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Sample records for regulatory dna elements

  1. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  2. Using FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements) to isolate active regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jeremy M.; Giresi, Paul G.; Davis, Ian J.; Lieb, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Eviction or destabilization of nucleosomes from chromatin is a hallmark of functional regulatory elements of the eukaryotic genome. Historically identified by nuclease hypersensitivity, these regulatory elements are typically bound by transcription factors or other regulatory proteins. FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements) is an alternative approach to identify these genomic regions and has proven successful in a multitude of eukaryotic cell and tissue types. Cells or dissociated tissues are crosslinked briefly with formaldehyde, lysed, and sonicated. Sheared chromatin is subjected to phenol-chloroform extraction and the isolated DNA, typically encompassing 1–3% of the human genome, is purified. We provide guidelines for quantitative analysis by PCR, microarrays, or next-generation sequencing. Regulatory elements enriched by FAIRE display high concordance with those identified by nuclease hypersensitivity or ChIP, and the entire procedure can be completed in three days. FAIRE exhibits low technical variability, which allows its use in large-scale studies of chromatin from normal or diseased tissues. PMID:22262007

  3. De novo DNA demethylation and noncoding transcription define active intergenic regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Felix; Smith, Andrew D; Gingeras, Thomas R; Hannon, Gregory J; Hodges, Emily

    2013-10-01

    Deep sequencing of mammalian DNA methylomes has uncovered a previously unpredicted number of discrete hypomethylated regions in intergenic space (iHMRs). Here, we combined whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data with extensive gene expression and chromatin-state data to define functional classes of iHMRs, and to reconstruct the dynamics of their establishment in a developmental setting. Comparing HMR profiles in embryonic stem and primary blood cells, we show that iHMRs mark an exclusive subset of active DNase hypersensitive sites (DHS), and that both developmentally constitutive and cell-type-specific iHMRs display chromatin states typical of distinct regulatory elements. We also observe that iHMR changes are more predictive of nearby gene activity than the promoter HMR itself, and that expression of noncoding RNAs within the iHMR accompanies full activation and complete demethylation of mature B cell enhancers. Conserved sequence features corresponding to iHMR transcript start sites, including a discernible TATA motif, suggest a conserved, functional role for transcription in these regions. Similarly, we explored both primate-specific and human population variation at iHMRs, finding that while enhancer iHMRs are more variable in sequence and methylation status than any other functional class, conservation of the TATA box is highly predictive of iHMR maintenance, reflecting the impact of sequence plasticity and transcriptional signals on iHMR establishment. Overall, our analysis allowed us to construct a three-step timeline in which (1) intergenic DHS are pre-established in the stem cell, (2) partial demethylation of blood-specific intergenic DHSs occurs in blood progenitors, and (3) complete iHMR formation and transcription coincide with enhancer activation in lymphoid-specified cells.

  4. Efficient inversions and duplications of mammalian regulatory DNA elements and gene clusters by CRISPR/Cas9

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhuan; Shou, Jia; Guo, Ya; Tang, Yuanxiao; Wu, Yonghu; Jia, Zhilian; Zhai, Yanan; Chen, Zhifeng; Xu, Quan; Wu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome contains millions of DNA regulatory elements and a large number of gene clusters, most of which have not been tested experimentally. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9 (Cas9) programed with a synthetic single-guide RNA (sgRNA) emerges as a method for genome editing in virtually any organisms. Here we report that targeted DNA fragment inversions and duplications could easily be achieved in human and mouse genomes by CRISPR with two sgRNAs. Specifically, we found that, in cultured human cells and mice, efficient precise inversions of DNA fragments ranging in size from a few tens of bp to hundreds of kb could be generated. In addition, DNA fragment duplications and deletions could also be generated by CRISPR through trans-allelic recombination between the Cas9-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) on two homologous chromosomes (chromatids). Moreover, junctions of combinatorial inversions and duplications of the protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters induced by Cas9 with four sgRNAs could be detected. In mice, we obtained founders with alleles of precise inversions, duplications, and deletions of DNA fragments of variable sizes by CRISPR. Interestingly, we found that very efficient inversions were mediated by microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ) through short inverted repeats. We showed for the first time that DNA fragment inversions could be transmitted through germlines in mice. Finally, we applied this CRISPR method to a regulatory element of the Pcdhα cluster and found a new role in the regulation of members of the Pcdhγ cluster. This simple and efficient method should be useful in manipulating mammalian genomes to study millions of regulatory DNA elements as well as vast numbers of gene clusters. PMID:25757625

  5. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K.; Skaar, David; Nye, Monica; Vidal, Adriana C.; Cecil, Kim M.; Dietrich, Kim N.; Puga, Alvaro; Jirtle, Randy L.; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    30 to 78 months. Conclusions: Our findings provide evidence that early childhood lead exposure results in sex-dependent and gene-specific DNA methylation differences in the DMRs of PEG3, IGF2/H19, and PLAGL1/HYMAI in adulthood. Citation: Li Y, Xie C, Murphy SK, Skaar D, Nye M, Vidal AC, Cecil KM, Dietrich KN, Puga A, Jirtle RL, Hoyo C. 2016. Lead exposure during early human development and DNA methylation of imprinted gene regulatory elements in adulthood. Environ Health Perspect 124:666–673; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408577 PMID:26115033

  6. Reconfiguration of nucleosome-depleted regions at distal regulatory elements accompanies DNA methylation of enhancers and insulators in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Statham, Aaron L.; Kelly, Theresa K.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that cancer-associated epigenetic repression occurs concomitant with CpG island hypermethylation and loss of nucleosomes at promoters, but the role of nucleosome occupancy and epigenetic reprogramming at distal regulatory elements in cancer is still poorly understood. Here, we evaluate the scope of global epigenetic alterations at enhancers and insulator elements in prostate and breast cancer cells using simultaneous genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation and nucleosome occupancy (NOMe-seq). We find that the genomic location of nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) is mostly cell type specific and preferentially found at enhancers in normal cells. In cancer cells, however, we observe a global reconfiguration of NDRs at distal regulatory elements coupled with a substantial reorganization of the cancer methylome. Aberrant acquisition of nucleosomes at enhancer-associated NDRs is associated with hypermethylation and epigenetic silencing marks, and conversely, loss of nucleosomes with demethylation and epigenetic activation. Remarkably, we show that nucleosomes remain strongly organized and phased at many facultative distal regulatory elements, even in the absence of a NDR as an anchor. Finally, we find that key transcription factor (TF) binding sites also show extensive peripheral nucleosome phasing, suggesting the potential for TFs to organize NDRs genome-wide and contribute to deregulation of cancer epigenomes. Together, our findings suggest that “decommissioning” of NDRs and TFs at distal regulatory elements in cancer cells is accompanied by DNA hypermethylation susceptibility of enhancers and insulator elements, which in turn may contribute to an altered genome-wide architecture and epigenetic deregulation in malignancy. PMID:24916973

  7. Functional validation of mouse tyrosinase non-coding regulatory DNA elements by CRISPR–Cas9-mediated mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Seruggia, Davide; Fernández, Almudena; Cantero, Marta; Pelczar, Pawel; Montoliu, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Newly developed genome-editing tools, such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–Cas9 system, allow simple and rapid genetic modification in most model organisms and human cell lines. Here, we report the production and analysis of mice carrying the inactivation via deletion of a genomic insulator, a key non-coding regulatory DNA element found 5′ upstream of the mouse tyrosinase (Tyr) gene. Targeting sequences flanking this boundary in mouse fertilized eggs resulted in the efficient deletion or inversion of large intervening DNA fragments delineated by the RNA guides. The resulting genome-edited mice showed a dramatic decrease in Tyr gene expression as inferred from the evident decrease of coat pigmentation, thus supporting the functionality of this boundary sequence in vivo, at the endogenous locus. Several potential off-targets bearing sequence similarity with each of the two RNA guides used were analyzed and found to be largely intact. This study reports how non-coding DNA elements, even if located in repeat-rich genomic sequences, can be efficiently and functionally evaluated in vivo and, furthermore, it illustrates how the regulatory elements described by the ENCODE and EPIGENOME projects, in the mouse and human genomes, can be systematically validated. PMID:25897126

  8. Discover regulatory DNA elements using chromatin signatures and artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    Firpi, Hiram A.; Ucar, Duygu; Tan, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Recent large-scale chromatin states mapping efforts have revealed characteristic chromatin modification signatures for various types of functional DNA elements. Given the important influence of chromatin states on gene regulation and the rapid accumulation of genome-wide chromatin modification data, there is a pressing need for computational methods to analyze these data in order to identify functional DNA elements. However, existing computational tools do not exploit data transformation and feature extraction as a means to achieve a more accurate prediction. Results: We introduce a new computational framework for identifying functional DNA elements using chromatin signatures. The framework consists of a data transformation and a feature extraction step followed by a classification step using time-delay neural network. We implemented our framework in a software tool CSI-ANN (chromatin signature identification by artificial neural network). When applied to predict transcriptional enhancers in the ENCODE region, CSI-ANN achieved a 65.5% sensitivity and 66.3% positive predictive value, a 5.9% and 11.6% improvement, respectively, over the previously best approach. Availability and Implementation: CSI-ANN is implemented in Matlab. The source code is freely available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/tan/CSIANNsoft.zip Contact: kai-tan@uiowa.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary Materials are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20453004

  9. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  10. A novel regulatory element (E77) isolated from CHO‐K1 genomic DNA enhances stable gene expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shin‐Young; Kim, Yeon‐Gu; Kang, Seunghee; Lee, Hong Weon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vectors flanked by regulatory DNA elements have been used to generate stable cell lines with high productivity and transgene stability; however, regulatory elements in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, which are the most widely used mammalian cells in biopharmaceutical production, are still poorly understood. We isolated a novel gene regulatory element from CHO‐K1 cells, designated E77, which was found to enhance the stable expression of a transgene. A genomic library was constructed by combining CHO‐K1 genomic DNA fragments with a CMV promoter‐driven GFP expression vector, and the E77 element was isolated by screening. The incorporation of the E77 regulatory element resulted in the generation of an increased number of clones with high expression, thereby enhancing the expression level of the transgene in the stable transfectant cell pool. Interestingly, the E77 element was found to consist of two distinct fragments derived from different locations in the CHO genome shotgun sequence. High and stable transgene expression was obtained in transfected CHO cells by combining these fragments. Additionally, the function of E77 was found to be dependent on its site of insertion and specific orientation in the vector construct. Our findings demonstrate that stable gene expression mediated by the CMV promoter in CHO cells may be improved by the isolated novel gene regulatory element E77 identified in the present study. PMID:26762773

  11. Epigenetic conservation at gene regulatory elements revealed by non-methylated DNA profiling in seven vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Long, Hannah K; Sims, David; Heger, Andreas; Blackledge, Neil P; Kutter, Claudia; Wright, Megan L; Grützner, Frank; Odom, Duncan T; Patient, Roger; Ponting, Chris P; Klose, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Two-thirds of gene promoters in mammals are associated with regions of non-methylated DNA, called CpG islands (CGIs), which counteract the repressive effects of DNA methylation on chromatin. In cold-blooded vertebrates, computational CGI predictions often reside away from gene promoters, suggesting a major divergence in gene promoter architecture across vertebrates. By experimentally identifying non-methylated DNA in the genomes of seven diverse vertebrates, we instead reveal that non-methylated islands (NMIs) of DNA are a central feature of vertebrate gene promoters. Furthermore, NMIs are present at orthologous genes across vast evolutionary distances, revealing a surprising level of conservation in this epigenetic feature. By profiling NMIs in different tissues and developmental stages we uncover a unifying set of features that are central to the function of NMIs in vertebrates. Together these findings demonstrate an ancient logic for NMI usage at gene promoters and reveal an unprecedented level of epigenetic conservation across vertebrate evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00348.001. PMID:23467541

  12. Web-based identification of evolutionary conserved DNA cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Benos, Panayiotis V; Corcoran, David L; Feingold, Eleanor

    2007-01-01

    Transcription regulation on a gene-by-gene basis is achieved through transcription factors, the DNA-binding proteins that recognize short DNA sequences in the proximity of the genes. Unlike other DNA-binding proteins, each transcription factor recognizes a number of sequences, usually variants of a preferred, "consensus" sequence. The degree of dissimilarity of a given target sequence from the consensus is indicative of the binding affinity of the transcription factor-DNA interaction. Because of the short size and the degeneracy of the patterns, it is frequently difficult for a computational algorithm to distinguish between the true sites and the background genomic "noise." One way to overcome this problem of low signal-to-noise ratio is to use evolutionary information to detect signals that are conserved in two or more species. FOOTER is an algorithm that uses this phylogenetic footprinting concept and evaluates putative mammalian transcription factor binding sites in a quantitative way. The user is asked to upload the human and mouse promoter sequences and select the transcription factors to be analyzed. The results' page presents an alignment of the two sequences (color-coded by degree of conservation) and information about the predicted sites and single-nucleotide polymorphisms found around the predicted sites. This chapter presents the main aspects of the underlying method and gives detailed instructions and tips on the use of this web-based tool.

  13. Effect of fetal hemoglobin-stimulating medicines on the interaction of DNA and protein of important erythroid regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xin-Jun; Liu, De-pei; Xu, Dong-Dong; Li, Lei; Liang, Chih-chuan

    2003-08-01

    Beta-Thalassemia is the most common single gene disorder in the world, which is caused by the imbalance between alpha-globin chain and beta-globin chain synthesis. Several medicines, such as 5-azacytidine, hydroxyurea, cytarabine, vinblatine, butyrate, and myleran, have been shown to be able to reactivate gamma-globin chain synthesis during the adult stage, and some of them (5-azacytidine, hydroxyurea, myleran, and butyrate) have been used clinically to treat thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Much research efforts are focusing on the determination of the underlying mechanisms of medicine action. In this experiment, as an effort to probe the underlying mechanism of medicine action, we used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction and in vivo footprinting methods to study the DNA-protein interaction at critical erythroid regulatory elements after hydroxyurea or myleran administration to mice. Our results showed that the patterns of in vivo footprints at both the hypersensitive site 2 of the locus control region and the beta-globin gene promoter were changed after medicine treatment. We proposed based on these results that the medicines' administration might result in a change in the interaction between trans-acting factors and cis-acting elements at these regions. These changes might influence the assembly of the transcription complex and, lastly, influence the expression of the beta-globin gene.

  14. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser. PMID:25324314

  15. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser.

  16. Regulatory Mechanisms That Prevent Re-initiation of DNA Replication Can Be Locally Modulated at Origins by Nearby Sequence Elements

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher D.; Li, Joachim J.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells must inhibit re-initiation of DNA replication at each of the thousands of origins in their genome because re-initiation can generate genomic alterations with extraordinary frequency. To minimize the probability of re-initiation from so many origins, cells use a battery of regulatory mechanisms that reduce the activity of replication initiation proteins. Given the global nature of these mechanisms, it has been presumed that all origins are inhibited identically. However, origins re-initiate with diverse efficiencies when these mechanisms are disabled, and this diversity cannot be explained by differences in the efficiency or timing of origin initiation during normal S phase replication. This observation raises the possibility of an additional layer of replication control that can differentially regulate re-initiation at distinct origins. We have identified novel genetic elements that are necessary for preferential re-initiation of two origins and sufficient to confer preferential re-initiation on heterologous origins when the control of re-initiation is partially deregulated. The elements do not enhance the S phase timing or efficiency of adjacent origins and thus are specifically acting as re-initiation promoters (RIPs). We have mapped the two RIPs to ∼60 bp AT rich sequences that act in a distance- and sequence-dependent manner. During the induction of re-replication, Mcm2-7 reassociates both with origins that preferentially re-initiate and origins that do not, suggesting that the RIP elements can overcome a block to re-initiation imposed after Mcm2-7 associates with origins. Our findings identify a local level of control in the block to re-initiation. This local control creates a complex genomic landscape of re-replication potential that is revealed when global mechanisms preventing re-replication are compromised. Hence, if re-replication does contribute to genomic alterations, as has been speculated for cancer cells, some regions of the genome

  17. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs.

  18. Lactase persistence DNA variant enhances lactase promoter activity in vitro: functional role as a cis regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Olds, Lynne C; Sibley, Eric

    2003-09-15

    Lactase persistence is a heritable, autosomal dominant, condition that results in a sustained ability to digest the milk sugar lactose throughout adulthood. The majority of the world's human population experiences a decline in production of the digestive enzyme lactase-phlorizin hydrolase during maturation. However, individuals with lactase persistence continue to express high levels of the lactase gene into adulthood. Lactase persistence has been strongly correlated with single nucleotide genetic variants, C/T_(13910) and G/A_(22018), located 13.9 and 22 kb upstream from the lactase structural gene. We aimed to characterize a functional role for the polymorphisms in regulating lactase gene transcription. DNA in the region of the C/T_(13910) or G/A_(22018) human lactase variants was cloned upstream of the 3.0 kb rat lactase gene promoter in a luciferase reporter construct. Human intestinal Caco-2 cells were transfected with the lactase variant/promoter-reporter constructs and assayed for promoter activity. A 200 bp region surrounding the C_(13910) variant, associated with lactase non-persistence, results in a 2.2-fold increase in lactase promoter activity. The T_(13910) variant, associated with lactase persistence, results in an even greater 2.8-fold increase. The DNA sequence of the C/T_(13910) variants differentially interacts with intestinal cell nuclear proteins on EMSAs. AP2 co-transfection results in a similar repression of the C/T_(13910) variant/promoter-reporter constructs. The DNA region of the C/T_(13910) lactase persistence/non-persistence variant functions in vitro as a cis element capable of enhancing differential transcriptional activation of the lactase promoter. Such differential regulation by the C and T variants is consistent with a causative role in the mechanism specifying the lactase persistence/non-persistence phenotypes in humans.

  19. Transposable Elements and DNA Methylation Create in Embryonic Stem Cells Human-Specific Regulatory Sequences Associated with Distal Enhancers and Noncoding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2015-05-07

    Despite significant progress in the structural and functional characterization of the human genome, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the genetic basis of human phenotypic uniqueness remains limited. Here, I report that transposable element-derived sequences, most notably LTR7/HERV-H, LTR5_Hs, and L1HS, harbor 99.8% of the candidate human-specific regulatory loci (HSRL) with putative transcription factor-binding sites in the genome of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). A total of 4,094 candidate HSRL display selective and site-specific binding of critical regulators (NANOG [Nanog homeobox], POU5F1 [POU class 5 homeobox 1], CCCTC-binding factor [CTCF], Lamin B1), and are preferentially located within the matrix of transcriptionally active DNA segments that are hypermethylated in hESC. hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites are enriched near the protein-coding genes regulating brain size, pluripotency long noncoding RNAs, hESC enhancers, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-harboring regions immediately adjacent to binding sites. Sequences of only 4.3% of hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites are present in Neanderthals' genome, suggesting that a majority of these regulatory elements emerged in Modern Humans. Comparisons of estimated creation rates of novel TF-binding sites revealed that there was 49.7-fold acceleration of creation rates of NANOG-binding sites in genomes of Chimpanzees compared with the mouse genomes and further 5.7-fold acceleration in genomes of Modern Humans compared with the Chimpanzees genomes. Preliminary estimates suggest that emergence of one novel NANOG-binding site detectable in hESC required 466 years of evolution. Pathway analysis of coding genes that have hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites within gene bodies or near gene boundaries revealed their association with physiological development and functions of nervous and cardiovascular systems, embryonic development, behavior, as well as development of a diverse spectrum of pathological conditions

  20. Transposable Elements and DNA Methylation Create in Embryonic Stem Cells Human-Specific Regulatory Sequences Associated with Distal Enhancers and Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Glinsky, Gennadi V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in the structural and functional characterization of the human genome, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the genetic basis of human phenotypic uniqueness remains limited. Here, I report that transposable element-derived sequences, most notably LTR7/HERV-H, LTR5_Hs, and L1HS, harbor 99.8% of the candidate human-specific regulatory loci (HSRL) with putative transcription factor-binding sites in the genome of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). A total of 4,094 candidate HSRL display selective and site-specific binding of critical regulators (NANOG [Nanog homeobox], POU5F1 [POU class 5 homeobox 1], CCCTC-binding factor [CTCF], Lamin B1), and are preferentially located within the matrix of transcriptionally active DNA segments that are hypermethylated in hESC. hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites are enriched near the protein-coding genes regulating brain size, pluripotency long noncoding RNAs, hESC enhancers, and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-harboring regions immediately adjacent to binding sites. Sequences of only 4.3% of hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites are present in Neanderthals’ genome, suggesting that a majority of these regulatory elements emerged in Modern Humans. Comparisons of estimated creation rates of novel TF-binding sites revealed that there was 49.7-fold acceleration of creation rates of NANOG-binding sites in genomes of Chimpanzees compared with the mouse genomes and further 5.7-fold acceleration in genomes of Modern Humans compared with the Chimpanzees genomes. Preliminary estimates suggest that emergence of one novel NANOG-binding site detectable in hESC required 466 years of evolution. Pathway analysis of coding genes that have hESC-specific NANOG-binding sites within gene bodies or near gene boundaries revealed their association with physiological development and functions of nervous and cardiovascular systems, embryonic development, behavior, as well as development of a diverse spectrum of pathological conditions

  1. Expression of 5 S rRNA genes linked to 35 S rDNA in plants, their epigenetic modification and regulatory element divergence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In plants, the 5 S rRNA genes usually occur as separate tandems (S-type arrangement) or, less commonly, linked to 35 S rDNA units (L-type). The activity of linked genes remains unknown so far. We studied the homogeneity and expression of 5 S genes in several species from family Asteraceae known to contain linked 35 S-5 S units. Additionally, their methylation status was determined using bisulfite sequencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to reveal the sub-nuclear positions of rDNA arrays. Results We found that homogenization of L-type units went to completion in most (4/6) but not all species. Two species contained major L-type and minor S-type units (termed Ls-type). The linked genes dominate 5 S rDNA expression while the separate tandems do not seem to be expressed. Members of tribe Anthemideae evolved functional variants of the polymerase III promoter in which a residing C-box element differs from the canonical angiosperm motif by as much as 30%. On this basis, a more relaxed consensus sequence of a plant C-box: (5’-RGSWTGGGTG-3’) is proposed. The 5 S paralogs display heavy DNA methylation similarly as to their unlinked counterparts. FISH revealed the close association of 35 S-5 S arrays with nucleolar periphery indicating that transcription of 5 S genes may occur in this territory. Conclusions We show that the unusual linked arrangement of 5 S genes, occurring in several plant species, is fully compatible with their expression and functionality. This extraordinary 5 S gene dynamics is manifested at different levels, such as variation in intrachromosomal positions, unit structure, epigenetic modification and considerable divergence of regulatory motifs. PMID:22716941

  2. Global Analysis of DNA Methylation Variation in Adipose Tissue from Twins Reveals Links to Disease-Associated Variants in Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Grundberg, Elin; Meduri, Eshwar; Sandling, Johanna K.; Hedman, Åsa K.; Keildson, Sarah; Buil, Alfonso; Busche, Stephan; Yuan, Wei; Nisbet, James; Sekowska, Magdalena; Wilk, Alicja; Barrett, Amy; Small, Kerrin S.; Ge, Bing; Caron, Maxime; Shin, So-Youn; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Ainali, Chrysanthi; Barrett, Amy; Bataille, Veronique; Bell, Jordana T.; Buil, Alfonso; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dimas, Antigone S.; Durbin, Richard; Glass, Daniel; Grundberg, Elin; Hassanali, Neelam; Hedman, Åsa K.; Ingle, Catherine; Knowles, David; Krestyaninova, Maria; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lowe, Christopher E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meduri, Eshwar; di Meglio, Paola; Min, Josine L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Nestle, Frank O.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Nisbet, James; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Parts, Leopold; Potter, Simon; Sandling, Johanna; Sekowska, Magdalena; Shin, So-Youn; Small, Kerrin S.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Surdulescu, Gabriela; Travers, Mary E.; Tsaprouni, Loukia; Tsoka, Sophia; Wilk, Alicja; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zondervan, Krina T.; Lathrop, Mark; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spector, Timothy D.; Bell, Jordana T.; Deloukas, Panos

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation play a key role in gene regulation and disease susceptibility. However, little is known about the genome-wide frequency, localization, and function of methylation variation and how it is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. We utilized the Multiple Tissue Human Expression Resource (MuTHER) and generated Illumina 450K adipose methylome data from 648 twins. We found that individual CpGs had low variance and that variability was suppressed in promoters. We noted that DNA methylation variation was highly heritable (h2median = 0.34) and that shared environmental effects correlated with metabolic phenotype-associated CpGs. Analysis of methylation quantitative-trait loci (metQTL) revealed that 28% of CpGs were associated with nearby SNPs, and when overlapping them with adipose expression quantitative-trait loci (eQTL) from the same individuals, we found that 6% of the loci played a role in regulating both gene expression and DNA methylation. These associations were bidirectional, but there were pronounced negative associations for promoter CpGs. Integration of metQTL with adipose reference epigenomes and disease associations revealed significant enrichment of metQTL overlapping metabolic-trait or disease loci in enhancers (the strongest effects were for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and body mass index [BMI]). We followed up with the BMI SNP rs713586, a cg01884057 metQTL that overlaps an enhancer upstream of ADCY3, and used bisulphite sequencing to refine this region. Our results showed widespread population invariability yet sequence dependence on adipose DNA methylation but that incorporating maps of regulatory elements aid in linking CpG variation to gene regulation and disease risk in a tissue-dependent manner. PMID:24183450

  3. Characterization of various promoter regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes and identification of duplicated ets (GGAA) motifs as an essential transcription regulatory element.

    PubMed

    Uchiumi, Fumiaki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Tanuma, Sei-ichi

    2010-05-15

    DNA helicases are important in the regulation of DNA transaction and thereby various cellular functions. In this study, we developed a cost-effective multiple DNA transfection assay with DEAE-dextran reagent and analyzed the promoter activities of the human DNA helicases. The 5'-flanking regions of the human DNA helicase-encoding genes were isolated and subcloned into luciferase (Luc) expression plasmids. They were coated onto 96-well plate and used for co-transfection with a renilla-Luc expression vector into various cells, and dual-Luc assays were performed. The profiles of promoter activities were dependent on cell lines used. Among these human DNA helicase genes, XPB, RecQL5, and RTEL promoters were activated during TPA-induced HL-60 cell differentiation. Interestingly, duplicated ets (GGAA) elements are commonly located around the transcription start sites of these genes. The duplicated GGAA motifs are also found in the promoters of DNA replication/repair synthesis factor genes including PARG, ATR, TERC, and Rb1. Mutation analyses suggested that the duplicated GGAA-motifs are necessary for the basal promoter activity in various cells and some of them positively respond to TPA in HL-60 cells. TPA-induced response of 44-bp in the RTEL promoter was attenuated by co-transfection of the PU.1 expression vector. These findings suggest that the duplicated ets motifs regulate DNA-repair associated gene expressions during macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells.

  4. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

    2003-12-31

    Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

  5. Uncovering drug-responsive regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Luizon, Marcelo R; Ahituv, Nadav

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide changes in gene regulatory elements can have a major effect on interindividual differences in drug response. For example, by reviewing all published pharmacogenomic genome-wide association studies, we show here that 96.4% of the associated single nucleotide polymorphisms reside in noncoding regions. We discuss how sequencing technologies are improving our ability to identify drug response-associated regulatory elements genome-wide and to annotate nucleotide variants within them. We highlight specific examples of how nucleotide changes in these elements can affect drug response and illustrate the techniques used to find them and functionally characterize them. Finally, we also discuss challenges in the field of drug-responsive regulatory elements that need to be considered in order to translate these findings into the clinic. PMID:26555224

  6. Transcriptional Regulatory Elements in Fungal Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenbing; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce a variety of secondary metabolites of diverse beneficial and detrimental activities to humankind. The genes encoding the enzymatic machinery required to make these metabolites are typically clustered in fungal genomes. There is considerable evidence that secondary metabolite gene regulation is, in part, by transcriptional control through hierarchical levels of transcriptional regulatory elements involved in secondary metabolite cluster regulation. Identification of secondary metabolism regulatory elements could potentially provide a means of increasing production of beneficial metabolites, decreasing production of detrimental metabolites, aid in the identification of ‘silent’ natural products and also contribute to a broader understanding of molecular mechanisms by which secondary metabolites are produced. This review summarizes regulation of secondary metabolism associated on transcriptional regulatory elements from a broad view as well as tremendous advances in discovery of cryptic or novel secondary metabolites by genomic mining in the basis of this knowledge. PMID:21717315

  7. Conserved cis-regulatory elements for DNA-binding-with-one-finger and homeo-domain-leucine-zipper transcription factors regulate companion cell-specific expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Schneidereit, Alexander; Imlau, Astrid; Sauer, Norbert

    2008-09-01

    The transition from young carbon-importing sink leaves of higher plants to mature carbon-exporting source leaves is paralleled by a complete reversal of phloem function. While sink-leaf phloem mediates the influx of reduced carbon from older source leaves and the release of this imported carbon to the sink-leaf mesophyll, source-leaf phloem catalyzes the uptake of photoassimilates into companion cells (CCs) and sieve elements (SEs) and the net carbon export from the leaf. Phloem loading in source leaves with sucrose, the main or exclusive transport form for fixed carbon in most higher plants, is catalyzed by plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporters. Consistent with the described physiological switch from sink to source, the promoter of the Arabidopsis AtSUC2 gene is active only in source-leaf CCs of Arabidopsis or of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For the identification of regulatory elements involved in this companion cell-specific and source-specific gene expression, we performed detailed analyses of the AtSUC2 promoter by truncation and mutagenesis. A 126-bp promoter fragment was identified, which seems to contain these fragments and which drives AtSUC2-typical expression when combined with a 35S minimal promoter. Within this fragment, linker-scanning analyses revealed two cis-regulatory elements that were further characterized as putative binding sites for transcription factors of the DNA-binding-with-one-finger or the homeo-domain-leucine-zipper families. Similar or identical binding sites are found in other genes and in different plant species, suggesting an ancient regulatory mechanism for this important physiological switch. PMID:18551303

  8. Identifying Synonymous Regulatory Elements in Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, I; Nobrega, M A

    2005-02-07

    Synonymous gene regulation, defined as driving shared temporal and/or spatial expression of groups of genes, is likely predicated on genomic elements that contain similar modules of certain transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). We have developed a method to scan vertebrate genomes for evolutionary conserved modules of TFBS in a predefined configuration, and created a tool, named SynoR that identify synonymous regulatory elements (SREs) in vertebrate genomes. SynoR performs de novo identification of SREs utilizing known patterns of TFBS in active regulatory elements (REs) as seeds for genome scans. Layers of multiple-species conservation allow the use of differential phylogenetic sequence conservation filters in the search of SREs and the results are displayed as to provide an extensive annotation of genes containing detected REs. Gene Ontology categories are utilized to further functionally classify the identified genes, and integrated GNF Expression Atlas 2 data allow the cataloging of tissue-specificities of the predicted SREs. We illustrate how this new tool can be used to establish a linkage between human diseases and noncoding genomic content. SynoR is publicly available at http://synor.dcode.org.

  9. Global Mapping of Open Chromatin Regulatory Elements by Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements Followed by Sequencing (FAIRE-seq).

    PubMed

    Bianco, Stéphanie; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Murphy, Bruce D; Gévry, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is organized in a complex structure composed of DNA and proteins together designated chromatin. Chromatin plays a dynamic role in transcriptional processes in that alteration of the interaction between its components results in the deregulation of cellular transcriptional program. Modification of epigenetic marks, variation in the precise positioning of nucleosomes, and consequent mobilization of nucleosomes regulate the access of various transcriptional factors to its underlying DNA template. Nucleosome-depleted regions, also designated open chromatin domains, are associated with active DNA regulatory elements, including promoters, enhancers, silencers, and insulators. Here, we describe the protocol of a rapid and simple technique entitled FAIRE (formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements). Combined with high-throughput sequencing (FAIRE-seq), this procedure allows isolation of nucleosome-free regions and their mapping along the genome, thereby providing a global view of cell-specific regulatory elements.

  10. Information capacity of genetic regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Tkačik, Gašper; Callan, Curtis G.; Bialek, William

    2010-01-01

    Changes in a cell’s external or internal conditions are usually reflected in the concentrations of the relevant transcription factors. These proteins in turn modulate the expression levels of the genes under their control and sometimes need to perform nontrivial computations that integrate several inputs and affect multiple genes. At the same time, the activities of the regulated genes would fluctuate even if the inputs were held fixed, as a consequence of the intrinsic noise in the system, and such noise must fundamentally limit the reliability of any genetic computation. Here we use information theory to formalize the notion of information transmission in simple genetic regulatory elements in the presence of physically realistic noise sources. The dependence of this “channel capacity” on noise parameters, cooperativity and cost of making signaling molecules is explored systematically. We find that, in the range of parameters probed by recent in vivo measurements, capacities higher than one bit should be achievable. It is of course generally accepted that gene regulatory elements must, in order to function properly, have a capacity of at least one bit. The central point of our analysis is the demonstration that simple physical models of noisy gene transcription, with realistic parameters, can indeed achieve this capacity: it was not self-evident that this should be so. We also demonstrate that capacities significantly greater than one bit are possible, so that transcriptional regulation need not be limited to simple “on-off” components. The question whether real systems actually exploit this richer possibility is beyond the scope of this investigation. PMID:18763985

  11. Finding regulatory elements and regulatory motifs: a general probabilistic framework

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Over the last two decades a large number of algorithms has been developed for regulatory motif finding. Here we show how many of these algorithms, especially those that model binding specificities of regulatory factors with position specific weight matrices (WMs), naturally arise within a general Bayesian probabilistic framework. We discuss how WMs are constructed from sets of regulatory sites, how sites for a given WM can be discovered by scanning of large sequences, how to cluster WMs, and more generally how to cluster large sets of sites from different WMs into clusters. We discuss how 'regulatory modules', clusters of sites for subsets of WMs, can be found in large intergenic sequences, and we discuss different methods for ab initio motif finding, including expectation maximization (EM) algorithms, and motif sampling algorithms. Finally, we extensively discuss how module finding methods and ab initio motif finding methods can be extended to take phylogenetic relations between the input sequences into account, i.e. we show how motif finding and phylogenetic footprinting can be integrated in a rigorous probabilistic framework. The article is intended for readers with a solid background in applied mathematics, and preferably with some knowledge of general Bayesian probabilistic methods. The main purpose of the article is to elucidate that all these methods are not a disconnected set of individual algorithmic recipes, but that they are just different facets of a single integrated probabilistic theory. PMID:17903285

  12. Massive contribution of transposable elements to mammalian regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Nirmala Arul; Del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2016-09-01

    Barbara McClintock discovered the existence of transposable elements (TEs) in the late 1940s and initially proposed that they contributed to the gene regulatory program of higher organisms. This controversial idea gained acceptance only much later in the 1990s, when the first examples of TE-derived promoter sequences were uncovered. It is now known that half of the human genome is recognizably derived from TEs. It is thus important to understand the scope and nature of their contribution to gene regulation. Here, we provide a timeline of major discoveries in this area and discuss how transposons have revolutionized our understanding of mammalian genomes, with a special emphasis on the massive contribution of TEs to primate evolution. Our analysis of primate-specific functional elements supports a simple model for the rate at which new functional elements arise in unique and TE-derived DNA. Finally, we discuss some of the challenges and unresolved questions in the field, which need to be addressed in order to fully characterize the impact of TEs on gene regulation, evolution and disease processes. PMID:27174439

  13. Massive contribution of transposable elements to mammalian regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Nirmala Arul; Del Rosario, Ricardo C H; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2016-09-01

    Barbara McClintock discovered the existence of transposable elements (TEs) in the late 1940s and initially proposed that they contributed to the gene regulatory program of higher organisms. This controversial idea gained acceptance only much later in the 1990s, when the first examples of TE-derived promoter sequences were uncovered. It is now known that half of the human genome is recognizably derived from TEs. It is thus important to understand the scope and nature of their contribution to gene regulation. Here, we provide a timeline of major discoveries in this area and discuss how transposons have revolutionized our understanding of mammalian genomes, with a special emphasis on the massive contribution of TEs to primate evolution. Our analysis of primate-specific functional elements supports a simple model for the rate at which new functional elements arise in unique and TE-derived DNA. Finally, we discuss some of the challenges and unresolved questions in the field, which need to be addressed in order to fully characterize the impact of TEs on gene regulation, evolution and disease processes.

  14. Evolution of DNA specificity in a transcription factor family produced a new gene regulatory module.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Alesia N; Bridgham, Jamie T; Anderson, Dave W; Murphy, Michael N; Ortlund, Eric A; Thornton, Joseph W

    2014-09-25

    Complex gene regulatory networks require transcription factors (TFs) to bind distinct DNA sequences. To understand how novel TF specificity evolves, we combined phylogenetic, biochemical, and biophysical approaches to interrogate how DNA recognition diversified in the steroid hormone receptor (SR) family. After duplication of the ancestral SR, three mutations in one copy radically weakened binding to the ancestral estrogen response element (ERE) and improved binding to a new set of DNA sequences (steroid response elements, SREs). They did so by establishing unfavorable interactions with ERE and abolishing unfavorable interactions with SRE; also required were numerous permissive substitutions, which nonspecifically improved cooperativity and affinity of DNA binding. Our findings indicate that negative determinants of binding play key roles in TFs' DNA selectivity and-with our prior work on the evolution of SR ligand specificity during the same interval-show how a specific new gene regulatory module evolved without interfering with the integrity of the ancestral module. PMID:25259920

  15. Isolation of a non-genomic origin fluoroquinolone responsive regulatory element using a combinatorial bioengineering approach

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Iyer, V. Rajesh; Ghosh, Tamoghna; Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Advances in chemical biology have led to selection of synthetic functional nucleic acids for in vivo applications. Discovery of synthetic nucleic acid regulatory elements has been a long-standing goal of chemical biologists. Availability of vast genome level genetic resources has motivated efforts for discovery and understanding of inducible synthetic genetic regulatory elements. Such elements can lead to custom-design of switches and sensors, oscillators, digital logic evaluators and cell–cell communicators. Here, we describe a simple, robust and universally applicable module for discovery of inducible gene regulatory elements. The distinguishing feature is the use of a toxic peptide as a reporter to suppress the background of unwanted bacterial recombinants. Using this strategy, we show that it is possible to isolate genetic elements of non-genomic origin which specifically get activated in the presence of DNA gyrase A inhibitors belonging to fluoroquinolone (FQ) group of chemicals. Further, using a system level genetic resource, we prove that the genetic regulation is exerted through histone-like nucleoid structuring (H-NS) repressor protein. Till date, there are no reports of in vivo selection of non-genomic origin inducible regulatory promoter like elements. Our strategy opens an uncharted route to discover inducible synthetic regulatory elements from biologically-inspired nucleic acid sequences. PMID:26837578

  16. EMERGE: a flexible modelling framework to predict genomic regulatory elements from genomic signatures

    PubMed Central

    van Duijvenboden, Karel; de Boer, Bouke A.; Capon, Nicolas; Ruijter, Jan M.; Christoffels, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory DNA elements, short genomic segments that regulate gene expression, have been implicated in developmental disorders and human disease. Despite this clinical urgency, only a small fraction of the regulatory DNA repertoire has been confirmed through reporter gene assays. The overall success rate of functional validation of candidate regulatory elements is low. Moreover, the number and diversity of datasets from which putative regulatory elements can be identified is large and rapidly increasing. We generated a flexible and user-friendly tool to integrate the information from different types of genomic datasets, e.g. ATAC-seq, ChIP-seq, conservation, aiming to increase the ease and success rate of functional prediction. To this end, we developed the EMERGE program that merges all datasets that the user considers informative and uses a logistic regression framework, based on validated functional elements, to set optimal weights to these datasets. ROC curve analysis shows that a combination of datasets leads to improved prediction of tissue-specific enhancers in human, mouse and Drosophila genomes. Functional assays based on this prediction can be expected to have substantially higher success rates. The resulting integrated signal for prediction of functional elements can be plotted in a build-in genome browser or exported for further analysis. PMID:26531828

  17. A user's guide to the encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE).

    PubMed

    2011-04-01

    The mission of the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project is to enable the scientific and medical communities to interpret the human genome sequence and apply it to understand human biology and improve health. The ENCODE Consortium is integrating multiple technologies and approaches in a collective effort to discover and define the functional elements encoded in the human genome, including genes, transcripts, and transcriptional regulatory regions, together with their attendant chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. In the process, standards to ensure high-quality data have been implemented, and novel algorithms have been developed to facilitate analysis. Data and derived results are made available through a freely accessible database. Here we provide an overview of the project and the resources it is generating and illustrate the application of ENCODE data to interpret the human genome.

  18. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  19. The ENCODE (ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements) Project.

