, J D; Grinyó, J M; Weimar, W; Betjes, M G H; Baan, C C; Hoogduijn, M J

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal or stromal stem cells (MSC) interact with cells of the immune system in multiple ways. Modulation of the immune system by MSC is believed to be a therapeutic option for autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. In recent years, B cells have moved into the focus of the attention as targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Current B-cell targeting treatment is based on the indiscriminate depletion of B cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether human adipose tissue-derived MSC (ASC) interact with B cells to affect their proliferation, differentiation, and immune function. ASC supported the survival of quiescent B cells predominantly via contact-dependent mechanisms. Coculture of B cells with activated T helper cells led to proliferation and differentiation of B cells into CD19(+) CD27(high) CD38(high) antibody-producing plasmablasts. ASC inhibited the proliferation of B cells and this effect was dependent on the presence of T cells. In contrast, ASC directly targeted B-cell differentiation, independently of T cells. In the presence of ASC, plasmablast formation was reduced and IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD24(high) CD38(high) B cells, known as regulatory B cells, were induced. These results demonstrate that ASC affect B cell biology in vitro, suggesting that they can be a tool for the modulation of the B-cell response in immune disease.

  3. T Cells: Soldiers and Spies--The Surveillance and Control of Effector T Cells by Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M

    2015-11-06

    Traditionally, T cells were CD4+ helper or CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and with antibodies, they were the soldiers of immunity. Now, many functionally distinct subsets of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells have been described, each with distinct cytokine and transcription factor expression. For CD4+ T cells, these include Th1 cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet and cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-β; Th2 cells expressing GATA-3 and the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13; and Th17 cells expressing RORγt and cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, and IL-22. The cytokines produced determine the immune inflammation that they mediate. T cells of the effector lineage can be naïve T cells, recently activated T cells, or memory T cells that can be distinguished by cell surface markers. T regulatory cells or spies were characterized as CD8+ T cells expressing I-J in the 1970s. In the 1980s, suppressor cells fell into disrepute when the gene for I-J was not present in the mouse MHC I region. At that time, a CD4+ T cell expressing CD25, the IL-2 receptor-α, was identified to transfer transplant tolerance. This was the same phenotype of activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells that mediated rejection. Thus, the cells that could induce tolerance and undermine rejection had similar badges and uniforms as the cells effecting rejection. Later, FOXP3, a transcription factor that confers suppressor function, was described and distinguishes T regulatory cells from effector T cells. Many subtypes of T regulatory cells can be characterized by different expressions of cytokines and receptors for cytokines or chemokines. In intense immune inflammation, T regulatory cells express cytokines characteristic of effector cells; for example, Th1-like T regulatory cells express T-bet, and IFN-γ-like Th1 cells and effector T cells can change sides by converting to T regulatory cells. Effector T cells and T regulatory cells use similar molecules to be activated and mediate their function, and thus, it can be

  4. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  5. Sclareol modulates the Treg intra-tumoral infiltrated cell and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Noori, Shokoofe; Hassan, Zuhair M; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Habibi, Zohre; Sohrabi, Nooshin; Bayanolhagh, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    A regulatory or suppressor T cell is functionally defined as a T cell that inhibits an immune response by influencing the activity of another cell type. On the other hand, Th1 cells express IFN-gamma and mediate cellular immunity. Sclareol exhibits growth inhibition and cytotoxic activity against a variety of human cancer cell lines. In the first set of experiments, Sclareol was isolated from the plant Salvia sclarea and our study assessed the immuno-therapeutic effectiveness of Sclareol by direct intra-tumoral injection. Secondly, several immunological parameters such as splenocytes proliferation, intra-tumor CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, IFN-gamma and IL-4 secretion and tumor size were assessed to evaluate the anti-tumoral immune response. By all means, the findings confirmed that the activity of Sclareol could reduce the tumor growth in vivo against breast cancer. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Inhibition of an IgE response by secondary B cells of a different isotype

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We found that the synthesis of IgE anti-Ars antibodies is strongly inhibited by the presence of secondary non-IgE-producing cells that are specific for the Ars hapten. Such B cells can be induced by inoculation of a protein-Ars conjugate in CFA. The effect is seen after inoculation of OVA-Ars in CFA followed by KLH-Ars in alum, or, more convincingly, after adoptive transfer of B cells induced by antigen in CFA. Dose- response data indicated that inhibition can be effected by B cells containing noninhibitory numbers of contaminating T cells. Possible synergistic effects of carrier-specific regulatory T cells were ruled out by using a different protein carrier for immunization of donor and recipient mice. The effect was shown to be specific for the hapten used for immunization of donor mice. PMID:3491175

  7. Inhibition of an IgE response by secondary B cells of a different isotype.

    PubMed

    Haba, S; Gurish, M F; Nisonoff, A

    1986-12-01

    We found that the synthesis of IgE anti-Ars antibodies is strongly inhibited by the presence of secondary non-IgE-producing cells that are specific for the Ars hapten. Such B cells can be induced by inoculation of a protein-Ars conjugate in CFA. The effect is seen after inoculation of OVA-Ars in CFA followed by KLH-Ars in alum, or, more convincingly, after adoptive transfer of B cells induced by antigen in CFA. Dose-response data indicated that inhibition can be effected by B cells containing noninhibitory numbers of contaminating T cells. Possible synergistic effects of carrier-specific regulatory T cells were ruled out by using a different protein carrier for immunization of donor and recipient mice. The effect was shown to be specific for the hapten used for immunization of donor mice.

  8. Mucosally induced immunological tolerance, regulatory T cells and the adjuvant effect by cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed

    Sun, J-B; Czerkinsky, C; Holmgren, J

    2010-01-01

    Induction of peripheral immunological tolerance by mucosal administration of selected antigens (Ags) ('oral tolerance') is an attractive, yet medically little developed, approach to prevent or treat selected autoimmune or allergic disorders. A highly effective way to maximize oral tolerance induction for immunotherapeutic purposes is to administer the relevant Ag together with, and preferably linked to the non-toxic B subunit protein of cholera toxin (CTB). Oral, nasal or sublingual administration of such Ag/CTB conjugates or gene fusion proteins have been found to induce tolerance with superior efficiency compared with administration of Ag alone, including the suppression of various autoimmune disorders and allergies in animal models. In a proof-of-concept clinical trial in patients with Behcet's disease, this was extended with highly promising results to prevent relapse of autoimmune uveitis. Tolerization by mucosal Ag/CTB administration results in a strong increase in Ag-specific regulatory CD4(+) T cells, apparently via two separate pathways: one using B cells as APCs and leading to a strong expansion of Foxp3(+) Treg cells which can both suppress and mediate apoptotic depletion of effector T cells, and one being B cell-independent and associated with development of Foxp3(-) regulatory T cells that express membrane latency-associated peptide and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta) and/or IL-10. The ability of CTB to dramatically increase mucosal Ag uptake and presentation by different APCs through binding to GM1 ganglioside (which makes most B cells effective APCs irrespective of their Ag specificity), together with CTB-mediated stimulation of TGF-beta and IL-10 production and inhibition of IL-6 formation may explain the dramatic potentiation of oral tolerance by mucosal Ags presented with CTB.