    PubMed

    2004-10-22

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The pilot phase of the Project is focused on a specified 30 megabases (approximately 1%) of the human genome sequence and is organized as an international consortium of computational and laboratory-based scientists working to develop and apply high-throughput approaches for detecting all sequence elements that confer biological function. The results of this pilot phase will guide future efforts to analyze the entire human genome.

  20. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field.

  1. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field. PMID:26499213

  2. Identification of altered cis-regulatory elements in human disease.

    PubMed

    Mathelier, Anthony; Shi, Wenqiang; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-02-01

    It has long been appreciated that variations in regulatory regions of genes can impact gene expression. With the advent of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), it has become possible to begin cataloging these noncoding variants. Evidence continues to accumulate linking clinical cases with cis-regulatory element disruption in a wide range of diseases. Identifying variants is becoming routine, but assessing their impact on regulation remains challenging. Bioinformatics approaches that identify variations functionally altering transcription factor (TF) binding are increasingly important for meeting this challenge. We present the current state of computational tools and resources for identifying the genomic regulatory components (cis-regulatory regions and TF binding sites, TFBSs) controlling gene transcriptional regulation. We review how such approaches can be used to interpret the potential disease causality of point mutations and small insertions or deletions. We hope this will motivate further the development of methods enabling the identification of etiological cis-regulatory variations.

  3. An integrated encyclopedia of DNA elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall, the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and is an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research.

  4. An Integrated Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary The human genome encodes the blueprint of life, but the function of the vast majority of its nearly three billion bases is unknown. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has systematically mapped regions of transcription, transcription factor association, chromatin structure, and histone modification. These data enabled us to assign biochemical functions for 80% of the genome, in particular outside of the well-studied protein-coding regions. Many discovered candidate regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and with expressed genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene regulation. The newly identified elements also show a statistical correspondence to sequence variants linked to human disease, and can thereby guide interpretation of this variation. Overall the project provides new insights into the organization and regulation of our genes and genome, and an expansive resource of functional annotations for biomedical research. PMID:22955616

  5. Modeling DNA sequence-based cis-regulatory gene networks.

    PubMed

    Bolouri, Hamid; Davidson, Eric H

    2002-06-01

    Gene network analysis requires computationally based models which represent the functional architecture of regulatory interactions, and which provide directly testable predictions. The type of model that is useful is constrained by the particular features of developmentally active cis-regulatory systems. These systems function by processing diverse regulatory inputs, generating novel regulatory outputs. A computational model which explicitly accommodates this basic concept was developed earlier for the cis-regulatory system of the endo16 gene of the sea urchin. This model represents the genetically mandated logic functions that the system executes, but also shows how time-varying kinetic inputs are processed in different circumstances into particular kinetic outputs. The same basic design features can be utilized to construct models that connect the large number of cis-regulatory elements constituting developmental gene networks. The ultimate aim of the network models discussed here is to represent the regulatory relationships among the genomic control systems of the genes in the network, and to state their functional meaning. The target site sequences of the cis-regulatory elements of these genes constitute the physical basis of the network architecture. Useful models for developmental regulatory networks must represent the genetic logic by which the system operates, but must also be capable of explaining the real time dynamics of cis-regulatory response as kinetic input and output data become available. Most importantly, however, such models must display in a direct and transparent manner fundamental network design features such as intra- and intercellular feedback circuitry; the sources of parallel inputs into each cis-regulatory element; gene battery organization; and use of repressive spatial inputs in specification and boundary formation. Successful network models lead to direct tests of key architectural features by targeted cis-regulatory analysis. PMID

  6. A saturation screen for cis-acting regulatory DNA in the Hox genes of Ciona intestinalis

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, David N.; Lee, Byung-in; Di Gregorio, Anna; Harafuji, Naoe; Detter, Chris; Wang, Mei; Kahsai, Orsalem; Ahn, Sylvia; Arellano, Andre; Zhang, Quin; Trong, Stephan; Doyle, Sharon A.; Satoh, Noriyuki; Satou, Yutaka; Saiga, Hidetoshi; Christian, Allen; Rokhsar, Dan; Hawkins, Trevor L.; Levine, Mike; Richardson, Paul

    2005-01-05

    A screen for the systematic identification of cis-regulatory elements within large (>100 kb) genomic domains containing Hox genes was performed by using the basal chordate Ciona intestinalis. Randomly generated DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes containing two clusters of Hox genes were inserted into a vector upstream of a minimal promoter and lacZ reporter gene. A total of 222 resultant fusion genes were separately electroporated into fertilized eggs, and their regulatory activities were monitored in larvae. In sum, 21 separable cis-regulatory elements were found. These include eight Hox linked domains that drive expression in nested anterior-posterior domains of ectodermally derived tissues. In addition to vertebrate-like CNS regulation, the discovery of cis-regulatory domains that drive epidermal transcription suggests that C. intestinalis has arthropod-like Hox patterning in the epidermis.

  7. Close Sequence Comparisons are Sufficient to Identify Humancis-Regulatory Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M.; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2005-12-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons, due to the lack of a universal metric for sequence conservation, and also the paucity of empirically defined benchmark sets of cis-regulatory elements. To address this problem, we developed a general-purpose algorithm (Gumby) that detects slowly-evolving regions in primate, mammalian and more distant comparisons without requiring adjustment of parameters, and ranks conserved elements by P-value using Karlin-Altschul statistics. We benchmarked Gumby predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci, and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using reporter-gene assays in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity and specificity by comparison with 1-5 other eutherian mammals or 6 other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole genome comparative analysis, which explains some of these findings. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for testing at embryonic time points.

  8. Transcriptional Targeting in the Airway Using Novel Gene Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Burnight, Erin R.; Wang, Guoshun; McCray, Paul B.

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to airway epithelia is a goal of many gene therapy strategies to treat cystic fibrosis. Because the native regulatory elements of the CFTR are not well characterized, the development of vectors with heterologous promoters of varying strengths and specificity would aid in our selection of optimal reagents for the appropriate expression of the vector-delivered CFTR gene. Here we contrasted the performance of several novel gene-regulatory elements. Based on airway expression analysis, we selected putative regulatory elements from BPIFA1 and WDR65 to investigate. In addition, we selected a human CFTR promoter region (∼ 2 kb upstream of the human CFTR transcription start site) to study. Using feline immunodeficiency virus vectors containing the candidate elements driving firefly luciferase, we transduced murine nasal epithelia in vivo. Luciferase expression persisted for 30 weeks, which was the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, when the nasal epithelium was ablated using the detergent polidocanol, the mice showed a transient loss of luciferase expression that returned 2 weeks after administration, suggesting that our vectors transduced a progenitor cell population. Importantly, the hWDR65 element drove sufficient CFTR expression to correct the anion transport defect in CFTR-null epithelia. These results will guide the development of optimal vectors for sufficient, sustained CFTR expression in airway epithelia. PMID:22447971

  9. Identification of germline transcriptional regulatory elements in Aedes aegypti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Omar S.; Papathanos, Philippos A.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Kennedy, Katie; Hay, Bruce A.

    2014-02-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for the yellow fever and dengue viruses, and is also responsible for recent outbreaks of the alphavirus chikungunya. Vector control strategies utilizing engineered gene drive systems are being developed as a means of replacing wild, pathogen transmitting mosquitoes with individuals refractory to disease transmission, or bringing about population suppression. Several of these systems, including Medea, UDMEL, and site-specific nucleases, which can be used to drive genes into populations or bring about population suppression, utilize transcriptional regulatory elements that drive germline-specific expression. Here we report the identification of multiple regulatory elements able to drive gene expression specifically in the female germline, or in the male and female germline, in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. These elements can also be used as tools with which to probe the roles of specific genes in germline function and in the early embryo, through overexpression or RNA interference.

  10. Identification of germline transcriptional regulatory elements in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Omar S; Papathanos, Philippos A; Sandler, Jeremy E; Kennedy, Katie; Hay, Bruce A

    2014-02-04

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for the yellow fever and dengue viruses, and is also responsible for recent outbreaks of the alphavirus chikungunya. Vector control strategies utilizing engineered gene drive systems are being developed as a means of replacing wild, pathogen transmitting mosquitoes with individuals refractory to disease transmission, or bringing about population suppression. Several of these systems, including Medea, UD(MEL), and site-specific nucleases, which can be used to drive genes into populations or bring about population suppression, utilize transcriptional regulatory elements that drive germline-specific expression. Here we report the identification of multiple regulatory elements able to drive gene expression specifically in the female germline, or in the male and female germline, in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. These elements can also be used as tools with which to probe the roles of specific genes in germline function and in the early embryo, through overexpression or RNA interference.

  11. Computational discovery of regulatory elements in a continuous expression space

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Approaches for regulatory element discovery from gene expression data usually rely on clustering algorithms to partition the data into clusters of co-expressed genes. Gene regulatory sequences are then mined to find overrepresented motifs in each cluster. However, this ad hoc partition rarely fits the biological reality. We propose a novel method called RED2 that avoids data clustering by estimating motif densities locally around each gene. We show that RED2 detects numerous motifs not detected by clustering-based approaches, and that most of these correspond to characterized motifs. RED2 can be accessed online through a user-friendly interface. PMID:23186104

  12. Identification of a novel cis-regulatory element essential for immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    LaFlam, Taylor N; Seumois, Grégory; Miller, Corey N; Lwin, Wint; Fasano, Kayla J; Waterfield, Michael; Proekt, Irina; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Anderson, Mark S

    2015-11-16

    Thymic central tolerance is essential to preventing autoimmunity. In medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), the Autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene plays an essential role in this process by driving the expression of a diverse set of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs), which are presented and help tolerize self-reactive thymocytes. Interestingly, Aire has a highly tissue-restricted pattern of expression, with only mTECs and peripheral extrathymic Aire-expressing cells (eTACs) known to express detectable levels in adults. Despite this high level of tissue specificity, the cis-regulatory elements that control Aire expression have remained obscure. Here, we identify a highly conserved noncoding DNA element that is essential for Aire expression. This element shows enrichment of enhancer-associated histone marks in mTECs and also has characteristics of being an NF-κB-responsive element. Finally, we find that this element is essential for Aire expression in vivo and necessary to prevent spontaneous autoimmunity, reflecting the importance of this regulatory DNA element in promoting immune tolerance. PMID:26527800

  13. Distinct regulatory elements mediate similar expression patterns in the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongying; Fang, Li; Chen, Nansheng; Johnsen, Robert C; Stein, Lincoln; Baillie, David L

    2005-11-18

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements and their binding proteins constitutes an important part of understanding gene function and regulation. It is well accepted that co-expressed genes tend to share transcriptional elements. However, recent findings indicate that co-expression data show poor correlation with co-regulation data even in unicellular yeast. This motivates us to experimentally explore whether it is possible that co-expressed genes are subject to differential regulatory control using the excretory cell of Caenorhabditis elegans as an example. Excretory cell is a functional equivalent of human kidney. Transcriptional regulation of gene expression in the cell is largely unknown. We isolated a 10-bp excretory cell-specific cis-element, Ex-1, from a pgp-12 promoter. The significance of the element has been demonstrated by its capacity of converting an intestine-specific promoter into an excretory cell-specific one. We also isolated a cDNA encoding an Ex-1 binding transcription factor, DCP-66, using a yeast one-hybrid screen. Role of the factor in regulation of pgp-12 expression has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Search for occurrence of Ex-1 reveals that only a small portion of excretory cell-specific promoters contain Ex-1. Two other distinct cis-elements isolated from two different promoters can also dictate the excretory cell-specific expression but are independent of regulation by DCP-66. The results indicate that distinct regulatory elements are able to mediate the similar expression patterns.

  14. Regulatory role of suppressive motifs from commensal DNA.

    PubMed

    Bouladoux, N; Hall, J A; Grainger, J R; dos Santos, L M; Kann, M G; Nagarajan, V; Verthelyi, D; Belkaid, Y

    2012-11-01

    The microbiota contributes to the induction of both effector and regulatory responses in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, the mechanisms controlling these distinct properties remain poorly understood. We previously showed that commensal DNA promotes intestinal immunity. Here, we find that the capacity of bacterial DNA to stimulate immune responses is species specific and correlated with the frequency of motifs known to exert immunosuppressive function. In particular, we show that the DNA of Lactobacillus species, including various probiotics, is enriched in suppressive motifs able to inhibit lamina propria dendritic cell activation. In addition, immunosuppressive oligonucleotides sustain T(reg) cell conversion during inflammation and limit pathogen-induced immunopathology and colitis. Altogether, our findings identify DNA-suppressive motifs as a molecular ligand expressed by commensals and support the idea that a balance between stimulatory and regulatory DNA motifs contributes to the induction of controlled immune responses in the GI tract and gut immune homeostasis. Further, our findings suggest that the endogenous regulatory capacity of DNA motifs enriched in some commensal bacteria could be exploited for therapeutic purposes. PMID:22617839

  15. Identifying splicing regulatory elements with de Bruijn graphs.

    PubMed

    Badr, Eman; Heath, Lenwood S

    2014-12-01

    Splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are short, degenerate sequences on pre-mRNA molecules that enhance or inhibit the splicing process via the binding of splicing factors, proteins that regulate the functioning of the spliceosome. Existing methods for identifying SREs in a genome are either experimental or computational. Here, we propose a formalism based on de Bruijn graphs that combines genomic structure, word count enrichment analysis, and experimental evidence to identify SREs found in exons. In our approach, SREs are not restricted to a fixed length (i.e., k-mers, for a fixed k). As a result, we identify 2001 putative exonic enhancers and 3080 putative exonic silencers for human genes, with lengths varying from 6 to 15 nucleotides. Many of the predicted SREs overlap with experimentally verified binding sites. Our model provides a novel method to predict variable length putative regulatory elements computationally for further experimental investigation.

  16. Identifying splicing regulatory elements with de Bruijn graphs.

    PubMed

    Badr, Eman; Heath, Lenwood S

    2014-12-01

    Splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are short, degenerate sequences on pre-mRNA molecules that enhance or inhibit the splicing process via the binding of splicing factors, proteins that regulate the functioning of the spliceosome. Existing methods for identifying SREs in a genome are either experimental or computational. Here, we propose a formalism based on de Bruijn graphs that combines genomic structure, word count enrichment analysis, and experimental evidence to identify SREs found in exons. In our approach, SREs are not restricted to a fixed length (i.e., k-mers, for a fixed k). As a result, we identify 2001 putative exonic enhancers and 3080 putative exonic silencers for human genes, with lengths varying from 6 to 15 nucleotides. Many of the predicted SREs overlap with experimentally verified binding sites. Our model provides a novel method to predict variable length putative regulatory elements computationally for further experimental investigation. PMID:25393830

  17. Environment-induced epigenetic reprogramming in genomic regulatory elements in smoking mothers and their children.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Tobias; Trump, Saskia; Ishaque, Naveed; Thürmann, Loreen; Gu, Lei; Bauer, Mario; Bieg, Matthias; Gu, Zuguang; Weichenhan, Dieter; Mallm, Jan-Philipp; Röder, Stefan; Herberth, Gunda; Takada, Eiko; Mücke, Oliver; Winter, Marcus; Junge, Kristin M; Grützmann, Konrad; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Wang, Qi; Lawerenz, Christian; Borte, Michael; Polte, Tobias; Schlesner, Matthias; Schanne, Michaela; Wiemann, Stefan; Geörg, Christina; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Plass, Christoph; Rippe, Karsten; Mizuguchi, Junichiro; Herrmann, Carl; Eils, Roland; Lehmann, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have emerged as links between prenatal environmental exposure and disease risk later in life. Here, we studied epigenetic changes associated with maternal smoking at base pair resolution by mapping DNA methylation, histone modifications, and transcription in expectant mothers and their newborn children. We found extensive global differential methylation and carefully evaluated these changes to separate environment associated from genotype-related DNA methylation changes. Differential methylation is enriched in enhancer elements and targets in particular "commuting" enhancers having multiple, regulatory interactions with distal genes. Longitudinal whole-genome bisulfite sequencing revealed that DNA methylation changes associated with maternal smoking persist over years of life. Particularly in children prenatal environmental exposure leads to chromatin transitions into a hyperactive state. Combined DNA methylation, histone modification, and gene expression analyses indicate that differential methylation in enhancer regions is more often functionally translated than methylation changes in promoters or non-regulatory elements. Finally, we show that epigenetic deregulation of a commuting enhancer targeting c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) is linked to impaired lung function in early childhood.

  18. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R.

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  19. Combinatorial Gene Regulatory Functions Underlie Ultraconserved Elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Warnefors, Maria; Hartmann, Britta; Thomsen, Stefan; Alonso, Claudio R

    2016-09-01

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) are discrete genomic elements conserved across large evolutionary distances. Although UCEs have been linked to multiple facets of mammalian gene regulation their extreme evolutionary conservation remains largely unexplained. Here, we apply a computational approach to investigate this question in Drosophila, exploring the molecular functions of more than 1,500 UCEs shared across the genomes of 12 Drosophila species. Our data indicate that Drosophila UCEs are hubs for gene regulatory functions and suggest that UCE sequence invariance originates from their combinatorial roles in gene control. We also note that the gene regulatory roles of intronic and intergenic UCEs (iUCEs) are distinct from those found in exonic UCEs (eUCEs). In iUCEs, transcription factor (TF) and epigenetic factor binding data strongly support iUCE roles in transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In contrast, analyses of eUCEs indicate that they are two orders of magnitude more likely than the expected to simultaneously include protein-coding sequence, TF-binding sites, splice sites, and RNA editing sites but have reduced roles in transcriptional or epigenetic regulation. Furthermore, we use a Drosophila cell culture system and transgenic Drosophila embryos to validate the notion of UCE combinatorial regulatory roles using an eUCE within the Hox gene Ultrabithorax and show that its protein-coding region also contains alternative splicing regulatory information. Taken together our experiments indicate that UCEs emerge as a result of combinatorial gene regulatory roles and highlight common features in mammalian and insect UCEs implying that similar processes might underlie ultraconservation in diverse animal taxa. PMID:27247329

  20. Regulatory element copy number differences shape primate expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Iskow, Rebecca C.; Gokcumen, Omer; Abyzov, Alexej; Malukiewicz, Joanna; Zhu, Qihui; Sukumar, Ann T.; Pai, Athma A.; Mills, Ryan E.; Habegger, Lukas; Cusanovich, Darren A.; Rubel, Meagan A.; Perry, George H.; Gerstein, Mark; Stone, Anne C.; Gilad, Yoav; Lee, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression differences are shaped by selective pressures and contribute to phenotypic differences between species. We identified 964 copy number differences (CNDs) of conserved sequences across three primate species and examined their potential effects on gene expression profiles. Samples with copy number different genes had significantly different expression than samples with neutral copy number. Genes encoding regulatory molecules differed in copy number and were associated with significant expression differences. Additionally, we identified 127 CNDs that were processed pseudogenes and some of which were expressed. Furthermore, there were copy number-different regulatory regions such as ultraconserved elements and long intergenic noncoding RNAs with the potential to affect expression. We postulate that CNDs of these conserved sequences fine-tune developmental pathways by altering the levels of RNA. PMID:22797897

  1. Human and mouse ABCA1 comparative sequencing and transgenesis studies identify regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yang; Cavelier, L.; Chiu, Sally; Rubin, Edward; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2000-08-01

    The expression of ABCA1, a major participant in apolipoprotein mediated cholesterol efflux is highly regulated by a variety of factors including intracellular cholesterol concentration. To analyze its genomic organization and identify those sequences involved in its regulation we sequenced and compared approximately 200 Kb of orthologous DNA from mice and humans containing the ABCA1 gene and significant flanking DNA. The comparison revealed a variety of mouse human conserved sequences including 50 conserved ABCA1 exons over 147Kb of human and 124Kb of mouse genomic DNA as well as multiple mouse human conserved noncoding sequences. Using as a criteria for identifying putative regulatory elements in non-coding sequence, human and mouse sequences that were &62;75% identical for over 120 bp were screened for resulting in the identification of 34 elements. The two most highly conserved human mouse noncoding elements (CNS1: 88% identity over 498 bp, CNS2: 81% identity over 214 bp)! were also highly conserved in the ABCA1 genes of rats, dogs, cows, rabbits and pigs. Two independent studies have demonstrated that the DNA segments containing CNS2 function in vitro as a sterol response promoter. Support for the inclusion of major ABCA1 regulatory elements in the human genomic sequence examined was the demonstration that mice containing a human BAC transgene containing sequences exclusively from the analyzed interval, expressed human ABCA1 in a tissue distribution mimicking expression of endogenous mouse ABC1. These studies using a comparative genomic approach has characterized the structure of the human and mouse ABCA1 genes and has helped identify sequences participating in its expression.

  2. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Gac, Gérald Le; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory ‘chromatin looping’ systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF. PMID:26615198

  3. Evolutionary forces act on promoter length: identification of enriched cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, Erik; Thorsen, Michael; Tamás, Markus J; Nerman, Olle

    2009-06-01

    Transcription factors govern gene expression by binding to short DNA sequences called cis-regulatory elements. These sequences are typically located in promoters, which are regions of variable length upstream of the open reading frames of genes. Here, we report that promoter length and gene function are related in yeast, fungi, and plants. In particular, the promoters for stress-responsive genes are in general longer than those of other genes. Essential genes have, on the other hand, relatively short promoters. We utilize these findings in a novel method for identifying relevant cis-regulatory elements in a set of coexpressed genes. The method is shown to generate more accurate results and fewer false positives compared with other common procedures. Our results suggest that genes with complex transcriptional regulation tend to have longer promoters than genes responding to few signals. This phenomenon is present in all investigated species, indicating that evolution adjust promoter length according to gene function. Identification of cis-regulatory elements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be done with the web service located at http://enricher.zool.gu.se.

  4. Epistatic Interactions in the Arabinose Cis-Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Lagator, Mato; Igler, Claudia; Moreno, Anaísa B; Guet, Călin C; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2016-03-01

    Changes in gene expression are an important mode of evolution; however, the proximate mechanism of these changes is poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the effects of mutations within cis binding sites for transcription factors, or the nature of epistatic interactions between these mutations. Here, we tested the effects of single and double mutants in two cis binding sites involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon, a component of arabinose metabolism, using a synthetic system. This system decouples transcriptional control from any posttranslational effects on fitness, allowing a precise estimate of the effect of single and double mutations, and hence epistasis, on gene expression. We found that epistatic interactions between mutations in the araBAD cis-regulatory element are common, and that the predominant form of epistasis is negative. The magnitude of the interactions depended on whether the mutations are located in the same or in different operator sites. Importantly, these epistatic interactions were dependent on the presence of arabinose, a native inducer of the araBAD operon in vivo, with some interactions changing in sign (e.g., from negative to positive) in its presence. This study thus reveals that mutations in even relatively simple cis-regulatory elements interact in complex ways such that selection on the level of gene expression in one environment might perturb regulation in the other environment in an unpredictable and uncorrelated manner.

  5. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  6. [Regulatory potential of S/MAR elements in transient expression].

    PubMed

    Sass, A V; Ruda, V M; Akopov, S B; Snezhkov, E V; Nikolaev, L G; Sverdlov, E D

    2005-01-01

    S/MARs (scaffold/matrix attachment regions) are the DNA regions that are involved in the interaction with the nuclear matrix and are identified by in vitro methods. According to the available information, S/MARs possess an insulating activity, i.e., the ability to block the interaction between the enhancer and promoter in vivo, and are, probably, intact insulators or their fragments. Nevertheless, there is still no direct proof for this correspondence. To obtain additional information on the insulator activity of S/MARs, we selected five DNA fragments of different lengths and affinities for the nuclear matrix from the previously constructed library of S/MARs and tested their ability to serve as insulators. Two of five elements exhibited an insulator (enhancer-blocking) activity upon the transient transfection of CHO cells. None of the S/MARs displayed either promoter or enhancer/silencer activities in these cells. PMID:15787217

  7. A cis-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelli F; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B

    2015-06-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the G564 upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globular-stage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a cis-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved. A homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the G564 ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of G564 is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.

  8. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  9. Base pair opening in three DNA-unwinding elements.

    PubMed

    Coman, Daniel; Russu, Irina M

    2005-05-27

    DNA-unwinding elements are specific base sequences that are located in the origin of DNA replication where they provide the start point for strand separation and unwinding of the DNA double helix. In the present work we have obtained the first characterization of the opening of individual base pairs in DNA-unwinding elements. The three DNA molecules investigated reproduce the 13-mer DNA-unwinding elements present in the Escherichia coli chromosome. The base sequences of the three 13-mers are conserved in the origins of replication of enteric bacterial chromosomes. The exchange of imino protons with solvent protons was measured for each DNA as a function of the concentration of exchange catalyst using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The exchange rates provided the rates and the equilibrium constants for opening of individual base pairs in each DNA at 20 degrees C. The results reveal that the kinetics and energetics of the opening reactions for AT/TA base pairs are different in the three DNA-unwinding elements due to long range effects of the base sequence. These differences encompass the AT/TA base pairs that are conserved in various bacterial genomes. Furthermore, a qualitative correlation is observed between the kinetics and energetics of opening of AT/TA base pairs and the location of the corresponding DNA-unwinding element in the origin of DNA replication. PMID:15784615

  10. BLSSpeller: exhaustive comparative discovery of conserved cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    De Witte, Dieter; Van de Velde, Jan; Decap, Dries; Van Bel, Michiel; Audenaert, Pieter; Demeester, Piet; Dhoedt, Bart; Vandepoele, Klaas; Fostier, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The accurate discovery and annotation of regulatory elements remains a challenging problem. The growing number of sequenced genomes creates new opportunities for comparative approaches to motif discovery. Putative binding sites are then considered to be functional if they are conserved in orthologous promoter sequences of multiple related species. Existing methods for comparative motif discovery usually rely on pregenerated multiple sequence alignments, which are difficult to obtain for more diverged species such as plants. As a consequence, misaligned regulatory elements often remain undetected. Results: We present a novel algorithm that supports both alignment-free and alignment-based motif discovery in the promoter sequences of related species. Putative motifs are exhaustively enumerated as words over the IUPAC alphabet and screened for conservation using the branch length score. Additionally, a confidence score is established in a genome-wide fashion. In order to take advantage of a cloud computing infrastructure, the MapReduce programming model is adopted. The method is applied to four monocotyledon plant species and it is shown that high-scoring motifs are significantly enriched for open chromatin regions in Oryza sativa and for transcription factor binding sites inferred through protein-binding microarrays in O.sativa and Zea mays. Furthermore, the method is shown to recover experimentally profiled ga2ox1-like KN1 binding sites in Z.mays. Availability and implementation: BLSSpeller was written in Java. Source code and manual are available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/blsspeller Contact: Klaas.Vandepoele@psb.vib-ugent.be or jan.fostier@intec.ugent.be Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26254488

  11. Regulatory elements required for the activation and repression of the protocadherin-alpha gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Kehayova, Polina; Monahan, Kevin; Chen, Weisheng; Maniatis, Tom

    2011-10-11

    The mouse protocadherin (Pcdh) -α, -β, and -γ gene clusters encode more than 50 protein isoforms, the combinatorial expression of which generates vast single-cell diversity in the brain. At present, the mechanisms by which this diversity is expressed are not understood. Here we show that two transcriptional enhancer elements, HS5-1 and HS7, play a critical role in Pcdhα gene expression in mice. We show that the HS5-1 element functions as an enhancer in neurons and a silencer in nonneuronal cells. The enhancer activity correlates with the binding of zinc finger DNA binding protein CTCF to the target promoters, and the silencer activity requires the binding of the REST/NRSF repressor complex in nonneuronal cells. Thus, the HS5-1 element functions as a neuron-specific enhancer and nonneuronal cell repressor. In contrast, the HS7 element functions as a Pcdhα cluster-wide transcription enhancer element. These studies reveal a complex organization of regulatory elements required for generating single cell Pcdh diversity. PMID:21949399

  12. Dissection of a Ciona regulatory element reveals complexity of cross-species enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chung; Pauls, Stefan; Bacha, Jamil; Elgar, Greg; Loose, Matthew; Shimeld, Sebastian M

    2014-06-15

    Vertebrate genomes share numerous conserved non-coding elements, many of which function as enhancer elements and are hypothesised to be under evolutionary constraint due to a need to be bound by combinations of sequence-specific transcription factors. In contrast, few such conserved elements can be detected between vertebrates and their closest invertebrate relatives. Despite this lack of sequence identity, cross-species transgenesis has identified some cases where non-coding DNA from invertebrates drives reporter gene expression in transgenic vertebrates in patterns reminiscent of the expression of vertebrate orthologues. Such instances are presumed to reflect the presence of conserved suites of binding sites in the regulatory regions of invertebrate and vertebrate orthologues, such that both regulatory elements can correctly interpret the trans-activating environment. Shuffling of binding sites has been suggested to lie behind loss of sequence conservation; however this has not been experimentally tested. Here we examine the underlying basis of enhancer activity for the Ciona intestinalis βγ-crystallin gene, which drives expression in the lens of transgenic vertebrates despite the Ciona lineage predating the evolution of the lens. We construct an interactive gene regulatory network (GRN) for vertebrate lens development, allowing network interactions to be robustly catalogued and conserved network components and features to be identified. We show that a small number of binding motifs are necessary for Ciona βγ-crystallin expression, and narrow down the likely factors that bind to these motifs. Several of these overlap with the conserved core of the vertebrate lens GRN, implicating these sites in cross species function. However when we test these motifs in a transgenic vertebrate they prove to be dispensable for reporter expression in the lens. These results show that current models depicting cross species enhancer function as dependent on conserved binding

  13. Promoter elements determining weak expression of the GAL4 regulatory gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, D W; Johnston, M

    1993-01-01

    The GAL4 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (encoding the activator of transcription of the GAL genes) is poorly expressed and is repressed during growth on glucose. To determine the basis for its weak expression and to identify DNA sequences recognized by proteins that activate transcription of a gene that itself encodes an activator of transcription, we have analyzed GAL4 promoter structure. We show that the GAL4 promoter is about 90-fold weaker than the strong GAL1 promoter and at least 7-fold weaker than the feeble URA3 promoter and that this low level of GAL4 expression is primarily due to a weak promoter. By deletion mapping, the GAL4 promoter can be divided into three functional regions. Two of these regions contain positive elements; a distal region termed the UASGAL4 (upstream activation sequence) contains redundant elements that increase promoter function, and a central region termed the UESGAL4 (upstream essential sequence) is essential for even basal levels of GAL4 expression. The third element, an upstream repression sequence, mediates glucose repression of GAL4 expression and is located between the UES and the transcriptional start site. The UASGAL4 is unusual because it is not interchangable with UAS elements in other yeast promoters; it does not function as a UAS element when inserted in a CYC1 promoter, and a normally strong UAS functions poorly in place of UASGAL4 in the GAL4 promoter. Similarly, the UES element of GAL4 does not function as a TATA element in a test promoter, and consensus TATA elements do not function in place of UES elements in the GAL4 promoter. These results suggest that GAL4 contains a weak TATA-less promoter and that the proteins regulating expression of this regulatory gene may be novel and context specific. PMID:8393142

  14. The Y chromosome as a regulatory element shaping immune cell transcriptomes and susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Case, Laure K; Wall, Emma H; Dragon, Julie A; Saligrama, Naresha; Krementsov, Dimitry N; Moussawi, Mohamad; Zachary, James F; Huber, Sally A; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the DNA elements that constitute and control the regulatory genome is critical for the appropriate therapeutic management of complex diseases. Here, using chromosome Y (ChrY) consomic mouse strains on the C57BL/6J (B6) background, we show that susceptibility to two diverse animal models of autoimmune disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental myocarditis, correlates with the natural variation in copy number of Sly and Rbmy multicopy ChrY genes. On the B6 background, ChrY possesses gene regulatory properties that impact genome-wide gene expression in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. Using a ChrY consomic strain on the SJL background, we discovered a preference for ChrY-mediated gene regulation in macrophages, the immune cell subset underlying the EAE sexual dimorphism in SJL mice, rather than CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, in both genetic backgrounds, an inverse correlation exists between the number of Sly and Rbmy ChrY gene copies and the number of significantly up-regulated genes in immune cells, thereby supporting a link between copy number variation of Sly and Rbmy with the ChrY genetic element exerting regulatory properties. Additionally, we show that ChrY polymorphism can determine the sexual dimorphism in EAE and myocarditis. In humans, an analysis of the CD4(+) T cell transcriptome from male multiple sclerosis patients versus healthy controls provides further evidence for an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene regulation by ChrY. Thus, as in Drosophila, these data establish the mammalian ChrY as a member of the regulatory genome due to its ability to epigenetically regulate genome-wide gene expression in immune cells. PMID:23800453

  15. The Y chromosome as a regulatory element shaping immune cell transcriptomes and susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Case, Laure K; Wall, Emma H; Dragon, Julie A; Saligrama, Naresha; Krementsov, Dimitry N; Moussawi, Mohamad; Zachary, James F; Huber, Sally A; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the DNA elements that constitute and control the regulatory genome is critical for the appropriate therapeutic management of complex diseases. Here, using chromosome Y (ChrY) consomic mouse strains on the C57BL/6J (B6) background, we show that susceptibility to two diverse animal models of autoimmune disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental myocarditis, correlates with the natural variation in copy number of Sly and Rbmy multicopy ChrY genes. On the B6 background, ChrY possesses gene regulatory properties that impact genome-wide gene expression in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. Using a ChrY consomic strain on the SJL background, we discovered a preference for ChrY-mediated gene regulation in macrophages, the immune cell subset underlying the EAE sexual dimorphism in SJL mice, rather than CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, in both genetic backgrounds, an inverse correlation exists between the number of Sly and Rbmy ChrY gene copies and the number of significantly up-regulated genes in immune cells, thereby supporting a link between copy number variation of Sly and Rbmy with the ChrY genetic element exerting regulatory properties. Additionally, we show that ChrY polymorphism can determine the sexual dimorphism in EAE and myocarditis. In humans, an analysis of the CD4(+) T cell transcriptome from male multiple sclerosis patients versus healthy controls provides further evidence for an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene regulation by ChrY. Thus, as in Drosophila, these data establish the mammalian ChrY as a member of the regulatory genome due to its ability to epigenetically regulate genome-wide gene expression in immune cells.

  16. Widespread contribution of transposable elements to the innovation of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vasavi; Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Li, Daofeng; Xing, Xiaoyun; Edge, Peter; Snyder, Michael P; Wang, Ting

    2014-12-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have been shown to contain functional binding sites for certain transcription factors (TFs). However, the extent to which TEs contribute to the evolution of TF binding sites is not well known. We comprehensively mapped binding sites for 26 pairs of orthologous TFs in two pairs of human and mouse cell lines (representing two cell lineages), along with epigenomic profiles, including DNA methylation and six histone modifications. Overall, we found that 20% of binding sites were embedded within TEs. This number varied across different TFs, ranging from 2% to 40%. We further identified 710 TF-TE relationships in which genomic copies of a TE subfamily contributed a significant number of binding peaks for a TF, and we found that LTR elements dominated these relationships in human. Importantly, TE-derived binding peaks were strongly associated with open and active chromatin signatures, including reduced DNA methylation and increased enhancer-associated histone marks. On average, 66% of TE-derived binding events were cell type-specific with a cell type-specific epigenetic landscape. Most of the binding sites contributed by TEs were species-specific, but we also identified binding sites conserved between human and mouse, the functional relevance of which was supported by a signature of purifying selection on DNA sequences of these TEs. Interestingly, several TFs had significantly expanded binding site landscapes only in one species, which were linked to species-specific gene functions, suggesting that TEs are an important driving force for regulatory innovation. Taken together, our data suggest that TEs have significantly and continuously shaped gene regulatory networks during mammalian evolution.