  9. Circulating regulatory anti–T cell receptor antibodies in patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Jambou, Florence; Zhang, Wei; Menestrier, Monique; Klingel-Schmitt, Isabelle; Michel, Olivier; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Aissaoui, Abderrahim; Landemarre, Ludovic; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2003-01-01

    Serum anti–T cell receptor (TCR) Ab’s are involved in immune regulation directed against pathogenic T cells in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. Our identification of a dominant T cell population expressing the Vβ5.1 TCR gene (TCRBV5-1), which is responsible for the production of pathogenic anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) autoantibodies in HLA-DR3 patients with early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG), prompted us to explore the occurrence, reactivity, and regulatory role of anti-TCR Ab’s in EOMG patients and disease controls with clearly defined other autoantibodies. In the absence of prior vaccination against the TCR, EOMG patients had elevated anti-Vβ5.1 Ab’s of the IgG class. This increase was restricted largely to EOMG cases with HLA-DR3 and with less severe disease, and it predicted clinical improvement in follow-up studies. EOMG patient sera containing anti-TCR Ab’s bound specifically the native TCR on intact Vβ5.1-expressing cells and specifically inhibited the proliferation and IFN-γ production of purified Vβ5.1-expressing cells to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and the proliferation of a Vβ5.1-expressing T cell clone to an AChR peptide, indicating a regulatory function for these Ab’s. This evidence of spontaneously active anti-Vβ5.1 Ab’s in EOMG patients suggests dynamic protective immune regulation directed against the excess of pathogenic Vβ5.1-expressing T cells. Though not sufficient to prevent a chronic, exacerbated autoimmune process, it might be boosted using a TCR peptide as vaccine. PMID:12865414

  10. Heterogeneity and Stability in Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Booki

    2017-09-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in controlling tolerance and immunity against self- and foreign antigens. The failure of Tregs to properly function is the direct cause of systemic and chronic inflammation as well as immune suppression. It is now evident that Tregs are highly heterogeneous populations depending on the surface phenotypes, cytokine profiles, and anatomical locations. Yet, our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying such heterogeneity is very limited. Furthermore, some Tregs lose the phenotype (and suppressive functions) and instead acquire pathogenicity. Since utilizing Tregs as a tool for immunotherapy is being implemented in many clinical settings, it is of utmost importance to understand the precise mechanisms by which the loss of Treg phenotype (and function) is prevented. In this review, both cellular and molecular factors involved in Treg heterogeneity and stability are discussed.

  11. Foetal immune programming: hormones, cytokines, microbes and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Peter; Nanan, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    In addition to genetic factors, environmental cues play important roles in shaping the immune system. The first environment that the developing foetal immune system encounters is the uterus. Although physically the mother and the foetus are separated by the placental membranes, various factors such as hormones and cytokines may provide "environmental cues" to the foetal immune system. Additionally, increasing evidence suggests that prenatal maternal environmental factors, particularly microbial exposure, might significantly influence the foetal immune system, affecting long-term outcomes, a concept termed foetal immune programming. Here we discuss the potential mediators of foetal immune programming, focusing on the role of pregnancy-related hormones, cytokines and regulatory T cells, which play a critical role in immune tolerance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Control of Regulatory T Cell Migration, Function, and Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Daniel J

    2015-09-15

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for preventing autoimmunity and uncontrolled inflammation, and they modulate immune responses during infection and the development of cancer. Accomplishing these tasks requires the widespread distribution of Tregs in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, and the selective recruitment of Tregs to different tissue sites has emerged as a key checkpoint that controls tissue inflammation in autoimmunity, infection, and cancer development, as well as in the context of allograft acceptance or rejection. Additionally, Tregs are functionally diverse, and it has become clear that some of this diversity segregates with Treg localization to particular tissue sites. In this article, I review the progress in understanding the mechanisms of Treg trafficking and discuss factors controlling their homeostatic maintenance and function in distinct tissue sites.

  13. Hepatic CD206-positive macrophages express amphiregulin to promote the immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T cells in HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kai; Huang, Ling; Sun, Xiaomei; Yang, Lihua; Gong, Zuojiong

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus is a major cause of chronic liver inflammation worldwide. Innate and adaptive immune responses work together to restrain or eliminate hepatitis B virus in the liver. Compromised or failed adaptive immune response results in persistent virus replication and spread. How to promote antiviral immunity is a research focus for hepatitis B virus prevention and therapy. In this study, we investigated the role of macrophages in the regulation of antiviral immunity. We found that F4/80(+)CD206(+)CD80(lo/+) macrophages were a particular hepatic macrophage subset that expressed amphiregulin in our mouse hepatitis B virus infection model. CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin promoted the immunosuppressive activity of intrahepatic regulatory T cells, demonstrated by higher expression of CTLA-4, ICOS, and CD39, as well as stronger inhibition of antiviral function of CD8(+) T cells. Amphiregulin-neutralizing antibody diminished the effect of CD206(+) macrophages on regulatory T cells. In addition, we found that CD206(+) macrophage-derived amphiregulin activated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in regulatory T cells, and this mammalian target of rapamycin activation was essential for promotion of regulatory T cell activity by CD206(+) macrophages. Adoptive transfer of CD206(+) macrophages into hepatitis B virus-infected mice increased cytoplasmic hepatitis B virus DNA in hepatocytes and also increased serum hepatitis B surface antigen. The antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells was decreased after macrophage transfer. Therefore, our research indicated that amphiregulin produced by CD206(+) macrophages plays an important role in modulating regulatory T cell function and subsequently restrains the antiviral activity of CD8(+) T cells. Our study offers new insights into the immunomodulation in hepatitis B virus infection.

  14. Galectin-8 promotes regulatory T cell differentiation by modulating IL-2 and TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, James F.; Suryawanshi, Amol; Chen, Wei-Sheng; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2015-01-01

    Galectins have emerged as potent immunoregulatory molecules that control chronic inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Galectin-8 (Gal-8), a tandem-repeat type galectin with unique preference for α2,3-sialylated glycans, is ubiquitously expressed, but little is known about its role in T cell differentiation. Here, we report that Gal-8 promotes the polyclonal differentiation of primary mouse Treg cells in vitro. We further show that Gal-8 also facilitates antigen-specific differentiation of regulatory T (Treg) cells, and that Treg cells polarized in the presence of Gal-8 express cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and IL-10 at a higher frequency than control Treg cells, and efficiently inhibit proliferation of activated T cells in vitro. Investigation of the mechanism by which Gal-8 promotes Treg conversion revealed that Gal-8 activates TGFβ signaling and promotes sustained IL-2R signaling. Taken together, these data suggest that Gal-8 promotes the differentiation of highly suppressive Treg cells, which has implications for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26282995

  15. Stem cell regulatory function mediated by expression of a novel mouse Oct4 pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey; Shabbir, Arsalan; Molnar, Merced; Lee, Techung . E-mail: chunglee@buffalo.edu

    2007-03-30

    Multiple pseudogenes have been proposed for embryonic stem (ES) cell-specific genes, and their abundance suggests that some of these potential pseudogenes may be functional. ES cell-specific expression of Oct4 regulates stem cell pluripotency and self-renewing state. Although Oct4 expression has been reported in adult tissues during gene reprogramming, the detected Oct4 signal might be contributed by Oct4 pseudogenes. Among the multiple Oct4 transcripts characterized here is a {approx}1 kb clone derived from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells, which shares a {approx}87% sequence homology with the parent Oct4 gene, and has the potential of encoding an 80-amino acid product (designated as Oct4P1). Adenoviral expression of Oct4P1 in mesenchymal stem cells promotes their proliferation and inhibits their osteochondral differentiation. These dual effects of Oct4P1 are reminiscent of the stem cell regulatory function of the parent Oct4, and suggest that Oct4P1 may be a functional pseudogene or a novel Oct4-related gene with a unique function in stem cells.

  16. In vivo prevention of transplant arteriosclerosis by ex vivo-expanded human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nadig, Satish N; Wieckiewicz, Joanna; Wu, Douglas C; Warnecke, Gregor; Zhang, Wei; Luo, Shiqiao; Schiopu, Alexandru; Taggart, David P; Wood, Kathryn J

    2010-07-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is the hallmark of chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) affecting transplanted organs in the long term. These fibroproliferative lesions lead to neointimal thickening of arteries in all transplanted allografts. Luminal narrowing then leads to graft ischemia and organ demise. To date, there are no known tolerance induction strategies that prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, we designed this study to test the hypothesis that human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) expanded ex vivo can prevent transplant arteriosclerosis. Here we show the comparative capacity of T(reg) cells, sorted via two separate strategies, to prevent transplant arteriosclerosis in a clinically relevant chimeric humanized mouse system. We found that the in vivo development of transplant arteriosclerosis in human arteries was prevented by treatment of ex vivo-expanded human T(reg) cells. Additionally, we show that T(reg) cells sorted on the basis of low expression of CD127 provide a more potent therapy to conventional T(reg) cells. Our results demonstrate that human T(reg) cells can inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis by impairing effector function and graft infiltration. We anticipate our findings to serve as a foundation for the clinical development of therapeutics targeting transplant arteriosclerosis in both allograft transplantation and other immune-mediated causes of vasculopathy.

  17. Percentage of Peripheral CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B Cells in Neonatal Sepsis Patients and Its Functional Implication.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao; Ji, Zuoquan; Xue, Jiang

    2016-07-07

    BACKGROUND As a major cause of mortality in neonates, neonatal sepsis is often accompanied by immune dysfunctions, which are frequently caused by dysregulated T cell sub-populations. The role of regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis, however, remains unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the percentage and functional variation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in peripheral blood of neonatal sepsis patients in an attempt to elucidate the role of these regulatory B cells in pathogenesis of sepsis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Flow cytometry was used to quantify the percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells from peripheral blood samples. The correlation between B cell percentage and C reactive protein (CRP) level was analyzed. Secretion level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and effects on the proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells were further analyzed. RESULTS The percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis patients was significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p<0.05), and was positively correlated with serum CRP level. The percentage of IL-10+ CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells was also higher in sepsis patients, and also had more potent inhibition on naïve CD4+ T cells (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The elevation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis can inhibit body immune function and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis.

  18. MET Inhibition in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zuoquan; Lee, Young H.; Boeke, Marta; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.; Liu, Zongzhi; Bottaro, Donald P.; Kluger, Harriet M.; Shuch, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most lethal form of kidney cancer. Small molecule VEGFR inhibitors are widely used but are not curative and various resistance mechanisms such as activation of the MET pathway have been described. Dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitors have recently shown clinical benefit but limited preclinical data evaluates their effects in ccRCC. Methods: An interrogation of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset was performed to evaluate oncogenic alterations in the MET/VEGFR2 pathway. We evaluated the in vitro effects of Cabozantinib, a dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, using a panel of ccRCC cell lines. Drug effects of cell viability and proliferation, migration, cell scatter, anchorage independent growth, and downstream MET/VEGFR2 signaling pathways were assessed. Results: Twelve percent of TCGA cases had possible MET/HGF oncogenic alterations with co-occurrence noted (p<0.001). MET/HGF altered cases had worse overall survival (p=0.044). Cabozantinib was a potent inhibitor of MET and VEGFR2 in vitro in our cell line panel. PI3K, MAPK and mTOR pathways were also suppressed by cabozantinib, however the effects on cell viability in vitro were modest. At nanomolar concentrations of cabozantinib, HGF-stimulated migration, invasion, cellular scattering and soft agar colony formation were inhibited. Conclusions: We provide further preclinical rationale for dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibition in ccRCC. While the MET pathway is implicated in VEGFR resistance, dual inhibitors may have direct anti-tumor effects in a patient subset with evidence of MET pathway involvement. Cabozantinib is a potent dual MET/VEGFR2 inhibitor, significantly inhibits cell migration and invasion in vitro and likely has anti-angiogenic effects similar to other VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Future work involving in vivo models will be useful to better define mechanisms of potential anti-tumor activity. PMID:27390595

  19. CD4+CD25+ T Regulatory Cells in Transplantation Tolerance: 25 Years On.

    PubMed

    Hall, Bruce M

    2016-12-01

    In the 1970s, the capacity of T cells to inhibit immunity and those from transplant tolerant hosts to transfer alloantigen-specific suppression to lymphopenic recipients was described. CD4 T suppressor cells that ex vivo reverted to effector cells were described in the 1980s. Their antigen-specific suppressor function could be preserved by stimulation by specific donor alloantigen and cytokines from activated lymphocytes. This led to the finding that alloantigen-specific T suppressor cells express IL-2 receptor (CD25) and that IL-2 in part promotes their survival.Whether these alloantigen-specific CD4CD25FOXP3 regulatory T (Treg) cells are progeny of thymic-derived CD4CD25FOXP3 Treg (tTreg) cells or are induced from peripheral effector CD4CD25FOXP3T cells (iTreg) cells is still debated.In vitro studies of antigen specific Treg has been difficult as they die in the absence of cytokines produced by immune activated cells. The antigen-specific CD4CD25 T cells that control rejection in tolerant hosts differ from the naive tTreg. Thymic-derived Treg cells are not antigen-specific, and very high ratios are required to suppress rejection. Thymic-derived Treg cells can be expanded ex vivo and are currently being tested in trials to control allograft rejection and graft versus host disease.Thymic-derived Treg cells with specific receptors for alloantigen are activated by either IL-2 or IL-4 but rapidly become dependent on other cytokines, respectively, IFN-γ or IL-12 if activated by IL-2, or IL-5 if activated by IL-4. The Th1 and Th2 pathways for activation of tTreg produce more potent antigen-specific Treg that only suppress specific donor rejection. After 25 years, much remains unknown about antigen-specific CD4CD25FOXP3 Treg-mediating transplant tolerance.

  20. Inhibition of EGFR-mediated phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3-K) signaling and glioblastoma phenotype by signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs).

    PubMed

    Wu, C J; Chen, Z; Ullrich, A; Greene, M I; O'Rourke, D M

    2000-08-17

    Several growth factors and cytokines, including EGF, are known to induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Signal Regulatory Proteins (SIRPs). Consistent with the idea that increased phosphorylation activates SIRP function, we overexpressed human SIRPalpha1 in U87MG glioblastoma cells in order to examine how SIRPalpha1 modulates EGFR signaling pathways. Endogenous EGFR proteins are overexpressed in U87MG cells and these cells exhibit survival and motility phenotypes that are influenced by EGFR kinase activity. Overexpression of the SIRPalpha1 cDNA diminished EGF-induced phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3-K) activation in U87MG cells. Reduced EGF-stimulated activation of PI3-K was mediated by interactions between carboxyl terminus of SIRPalpha1 and the Src homology-2 (SH2)-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase, SHP2. SIRPalpha1 overexpression also reduced the EGF-induced association between SHP2 and the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3-K. Inhibition of transformation and enhanced apoptosis following gamma-irradiation were observed in SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG cells, and enhanced apoptosis was associated with reduced levels of bcl-xL protein. Furthermore, SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG cells displayed reduced cell migration and cell spreading that was mediated by association between SIRPalpha1 and SHP2. However, SIRPalpha1-overexpressing U87MG clonal derivatives exhibited no differences in cell growth or levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. These data reveal a pathway that negatively regulates EGFR-induced PI3-K activation in glioblastoma cells and involves interactions between SHP2 and tyrosine phosphorylated SIRPalpha1. These results also suggest that negative regulation of PI3-K pathway activation by the SIRP family of transmembrane receptors may diminish EGFR-mediated motility and survival phenotypes that contribute to transformation of glioblastoma cells. Oncogene (2000) 19, 3999 - 4010.

  1. GTP cyclohydrolase I inhibition by the prototypic inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine. Mechanisms and unanticipated role of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, L; Smith, J A; Gross, S S

    1998-08-14

    2,4-Diamino-6-hydroxypyrimidine (DAHP) is considered to be a selective and direct-acting inhibitor of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Accordingly, DAHP has been widely employed to distinguish whether de novo BH4 synthesis is required in a given biological system. Although it has been assumed that DAHP inhibits GTPCH by direct competition with substrate GTP, this has never been formally demonstrated. In view of apparent structural homology between DAHP and BH4, we questioned whether DAHP may mimic BH4 in its inhibition of GTPCH by an indirect mechanism, involving interaction with a recently cloned 9.5-kDa protein termed GTPCH Feedback Regulatory Protein (GFRP). We show by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction that GFRP mRNA is constitutively expressed in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and further induced by treatment with immunostimulants. Moreover, functional GFRP is expressed and immunostimulant-induced BH4 accumulates in sufficient quantity to trigger feedback inhibition of GTPCH. Studies with DAHP reveal that GFRP is also essential to achieve potent inhibition of GTPCH. Indeed, DAHP inhibits GTPCH by dual mechanisms. At a relatively low concentration, DAHP emulates BH4 and engages the GFRP-dependent feedback inhibitory system; at higher concentrations, DAHP competes directly for binding with GTP substrate. This knowledge predicts that DAHP would preferably target GTPCH in tissues with abundant GFRP.

  2. Na+,Cl- cotransport in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells activated during volume regulation (regulatory volume increase).