  17. Widespread contribution of transposable elements to the innovation of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vasavi; Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Li, Daofeng; Xing, Xiaoyun; Edge, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) have been shown to contain functional binding sites for certain transcription factors (TFs). However, the extent to which TEs contribute to the evolution of TF binding sites is not well known. We comprehensively mapped binding sites for 26 pairs of orthologous TFs in two pairs of human and mouse cell lines (representing two cell lineages), along with epigenomic profiles, including DNA methylation and six histone modifications. Overall, we found that 20% of binding sites were embedded within TEs. This number varied across different TFs, ranging from 2% to 40%. We further identified 710 TF–TE relationships in which genomic copies of a TE subfamily contributed a significant number of binding peaks for a TF, and we found that LTR elements dominated these relationships in human. Importantly, TE-derived binding peaks were strongly associated with open and active chromatin signatures, including reduced DNA methylation and increased enhancer-associated histone marks. On average, 66% of TE-derived binding events were cell type-specific with a cell type-specific epigenetic landscape. Most of the binding sites contributed by TEs were species-specific, but we also identified binding sites conserved between human and mouse, the functional relevance of which was supported by a signature of purifying selection on DNA sequences of these TEs. Interestingly, several TFs had significantly expanded binding site landscapes only in one species, which were linked to species-specific gene functions, suggesting that TEs are an important driving force for regulatory innovation. Taken together, our data suggest that TEs have significantly and continuously shaped gene regulatory networks during mammalian evolution. PMID:25319995

  18. Satellite DNA-like elements associated with genes within euchromatin of the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Brajković, Josip; Feliciello, Isidoro; Bruvo-Mađarić, Branka; Ugarković, Durđica

    2012-08-01

    In the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum the major TCAST satellite DNA accounts for 35% of the genome and encompasses the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes. Because of the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and transcriptional activity in these sequences, TCAST satellite DNAs also have been proposed to be modulators of gene expression within euchromatin. Here, we analyze the distribution of TCAST homologous repeats in T. castaneum euchromatin and study their association with genes as well as their potential gene regulatory role. We identified 68 arrays composed of TCAST-like elements distributed on all chromosomes. Based on sequence characteristics the arrays were composed of two types of TCAST-like elements. The first type consists of TCAST satellite-like elements in the form of partial monomers or tandemly arranged monomers, up to tetramers, whereas the second type consists of TCAST-like elements embedded with a complex unit that resembles a DNA transposon. TCAST-like elements were also found in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the CR1-3_TCa retrotransposon, and therefore retrotransposition may have contributed to their dispersion throughout the genome. No significant difference in the homogenization of dispersed TCAST-like elements was found either at the level of local arrays or chromosomes nor among different chromosomes. Of 68 TCAST-like elements, 29 were located within introns, with the remaining elements flanked by genes within a 262 to 404,270 nt range. TCAST-like elements are statistically overrepresented near genes with immunoglobulin-like domains attesting to their nonrandom distribution and a possible gene regulatory role. PMID:22908042

  19. Satellite DNA-Like Elements Associated With Genes Within Euchromatin of the Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Brajković, Josip; Feliciello, Isidoro; Bruvo-Mađarić, Branka; Ugarković, Đurđica

    2012-01-01

    In the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum the major TCAST satellite DNA accounts for 35% of the genome and encompasses the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes. Because of the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and transcriptional activity in these sequences, TCAST satellite DNAs also have been proposed to be modulators of gene expression within euchromatin. Here, we analyze the distribution of TCAST homologous repeats in T. castaneum euchromatin and study their association with genes as well as their potential gene regulatory role. We identified 68 arrays composed of TCAST-like elements distributed on all chromosomes. Based on sequence characteristics the arrays were composed of two types of TCAST-like elements. The first type consists of TCAST satellite-like elements in the form of partial monomers or tandemly arranged monomers, up to tetramers, whereas the second type consists of TCAST-like elements embedded with a complex unit that resembles a DNA transposon. TCAST-like elements were also found in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the CR1-3_TCa retrotransposon, and therefore retrotransposition may have contributed to their dispersion throughout the genome. No significant difference in the homogenization of dispersed TCAST-like elements was found either at the level of local arrays or chromosomes nor among different chromosomes. Of 68 TCAST-like elements, 29 were located within introns, with the remaining elements flanked by genes within a 262 to 404,270 nt range. TCAST-like elements are statistically overrepresented near genes with immunoglobulin-like domains attesting to their nonrandom distribution and a possible gene regulatory role. PMID:22908042

  20. FootprintDB: Analysis of Plant Cis-Regulatory Elements, Transcription Factors, and Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sebastian, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    FootprintDB is a database and search engine that compiles regulatory sequences from open access libraries of curated DNA cis-elements and motifs, and their associated transcription factors (TFs). It systematically annotates the binding interfaces of the TFs by exploiting protein-DNA complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Each entry in footprintDB is thus a DNA motif linked to the protein sequence of the TF(s) known to recognize it, and in most cases, the set of predicted interface residues involved in specific recognition. This chapter explains step-by-step how to search for DNA motifs and protein sequences in footprintDB and how to focus the search to a particular organism. Two real-world examples are shown where this software was used to analyze transcriptional regulation in plants. Results are described with the aim of guiding users on their interpretation, and special attention is given to the choices users might face when performing similar analyses. PMID:27557773

  1. Potential use of DNA barcodes in regulatory science: applications of the Regulatory Fish Encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yancy, Haile F; Zemlak, Tyler S; Mason, Jacquline A; Washington, Jewell D; Tenge, Bradley J; Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan T; Barnett, James D; Savary, Warren E; Hill, Walter E; Moore, Michelle M; Fry, Frederick S; Randolph, Spring C; Rogers, Patricia L; Hebert, Paul D N

    2008-01-01

    The use of a DNA-based identification system (DNA barcoding) founded on the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) was investigated for updating the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Fish Encyclopedia (RFE; http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/-frf/rfe0.html). The RFE is a compilation of data used to identify fish species. It was compiled to help regulators identify species substitution that could result in potential adverse health consequences or could be a source of economic fraud. For each of many aquatic species commonly sold in the United States, the RFE includes high-resolution photographs of whole fish and their marketed product forms and species-specific biochemical patterns for authenticated fish species. These patterns currently include data from isoelectric focusing studies. In this article, we describe the generation of DNA barcodes for 172 individual authenticated fish representing 72 species from 27 families contained in the RFE. These barcode sequences can be used as an additional identification resource. In a blind study, 60 unknown fish muscle samples were barcoded, and the results were compared with the RFE barcode reference library. All 60 samples were correctly identified to species based on the barcoding data. Our study indicates that DNA barcoding can be a powerful tool for species identification and has broad potential applications.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific {sup 3}H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

  3. Search for enhancers: teleost models in comparative genomic and transgenic analysis of cis regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ferenc; Blader, Patrick; Strähle, Uwe

    2002-06-01

    Homology searches between DNA sequences of evolutionary distant species (phylogenetic footprinting) offer a fast detection method for regulatory sequences. Because of the small size of their genomes, tetraodontid species such as the Japanese pufferfish and green spotted pufferfish have become attractive models for comparative genomics. A disadvantage of the tetraodontid species is, however, that they cannot be bred and manipulated routinely under laboratory conditions, so these species are less attractive for developmental and genetic analysis. In contrast, an increasing arsenal of transgene techniques with the developmental model species zebrafish and medaka are being used for functional analysis of cis regulatory sequences. The main disadvantage is the much larger genome. While comparison between many loci proved the suitability of phylogenetic footprinting using fish and mammalian sequences, fast rate of change in enhancer structure and gene duplication within teleosts may obscure detection of homologies. Here we discuss the contribution and potentials provided by different teleost models for the detection and functional analysis of conserved cis-regulatory elements. PMID:12111739

  4. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    PubMed

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  5. KA1-targeted regulatory domain mutations activate Chk1 in the absence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Smits, Veronique A J; Fumagallo, Felipe; Piscitello, Desiree; Morrice, Nick; Freire, Raimundo; Gillespie, David A

    2015-01-01

    The Chk1 protein kinase is activated in response to DNA damage through ATR-mediated phosphorylation at multiple serine-glutamine (SQ) residues within the C-terminal regulatory domain, however the molecular mechanism is not understood. Modelling indicates a high probability that this region of Chk1 contains a kinase-associated 1 (KA1) domain, a small, compact protein fold found in multiple protein kinases including SOS2, AMPK and MARK3. We introduced mutations into Chk1 designed to disrupt specific structural elements of the predicted KA1 domain. Remarkably, six of seven Chk1 KA1 mutants exhibit constitutive biological activity (Chk1-CA) in the absence of DNA damage, profoundly arresting cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Cell cycle arrest induced by selected Chk1-CA mutants depends on kinase catalytic activity, which is increased several-fold compared to wild-type, however phosphorylation of the key ATR regulatory site serine 345 (S345) is not required. Thus, mutations targeting the putative Chk1 KA1 domain confer constitutive biological activity by circumventing the need for ATR-mediated positive regulatory phosphorylation. PMID:26039276

  6. Orientation-dependent interaction between Drosophila insulators is a property of this class of regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kyrchanova, Olga; Chetverina, Darya; Maksimenko, Oksana; Kullyev, Andrey; Georgiev, Pavel

    2008-12-01

    Insulators are defined as a class of regulatory elements that delimit independent transcriptional domains within eukaryotic genomes. According to previous data, an interaction (pairing) between some Drosophila insulators can support distant activation of a promoter by an enhancer. Here, we have demonstrated that pairs of well-studied insulators such as scs-scs, scs'-scs', 1A2-1A2 and Wari-Wari support distant activation of the white promoter by the yeast GAL4 activator in an orientation-dependent manner. The same is true for the efficiency of the enhancer that stimulates white expression in the eyes. In all insulator pairs tested, stimulation of the white gene was stronger when insulators were inserted between the eye enhancer or GAL4 and the white promoter in opposite orientations relative to each other. As shown previously, Zw5, Su(Hw) and dCTCF proteins are required for the functioning of different insulators that do not interact with each other. Here, strong functional interactions have been revealed between DNA fragments containing binding sites for either Zw5 or Su(Hw) or dCTCF protein but not between heterologous binding sites [Zw5-Su(Hw), dCTCF-Su(Hw), or dCTCF-Zw5]. These results suggest that insulator proteins can support selective interactions between distant regulatory elements.

  7. Transcription factor MITF and remodeller BRG1 define chromatin organisation at regulatory elements in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Koludrovic, Dana; Keime, Céline; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Seberg, Hannah; Van Otterloo, Eric; Imrichova, Hana; Siddaway, Robert; Aerts, Stein; Cornell, Robert A; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-03-24

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is the master regulator of the melanocyte lineage. To understand how MITF regulates transcription, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to define a comprehensive MITF interactome identifying novel cofactors involved in transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin organisation. We show that MITF interacts with a PBAF chromatin remodelling complex comprising BRG1 and CHD7. BRG1 is essential for melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and for normal melanocyte development in vivo. MITF and SOX10 actively recruit BRG1 to a set of MITF-associated regulatory elements (MAREs) at active enhancers. Combinations of MITF, SOX10, TFAP2A, and YY1 bind between two BRG1-occupied nucleosomes thus defining both a signature of transcription factors essential for the melanocyte lineage and a specific chromatin organisation of the regulatory elements they occupy. BRG1 also regulates the dynamics of MITF genomic occupancy. MITF-BRG1 interplay thus plays an essential role in transcription regulation in melanoma.

  8. Transcription factor MITF and remodeller BRG1 define chromatin organisation at regulatory elements in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Koludrovic, Dana; Keime, Céline; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Seberg, Hannah; Van Otterloo, Eric; Imrichova, Hana; Siddaway, Robert; Aerts, Stein; Cornell, Robert A; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is the master regulator of the melanocyte lineage. To understand how MITF regulates transcription, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to define a comprehensive MITF interactome identifying novel cofactors involved in transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin organisation. We show that MITF interacts with a PBAF chromatin remodelling complex comprising BRG1 and CHD7. BRG1 is essential for melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and for normal melanocyte development in vivo. MITF and SOX10 actively recruit BRG1 to a set of MITF-associated regulatory elements (MAREs) at active enhancers. Combinations of MITF, SOX10, TFAP2A, and YY1 bind between two BRG1-occupied nucleosomes thus defining both a signature of transcription factors essential for the melanocyte lineage and a specific chromatin organisation of the regulatory elements they occupy. BRG1 also regulates the dynamics of MITF genomic occupancy. MITF-BRG1 interplay thus plays an essential role in transcription regulation in melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06857.001 PMID:25803486

  9. Human polyomavirus JCV late leader peptide region contains important regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Akan, Ilhan; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Biffi, Renato; Palermo, Victoria; Woolridge, Stefanie; White, Martyn K.; Amini, Shohreh |; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut . E-mail: msafak@temple.edu

    2006-05-25

    Transcription is a complex process that relies on the cooperative interaction between sequence-specific factors and the basal transcription machinery. The strength of a promoter depends on upstream or downstream cis-acting DNA elements, which bind transcription factors. In this study, we investigated whether DNA elements located downstream of the JCV late promoter, encompassing the late leader peptide region, which encodes agnoprotein, play regulatory roles in the JCV lytic cycle. For this purpose, the entire coding region of the leader peptide was deleted and the functional consequences of this deletion were analyzed. We found that viral gene expression and replication were drastically reduced. Gene expression also decreased from a leader peptide point mutant but to a lesser extent. This suggested that the leader peptide region of JCV might contain critical cis-acting DNA elements to which transcription factors bind and regulate viral gene expression and replication. We analyzed the entire coding region of the late leader peptide by a footprinting assay and identified three major regions (region I, II and III) that were protected by nuclear proteins. Further investigation of the first two protected regions by band shift assays revealed a new band that appeared in new infection cycles, suggesting that viral infection induces new factors that interact with the late leader peptide region of JCV. Analysis of the effect of the leader peptide region on the promoter activity of JCV by transfection assays demonstrated that this region has a positive and negative effect on the large T antigen (LT-Ag)-mediated activation of the viral early and late promoters, respectively. Furthermore, a partial deletion analysis of the leader peptide region encompassing the protected regions I and II demonstrated a significant down-regulation of viral gene expression and replication. More importantly, these results were similar to that obtained from a complete deletion of the late leader

  10. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding.

  11. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  12. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  13. Polyomavirus origin for DNA replication comprises multiple genetic elements.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, W J; Mueller, C R; Mes, A M; Hassell, J A

    1983-01-01

    To define the minimal cis-acting sequences required for polyomavirus DNA replication (ori), we constructed a number of polyomavirus-plasmid recombinants and measured their replicative capacity after transfection of a permissive mouse cell line capable of providing polyomavirus large T antigen in trans (MOP cells). Recombinant plasmids containing a 251-base-pair fragment of noncoding viral DNA replicate efficiently in MOP cells. Mutational analyses of these viral sequences revealed that they can be physically separated into two genetic elements. One of these elements, termed the core, contains an adenine-thymine-rich area, a 32-base-pair guanine-cytosine-rich palindrome, and a large T antigen binding site, and likely includes the site from which bidirectional DNA replication initiates. The other, termed beta, is located adjacent to the core near the late region and is devoid of outstanding sequence features. Surprisingly, another sequence element named alpha, located adjacent to beta but outside the borders of the 251-base-pair fragment, can functionally substitute for beta. This sequence too contains no readily recognized sequence features and possesses no obvious homology to the beta element. The three elements together occupy a contiguous noncoding stretch of DNA no more than 345 base pairs in length in the order alpha, beta, and core. These results indicate that the polyomavirus origin for DNA replication comprises multiple genetic elements. Images PMID:6312083

  14. UCNEbase--a database of ultraconserved non-coding elements and genomic regulatory blocks.

    PubMed

    Dimitrieva, Slavica; Bucher, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    UCNEbase (http://ccg.vital-it.ch/UCNEbase) is a free, web-accessible information resource on the evolution and genomic organization of ultra-conserved non-coding elements (UCNEs). It currently covers 4351 such elements in 18 different species. The majority of UCNEs are supposed to be transcriptional regulators of key developmental genes. As most of them occur as clusters near potential target genes, the database is organized along two hierarchical levels: individual UCNEs and ultra-conserved genomic regulatory blocks (UGRBs). UCNEbase introduces a coherent nomenclature for UCNEs reflecting their respective associations with likely target genes. Orthologous and paralogous UCNEs share components of their names and are systematically cross-linked. Detailed synteny maps between the human and other genomes are provided for all UGRBs. UCNEbase is managed by a relational database system and can be accessed by a variety of web-based query pages. As it relies on the UCSC genome browser as visualization platform, a large part of its data content is also available as browser viewable custom track files. UCNEbase is potentially useful to any computational, experimental or evolutionary biologist interested in conserved non-coding DNA elements in vertebrates. PMID:23193254

  15. UCNEbase--a database of ultraconserved non-coding elements and genomic regulatory blocks.

    PubMed

    Dimitrieva, Slavica; Bucher, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    UCNEbase (http://ccg.vital-it.ch/UCNEbase) is a free, web-accessible information resource on the evolution and genomic organization of ultra-conserved non-coding elements (UCNEs). It currently covers 4351 such elements in 18 different species. The majority of UCNEs are supposed to be transcriptional regulators of key developmental genes. As most of them occur as clusters near potential target genes, the database is organized along two hierarchical levels: individual UCNEs and ultra-conserved genomic regulatory blocks (UGRBs). UCNEbase introduces a coherent nomenclature for UCNEs reflecting their respective associations with likely target genes. Orthologous and paralogous UCNEs share components of their names and are systematically cross-linked. Detailed synteny maps between the human and other genomes are provided for all UGRBs. UCNEbase is managed by a relational database system and can be accessed by a variety of web-based query pages. As it relies on the UCSC genome browser as visualization platform, a large part of its data content is also available as browser viewable custom track files. UCNEbase is potentially useful to any computational, experimental or evolutionary biologist interested in conserved non-coding DNA elements in vertebrates.

  16. A step-by-step protocol for formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Omidbakhshfard, Mohammad Amin; Winck, Flavia Vischi; Arvidsson, Samuel; Riaño-Pachón, Diego M; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    The control of gene expression by transcriptional regulators and other types of functionally relevant DNA transactions such as chromatin remodeling and replication underlie a vast spectrum of biological processes in all organisms. DNA transactions require the controlled interaction of proteins with DNA sequence motifs which are often located in nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) of the chromatin. Formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE) has been established as an easy-to-implement method for the isolation of NDRs from a number of eukaryotic organisms, and it has been successfully employed for the discovery of new regulatory segments in genomic DNA from, for example, yeast, Drosophila, and humans. Until today, however, FAIRE has only rarely been employed in plant research and currently no detailed FAIRE protocol for plants has been published. Here, we provide a step-by-step FAIRE protocol for NDR discovery in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that NDRs isolated from plant chromatin are readily amenable to quantitative polymerase chain reaction and next-generation sequencing. Only minor modification of the FAIRE protocol will be needed to adapt it to other plants, thus facilitating the global inventory of regulatory regions across species.

  17. The bacterial DnaA-trio replication origin element specifies single-stranded DNA initiator binding.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tomas T; Harran, Omar; Murray, Heath

    2016-06-16

    DNA replication is tightly controlled to ensure accurate inheritance of genetic information. In all organisms, initiator proteins possessing AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) domains bind replication origins to license new rounds of DNA synthesis. In bacteria the master initiator protein, DnaA, is highly conserved and has two crucial DNA binding activities. DnaA monomers recognize the replication origin (oriC) by binding double-stranded DNA sequences (DnaA-boxes); subsequently, DnaA filaments assemble and promote duplex unwinding by engaging and stretching a single DNA strand. While the specificity for duplex DnaA-boxes by DnaA has been appreciated for over 30 years, the sequence specificity for single-strand DNA binding has remained unknown. Here we identify a new indispensable bacterial replication origin element composed of a repeating trinucleotide motif that we term the DnaA-trio. We show that the function of the DnaA-trio is to stabilize DnaA filaments on a single DNA strand, thus providing essential precision to this binding mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis detects DnaA-trios in replication origins throughout the bacterial kingdom, indicating that this element is part of the core oriC structure. The discovery and characterization of the novel DnaA-trio extends our fundamental understanding of bacterial DNA replication initiation, and because of the conserved structure of AAA+ initiator proteins these findings raise the possibility of specific recognition motifs within replication origins of higher organisms. PMID:27281207

  18. Variation in Vertebrate Cis-Regulatory Elements in Evolution and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Adam Thomas; Hill, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Much of the genetic information that drives animal diversity lies within the vast non-coding regions of the genome. Multi-species sequence conservation in non-coding regions of the genome flags important regulatory elements and more recently, techniques that look for functional signatures predicted for regulatory sequences have added to the identification of thousands more. For some time, biologists have argued that changes in cis-regulatory sequences creates the basic genetic framework for evolutionary change. Recent advances support this notion and show that there is extensive genomic variability in non-coding regulatory elements associated with trait variation, speciation and disease. PMID:25764334

  19. Functional Annotation of Putative Regulatory Elements at Cancer Susceptibility Loci

    PubMed Central

    Rosse, Stephanie A; Auer, Paul L; Carlson, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer-associated genetic variants identified from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) do not obviously change protein structure, leading to the hypothesis that the associations are attributable to regulatory polymorphisms. Translating genetic associations into mechanistic insights can be facilitated by knowledge of the causal regulatory variant (or variants) responsible for the statistical signal. Experimental validation of candidate functional variants is onerous, making bioinformatic approaches necessary to prioritize candidates for laboratory analysis. Thus, a systematic approach for recognizing functional (and, therefore, likely causal) variants in noncoding regions is an important step toward interpreting cancer risk loci. This review provides a detailed introduction to current regulatory variant annotations, followed by an overview of how to leverage these resources to prioritize candidate functional polymorphisms in regulatory regions. PMID:25288875

  20. A steganalysis-based approach to comprehensive identification and characterization of functional regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guandong; Zhang, Weixiong

    2006-01-01

    The comprehensive identification of cis-regulatory elements on a genome scale is a challenging problem. We develop a novel, steganalysis-based approach for genome-wide motif finding, called WordSpy, by viewing regulatory regions as a stegoscript with cis-elements embedded in 'background' sequences. We apply WordSpy to the promoters of cell-cycle-related genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis thaliana, identifying all known cell-cycle motifs with high ranking. WordSpy can discover a complete set of cis-elements and facilitate the systematic study of regulatory networks. PMID:16787547

  1. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations - mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation - is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia associated with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ryotokuji, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Usuki, Kensuke; Kurosawa, Saiko; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Kawata, Eri; Tajika, Kenji; Gomi, Seiji; Kanda, Junya; Kobayashi, Anna; Omori, Ikuko; Marumo, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Yui, Shunsuke; Terada, Kazuki; Fukunaga, Keiko; Hirakawa, Tsuneaki; Arai, Kunihito; Kitano, Tomoaki; Kosaka, Fumiko; Tamai, Hayato; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Wakita, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that the frequency of DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations – mutations of the genes that regulate gene expression through DNA methylation – is high in acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the clinical characteristics and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with associated DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation. We studied 308 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations were observed in 135 of the 308 cases (43.8%). Acute myeloid leukemia associated with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was more frequent in older patients (P<0.0001) and in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk (P<0.0001) accompanied by a high white blood cell count (P=0.0032). DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival in the whole cohort (P=0.0018), in patients aged ≤70 years, in patients with intermediate cytogenetic risk, and in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (P=0.0409). Among the patients with DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutations, 26.7% were found to have two or more such mutations and prognosis worsened with increasing number of mutations. In multivariate analysis DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (P=0.0424). However, patients with a DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation in first remission had a significantly better prognosis than those who did not undergo such transplantation (P=0.0254). Our study establishes that DNA-methylation regulatory gene mutation is an important unfavorable prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27247325

  3. A brief review on the Human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2013-06-01

    The ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project is an international research consortium that aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome sequence. The second phase of the project comprised 1640 datasets from 147 different cell types, yielding a set of 30 publications across several journals. These data revealed that 80.4% of the human genome displays some functionality in at least one cell type. Many of these regulatory elements are physically associated with one another and further form a network or three-dimensional conformation to affect gene expression. These elements are also related to sequence variants associated with diseases or traits. All these findings provide us new insights into the organization and regulation of genes and genome, and serve as an expansive resource for understanding human health and disease.

  4. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-12-06

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel 'recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4-Met28-Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity.

  5. SeqGL Identifies Context-Dependent Binding Signals in Genome-Wide Regulatory Element Maps.

    PubMed

    Setty, Manu; Leslie, Christina S

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide maps of transcription factor (TF) occupancy and regions of open chromatin implicitly contain DNA sequence signals for multiple factors. We present SeqGL, a novel de novo motif discovery algorithm to identify multiple TF sequence signals from ChIP-, DNase-, and ATAC-seq profiles. SeqGL trains a discriminative model using a k-mer feature representation together with group lasso regularization to extract a collection of sequence signals that distinguish peak sequences from flanking regions. Benchmarked on over 100 ChIP-seq experiments, SeqGL outperformed traditional motif discovery tools in discriminative accuracy. Furthermore, SeqGL can be naturally used with multitask learning to identify genomic and cell-type context determinants of TF binding. SeqGL successfully scales to the large multiplicity of sequence signals in DNase- or ATAC-seq maps. In particular, SeqGL was able to identify a number of ChIP-seq validated sequence signals that were not found by traditional motif discovery algorithms. Thus compared to widely used motif discovery algorithms, SeqGL demonstrates both greater discriminative accuracy and higher sensitivity for detecting the DNA sequence signals underlying regulatory element maps. SeqGL is available at http://cbio.mskcc.org/public/Leslie/SeqGL/. PMID:26016777

  6. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  7. SOS regulatory elements are essential for UPEC pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Birong; Smith, Peter; Horvath, Dennis J; Romesberg, Floyd E; Justice, Sheryl S

    2010-08-01

    Epithelial cells are highly regarded as the first line of defense against microorganisms, but the mechanisms used to control bacterial diseases are poorly understood. A component of the DNA damage repair regulon, SulA, is essential for UPEC virulence in a mouse model for human urinary tract infection, suggesting that DNA damage is a key mediator in the primary control of pathogens within the epithelium. In this study, we examine the role of DNA damage repair regulators in the intracellular lifestyle of UPEC within superficial bladder epithelial cells. LexA and RecA coordinate various operons for repair of DNA damage due to exogenous and endogenous agents and are known regulators of sulA. UPEC strains defective in regulation of the SOS response mediated by RecA and LexA display attenuated virulence in immunocompetent mice within the first 6 h post infection. RecA and LexA regulation of the SOS regulon is dispensable in immunocompromised mice. These data suggest that epithelial cells produce sufficient levels of DNA damaging agents, such that the bacterial DNA damage repair response is essential, as a means to control invading bacteria. Since many pathogens interact with the epithelium before exposure to professional phagocytes, it is likely that adaptation to oxidative radicals during intracellular growth provides additional protection from killing by innate immune phagocytes.

  8. FARE-CAFE: a database of functional and regulatory elements of cancer-associated fusion events.

    PubMed

    Korla, Praveen Kumar; Cheng, Jack; Huang, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation (CT) is of enormous clinical interest because this disorder is associated with various major solid tumors and leukemia. A tumor-specific fusion gene event may occur when a translocation joins two separate genes. Currently, various CT databases provide information about fusion genes and their genomic elements. However, no database of the roles of fusion genes, in terms of essential functional and regulatory elements in oncogenesis, is available. FARE-CAFE is a unique combination of CTs, fusion proteins, protein domains, domain-domain interactions, protein-protein interactions, transcription factors and microRNAs, with subsequent experimental information, which cannot be found in any other CT database. Genomic DNA information including, for example, manually collected exact locations of the first and second break points, sequences and karyotypes of fusion genes are included. FARE-CAFE will substantially facilitate the cancer biologist's mission of elucidating the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. This database will ultimately help to develop 'novel' therapeutic approaches. Database URL: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/FARE-CAFE.

  9. Characterization of CYP1A1 regulatory elements in Atlantic tomcod

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, N.; Wirgin, I.; Courtenay, S.

    1995-12-31

    Coplanar PCBs, TCDD, and PAHs induce cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1) mRNA in Atlantic tomcod from the Miramichi River (MR), whereas only PAHs induce gene expression in tomcod from the Hudson River (HR). Relative to the highly industrialized HR, MR is relatively clean. The authors hypothesize that non-inducibility of CYP1A1 mRNA in PCB (TCB) or TCDD treated tomcod from the HR is due to prior exposure to environmentally-borne xenobiotics. To evaluate the mechanisms which selectively inhibit CYP1A1 inducibility, they isolated and characterized 5{tilde O}and intronic CYP1A1 regulatory elements from tomcod genomic DNA. Tomcod 5{tilde O} CYP1A1 contains four motifs with core sequences identical to the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor elements (AhREs) identified in mammals. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) with nuclear extracts prepared form the livers of B[a]P treated HR tomcod showed protein binding to 142 and 156 bp tomcod DNA fragments each containing two tomcod AhREs. EMSAs with nuclear extracts prepared from DMBA treated rat livers and human MOLT4 cells also showed protein binding to the fish AhREs. Protein binding at individual tomcod AhREs was characterized with hepatic protein extracts prepared from TCB, B[a]P, and vehicle treated tomcod from the HR and MR. Preliminary studies showed a difference in protein binding between HR and MR tomcod i.p. injected with TCB 1d, 5d, or 15d previous, but not B[a]P 6 hr or 24 hr previous. These results suggest that the mechanisms of CYP1A1 transcription are similar tomcod and mammals and that variation in levels of gene inducibility among individual tomcod may be due to differences in inducible protein binding to CYP1A1 AhREs.

  10. [Identification and mapping of cis-regulatory elements within long genomic sequences].

    PubMed

    Akopov, S B; Chernov, I P; Vetchinova, A S; Bulanenkova, S S; Nikolaev, L G

    2007-01-01

    The publication of the human and other metazoan genome sequences opened up the possibility for mapping and analysis of genomic regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of such sequences as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. As most genomic regulatory elements (e.g., enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements in silico is often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identification and mapping of genomic functional elements is highly desirable. In this review we discuss novel approaches to high-throughput experimental identification of mammalian genomes cis-regulatory elements which is a necessary step toward the complete genome annotation. PMID:18240562

  11. Developmental timing of mRNA translation--integration of distinct regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2010-08-01

    Targeted mRNA translation is emerging as a critical mechanism to control gene expression during developmental processes. Exciting new findings have revealed a critical role for regulatory elements within the mRNA untranslated regions to direct the timing of mRNA translation. Regulatory elements can be targeted by sequence-specific binding proteins to direct either repression or activation of mRNA translation in response to developmental signals. As new regulatory elements continue to be identified it has become clear that targeted mRNAs can contain multiple regulatory elements, directing apparently contradictory translational patterns. How is this complex regulatory input integrated? In this review, we focus on a new challenge area-how sequence-specific RNA binding proteins respond to developmental signals and functionally integrate to regulate the extent and timing of target mRNA translation. We discuss current understanding with a particular emphasis on the control of cell cycle progression that is mediated through a complex interplay of distinct mRNA regulatory elements during Xenopus oocyte maturation.

  12. Characterization of oocyte-expressed GDF9 gene in buffalo and mapping of its TSS and putative regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Roy, B; Rajput, S; Raghav, S; Kumar, P; Verma, A; Jain, A; Jain, T; Singh, D; De, S; Goswami, S L; Datta, T K

    2013-05-01

    Summary In spite of emerging evidence about the vital role of GDF9 in determination of oocyte competence, there is insufficient information about its regulation of oocyte-specific expression, particularly in livestock animals. Because of the distinct prominence of buffalo as a dairy animal, the present study was undertaken to isolate and characterize GDF9 cDNA using orthologous primers based on the bovine GDF9 sequence. GDF9 transcripts were found to be expressed in oocytes irrespective of their follicular origin, and shared a single transcription start site (TSS) at -57 base pairs (bp) upstream of ATG. Assignment of the TSS is consistent with the presence of a TATA element at -23 of the TSS mapped in this study. Localization of a buffalo-specific minimal promoter within 320 bp upstream of ATG was consolidated by identification of an E-box element at -113bp. Presence of putative transcription factor binding sites and other cis regulatory elements were analyzed at ~5 kb upstream of TSS. Various germ cell-specific cis-acting regulatory elements (BNCF, BRNF, NR2F, SORY, Foxh1, OCT1, LHXF etc.) have been identified in the 5' flanking region of the buffalo GDF9 gene, including NOBOX DNA binding elements and consensuses E-boxes (CANNTG). Presence of two conserved E-boxes found on buffalo sequence at -520 and -718 positions deserves attention in view of its sequence deviation from other species. Two NOBOX binding elements (NBE) were detected at the -3471 and -203 positions. The fall of the NBE within the putative minimal promoter territory of buffalo GDF9 and its unique non-core binding sequence could have a possible role in the control of the core promoter activity.

  13. Prebending the estrogen response element destabilizes binding of the estrogen receptor DNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; de Haan, G; Nardulli, A M; Shapiro, D J

    1997-01-01

    Binding of many eukaryotic transcription regulatory proteins to their DNA recognition sequences results in conformational changes in DNA. To test the effect of altering DNA topology by prebending a transcription factor binding site, we examined the interaction of the estrogen receptor (ER) DNA binding domain (DBD) with prebent estrogen response elements (EREs). When the ERE in minicircle DNA was prebent toward the major groove, which is in the same direction as the ER-induced DNA bend, there was no significant effect on ER DBD binding relative to the linear counterparts. However, when the ERE was bent toward the minor groove, in a direction that opposes the ER-induced DNA bend, there was a four- to eightfold reduction in ER DBD binding. Since reduced binding was also observed with the ERE in nicked circles, the reduction in binding was not due to torsional force induced by binding of ER DBD to the prebent ERE in covalently closed minicircles. To determine the mechanism responsible for reduced binding to the prebent ERE, we examined the effect of prebending the ERE on the association and dissociation of the ER DBD. Binding of the ER DBD to ERE-containing minicircles was rapid when the EREs were prebent toward either the major or minor groove of the DNA (k(on) of 9.9 x 10(6) to 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). Prebending the ERE toward the minor groove resulted in an increase in k(off) of four- to fivefold. Increased dissociation of the ER DBD from the ERE is, therefore, the major factor responsible for reduced binding of the ER DBD to an ERE prebent toward the minor groove. These data provide the first direct demonstration that the interaction of a eukaryotic transcription factor with its recognition sequence can be strongly influenced by altering DNA topology through prebending the DNA. PMID:9154816

  14. From Cis-Regulatory Elements to Complex RNPs and Back

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Fátima; Preiss, Thomas; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNAs (mRNAs), the templates for translation, have evolved to harbor abundant cis-acting sequences that affect their posttranscriptional fates. These elements are frequently located in the untranslated regions and serve as binding sites for trans-acting factors, RNA-binding proteins, and/or small non-coding RNAs. This article provides a systematic synopsis of cis-acting elements, trans-acting factors, and the mechanisms by which they affect translation. It also highlights recent technical advances that have ushered in the era of transcriptome-wide studies of the ribonucleoprotein complexes formed by mRNAs and their trans-acting factors. PMID:22751153

  15. Genome-Wide Profiling of PARP1 Reveals an Interplay with Gene Regulatory Regions and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Nalabothula, Narasimharao; Al-jumaily, Taha; Eteleeb, Abdallah M.; Flight, Robert M.; Xiaorong, Shao; Moseley, Hunter; Rouchka, Eric C.; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) is a nuclear enzyme involved in DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and gene expression. PARP1 interactions with chromatin architectural multi-protein complexes (i.e. nucleosomes) alter chromatin structure resulting in changes in gene expression. Chromatin structure impacts gene regulatory processes including transcription, splicing, DNA repair, replication and recombination. It is important to delineate whether PARP1 randomly associates with nucleosomes or is present at specific nucleosome regions throughout the cell genome. We performed genome-wide association studies in breast cancer cell lines to address these questions. Our studies show that PARP1 associates with epigenetic regulatory elements genome-wide, such as active histone marks, CTCF and DNase hypersensitive sites. Additionally, the binding of PARP1 to chromatin genome-wide is mutually exclusive with DNA methylation pattern suggesting a functional interplay between PARP1 and DNA methylation. Indeed, inhibition of PARylation results in genome-wide changes in DNA methylation patterns. Our results suggest that PARP1 controls the fidelity of gene transcription and marks actively transcribed gene regions by selectively binding to transcriptionally active chromatin. These studies provide a platform for developing our understanding of PARP1’s role in gene regulation. PMID:26305327

  16. Transposable elements: from DNA parasites to architects of metazoan evolution.

    PubMed

    Piskurek, Oliver; Jackson, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    One of the most unexpected insights that followed from the completion of the human genome a decade ago was that more than half of our DNA is derived from transposable elements (TEs). Due to advances in high throughput sequencing technologies it is now clear that TEs comprise the largest molecular class within most metazoan genomes. TEs, once categorised as "junk DNA", are now known to influence genomic structure and function by increasing the coding and non-coding genetic repertoire of the host. In this way TEs are key elements that stimulate the evolution of metazoan genomes. This review highlights several lines of TE research including the horizontal transfer of TEs through host-parasite interactions, the vertical maintenance of TEs over long periods of evolutionary time, and the direct role that TEs have played in generating morphological novelty.

  17. DNA sequence of the maize transposable element Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Döring, H P; Tillmann, E; Starlinger, P

    The DNA sequence of the terminal 4.2 kilobases (kb) of the 30-kb insertion in the endosperm sucrose synthase gene of maize mutant sh-m5933 shows that it comprises two identical 2,040-base pair (bp) segments, one inserted in the reverse direction into the other. We suggest that the 2,040-bp sequence is an example of the transposable element Dissociation described by Barbara McClintock. PMID:6318121

  18. DNA sequence of the maize transposable element Dissociation.

    PubMed

    Döring, H P; Tillmann, E; Starlinger, P

    The DNA sequence of the terminal 4.2 kilobases (kb) of the 30-kb insertion in the endosperm sucrose synthase gene of maize mutant sh-m5933 shows that it comprises two identical 2,040-base pair (bp) segments, one inserted in the reverse direction into the other. We suggest that the 2,040-bp sequence is an example of the transposable element Dissociation described by Barbara McClintock.

  19. Mobile DNA Elements: The Seeds of Organic Complexity on Earth.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Laleh; Pedram, Mehrdad; AmirPhirozy, Akbar; Bonyadi, Khadijeh

    2015-10-01

    Mobile DNA or transposable elements (TEs) are genomic sequences capable of moving themselves independently into different parts of the genome. Viral invasion of eukaryotic genomes is assumed to be the main source of TEs. Selfish transposition of these elements could be a serious threat to the host cell, as they can insert themselves into the middle of coding genes and/or induce genomic instability. In response, through millions of years of evolution, cells have come up with various mechanisms such as genomic imprinting, DNA methylation, heterochromatin formation, and RNA interference to deactivate them. Interestingly, these processes have also greatly contributed to important cellular functions involved in cell differentiation, development, and differential gene expression. Propagation of TE copies during the course of evolution have resulted in increasing the genome size and providing proper space and flexibility in shaping the genome by creating new genes and establishing essential cellular structures such as heterochromatin, centromere, and telomeres. Yet, these elements are mostly labeled for playing a role in pathogenesis of human diseases. Here, we attempt to introduce TEs as factors necessary for making us human rather than just selfish sequences or obligatory guests invading our DNA.

  20. Autocrine signaling is a key regulatory element during osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kopesky, Paul; Tiedemann, Kerstin; Alkekhia, Dahlia; Zechner, Christoph; Millard, Bjorn; Schoeberl, Birgit; Komarova, Svetlana V.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Osteoclasts are responsible for bone destruction in degenerative, inflammatory and metastatic bone disorders. Although osteoclastogenesis has been well-characterized in mouse models, many questions remain regarding the regulation of osteoclast formation in human diseases. We examined the regulation of human precursors induced to differentiate and fuse into multinucleated osteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). High-content single cell microscopy enabled the time-resolved quantification of both the population of monocytic precursors and the emerging osteoclasts. We observed that prior to induction of osteoclast fusion, RANKL stimulated precursor proliferation, acting in part through an autocrine mediator. Cytokines secreted during osteoclastogenesis were resolved using multiplexed quantification combined with a Partial Least Squares Regression model to identify the relative importance of specific cytokines for the osteoclastogenesis outcome. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) was identified as one of RANKL-induced cytokines and validated for its role in osteoclast formation using inhibitors of the IL-8 cognate receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 or an IL-8 blocking antibody. These insights demonstrate that autocrine signaling induced by RANKL represents a key regulatory component of human osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25063197

  1. Epigenetic modifications as regulatory elements of autophagy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Sui, Xinbing; Zhu, Jing; Zhou, Jichun; Wang, Xian; Li, Da; Han, Weidong; Fang, Yong; Pan, Hongming

    2015-05-01

    Epigenetic modifications have been considered as hallmarks of cancer and play an important role in tumor initiation and development. Epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs, may regulate cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy). Autophagy, as a crucial cellular homeostatic mechanism, performs a dual role, having pro-survival or pro-death properties. A variety of signaling pathways including epigenetic control have been implicated in the upregulation or downregulation of autophagy. However, the role of epigenetic regulation in autophagy is still less well acknowledged. Recent studies have linked epigenetic control to the autophagic process. Some epigenetic modifiers are also involved in the regulation of autophagy and potentiate the efficacy of traditional therapeutics. Thus, understanding the novel functions of epigenetic control in autophagy may allow us to develop potential therapeutic approaches for cancer treatment.

  2. Characterization of a gene encoding a DNA binding protein with specificity for a light-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, P M; Memelink, J; Hiratsuka, K; Kay, S A; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    The sequence element of box II (GTGTGGTTAATATG) is a regulatory component of a light-responsive element present within the upstream region of pea rbcS-3A. The nuclear protein GT-1 was defined previously as a DNA binding activity that interacts with box II. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA sequences that encode a DNA binding protein with specificity for this element. The recombinant protein, tobacco GT-1a, shows similar sequence requirements for DNA binding to nuclear GT-1, as assayed by its ability to interact with previously defined 2-bp scanning mutations of box II, and is shown to be immunologically related to nuclear GT-1. The predicted structure of the 43-kD protein derived from the cDNA sequence suggests the presence of a novel helix-helix-turn-helix (HHTH) motif. Comparison between the predicted protein sequence encoded by the tobacco GT-1a cDNA and that of another GT binding protein, rice GT-2, reveals strong amino acid conservation over the HHTH region; this motif appears to be involved in the interaction between the recombinant protein and box II. Genomic DNA gel blot analysis indicated the presence of a small gene family of related sequences within the tobacco nuclear genome. RNA gel blot analysis of tobacco mRNA using the isolated cDNA as a probe showed that transcripts are present in several tissues, including both light-grown and dark-adapted leaves. PMID:1392598

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Cis-Regulatory Element Activity Using Synthetic Promoters in Transgenic Plants.

    PubMed

    Benn, Geoffrey; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters, introduced stably or transiently into plants, are an invaluable tool for the identification of functional regulatory elements and the corresponding transcription factor(s) that regulate the amplitude, spatial distribution, and temporal patterns of gene expression. Here, we present a protocol describing the steps required to identify and characterize putative cis-regulatory elements. These steps include application of computational tools to identify putative elements, construction of a synthetic promoter upstream of luciferase, identification of transcription factors that regulate the element, testing the functionality of the element introduced transiently and/or stably into the species of interest followed by high-throughput luciferase screening assays, and subsequent data processing and statistical analysis. PMID:27557758

  4. Multiple Regulatory Systems Coordinate DNA Replication with Cell Growth in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes. PMID:25340815

  5. Functional and Regulatory Biomolecular Networks Organized by DNA Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minghui

    DNA has recently emerged as an extremely promising material to organize molecules on nanoscale. The reliability of base recognition, self-assembling behavior, and attractive structural properties of DNA are of unparalleled value in systems of this size. DNA scaffolds have already been used to organize a variety of molecules including nanoparticles and proteins. New protein-DNA bio-conjugation chemistries make it possible to precisely position proteins and other biomolecules on underlying DNA scaffolds, generating multi-biomolecule pathways with the ability to modulate intermolecular interactions and the local environment. This dissertation focuses on studying the application of using DNA nanostructure to direct the self-assembly of other biomolecular networks to translate biochemical pathways to non-cellular environments. Presented here are a series of studies toward this application. First, a novel strategy utilized DNA origami as a scaffold to arrange spherical virus capsids into one-dimensional arrays with precise nanoscale positioning. This hierarchical self-assembly allows us to position the virus particles with unprecedented control and allows the future construction of integrated multi-component systems from biological scaffolds using the power of rationally engineered DNA nanostructures. Next, discrete glucose oxidase (GOx)/ horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme pairs were organized on DNA origami tiles with controlled interenzyme spacing and position. This study revealed two different distance-dependent kinetic processes associated with the assembled enzyme pairs. Finally, a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice was designed and constructed to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation were successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  6. Ancora: a web resource for exploring highly conserved noncoding elements and their association with developmental regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Pär G; Fredman, David; Lenhard, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Metazoan genomes contain arrays of highly conserved noncoding elements (HCNEs) that span developmental regulatory genes and define regulatory domains. We describe Ancora , a web resource that provides data and tools for exploring genomic organization of HCNEs for multiple genomes. Ancora includes a genome browser that shows HCNE locations and features novel HCNE density plots as a powerful tool to discover developmental regulatory genes and distinguish their regulatory elements and domains. PMID:18279518

  7. Transposable DNA elements and life history traits: II. Transposition of P DNA elements in somatic cells reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N; Barker, J S; Huai, H

    1999-01-01

    Some transposable DNA elements in higher organisms are active in somatic cells, as well as in germinal cells. What effect does the movement of DNA elements in somatic cells have on life history traits? It has previously been reported that somatically active P and mariner elements in Drosophila induce genetic damage and significantly reduce lifespan. In this study, we report that the movement of P elements in somatic cells also significantly reduces fitness, mating activity, and locomotion of Drosophila melanogaster. If other elements cause similar changes in life history traits, it is doubtful if transposable DNA elements remain active for long in somatic cells in natural populations.