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, E K; Sjøholm, C; Simonsen, L O

    1983-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites cells were preincubated in hypotonic medium with subsequent restoration of tonicity. After the initial osmotic shrinkage the cells recovered their volume within 5 min with an associated KCl uptake. The volume recovery was inhibited when NO-3 was substituted for Cl-, and when Na+ was replaced by K+, or by choline (at 5 mM external K+). The volume recovery was strongly inhibited by furosemide and bumetanide, but essentially unaffected by DIDS. The net uptake of Cl- was much larger than the value predicted from the conductive Cl- permeability. The undirectional 36Cl flux, which was insensitive to bumetanide under steady-state conditions, was substantially increased during regulatory volume increase, and showed a large bumetanide-sensitive component. During volume recovery the Cl- flux ratio (influx/efflux) for the bumetanide-sensitive component was estimated at 1.85, compatible with a coupled uptake of Na+ and Cl-, or with an uptake via a K+,Na+,2Cl- cotransport system. The latter possibility is unlikely, however, because a net uptake of KCl was found even at low external K+, and because no K+ uptake was found in ouabain-poisoned cells. In the presence of ouabain a bumetanide-sensitive uptake during volume recovery of Na+ and Cl- in nearly equimolar amounts was demonstrated. It is proposed that the primary process during the regulatory volume increase is an activation of an otherwise quiescent, bumetanide-sensitive Na+,Cl- cotransport system with subsequent replacement of Na+ by K+ via the Na+/K+ pump, stimulated by the Na+ influx through the Na+,Cl- cotransport system.

  3. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  4. GITR+ regulatory T cells in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrillo, Maria Grazia; Ronchetti, Simona; Ricci, Erika; Alunno, Alessia; Gerli, Roberto; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases decrease life expectancy and quality of life for millions of women and men. Although treatments can slow disease progression and improve quality of life, all currently available drugs have adverse effects and none of them are curative; therefore, requiring patients to take immunosuppressive drugs for the remainder of their lives. A curative therapy that is safe and effective is urgently needed. We believe that therapies promoting the in vivo expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) or injection of in vitro expanded autologous/heterologous Tregs (cellular therapy) can alter the natural history of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we present data from murine and human studies suggesting that 1) glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) plays a crucial role in thymic Treg (tTreg) differentiation and expansion; 2) GITR plays a crucial role in peripheral Treg (pTreg) expansion; 3) in patients with Sjögren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus, CD4(+)GITR(+) pTregs are expanded in patients with milder forms of the disease; and 4) GITR is superior to other cell surface markers to differentiate Tregs from other CD4(+) T cells. In this context, we consider two potential new approaches for treating autoimmune diseases consisting of the in vivo expansion of GITR(+) Tregs by GITR-triggering drugs and in vitro expansion of autologous or heterologous GITR(+) Tregs to be infused in patients. Advantages of such an approach, technical problems, and safety issues are discussed.

  5. Naturally occurring regulatory T cells: markers, mechanisms, and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Schmetterer, Klaus G; Neunkirchner, Alina; Pickl, Winfried F

    2012-06-01

    Naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cells (nTregs) are key mediators of immunity, which orchestrate and maintain tolerance to self and foreign antigens. In the recent 1.5 decades, a multitude of studies have aimed to define the phenotype and function of nTregs and to assess their therapeutic potential for modulating immune mediated disorders such as autoimmunity, allergy, and episodes of transplant rejection. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of nTregs. We address the exact definition of nTregs by specific markers and combinations thereof, which is a prerequisite for the state-of-the-art isolation of defined nTreg populations. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism by which nTregs mediate immunosuppression and how this knowledge might translate into novel therapeutic modalities. With first clinical studies of nTreg-based therapies being finished, questions concerning the reliable sources of nTregs are becoming more and more eminent. Consequently, approaches allowing conversion of CD4(+) T cells into nTregs by coculture with antigen-presenting cells, cytokines, and/or pharmacological agents are discussed. In addition, genetic engineering approaches for the generation of antigen-specific nTregs are described.

  6. TIM3+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells are tissue-specific promoters of T-cell dysfunction in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Sullivan, Jenna M.; Teng, Michele W. L.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Smyth, Mark J.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 3 (TIM3) is an inhibitory molecule that has emerged as a key regulator of dysfunctional or exhausted CD8+ T cells arising in chronic diseases such as cancer. In addition to exhausted CD8+ T cells, highly suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a significant barrier against the induction of antitumor immunity. We have found that the majority of intratumoral FOXP3+ Tregs express TIM3. TIM3+ Tregs co-express PD-1, are highly suppressive and comprise a specialized subset of tissue Tregs that are rarely observed in the peripheral tissues or blood of tumor-bearing mice. The co-blockade of the TIM3 and PD-1 signaling pathways in vivo results in the downregulation of molecules associated with TIM3+ Treg suppressor functions. This suggests that the potent clinical efficacy of co-blocking TIM3 and PD-1 signal transduction cascades likely stems from the reversal of T-cell exhaustion combined with the inhibition of regulatory T-cell function in tumor tissues. Interestingly, we find that TIM3+ Tregs accumulate in the tumor tissue prior to the appearance of exhausted CD8+ T cells, and that the depletion of Tregs at this stage interferes with the development of the exhausted phenotype by CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our data indicate that TIM3 marks highly suppressive tissue-resident Tregs that play an important role in shaping the antitumor immune response in situ, increasing the value of TIM3-targeting therapeutic strategies against cancer. PMID:23734331

  7. Treating arthritis by immunomodulation: is there a role for regulatory T cells?

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Femke; Roord, Sarah T.; Albani, Salvatore; Prakken, Berent J.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory T cells almost 15 years ago initiated a new and exciting research area. The growing evidence for a critical role of these cells in controlling autoimmune responses has raised expectations for therapeutic application of regulatory T cells in patients with autoimmune arthritis. Here, we review recent studies investigating the presence, phenotype and function of these cells in patients with RA and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and consider their therapeutic potential. Both direct and indirect methods to target these cells will be discussed. Arguably, a therapeutic approach that combines multiple regulatory T-cell-enhancing strategies could be most successful for clinical application. PMID:20463189

  8. Hypoxia-induced CCL28 promotes recruitment of regulatory T cells and tumor growth in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhu, Zhifeng; Lu, Rong; Yao, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells craft microenvironment to overcome growth disadvantages and adjust to escape the immunosurveillance during tumorigenesis and metastasis. The evolving adaption to the changing microenvironment is exemplified by the development of strategies to deal with hypoxia resulted from fast proliferation of the tumor cells. In this study, we found that hypoxia hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells recruited Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expressed more Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 28 (CCL28). Deletion of CCL28 inhibited Treg recruitment. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL28 promoted tumor growth and Treg infiltration in vivo. Enhanced angiogenesis and VEGF expression was also observed. Moreover, inhibition of HIF1α reversed hypoxia-induced CCL28 upregulation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HCC recruits Tregs to promote angiogenesis under hypoxic condition by upregulating CCL28 expression. These findings establish a link between Tregs and hypoxia in HCC growth and may provide a new potential therapeutic target for treating HCC. PMID:27716621

  9. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    PubMed

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (P<0.05). Fusion index was reduced in RES lambs at 3 months of age compared with CON (P<0.001). Restricted nutrition during gestation alters the temporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors in satellite cells of the

  10. MALT1 is an intrinsic regulator of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Brüstle, A; Brenner, D; Knobbe-Thomsen, C B; Cox, M; Lang, P A; Lang, K S; Mak, T W

    2015-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and their absence or dysfunction can lead to autoimmunity. However, the molecular pathways that govern Treg biology remain obscure. In this study, we show that the nuclear factor-κB signalling mediator mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is an important novel regulator of both Tregs originating in the thymus ('natural' or nTregs) and Tregs induced to differentiate from naive thymocyte helper (Th) cells in the periphery ('induced' or iTregs). Our examination of mice deficient for MALT1 revealed that these mutants have a reduced number of total Tregs. In young Malt1(-/-) mice, nTregs are totally absent and iTreg are diminished in the periphery. Interestingly, total Treg numbers increase in older Malt1(-/-) mice as well as in Malt1(-/-) mice subjected to experimentally induced inflammation. iTregs isolated from WT and Malt1(-/-) mice were indistinguishable with respect to their ability to suppress the activities of effector T cells, but Malt1(-/-) iTregs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Treatment of WT and Malt1(-/-) Th cells in vitro with the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys strongly enhanced the induction and proliferation of Malt1(-/-) iTregs. Our data suggest that MALT1 supports nTreg development in the thymus but suppresses iTreg induction in the periphery during inflammation. Our data position MALT1 as a key molecule that contributes to immune tolerance at steady-state while facilitating immune reactivity under stress conditions.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 25 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cdd.2015.104.