  8. Characterization of "cis"-regulatory elements ("c"RE) associated with mammary gland function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Bos taurus genome assembly has propelled dairy science into a new era; still, most of the information encoded in the genome has not yet been decoded. The human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has spearheaded the identification and annotation of functional genomic elements in the hu...

  9. Dual regulatory effects of non-coding GC-rich elements on the expression of virulence genes in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guiying; Zhao, Yuemeng; Zhang, Qingfeng; Pan, Weiqing

    2015-12-01

    As the primary virulence factor of falciparum malaria, var genes harboring mutually exclusive expression pattern lead to antigenic variation and immune evasion of this pathogen in human host. Although various mechanisms contribute to silence of var genes, little is known of transcriptional activation pathways of a single var gene and maintenance of its active state with other silent var loci. Here, we report a monoallelic expression pattern of the non-coding GC-elements flanking chromosomal internal var genes, and transcript from the active one was required for activation of the var gene in the same array. Meanwhile, GFP reporter assays revealed a repressive effect on the adjacent gene induced by DNA motifs of the insulator-like GC-element, which was linked to heterochromatin subnuclear localization. Taken together, these data for the first time provide experimental evidence of the dual cis- and trans-acting regulatory functions of the GC-elements in both silence and activation of var genes, which would advance our understanding of the complex regulatory network of the virulence gene family in P. falciparum.

  10. Association between hypermethylation of DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell DNA and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Neale, Rachel E; Clark, Paul J; Fawcett, Jonathan; Fritschi, Lin; Nagler, Belinda N; Risch, Harvey A; Walters, Rhiannon J; Crawford, William J; Webb, Penelope M; Whiteman, David C; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Methylation of DNA may influence risk or be a marker of early disease. The aim of this study was to measure the association between methylation of three DNA repetitive elements in white blood cell (WBC) DNA and pancreatic cancer. DNA from WBCs of pancreatic cancer cases (n=559) and healthy unrelated controls (n=603) were tested for methylation of the LINE-1, Alu and Sat2 DNA repetitive elements using MethyLight quantitative PCR assays. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) between both continuous measures of percent of methylated sample compared to a reference (PMR) or quintiles of PMR and pancreatic cancer, adjusted for age, sex, smoking, BMI, alcohol and higher education, were estimated. The PMR for each of the three markers was higher in cases than in controls, although only LINE-1 was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (OR per log unit=1.37, 95%CI=1.16-1.63). The marker methylation score for all three markers combined was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer (p-trend=0.0006). There were no associations between measures of PMR and either presence of metastases, or timing of blood collection in relation to diagnosis, surgery, chemotherapy or death (all p>0.1). We observed an association between methylation of LINE-1 in WBC DNA and risk of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to confirm this association.

  11. Barcoded DNA-Tag Reporters for Multiplex Cis-Regulatory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jongmin; Davidson, Eric H.

    2012-01-01

    Cis-regulatory DNA sequences causally mediate patterns of gene expression, but efficient experimental analysis of these control systems has remained challenging. Here we develop a new version of “barcoded" DNA-tag reporters, “Nanotags" that permit simultaneous quantitative analysis of up to 130 distinct cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). The activities of these reporters are measured in single experiments by the NanoString RNA counting method and other quantitative procedures. We demonstrate the efficiency of the Nanotag method by simultaneously measuring hourly temporal activities of 126 CRMs from 46 genes in the developing sea urchin embryo, otherwise a virtually impossible task. Nanotags are also used in gene perturbation experiments to reveal cis-regulatory responses of many CRMs at once. Nanotag methodology can be applied to many research areas, ranging from gene regulatory networks to functional and evolutionary genomics. PMID:22563420

  12. LDRD Report FY 03: Structure and Function of Regulatory DNA: A Next Major Challenge in Genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, L

    2003-02-18

    leverage their long-standing investment and expertise in mapping, sequencing, and genetics of human chromosome 19 (ch19). The starting point of this effort was the LLNL and Joint Genome Institute (JGI) genomics teams' success in sequencing mouse DNA related to ch19. This effort was the first comparative sequencing project to be conducted on such a large scale; a manuscript describing this work was published in Science shortly after this LDRD began (Dehal et al., Science 293: 104-111, 2001). Like protein-coding genes themselves, DNA elements that control gene expression are protected from structural change over evolutionary time, since their function is dependent on sequence integrity. By contrast, DNA that serves no function (''junk DNA'') can accumulate mutations that change sequence content without biological consequence. As a result, the ''junk DNA'' of human and mouse are not at all alike in sequence; however, genes and regulatory elements (REs) of human, mouse, and other animals--as far removed from human and fish and birds--are very similar in sequence and structure.

  13. Regulatory elements in the FBP1 promoter respond differently to glucose-dependent signals in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, O; Vincent, O; Gancedo, J M

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae expression of the fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase-encoding gene, FBP1, is controlled by glucose through the upstream activating sequences UAS1 and UAS2 and the upstream repressing sequence URS1 in its promoter. We have studied the regulation of the proteins that could bind to these elements. We have investigated the role of the putative transcription factors Cat8 and Sip4 in the formation of specific DNA-protein complexes with UAS1 and UAS2, and in the expression of UAS1-lacZ and UAS2-lacZ. The expression of CAT8-lacZ and SIP4-lacZ has been also measured in mig1, tup1 or hxk2 mutants, partially refractory to catabolite repression. We conclude that there is no strict correlation between Cat8 and Sip4 expression or in vitro formation of DNA-protein complexes and expression of UAS1-lacZ and UAS2-lacZ. The URS1 element binds the regulatory protein Mig1, which blocks transcription by recruiting the proteins Cyc8 and Tup1. The pattern of complexes of URS1 with nuclear extracts was dependent on the carbon source and on Cyc8, but not on Tup1; it was also affected by the protein kinase Snf1 and by the exportin Msn5. The repression caused by URS1 in a fusion gene was dependent on Mig1, Cyc8 and Tup1, and on the carbon source in the medium; in a snf1 strain the repression observed was independent of the carbon source. Expression of Mig1 could occur in the absence of Snf1 and was moderately sensitive to glucose. We present data showing that different elements of the regulatory system controlling FBP1 responded differently to the concentration of glucose in the medium. PMID:11563983

  14. Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins are transcriptional regulators of the thyroglobulin gene in thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gaiping; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genes encoding sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO), both of which are essential for thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis, were shown to be regulated by sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1c and -2. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that transcription of a further gene essential for TH synthesis, the thyroglobulin (TG) gene, is under the control of SREBP. To test this hypothesis, we studied the influence of inhibition of SREBP maturation and SREBP knockdown on TG expression in FRTL-5 thyrocytes and explored transcriptional regulation of the TG promoter by reporter gene experiments in FRTL-5 and HepG2 cells, gel shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Inhibition of SREBP maturation by 25-hydroxycholesterol and siRNA-mediated knockdown of either SREBP-1c or SREBP-2 decreased mRNA and protein levels of TG in FRTL-5 thyrocytes. Reporter gene assays with wild-type and mutated TG promoter reporter truncation constructs revealed that the rat TG promoter is transcriptionally activated by nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2. DNA-binding assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that both nSREBP-1c and nSREBP-2 bind to a SREBP binding motif with characteristics of an E-box SRE at position -63 in the rat TG promoter. In connection with recent findings that NIS and TPO are regulated by SREBP in thyrocytes the present findings support the view that SREBP are regulators of essential steps of TH synthesis in the thyroid gland such as iodide uptake, iodide oxidation and iodination of tyrosyl residues of TG. This moreover suggests that SREBP may be molecular targets for pharmacological modulation of TH synthesis. PMID:27321819

  15. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  16. Disease-associated variants in different categories of disease located in distinct regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The invention of high throughput sequencing technologies has led to the discoveries of hundreds of thousands of genetic variants associated with thousands of human diseases. Many of these genetic variants are located outside the protein coding regions, and as such, it is challenging to interpret the function of these genetic variants by traditional genetic approaches. Recent genome-wide functional genomics studies, such as FANTOM5 and ENCODE have uncovered a large number of regulatory elements across hundreds of different tissues or cell lines in the human genome. These findings provide an opportunity to study the interaction between regulatory elements and disease-associated genetic variants. Identifying these diseased-related regulatory elements will shed light on understanding the mechanisms of how these variants regulate gene expression and ultimately result in disease formation and progression. Results In this study, we curated and categorized 27,558 Mendelian disease variants, 20,964 complex disease variants, 5,809 cancer predisposing germline variants, and 43,364 recurrent cancer somatic mutations. Compared against nine different types of regulatory regions from FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects, we found that different types of disease variants show distinctive propensity for particular regulatory elements. Mendelian disease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations are 22-fold and 10- fold significantly enriched in promoter regions respectively (q<0.001), compared with allele-frequency-matched genomic background. Separate from these two categories, cancer predisposing germline variants are 27-fold enriched in histone modification regions (q<0.001), 10-fold enriched in chromatin physical interaction regions (q<0.001), and 6-fold enriched in transcription promoters (q<0.001). Furthermore, Mendelian disease variants and recurrent cancer somatic mutations share very similar distribution across types of functional effects. We further found that

  17. Sites of Predicted Stress-Induced DNA Duplex Destabilization Occur Preferentially at Regulatory Loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Craig J.

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes a computational method to predict the sites on a DNA molecule where imposed superhelical stresses destabilize the duplex. Several DNA sequences are analyzed in this way, including the pBR322 and ColE1 plasmids, bacteriophage f1, and the polyoma and bovine papilloma virus genomes. Superhelical destabilization in these molecules is predicted to occur at small numbers of discrete sites, most of which are within regulatory regions. The most destabilized sites include the terminator and promoter regions of specific plasmid operons, the LexA binding sites of genes under SOS control, the intergenic control region of bacteriophage f1, and the polyadenylylation sites in eukaryotic viruses. These results demonstrate the existence of close correspondences between sites of predicted superhelical duplex destabilization and specific types of regulatory regions. The use of these correspondences to supplement string-matching techniques in the search for regulatory loci is discussed.

  18. Interaction of the CCAAT displacement protein with shared regulatory elements required for transcription of paired histone genes.

    PubMed Central

    el-Hodiri, H M; Perry, M

    1995-01-01

    The H2A and H2B genes of the Xenopus xlh3 histone gene cluster are transcribed in opposite directions from initiation points located approximately 235 bp apart. The close proximity of these genes to one another suggests that their expression may be controlled by either a single bidirectional promoter or by separate promoters. Our analysis of the transcription of histone gene pairs containing deletions and site-specific mutations of intergenic DNA revealed that both promoters are distinct but that they overlap physically and share multiple regulatory elements, providing a possible basis for the coordinate regulation of their in vivo activities. Using the intergenic DNA fragment as a probe and extracts from mammalian and amphibian cells, we observed the formation of a specific complex containing the CCAAT displacement protein (CDP). The formation of the CDP-containing complex was not strictly dependent on any single element in the intergenic region but instead required the presence of at least two of the three CCAAT motifs. Interestingly, similar CDP-containing complexes were formed on the promoters from the three other histone genes. The binding of CDP to histone gene promoters may contribute to the coordination of their activities during the cell cycle and early development. PMID:7791766

  19. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Editing of a Single Regulatory Element Nearly Abolishes Target Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Slivano, Orazio J.; Christie, Christine K.; Cheng, Albert W.; Miano, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To ascertain the importance of a single regulatory element in the control of Cnn1 expression using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) genome editing. Approach and Results The CRISPR/Cas9 system was used to produce 3/18 founder mice carrying point mutations in an intronic CArG box of the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-restricted Cnn1 gene. Each founder was bred for germ line transmission of the mutant CArG box and littermate interbreeding to generate homozygous mutant (Cnn1ΔCArG/ΔCArG) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed dramatic reductions in Cnn1 mRNA and CNN1 protein expression in Cnn1ΔCArG/ΔCArG mice with no change in other SMC-restricted genes and little evidence of off-target edits elsewhere in the genome. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed a sharp decrease in binding of SRF to the mutant CArG box. Loss of CNN1 expression was coincident with an increase in Ki-67 positive cells in the normal vessel wall. Conclusion CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing of a single CArG box nearly abolishes Cnn1 expression in vivo and evokes increases in SMC DNA synthesis. This facile genome editing system paves the way for a new generation of studies designed to test the importance of individual regulatory elements in living animals, including regulatory variants in conserved sequence blocks linked to human disease. PMID:25538209

  20. Lactogenic hormonal induction of long distance interactions between beta-casein gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kabotyanski, Elena B; Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Buser, Adam C; Edwards, Dean P; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2009-08-21

    Lactogenic hormone regulation of beta-casein gene expression in mammary epithelial cells provides an excellent model in which to study the mechanisms by which steroid and peptide hormone signaling control gene expression. Prolactin- and glucocorticoid-mediated induction of beta-casein gene expression involves two principal regulatory regions, a proximal promoter and a distal enhancer located in the mouse approximately -6 kb upstream of the transcription start site. Using a chromosome conformation capture assay and quantitative real time PCR, we demonstrate that a chromatin loop is created in conjunction with the recruitment of specific transcription factors and p300 in HC11 mammary epithelial cells. Stimulation with both prolactin and hydrocortisone is required for the induction of these long range interactions between the promoter and enhancer, and no DNA looping was observed in nontreated cells or cells treated with each of the hormones separately. The lactogenic hormone-induced interaction between the proximal promoter and distal enhancer was confirmed in hormone-treated primary three-dimensional mammary acini cultures. In addition, the developmental regulation of DNA looping between the beta-casein regulatory regions was observed in lactating but not in virgin mouse mammary glands. Furthermore, beta-casein mRNA induction and long range interactions between these regulatory regions were inhibited in a progestin-dependent manner following stimulation with prolactin and hydrocortisone in HC11 cells expressing human PR-B. Collectively, these data suggest that the communication between these regulatory regions with intervening DNA looping is a crucial step required to both create and maintain active chromatin domains and regulate transcription.

  1. Transposable elements: an abundant and natural source of regulatory sequences for host genes.

    PubMed

    Rebollo, Rita; Romanish, Mark T; Mager, Dixie L

    2012-01-01

    The fact that transposable elements (TEs) can influence host gene expression was first recognized more than 50 years ago. However, since that time, TEs have been widely regarded as harmful genetic parasites-selfish elements that are rarely co-opted by the genome to serve a beneficial role. Here, we survey recent findings that relate to TE impact on host genes and remind the reader that TEs, in contrast to other noncoding parts of the genome, are uniquely suited to gene regulatory functions. We review recent studies that demonstrate the role of TEs in establishing and rewiring gene regulatory networks and discuss the overall ubiquity of exaptation. We suggest that although individuals within a population can be harmed by the deleterious effects of new TE insertions, the presence of TE sequences in a genome is of overall benefit to the population. PMID:22905872

  2. Comparative genomics-based identification and analysis of cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hajime; Ochi, Haruki; Uchiyama, Chihiro; Louie, Sarah; Grainger, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    Identification of cis-regulatory elements, such as enhancers and promoters, is very important not only for analysis of gene regulatory networks but also as a tool for targeted gene expression experiments. In this chapter, we introduce an easy but reliable approach to predict enhancers of a gene of interest by comparing mammalian and Xenopus genome sequences, and to examine their activity using a co-transgenesis technique in Xenopus embryos. Since the bioinformatics analysis utilizes publically available web tools, bench biologists can easily perform it without any need for special computing capability. The co-transgenesis assay, which directly uses polymerase chain reaction products, quickly screens for the activity of the candidate elements in a cloning-free manner.

  3. Recurrent Modification of a Conserved Cis-Regulatory Element Underlies Fruit Fly Pigmentation Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, William A.; Salomone, Joseph R.; Tacy, David J.; Camino, Eric M.; Davis, Kristen A.; Rebeiz, Mark; Williams, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE), little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab) transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B) and sex-determination (DSX) transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages. PMID:24009528

  4. Repressive BMP2 gene regulatory elements near the BMP2 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shan; Chandler, Ronald L.; Fritz, David T.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Rogers, Melissa B.

    2010-02-05

    The level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) profoundly influences essential cell behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. The spatial and temporal pattern of BMP2 synthesis, particular in diverse embryonic cells, is highly varied and dynamic. We have identified GC-rich sequences within the BMP2 promoter region that strongly repress gene expression. These elements block the activity of a highly conserved, osteoblast enhancer in response to FGF2 treatment. Both positive and negative gene regulatory elements control BMP2 synthesis. Detecting and mapping the repressive motifs is essential because they impede the identification of developmentally regulated enhancers necessary for normal BMP2 patterns and concentration.

  5. Role of Conserved Non-Coding Regulatory Elements in LMW Glutenin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Angéla; Makai, Szabolcs; Sebestyén, Endre; Tamás, László; Balázs, Ervin

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of LMW glutenin genes were investigated in-silico, using publicly available gene sequences and expression data. Genes were grouped into different LMW glutenin types and their promoter profiles were determined using cis-acting regulatory elements databases and published results. The various cis-acting elements belong to some conserved non-coding regulatory regions (CREs) and might act in two different ways. There are elements, such as GCN4 motifs found in the long endosperm box that could serve as key factors in tissue-specific expression. Some other elements, such as the AACA/TA motifs or the individual prolamin box variants, might modulate the level of expression. Based on the promoter sequences and expression characteristic LMW glutenin genes might be transcribed following two different mechanisms. Most of the s- and i-type genes show a continuously increasing expression pattern. The m-type genes, however, demonstrate normal distribution in their expression profiles. Differences observed in their expression could be related to the differences found in their promoter sequences. Polymorphisms in the number and combination of cis-acting elements in their promoter regions can be of crucial importance in the diverse levels of production of single LMW glutenin gene types. PMID:22242127

  6. Detection and characterization of regulatory elements using probabilistic conditional random field and hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-04-01

    By altering the electrostatic charge of histones or providing binding sites to protein recognition molecules, Chromatin marks have been proposed to regulate gene expression, a property that has motivated researchers to link these marks to cis-regulatory elements. With the help of next generation sequencing technologies, we can now correlate one specific chromatin mark with regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers or promoters) and also build tools, such as hidden Markov models, to gain insight into mark combinations. However, hidden Markov models have limitation for their character of generative models and assume that a current observation depends only on a current hidden state in the chain. Here, we employed two graphical probabilistic models, namely the linear conditional random field model and multivariate hidden Markov model, to mark gene regions with different states based on recurrent and spatially coherent character of these eight marks. Both models revealed chromatin states that may correspond to enhancers and promoters, transcribed regions, transcriptional elongation, and low-signal regions. We also found that the linear conditional random field model was more effective than the hidden Markov model in recognizing regulatory elements, such as promoter-, enhancer-, and transcriptional elongation-associated regions, which gives us a better choice.

  7. Detection and characterization of regulatory elements using probabilistic conditional random field and hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-04-01

    By altering the electrostatic charge of histones or providing binding sites to protein recognition molecules, Chromatin marks have been proposed to regulate gene expression, a property that has motivated researchers to link these marks to cis-regulatory elements. With the help of next generation sequencing technologies, we can now correlate one specific chromatin mark with regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers or promoters) and also build tools, such as hidden Markov models, to gain insight into mark combinations. However, hidden Markov models have limitation for their character of generative models and assume that a current observation depends only on a current hidden state in the chain. Here, we employed two graphical probabilistic models, namely the linear conditional random field model and multivariate hidden Markov model, to mark gene regions with different states based on recurrent and spatially coherent character of these eight marks. Both models revealed chromatin states that may correspond to enhancers and promoters, transcribed regions, transcriptional elongation, and low-signal regions. We also found that the linear conditional random field model was more effective than the hidden Markov model in recognizing regulatory elements, such as promoter-, enhancer-, and transcriptional elongation-associated regions, which gives us a better choice. PMID:23237214

  8. Developmental Switch in the Transcriptional Activity of a Long-Range Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Braikia, Fatima-Zohra; Conte, Caroline; Moutahir, Mohamed; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is often controlled by distant regulatory elements. In developing B lymphocytes, transcription is associated with V(D)J recombination at immunoglobulin loci. This process is regulated by remote cis-acting elements. At the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus, the 3′ regulatory region (3′RR) promotes transcription in mature B cells. This led to the notion that the 3′RR orchestrates the IgH locus activity at late stages of B cell maturation only. However, long-range interactions involving the 3′RR were detected in early B cells, but the functional consequences of these interactions were unknown. Here we show that not only does the 3′RR affect transcription at distant sites within the IgH variable region but also it conveys a transcriptional silencing activity on both sense and antisense transcription. The 3′RR-mediated silencing activity is switched off upon completion of VH-DJH recombination. Our findings reveal a developmentally controlled, stage-dependent shift in the transcriptional activity of a master regulatory element. PMID:26195822

  9. Discovery of cell-type specific regulatory elements in the human genome using differential chromatin modification analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin modifications have been comprehensively illustrated to play important roles in gene regulation and cell diversity in recent years. Given the rapid accumulation of genome-wide chromatin modification maps across multiple cell types, there is an urgent need for computational methods to analyze multiple maps to reveal combinatorial modification patterns and define functional DNA elements, especially those are specific to cell types or tissues. In this current study, we developed a computational method using differential chromatin modification analysis (dCMA) to identify cell-type-specific genomic regions with distinctive chromatin modifications. We then apply this method to a public data set with modification profiles of nine marks for nine cell types to evaluate its effectiveness. We found cell-type-specific elements unique to each cell type investigated. These unique features show significant cell-type-specific biological relevance and tend to be located within functional regulatory elements. These results demonstrate the power of a differential comparative epigenomic strategy in deciphering the human genome and characterizing cell specificity. PMID:23945931

  10. Genome-wide identification of regulatory elements and reconstruction of gene regulatory networks of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under carbon deprivation.

    PubMed

    Winck, Flavia Vischi; Vischi Winck, Flavia; Arvidsson, Samuel; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hempel, Sabrina; Koseska, Aneta; Nikoloski, Zoran; Urbina Gomez, David Alejandro; Rupprecht, Jens; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a long-established model organism for studies on photosynthesis and carbon metabolism-related physiology. Under conditions of air-level carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], a carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) is induced to facilitate cellular carbon uptake. CCM increases the availability of carbon dioxide at the site of cellular carbon fixation. To improve our understanding of the transcriptional control of the CCM, we employed FAIRE-seq (formaldehyde-assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements, followed by deep sequencing) to determine nucleosome-depleted chromatin regions of algal cells subjected to carbon deprivation. Our FAIRE data recapitulated the positions of known regulatory elements in the promoter of the periplasmic carbonic anhydrase (Cah1) gene, which is upregulated during CCM induction, and revealed new candidate regulatory elements at a genome-wide scale. In addition, time series expression patterns of 130 transcription factor (TF) and transcription regulator (TR) genes were obtained for cells cultured under photoautotrophic condition and subjected to a shift from high to low [CO2]. Groups of co-expressed genes were identified and a putative directed gene-regulatory network underlying the CCM was reconstructed from the gene expression data using the recently developed IOTA (inner composition alignment) method. Among the candidate regulatory genes, two members of the MYB-related TF family, Lcr1 (Low-CO 2 response regulator 1) and Lcr2 (Low-CO2 response regulator 2), may play an important role in down-regulating the expression of a particular set of TF and TR genes in response to low [CO2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the transcriptional control of the CCM and revealed more than 60 new candidate regulatory genes. Deep sequencing of nucleosome-depleted genomic regions indicated the presence of new, previously unknown regulatory elements in the C. reinhardtii genome. Our work can

  11. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein (Srb1) Is Required for Hypoxic Adaptation and Virulence in the Dimorphic Fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, Juwen C.; Smulian, A. George

    2016-01-01

    The Histoplasma capsulatum sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), Srb1 is a member of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH), leucine zipper DNA binding protein family of transcription factors that possess a unique tyrosine (Y) residue instead of an arginine (R) residue in the bHLH region. We have determined that Srb1 message levels increase in a time dependent manner during growth under oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). To further understand the role of Srb1 during infection and hypoxia, we silenced the gene encoding Srb1 using RNA interference (RNAi); characterized the resulting phenotype, determined its response to hypoxia, and its ability to cause disease within an infected host. Silencing of Srb1 resulted in a strain of H. capsulatum that is incapable of surviving in vitro hypoxia. We found that without complete Srb1 expression, H. capsulatum is killed by murine macrophages and avirulent in mice given a lethal dose of yeasts. Additionally, silencing Srb1 inhibited the hypoxic upregulation of other known H. capsulatum hypoxia-responsive genes (HRG), and genes that encode ergosterol biosynthetic enzymes. Consistent with these regulatory functions, Srb1 silenced H. capsulatum cells were hypersensitive to the antifungal azole drug itraconazole. These data support the theory that the H. capsulatum SREBP is critical for hypoxic adaptation and is required for H. capsulatum virulence. PMID:27711233

  12. A novel processing system of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c regulated by polyunsaturated fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Nakakuki, Masanori; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    The proteolytic cascade is the key step in transactivation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs), a transcriptional factor of lipid synthesis. Proteolysis of SREBP-2 is strictly regulated by sterols, but that of SREBP-1c was not strongly sterol-regulated, but inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). In this study, the proteolytic processing of SREBP-1 and -2 was examined by transfection studies of cDNA-encoding mutants in which all the known cleavage sites were disrupted. In cultured cells, sterol-regulated SREBP-2 processing was completely eliminated by mutation of cleavage sites. In contrast, the corresponding SREBP-1c mutants as well as wild type exhibited large amounts of cleaved products in the nuclear extracts from culture cells and murine liver in vivo. The nuclear form of the mutant SREBP-1c was induced by delipidated condition and suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid, an n-3 PUFA, but not by sterols. This novel processing mechanism was affected by neither SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) nor insulin-induced gene (Insig)-1, unlike SREBP-2, but abolished by a serine protease inhibitor. Through analysis of deletion mutant, a site-2 protease recognition sequence (DRSR) was identified to be involved in this novel processing. These findings suggest that SREBP-1c cleavage could be subjected to a novel PUFA-regulated cleavage system in addition to the sterol-regulatory SCAP/Insig system.

  13. Upstream Distal Regulatory Elements Contact the Lmo2 Promoter in Mouse Erythroid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Anandi; Chen, Chih-Yu; Ho, Sara; Mitchell, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    The Lim domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene encodes a transcriptional cofactor critical for the development of hematopoietic stem cells. Several distal regulatory elements have been identified upstream of the Lmo2 gene in the human and mouse genomes that are capable of enhancing reporter gene expression in erythroid cells and may be responsible for the high level transcription of Lmo2 in the erythroid lineage. In this study we investigate how these elements regulate transcription of Lmo2 and whether or not they function cooperatively in the endogenous context. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) experiments show that chromatin-chromatin interactions exist between upstream regulatory elements and the Lmo2 promoter in erythroid cells but that these interactions are absent from kidney where Lmo2 is transcribed at twelve fold lower levels. Specifically, long range chromatin-chromatin interactions occur between the Lmo2 proximal promoter and two broad regions, 3–31 and 66–105 kb upstream of Lmo2, which we term the proximal and distal control regions for Lmo2 (pCR and dCR respectively). Each of these regions is bound by several transcription factors suggesting that multiple regulatory elements cooperate in regulating high level transcription of Lmo2 in erythroid cells. Binding of CTCF and cohesin which support chromatin loops at other loci were also found within the dCR and at the Lmo2 proximal promoter. Intergenic transcription occurs throughout the dCR in erythroid cells but not in kidney suggesting a role for these intergenic transcripts in regulating Lmo2, similar to the broad domain of intergenic transcription observed at the human β-globin locus control region. Our data supports a model in which the dCR functions through a chromatin looping mechanism to contact and enhance Lmo2 transcription specifically in erythroid cells. Furthermore, these chromatin loops are supported by the cohesin complex recruited to both CTCF and transcription factor bound regions. PMID

  14. An ant colony optimization based algorithm for identifying gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Hanwu; Chen, Ling

    2013-08-01

    It is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics to identify the regulatory elements in gene sequences. Most of the existing algorithms for identifying regulatory elements are inclined to converge into a local optimum, and have high time complexity. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic method based on swarm intelligence and is derived from a model inspired by the collective foraging behavior of real ants. Taking advantage of the ACO in traits such as self-organization and robustness, this paper designs and implements an ACO based algorithm named ACRI (ant-colony-regulatory-identification) for identifying all possible binding sites of transcription factor from the upstream of co-expressed genes. To accelerate the ants' searching process, a strategy of local optimization is presented to adjust the ants' start positions on the searched sequences. By exploiting the powerful optimization ability of ACO, the algorithm ACRI can not only improve precision of the results, but also achieve a very high speed. Experimental results on real world datasets show that ACRI can outperform other traditional algorithms in the respects of speed and quality of solutions. PMID:23746735

  15. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer. PMID:24707736

  16. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  17. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-10-27

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the -427 to -376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor.

  18. [Regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Saccoglossus mereschkowskii (Enteropneusta, Hemichordata): electron microscopic and immunocytochemical study].

    PubMed

    Stoliarova, M V; Val'kovich, E I

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to demonstrate the regulatory elements in the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta which are supposed to be related to the chordate ancestors. Using electron microscopy, it was found that in the skin epithelium of a representative of enteropneusts Saccoglossus mereschkowskii, the basal parts of some epitheliocytes took part in formation of a nerve layer. These cells were considered as receptor ciliated cells. The granular epithelial cells were shown to release secretion according to both exocrine and endocrine mechanism; these cells were characterized as endocrine-like regulatory cells. Fine granular cells possibly represent special receptor-endocrine-like cell type. The immunocytochemical detection of FMRFamid neuropeptide localization in histological sections confirmed the electron microscopic data on the presence of receptor and endocrine-like cells in the epithelium. It is suggested that the skin epithelium of Enteropneusta contains a peculiar neuro-endocrine regulatory system that is represented by receptor cells, receptor-endocrine-like cells of an open type and nerve elements of the nerve layer.

  19. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the −427 to −376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor. PMID:26516845

  20. Rearrangement of Upstream Regulatory Elements Leads to Ectopic Expression of the Drosophila Mulleri Adh-2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Falb, D.; Fischer, J.; Maniatis, T.

    1992-01-01

    The Adh-2 gene of Drosophila mulleri is expressed in the larval fat body and the adult fat body and hindgut, and a 1500-bp element located 2-3 kb upstream of the Adh-2 promoter is necessary for maximal levels of transcription. Previous work demonstrated that deletion of sequences between this upstream element and the Adh-2 promoter results in Adh-2 gene expression in a novel larval tissue, the middle midgut. In this study we show that the upstream element possesses all of the characteristics of a transcriptional enhancer: its activity is independent of orientation, it acts on a heterologous promoter, and it functions at various positions both 5' and 3' to the Adh-2 gene. Full enhancer function can be localized to a 750-bp element, although other regions possess some redundant activity. The ectopic expression pattern is dependent on the proximity of at least two sequence elements. Thus, tissue-specific transcription can involve complex proximity-dependent interactions among combinations of regulatory elements. PMID:1459428

  1. Inducer effect on the complex formation between rat liver nuclear proteins and cytochrome P450 2B gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Duzhak, T G; Schwartz, E I; Gulyaeva, L F; Lyakhovich, V V

    2002-09-01

    DNA gel retardation assay has been applied to the investigation of complexes between rat liver nuclear proteins and Barbie box positive regulatory element of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) genes. The intensities of B1 and B2 bands detected in the absence of an inducer increased after 30 min protein incubation with phenobarbital (PB) or triphenyldioxane (TPD), but not with 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOPOB). In addition, a new complex (B3 band) was for the first time detected under induction by PB, TPD, and TCPOPOB. Increase in the incubation time up to 2 h facilitated the formation of other new complexes (B4 and B5 bands), which were detected only in the presence of TPD. The use of [3H]TPD in hybridization experiments revealed that this inducer, capable of binding to Barbie box DNA, is also present in B4 and B5 complexes. It is probable that the investigated compounds activate the same proteins at the initial induction steps, which correlates with the formation of B1, B2, and B3 complexes. The further induction step might be inducer-specific, as indicated by the formation of B4 and B5 complexes in the presence of TPD only. Thus, the present data suggest the possibility of specific gene activation signaling pathways that are dependent on a particular inducer. PMID:12387719

  2. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  3. De Novo Synonymous Mutations in Regulatory Elements Contribute to the Genetic Etiology of Autism and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Takata, Atsushi; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Gogos, Joseph A; Xu, Bin; Karayiorgou, Maria

    2016-03-01

    We analyze de novo synonymous mutations identified in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia (SCZ) with potential impact on regulatory elements using data from whole-exome sequencing (WESs) studies. Focusing on five types of genetic regulatory functions, we found that de novo near-splice site synonymous mutations changing exonic splicing regulators and those within frontal cortex-derived DNase I hypersensitivity sites are significantly enriched in ASD and SCZ, respectively. These results remained significant, albeit less so, after incorporating two additional ASD datasets. Among the genes identified, several are hit by multiple functional de novo mutations, with RAB2A and SETD1A showing the highest statistical significance in ASD and SCZ, respectively. The estimated contribution of these synonymous mutations to disease liability is comparable to de novo protein-truncating mutations. These findings expand the repertoire of functional de novo mutations to include "functional" synonymous ones and strengthen the role of rare variants in neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:26938441

  4. ConSite: web-based prediction of regulatory elements using cross-species comparison.

    PubMed

    Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Lenhard, Boris

    2004-07-01

    ConSite is a user-friendly, web-based tool for finding cis-regulatory elements in genomic sequences. Predictions are based on the integration of binding site prediction generated with high-quality transcription factor models and cross-species comparison filtering (phylogenetic footprinting). By incorporating evolutionary constraints, selectivity is increased by an order of magnitude as compared to single-sequence analysis. ConSite offers several unique features, including an interactive expert system for retrieving orthologous regulatory sequences. Programming modules and biological databases that form the foundation of the ConSite service are freely available to the research community. ConSite is available at http:/www.phylofoot.org/consite.

  5. The structure of the human peripherin gene (PRPH) and identification of potential regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, J.; Ley, C.A.; Parysek, L.M.

    1994-07-15

    The authors determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the coding region of the human peripherin gene (PRPH), as well as 742 bp 5{prime} to the cap site and 584 bp 3{prime} to the stop codon, and compared its structure and sequence to the rat and mouse genes. The overall structure of 9 exons separated by 8 introns is conserved among these three mammalian species. The nucleotide sequences of the human peripherin gene exons were 90% identical to the rat gene sequences, and the predicted human peripherin protein differed from rat peripherin at only 18 of 475 amino acid residues. Comparison of the 5{prime} flanking regions of the human peripherin gene and rodent genes revealed extensive areas of high homology. Additional conserved segments were found in introns 1 and 2. Within the 5{prime} region, potential regulatory sequences, including a nerve growth factor negative regulatory element, a Hox protein binding site, and a heat shock element, were identified in all peripherin genes. The positional conservation of each element suggests that they may be important in the tissue-specific, developmental-specific, and injury-specific expression of the peripherin gene. 24 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Distal cis-regulatory elements are required for tissue-specific expression of enamelin (Enam)

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Papagerakis, Petros; Ye, Ling; Feng, Jerry Q.; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2009-01-01

    Enamel formation is orchestrated by the sequential expression of genes encoding enamel matrix proteins; however, the mechanisms sustaining the spatio–temporal order of gene transcription during amelogenesis are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the cis-regulatory sequences necessary for normal expression of enamelin (Enam). Several enamelin transcription regulatory regions, showing high sequence homology among species, were identified. DNA constructs containing 5.2 or 3.9 kb regions upstream of the enamelin translation initiation site were linked to a LacZ reporter and used to generate transgenic mice. Only the 5.2-Enam–LacZ construct was sufficient to recapitulate the endogenous pattern of enamelin tooth-specific expression. The 3.9-Enam–LacZ transgenic lines showed no expression in dental cells, but ectopic β-galactosidase activity was detected in osteoblasts. Potential transcription factor-binding sites were identified that may be important in controlling enamelin basal promoter activity and in conferring enamelin tissue-specific expression. Our study provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms governing enamelin expression. PMID:18353004

  7. Regulation of human PTCH1b expression by different 5' untranslated region cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Ozretić, Petar; Bisio, Alessandra; Musani, Vesna; Trnski, Diana; Sabol, Maja; Levanat, Sonja; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    PTCH1 gene codes for a 12-pass transmembrane receptor with a negative regulatory role in the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PTCH1 germline mutations cause Gorlin syndrome, a disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and tumor susceptibility. The autosomal dominant inheritance, and the evidence for PTCH1 haploinsufficiency, suggests that fine-tuning systems of protein patched homolog 1 (PTC1) levels exist to properly regulate the pathway. Given the role of 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) in protein expression, our aim was to thoroughly explore cis-regulatory elements in the 5'UTR of PTCH1 transcript 1b. The (CGG)n polymorphism was the main potential regulatory element studied so far but with inconsistent results and no clear association between repeat number and disease risk. Using luciferase reporter constructs in human cell lines here we show that the number of CGG repeats has no strong impact on gene expression, both at mRNA and protein levels. We observed variability in the length of 5'UTR and changes in abundance of the associated transcripts after pathway activation. We show that upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) present only in longer 5'UTRs could negatively regulate the amount of PTC1 isoform L (PTC1-L). The existence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) observed using different approaches and mapped in the region comprising the CGG repeats, would counteract the effect of the uAUGs and enable synthesis of PTC1-L under stressful conditions, such as during hypoxia. Higher relative translation efficiency of PTCH1b mRNA in HEK 293T cultured hypoxia was observed by polysomal profiling and Western blot analyses. All our results point to an exceptionally complex and so far unexplored role of 5'UTR PTCH1b cis-element features in the regulation of the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PMID:25826662

  8. Movable Genetic Elements: Detection of Changes in Maize DNA at the Shrunken Locus Due to the Intervention of Ds Elements

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  9. Movable genetic elements: detection of changes in maize DNA at the Shrunken locus due to the intervention of Ds elements

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, B.; Burr, F.A.

    1980-05-28

    This report describes our initial attempts at the molecular characterization of a maize controlling element. We have prepared a cDNA probe and used it to detect changes at a locus where Ds elements are found. Evidence of their presence are indicated by changes in the restriction patterns, but there is as yet no information on the physical nature of the controlling elements nor on the kinds of rearrangements they cause.

  10. Conserved regulatory elements of the promoter sequence of the gene rpoH of enteric bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Santos, Jesús; Collado-Vides, Julio; García-Varela, Martin; Gómez-Eichelmann, M. Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The rpoH regulatory region of different members of the enteric bacteria family was sequenced or downloaded from GenBank and compared. In addition, the transcriptional start sites of rpoH of Yersinia frederiksenii and Proteus mirabilis, two distant members of this family, were determined. Sequences similar to the σ70 promoters P1, P4 and P5, to the σE promoter P3 and to boxes DnaA1, DnaA2, cAMP receptor protein (CRP) boxes CRP1, CRP2 and box CytR present in Escherichia coli K12, were identified in sequences of closely related bacteria such as: E.coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In more distant bacteria, Y.frederiksenii and P.mirabilis, the rpoH regulatory region has a distal P1-like σ70 promoter and two proximal promoters: a heat-induced σE-like promoter and a σ70 promoter. Sequences similar to the regulatory boxes were not identified in these bacteria. This study suggests that the general pattern of transcription of the rpoH gene in enteric bacteria includes a distal σ70 promoter, >200 nt upstream of the initiation codon, and two proximal promoters: a heat-induced σE-like promoter and a σ70 promoter. A second proximal σ70 promoter under catabolite-regulation is probably present only in bacteria closely related to E.coli. PMID:11139607

  11. Genome-wide discovery of drug-dependent human liver regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robin P; Eckalbar, Walter L; Morrissey, Kari M; Luizon, Marcelo R; Hoffmann, Thomas J; Sun, Xuefeng; Jones, Stacy L; Force Aldred, Shelley; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Desta, Zeruesenay; Liu, Yunlong; Skaar, Todd C; Trinklein, Nathan D; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-10-01

    Inter-individual variation in gene regulatory elements is hypothesized to play a causative role in adverse drug reactions and reduced drug activity. However, relatively little is known about the location and function of drug-dependent elements. To uncover drug-associated elements in a genome-wide manner, we performed RNA-seq and ChIP-seq using antibodies against the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and three active regulatory marks (p300, H3K4me1, H3K27ac) on primary human hepatocytes treated with rifampin or vehicle control. Rifampin and PXR were chosen since they are part of the CYP3A4 pathway, which is known to account for the metabolism of more than 50% of all prescribed drugs. We selected 227 proximal promoters for genes with rifampin-dependent expression or nearby PXR/p300 occupancy sites and assayed their ability to induce luciferase in rifampin-treated HepG2 cells, finding only 10 (4.4%) that exhibited drug-dependent activity. As this result suggested a role for distal enhancer modules, we searched more broadly to identify 1,297 genomic regions bearing a conditional PXR occupancy as well as all three active regulatory marks. These regions are enriched near genes that function in the metabolism of xenobiotics, specifically members of the cytochrome P450 family. We performed enhancer assays in rifampin-treated HepG2 cells for 42 of these sequences as well as 7 sequences that overlap linkage-disequilibrium blocks defined by lead SNPs from pharmacogenomic GWAS studies, revealing 15/42 and 4/7 to be functional enhancers, respectively. A common African haplotype in one of these enhancers in the GSTA locus was found to exhibit potential rifampin hypersensitivity. Combined, our results further suggest that enhancers are the predominant targets of rifampin-induced PXR activation, provide a genome-wide catalog of PXR targets and serve as a model for the identification of drug-responsive regulatory elements.