  11. Integrating innate and adaptive immune cells: Mast cells as crossroads between regulatory and effector B and T cells.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y; Frossi, Barbara; Mion, Francesca; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2016-05-05

    A diversity of immune mechanisms have evolved to protect normal tissues from infection, but from immune damage too. Innate cells, as well as adaptive cells, are critical contributors to the correct development of the immune response and of tissue homeostasis. There is a dynamic "cross-talk" between the innate and adaptive immunomodulatory mechanisms for an integrated control of immune damage as well as the development of the immune response. Mast cells have shown a great plasticity, modifying their behavior at different stages of immune response through interaction with effector and regulatory populations of adaptive immunity. Understanding the interplays among T effectors, regulatory T cells, B cells and regulatory B cells with mast cells will be critical in the future to assist in the development of therapeutic strategies to enhance and synergize physiological immune-modulator and -suppressor elements in the innate and adaptive immune system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  13. Anti-TNF drives regulatory T cell expansion by paradoxically promoting membrane TNF-TNF-RII binding in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dao Xuan; Ehrenstein, Michael R

    2016-06-27

    The interplay between inflammatory and regulatory pathways orchestrates an effective immune response that provides protection from pathogens while limiting injury to host tissue. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a pivotal inflammatory cytokine, but there is conflicting evidence as to whether it boosts or inhibits regulatory T cells (T reg cells). In this study, we show that the therapeutic anti-TNF antibody adalimumab, but not the soluble TNF receptor etanercept, paradoxically promoted the interaction between monocytes and T reg cells isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Adalimumab bound to monocyte membrane TNF from RA patients and unexpectedly enhanced its expression and its binding to TNF-RII expressed on T reg cells. As a consequence, adalimumab expanded functional Foxp3(+) T reg cells equipped to suppress Th17 cells through an IL-2/STAT5-dependent mechanism. Our data not only highlight the beneficial effect of membrane TNF on T reg cell numbers during chronic inflammation, but in addition reveal how a therapeutic antibody that is thought to act by simply blocking its target can enhance the regulatory properties of this proinflammatory cytokine.

  14. Teplizumab induces human gut-tropic regulatory cells in humanized mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Waldron-Lynch, Frank; Henegariu, Octavian; Deng, Songyan; Preston-Hurlburt, Paula; Tooley, James; Flavell, Richard; Herold, Kevan C

    2012-01-25

    The development and optimization of immune therapies in patients has been hampered by the lack of preclinical models in which their effects on human immune cells can be studied. As a result, observations that have been made in preclinical studies have suggested mechanisms of drug action in murine models that have not been confirmed in clinical studies. Here, we used a humanized mouse reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells to study the mechanism of action of teplizumab, an Fc receptor nonbinding humanized monoclonal antibody to CD3 being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this model, human gut-tropic CCR6(+) T cells exited the circulation and secondary lymph organs and migrated to the small intestine. These cells then produced interleukin-10 (IL-10), a regulatory cytokine, in quantities that could be detected in the peripheral circulation. Blocking T cell migration to the small intestine with natalizumab, which prevents cellular adhesion by inhibiting α(4) integrin binding, abolished the treatment effects of teplizumab. Moreover, IL-10 expression by CD4(+)CD25(high)CCR6(+)FoxP3 cells returning to the peripheral circulation was increased in patients with type 1 diabetes treated with teplizumab. These findings demonstrate that humanized mice may be used to identify novel immunologic mechanisms that occur in patients treated with immunomodulators.

  15. Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory T cells during resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gagliani, Nicola; Vesely, Maria Carolina Amezcua; Iseppon, Andrea; Brockmann, Leonie; Xu, Hao; Palm, Noah W.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Licona-Limón, Paula; Paiva, Ricardo S.; Ching, Travers; Weaver, Casey; Zi, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Xinghua; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X.; Cotton, Matthew J.; Drier, Yotam; Bernstein, Bradley; Geginat, Jens; Stockinger, Brigitta; Esplugues, Enric; Huber, Samuel; Flavell, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a beneficial host response to infection but can contribute to inflammatory disease if unregulated. The TH17 lineage of T helper (TH) cells can cause severe human inflammatory diseases. These cells exhibit both instability (they can cease to express their signature cytokine, IL-17A)1 and plasticity (they can start expressing cytokines typical of other lineages)1,2 upon in vitro re-stimulation. However, technical limitations have prevented the transcriptional profiling of pre- and post-conversion TH17 cells ex vivo during immune responses. Thus, it is unknown whether TH17 cell plasticity merely reflects change in expression of a few cytokines, or if TH17 cells physiologically undergo global genetic reprogramming driving their conversion from one T helper cell type to another, a process known as transdifferentiation3,4. Furthermore, although TH17 cell instability/plasticity has been associated with pathogenicity1,2,5, it is unknown whether this could present a therapeutic opportunity, whereby formerly pathogenic TH17 cells could adopt an anti-inflammatory fate. Here we used two new fate-mapping mouse models to track TH17 cells during immune responses to show that CD4+ T cells that formerly expressed IL-17A go on to acquire an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The transdifferentiation of TH17 into regulatory T cells was illustrated by a change in their signature transcriptional profile and the acquisition of potent regulatory capacity. Comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of pre- and postconversion TH17 cells also revealed a role for canonical TGF-β signalling and consequently for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in conversion. Thus, TH17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory cells, and contribute to the resolution of inflammation. Our data suggest that TH17 cell instability and plasticity is a therapeutic opportunity for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25924064

  16. Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory T cells during resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gagliani, Nicola; Amezcua Vesely, Maria Carolina; Iseppon, Andrea; Brockmann, Leonie; Xu, Hao; Palm, Noah W; de Zoete, Marcel R; Licona-Limón, Paula; Paiva, Ricardo S; Ching, Travers; Weaver, Casey; Zi, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Xinghua; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X; Cotton, Matthew J; Drier, Yotam; Bernstein, Bradley; Geginat, Jens; Stockinger, Brigitta; Esplugues, Enric; Huber, Samuel; Flavell, Richard A

    2015-07-09

    Inflammation is a beneficial host response to infection but can contribute to inflammatory disease if unregulated. The Th17 lineage of T helper (Th) cells can cause severe human inflammatory diseases. These cells exhibit both instability (they can cease to express their signature cytokine, IL-17A) and plasticity (they can start expressing cytokines typical of other lineages) upon in vitro re-stimulation. However, technical limitations have prevented the transcriptional profiling of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells ex vivo during immune responses. Thus, it is unknown whether Th17 cell plasticity merely reflects change in expression of a few cytokines, or if Th17 cells physiologically undergo global genetic reprogramming driving their conversion from one T helper cell type to another, a process known as transdifferentiation. Furthermore, although Th17 cell instability/plasticity has been associated with pathogenicity, it is unknown whether this could present a therapeutic opportunity, whereby formerly pathogenic Th17 cells could adopt an anti-inflammatory fate. Here we used two new fate-mapping mouse models to track Th17 cells during immune responses to show that CD4(+) T cells that formerly expressed IL-17A go on to acquire an anti-inflammatory phenotype. The transdifferentiation of Th17 into regulatory T cells was illustrated by a change in their signature transcriptional profile and the acquisition of potent regulatory capacity. Comparisons of the transcriptional profiles of pre- and post-conversion Th17 cells also revealed a role for canonical TGF-β signalling and consequently for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in conversion. Thus, Th17 cells transdifferentiate into regulatory cells, and contribute to the resolution of inflammation. Our data suggest that Th17 cell instability and plasticity is a therapeutic opportunity for inflammatory diseases.