  12. Genome-Wide Discovery of Drug-Dependent Human Liver Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Kari M.; Luizon, Marcelo R.; Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Sun, Xuefeng; Jones, Stacy L.; Force Aldred, Shelley; Ramamoorthy, Anuradha; Desta, Zeruesenay; Liu, Yunlong; Skaar, Todd C.; Trinklein, Nathan D.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    Inter-individual variation in gene regulatory elements is hypothesized to play a causative role in adverse drug reactions and reduced drug activity. However, relatively little is known about the location and function of drug-dependent elements. To uncover drug-associated elements in a genome-wide manner, we performed RNA-seq and ChIP-seq using antibodies against the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and three active regulatory marks (p300, H3K4me1, H3K27ac) on primary human hepatocytes treated with rifampin or vehicle control. Rifampin and PXR were chosen since they are part of the CYP3A4 pathway, which is known to account for the metabolism of more than 50% of all prescribed drugs. We selected 227 proximal promoters for genes with rifampin-dependent expression or nearby PXR/p300 occupancy sites and assayed their ability to induce luciferase in rifampin-treated HepG2 cells, finding only 10 (4.4%) that exhibited drug-dependent activity. As this result suggested a role for distal enhancer modules, we searched more broadly to identify 1,297 genomic regions bearing a conditional PXR occupancy as well as all three active regulatory marks. These regions are enriched near genes that function in the metabolism of xenobiotics, specifically members of the cytochrome P450 family. We performed enhancer assays in rifampin-treated HepG2 cells for 42 of these sequences as well as 7 sequences that overlap linkage-disequilibrium blocks defined by lead SNPs from pharmacogenomic GWAS studies, revealing 15/42 and 4/7 to be functional enhancers, respectively. A common African haplotype in one of these enhancers in the GSTA locus was found to exhibit potential rifampin hypersensitivity. Combined, our results further suggest that enhancers are the predominant targets of rifampin-induced PXR activation, provide a genome-wide catalog of PXR targets and serve as a model for the identification of drug-responsive regulatory elements. PMID:25275310

  13. Goblet-cell-specific transcription of mouse intestinal trefoil factor gene results from collaboration of complex series of positive and negative regulatory elements.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, H; Inoue, N; Podolsky, D K

    1999-01-01

    Intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) is expressed selectively in intestinal goblet cells. Previous studies of the rat ITF gene identified one cis-regulatory element, designated the goblet-cell-response element (GCRE), present in the proximal region of the promoter. To identify additional cis-regulatory elements responsible for goblet-cell-specific expression, a DNA fragment containing 6353 bp of the 5'-flanking region of the mouse ITF gene was cloned and its promoter activity was examined extensively. In human and murine intestinal-derived cell lines (LS174T and CMT-93), the luciferase activities of a 6.3-kb construct were 5- and 2-fold greater than the smaller 1.8-kb construct, respectively. In contrast, the activity in non-intestinal cell lines (HepG2 and HeLa) was 2-4-fold lower than the smaller construct. In the region downstream from the 1.8-kb position, strong luciferase activities in LS174T and HepG2 cells were observed using a 201-bp construct. Interestingly, increased activity was almost completely suppressed in cells transfected with a 391-bp construct. Detailed analyses of this region revealed the existence of a 11-bp positive regulatory element (-181 to -170; ACCTCTTCCTG) and a 9-bp negative regulatory element (-208 to -200; ATTGACAGA) in addition to the GCRE. All three elements were well conserved among human, rat and mouse ITF gene promoters. In addition, a mutant 1.8-kb construct in which the negative regulatory region was deleted yielded the same approximate luciferase activity as a 6.3-kb construct, suggesting binding of a goblet-cell-specific silencer inhibitor (SI) between -6.3 and -1.8 kb. The SI present in goblet cells may block the silencers' binding to the pre-initiation complex and allow increased transcriptional activity driven by specific and non-specific enhancers. High-level expression of the mouse ITF gene specifically in intestinal goblet cells may be achieved through the combined effects of these regulatory elements. PMID:10393106

  14. Mapping of Variable DNA Methylation Across Multiple Cell Types Defines a Dynamic Regulatory Landscape of the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junchen; Stevens, Michael; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Daofeng; Zhang, Bo; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Jarvis, James N.; Jiang, Kaiyu; Cicero, Theodore; Costello, Joseph F.; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in many biological processes and diseases. Many studies have mapped DNA methylation changes associated with embryogenesis, cell differentiation, and cancer at a genome-wide scale. Our understanding of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a developmental or disease-related context has been steadily growing. However, the investigation of which CpGs are variably methylated in different normal cell or tissue types is still limited. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of 54 single-CpG-resolution DNA methylomes of normal human cell types by integrating high-throughput sequencing-based methylation data. We found that the ratio of methylated to unmethylated CpGs is relatively constant regardless of cell type. However, which CpGs made up the unmethylated complement was cell-type specific. We categorized the 26,000,000 human autosomal CpGs based on their methylation levels across multiple cell types to identify variably methylated CpGs and found that 22.6% exhibited variable DNA methylation. These variably methylated CpGs formed 660,000 variably methylated regions (VMRs), encompassing 11% of the genome. By integrating a multitude of genomic data, we found that VMRs enrich for histone modifications indicative of enhancers, suggesting their role as regulatory elements marking cell type specificity. VMRs enriched for transcription factor binding sites in a tissue-dependent manner. Importantly, they enriched for GWAS variants, suggesting that VMRs could potentially be implicated in disease and complex traits. Taken together, our results highlight the link between CpG methylation variation, genetic variation, and disease risk for many human cell types. PMID:26888867

  15. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  16. Identification of cis-acting repressive sequences within the negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y C; Touzjian, N; Stenzel, M; Dorfman, T; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1990-01-01

    The negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is a 260-nucleotide-long sequence that decreases the rate of RNA transcription initiation specified by the long terminal repeat. This region has the potential to bind several cellular transcription factors. Here it is shown that sequences which recognize the NFAT-1 and USF cellular transcription factors contribute to this negative regulatory effect. The sequences within the negative regulatory element which resemble the AP-1 site and the URS do not negatively regulate human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat transcription initiation. PMID:2398545

  17. DNA and mRNA elements with complementary responses to hemin, antioxidant inducers, and iron control ferritin-L expression.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Korry J; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2005-10-18

    Ferritins, an ancient family of protein nanocages, concentrate iron in iron-oxy minerals for iron-protein biosynthesis and protection against oxy radical damage. Of the two genetic mechanisms that regulate rates of ferritin-L synthesis, DNA transcription and mRNA translation, more is known about mRNA regulation where iron targets complexes of an mRNA structure, the iron-responsive element (IRE) sequence, and ferritin IRE repressors (iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2). Neither the integration of mRNA and DNA regulation nor the ferritin-L DNA promoter are well studied. We now report the combined effects of DNA transcription and mRNA translation regulation of ferritin-L synthesis. First, the promoter of human ferritin-L, encoding the animal-specific subunit associated with human diseases, was identified, and contained an overlapping Maf recognition element (MARE) and antioxidant responsive element (ARE) that was positively regulated by tert-butylhydroquinone, sulforaphane, and hemin with responses comparable to thioredoxin reductase (ARE regulator) or quinone reductase (MARE/ARE regulator). Iron, a poor regulator of the ferritin-L promoter, was 800 times less effective than sulforaphane. Combining the ferritin-L MARE/ARE and IRE produced a response to hemin that was 3-fold greater than the sum of responses of the MARE/ARE or IRE alone. Regulation of ferritin-L by a MARE/ARE DNA sequence emphasizes the importance of ferritin-L in oxidative stress that complements the mRNA regulation in iron stress. Combining DNA and mRNA mechanisms of regulation, as for ferritin-L, illustrates the advantages of using two types of genetic targets to achieve sensitive responses to multiple signals.

  18. Densely ionizing radiation affects DNA methylation of selective LINE-1 elements.

    PubMed

    Prior, Sara; Miousse, Isabelle R; Nzabarushimana, Etienne; Pathak, Rupak; Skinner, Charles; Kutanzi, Kristy R; Allen, Antiño R; Raber, Jacob; Tackett, Alan J; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Koturbash, Igor

    2016-10-01

    Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element 1 (LINE-1) retrotransposons are heavily methylated and are the most abundant transposable elements in mammalian genomes. Here, we investigated the differential DNA methylation within the LINE-1 under normal conditions and in response to environmentally relevant doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that DNA methylation of LINE-1 elements in the lungs of C57BL6 mice is dependent on their evolutionary age, where the elder age of the element is associated with the lower extent of DNA methylation. Exposure to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and methionine-deficient diet affected DNA methylation of selective LINE-1 elements in an age- and promoter type-dependent manner. Exposure to densely IR, but not sparsely IR, resulted in DNA hypermethylation of older LINE-1 elements, while the DNA methylation of evolutionary younger elements remained mostly unchanged. We also demonstrate that exposure to densely IR increased mRNA and protein levels of LINE-1 via the loss of the histone H3K9 dimethylation and an increase in the H3K4 trimethylation at the LINE-1 5'-untranslated region, independently of DNA methylation. Our findings suggest that DNA methylation is important for regulation of LINE-1 expression under normal conditions, but histone modifications may dictate the transcriptional activity of LINE-1 in response to exposure to densely IR.

  19. Who owns Australia's water--elements of an effective regulatory model.

    PubMed

    McKay, J

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes a number of global trends in regulatory theory and legal scholarship. It points out the huge level of complexity demanded by globalisation and the unfortunate complication of this is that there is legal indeterminacy. The legal indeterminacy springs from the desire to amend and alter existing models. That has been the thrust of the Council of Australian Governments changes to adapt and add huge amounts of complexity to a flawed system. This paper argues that an effective water regulatory model requires a fundamental re-examination of the concept of water ownership and a capturing by the State of the right to allocate rainfall. This foundation is effective and the way forward to deal with the key issues in this transition phase. The second key element to an effective regulatory model is the concept of performance-based assessment. This requires information and schemes to be set up to work out ways to monitor and evaluate the performance of the utility on selected criteria. For Australia at present there is a dire lack of agreed criteria on these key issues and these have the potential to pull apart the whole process. The key issues are indigenous rights, governance issues, public participation, alteration of pre-existing rights and incorporation of environmental requirements. PMID:14653647

  20. Who owns Australia's water--elements of an effective regulatory model.

    PubMed

    McKay, J

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes a number of global trends in regulatory theory and legal scholarship. It points out the huge level of complexity demanded by globalisation and the unfortunate complication of this is that there is legal indeterminacy. The legal indeterminacy springs from the desire to amend and alter existing models. That has been the thrust of the Council of Australian Governments changes to adapt and add huge amounts of complexity to a flawed system. This paper argues that an effective water regulatory model requires a fundamental re-examination of the concept of water ownership and a capturing by the State of the right to allocate rainfall. This foundation is effective and the way forward to deal with the key issues in this transition phase. The second key element to an effective regulatory model is the concept of performance-based assessment. This requires information and schemes to be set up to work out ways to monitor and evaluate the performance of the utility on selected criteria. For Australia at present there is a dire lack of agreed criteria on these key issues and these have the potential to pull apart the whole process. The key issues are indigenous rights, governance issues, public participation, alteration of pre-existing rights and incorporation of environmental requirements.

  1. Inferring regulatory element landscapes and transcription factor networks from cancer methylomes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijing; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W; Farnham, Peggy J; Berman, Benjamin P

    2015-05-21

    Recent studies indicate that DNA methylation can be used to identify transcriptional enhancers, but no systematic approach has been developed for genome-wide identification and analysis of enhancers based on DNA methylation. We describe ELMER (Enhancer Linking by Methylation/Expression Relationships), an R-based tool that uses DNA methylation to identify enhancers and correlates enhancer state with expression of nearby genes to identify transcriptional targets. Transcription factor motif analysis of enhancers is coupled with expression analysis of transcription factors to infer upstream regulators. Using ELMER, we investigated more than 2,000 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identified networks regulated by known cancer drivers such as GATA3 and FOXA1 (breast cancer), SOX17 and FOXA2 (endometrial cancer), and NFE2L2, SOX2, and TP63 (squamous cell lung cancer). We also identified novel networks with prognostic associations, including RUNX1 in kidney cancer. We propose ELMER as a powerful new paradigm for understanding the cis-regulatory interface between cancer-associated transcription factors and their functional target genes.

  2. Isolation of Sparus auratus prolactin gene and activity of the cis-acting regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Astola, Antonio; Ortiz, Manuela; Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Valdivia, Manuel M

    2003-10-15

    A sea bream prolactin (sbPRL) gene was isolated using a prolactin cDNA fragment, generated by PCR as a probe. The gene analyzed comprises 3.5 kb of DNA containing five exons as described previously for other fish PRL genes. Analysis of 1.0 kb of the proximal promoter sequence reveals a consensus TATAA box, up to seven (A/T)3NCAT consensus motifs for binding of the pituitary-specific factor Pit-1 and putative CREB and GATA binding sites. CHO culture cells co-transfected with a sbPRL promoter sequence and a sea bream Pit-1 cDNA expression plasmid showed expression of a linked luciferase reporter gene. Transient expression experiments with 5'-delection mutants reveals at least three regulatory regions on the sbPRL gene, two with a stimulatory effect on transcription and one with apparent inhibitory effect. From a comparative point of view, this study of PRL gene in Sparus auratus, correlates well with those previously published on tilapia and rainbow trout. The molecular data reported will be useful for comparative analysis of gene regulation in the GH/PRL gene family in teleosts.

  3. Quantitative comparison of cis-regulatory element (CRE) activities in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William A; Williams, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression patterns are specified by cis-regulatory element (CRE) sequences, which are also called enhancers or cis-regulatory modules. A typical CRE possesses an arrangement of binding sites for several transcription factor proteins that confer a regulatory logic specifying when, where, and at what level the regulated gene(s) is expressed. The full set of CREs within an animal genome encodes the organism's program for development, and empirical as well as theoretical studies indicate that mutations in CREs played a prominent role in morphological evolution. Moreover, human genome wide association studies indicate that genetic variation in CREs contribute substantially to phenotypic variation. Thus, understanding regulatory logic and how mutations affect such logic is a central goal of genetics. Reporter transgenes provide a powerful method to study the in vivo function of CREs. Here a known or suspected CRE sequence is coupled to heterologous promoter and coding sequences for a reporter gene encoding an easily observable protein product. When a reporter transgene is inserted into a host organism, the CRE's activity becomes visible in the form of the encoded reporter protein. P-element mediated transgenesis in the fruit fly species Drosophila (D.) melanogaster has been used for decades to introduce reporter transgenes into this model organism, though the genomic placement of transgenes is random. Hence, reporter gene activity is strongly influenced by the local chromatin and gene environment, limiting CRE comparisons to being qualitative. In recent years, the phiC31 based integration system was adapted for use in D. melanogaster to insert transgenes into specific genome landing sites. This capability has made the quantitative measurement of gene and, relevant here, CRE activity feasible. The production of transgenic fruit flies can be outsourced, including phiC31-based integration, eliminating the need to purchase expensive equipment and/or have proficiency at

  4. Splicing regulation: From a parts list of regulatory elements to an integrated splicing code

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Burge, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to both proteomic diversity and control of gene expression levels. Splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages, and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human diseases. An important long-term goal in the splicing field is to determine a set of rules or “code” for splicing that will enable prediction of the splicing pattern of any primary transcript from its sequence. Outside of the core splice site motifs, the bulk of the information required for splicing is thought to be contained in exonic and intronic cis-regulatory elements that function by recruitment of sequence-specific RNA-binding protein factors that either activate or repress the use of adjacent splice sites. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge of splicing cis-regulatory elements and their context-dependent effects on splicing, emphasizing recent global/genome-wide studies and open questions. PMID:18369186

  5. Molecular dynamics of a κB DNA element: base flipping via cross-strand intercalative stacking in a microsecond-scale simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mura, Cameron; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The sequence-dependent structural variability and conformational dynamics of DNA play pivotal roles in many biological milieus, such as in the site-specific binding of transcription factors to target regulatory elements. To better understand DNA structure, function, and dynamics in general, and protein···DNA recognition in the ‘κB’ family of genetic regulatory elements in particular, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a 20-bp DNA encompassing a cognate κB site recognized by the proto-oncogenic ‘c-Rel’ subfamily of NF-κB transcription factors. Simulations of the κB DNA in explicit water were extended to microsecond duration, providing a broad, atomically detailed glimpse into the structural and dynamical behavior of double helical DNA over many timescales. Of particular note, novel (and structurally plausible) conformations of DNA developed only at the long times sampled in this simulation—including a peculiar state arising at ≈0.7 μs and characterized by cross-strand intercalative stacking of nucleotides within a longitudinally sheared base pair, followed (at ≈1 μs) by spontaneous base flipping of a neighboring thymine within the A-rich duplex. Results and predictions from the microsecond-scale simulation include implications for a dynamical NF-κB recognition motif, and are amenable to testing and further exploration via specific experimental approaches that are suggested herein. PMID:18653524

  6. Structure of Proximal and Distant Regulatory Elements in the Human Genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharenko, Ivan

    Clustering of multiple transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) for the same transcription factor (TF) is a common feature of cis-regulatory modules in invertebrate animals, but the occurrence of such homotypic clusters of TFBSs (HCTs) in the human genome has remained largely unknown. To explore whether HCTs are also common in human and other vertebrates, we used known binding motifs for vertebrate TFs and a hidden Markov model-based approach to detect HCTs in the human, mouse, chicken, and fugu genomes, and examined their association with cis-regulatory modules. We found that evolutionarily conserved HCTs occupy nearly 2% of the human genome, with experimental evidence for individual TFs supporting their binding to predicted HCTs. More than half of promoters of human genes contain HCTs, with a distribution around the transcription start site in agreement with the experimental data from the ENCODE project. In addition, almost half of 487 experimentally validated developmental enhancers contain them as well - a number more than 25-fold larger than expected by chance. We also found evidence of negative selection acting on TFBSs within HCTs, as the conservation of TFBSs is stronger than the conservation of sequences separating them. The important role of HCTs as components of developmental enhancers is additionally supported by a strong correlation between HCTs and the binding of the enhancer-associated co-activator protein p300. Experimental validation of HCT-containing elements in both zebrafish and mouse suggest that HCTs could be used to predict both the presence of enhancers and their tissue specificity, and are thus a feature that can be effectively used in deciphering the gene regulatory code. In conclusion, our results indicate that HCTs are a pervasive feature of human cis-regulatory modules and suggest that they play an important role in gene regulation in the human and other vertebrate genomes.

  7. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  8. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  9. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  10. Direct regulation of knot gene expression by Ultrabithorax and the evolution of cis-regulatory elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Bradley M; Carroll, Sean B

    2005-04-01

    The regulation of development by Hox proteins is important in the evolution of animal morphology, but how the regulatory sequences of Hox-regulated target genes function and evolve is unclear. To understand the regulatory organization and evolution of a Hox target gene, we have identified a wing-specific cis-regulatory element controlling the knot gene, which is expressed in the developing Drosophila wing but not the haltere. This regulatory element contains a single binding site that is crucial for activation by the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), and a cluster of binding sites for repression by the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (UBX). The negative and positive control regions are physically separable, demonstrating that UBX does not repress by competing for occupancy of Ci-binding sites. Although knot expression is conserved among Drosophila species, this cluster of UBX binding sites is not. We isolated the knot wing cis-regulatory element from D. pseudoobscura, which contains a cluster of UBX-binding sites that is not homologous to the functionally defined D. melanogaster cluster. It is, however, homologous to a second D. melanogaster region containing a cluster of UBX sites that can also function as a repressor element. Thus, the knot regulatory region in D. melanogaster has two apparently functionally redundant blocks of sequences for repression by UBX, both of which are widely separated from activator sequences. This redundancy suggests that the complete evolutionary unit of regulatory control is larger than the minimal experimentally defined control element. The span of regulatory sequences upon which selection acts may, in general, be more expansive and less modular than functional studies of these elements have previously indicated.

  11. Structural characterization and regulatory element analysis of the heart isoform of cytochrome c oxidase VIa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wan, B.; Moreadith, R. W.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism(s) governing the striated muscle-specific expression of cytochrome c oxidase VIaH we have characterized the murine gene and analyzed its transcriptional regulatory elements in skeletal myogenic cell lines. The gene is single copy, spans 689 base pairs (bp), and is comprised of three exons. The 5'-ends of transcripts from the gene are heterogeneous, but the most abundant transcript includes a 5'-untranslated region of 30 nucleotides. When fused to the luciferase reporter gene, the 3.5-kilobase 5'-flanking region of the gene directed the expression of the heterologous protein selectively in differentiated Sol8 cells and transgenic mice, recapitulating the pattern of expression of the endogenous gene. Deletion analysis identified a 300-bp fragment sufficient to direct the myotube-specific expression of luciferase in Sol8 cells. The region lacks an apparent TATA element, and sequence motifs predicted to bind NRF-1, NRF-2, ox-box, or PPAR factors known to regulate other nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are not evident. Mutational analysis, however, identified two cis-elements necessary for the high level expression of the reporter protein: a MEF2 consensus element at -90 to -81 bp and an E-box element at -147 to -142 bp. Additional E-box motifs at closely located positions were mutated without loss of transcriptional activity. The dependence of transcriptional activation of cytochrome c oxidase VIaH on cis-elements similar to those found in contractile protein genes suggests that the striated muscle-specific expression is coregulated by mechanisms that control the lineage-specific expression of several contractile and cytosolic proteins.

  12. cis-acting regulatory elements within gag genes of avian retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, S; Yun, M; Beemon, K

    1987-01-01

    A cis-acting enhancer element has been detected within the gag gene of several avian retroviruses, including Rous sarcoma virus, Fujinami sarcoma virus, and the endogenous Rous-associated virus-0. A consensus enhancer core sequence, GTGGTTTG, is present in all of these viral genomes, approximately 900 bases downstream from the site of initiation of transcription. When an internal fragment derived from the gag gene of any of these viruses (spanning nucleotides 533 to approximately 1149) was inserted into a plasmid containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter, 9- or 21-fold enhancement of CAT expression was observed after transfection into mouse L cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts, respectively. This enhancement was not dependent on the position of insertion of the gag fragment into the plasmid. However, there was a strong dependence on orientation, with higher levels of CAT expression in constructs in which the 5' end of the gag fragment was nearest to the promoter, suggesting a possible negative regulatory element at the 3' end of this fragment. Deletion of the 3' end of the insert resulted in a gag fragment, containing nucleotides 533 to 1017, which enhanced expression equally in either orientation. When the gag fragment was inserted into a plasmid containing the cat gene under the control of an intact Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, it induced a two- to threefold increase in CAT activity and CAT mRNA levels. Translation of the gag fragment did not appear to be necessary for the observed enhancement, since two insertional mutations resulting in frameshifts in the gag insert did not affect CAT expression. However, deletion of a 330-base internal fragment from the gag insert restored a basal level of CAT activity. These results suggest that retroviruses have regulatory elements within their genes distinct from those in the long terminal repeats that flank the genes. Images PMID:3031470

  13. Four p53 DNA-binding domain peptides bind natural p53-response elements and bend the DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Balagurumoorthy, P; Sakamoto, H; Lewis, M S; Zambrano, N; Clore, G M; Gronenborn, A M; Appella, E; Harrington, R E

    1995-01-01

    Recent structural studies of the minimal core DNA-binding domain of p53 (p53DBD) complexed to a single consensus pentamer sequence and of the isolated p53 tetramerization domain have provided valuable insights into their functions, but many questions about their interacting roles and synergism remain unanswered. To better understand these relationships, we have examined the binding of the p53DBD to two biologically important full-response elements (the WAF1 and ribosomal gene cluster sites) by using DNA circularization and analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that the p53DBD binds DNA strongly and cooperatively with p53DBD to DNA binding stoichiometries of 4:1. For the WAF1 element, the mean apparent Kd is (8.3 +/- 1.4) x 10(-8) M, and no intermediate species of lower stoichiometries can be detected. We show further that complex formation induces an axial bend of at least 60 degrees in both response elements. These results, taken collectively, demonstrate that p53DBD possesses the ability to direct the formation of a tight nucleoprotein complex having the same 4:1 DNA-binding stoichiometry as wild-type p53 which is accompanied by a substantial conformational change in the response-element DNA. This suggests that the p53DBD may play a role in the tetramerization function of p53. A possible role in this regard is proposed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7567980

  14. An insight into the various regulatory mechanisms modulating human DNA methyltransferase 1 stability and function

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Parbin, Sabnam; Torrisani, Jérôme; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the principal epigenetic signals that participate in cell specific gene expression in vertebrates. DNA methylation plays a quintessential role in the control of gene expression, cellular differentiation and development. It also plays a central role in the preservation of chromatin structure and chromosomal integrity, parental imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, aging and carcinogenesis. The foremost contributor in the mammalian methylation scheme is DNMT1, a maintenance methyltransferase that faithfully copies the pre-existing methyl marks onto hemimethylated daughter strands during DNA replication to maintain the established methylation patterns across successive cell divisions. The ever-changing cellular physiology and the significant part that DNA methylation plays in genome regulation necessitate rigid management of this enzyme. In mammalian cells, a host of intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms regulate the expression, activity and stability of DNMT1. Transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional auto-inhibitory controls and post-translational modifications of the enzyme are responsible for the efficient inheritance of DNA methylation patterns. Also, a large number of intra- and intercellular signaling cascades and numerous interactions with other modulator molecules that affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme at multiple levels function as major checkpoints of the DNMT1 control system. An in-depth understanding of the DNMT1 enzyme, its targeting and function is crucial for comprehending how DNA methylation is coordinated with other critical developmental and physiological processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive account of the various regulatory mechanisms and interactions of DNMT1 so as to elucidate its function at the molecular level and understand the dynamics of DNA methylation at the cellular level. PMID:22894906

  15. FOOTER: a web tool for finding mammalian DNA regulatory regions using phylogenetic footprinting.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, David L; Feingold, Eleanor; Benos, Panayiotis V

    2005-07-01

    FOOTER is a newly developed algorithm that analyzes homologous mammalian promoter sequences in order to identify transcriptional DNA regulatory 'signals'. FOOTER uses prior knowledge about the binding site preferences of the transcription factors (TFs) in the form of position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs). The PSSM models are generated from known mammalian binding sites from the TRANSFAC database. In a test set of 72 confirmed binding sites (most of them not present in TRANSFAC) of 19 TFs, it exhibited 83% sensitivity and 72% specificity. FOOTER is accessible over the web at http://biodev.hgen.pitt.edu/Footer/.

  16. Functional characterization of transcriptional regulatory elements in the upstream region of the yeast GLK1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, P; Flores, L; de la Cera, T; Moreno, F

    1999-01-01

    The glucokinase gene GLK1 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is transcriptionally regulated in response to the carbon source of the growth medium. Northern-blot analysis shows that the GLK1 gene is expressed at a basal level in the presence of glucose, de-repressed more than 6-fold under conditions of sugar limitation and more than 25-fold under conditions of ethanol induction. lacZ fusions of the GLK1 gene promoter were constructed and a deletion analysis was performed in order to identify the cis-acting regulatory elements of the promoter that controls GLK1 gene expression. First, the expression seemed to be mediated mainly by one GCR1 and three stress-responsive element (STRE) activating elements. Secondly, an ethanol repression autoregulation (ERA)/twelve-fold TA repeat (TAB) repressor element was identified within the promoter region of the GLK1 gene. A specific and differential protein binding to the STRE was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells. No differential binding to the GCR1 or ERA/TAB elements was observed with extracts from de-repressed and repressed cells, but, in both cases, the binding was competed for by an excess of the unlabelled GLK1(GCR1) and GLK1(ERA) sequence. The transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4, which bind to the GLK1 upstream region through the STRE, contribute to inductive activation. The transcription factor Gcr1, which binds through the GCR1 element, contributes to constitutive activation. In order to achieve the severe glucose repression of GLK1, constitutive repressor factors acting through the ERA/TAB element must counteract constitutive activation generated by Gcr1 binding to the GCR1 element. Full expression of the GLK1 gene is produced by inductive activation of three STRE when Msn2 and Msn4 proteins are translocated to the nucleus by covalent modification. The combinatorial effect of the entire region leads to the regulated transcription of GLK1, i.e., silent in media with glucose and other

  17. A DNA-centric protein interaction map of ultraconserved elements reveals contribution of transcription factor binding hubs to conservation.

    PubMed

    Viturawong, Tar; Meissner, Felix; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias

    2013-10-31

    Ultraconserved elements (UCEs) have been the subject of great interest because of their extreme sequence identity and their seemingly cryptic and largely uncharacterized functions. Although in vivo studies of UCE sequences have demonstrated regulatory activity, protein interactors at UCEs have not been systematically identified. Here, we combined high-throughput affinity purification, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and SILAC quantification to map intrinsic protein interactions for 193 UCE sequences. The interactome contains over 400 proteins, including transcription factors with known developmental roles. We demonstrate based on our data that UCEs consist of strongly conserved overlapping binding sites. We also generated a fine-resolution interactome of a UCE, confirming the hub-like nature of the element. The intrinsic interactions mapped here are reflected in open chromatin, as indicated by comparison with existing ChIP data. Our study argues for a strong contribution of protein-DNA interactions to UCE conservation and provides a basis for further functional characterization of UCEs.

  18. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  19. Magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor with DNA-modified carbon nanotubes as recognition elements for detection of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Po; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang; Ling, Jian; Liu, Yu Ling; Fei, Liang Run; Xie, Jian Ping

    2008-03-01

    In this contribution, we design a visual sensor for DNA hybridization with DNA probe-modified magnetic particles (MPs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) without involving a visual recognition element such as fluorescent/chemiluminescent reagents. It was found that DNA probe-modified MWNTs, which could be dispersed in aqueous medium and have strong light scattering signals under the excitation of a light beam in the UV-vis region, could connect with DNA probe-modified MPs together in the presence of perfectly complementary target DNA and form a sandwich structure. In a magnetic field, the formed MP-MWNT species can easily be removed from the solution, resulting in a decrease of light scattering signals. Thus, a magnetic particle-based sandwich sensor could be developed to detect DNA hybridization by measuring the light scattering signals with DNA-modified MWNTs as recognition elements. Experiments showed that the DNA-modified MPs sensor could be reused at least 17 times and was stable for more than 6 months.

  20. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Dare, Andrew P; Schaffer, Robert J; Lin-Wang, Kui; Allan, Andrew C; Hellens, Roger P

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors (TFs) co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1) leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA, it does provide a tool to

  1. A DNA element that regulates expression of an endogenous retrovirus during F9 cell differentiation is E1A dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, B T; Satyamoorthy, K; Solter, D; Basu, A; Xu, M Q; Weinmann, R; Howe, C C

    1992-01-01

    The retinoic acid-induced differentiation of F9 cells into parietal endoderm-like cells activates transcription of the endogenous mouse retrovirus, the intracisternal A-particle (IAP). To investigate the elements that control IAP gene differentiation-specific expression, we used methylation interference, Southwestern (DNA-protein), and transient-transfection assays and identified the IAP-proximal enhancer (IPE) element that directs differentiation-specific expression. We find that the IPE is inactive in undifferentiated F9 cells and active in differentiated parietal endoderm-like PYS-2 cells. Three proteins of 40, 60, and 68 kDa bind to the sequence GAGTAGAC located between nucleotides -53 and -47 within the IPE. The 40- and 68-kDa proteins from both the undifferentiated and differentiated cells exhibit similar DNA-binding activities. However, the 60-kDa protein from differentiated cells has greater binding activity than that from undifferentiated cells, suggesting a role for this protein in F9 differentiation-specific expression of the IAP gene. The IAP gene is negatively regulated by the adenovirus E1A proteins, and the E1A sequence responsible for repression is located at the N terminus, between amino acids 2 and 67. The DNA sequence that is the target of E1A repression also maps to the IPE element. Colocalization of the differentiation-specific and E1A-sensitive elements to the same protein-binding site within the IPE suggests that the E1A-like activity functions in F9 cells to repress IAP gene expression. Activation of the IAP gene may result when the E1A-like activity is lost or inactivated during F9 cell differentiation, followed by binding of the 60-kDa positive regulatory protein to the enhancer element. Images PMID:1406664

  2. An evolutionary constraint: strongly disfavored class of change in DNA sequence during divergence of cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Cameron, R Andrew; Chow, Suk Hen; Berney, Kevin; Chiu, Tsz-Yeung; Yuan, Qiu-Autumn; Krämer, Alexander; Helguero, Argelia; Ransick, Andrew; Yun, Mirong; Davidson, Eric H

    2005-08-16

    The DNA of functional cis-regulatory modules displays extensive sequence conservation in comparisons of genomes from modestly distant species. Patches of sequence that are several hundred base pairs in length within these modules are often seen to be 80-95% identical, although the flanking sequence cannot even be aligned. However, it is unlikely that base pairs located between the transcription factor target sites of cis-regulatory modules have sequence-dependent function, and the mechanism that constrains evolutionary change within cis-regulatory modules is incompletely understood. We chose five functionally characterized cis-regulatory modules from the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) genome and obtained orthologous regulatory and flanking sequences from a bacterial artificial chromosome genome library of a congener, Strongylocentrotus franciscanus. As expected, single-nucleotide substitutions and small indels occur freely at many positions within the regulatory modules of these two species, as they do outside the regulatory modules. However, large indels (>20 bp) are statistically almost absent within the regulatory modules, although they are common in flanking intergenic or intronic sequence. The result helps to explain the patterns of evolutionary sequence divergence characteristic of cis-regulatory DNA.

  3. Functional conservation of cis-regulatory elements of heat-shock genes over long evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengying; Eichel, Kelsie; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene regulation is an intricate process that requires precise orchestration of a number of molecular components. Studying its evolution can serve as a useful model for understanding how complex molecular machines evolve. One way to investigate evolution of transcriptional regulation is to test the functions of cis-elements from one species in a distant relative. Previous results suggested that few, if any, tissue-specific promoters from Drosophila are faithfully expressed in C. elegans. Here we show that, in contrast, promoters of fly and human heat-shock genes are upregulated in C. elegans upon exposure to heat. Inducibility under conditions of heat shock may represent a relatively simple "on-off" response, whereas complex expression patterns require integration of multiple signals. Our results suggest that simpler aspects of regulatory logic may be retained over longer periods of evolutionary time, while more complex ones may be diverging more rapidly.

  4. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Garst, Andrew D.; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P.; Batey, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8Å resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  5. Crystal structure of the lysine riboswitch regulatory mRNA element.

    PubMed

    Garst, Andrew D; Héroux, Annie; Rambo, Robert P; Batey, Robert T

    2008-08-15

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8 angstroms resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding. PMID:18593706

  6. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    SciTech Connect

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  7. Phylogeny disambiguates the evolution of heat-shock cis-regulatory elements in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sibo; Haney, Robert A; Feder, Martin E

    2010-01-01

    Heat-shock genes have a well-studied control mechanism for their expression that is mediated through cis-regulatory motifs known as heat-shock elements (HSEs). The evolution of important features of this control mechanism has not been investigated in detail, however. Here we exploit the genome sequencing of multiple Drosophila species, combined with a wealth of available information on the structure and function of HSEs in D. melanogaster, to undertake this investigation. We find that in single-copy heat shock genes, entire HSEs have evolved or disappeared 14 times, and the phylogenetic approach bounds the timing and direction of these evolutionary events in relation to speciation. In contrast, in the multi-copy gene Hsp70, the number of HSEs is nearly constant across species. HSEs evolve in size, position, and sequence within heat-shock promoters. In turn, functional significance of certain features is implicated by preservation despite this evolutionary change; these features include tail-to-tail arrangements of HSEs, gapped HSEs, and the presence or absence of entire HSEs. The variation among Drosophila species indicates that the cis-regulatory encoding of responsiveness to heat and other stresses is diverse. The broad dimensions of variation uncovered are particularly important as they suggest a substantial challenge for functional studies.

  8. Identification of Regulatory Mutations in SERPINC1 Affecting Vitamin D Response Elements Associated with Antithrombin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Toderici, Mara; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Antón, Ana Isabel; Iniesta, Juan Antonio; Herranz, María Teresa; Fernández, Nuria; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a crucial anticoagulant serpin whose even moderate deficiency significantly increases the risk of thrombosis. Most cases with antithrombin deficiency carried genetic defects affecting exons or flanking regions of SERPINC1.We aimed to identify regulatory mutations inSERPINC1 through sequencing the promoter, intron 1 and 2 of this gene in 23 patients with antithrombin deficiency but without known genetic defects. Three cases with moderate antithrombin deficiency (63–78%) carried potential regulatory mutations. One located 200 bp before the initiation ATG and two in intron 1. These mutations disrupted two out of five potential vitamin D receptor elements (VDRE) identified in SERPINC1 with different software. One genetic defect, c.42-1060_-1057dupTTGA, was a new low prevalent polymorphism (MAF: 0.01) with functional consequences on plasma antithrombin levels. The relevance of the vitamin D pathway on the regulation of SERPINC1 was confirmed in a cell model. Incubation of HepG2 with paricalcitol, a vitamin D analog, increased dose-dependently the levels of SERPINC1transcripts and antithrombin released to the conditioned medium. This study shows further evidence of the transcriptional regulation of SERPINC1 by vitamin D and first describes the functional and pathological relevance of mutations affecting VDRE of this gene. Our study opens new perspectives in the search of new genetic defects involved in antithrombin deficiency and the risk of thrombosis as well as in the design of new antithrombotic treatments. PMID:27003919

  9. Dynamic BRG1 recruitment during T helper differentiation and activation reveals distal regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    De, Supriyo; Wurster, Andrea L; Precht, Patricia; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin G; Pazin, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    T helper cell differentiation and activation require specific transcriptional programs accompanied by changes in chromatin structure. However, little is known about the chromatin remodeling enzymes responsible. We performed genome-wide analysis to determine the general principles of BRG1 binding, followed by analysis of specific genes to determine whether these general rules were typical of key T cell genes. We found that binding of the remodeling protein BRG1 was programmed by both lineage and activation signals. BRG1 binding positively correlated with gene activity at protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) genes. BRG1 binding was found at promoters and distal regions, including both novel and previously validated distal regulatory elements. Distal BRG1 binding correlated with expression, and novel distal sites in the Gata3 locus possessed enhancer-like activity, suggesting a general role for BRG1 in long-distance gene regulation. BRG1 recruitment to distal sites in Gata3 was impaired in cells lacking STAT6, a transcription factor that regulates lineage-specific genes. Together, these findings suggest that BRG1 interprets both differentiation and activation signals and plays a causal role in gene regulation, chromatin structure, and cell fate. Our findings suggest that BRG1 binding is a useful marker for identifying active cis-regulatory regions in protein-coding and miRNA genes.

  10. Long Terminal Repeats: From Parasitic Elements to Building Blocks of the Transcriptional Regulatory Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter J; Macfarlan, Todd S; Lorincz, Matthew C

    2016-06-01

    The life cycle of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), also called long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, begins with transcription by RNA polymerase II followed by reverse transcription and re-integration into the host genome. While most ERVs are relics of ancient integration events, "young" proviruses competent for retrotransposition-found in many mammals, but not humans-represent an ongoing threat to host fitness. As a consequence, several restriction pathways have evolved to suppress their activity at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional stages of the viral life cycle. Nevertheless, accumulating evidence has revealed that LTR sequences derived from distantly related ERVs have been exapted as regulatory sequences for many host genes in a wide range of cell types throughout mammalian evolution. Here, we focus on emerging themes from recent studies cataloging the diversity of ERV LTRs acting as important transcriptional regulatory elements in mammals and explore the molecular features that likely account for LTR exaptation in developmental and tissue-specific gene regulation. PMID:27259207

  11. Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts secretome can evidence relations among regulatory elements of exocytosis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ul-Rehman, Reiaz; Rinalducci, Sara; Zolla, Lello; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Di Sansebastiano, Gian Pietro

    2011-08-01

    An alternative study involving proteome analysis of the 24 hour Nicotiana tabacum protoplast culture medium was performed with the aim to confirm relations among regulatory elements of exocytotic processes. Protoplasts present many convenient features to study cellular processes during transient over-expression or suppression of specific gene's products. We performed a proteomic analysis of the culture medium fraction of protoplasts transiently expressing transgenes for 24 hours to characterize the effect of various regulatory proteins dominant negative mutants. A total number of 49 spots were found reproducible in the medium. 24 of these spots were identified with nano RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Only three and six spots were respectively identified as canonical and non-canonical secreted cell wall proteins. The low number of spots present in the culture medium fraction allowed us the ambitious experiment to analyze the influence of various SNAREs (SYP121, SYP122, SNAP33) and Rab (Rab11) dominant negative mutants. Missing a reasonable number of identified proteins the analyses gave rise to a similarity matrix statistically analyzed considering variation within the presence of 24 spots reproducible in presence of transient over-expression of SNAREs (SYP121 and SYP122) and Rab11 native cDNAs. The similarity confirmed the closer relation between the function of SYP122 and Rab11 as evidenced by the secRGUS based analysis. This analysis included the effect of SNAP33 DN mutant and showed that this Qb-c-SNARE influence both SYP121 and SYP122 SNARE complexes.

  12. Functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements of COL18A1 identified through zebrafish transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Kague, Erika; Bessling, Seneca L; Lee, Josephine; Hu, Gui; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Fisher, Shannon

    2010-01-15

    Type XVIII collagen is a component of basement membranes, and expressed prominently in the eye, blood vessels, liver, and the central nervous system. Homozygous mutations in COL18A1 lead to Knobloch Syndrome, characterized by ocular defects and occipital encephalocele. However, relatively little has been described on the role of type XVIII collagen in development, and nothing is known about the regulation of its tissue-specific expression pattern. We have used zebrafish transgenesis to identify and characterize cis-regulatory sequences controlling expression of the human gene. Candidate enhancers were selected from non-coding sequence associated with COL18A1 based on sequence conservation among mammals. Although these displayed no overt conservation with orthologous zebrafish sequences, four regions nonetheless acted as tissue-specific transcriptional enhancers in the zebrafish embryo, and together recapitulated the major aspects of col18a1 expression. Additional post-hoc computational analysis on positive enhancer sequences revealed alignments between mammalian and teleost sequences, which we hypothesize predict the corresponding zebrafish enhancers; for one of these, we demonstrate functional overlap with the orthologous human enhancer sequence. Our results provide important insight into the biological function and regulation of COL18A1, and point to additional sequences that may contribute to complex diseases involving COL18A1. More generally, we show that combining functional data with targeted analyses for phylogenetic conservation can reveal conserved cis-regulatory elements in the large number of cases where computational alignment alone falls short.

  13. Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Mock, Jason R.; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Florez, Marcus A.; Chau, Eric; Gibbs, Kevin W.; Mandke, Pooja; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; King, Landon S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and often fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild-type (WT) mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs from DAC-treated WT mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1–null mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3DTR) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 2 × 105 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. In addition, in WT mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:25295995

  14. Comprehensive analysis of hydrogen bonds in regulatory protein DNA-complexes: in search of common principles.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Gutfreund, Y; Schueler, O; Margalit, H

    1995-10-20

    A systematic analysis of hydrogen bonds between regulatory proteins and their DNA targets is presented, based on 28 crystallographically solved complexes. All possible hydrogen bonds were screened and classified into different types: those that involve the amino acid side-chains and DNA base edges and those that involve the backbone atoms of the molecules. For each interaction type, all bonds were characterized and a statistical analysis was performed to reveal significant amino acid-base interdependence. The interactions between the amino acid side-chains and DNA backbone constitute about half of the interactions, but did not show any amino acid-base correlation. Interactions via the protein backbone were also observed, predominantly with the DNA backbone. As expected, the most significant pairing preference was demonstrated for interactions between the amino acid side-chains and the DNA base edges. The statistically significant relationships could mostly be explained by the chemical nature of the participants. However, correlations that could not be trivially predicted from the hydrogen bonding potential of the residues were also identified, like the preference of lysine for guanine over adenine, or the preference of glutamic acid for cystosine over adenine. While Lys x G interactions were very frequent and spread over various families, the Glu x C interactions were found mainly in the basic helix-loop-helix family. Further examination of the side-chain-base edge contacts at the atomic level revealed a trend of the amino acids to contact the DNA by their donor atoms, preferably at position W2 in the major groove. In most cases it seems that the interactions are not guided simply by the presence of a required atom in a specific position in the groove, but that the identity of the base possessing this atom is crucial. This may have important implications in molecular design experiments.

  15. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1)c promoter: Characterization and transcriptional regulation by mature SREBP-1 and liver X receptor α in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Wang, H P; Wang, H; Zhang, T Y; Tian, H B; Yao, D W; Loor, J J

    2016-02-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) is a key transcription factor that regulates lipogenesis in rodent liver. Two isoforms (SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c) of SREBP-1 are transcribed by an alternative promoter on the same gene (SREBF1), and the isoforms differ only in their first exon. Although the regulatory effects of SREBP-1 on lipid and milk fat synthesis have received much attention in ruminants, SREBP-1c promoter and its regulatory mechanisms have not been characterized in the goat. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced a 2,012-bp fragment of the SREBP-1c 5'-flanking region from goat genomic DNA. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that SREBP-1c is transcriptionally activated by the liver X receptor α (LXRα) agonist T0901317, and is decreased by SREBP-1 small interfering (si)RNA. A 5' deletion analysis revealed a core promoter region located -395 to +1 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (TSS). Site-directed mutagenesis of LXRα binding elements (LXRE1 and LXRE2) and sterol regulatory elements (SRE1 and SRE2) revealed that the full effects of T 4506585 require the presence of both LXRE and SRE. We also characterized a new SRE (SRE1) and demonstrated a direct role of SREBP-1 (auto-loop regulation) in maintaining its basal transcription activity. Results suggest that goat SREBP-1c gene is transcriptionally regulated by mature SREBP-1 (auto-loop circuit regulation) and LXRα in goat mammary epithelial cells. PMID:26709176

  16. Identification and characterization of regulatory elements in the promoter of ACVR1, the gene mutated in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Mutations in the ACVR1 gene are associated with Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP), a rare and extremely disabling disorder characterized by congenital malformation of the great toes and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification in muscles and other non-skeletal tissues. Several aspects of FOP pathophysiology are still poorly understood, including mechanisms regulating ACVR1 expression. This work aimed to identify regulatory elements that control ACVR1 gene transcription. Methods and results We first characterized the structure and composition of human ACVR1 gene transcripts by identifying the transcription start site, and then characterized a 2.9 kb upstream region. This region showed strong activating activity when tested by reporter gene assays in transfected cells. We identified specific elements within the 2.9 kb region that are important for transcription factor binding using deletion constructs, co-transfection experiments with plasmids expressing selected transcription factors, site-directed mutagenesis of consensus binding-site sequences, and by protein/DNA binding assays. We also characterized a GC-rich minimal promoter region containing binding sites for the Sp1 transcription factor. Conclusions Our results showed that several transcription factors such as Egr-1, Egr-2, ZBTB7A/LRF, and Hey1, regulate the ACVR1 promoter by binding to the -762/-308 region, which is essential to confer maximal transcriptional activity. The Sp1 transcription factor acts at the most proximal promoter segment upstream of the transcription start site. We observed significant differences in different cell types suggesting tissue specificity of transcriptional regulation. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that regulate expression of the ACVR1 gene and that could be targets of new strategies for future therapeutic treatments. PMID:24047559

  17. A Comparative Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in the Mouse Genome

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D.; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Bob; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K.; Williams, Brian A.; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M. A.; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T.; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Bansal, Mukul S.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Morrissey, Christapher S.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S.; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S.; Cline, Melissa S.; Erickson, Drew T.; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; de Sousa, Beatriz Lacerda; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W. James; Santos, Miguel Ramalho; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J.; Wilken, Matthew S.; Reh, Thomas A.; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P.; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R. Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Good, Peter J.; Lowdon, Rebecca F.; Adams, Leslie B.; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J.; Feingold, Elise A.; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Kellis, Manolis; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Snyder, Michael P.; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Gilbert, David M.; Hardison, Ross C.; Beer, Michael A.; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Summary As the premier model organism in biomedical research, the laboratory mouse shares the majority of protein-coding genes with humans, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications, and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of other sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases. PMID:25409824

  18. A comparative encyclopedia of DNA elements in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Cheng, Yong; Breschi, Alessandra; Vierstra, Jeff; Wu, Weisheng; Ryba, Tyrone; Sandstrom, Richard; Ma, Zhihai; Davis, Carrie; Pope, Benjamin D; Shen, Yin; Pervouchine, Dmitri D; Djebali, Sarah; Thurman, Robert E; Kaul, Rajinder; Rynes, Eric; Kirilusha, Anthony; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine; Antoshechkin, Igor; DeSalvo, Gilberto; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Zaleski, Chris; Dobin, Alex; Prieto, Pablo; Lagarde, Julien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Tanzer, Andrea; Denas, Olgert; Li, Kanwei; Bender, M A; Zhang, Miaohua; Byron, Rachel; Groudine, Mark T; McCleary, David; Pham, Long; Ye, Zhen; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Wu, Yi-Chieh; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Bansal, Mukul S; Kellis, Manolis; Keller, Cheryl A; Morrissey, Christapher S; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Dogan, Nergiz; Harris, Robert S; Cayting, Philip; Kawli, Trupti; Boyle, Alan P; Euskirchen, Ghia; Kundaje, Anshul; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Jansen, Camden; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Erickson, Drew T; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Sloan, Cricket A; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Lacerda de Sousa, Beatriz; Beal, Kathryn; Pignatelli, Miguel; Flicek, Paul; Lian, Jin; Kahveci, Tamer; Lee, Dongwon; Kent, W James; Ramalho Santos, Miguel; Herrero, Javier; Notredame, Cedric; Johnson, Audra; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Neri, Fidencio; Diegel, Morgan; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter J; Wilken, Matthew S; Reh, Thomas A; Giste, Erika; Shafer, Anthony; Kutyavin, Tanya; Haugen, Eric; Dunn, Douglas; Reynolds, Alex P; Neph, Shane; Humbert, Richard; Hansen, R Scott; De Bruijn, Marella; Selleri, Licia; Rudensky, Alexander; Josefowicz, Steven; Samstein, Robert; Eichler, Evan E; Orkin, Stuart H; Levasseur, Dana; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Skoultchi, Arthur; Gosh, Srikanta; Disteche, Christine; Treuting, Piper; Wang, Yanli; Weiss, Mitchell J; Blobel, Gerd A; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Good, Peter J; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B; Zhou, Xiao-Qiao; Pazin, Michael J; Feingold, Elise A; Wold, Barbara; Taylor, James; Mortazavi, Ali; Weissman, Sherman M; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael P; Guigo, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R; Gilbert, David M; Hardison, Ross C; Beer, Michael A; Ren, Bing

    2014-11-20

    The laboratory mouse shares the majority of its protein-coding genes with humans, making it the premier model organism in biomedical research, yet the two mammals differ in significant ways. To gain greater insights into both shared and species-specific transcriptional and cellular regulatory programs in the mouse, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium has mapped transcription, DNase I hypersensitivity, transcription factor binding, chromatin modifications and replication domains throughout the mouse genome in diverse cell and tissue types. By comparing with the human genome, we not only confirm substantial conservation in the newly annotated potential functional sequences, but also find a large degree of divergence of sequences involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin state and higher order chromatin organization. Our results illuminate the wide range of evolutionary forces acting on genes and their regulatory regions, and provide a general resource for research into mammalian biology and mechanisms of human diseases.

  19. Allosteric control of mammalian DNA methyltransferases – a new regulatory paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Jeltsch, Albert; Jurkowska, Renata Z.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, DNA methylation is introduced by the DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B methyltransferases, which are all large multi-domain proteins containing a catalytic C-terminal domain and an N-terminal part with regulatory functions. Recently, two novel regulatory principles of DNMTs were uncovered. It was shown that their catalytic activity is under allosteric control of N-terminal domains with autoinhibitory function, the RFT and CXXC domains in DNMT1 and the ADD domain in DNMT3. Moreover, targeting and activity of DNMTs were found to be regulated in a concerted manner by interactors and posttranslational modifications (PTMs). In this review, we describe the structures and domain composition of the DNMT1 and DNMT3 enzymes, their DNA binding, catalytic mechanism, multimerization and the processes controlling their stability in cells with a focus on their regulation and chromatin targeting by PTMs, interactors and chromatin modifications. We propose that the allosteric regulation of DNMTs by autoinhibitory domains acts as a general switch for the modulation of the function of DNMTs, providing numerous possibilities for interacting proteins, nucleic acids or PTMs to regulate DNMT activity and targeting. The combined regulation of DNMT targeting and catalytic activity contributes to the precise spatiotemporal control of DNMT function and genome methylation in cells. PMID:27521372

  20. Capture of flanking DNA by a P element in Drosophila melanogaster: Creation of a transposable element

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubota, Stuart, I.; Huong Dangvu )

    1991-02-01

    A 6.1-kilobase nsertion into the rudimentary (r) gene was cloned and partially sequenced. The insertion consists of a 703-base-pair (bp) P element next to a 5.4-kilobase single-copy sequence. The normal positon of the single-copy sequence is near the tip of the X chromosome. Upon insertion into the r gene, this chimeric element generated an 8-bp target-site duplication, characteristic of P elements. At the non-P-element end of the insertion, the first 8 bp are identical to the first 8 bp of the inverted terminal repeats of the P element. Thus, this element has inverted terminal repeats of 8 bp. This large element can excise from the r gene under conditions of hybrid dysgenesis, which indicates that it behaves like a normal P element. These data support the conclusion that a normally stable single-copy sequence has now become unstable and duplicated within the genome.

  1. Function of a Foxp3 cis-element in protecting regulatory T cell identity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xudong; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Benner, Chris; Zheng, Ye

    2014-08-14

    The homeostasis of multicellular organisms requires terminally differentiated cells to preserve their lineage specificity. However, it is unclear whether mechanisms exist to actively protect cell identity in response to environmental cues that confer functional plasticity. Regulatory T (Treg) cells, specified by the transcription factor Foxp3, are indispensable for immune system homeostasis. Here, we report that conserved noncoding sequence 2 (CNS2), a CpG-rich Foxp3 intronic cis-element specifically demethylated in mature Tregs, helps maintain immune homeostasis and limit autoimmune disease development by protecting Treg identity in response to signals that shape mature Treg functions and drive their initial differentiation. In activated Tregs, CNS2 helps protect Foxp3 expression from destabilizing cytokine conditions by sensing TCR/NFAT activation, which facilitates the interaction between CNS2 and Foxp3 promoter. Thus, epigenetically marked cis-elements can protect cell identity by sensing key environmental cues central to both cell identity formation and functional plasticity without interfering with initial cell differentiation. PMID:25126782

  2. Regulation of the Nanog Gene by Both Positive and Negative cis-Regulatory Elements in Embryonal Carcinoma Cells and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Brian; Cox, Jesse L.; Claassen, David; Mallanna, Sunil Kumar; Desler, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie

    2008-01-01

    The transcription factor Nanog is essential for mammalian embryogenesis, as well as the pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Work with ES cells and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells previously identified positive and negative cis-regulatory elements that influence the activity of the Nanog promoter, including adjacent cis-regulatory elements that bind Sox2 and Oct-3/4. Given the importance of Nanog during mammalian development, we examined the cis-regulatory elements required for Nanog promoter activity more closely. In this study, we demonstrate that two positive cis-regulatory elements previously shown to be active in F9 EC cells are also active in ES cells. We also identify a novel negative regulatory region that is located in close proximity to two other positive Nanog cis-regulatory elements. Although this negative regulatory region is active in F9 EC cells and ES cells, it is inactive in P19 EC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that one of the positive cis-regulatory elements active in F9 EC cells and ES cells is inactive in P19 EC cells. Together, these and other studies suggest that Nanog transcription is regulated by the interplay of positive and negative cis-regulatory elements. Given that P19 appears to be more closely related to a later developmental stage of mammalian development than F9 and ES cells, differential utilization of cis-regulatory elements may reflect mechanisms used during development to achieve the correct level of Nanog expression as embryogenesis unfolds. PMID:18537119

  3. Unusual Properties of Regulatory DNA from the Drosophila Engrailed Gene: Three ``pairing-Sensitive'' Sites within a 1.6-Kb Region

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 2-kb fragment of engrailed DNA can suppress expression of a linked marker gene, white, in the P element vector CaSpeR. This suppression is dependent on the presence of two copies of engrailed DNA-containing P elements (P[en]) in proximity in the Drosophila genome (either in cis or in trans). In this study, the 2-kb fragment was dissected and found to contain three fragments of DNA which could mediate white suppression [called ``pairing-sensitive sites'' (PS)]. A PS site was also identified in regulatory DNA from the Drosophila escargot gene. The eye colors of six different P[en] insertions in the escargot gene suggest an interaction between P[en]-encoded and genome-encoded PS sites. I hypothesize that white gene expression from P[en] is repressed by the formation of a protein complex which is initiated at the engrailed PS sites and also requires interactions with flanking genomic DNA. Genes were sought which influence the function of PS sites. Mutations in some Polycomb and trithorax group genes were found to affect the eye color from some P[en] insertion sites. However, different mutations affected expression from different P[en] insertion sites and no one mutation was found to affect expression from all P[en] insertion sites examined. These results suggest that white expression from P[en] is not directly regulated by members of the Polycomb and trithorax group genes, but in some cases can be influenced by them. I propose that engrailed PS sites normally act to promote interactions between distantly located engrailed regulatory sites and the engrailed promoter. PMID:8005412

  4. A Transposable Element within the Non-canonical Telomerase RNA of Arabidopsis thaliana Modulates Telomerase in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hengyi; Nelson, Andrew D. L.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as critical factors in many biological processes, but little is known about how their regulatory functions evolved. One of the best-studied lncRNAs is TER, the essential RNA template for telomerase reverse transcriptase. We previously showed that Arabidopsis thaliana harbors three TER isoforms: TER1, TER2 and TER2S. TER1 serves as a canonical telomere template, while TER2 is a novel negative regulator of telomerase activity, induced in response to double-strand breaks (DSBs). TER2 contains a 529 nt intervening sequence that is removed along with 36 nt at the RNA 3’ terminus to generate TER2S, an RNA of unknown function. Here we investigate how A. thaliana TER2 acquired its regulatory function. Using data from the 1,001 Arabidopsis genomes project, we report that the intervening sequence within TER2 is derived from a transposable element termed DSB responsive element (DRE). DRE is found in the TER2 loci of most but not all A. thaliana accessions. By analyzing accessions with (TER2) and without DRE (TER2Δ) we demonstrate that this element is responsible for many of the unique properties of TER2, including its enhanced binding to TERT and telomerase inhibitory function. We show that DRE destabilizes TER2, and further that TER2 induction by DNA damage reflects increased RNA stability and not increased transcription. DRE-mediated changes in TER2 stability thus provide a rapid and sensitive switch to fine-tune telomerase enzyme activity. Altogether, our data shows that invasion of the TER2 locus by a small transposon converted this lncRNA into a DNA damage sensor that modulates telomerase enzyme activity in response to genome assault. PMID:26075395

  5. Isolation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase cDNA and Basal Regulatory Region from Metroxylon sagu.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ching Ching; Roslan, Hairul Azman

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) is a versatile enzyme involved in many biochemical pathways in plants such as in germination and stress tolerance. Sago palm is plant with much importance to the state of Sarawak as one of the most important crops that bring revenue with the advantage of being able to withstand various biotic and abiotic stresses such as heat, pathogens, and water logging. Here we report the isolation of sago palm Adh cDNA and its putative promoter region via the use of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and genomic walking. The isolated cDNA was characterized and determined to be 1464 bp long encoding for 380 amino acids. BLAST analysis showed that the Adh is similar to the Adh1 group with 91% and 85% homology with Elaeis guineensis and Washingtonia robusta, respectively. The putative basal msAdh1 regulatory region was further determined to contain promoter signals of TATA and AGGA boxes and predicted amino acids analyses showed several Adh-specific motifs such as the two zinc-binding domains that bind to the adenosine ribose of the coenzyme and binding to alcohol substrate. A phylogenetic tree was also constructed using the predicted amino acid showed clear separation of Adh from bacteria and clustered within the plant Adh group.

  6. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A.

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  7. Modular structural elements in the replication origin region of Tetrahymena rDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Du, C; Sanzgiri, R P; Shaiu, W L; Choi, J K; Hou, Z; Benbow, R M; Dobbs, D L

    1995-01-01

    Computer analyses of the DNA replication origin region in the amplified rRNA genes of Tetrahymena thermophila identified a potential initiation zone in the 5'NTS [Dobbs, Shaiu and Benbow (1994), Nucleic Acids Res. 22, 2479-2489]. This region consists of a putative DNA unwinding element (DUE) aligned with predicted bent DNA segments, nuclear matrix or scaffold associated region (MAR/SAR) consensus sequences, and other common modular sequence elements previously shown to be clustered in eukaryotic chromosomal origin regions. In this study, two mung bean nuclease-hypersensitive sites in super-coiled plasmid DNA were localized within the major DUE-like element predicted by thermodynamic analyses. Three restriction fragments of the 5'NTS region predicted to contain bent DNA segments exhibited anomalous migration characteristic of bent DNA during electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels. Restriction fragments containing the 5'NTS region bound Tetrahymena nuclear matrices in an in vitro binding assay, consistent with an association of the replication origin region with the nuclear matrix in vivo. The direct demonstration in a protozoan origin region of elements previously identified in Drosophila, chick and mammalian origin regions suggests that clusters of modular structural elements may be a conserved feature of eukaryotic chromosomal origins of replication. Images PMID:7784181

  8. Translating the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements Project findings to the clinic: ENCODE's implications for eye disease.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Paul G; Hewitt, Alex W

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10 years after the Human Genome Project unravelled the sequence of our DNA, the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project sought to interpret it. Data from the recently completed project have shed new light on the proportion of biologically active human DNA, assigning a biochemical role to much of the sequence previously considered to be 'junk'. Many of these newly catalogued functional elements represent epigenetic mechanisms involved in regulation of gene expression. Analogous to an Ishihara plate, a gene-coding region of DNA (target dots) only comes into context when the non-coding DNA (surrounding dots) is appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the ENCODE project, discussing the significance of these data for ophthalmic research and eye disease. The novel insights afforded by the ENCODE project will in time allow for the development of new therapeutic strategies in the management of common blinding disorders.

  9. Putative regulatory elements within the non-coding regions of Chrysomelidae Diapause Associated Transcript-1 (DAT-1) orthologs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop a more comprehensive understanding of diapause within Chrysomelidae, we are employing phylogenetic foot-printing to isolate and characterize the regulatory elements associated with the diapause-associated gene, DAT-1. Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Colorado potato beetle, CPB) DAT-1 has been ...

  10. Proteomics to study DNA-bound and chromatin-associated gene regulatory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wierer, Michael; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is a powerful method for the identification of soluble protein complexes and large-scale affinity purification screens can decode entire protein interaction networks. In contrast, protein complexes residing on chromatin have been much more challenging, because they are difficult to purify and often of very low abundance. However, this is changing due to recent methodological and technological advances in proteomics. Proteins interacting with chromatin marks can directly be identified by pulldowns with synthesized histone tails containing posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Similarly, pulldowns with DNA baits harbouring single nucleotide polymorphisms or DNA modifications reveal the impact of those DNA alterations on the recruitment of transcription factors. Accurate quantitation – either isotope-based or label free – unambiguously pinpoints proteins that are significantly enriched over control pulldowns. In addition, protocols that combine classical chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) methods with mass spectrometry (ChIP-MS) target gene regulatory complexes in their in-vivo context. Similar to classical ChIP, cells are crosslinked with formaldehyde and chromatin sheared by sonication or nuclease digested. ChIP-MS baits can be proteins in tagged or endogenous form, histone PTMs, or lncRNAs. Locus-specific ChIP-MS methods would allow direct purification of a single genomic locus and the proteins associated with it. There, loci can be targeted either by artificial DNA-binding sites and corresponding binding proteins or via proteins with sequence specificity such as TAL or nuclease deficient Cas9 in combination with a specific guide RNA. We predict that advances in MS technology will soon make such approaches generally applicable tools in epigenetics. PMID:27402878

  11. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Yang, D M

    1989-01-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base-pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-bp inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs of the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTR sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression. Further analyses using chimeric LTR constructs located the presence of a strong negative regulatory element within the region containing the 5' portion of the enhancer and the immediate upstream sequences in the MuLV-related LTRs. Images PMID:2542587

  12. Nerve growth factor-induced derepression of peripherin gene expression is associated with alterations in proteins binding to a negative regulatory element.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M A; Lee, E; Lawe, D; Gizang-Ginsberg, E; Ziff, E B

    1992-01-01

    The peripherin gene, which encodes a neuronal-specific intermediate filament protein, is transcriptionally induced with a late time course when nerve growth factor (NGF) stimulates PC12 cells to differentiate into neurons. We have studied its transcriptional regulation in order to better understand the neuronal-specific end steps of the signal transduction pathway of NGF. By 5' deletion mapping of the peripherin promoter, we have localized two positive regulatory elements necessary for full induction by NGF: a distal positive element and a proximal constitutive element within 111 bp of the transcriptional start site. In addition, there is a negative regulatory element (NRE; -179 to -111), the deletion of which results in elevated basal expression of the gene. Methylation interference footprinting of the NRE defined a unique sequence, GGCAGGGCGCC, as the binding site for proteins present in nuclear extracts from both undifferentiated and differentiated PC12 cells. However, DNA mobility shift assays using an oligonucleotide probe containing the footprinted sequence demonstrate a prominent retarded complex in extracts from undifferentiated PC12 cells which migrates with slower mobility than do the complexes produced by using differentiated PC12 cell extract. Transfection experiments using peripherin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs in which the footprinted sequence has been mutated confirm that the NRE has a functional, though not exclusive, role in repressing peripherin expression in undifferentiated and nonneuronal cells. We propose a two-step model of activation of peripherin by NGF in which dissociation of a repressor from the protein complex at the NRE, coupled with a positive signal from the distal positive element, results in depression of the gene. Images PMID:1588954

  13. Highly specific epigenome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 repressors for silencing of distal regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Pratiksha I; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K; Kabadi, Ami M; Reddy, Timothy E; Crawford, Gregory E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 platform is a promising technology for modulating gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB are not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates the expression of multiple globin genes, and observed highly specific induction of H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and decreased chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in global gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome.

  14. Generation and Screening of Transgenic Mice with Neuronal Labeling Controlled by Thy1 Regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Petar; Godinho, Leanne; Misgeld, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Major progress has been made using in vivo imaging in mice to study mammalian nervous system development, plasticity, and disease. This progress has depended in part on the wide availability of two-photon microscopy, which is capable of penetrating deep into scattering tissue. Equally important, however, is the generation of suitable transgenic mouse models, which provide a "Golgi staining"-like labeling of neurons that is sparse and bright enough for in vivo imaging. Particularly prominent among such transgenic mice are the so-called Thy1-XFP mice (in which XFP stands for any fluorescent protein) that are used in numerous studies, especially to visualize spine plasticity in the cortex and remodeling in peripheral synapses. New generations of Thy1-XFP mice are now being generated at a high rate, and these have allowed previously difficult experiments to become feasible. Moreover, with easy access to core facilities or commercial providers of pronuclear injections, generating simple Thy1 transgenic mice is now a possibility even for small laboratories. In this introduction, we discuss the Thy1 regulatory elements used to generate transgenic lines with neuronal labeling. We provide a brief overview of currently available Thy1 transgenic mice, including lines labeling neuronal organelles or reporting neuronal function. PMID:26430261

  15. Highly Specific Epigenome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 Repressors for Silencing of Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; D’Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K.; Kabadi, Ami M.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 platform is a promising technology to modulate gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of the nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the KRAB repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB is not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates expression of multiple globin genes. Genome-wide analyses demonstrated that localization of dCas9-KRAB to HS2 specifically induced H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and reduced the chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome. PMID:26501517

  16. A novel regulatory element between the human FGA and FGG genes.

    PubMed

    Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2012-09-01

    High circulating fibrinogen levels correlate with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Fibrinogen levels vary between people and also change in response to physiological and environmental stimuli. A modest proportion of the variation in fibrinogen levels can be explained by genotype, inferring that variation in genomic sequences that regulate the fibrinogen genes ( FGA , FGB and FGG ) may affect hepatic fibrinogen production and perhaps CVD risk. We previously identified a conserved liver enhancer in the fibrinogen gene cluster (CNC12), between FGB and FGA . Genome-wide Chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) demonstrated that transcription factors which bind fibrinogen gene promoters also interact with CNC12, as well as two potential fibrinogen enhancers (PFE), between FGA and FGG . Here we show that one of the PFE sequences has potent hepatocyte enhancer activity. Using a luciferase reporter gene system, we found that PFE2 enhances minimal promoter- and FGA promoter-driven gene expression in hepatoma cells, regardless of its orientation with respect to the promoters. A region within PFE2 bears a short series of conserved nucleotides which maintain enhancer activity without flanking sequence. We also demonstrate that PFE2 is a liver enhancer in vivo, driving enhanced green fluorescent protein expression in transgenic zebrafish larval livers. Our study shows that combining public domain ChIP-seq data with in vitro and in vivo functional tests can identify novel fibrinogen gene cluster regulatory sequences. Variation in such elements could affect fibrinogen production and influence CVD risk.

  17. Endotoxin regulates the maturation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 through the induction of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Albani, D; Bianchi, M; Salmona, M

    2001-01-01

    Endotoxin (LPS), by raising the levels of cytokines, markedly influences lipid metabolism. To clarify the molecular mechanism of this effect, we examined the action of endotoxin in vitro and in vivo on the regulation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). In HepG2 cells stimulated with LPS, a dose-dependent increase in the level of the mature form of SREBP-1 was observed. For in vivo studies, endotoxin was administered intraperitoneally to CD1 mice fed with a standard or a cholesterol-enriched diet to increase the basal levels of circulating and liver cholesterol. Endotoxin raised cholesterol levels and stimulated the maturation of hepatic SREBP-1 in both normal and cholesterol-fed mice, indicating that the lipogenic effect of LPS was independent of endogenous sterol levels. To assess whether the lipogenic effect of endotoxin was linked to cytokine production, we administered LPS to C57Bl/6J endotoxin-sensitive and to C3H/HeJ endotoxin-resistant mice, which do not produce tumor necrosis factor in response to LPS. Significant induction of cholesterol levels and SREBP-1 activation was observed only in C57Bl/6J mice, indicating that cytokine production is crucial for the regulation of SREBP-1, and that the transcriptional activation of cholesterol biosynthesis may be part of the acute-phase response.

  18. Systematic prediction of cis-regulatory elements in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome using comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2012-10-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important microalgae model organisms and has been widely studied toward the understanding of chloroplast functions and various cellular processes. Further exploitation of C. reinhardtii as a model system to elucidate various molecular mechanisms and pathways requires systematic study of gene regulation. However, there is a general lack of genome-scale gene regulation study, such as global cis-regulatory element (CRE) identification, in C. reinhardtii. Recently, large-scale genomic data in microalgae species have become available, which enable the development of efficient computational methods to systematically identify CREs and characterize their roles in microalgae gene regulation. Here, we performed in silico CRE identification at the whole genome level in C. reinhardtii using a comparative genomics-based method. We predicted a large number of CREs in C. reinhardtii that are consistent with experimentally verified CREs. We also discovered that a large percentage of these CREs form combinations and have the potential to work together for coordinated gene regulation in C. reinhardtii. Multiple lines of evidence from literature, gene transcriptional profiles, and gene annotation resources support our prediction. The predicted CREs will serve, to our knowledge, as the first large-scale collection of CREs in C. reinhardtii to facilitate further experimental study of microalgae gene regulation. The accompanying software tool and the predictions in C. reinhardtii are also made available through a Web-accessible database (http://hulab.ucf.edu/research/projects/Microalgae/sdcre/motifcomb.html).

  19. Testing of Cis-Regulatory Elements by Targeted Transgene Integration in Zebrafish Using PhiC31 Integrase.

    PubMed

    Hadzhiev, Yavor; Miguel-Escalada, Irene; Balciunas, Darius; Müller, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present several strategies for testing the function of cis-regulatory elements using the PhiC31 integrase system. Firstly, we present two different strategies to analyze the activity of candidate enhancer elements. Targeted integration of candidate enhancers into the same genomic location circumvents the variability-associated random integration and position effects. This method is suitable for testing of candidate enhancers identified through computational or other analyses a priori. Secondly, we present methodology for targeted integration of BACs into the same genomic location(s). By using additional reporters integrated into a BAC, this enables experimental testing whether cis-regulatory elements are functional in the sequence inserted in the BAC. PMID:27464802

  20. Surveying DNA Elements within Functional Genes of Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Jason A.; Meeks, John C.; Zehr, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria are capable of differentiating a variety of cell types in response to environmental factors. For instance, in low nitrogen conditions, some cyanobacteria form heterocysts, which are specialized for N2 fixation. Many heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have DNA elements interrupting key N2 fixation genes, elements that are excised during heterocyst differentiation. While the mechanism for the excision of the element has been well-studied, many questions remain regarding the introduction of the elements into the cyanobacterial lineage and whether they have been retained ever since or have been lost and reintroduced. To examine the evolutionary relationships and possible function of DNA sequences that interrupt genes of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, we identified and compared 101 interruption element sequences within genes from 38 heterocyst-forming cyanobacterial genomes. The interruption element lengths ranged from about 1 kb (the minimum able to encode the recombinase responsible for element excision), up to nearly 1 Mb. The recombinase gene sequences served as genetic markers that were common across the interruption elements and were used to track element evolution. Elements were found that interrupted 22 different orthologs, only five of which had been previously observed to be interrupted by an element. Most of the newly identified interrupted orthologs encode proteins that have been shown to have heterocyst-specific activity. However, the presence of interruption elements within genes with no known role in N2 fixation, as well as in three non-heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, indicates that the processes that trigger the excision of elements may not be limited to heterocyst development or that the elements move randomly within genomes. This comprehensive analysis provides the framework to study the history and behavior of these unique sequences, and offers new insight regarding the frequency and persistence of interruption elements in

  1. Surveying DNA Elements within Functional Genes of Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Jason A; Meeks, John C; Zehr, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria are capable of differentiating a variety of cell types in response to environmental factors. For instance, in low nitrogen conditions, some cyanobacteria form heterocysts, which are specialized for N2 fixation. Many heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have DNA elements interrupting key N2 fixation genes, elements that are excised during heterocyst differentiation. While the mechanism for the excision of the element has been well-studied, many questions remain regarding the introduction of the elements into the cyanobacterial lineage and whether they have been retained ever since or have been lost and reintroduced. To examine the evolutionary relationships and possible function of DNA sequences that interrupt genes of heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, we identified and compared 101 interruption element sequences within genes from 38 heterocyst-forming cyanobacterial genomes. The interruption element lengths ranged from about 1 kb (the minimum able to encode the recombinase responsible for element excision), up to nearly 1 Mb. The recombinase gene sequences served as genetic markers that were common across the interruption elements and were used to track element evolution. Elements were found that interrupted 22 different orthologs, only five of which had been previously observed to be interrupted by an element. Most of the newly identified interrupted orthologs encode proteins that have been shown to have heterocyst-specific activity. However, the presence of interruption elements within genes with no known role in N2 fixation, as well as in three non-heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria, indicates that the processes that trigger the excision of elements may not be limited to heterocyst development or that the elements move randomly within genomes. This comprehensive analysis provides the framework to study the history and behavior of these unique sequences, and offers new insight regarding the frequency and persistence of interruption elements in

  2. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; Waele, Kathleen De; Schepper, Jean De; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Baere, Elfride De

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26631348

  3. A milieu of regulatory elements in the epidermal differentiation complex syntenic block: implications for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman Strong, Cristina; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton B.; Cheng, Jun; Sears, Karen E.; Segre, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    Two common inflammatory skin disorders with impaired barrier, atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis, share distinct genetic linkage to the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) locus on 1q21. The EDC is comprised of tandemly arrayed gene families encoding proteins involved in skin cell differentiation. Discovery of semi-dominant mutations in filaggrin (FLG) associated with AD and a copy number variation within the LCE genes associated with psoriasis provide compelling evidence for the role of EDC genes in the pathogenesis of these diseases. To date, little is known about the potentially complex regulatory landscape within the EDC. Here, we report a computational approach to identify conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) in the EDC queried for regulatory function. Coordinate expression of EDC genes during mouse embryonic skin development and a striking degree of synteny and linearity in the EDC locus across a wide range of mammalian (placental and marsupial) genomes suggests an evolutionary conserved regulatory milieu in the EDC. CNEs identified by comparative genomics exhibit dynamic regulatory activity (enhancer or repressor) in differentiating or proliferating conditions. We further demonstrate epidermal-specific, developmental in vivo enhancer activities (DNaseI and transgenic mouse assays) in CNEs, including one within the psoriasis-associated deletion, LCE3C_LCE3B-del. Together, our multidisciplinary study features a network of regulatory elements coordinating developmental EDC gene expression as an unexplored resource for genetic variants in skin diseases. PMID:20089530

  4. Chromatin properties of regulatory DNA probed by manipulation of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sharov, Alexei A; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B; Longo, Dan L; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H

    2014-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs.

  5. Understanding the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation of banana Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene during fruit ripening: an insight into the functions of various cis-acting regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Swarup Roy; Roy, Sujit; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Sengupta, Dibyendu N

    2010-05-01

    Recently, we have reported the characterization of promoter region of Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) gene in banana and investigated the role of some cis-elements/motifs, present in the promoter of SPS, in the transcriptional regulation of the gene. DNA-protein interaction studies have demonstrated the presence of specific trans-acting factors which showed specific interactions with ethylene, auxin, low temperature and light responsive elements in regulating SPS transcription. Transient expression analyses have demonstrated the functional significance of the various cis-acting regulatory elements present in banana SPS promoter in regulating SPS expression during ripening. (1) Here, we have further discussed the possible role of these regulatory sequences in the regulation of transcriptional network and comment on their function in relation to sucrose metabolism during banana fruit ripening. PMID:20139735

  6. Unmasking risk loci: DNA methylation illuminates the biology of cancer predisposition: analyzing DNA methylation of transcriptional enhancers reveals missed regulatory links between cancer risk loci and genes.

    PubMed

    Aran, Dvir; Hellman, Asaf

    2014-02-01

    Paradoxically, DNA sequence polymorphisms in cancer risk loci rarely correlate with the expression of cancer genes. Therefore, the molecular mechanism underlying an individual's susceptibility to cancer has remained largely unknown. However, recent evaluations of the correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression levels across healthy and cancerous genomes have revealed enrichment of disease-related DNA methylation variations within disease-associated risk loci. Moreover, it appears that transcriptional enhancers embedded in cancer risk loci often contain DNA methylation sites that closely define the expression of prominent cancer genes, despite the lack of significant correlations between gene expression levels and the surrounding disease-associated polymorphic sequences. We suggest that DNA methylation variations may obscure the effect of co-residing risk sequence alleles. Analysis of enhancer methylation data may help to reveal the regulatory circuits underlying predisposition to cancers and other common diseases.

  7. Assessment of Changes in Global DNA Methylation Levels by Pyrosequencing® of Repetitive Elements.

    PubMed

    Tabish, Ali M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Godderis, Lode; Barrow, Timothy M; Hoet, Peter; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TE) comprise half of the human genome. LINE-1 and ALU are the most common TE, and they have been used to assess changes in the DNA methylation of repetitive elements in response to intrinsic and extrinsic cellular events. Pyrosequencing(®) is a real-time sequencing technology that enables quantitative assessment of TE methylation at single-base resolution. In Pyrosequencing, a region of interest is first amplified from bisulfite-converted DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), before PCR amplicons are rendered single stranded and annealed with the Pyrosequencing primer prior to sequencing. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the analysis of repetitive element DNA methylation by bisulfite Pyrosequencing, and we describe a protocol that can be used for such purposes.

  8. Genome Sequencing of Autism-Affected Families Reveals Disruption of Putative Noncoding Regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Duyzend, Michael H.; McClymont, Sarah A.; Hook, Paul W.; Iossifov, Ivan; Raja, Archana; Baker, Carl; Hoekzema, Kendra; Stessman, Holly A.; Zody, Michael C.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Huddleston, John; Sandstrom, Richard; Smith, Joshua D.; Hanna, David; Swanson, James M.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Nickerson, Deborah A.; McCallion, Andrew S.; Darnell, Robert; Eichler, Evan E.