  17. Dynamics of regulatory networks in gastrin-treated adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Bar, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene transcription regulatory networks is critical to deciphering the molecular mechanisms of different cellular states. Most studies focus on static transcriptional networks. In the current study, we used the gastrin-regulated system as a model to understand the dynamics of transcriptional networks composed of transcription factors (TFs) and target genes (TGs). The hormone gastrin activates and stimulates signaling pathways leading to various cellular states through transcriptional programs. Dysregulation of gastrin can result in cancerous tumors, for example. However, the regulatory networks involving gastrin are highly complex, and the roles of most of the components of these networks are unknown. We used time series microarray data of AR42J adenocarcinoma cells treated with gastrin combined with static TF-TG relationships integrated from different sources, and we reconstructed the dynamic activities of TFs using network component analysis (NCA). Based on the peak expression of TGs and activity of TFs, we created active sub-networks at four time ranges after gastrin treatment, namely immediate-early (IE), mid-early (ME), mid-late (ML) and very late (VL). Network analysis revealed that the active sub-networks were topologically different at the early and late time ranges. Gene ontology analysis unveiled that each active sub-network was highly enriched in a particular biological process. Interestingly, network motif patterns were also distinct between the sub-networks. This analysis can be applied to other time series microarray datasets, focusing on smaller sub-networks that are activated in a cascade, allowing better overview of the mechanisms involved at each time range.

  18. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  19. Decoy approach using RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides to inhibit the regulatory function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, T; Iwai, S; Fujinaga, K; Sato, Y; Otsuka, E; Ikuta, K

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes two regulatory proteins, Tat and Rev, that bind to target RNA sequences. These are the trans-activation responsive (TAR) RNA and the Rev-responsive element (RRE), respectively. The Rev protein shifts RNA synthesis to viral transcripts by binding to the RRE within the env gene. In the present study we prepared a RNA-DNA chimera consisting of 29 or 31 nucleotides to inhibit the Rev regulatory function by means of the decoy approach. The chimera oligonucleotides (anti-Rev oligonucleotides [AROs]) contained an RNA "bubble" structure (13 oligonucleotides; the Rev-binding element in RRE) that bound Rev with a high affinity in an in vitro assay. The controls were RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotides (negative control oligonucleotides [NCOs]) similar to ARO, but without the bubble structure, that bound with considerably less affinity to Rev. When the inhibitory effects of these decoys on HIV-1 replication were examined, we found that AROs, but no NCOs, reduced more than 90% of the HIV-1 production generated by productively infected human T-cell lines. The production of primary HIV-1 isolates in healthy donor-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also similarly inhibited by AROs. In addition, the induction of viral mRNAs and antigens in latently HIV-1-infected ACH-2 cells by tumor necrosis factor alpha was specifically inhibited by AROs, but not by NCOs. No apparent cytotoxicity was caused by either decoy. Thus, the use of a Rev-binding element-based decoy, the RNA-DNA chimera oligonucleotide, may represent a safer approach to gene therapy for reducing the virus load in HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:9021186

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells with rhBMP-2 inhibits the growth of canine osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to a unique group of proteins that includes the growth factor TGF-β. BMPs play important roles in cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and inhibition of cell growth. They also participate in the maturation of several cell types, depending on the microenvironment and interactions with other regulatory factors. Depending on their concentration gradient, the BMPs can attract various types of cells and act as chemotactic, mitogenic, or differentiation agents. BMPs can interfere with cell proliferation and the formation of cartilage and bone. In addition, BMPs can induce the differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells into various cell types, including chondroblasts and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of treatment with rhBMP-2 on the proliferation of canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) and the tumor suppression properties of rhBMP-2 in canine osteocarcoma (OST) cells. Osteosarcoma cell lines were isolated from biopsies and excisions of animals with osteosarcoma and were characterized by the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute. The mesenchymal stem cells were derived from the bone marrow of canine fetuses (cMSCs) and belong to the University of São Paulo, College of Veterinary Medicine (FMVZ-USP) stem cell bank. After expansion, the cells were cultured in a 12-well Transwell system; cells were treated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells associated with rhBMP2. Expression of the intracytoplasmic and nuclear markers such as Caspase-3, Bax, Bad, Bcl-2, Ki-67, p53, Oct3/4, Nanog, Stro-1 were performed by flow citometry. Results We evaluated the regenerative potential of in vitro treatment with rhBMP-2 and found that both osteogenic induction and tumor regression occur in stem cells from canine bone marrow. rhBMP-2 inhibits the proliferation capacity of OST cells by mechanisms of apoptosis and tumor suppression mediated by p53. Conclusion We

  1. Bestatin inhibits cell growth, cell division, and spore cell differentiation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Poloz, Yekaterina; Catalano, Andrew; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-04-01

    Bestatin methyl ester (BME) is an inhibitor of Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases that inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. We have used Dictyostelium as a model organism to study the effects of BME. Only two Zn(2+)-binding aminopeptidases have been identified in Dictyostelium to date, puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase A and B (PsaA and PsaB). PSA from other organisms is known to regulate cell division and differentiation. Here we show that PsaA is differentially expressed throughout growth and development of Dictyostelium, and its expression is regulated by developmental morphogens. We present evidence that BME specifically interacts with PsaA and inhibits its aminopeptidase activity. Treatment of cells with BME inhibited the rate of cell growth and the frequency of cell division in growing cells and inhibited spore cell differentiation during late development. Overexpression of PsaA-GFP (where GFP is green fluorescent protein) also inhibited spore cell differentiation but did not affect growth. Using chimeras, we have identified that nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of PsaA affects the choice between stalk or spore cell differentiation pathway. Cells that overexpressed PsaA-GFP (primarily nuclear) differentiated into stalk cells, while cells that overexpressed PsaAΔNLS2-GFP (cytoplasmic) differentiated into spores. In conclusion, we have identified that BME inhibits cell growth, division, and differentiation in Dictyostelium likely through inhibition of PsaA.

  2. Regulatory T-cell cytokines in patients with nonsegmental vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kidir, Mehtap; Karabulut, Ayse A; Ercin, Mustafa E; Atasoy, Pınar

    2017-05-01

    In the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo, the role of suppressor cytokines, such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), associated with regulatory T-cells (Treg) is not completely known. In this study, the role of Treg-cell functions in the skin of patients with nonsegmental vitiligo was investigated. Lesional and nonlesional skin samples from 30 adult volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 36 years with nonsegmental vitiligo were compared with normal skin area excision specimens of 30 benign melanocytic nevus cases as controls. All samples were evaluated staining for forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), TGF-β, and IL-10 using the standardized streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase immunohistochemistry method. Foxp3 expression was lower in lesional vitiligo skin specimens compared to controls; it was also lower in lesional vitiligo specimens than nonlesional vitiligo specimens. IL-10 levels were lower in lesional vitiligo specimens compared to the controls, whereas IL-10 expression was significantly lower in lesional specimens compared with nonlesional specimens. TGF-β expression was higher in both lesional and nonlesional skin specimens of patients with vitiligo compared to controls. TGF-β expression was lower in lesional skin specimens than nonlesional skin specimens. In addition, there was no significant correlation between Foxp3 expression with TGF-β and IL-10 expressions in lesional skin specimens in the vitiligo group. In this study, results supporting the contribution of Treg cells and IL-10 deficiency to the autoimmune process were obtained. Therefore, future studies are necessary to demonstrate the definitive role of Treg-cell functions in the etiopathogenesis of vitiligo.

  3. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) monitoring in environmental diseases.

    PubMed

    Mićović, Vladimir; Vojniković, Bozo; Bulog, Aleksandar; Coklo, Miran; Malatestinić, Dulija; Mrakovcić-Sutić, Ines

    2009-09-01

    The prevalence of environmental diseases is increasing worldwide and these diseases are an onerous burden both to the individual and to the public health. Urban air pollution is a grave problem in majority of metropolises, which contain high levels of traffic congestion generating great amounts of genotoxic substances. The contribution of such environmental exposure to increase prevalence of many allergic, environmental diseases and multiple chemical sensitivity or other related syndromes, as a result of an abnormal immune response based on environmental damage of lymphocyte subsets, is marked. Benzene is one of the most important air pollutants that are emitted by oil industry, since they are involved in almost every refinery process. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major group of air pollutants and play a crucial role in ecological damages, disturbing the ecosystem and human health. The variability of pollutants is an important factor in determining human exposure to these chemicals. The immune system possess a capacity to distinguish between innocuous and harmful foreign antigens and controls this action by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance, where crucial role play regulatory T cells (Tregs). We analyzed the characteristics of human Tregs of inhabitants living near gasoline industry which have assessed moderate spyrometric tests and compared them with those situated in rural areas. Our data demonstrate that the chronic inhalation exposure increases the percentage of Tregs cells, but contrary those of inhabitants with decreased spirometry values have shown diminished number of Tregs, which may contribute to the new therapeutic approach of environmental diseases.