    2016-01-01

    We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 208 genomes from 53 families affected by simplex autism. For the majority of these families, no copy-number variant (CNV) or candidate de novo gene-disruptive single-nucleotide variant (SNV) had been detected by microarray or whole-exome sequencing (WES). We integrated multiple CNV and SNV analyses and extensive experimental validation to identify additional candidate mutations in eight families. We report that compared to control individuals, probands showed a significant (p = 0.03) enrichment of de novo and private disruptive mutations within fetal CNS DNase I hypersensitive sites (i.e., putative regulatory regions). This effect was only observed within 50 kb of genes that have been previously associated with autism risk, including genes where dosage sensitivity has already been established by recurrent disruptive de novo protein-coding mutations (ARID1B, SCN2A, NR3C2, PRKCA, and DSCAM). In addition, we provide evidence of gene-disruptive CNVs (in DISC1, WNT7A, RBFOX1, and MBD5), as well as smaller de novo CNVs and exon-specific SNVs missed by exome sequencing in neurodevelopmental genes (e.g., CANX, SAE1, and PIK3CA). Our results suggest that the detection of smaller, often multiple CNVs affecting putative regulatory elements might help explain additional risk of simplex autism. PMID:26749308

  9. TFIIIC Bound DNA Elements in Nuclear Organization and Insulation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Jacob G.; Raab, Jesse R.

    2012-01-01

    tRNA genes (tDNAs) have been known to have barrier insulator function in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for over a decade. tDNAs also play a role in genome organization by clustering at sites in the nucleus and both of these functions are dependent on the transcription factor TFIIIC. More recently TFIIIC bound sites devoid of pol III, termed Extra-TFIIIC sites (ETC) have been identified in budding yeast and these sites also function as insulators and affect genome organization. Subsequent studies in Schizosaccharomyces pombe showed that TFIIIC bound sites were insulators and also functioned as Chromosome Organization Clamps (COC); tethering the sites to the nuclear periphery. Very recently studies have moved to mammalian systems where pol III genes and their associated factors have been investigated in both mouse and human cells. Short Interspersed Nuclear Elements (SINEs) that bind TFIIIC, function as insulator elements and tDNAs can also function as both enhancer -blocking and barrier insulators in these organisms. It was also recently shown that tDNAs cluster with other tDNAs and with ETCs but not with pol II transcribed genes. Intriguingly, TFIIIC is often found near pol II transcription start sites and it remains unclear what the consequences of TFIIIC based genomic organization are and what influence pol III factors have on pol II transcribed genes and vise versa. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview of the known data on pol III factors in insulation and genome organization and identify the many open questions that require further investigation. \\ PMID:23000638

  10. Integrated DNA Copy Number and Gene Expression Regulatory Network Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iranmanesh, Seyed M; Guo, Nancy L

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multi-level molecular profiles can distinguish interactions that cannot be revealed based on one kind of data in the analysis of cancer susceptibility and metastasis. DNA copy number variations (CNVs) are common in cancer cells, and their role in cell behaviors and relationship to gene expression (GE) is poorly understood. An integrative analysis of CNV and genome-wide mRNA expression can discover copy number alterations and their possible regulatory effects on GE. This study presents a novel framework to identify important genes and construct potential regulatory networks based on these genes. Using this approach, DNA copy number aberrations and their effects on GE in lung cancer progression were revealed. Specifically, this approach contains the following steps: (1) select a pool of candidate driver genes, which have significant CNV in lung cancer patient tumors or have a significant association with the clinical outcome at the transcriptional level; (2) rank important driver genes in lung cancer patients with good prognosis and poor prognosis, respectively, and use top-ranked driver genes to construct regulatory networks with the COpy Number and EXpression In Cancer (CONEXIC) method; (3) identify experimentally confirmed molecular interactions in the constructed regulatory networks using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA); and (4) visualize the refined regulatory networks with the software package Genatomy. The constructed CNV/mRNA regulatory networks provide important insights into potential CNV-regulated transcriptional mechanisms in lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25392690

  11. Control of mRNA decapping by positive and negative regulatory elements in the Dcp2 C-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Jacobson, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Decapping commits an mRNA to complete degradation and promotes general 5′ to 3′ decay, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), and transcript-specific degradation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a single decapping enzyme composed of a regulatory subunit (Dcp1) and a catalytic subunit (Dcp2) targets thousands of distinct substrate mRNAs. However, the mechanisms controlling this enzyme's in vivo activity and substrate specificity remain elusive. Here, using a genetic approach, we show that the large C-terminal domain of Dcp2 includes a set of conserved negative and positive regulatory elements. A single negative element inhibits enzymatic activity and controls the downstream functions of several positive elements. The positive elements recruit the specific decapping activators Edc3, Pat1, and Upf1 to form distinct decapping complexes and control the enzyme's substrate specificity and final activation. Our results reveal unforeseen regulatory mechanisms that control decapping enzyme activity and function in vivo, and define roles for several decapping activators in the regulation of mRNA decapping. PMID:26184073

  12. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Kulick, Amanda R.; Yedlapalli, Srilakshmi; Battistella, Louisa; Hajiran, Cyrus J.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 9.6 nM) and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device. PMID:25400940

  13. Cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) by CPP32 during apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Zelenski, N G; Yang, J; Sakai, J; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol homeostasis is controlled by sterol-regulated proteolysis of membrane-bound transcription factors called sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). CPP32, a cysteine protease, was shown previously to cleave SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 in vitro at an aspartic acid between the basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper domain and the first trans-membrane domain, liberating a transcriptionally active fragment. Here, we show that CPP32 exists in an inactive 32 kDa form in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. When apoptosis was induced with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, CPP32 was cleaved to subunits of 20 and 10 kDa to form the active protease. Under these conditions membrane-bound SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 were both cleaved, and the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragments were found in nuclear extracts. Similar results were obtained in human U937 cells induced to undergo apoptosis by anti-Fas and etoposide. The apoptosis-induced cleavage of SREBPs was not suppressed by sterols, indicating that apoptosis-induced cleavage and sterol-regulated cleavage are mediated by different proteases. CHO cells expressing a mutant SREBP-2 with an Asp--> Ala mutation at the CPP32 cleavage site showed sterol-regulated cleavage but no apoptosis-induced cleavage. These data are consistent with the emerging concept that CPP32 is a central mediator in apoptosis. They also indicate that SREBPs, like poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, are cleaved by CPP32 during programmed cell death. Images PMID:8605870

  14. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  15. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  16. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  17. Overview of regulatory strategies and molecular elements in metabolic engineering of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianwen; Ma, Xingyuan; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-11-01

    From a viewpoint of biotechnology, metabolic engineering mainly aims to change the natural status of a pathway in a microorganism towards the overproduction of certain bioproducts. The biochemical nature of a pathway implies us that changed pathway is often the collective results of altered behavior of the metabolic enzymes encoded by corresponding genes. By finely modulating the expression of these genes or the properties of the enzyme, we can gain efficient control on the pathway. In this article, we reviewed the typical methods that have been applied to regulate the expression of genes in metabolic engineering. These methods are grouped according to the operation targets in a typical gene. The transcription of a gene is controlled by an indispensable promoter. By utilizing promoters with different strengths, expected levels of expression can be easily achieved, and screening a promoter library may find suitable mutant promoters that can provide tunable expression of a gene. Auto-responsive promoter (quorum sensing (QS)-based or oxygen-inducible) simplifies the induction process by driving the expression of a gene in an automated manner. Light responsive promoter enables reversible and noninvasive control on gene activity, providing a promising method in controlling gene expression with time and space resolution in metabolic engineering involving complicated genetic circuits. Through directed evolution and/or rational design, the encoding sequences of a gene can be altered, leading to the possibly most profound changes in properties of a metabolic enzyme. Introducing an engineered riboswitch in mRNA can make it a regulatory molecule at the same time; ribosomal binding site is commonly engineered to be more attractive for a ribosome through design. Terminator of a gene will affect the stability of an mRNA, and intergenic region will influence the expression of many related genes. Improving the performance of these elements are generally the main activities in

  18. DNA capture elements for rapid detection and identification of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Parker, Jill E.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Vivekananda, Jeeva

    2004-08-01

    DNA capture elements (DCEs; aptamers) are artificial DNA sequences, from a random pool of sequences, selected for their specific binding to potential biological warfare agents. These sequences were selected by an affinity method using filters to which the target agent was attached and the DNA isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in an iterative, increasingly stringent, process. Reporter molecules were attached to the finished sequences. To date, we have made DCEs to Bacillus anthracis spores, Shiga toxin, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and Francisella tularensis. These DCEs have demonstrated specificity and sensitivity equal to or better than antibody.

  19. Multiple regulatory elements with spatially and temporally distinct activities control neurogenin1 expression in primary neurons of the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Blader, Patrick; Plessy, Charles; Strähle, Uwe

    2003-02-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix gene neurogenin1 (ngn1) is expressed in a complex pattern in the neural plate of zebrafish embryos, demarcating the sites of primary neurogenesis. We have dissected the ngn1 locus to identify cis-regulatory regions that control this expression. We have isolated two upstream elements that drive expression in precursors of Rohon-Beard sensory neurons and hindbrain interneurons and in clusters of neuronal precursors in the anterior neural plate, respectively. A third regulatory region mediates later expression. Thus, regulatory sequences with temporally and spatially distinct activities control ngn1 expression in primary neurons of the zebrafish embryo. These regions are highly similar to 5' sequences in the mouse and human ngn1 gene, suggesting that amniote embryos, despite lacking primary neurons, utilize related mechanism to control ngn1 expression. PMID:12559493

  20. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5. PMID:26175515

  1. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y

    2015-09-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5. PMID:26175515

  2. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements.

    PubMed

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y

    2015-09-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5.

  3. Characterization of a Disease-associated Mutation Affecting a Putative Splicing Regulatory Element in Intron 6b of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Faà, Valeria; Incani, Federica; Meloni, Alessandra; Corda, Denise; Masala, Maddalena; Baffico, A. Maria; Seia, Manuela; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, M. Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common recessive disorder caused by >1600 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. About 13% of CFTR mutations are classified as “splicing mutations,” but for almost 40% of these, their role in affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of the gene is not yet defined. In this work, we describe a new splicing mutation detected in three unrelated Italian CF patients. By DNA analyses and mRNA studies, we identified the c.1002–1110_1113delTAAG mutation localized in intron 6b of the CFTR gene. At the mRNA level, this mutation creates an aberrant inclusion of a sequence of 101 nucleotides between exons 6b and 7. This sequence corresponds to a portion of intron 6b and resembles a cryptic exon because it is characterized by an upstream ag and a downstream gt sequence, which are most probably recognized as 5′- and 3′-splice sites by the spliceosome. Through functional analysis of this splicing defect, we show that this mutation abolishes the interaction of the splicing regulatory protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 with an intronic splicing regulatory element and creates a new recognition motif for the SRp75 splicing factor, causing activation of the cryptic exon. Our results show that the c.1002–1110_1113delTAAG mutation creates a new intronic splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the CFTR gene exclusively recognized by SRp75. PMID:19759008

  4. Radiation-induced changes in DNA methylation of repetitive elements in the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Nzabarushimana, Etienne; Skinner, Charles M; Melnyk, Stepan B; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-05-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism, needed for proper control over the expression of genetic information and silencing of repetitive elements. Exposure to ionizing radiation, aside from its strong genotoxic potential, may also affect the methylation of DNA, within the repetitive elements, in particular. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J male mice to low absorbed mean doses of two types of space radiation-proton (0.1 Gy, 150 MeV, dose rate 0.53 ± 0.08 Gy/min), and heavy iron ions ((56)Fe) (0.5 Gy, 600 MeV/n, dose rate 0.38 ± 0.06 Gy/min). Radiation-induced changes in cardiac DNA methylation associated with repetitive elements were detected. Specifically, modest hypomethylation of retrotransposon LINE-1 was observed at day 7 after irradiation with either protons or (56)Fe. This was followed by LINE-1, and other retrotransposons, ERV2 and SINE B1, as well as major satellite DNA hypermethylation at day 90 after irradiation with (56)Fe. These changes in DNA methylation were accompanied by alterations in the expression of DNA methylation machinery and affected the one-carbon metabolism pathway. Furthermore, loss of transposable elements expression was detected in the cardiac tissue at the 90-day time-point, paralleled by substantial accumulation of mRNA transcripts, associated with major satellites. Given that the one-carbon metabolism pathway can be modulated by dietary modifications, these findings suggest a potential strategy for the mitigation and, possibly, prevention of the negative effects exerted by ionizing radiation on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, we show that the methylation status and expression of repetitive elements may serve as early biomarkers of exposure to space radiation.

  5. Molecular structure of the chicken vitamin D-induced calbindin-D28K gene reveals eleven exons, six Ca2+-binding domains, and numerous promoter regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, P P; Cancela, L; Fujisawa, Y; Theofan, G; Norman, A W

    1988-04-01

    The seco-steroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 is known to induce the expression of a calcium binding protein termed calbindin-D28K in a variety of target tissues. In order to comprehend the mechanism of induction we have cloned and sequenced the chicken calbindin-D28K gene. The gene spans some 18.5 kilobases (kb) of chromosomal DNA from the putative Cap site to the polyadenylation site of the 2.8 kb mRNA. It is split into 11 coding exons by 10 intervening sequences. The promoter region of this gene is markedly G + C-rich (60-80%) extending from -225 to +400. Within this region we find 70 CpG dinucleotides, four G-C boxes, and numerous known promoter regulatory signals. These putative regulatory signals include a TATA box (ATAAATA) at -30 and a CAT box (CCAAT) at -326. Ten additional variant CAT boxes are found in the upstream promoter region (-218 to -770) of this gene. Furthermore we have identified a glucocorticoid-like responsive element at -410 (TCTACACACTGTTCC) and this element overlaps a metal responsive element (TGCACTC) and a variant CAT box (CCAAAT) and juxtaposes an enhancer-like core element (AAATGGT) on its 3'-side. In addition, the calbindin-D28K promoter is composed of a variety of simple repeated sequences, some of which are components of putative regulatory signals. All splice junctions were found to conform to the GT-AG rule. A consensus sequence of the 5'-splice junction reads AG/GTAAG-TTATA. A consensus sequence of the 3'-splice site consists of two elements: a pyrimidine track (mainly T) followed by ACAG/G-T. A two-dimensional model of calbindin-D28K was constructed which projects the existence of 6 alpha-helix-loop-alpha-helix regions characteristic of calcium binding domains. The 3'-end of the gene consists of a single large (2039 base pair) uninterrupted exon, an organizational feature common to other members of the calcium binding protein gene family which include calmodulin, parvalbumin, Spec I, myosin light chains, etc. Another feature

  6. Regulatory elements in the 5'region of 16SrRNA gene of Bacillus sp. strain SJ­101

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Alarifi, Saud A; Musarrat, Javed

    2009-01-01

    Advancement in bioinformatics with the development of computational tools has enabled the in­silico prediction and identification of transcription regulatory factors and other genetic elements with great ease. In this study, computational analysis of sequence homology of 546 bp 5’ region of 16SrRNA gene of Bacillus sp. strain SJ­101 resulted in identification of promoter­like sequences within the rrn gene. Using BPROM tool, the regulatory motifs like -35 and -10 boxes were mapped at 392 and 411 positions, respectively. Furthermore, the cis-acting elements as the binding sites for transcription factors (TF) cpxR and argR were identified at positions 413 and 416 at the upstream of an open reading frame (ORF). The probable functions of the putative TFs were predicted through the Uni­Prot/Swiss­Prot protein database. Search for the Shine­Dalgarno sequence (SD) found the presence of highly conserved SD sequence (AATACC), and a short 42 bp coding sequence/ORF bounded with characteristic transcription start site (AAC) and a stop codon (TGA) at positions 426 and 465 downstream to the promoter elements. A 13 amino acid long translation product of a short ORF has exhibited 100% homology with protein sequences of Bacillus spp., while showing some degree of polymorphism with other reference strains. The comparative homology of the small protein exhibited maximum similarity with Prolyl­4 hydroxylase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with 4.11 ZSCORE. The highly conserved regulatory elements and the putative ORF predicted within the 16SrRNA gene may help understand the role of relatively unexplored short ORFs within rrn operon, and their functional products in genetic regulatory mechanisms in eubacteria. PMID:19759811

  7. The function of the conserved regulatory element within the second intron of the mammalian Csf1r locus.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Bouhlel, M Amine; O'Neal, Julie; Sester, David P; Tagoh, Hiromi; Ingram, Richard M; Pridans, Clare; Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R) is expressed exclusively in cells of the myeloid lineages as well as trophoblasts. A conserved element in the second intron, Fms-Intronic Regulatory Element (FIRE), is essential for macrophage-specific transcription of the gene. However, the molecular details of how FIRE activity is regulated and how it impacts the Csf1r promoter have not been characterised. Here we show that agents that down-modulate Csf1r mRNA transcription regulated promoter activity altered the occupancy of key FIRE cis-acting elements including RUNX1, AP1, and Sp1 binding sites. We demonstrate that FIRE acts as an anti-sense promoter in macrophages and reversal of FIRE orientation within its native context greatly reduced enhancer activity in macrophages. Mutation of transcription initiation sites within FIRE also reduced transcription. These results demonstrate that FIRE is an orientation-specific transcribed enhancer element.

  8. Analysis of genetic elements controlling Staphylococcus aureus lrgAB expression: potential role of DNA topology in SarA regulation.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, D F; Brunskill, E W; Bayles, K W

    2000-09-01

    Penicillin-induced killing and murein hydrolase activity in Staphylococcus aureus are dependent on a variety of regulatory elements, including the LytSR two-component regulatory system and the virulence factor regulators Agr and Sar. The LytSR effects on these processes can be explained, in part, by the recent finding that a LytSR-regulated operon, designated lrgAB, affects murein hydrolase activity and penicillin tolerance. To examine the regulation of lrgAB expression in greater detail, we performed Northern blot and promoter fusion analyses. Both methods revealed that Agr and Sar, like LytSR, positively regulate lrgAB expression. A mutation in the agr locus reduced lrgAB expression approximately sixfold, while the sar mutation reduced lrgAB expression to undetectable levels. cis-acting regulatory elements involved in lrgAB expression were identified by fusing various fragments of the lrgAB promoter region to the xylE reporter gene and integrating these constructs into the chromosome. Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase assays identified DNA sequences, including an inverted repeat and intrinsic bend sites, that contribute to maximal lrgAB expression. Confirmation of the importance of the inverted repeat was achieved by demonstrating that multiple copies of the inverted repeat reduced lrgAB promoter activity, presumably by titrating out a positive regulatory factor. The results of this study demonstrate that lrgAB expression responds to a variety of positive regulatory factors and suggest that specific DNA topology requirements are important for optimal expression. PMID:10940023

  9. Sequence analysis of Vicia faba repeated DNA, the FokI repeat element.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, A; Yakura, K; Tanifuji, S

    1984-01-01

    A type of highly repeated DNA sequences present in the genome of Vicia faba was detected by digestion its nuclear DNA with FokI endonuclease and fractionating the digests on polyacrylamide gels. Four fragments of 59, 108, 177 and 246 bp of the FokI repeated sequences were collected from the gels and their primary structures were determined by the method of Maxam and Gilbert. These repeated DNA sequences were shown to be a multiple tandem array of a 59 bp sequence element. And its nucleotide sequence was almost completely conserved among all the sequence members of each the size class and also among these classes. This sequence element consists of a duplet of an about the duplet has an incomplete dyad symmetrical structure. Images PMID:6089113

  10. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  11. A DNA-binding protein factor recognizes two binding domains within the octopine synthase enhancer element.

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhisa, J G; Singh, K; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    1990-01-01

    A protein that binds to the enhancing element of the octopine synthase gene has been identified in nuclear extracts from maize cell suspension cultures. Two protein-DNA complexes are distinguishable by electrophoretic mobility in gel retardation assays. Footprint analyses of these low and high molecular weight complexes show, respectively, half and complete protection of the ocs-element DNA from cleavage by methidiumpropyl-EDTA.FE(II). Two lines of evidence indicate that the element has two recognition sites, each of which can bind identical protein units. Elements that are mutated in one or the other half and form only the low molecular weight complex interfere with the formation of both the low and high molecular weight complexes by the wild-type element. Protein isolated from a complex with only one binding site occupied can bind to the wild-type ocs-element and generate complexes with protein occupying one or both binding sites. Occupation of both sites of the ocs-element is a prerequisite for transcriptional enhancement. PMID:2152113

  12. Microevolution of cis-regulatory elements: an example from the pair-rule segmentation gene fushi tarazu in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed

    Bakkali, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The importance of non-coding DNAs that control transcription is ever noticeable, but the characterization and analysis of the evolution of such DNAs presents challenges not found in the analysis of coding sequences. In this study of the cis-regulatory elements of the pair rule segmentation gene fushi tarazu (ftz) I report the DNA sequences of ftz's zebra element (promoter) and a region containing the proximal enhancer from a total of 45 fly lines belonging to several populations of the species Drosophila melanogaster, D. simulans, D. sechellia, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. teissieri, D. orena and D. erecta. Both elements evolve at slower rate than ftz synonymous sites, thus reflecting their functional importance. The promoter evolves more slowly than the average for ftz's coding sequence while, on average, the enhancer evolves more rapidly, suggesting more functional constraint and effective purifying selection on the former. Comparative analysis of the number and nature of base substitutions failed to detect significant evidence for positive/adaptive selection in transcription-factor-binding sites. These seem to evolve at similar rates to regions not known to bind transcription factors. Although this result reflects the evolutionary flexibility of the transcription factor binding sites, it also suggests a complex and still not completely understood nature of even the characterized cis-regulatory sequences. The latter seem to contain more functional parts than those currently identified, some of which probably transcription factor binding. This study illustrates ways in which functional assignments of sequences within cis-acting sequences can be used in the search for adaptive evolution, but also highlights difficulties in how such functional assignment and analysis can be carried out.

  13. Identification of a cis-acting DNA antisilencer element which modulates vimentin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, D M; Zehner, Z E

    1992-01-01

    Vimentin is a tissue-specific, developmentally regulated member of the intermediate filament protein family normally expressed in cells of mesenchymal origin. Transcription factors which recognize specific cis-acting elements of the chicken gene include Sp-1 and the 95-kDa silencer protein which binds to a 40-bp silencer element at -608 (F. X. Farrell, C. M. Sax, and Z. E. Zehner, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:2349-2358, 1990). In this study, we have identified a region upstream of the silencer element which restores gene activity. This region has been further delineated into two functional subelements of 75 and 260 bp. In transient transfection assays, the 75-bp element overrides the silencer effect of pStkCAT by 100%, while the 260-bp element is about half as active. Neither element affects gene activity when the silencer element is absent. Therefore, these elements do not function as enhancers, but they may serve only to override the silencer element and therefore can be viewed as antisilencers. In addition, the 75-bp element binds a specific 140-kDa protein, as determined by gel mobility shift assays and Southwestern (DNA-protein) blots, the binding site of which has been delineated to a 10- to 17-bp element by DNase I protection experiments. During myogenesis, a direct correlation can be made between the binding efficiency of the 140-kDa protein, the silencer protein, and gene activity in vivo. Genes known to contain a functional silencer element also contain at least one antisilencer element, as determined by sequence identity. Therefore, we have identified an antisilencer element and protein important in the developmental regulation of vimentin gene expression which may be involved in the regulation of other genes. Images PMID:1569950

  14. A new regulatory element modulates homoserine lactone-mediated autoinduction of Ti plasmid conjugal transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, I; Cook, D M; Farrand, S K

    1995-01-01

    Conjugal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline-type Ti plasmid pTiC58 is induced by agrocinopines A and B, opines secreted by crown gall tumors induced by the bacterium. This regulation functions through the transcriptional repressor, AccR. However, actual transcription of the tra genes is regulated by autoinduction through the activator TraR and the substituted homoserine lactone second messenger, Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). We have identified a new regulatory element that modulates the response of TraR to AAI. The gene, called traM, suppresses TraR-AAI activation of transcription of tra genes carried on recombinant clones. The suppression could be relieved by increasing the expression of TraR but not by increasing AAI levels. traM is located between traR and traAF on pTiC58 and is transcribed in the clockwise direction. The 306-bp gene encodes an 11.2-kDa protein showing no significant relatedness to other proteins in the databases. Mutations in traM in pTiC58 conferred a transfer-constitutive phenotype, and strains harboring the Ti plasmid produced easily detectable amounts of AAI. These same mutations engineered into the transfer-constitutive Ti plasmid pTiC58 delta accR conferred a hyperconjugal phenotype and very high levels of AAI production. Expression of traM required TraR, indicating that transcription of the gene is regulated by the autoinduction system. TraM had no effect on the expression of traR, demonstrating that the suppressive effect is not due to repression of the gene encoding the activator. These results suggest that TraM is not a direct transcriptional regulator. Since the suppressive effect is demonstrable only when traM is overexpressed with respect to traR, we suggest that TraM functions to sequester TraR from the very small amounts of AAI produced under conditions when the agrocinopines are not present. PMID:7814335

  15. Testosterone physiology in resistance exercise and training: the up-stream regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Vingren, Jakob L; Kraemer, William J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2010-12-01

    Testosterone is one of the most potent naturally secreted androgenic-anabolic hormones, and its biological effects include promotion of muscle growth. In muscle, testosterone stimulates protein synthesis (anabolic effect) and inhibits protein degradation (anti-catabolic effect); combined, these effects account for the promotion of muscle hypertrophy by testosterone. These physiological signals from testosterone are modulated through the interaction of testosterone with the intracellular androgen receptor (AR). Testosterone is important for the desired adaptations to resistance exercise and training; in fact, testosterone is considered the major promoter of muscle growth and subsequent increase in muscle strength in response to resistance training in men. The acute endocrine response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise generally includes increased secretion of various catabolic (breakdown-related) and anabolic (growth-related) hormones including testosterone. The response of testosterone and AR to resistance exercise is largely determined by upper regulatory elements including the acute exercise programme variable domains, sex and age. In general, testosterone concentration is elevated directly following heavy resistance exercise in men. Findings on the testosterone response in women are equivocal with both increases and no changes observed in response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise. Age also significantly affects circulating testosterone concentrations. Until puberty, children do not experience an acute increase in testosterone from a bout of resistance exercise; after puberty some acute increases in testosterone from resistance exercise can be found in boys but not in girls. Aging beyond 35-40 years is associated with a 1-3% decline per year in circulating testosterone concentration in men; this decline eventually results in the condition known as andropause. Similarly, aging results in a reduced acute testosterone response to resistance exercise in men

  16. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  17. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTR TAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  18. Overlapping protein-binding sites within a negative regulatory element modulate the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon-Limas, D.E.; Amaya-Manzanares, E.; Nino-Rosales, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene, whose deficiency in humans causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain, the significance and mechanism of which is unknown. Towards dissecting this molecular mechanism, we have previously identified a 182 bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human HPRT gene which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and RNAase protection assays. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60 bp region which, when tested by transient transfections in cultured fibroblasts, functioned as a repressor element. Methylation interference footprinting revealed a minimal unique DNA motif as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and non-neuronal sources. Moreover, UV-crosslinking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several distinct proteins. Strikingly, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the association of these two complexes. These data suggest that differential formation of DNA-protein complexes at this regulatory domain could be a major determinant in the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene.

  19. Increasing the dynamic control space of mammalian transcription devices by combinatorial assembly of homologous regulatory elements from different bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Bacchus, William; Weber, Wilfried; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Prokaryotic transcriptional regulatory elements are widely utilized building blocks for constructing regulatory genetic circuits adapted for mammalian cells and have found their way into a broad range of biotechnological applications. Prokaryotic transcriptional repressors, fused to eukaryotic transactivation or repression domains, compose the transcription factor, which binds and adjusts transcription from chimeric promoters containing the repressor-specific operator sequence. Escherichia coli and Chlamydia trachomatis share common features in the regulatory mechanism of the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan. The repressor protein TrpR of C. trachomatis regulates the trpRBA operon and the TrpR of E. coli regulates the trpEDCBA operon, both requiring l-tryptophan as a co-repressor. Fusion of these bacterial repressors to the VP16 transactivation domain of Herpes simplex virus creates synthetic transactivators that could bind and activate chimeric promoters, assembled by placing repressor-specific operator modules adjacent to a minimal promoter, in an l-tryptophan-adjustable manner. Combinations of different transactivator and promoter variants from the same or different bacterial species resulted in a multitude of regulatory systems where l-tryptophan regulation properties, background noise, and maximal gene expression levels were significantly diverse. Different l-tryptophan analogues showed diverse regulatory capacity depending on the promoter/transactivator combination. We believe the systems approach to rationally choose promoters, transactivators and inducer molecules, to obtain desired and predefined genetic expression dynamics and control profiles, will significantly advance the design of new regulatory circuits as well as improving already existing ones. PMID:23178502

  20. Identification of scaffold/Matrix Attachment (S/MAR) like DNA element from the gastrointestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin in the nucleus of all eukaryotes is organized into a system of loops and domains. These loops remain fastened at their bases to the fundamental framework of the nucleus, the matrix or the scaffold. The DNA sequences which anchor the bases of the chromatin loops to the matrix are known as Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions or S/MARs. Though S/MARs have been studied in yeast and higher eukaryotes and they have been found to be associated with gene organization and regulation of gene expression, they have not been reported in protists like Giardia. Several tools have been discovered and formulated to predict S/MARs from a genome of a higher eukaryote which take into account a number of features. However, the lack of a definitive consensus sequence in S/MARs and the randomness of the protozoan genome in general, make it a challenge to predict and identify such sequences from protists. Results Here, we have analysed the Giardia genome for the probable S/MARs predicted by the available computational tools; and then shown these sequences to be physically associated with the nuclear matrix. Our study also reflects that while no single computational tool is competent to predict such complex elements from protist genomes, a combination of tools followed by experimental verification is the only way to confirm the presence of these elements from these organisms. Conclusion This is the first report of S/MAR elements from the protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. This initial work is expected to lay a framework for future studies relating to genome organization as well as gene regulatory elements in this parasite. PMID:20565887

  1. Mavericks, a novel class of giant transposable elements widespread in eukaryotes and related to DNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Pritham, Ellen J; Putliwala, Tasneem; Feschotte, Cédric

    2007-04-01

    We previously identified a group of atypical mobile elements designated Mavericks from the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and the zebrafish Danio rerio. Here we present the results of comprehensive database searches of the genome sequences available, which reveal that Mavericks are widespread in invertebrates and non-mammalian vertebrates but show a patchy distribution in non-animal species, being present in the fungi Glomus intraradices and Phakopsora pachyrhizi and in several single-celled eukaryotes such as the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, the stramenopile Phytophthora infestans and the trichomonad Trichomonas vaginalis, but not detectable in plants. This distribution, together with comparative and phylogenetic analyses of Maverick-encoded proteins, is suggestive of an ancient origin of these elements in eukaryotes followed by lineage-specific losses and/or recurrent episodes of horizontal transmission. In addition, we report that Maverick elements have amplified recently to high copy numbers in T. vaginalis where they now occupy as much as 30% of the genome. Sequence analysis confirms that most Mavericks encode a retroviral-like integrase, but lack other open reading frames typically found in retroelements. Nevertheless, the length and conservation of the target site duplication created upon Maverick insertion (5- or 6-bp) is consistent with a role of the integrase-like protein in the integration of a double-stranded DNA transposition intermediate. Mavericks also display long terminal-inverted repeats but do not contain ORFs similar to proteins encoded by DNA transposons. Instead, Mavericks encode a conserved set of 5 to 9 genes (in addition to the integrase) that are predicted to encode proteins with homology to replication and packaging proteins of some bacteriophages and diverse eukaryotic double-stranded DNA viruses, including a DNA polymerase B homolog and putative capsid proteins. Based on these and other structural similarities, we

  2. P Element Regulatory Products Enhance Zeste(1) Repression of a P[white(duplicated)] Transgene in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coen, D.

    1990-01-01

    Drosophila P element mobilization is subject to a complex array of regulatory mechanisms. A fruitful approach to study them is the use of insertion mutations whose expression is influenced by P regulation. In the present report, it is shown that P element somatic products may influence the expression of an unrelated gene inserted in a P transposon. The P[w(d1)9.3]19DE transgene carries an in vitro modified white gene harboring a duplication of the 5' regulatory sequences. Expression of this transgene is repressed in a P background. No maternal effect is detected and repression can be relieved as soon as P chromosomes are replaced by M ones. The amplitude of repression is correlated to the P transposase activity of the individuals examined. Repression appears to be exerted by somatic products of complete autonomous P elements or of in vitro modified P elements lacking the capacity to express the fourth P exon. The P repression of P[w(d1)9.3]19DE is strongly dependent on the insertion site of this transgene. This P repression effect occurs only in the presence of the zeste(1) allele and is suppressed by Su(z)2 mutations. No qualitative differences of transcription pattern are observed between white(+) and P[w(d1)9.3]19DE in any backgrounds. P repression acts to reduce the amount of the major white transcript. This suggests that P regulatory products may act through cis-interactions at a distance of over 3 kb. PMID:1963871

  3. Potential Novel Mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: Deletion of a Distant Region Containing Regulatory Elements of PITX2

    PubMed Central

    Volkmann, Bethany A.; Zinkevich, Natalya S.; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F.; Bosenko, Dmitry V.; Reis, Linda M.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Mutations in PITX2 are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), which involves ocular, dental, and umbilical abnormalities. Identification of cis-regulatory elements of PITX2 is important to better understand the mechanisms of disease. Methods. Conserved noncoding elements surrounding PITX2/pitx2 were identified and examined through transgenic analysis in zebrafish; expression pattern was studied by in situ hybridization. Patient samples were screened for deletion/duplication of the PITX2 upstream region using arrays and probes. Results. Zebrafish pitx2 demonstrates conserved expression during ocular and craniofacial development. Thirteen conserved noncoding sequences positioned within a gene desert as far as 1.1 Mb upstream of the human PITX2 gene were identified; 11 have enhancer activities consistent with pitx2 expression. Ten elements mediated expression in the developing brain, four regions were active during eye formation, and two sequences were associated with craniofacial expression. One region, CE4, located approximately 111 kb upstream of PITX2, directed a complex pattern including expression in the developing eye and craniofacial region, the classic sites affected in ARS. Screening of ARS patients identified an approximately 7600-kb deletion that began 106 to 108 kb upstream of the PITX2 gene, leaving PITX2 intact while removing regulatory elements CE4 to CE13. Conclusions. These data suggest the presence of a complex distant regulatory matrix within the gene desert located upstream of PITX2 with an essential role in its activity and provides a possible mechanism for the previous reports of ARS in patients with balanced translocations involving the 4q25 region upstream of PITX2 and the current patient with an upstream deletion. PMID:20881290

  4. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan. PMID:26220938

  5. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan.

  6. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    PubMed

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  7. Structural basis of VDR–DNA interactions on direct repeat response elements

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Paul L.; Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2002-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) forms homo- or heterodimers on response elements composed of two hexameric half-sites separated by 3 bp of spacer DNA. We describe here the crystal structures at 2.7–2.8 Å resolution of the VDR DNA-binding region (DBD) in complex with response elements from three different promoters: osteopontin (SPP), canonical DR3 and osteocalcin (OC). These structures reveal the chemical basis for the increased affinity of VDR for the SPP response element, and for the poor stability of the VDR–OC complex, relative to the canonical DR3 response element. The homodimeric protein–protein interface is stabilized by van der Waals interactions and is predominantly non-polar. An extensive α-helix at the C-terminal end of the VDR DBD resembles that found in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), and suggests a mechanism by which VDR and TR discriminate among response elements. Selective structure-based mutations in the asymmetric homodimeric interface result in a VDR DBD protein that is defective in homodimerization but now forms heterodimers with the 9-cis retinoic acid receptor (RXR) DBD. PMID:11980721

  8. [Regulatory role of elements in the formation and accumulation of alkaloids in Papaver somniferum L. seedlings].

    PubMed

    Lovkova, M Ia; Buzuk, G N; Sokolova, S M

    2006-01-01

    The effects of 12 elements on the formation and accumulation of isoquinolines were studied in opium poppy seedlings (Papaver somniferum L.). Three types of concentration dependences of the effects of the elements under study were determined. The elements served as activators (Co, Mo, W, Cr, and Cu) or inhibitors of these processes (B, Fe, V, Mn, and Ca). The molecular mechanisms of action of these regulators are discussed. The optimum concentrations of Co and Mo were tested under combined treatment conditions with these elements.

  9. Scavenger receptor A gene regulatory elements target gene expression to macrophages and to foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Horvai, A; Palinski, W; Wu, H; Moulton, K S; Kalla, K; Glass, C K

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of the macrophage scavenger receptor A gene is markedly upregulated during monocyte to macrophage differentiation. In these studies, we demonstrate that 291 bp of the proximal scavenger receptor promoter, in concert with a 400-bp upstream enhancer element, is sufficient to direct macrophage-specific expression of a human growth hormone reporter in transgenic mice. These regulatory elements, which contain binding sites for PU.1, AP-1, and cooperating ets-domain transcription factors, are also sufficient to mediate regulation of transgene expression during the in vitro differentiation of bone marrow progenitor cells in response to macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Mutation of the PU.1 binding site within the scavenger receptor promoter severely impairs transgene expression, consistent with a crucial role of PU.1 in regulating the expression of the scavenger receptor gene. The ability of the scavenger receptor promoter and enhancer to target gene expression to macrophages in vivo, including foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions, suggests that these regulatory elements will be of general utility in the study of macrophage differentiation and function by permitting specific modifications of macrophage gene expression. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777517

  10. Creation of cis-regulatory elements during sea urchin evolution by co-option and optimization of a repetitive sequence adjacent to the spec2a gene.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Sandeep; Kiyama, Takae; Villinski, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Ning; Liang, Shuguang; Klein, William H

    2004-09-15

    The creation, preservation, and degeneration of cis-regulatory elements controlling developmental gene expression are fundamental genome-level evolutionary processes about which little is known. Here, we identify critical differences in cis-regulatory elements controlling the expression of the sea urchin aboral ectoderm-specific spec genes. We found multiple copies of a repetitive sequence element termed RSR in genomes of species within the Strongylocentrotidae family, but RSRs were not detected in genomes of species outside Strongylocentrotidae. spec genes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus are invariably associated with RSRs, and the spec2a RSR functioned as a transcriptional enhancer and displayed greater activity than did spec1 or spec2c RSRs. Single-base pair differences at two cis-regulatory elements within the spec2a RSR increased the binding affinities of four transcription factors, SpCCAAT-binding factor at one element and SpOtx, SpGoosecoid, and SpGATA-E at another. The cis-regulatory elements to which these four factors bound were recent evolutionary acquisitions that acted to either activate or repress transcription, depending on the cell type. These elements were found in the spec2a RSR ortholog in Strongylocentrotus pallidus but not in RSR orthologs of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis or Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. Our results indicated that a dynamic pattern of cis-regulatory element evolution exists for spec genes despite their conserved aboral ectoderm expression.

  11. PCR detection and DNA sequence analysis of the regulatory region of lymphotropic papovavirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an immunocompromised rhesus macaque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    A lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) archetypal regulatory region was amplified from DNA from the blood of an immunocompromised rhesus monkey. We believe this is the first nonserological evidence of LPV infection in rhesus monkeys.

  12. Modular sequence elements associated with origin regions in eukaryotic chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, D L; Shaiu, W L; Benbow, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have postulated that chromosomal replication origin regions in eukaryotes have in common clusters of certain modular sequence elements (Benbow, Zhao, and Larson, BioEssays 14, 661-670, 1992). In this study, computer analyses of DNA sequences from six origin regions showed that each contained one or more potential initiation regions consisting of a putative DUE (DNA unwinding element) aligned with clusters of SAR (scaffold associated region), and ARS (autonomously replicating sequence) consensus sequences, and pyrimidine tracts. The replication origins analyzed were from the following loci: Tetrahymena thermophila macronuclear rDNA gene, Chinese hamster ovary dihydrofolate reductase amplicon, human c-myc proto-oncogene, chicken histone H5 gene, Drosophila melanogaster chorion gene cluster on the third chromosome, and Chinese hamster ovary rhodopsin gene. The locations of putative initiation regions identified by the computer analyses were compared with published data obtained using diverse methods to map initiation sites. For at least four loci, the potential initiation regions identified by sequence analysis aligned with previously mapped initiation events. A consensus DNA sequence, WAWTTDDWWWDHWGWHMAWTT, was found within the potential initiation regions in every case. An additional 35 kb of combined flanking sequences from the six loci were also analyzed, but no additional copies of this consensus sequence were found. Images PMID:8041609

  13. Nanoparticle-labeled DNA capture elements for detection and identification of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiel, Johnathan L.; Holwitt, Eric A.; Parker, Jill E.; Vivekananda, Jeevalatha; Franz, Veronica

    2004-12-01

    Aptamers, synthetic DNA capture elements (DCEs), can be made chemically or in genetically engineered bacteria. DNA capture elements are artificial DNA sequences, from a random pool of sequences, selected for their specific binding to potential biological warfare or terrorism agents. These sequences were selected by an affinity method using filters to which the target agent was attached and the DNA isolated and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in an iterative, increasingly stringent, process. The probes can then be conjugated to Quantum Dots and super paramagnetic nanoparticles. The former provide intense, bleach-resistant fluorescent detection of bioagent and the latter provide a means to collect the bioagents with a magnet. The fluorescence can be detected in a flow cytometer, in a fluorescence plate reader, or with a fluorescence microscope. To date, we have made DCEs to Bacillus anthracis spores, Shiga toxin, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and Francisella tularensis. DCEs can easily distinguish Bacillus anthracis from its nearest relatives, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. Development of a high through-put process is currently being investigated.