  4. Geranylated flavanone tomentodiplacone B inhibits proliferation of human monocytic leukaemia (THP-1) cells

    PubMed Central

    Kollár, Peter; Bárta, Tomáš; Závalová, Veronika; Šmejkal, Karel; Hampl, Aleš

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Paulownia tomentosa is a rich source of geranylated flavanones, some of which we have previously shown to have cytotoxic activity. To identify members of this class of compounds with cytostatic effects, we assessed the effects of the geranylated flavanone tomentodiplacone B (TOM B) on cell cycle progression and cell cycle regulatory pathways of THP-1 human monocytic leukaemia cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cell viability was measured by dye exclusion and proliferation by WST-1 assays; cell cycle was monitored by flow cytometry. Regulatory proteins were assessed by immunoprecipitation and kinase assays, and Western blotting. KEY RESULTS Tomentodiplacone B had no effect during the first 24 h of cell growth at concentrations between 1 and 2.5 µM, but inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 5 µM or higher. Growth inhibition during the first 24 h of exposure to TOM B was not accompanied by cytotoxicity as cells were accumulated in G1 phase dose-dependently. This G1 phase accumulation was associated with down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity and also protein levels of cyclins E1 and A2. However, key stress-related molecules (γ-H2AX, p53 and p21) were not induced, suggesting that TOM B acts by directly inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 signalling pathway rather than initiating DNA damage or cellular stress. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study provides the first evidence that TOM B directly inhibits proliferation of human monocytic leukaemia cells, and thus is a potential anticancer agent, preventing leukaemia cells from progressing from G1 phase into DNA synthesis. PMID:21175584

  5. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A.; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  6. Regulatory Elements in Vectors for Efficient Generation of Cell Lines Producing Target Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maksimenko, O.; Gasanov, N. B.; Georgiev, P.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there has been an increasing number of drugs produced in mammalian cell cultures. In order to enhance the expression level and stability of target recombinant proteins in cell cultures, various regulatory elements with poorly studied mechanisms of action are used. In this review, we summarize and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of such regulatory elements. PMID:26483956

  7. Interleukin-2 treatment of tumor patients can expand regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Augmented numbers of regulatory T cells contribute to the overall immunosuppression in tumor patients. Interleukin-2 has been widely used in the clinics in anticancer therapy, yet evidence has accumulated that the major drawback, limiting clinical efficacy, is the expansion of regulatory T cells, which aggravates immunosuppression.

  8. IL-2 immunotoxin denileukin diftitox reduces regulatory T cells and enhances vaccine-mediated T-cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Litzinger, Mary T.; Fernando, Romaine; Curiel, Tyler J.; Grosenbach, Douglas W.; Palena, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have been implicated in the lack of effective antitumor immunity. Denileukin diftitox (DAB389IL-2), a fusion protein of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and diphtheria toxin, provides a means of targeting Treg cells. In this study, we examined (1) the effect of denileukin diftitox on the deletion of Treg cells in various lymphoid compartments and (2) the dose scheduling of denileukin diftitox in combination with a recombinant poxviral vaccine to enhance antigen-specific immune responses. Treg cells in spleen, peripheral blood, and bone marrow of normal C57BL/6 mice were variously reduced after a single intraperitoneal injection of denileukin diftitox; the reduction was evident within 24 hours and lasted approximately 10 days. Injection of denileukin diftitox 1 day before vaccination enhanced antigen-specific T-cell responses above levels induced by vaccination alone. These studies show for the first time in a murine model (1) the differential effects of denileukin diftitox on Treg cells in different cellular compartments, (2) the advantage of combining denileukin diftitox with a vaccine to enhance antigen-specific T-cell immune responses, (3) the lack of inhibition by denileukin diftitox of host immune responses directed against a live viral vector, and (4) the importance of dose scheduling of denileukin diftitox when used in combination with a vaccine. PMID:17616639

  9. Allergic Conjunctivitis Renders CD4+ T Cells Resistant to T Regulatory Cells and Exacerbates Corneal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nancy J.; Chen, Peter W.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases rob corneal allografts of immune privilege and increase immune rejection. Corneal allograft rejection in BALB/c allergic hosts was analyzed using a short ragweed (SWR) pollen model of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis did not induce exaggerated T cell responses to donor C57BL/6 (B6) alloantigens or stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Allergic conjunctivitis did affect T regulatory cells (Tregs) that support graft survival. Exogenous IL-4, but not IL-5 or IL-13, prevented Treg suppression of CD4+ effector T cells isolated from naïve mice. However, mice with allergic conjunctivitis developed Tregs that suppressed CD4+ effector T cell proliferation. In addition, IL-4 did not inhibit Treg suppression of IL-4Rα−/− CD4+ T cell responses, suggesting that IL-4 rendered effector T cells resistant to Tregs. SRW-sensitized IL-4Rα−/− mice displayed the same 50% graft survival as non-allergic WT mice, that was significantly less than the 100% rejection that occurred in allergic WT hosts, supporting the role of IL-4 in the abrogation of immune privilege. Moreover, exacerbation of corneal allograft rejection in allergic mice was reversed by administering anti-IL-4 antibody. Thus, allergy-induced exacerbation of corneal graft rejection is due to the production of IL-4, which renders effector T cells resistant to Treg suppression of alloimmune responses. PMID:23489547

  10. The Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Immuno-Suppression by Human Type 1 Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gregori, Silvia; Goudy, Kevin S.; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    The immuno-regulatory mechanisms of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells have been widely studied over the years. However, several recent discoveries have shed new light on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that human Tr1 cells use to control immune responses and induce tolerance. In this review we outline the well known and newly discovered regulatory properties of human Tr1 cells and provide an in-depth comparison of the known suppressor mechanisms of Tr1 cells with FOXP3+ Treg. We also highlight the role that Tr1 cells play in promoting and maintaining tolerance in autoimmunity, allergy, and transplantation. PMID:22566914

  11. Regulatory elements and structural features of Beta vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein gene for fungal and pest control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are involved in plant defense. PGIPs are cell wall leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins that are known to inhibit pathogen and pest polygalacturonases (PGs) during the infection process. Several sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) PGIP genes (BvPGIP) were clon...

  12. Human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: proteome analysis identifies galectin-10 as a novel marker essential for their anergy and suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Lutter, Petra; Bopp, Tobias; Stoll, Sabine; Becker, Christian; Huter, Eva; Richter, Christoph; Weingarten, Petra; Warger, Tobias; Knop, Jürgen; Müllner, Stefan; Wijdenes, John; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2007-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (CD25(+) Treg cells) direct the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance by active suppression of autoaggressive T-cell populations. However, the molecules mediating the anergic state and regulatory function of CD25(+) Treg cells are still elusive. Using differential proteomics, we identified galectin-10, a member of the lectin family, as constitutively expressed in human CD25(+) Treg cells, while they are nearly absent in resting and activated CD4(+) T cells. These data were confirmed on the mRNA and protein levels. Single-cell staining and flow cytometry showed a strictly intracellular expression of galectin-10 in CD25(+) Treg cells. Specific inhibition of galectin-10 restored the proliferative capacity of CD25(+) Treg cells and abrogated their suppressive function. Notably, first identified here as expressed in human T lymphocytes, galectin-10 is essential for the functional properties of CD25(+) Treg cells.

  13. Chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester induces cell cycle arrest by the inhibition of nuclear translocation of β-catenin in HCT116 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyung-Mi; Yun, Ji Ho; Lee, Dong Hwa; Park, Young Gyun; Son, Kun Ho; Nho, Chu Won; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2015-04-17

    We demonstrate that chikusetsusaponin IVa methyl ester (CME), a triterpenoid saponin from the root of Achyranthes japonica, has an anticancer activity. We investigate its molecular mechanism in depth in HCT116 cells. CME reduces the amount of β-catenin in nucleus and inhibits the binding of β-catenin to specific DNA sequences (TCF binding elements, TBE) in target gene promoters. Thus, CME appears to decrease the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Cyclin D1, as a representative target for β-catenin, as well as CDK2 and CDK4. As a result of the decrease of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, CME inhibits cell proliferation by arresting the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. Therefore, we suggest that CME as a novel Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor can be a putative agent for the treatment of colorectal cancers. - Highlights: • CME inhibits cell proliferation in HCT116 cells. • CME increases cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and apoptosis. • CME attenuates cyclin D1 and regulates cell cycle regulatory proteins. • CME inhibits β-catenin translocation to nucleus.

  14. The Role of Regulatory B Cell-Like Malignant Cells and Treg Cells in the Mouse Model of BCL1 Tumor Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    BitMansour, Andrew; Pop, Laurentiu M.; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer dormancy is a clinical state in which residual tumor cells persist for long periods of time but do not cause detectable disease. In the mouse B cell lymphoma model (BCL1), dormancy can be induced and maintained by immunizing mice with a soluble form of the IgM expressed on the surface of the tumor cells. Immunization induces an anti-idiotype antibody response that maintains dormancy. Mice with dormant tumor have low numbers of BCL1 cells in their spleens that divide and are killed at the same rate. When the anti-Id antibodies wane, the tumor cells grow rapidly and kill the host. Spleens from tumor-bearing mice contain both effector (CD4+ and CD8+) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). In other tumor models, it has been reported that Tregs promote tumor progression by preventing effector cells from killing the tumor. In this report, we demonstrate that the tumor site with rapidly dividing BCL1 cells has fewer Tregs than the tumor site harboring dormant BCL1 cells. In both cases, the Tregs were equally suppressive in vitro. In spleens from mice with actively growing tumor, CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells were virtually absent. In vitro analysis demonstrated a tumor-mediated elimination of CD8+ T cells that was contact dependent and involved the caspase-3 pathway. Most importantly, we found that the BCL1 cells expressed characteristics of B10 regulatory B cells, i.e., they were CD1dhiCD5+ and secreted high levels of IL-10. These BCL1 tumor cells can inhibit anti-tumor immune responses by depleting CD8+ effector T cells. PMID:27959896

  15. Cancer cell-derived IL-1α induces CCL22 and the recruitment of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiedemann, Gabriela Maria; Knott, Max Martin Ludwig; Vetter, Viola Katharina; Rapp, Moritz; Haubner, Sascha; Fesseler, Julia; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Layritz, Patrick; Thaler, Raffael; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Mayr, Doris; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In cancer patients, immunosuppression through regulatory T cells (Treg) is a crucial component of tumor immune evasion and contributes to disease progression. Tumor-infiltrating Treg in particular suppress local effector T cell responses and are associated with poor prognosis in tumors such as human pancreatic cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The chemokine CCL22 is known to recruit Treg into the tumor tissue and many types of human tumors are known to express high levels of CCL22. The mechanisms leading to intratumoral secretion of CCL22 are so far unknown. We demonstrate here that intratumoral CCL22 is induced in tumor-infiltrating immune cells through cancer cell-derived interleukin-1 (IL-1α). In pancreatic cancer and HCC, CCL22 is produced by intratumoral dendritic cells, while the cancer cells themselves do not secrete CCL22 in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or murine splenocytes with tumor cells or tumor cell supernatants strongly induced CCL22 secretion in vitro. Tumor cell supernatants contained IL-1 and CCL22 induction in PBMC could be specifically prevented by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or by transfection of tumor cell lines with IL-1 siRNA, leading to a suppression of Treg migration. In conclusion, we identify here tumor cell-derived IL-1α as a major inducer of the Treg attracting chemokine CCL22 in human cancer cells. Therapeutic blockade of the IL-1 pathway could represent a promising strategy to inhibit tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:27757295

  16. Cancer cell-derived IL-1α induces CCL22 and the recruitment of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Gabriela Maria; Knott, Max Martin Ludwig; Vetter, Viola Katharina; Rapp, Moritz; Haubner, Sascha; Fesseler, Julia; Kühnemuth, Benjamin; Layritz, Patrick; Thaler, Raffael; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Mayr, Doris; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David

    2016-01-01

    In cancer patients, immunosuppression through regulatory T cells (Treg) is a crucial component of tumor immune evasion and contributes to disease progression. Tumor-infiltrating Treg in particular suppress local effector T cell responses and are associated with poor prognosis in tumors such as human pancreatic cancer or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The chemokine CCL22 is known to recruit Treg into the tumor tissue and many types of human tumors are known to express high levels of CCL22. The mechanisms leading to intratumoral secretion of CCL22 are so far unknown. We demonstrate here that intratumoral CCL22 is induced in tumor-infiltrating immune cells through cancer cell-derived interleukin-1 (IL-1α). In pancreatic cancer and HCC, CCL22 is produced by intratumoral dendritic cells, while the cancer cells themselves do not secrete CCL22 in vitro and in vivo. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or murine splenocytes with tumor cells or tumor cell supernatants strongly induced CCL22 secretion in vitro. Tumor cell supernatants contained IL-1 and CCL22 induction in PBMC could be specifically prevented by the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or by transfection of tumor cell lines with IL-1 siRNA, leading to a suppression of Treg migration. In conclusion, we identify here tumor cell-derived IL-1α as a major inducer of the Treg attracting chemokine CCL22 in human cancer cells. Therapeutic blockade of the IL-1 pathway could represent a promising strategy to inhibit tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  17. Arctigenin induces cell cycle arrest by blocking the phosphorylation of Rb via the modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Hong, Se Chul; Jeong, Hyung Jin; Koo, Jin Suk

    2011-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths, worldwide being second only to lung cancer as a cause of death. Arctigenin, a representative dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, occurs in a variety of plants. However, the molecular mechanisms of arctigenin for anti-tumor effect on gastric cancer have not been examined. This study examined the biological effects of arctigenin on the human gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 and AGS. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay. In MTT assay, the proliferation of SNU-1 and AGS cells was significantly inhibited by arctigenin in a time and dose dependent manner, as compared with SNU-1 and AGS cells cultured in the absence of arctigenin. Inhibition of cell proliferation by arctigenin was in part associated with apoptotic cell death, as shown by changes in the expression ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax by arctigenin. Also, arctigenin blocked cell cycle arrest from G(1) to S phase by regulating the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins such as Rb, cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4, CDK2, p21Waf1/Cip1 and p15 INK4b. The antiproliferative effect of arctigenin on SNU-1 and AGS gastric cancer cells revealed in this study suggests that arctigenin has intriguing potential as a chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Deltex1 antagonizes HIF-1α and sustains the stability of regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Huey-Wen; Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Liu, Wen-Hsien; Hsieh, Wan-Chen; Chou, Ting-Fang; Wu, Yu-Jung; Jiang, Si-Tse; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2015-02-19

    Application of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in transplantation, autoimmunity and allergy has been extensively explored, but how Foxp3 and Treg stability is regulated in vivo is incompletely understood. Here, we identify a requirement for Deltex1 (DTX1), a contributor to T-cell anergy and Foxp3 protein level maintenance in vivo. Dtx1(-/-) Tregs are as effective as WT Tregs in the inhibition of CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell activation in vitro. However, the suppressive ability of Dtx1(-/-) Tregs is greatly impaired in vivo. We find that Foxp3 expression is diminished when Dtx1(-/-) Tregs are co-transferred with effector T cells in vivo. DTX1 promotes the degradation of HIF-1α. Knockout of HIF-1α restores the Foxp3 stability and rescues the defective suppressive activity in Dtx1(-/-) Treg cells in vivo. Our results suggest that DTX1 exerts another level of control on Treg stability in vivo by sustaining the expression of Foxp3 protein in Tregs.

  19. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The generation and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Taams, Leonie S; Curnow, S John; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Akbar, Arne N

    2006-09-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are essential components of the immune system. They help to maintain immune tolerance by exerting suppressive effects on cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. In the last few years there has been an abundance of papers addressing the suppressive effects of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and their putative role in various experimental disease models and human diseases. Despite the enormous amounts of data on these cells a number of controversial issues still exists. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were originally described as thymus-derived anergic/suppressive T cells. Recent papers however indicate that these cells might also be generated in the periphery. Due to the thymic development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells it was thought that these cells were specific for self-antigens. Indeed it was shown that CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells could be positively selected upon high affinity interaction with self-antigens. However, evidence is accumulating that these cells might also interact with non-self antigens. Finally, in the literature there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of soluble factors versus cell-contact in the mechanism of suppression. The aim of this review is to summarize the evidence supporting these opposing viewpoints and to combine them into a general model for the origin, function and antigen-specificity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.