  14. The Contribution of Alu Elements to Mutagenic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Streva, Vincent A.; DeFreece, Cecily B.; Hedges, Dale J.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2015-01-01

    Alu elements make up the largest family of human mobile elements, numbering 1.1 million copies and comprising 11% of the human genome. As a consequence of evolution and genetic drift, Alu elements of various sequence divergence exist throughout the human genome. Alu/Alu recombination has been shown to cause approximately 0.5% of new human genetic diseases and contribute to extensive genomic structural variation. To begin understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to these rearrangements in mammalian cells, we constructed Alu/Alu recombination reporter cell lines containing Alu elements ranging in sequence divergence from 0%-30% that allow detection of both Alu/Alu recombination and large non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) deletions that range from 1.0 to 1.9 kb in size. Introduction of as little as 0.7% sequence divergence between Alu elements resulted in a significant reduction in recombination, which indicates even small degrees of sequence divergence reduce the efficiency of homology-directed DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Further reduction in recombination was observed in a sequence divergence-dependent manner for diverged Alu/Alu recombination constructs with up to 10% sequence divergence. With greater levels of sequence divergence (15%-30%), we observed a significant increase in DSB repair due to a shift from Alu/Alu recombination to variable-length NHEJ which removes sequence between the two Alu elements. This increase in NHEJ deletions depends on the presence of Alu sequence homeology (similar but not identical sequences). Analysis of recombination products revealed that Alu/Alu recombination junctions occur more frequently in the first 100 bp of the Alu element within our reporter assay, just as they do in genomic Alu/Alu recombination events. This is the first extensive study characterizing the influence of Alu element sequence divergence on DNA repair, which will inform predictions regarding the effect of Alu element sequence divergence on both

  15. The Role of Crowding Forces in Juxtaposing β-Globin Gene Domain Remote Regulatory Elements in Mouse Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Golov, Arkadiy K; Gavrilov, Alexey A; Razin, Sergey V

    2015-01-01

    The extremely high concentration of macromolecules in a eukaryotic cell nucleus indicates that the nucleoplasm is a crowded macromolecular solution in which large objects tend to gather together due to crowding forces. It has been shown experimentally that crowding forces support the integrity of various nuclear compartments. However, little is known about their role in control of chromatin dynamics in vivo. Here, we experimentally addressed the possible role of crowding forces in spatial organization of the eukaryotic genome. Using the mouse β-globin domain as a model, we demonstrated that spatial juxtaposition of the remote regulatory elements of this domain in globin-expressing cells may be lost and restored by manipulation of the level of macromolecular crowding. In addition to proving the role of crowding forces in shaping interphase chromatin, our results suggest that the folding of the chromatin fiber is a major determinant in juxtaposing remote genomic elements. PMID:26436546

  16. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  17. Molecular dissection of cis-acting regulatory elements from 5'-proximal regions of a vaccinia virus late gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Miner, J N; Weinrich, S L; Hruby, D E

    1988-01-01

    Promoter elements responsible for directing the transcription of six tightly clustered vaccinia virus (VV) late genes (open reading frames [ORFs] D11, D12, D13, A1, A2, and A3) from the HindIII D/A region of the viral genome were identified within the upstream sequences proximal to each individual locus. These regions were identified as promoters by excising them from the VV genome, abutting them to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene, and demonstrating their ability to drive expression of the reporter gene in transient-expression assays in an orientation-specific manner. To delineate the 5' boundary of the upstream elements, two of the VV late gene (A1 and D13) promoter: CAT constructs were subjected to deletion mutagenesis procedures. A series of 5' deletions of the ORF A1 promoter from -114 to -24 showed no reduction in promoter activity, whereas additional deletion of the sequences from -24 to +2 resulted in the complete loss of activity. Deletion of the ORF A1 fragment from -114 to -104 resulted in a 24% increase in activity, suggesting the presence of a negative regulatory region. In marked contrast to previous 5' deletion analyses which have identified VV late promoters as 20- to 30-base-pair cap-proximal sequences, 5' deletions to define the upstream boundary of the ORF D13 promoter identified two positive regulatory regions, the first between -235 and -170 and the second between -123 and -106. Background levels of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression were obtained with deletions past -88. Significantly, this places the ORF D13 regulatory regions within the upstream coding sequences of the ORF A1. A high-stringency computer search for homologies between VV late promoters that have been thus far characterized was carried out. Several potential consensus sequences were found just upstream from RNA start sites of temporally related promoter elements. Three major conclusions are drawn from these experiments. (i) The presence of

  18. Ethylene-inducible DNA binding proteins that interact with an ethylene-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Ohme-Takagi, M; Shinshi, H

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrated that the GCC box, which is an 11-bp sequence (TAAGAGCCGCC) conserved in the 5' upstream region of ethylene-inducible pathogenesis-related protein genes in Nicotiana spp and in some other plants, is the sequence that is essential for ethylene responsiveness when incorporated into a heterologous promoter. Competitive gel retardation assays showed DNA binding activities to be specific to the GCC box sequence in tobacco nuclear extracts. Four different cDNAs encoding DNA binding proteins specific for the GCC box sequence were isolated, and their products were designated ethylene-responsive element binding proteins (EREBPs). The deduced amino acid sequences of EREBPs exhibited no homology with those of known DNA binding proteins or transcription factors; neither did the deduced proteins contain a basic leucine zipper or zinc finger motif. The DNA binding domain was identified within a region of 59 amino acid residues that was common to all four deduced EREBPs. Regions highly homologous to the DNA binding domain of EREBPs were found in proteins deduced from the cDNAs of various plants, suggesting that this domain is evolutionarily conserved in plants. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that accumulation of mRNAs for EREBPs was induced by ethylene, but individual EREBPs exhibited different patterns of expression. PMID:7756828

  19. PARP-2 and PARP-3 are selectively activated by 5' phosphorylated DNA breaks through an allosteric regulatory mechanism shared with PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Marie-France; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M

    2014-07-01

    PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3 are DNA-dependent PARPs that localize to DNA damage, synthesize poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) covalently attached to target proteins including themselves, and thereby recruit repair factors to DNA breaks to increase repair efficiency. PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3 have in common two C-terminal domains-Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) and catalytic (CAT). In contrast, the N-terminal region (NTR) of PARP-1 is over 500 residues and includes four regulatory domains, whereas PARP-2 and PARP-3 have smaller NTRs (70 and 40 residues, respectively) of unknown structural composition and function. Here, we show that PARP-2 and PARP-3 are preferentially activated by DNA breaks harboring a 5' phosphate (5'P), suggesting selective activation in response to specific DNA repair intermediates, in particular structures that are competent for DNA ligation. In contrast to PARP-1, the NTRs of PARP-2 and PARP-3 are not strictly required for DNA binding or for DNA-dependent activation. Rather, the WGR domain is the central regulatory domain of PARP-2 and PARP-3. Finally, PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3 share an allosteric regulatory mechanism of DNA-dependent catalytic activation through a local destabilization of the CAT. Collectively, our study provides new insights into the specialization of the DNA-dependent PARPs and their specific roles in DNA repair pathways.

  20. AthaMap web tools for database-assisted identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements and the display of highly conserved transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-07-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap contains more than 7.4 x 10(6) putative binding sites for 36 transcription factors (TFs) from 16 different TF families. A newly implemented functionality allows the display of subsets of higher conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Furthermore, a web tool was developed that permits a user-defined search for co-localizing cis-regulatory elements. The user can specify individually the level of conservation for each TFBS and a spacer range between them. This web tool was employed for the identification of co-localizing sites of known interacting TFs and TFs containing two DNA-binding domains. More than 1.8 x 10(5) combinatorial elements were annotated in the AthaMap database. These elements can also be used to identify more complex co-localizing elements consisting of up to four TFBSs. The AthaMap database and the connected web tools are a valuable resource for the analysis and the prediction of gene expression regulation at http://www.athamap.de. PMID:15980498

  1. An adaptive transposable element insertion in the regulatory region of the EO gene in the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Yi-Hong; Han, Min-Jin; Cao, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Although there are many studies to show a key role of transposable elements (TEs) in adaptive evolution of higher organisms, little is known about the molecular mechanisms. In this study, we found that a partial TE (Taguchi) inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the silkworm ecdysone oxidase (EO) gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme to reduce the titer of molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E). The TE insertion occurred during domestication of silkworm and the frequency of the TE insertion in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori) is high, 54.24%. The linkage disequilibrium in the TE inserted strains of the domesticated silkworm was elevated. Molecular population genetics analyses suggest that this TE insertion is adaptive for the domesticated silkworm. Luminescent reporter assay shows that the TE inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene functions as a 20E-induced enhancer of the gene expression. Further, phenotypic bioassay indicates that the silkworm with the TE insertion exhibited more stable developmental phenotype than the silkworm without the TE insertion when suffering from food shortage. Thus, the inserted TE in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene increased developmental uniformity of silkworm individuals through regulating 20E metabolism, partially explaining transformation of a domestication developmental trait in the domesticated silkworm. Our results emphasize the exceptional role of gene expression regulation in developmental transition of domesticated animals.

  2. Effects of trace elements and pesticides on dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.; Johanson, J.B.; Lund L.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of 14 trace elements, 12 herbicides, and two fungicides on dephosphorylation of yeast ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) added to soils (Xerollic Calciorthids and Typic Haploxeralfs). The cumulative amount of ortho phosphate (Pi) released from nucleic acids increased linearly with time of incubation (up to 72 h), decreased with profile depth, and was highly influenced by soil pH. When trace elements were applied and compared by using 2.5 mmol kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA in two soils ranged from 17% with Co(II) to 52% with Cu(II). The most effective inhibitors of nucleic acid dephosphorylation were Ag(I), Cu(I), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) (avg inhibition greater than or equal to 35%). Other elements that inhibited dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils included Ba(II), Co(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), Ti(IV), V(IV), and W(VI). When the pesticides were compared by using 5 mg of active ingredient kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in nucleic acid dephosphorylation ranged from 14% with butylate to 39% with chloramben. The most effective inhibitors (> 25%) were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, trifluralin, and maneb. Other pesticides that inhibited RNA and DNA dephosphorylation in soils included cyanazine, 2,4-D, dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, alachlor, paraquat, butylate, and captan.

  3. Curcumin up-regulates LDL receptor expression via the sterol regulatory element pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaobing; Fan, Chunlei; Wo, Like; Yan, Jin; Qian, Ying; Wo, Xingde

    2008-09-01

    Plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) is mainly taken up and cleared by the hepatocellular LDL receptor (LDL-R). LDL-R gene expression is regulated by the sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs). Previous studies have shown that curcumin reduces plasma LDL-C and has hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Herein, we investigated the effect of curcumin on LDL-R expression and its molecular mechanism in HepG2 cells. Curcumin increased LDL-R expression (mRNA and protein) and the resultant uptake of DiI-LDL in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using a GFP reporter system in a transfected HepG2/SRE-GFP cell line, we found that curcumin activated the sterol regulatory element of the LDL-R promoter. In HepG2/Insig2 cells, curcumin reversed the inhibition of LDL-R expression induced by Insig2 overexpression. These data demonstrate that curcumin increases LDL-R protein expression and uptake activity via the SREBPs pathway. These findings contribute to our further understanding of the cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherosclerotic effects of curcumin.

  4. Exploiting a precise design of universal synthetic modular regulatory elements to unlock the microbial natural products in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chaoxian; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Xuejin; Hu, Yiling; Xiang, Sihai; Miao, Jin; Lou, Chunbo; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    There is a great demand for precisely quantitating the expression of genes of interest in synthetic and systems biotechnology as new and fascinating insights into the genetics of streptomycetes have come to light. Here, we developed, for the first time to our knowledge, a quantitative method based on flow cytometry and a superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) at single-cell resolution in Streptomyces. Single cells of filamentous bacteria were obtained by releasing the protoplasts from the mycelium, and the dead cells could be distinguished from the viable ones by propidium iodide (PI) staining. With this sophisticated quantitative method, some 200 native or synthetic promoters and 200 ribosomal binding sites (RBSs) were characterized in a high-throughput format. Furthermore, an insulator (RiboJ) was recruited to eliminate the interference between promoters and RBSs and improve the modularity of regulatory elements. Seven synthetic promoters with gradient strength were successfully applied in a proof-of-principle approach to activate and overproduce the cryptic lycopene in a predictable manner in Streptomyces avermitilis. Our work therefore presents a quantitative strategy and universal synthetic modular regulatory elements, which will facilitate the functional optimization of gene clusters and the drug discovery process in Streptomyces. PMID:26374838

  5. Protein phosphatase 2A and Cdc7 kinase regulate the DNA unwinding element-binding protein in replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanzhe; Yao, Jianhong; Poudel, Sumeet; Romer, Eric; Abu-Niaaj, Lubna; Leffak, Michael

    2014-12-26

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE)-binding protein (DUE-B) binds to replication origins coordinately with the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase and the helicase activator Cdc45 in vivo, and loads Cdc45 onto chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Human DUE-B also retains the aminoacyl-tRNA proofreading function of its shorter orthologs in lower organisms. Here we report that phosphorylation of the DUE-B unstructured C-terminal domain unique to higher organisms regulates DUE-B intermolecular binding. Gel filtration analyses show that unphosphorylated DUE-B forms multiple high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and Mcm2-7 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry of the HMW complexes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase binding is RNase A sensitive, whereas interaction with Mcm2-7 is nuclease resistant. Unphosphorylated DUE-B HMW complex formation is decreased by PP2A inhibition or direct DUE-B phosphorylation, and increased by inhibition of Cdc7. These results indicate that the state of DUE-B phosphorylation is maintained by the equilibrium between Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation and PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation, each previously shown to regulate replication initiation. Alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation target sites increases MCM binding but blocks Cdc45 loading in vivo and inhibits cell division. In egg extracts alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation sites blocks Cdc45 loading and inhibits DNA replication. The effects of DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation reveal a novel S phase kinase regulatory mechanism for Cdc45 loading and MCM helicase activation.

  6. Mouse mammary tumor virus proviruses in T-cell lymphomas lack a negative regulatory element in the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, C L; Fabritius, C; Dudley, J

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of long terminal repeats (LTRs) from several mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) proviruses acquired in mouse T-cell lymphomas were determined. All MMTV proviruses cloned from a C57BL/6 lymphoma contained an identical LTR deletion of 491 base pairs (approximately -655 to -165), whereas an MMTV provirus from a BALB/c T-cell lymphoma had a 430-base-pair deletion in the same U3 region. MMTV proviruses with LTR deletions were acquired in these tumors 10 times more frequently than proviruses with intact LTRs. Because the deletions removed a portion of the glucocorticoid response element or "regulated" enhancer, the transcriptional activity of the deleted MMTV LTRs was assessed in both transient expression and stable transfection experiments. Plasmids were constructed in which the deleted or full-length MMTV LTRs were placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Results from transfection experiments with these constructs showed that the basal expression of the deleted MMTV LTR in the absence of glucocorticoids was higher than that of the full-length Mtv-17 or C3H MMTV LTRs under the same conditions. Moreover, the C3H LTR with a similar deletion (-637 to -255) also promoted high basal levels of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. These results, coupled with the observation in lymphomas of high basal levels of transcription from MMTV proviruses with deleted LTRs, suggested that these proviruses lack negative regulatory elements in their LTRs. Loss of the negative regulatory element may contribute to the selective propagation of proviruses with deleted LTRs. Images PMID:2846876

  7. A tobacco DNA binding protein that interacts with a light-responsive box II element.

    PubMed Central

    Perisic, O; Lam, E

    1992-01-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase plays a key role in photosynthetic carbon fixation in higher plants. The small subunit of this chloroplast enzyme (rbcS), encoded by a family of nuclear genes, is regulated at the transcriptional level by light. Promoter analyses have previously identified the box II sequence as a cis element critical for the light-regulated expression of rbcS genes. Nuclear factor GT-1 binds specifically to this element and is one of the plant nuclear factors that has been detected and studied in great detail. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a tobacco cDNA encoding a protein, designated B2F (Box II Factor), with similar binding specificity and mobility in gel retardation assays as nuclear GT-1. Steady state levels of mRNA encoding B2F do not appear to be regulated by light; this is consistent with the previous observation that nuclear GT-1 activity is present in extracts from both light-grown and dark-adapted plants. Sequence comparison with another plant trans-acting factor, GT-2, which binds to a GT-like element in the rice phytochrome promoter, shows striking homology in three putative alpha-helices that may be involved in DNA binding. PMID:1392597

  8. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element against Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Crihfield, Cassandra L.; Gattu, Srikanth; Holland, Lisa A.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of the chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has led to serious environmental and human health consequences. Current methods of detecting atrazine contamination are neither rapid nor cost-effective. In this work, atrazine-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition elements (MRE) were isolated. We utilized a stringent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology that placed the greatest emphasis on what the MRE should not bind to. After twelve rounds of SELEX, an atrazine-specific MRE with high affinity was obtained. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the ssDNA sequence is 0.62 ± 0.21 nM. It also has significant selectivity for atrazine over atrazine metabolites and other pesticides found in environmentally similar locations and concentrations. Furthermore, we have detected environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations in river water using this MRE. The strong affinity and selectivity of the selected atrazine-specific ssDNA validated the stringent SELEX methodology and identified a MRE that will be useful for rapid atrazine detection in environmental samples. PMID:25196435

  9. In vitro selection of a single-stranded DNA molecular recognition element against atrazine.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan M; Crihfield, Cassandra L; Gattu, Srikanth; Holland, Lisa A; Sooter, Letha J

    2014-08-18

    Widespread use of the chlorotriazine herbicide, atrazine, has led to serious environmental and human health consequences. Current methods of detecting atrazine contamination are neither rapid nor cost-effective. In this work, atrazine-specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition elements (MRE) were isolated. We utilized a stringent Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) methodology that placed the greatest emphasis on what the MRE should not bind to. After twelve rounds of SELEX, an atrazine-specific MRE with high affinity was obtained. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the ssDNA sequence is 0.62 ± 0.21 nM. It also has significant selectivity for atrazine over atrazine metabolites and other pesticides found in environmentally similar locations and concentrations. Furthermore, we have detected environmentally relevant atrazine concentrations in river water using this MRE. The strong affinity and selectivity of the selected atrazine-specific ssDNA validated the stringent SELEX methodology and identified a MRE that will be useful for rapid atrazine detection in environmental samples.

  10. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  11. Preventing Phosphorylation of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1a by MAP-Kinases Protects Mice from Fatty Liver and Visceral Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jutta; Kremer, Lorena; Jacob, Sylvia; Hartwig, Sonja; Nitzgen, Ulrike; Muller–Wieland, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1a plays a pivotal role in lipid metabolism. Using the SREBP-1a expressing human hepatoma cell line HepG2 we have shown previously that human SREBP-1a is phosphorylated at serine 117 by ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Using a combination of cell biology and protein chemistry approach we show that SREBP-1a is also target of other MAPK-families, i.e. c-JUN N-terminal protein kinases (JNK) or p38 stress activated MAP kinases. Serine 117 is also the major phosphorylation site in SREBP-1a for JNK. In contrast to that the major phosphorylation sites of p38 MAPK family are serine 63 and threonine 426. Functional analyses reveal that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a does not alter protein/DNA interaction. The identified phosphorylation sites are specific for both kinase families also in cellular context. To provide direct evidence that phosphorylation of SREBP-1a is a regulatory principle of biological and clinical relevance, we generated transgenic mice expressing mature transcriptionally active N-terminal domain of human SREBP–1a variant lacking all identified phosphorylaton sites designed as alb-SREBP-1aΔP and wild type SREBP-1a designed as alb-SREBP-1a liver specific under control of the albumin promoter and a liver specific enhancer. In contrast to alb-SREBP–1a mice the phosphorylation–deficient mice develop no enlarged fatty livers under normocaloric conditions. Phenotypical examination reveales a massive accumulation of adipose tissue in alb-SREBP-1a but not in the phosphorylation deficient alb-SREBP-1aΔP mice. Moreover, preventing phosphorylation of SREBP-1a protects mice also from dyslipidemia. In conclusion, phosphorylation of SREBP-1a by ERK, JNK and p38 MAPK-families resembles a biological principle and plays a significant role, in vivo. PMID:22384276

  12. Uniformity of nucleosome preservation pattern in Mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements.

    PubMed

    Samans, Birgit; Yang, Yang; Krebs, Stefan; Sarode, Gaurav Vilas; Blum, Helmut; Reichenbach, Myriam; Wolf, Eckhard; Steger, Klaus; Dansranjavin, Temuujin; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga

    2014-07-14

    Nucleosome-to-protamine exchange during mammalian spermiogenesis is essential for compaction and protection of paternal DNA. It is interesting that, depending on the species, 1% to 15% of nucleosomes are retained, but the generalizability and biological function of this retention are unknown. Here, we show concordantly in human and bovine that nucleosomes remained in sperm chromatin predominantly within distal intergenic regions and introns and associated with centromere repeats and retrotransposons (LINE1 and SINEs). In contrast, nucleosome depletion concerned particularly exons, 5'-UTR, 3'-UTR, TSS, and TTS and was associated with simple and low-complexity repeats. Overlap of human and bovine genes exhibiting nucleosome preservation in the promoter and gene body revealed a significant enrichment of signal transduction and RNA- and protein-processing factors. Our study demonstrates the genome-wide uniformity of the nucleosome preservation pattern in mammalian sperm and its connection to repetitive DNA elements and suggests a function in preimplantation processes for paternally derived nucleosomes.

  13. Enhancer activity of light-responsive regulatory elements in the untranslated leader regions of cyanobacterial psbA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Golden, S S

    1993-01-01

    Three psbA genes encoding the D1 protein of the photosystem II reaction center are differentially expressed under different light intensities in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. Two of the three psbA genes, psbAII and psbAIII, are induced rapidly when light intensity is increased from 125 x 10(-6) mol.m-2.s-1 to 750 x 10(-6) mol.m-2.s-1. A recombinational cloning vector that carries a transcriptional lacZ reporter gene was used to characterize the controlling elements responsible for light induction. At least three distinct cis elements are present in the regulatory regions of pbsAII and psbAIII: basal promoters, comparable to Escherichia coli sigma 70 promoters in position and sequence, confer constitutive expression of the genes under both low and high light intensities; negative elements upstream of the promoters down-regulate the expression of the corresponding gene; and sequences downstream of the promoters that correspond to the untranslated leader regions of the mRNAs (+1 to +41 in psbAII and +1 to +39 in psbAIII) are responsible for increased expression under high light. When these light-responsive elements were combined with an E. coli promoter (conII) in different positions and orientations, the expression of the lacZ gene was induced 4- to 11-fold. The induction of gene expression under high light by these enhancers was position independent but orientation dependent. When the elements were combined with the conII promoter in the correct orientation, they also conferred a small but reproducible level of light-responsive expression on this E. coli promoter. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8265608

  14. Definition of regulatory sequence elements in the promoter region and the first intron of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, C J; Sabourin, L A; Waring, J D; Korneluk, R G

    1998-04-10

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder with a global frequency of 1/8000. The genetic defect is an expanding CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene. We present the in vitro characterization of cis regulatory elements controlling transcription of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene in myoblasts and fibroblasts. The region 5' to the initiating ATG contains no consensus TATA or CCAAT box. We have mapped two transcriptional start sites by primer extension. Deletion constructs from this region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene revealed only subtle muscle specific cis elements. The strongest promoter activity mapped to a 189-base pair fragment. This sequence contains a conserved GC box to which the transcription factor Sp1 binds. Reporter gene constructs containing a 2-kilobase pair first intron fragment of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene enhances reporter activity up to 6-fold in the human rhabdomyosarcoma myoblast cell line TE32 but not in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Co-transfection of a MyoD expression vector with reporter constructs containing the first intron into 10 T1/2 fibroblasts resulted in a 10-20-fold enhancement of expression. Deletion analysis of four E-box elements within the first intron reveal that these elements contribute to enhancer activity similarly in TE32 myoblasts and 10 T1/2 fibroblasts. These data suggest that E-boxes within the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase first intron mediate interactions with upstream promoter elements to up-regulate transcription of this gene in myoblasts.

  15. Molecular stripping in the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic regulatory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Wolynes, Peter

    Genetic switches based on the NFκB / IκB / DNA system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that IκB can actively remove NF κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called ''molecular stripping''. This allows the NFκB / IκB / DNA switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor NFκB and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor I κB. These studies show that the function of the NFκB / IκB / DNA genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of IκB which occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of IκB not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the

  16. Molecular stripping in the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Potoyan, Davit A.; Zheng, Weihua; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic switches based on the NF-κB/IκB/DNA system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that IκB can actively remove NF-κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called “molecular stripping.” This allows the NF-κB/IκB/DNA switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor NF-κB and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor IκB. These studies show that the function of the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of IκB that occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of IκB not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the free energy onto various reaction coordinates reveal the structural details of the stripping pathways. PMID:26699500

  17. Parainfluenza virus chimeric mini-replicons indicate a novel regulatory element in the leader promoter.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yusuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Goto, Hideo; Nishio, Machiko

    2016-07-01

    Gene expression of paramyxoviruses is regulated by genome-encoded cis-acting elements; however, whether all the required elements for viral growth have been identified is not clear. Using a mini-replicon system, it has been shown that human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2) polymerase can recognize the promoter elements of parainfluenza virus type 5 (PIV5), but reporter activity is lower in this case. We constructed a series of luciferase-encoding chimeric PIV2/5 mini-genomes that are basically hPIV2, but whose leader (le), mRNA start signal and trailer sequence are partially replaced with those of PIV5. Studies of the chimeric PIV2/5 mini-replicons demonstrated that replacement of hPIV2 le with PIV5 le results in remarkably weak luciferase expression. Further mutagenesis identified the responsible region as positions 25-30 of the PIV5 le. Using recombinant hPIV2, the impact of this region on viral life cycles was assessed. Insertion of the mutation at this region facilitated viral growth, genomic replication and mRNA transcription at the early stage of infection, which elicited severe cell damage. In contrast, at the late infection stage it caused a reduction in viral transcription. Here, we identify a novel cis-acting element in the internal region of an le sequence that is involved in the regulation of polymerase, and which contributes to maintaining a balance between viral growth and cytotoxicity. PMID:27072881

  18. DANIO-CODE: Toward an Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zebrafish has emerged as a model organism for genomics studies. The symposium “Toward an encyclopedia of DNA elements in zebrafish” held in London in December 2014, was coorganized by Ferenc Müller and Fiona Wardle. This meeting is a follow-up of a similar previous workshop held 2 years earlier and represents a push toward the formalization of a community effort to annotate functional elements in the zebrafish genome. The meeting brought together zebrafish researchers, bioinformaticians, as well as members of established consortia, to exchange scientific findings and experience, as well as to discuss the initial steps toward the formation of a DANIO-CODE consortium. In this study, we provide the latest updates on the current progress of the consortium's efforts, opening up a broad invitation to researchers to join in and contribute to DANIO-CODE. PMID:26671609

  19. DANIO-CODE: Toward an Encyclopedia of DNA Elements in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haihan; Onichtchouk, Daria; Winata, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    The zebrafish has emerged as a model organism for genomics studies. The symposium "Toward an encyclopedia of DNA elements in zebrafish" held in London in December 2014, was coorganized by Ferenc Müller and Fiona Wardle. This meeting is a follow-up of a similar previous workshop held 2 years earlier and represents a push toward the formalization of a community effort to annotate functional elements in the zebrafish genome. The meeting brought together zebrafish researchers, bioinformaticians, as well as members of established consortia, to exchange scientific findings and experience, as well as to discuss the initial steps toward the formation of a DANIO-CODE consortium. In this study, we provide the latest updates on the current progress of the consortium's efforts, opening up a broad invitation to researchers to join in and contribute to DANIO-CODE.

  20. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hadas, Yoav; Nitzan, Noa; Furley, Andrew J W; Kozlov, Serguei V; Klar, Avihu

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1) and Neurofascin (Nfasc) are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  1. DNA-affinity-purified chip (DAP-chip) method to determine gene targets for bacterial two component regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-07-21

    In vivo methods such as ChIP-chip are well-established techniques used to determine global gene targets for transcription factors. However, they are of limited use in exploring bacterial two component regulatory systems with uncharacterized activation conditions. Such systems regulate transcription only when activated in the presence of unique signals. Since these signals are often unknown, the in vitro microarray based method described in this video article can be used to determine gene targets and binding sites for response regulators. This DNA-affinity-purified-chip method may be used for any purified regulator in any organism with a sequenced genome. The protocol involves allowing the purified tagged protein to bind to sheared genomic DNA and then affinity purifying the protein-bound DNA, followed by fluorescent labeling of the DNA and hybridization to a custom tiling array. Preceding steps that may be used to optimize the assay for specific regulators are also described. The peaks generated by the array data analysis are used to predict binding site motifs, which are then experimentally validated. The motif predictions can be further used to determine gene targets of orthologous response regulators in closely related species. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by determining the gene targets and binding site motifs and thus predicting the function for a sigma54-dependent response regulator DVU3023 in the environmental bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

  2. Methylome analysis reveals alterations in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of left ventricle development genes in human dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jo, Bong-Seok; Koh, In-Uk; Bae, Jae-Bum; Yu, Ho-Yeong; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Lee, Hae-Young; Kim, Jae-Joong; Choi, Murim; Choi, Sun Shim

    2016-08-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is one of the main causes of heart failure (called cardiomyopathies) in adults. Alterations in epigenetic regulation (i.e., DNA methylation) have been implicated in the development of DCM. Here, we identified a total of 1828 differentially methylated probes (DMPs) using the Infinium 450K HumanMethylation Bead chip by comparing the methylomes between 18 left ventricles and 9 right ventricles. Alterations in DNA methylation levels were observed mainly in lowly methylated regions corresponding to promoter-proximal regions, which become hypermethylated in severely affected left ventricles. Subsequent mRNA microarray analysis showed that the effect of DNA methylation on gene expression regulation is not unidirectional but is controlled by the functional sub-network context. DMPs were significantly enriched in the transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) we tested. Alterations in DNA methylation were specifically enriched in the cis-regulatory regions of cardiac development genes, the majority of which are involved in ventricular development (e.g., TBX5 and HAND1).

  3. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Flynn, Kaitlin J.; Byrne, Brenda G.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal spread of its ICE, suggesting a conserved regulatory interaction. As a first step to investigate the contribution of csrA regulators to this class of mobile genetic elements, we analyzed here the activity of the csrA paralog encoded on Legionella pneumophila ICE-βox. Deletion of this gene, which we name csrT, had no observed effect under laboratory conditions. However, ectopic expression of csrT abrogated the protection to hydrogen peroxide and macrophage degradation that ICE-βox confers to L. pneumophila. When ectopically expressed, csrT also repressed L. pneumophila flagellin production and motility, a function similar to the core genome's canonical csrA. Moreover, csrT restored the repression of motility to csrA mutants of Bacillus subtilis, a finding consistent with the predicted function of CsrT as an mRNA binding protein. Since all known ICEs of legionellae encode coinherited csrA-type IV secretion system pairs, we postulate that CsrA superfamily proteins regulate ICE activity to increase their horizontal spread, thereby expanding L. pneumophila versatility. IMPORTANCE ICEs are mobile DNA elements whose type IV secretion machineries mediate spread among bacterial populations. All surveyed ICEs within the Legionella genus also carry paralogs of the essential life cycle regulator csrA. It is striking that the csrA loci could be classified into distinct families based on either their sequence or the subtype of the adjacent type IV secretion system locus. To

  4. Differential regulation of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs): a specific regulatory element in HIV-2 responds to stimulation of the T-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, D M; Hannibal, M; Perez, V L; Gauntt, C; Folks, T M; Nabel, G J

    1990-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) types 1 and 2 have similar genetic organization but differ significantly in nucleic acid sequence. Although infection by either agent leads to symptoms of immunodeficiency, recent studies suggest potential differences in the time course and severity of these diseases. In this report, the transcriptional regulation and induction of these retroviruses were analyzed. We report that the regulation of HIV-2 differs from that of HIV-1: a distinct T-cell activation pathway, triggering of the CD3 component of the T-cell receptor complex, stimulates HIV-2 but not HIV-1 gene expression. The response to T-cell receptor stimulation in HIV-2 is mediated partly by an upstream regulatory element, termed CD3R, which is recognized by a sequence-specific DNA binding protein, NF-CD3R. Jurkat T leukemia cell lines containing HIV-2 provirus also showed increased viral replication after stimulation of the T-cell receptor complex, in contrast to HIV-1. These findings suggest that transcriptional regulation and induction of HIV-2 differ from HIV-1 and raise the possibility that different cofactors contribute to the activation of HIV-1- and HIV-2-associated AIDS. Images PMID:2147512

  5. Interaction of doxorubicin with a regulatory element of hmga1 and its in vitro anti-cancer activity associated with decreased HMGA1 expression.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Md Zahid; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2014-12-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) non-histone chromatin protein is known as an architectural transcription factor that regulates transcription of various genes. HMGA1 is highly expressed in almost all human cancers and considered as a potent tumor marker. Because of its association with cancers, hmga1 is considered as a critical target for anti-cancer drugs. In the present study, we report interaction of doxorubicin (DOX) with a short deoxyoligonucleotide (-1917 to -1940) within a regulatory element of hmga1 and its subsequent effect on expression of HMGA1 in breast cancer MCF7 cells. Binding of DOX to DNA was found to be strong (K(a), 5.2 × 10(5)M(-1)) and thermodynamically favorable by both negative enthalpy (ΔH, -8.1 ± 0.25 kcal M(-1)) and positive entropy changes (TΔS, 21.1 ± 5.2 kcal M(-1)) at 20 °C. A significant increase in melting temperature of DNA in presence of DOX by +10 °C was accompanied by substantial quenching of fluorescence of DOX (∼ 85%) at 595 nm and hypochromic change (∼ 40%) at 500 nm absorption spectra of DOX along with a bathochromic shift of ∼ 5 nm. Reduced expression of HMGA1 by ∼ 60% both at mRNA and protein level and associated cell death in presence of DOX was observed in breast cancer cells. Therefore, hmga1 is a promising chemotherapeutic target in treating human malignancies. PMID:25313540

  6. Interaction of doxorubicin with a regulatory element of hmga1 and its in vitro anti-cancer activity associated with decreased HMGA1 expression.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Md Zahid; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2014-12-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) non-histone chromatin protein is known as an architectural transcription factor that regulates transcription of various genes. HMGA1 is highly expressed in almost all human cancers and considered as a potent tumor marker. Because of its association with cancers, hmga1 is considered as a critical target for anti-cancer drugs. In the present study, we report interaction of doxorubicin (DOX) with a short deoxyoligonucleotide (-1917 to -1940) within a regulatory element of hmga1 and its subsequent effect on expression of HMGA1 in breast cancer MCF7 cells. Binding of DOX to DNA was found to be strong (K(a), 5.2 × 10(5)M(-1)) and thermodynamically favorable by both negative enthalpy (ΔH, -8.1 ± 0.25 kcal M(-1)) and positive entropy changes (TΔS, 21.1 ± 5.2 kcal M(-1)) at 20 °C. A significant increase in melting temperature of DNA in presence of DOX by +10 °C was accompanied by substantial quenching of fluorescence of DOX (∼ 85%) at 595 nm and hypochromic change (∼ 40%) at 500 nm absorption spectra of DOX along with a bathochromic shift of ∼ 5 nm. Reduced expression of HMGA1 by ∼ 60% both at mRNA and protein level and associated cell death in presence of DOX was observed in breast cancer cells. Therefore, hmga1 is a promising chemotherapeutic target in treating human malignancies.

  7. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene

    PubMed Central

    Flanigan, Kevin M.; Dunn, Diane M.; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T.; Sampson, Jacinda B.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Mendell, Jerry R.; Taylor, Laura; Anderson, Christine B.; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine; Connolly, Anne M.; Mathews, Katherine D.; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Day, John W.; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping. PMID:21972111

  8. Nonsense mutation-associated Becker muscular dystrophy: interplay between exon definition and splicing regulatory elements within the DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, Kevin M; Dunn, Diane M; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Soltanzadeh, Payam; Howard, Michael T; Sampson, Jacinda B; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Bromberg, Mark B; Mendell, Jerry R; Taylor, Laura E; Anderson, Christine B; Pestronk, Alan; Florence, Julaine M; Connolly, Anne M; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda; Finkel, Richard S; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Day, John W; McDonald, Craig; Weiss, Robert B

    2011-03-01

    Nonsense mutations are usually predicted to function as null alleles due to premature termination of protein translation. However, nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, encoding the dystrophin protein, have been associated with both the severe Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and milder Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) phenotypes. In a large survey, we identified 243 unique nonsense mutations in the DMD gene, and for 210 of these we could establish definitive phenotypes. We analyzed the reading frame predicted by exons flanking those in which nonsense mutations were found, and present evidence that nonsense mutations resulting in BMD likely do so by inducing exon skipping, confirming that exonic point mutations affecting exon definition have played a significant role in determining phenotype. We present a new model based on the combination of exon definition and intronic splicing regulatory elements for the selective association of BMD nonsense mutations with a subset of DMD exons prone to mutation-induced exon skipping.

  9. Asymmetric and node-specific nodal expression patterns are controlled by two distinct cis-acting regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Dominic P.; Robertson, Elizabeth J.

    1999-01-01

    The TGFβ-related molecule Nodal is required for establishment of the anterior–posterior (A–P) and left–right (L-R) body axes of the vertebrate embryo. In mouse, several discrete sites of nodal activity closely correlate with its highly dynamic expression domains. nodal function in the posterior epiblast promotes primitive streak formation, whereas transient nodal expression in the extraembryonic visceral endoderm is essential for patterning the rostral central nervous system. Asymmetric nodal expression in the developing node and at later stages in left lateral plate mesoderm has been implicated as a key regulator of L-R axis determination. We have analyzed the cis-regulatory elements controlling nodal expression domains during early development. We show that the regulatory sequences conferring node-specific expression are contained in an upstream region of the locus, whereas early expression in the endoderm and epiblast and asymmetric expression at later stages on the left side of the body axis are controlled by a 600-bp intronic enhancer. Targeted deletion of a 100-bp subregion of this intronic enhancer eliminates nodal expression in the early epiblast and visceral endoderm and disrupts asymmetric expression in the node and lateral plate mesoderm. Thus, developmentally regulated nodal expression at distinct tissue sites during A–P and L-R axis formation is potentially controlled by common transcriptional activators. PMID:10385626

  10. Global identification of the genetic networks and cis-regulatory elements of the cold response in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Mingli; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Jinfeng; Niu, Hongbo; Liu, Yimeng; Wu, Zhichao; Han, Bingshe; Zhai, Wanying; Shen, Yu; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-10-30

    The transcriptional programs of ectothermic teleosts are directly influenced by water temperature. However, the cis- and trans-factors governing cold responses are not well characterized. We profiled transcriptional changes in eight zebrafish tissues exposed to mildly and severely cold temperatures using RNA-Seq. A total of 1943 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, from which 34 clusters representing distinct tissue and temperature response expression patterns were derived using the k-means fuzzy clustering algorithm. The promoter regions of the clustered DEGs that demonstrated strong co-regulation were analysed for enriched cis-regulatory elements with a motif discovery program, DREME. Seventeen motifs, ten known and seven novel, were identified, which covered 23% of the DEGs. Two motifs predicted to be the binding sites for the transcription factors Bcl6 and Jun, respectively, were chosen for experimental verification, and they demonstrated the expected cold-induced and cold-repressed patterns of gene regulation. Protein interaction modeling of the network components followed by experimental validation suggested that Jun physically interacts with Bcl6 and might be a hub factor that orchestrates the cold response in zebrafish. Thus, the methodology used and the regulatory networks uncovered in this study provide a foundation for exploring the mechanisms of cold adaptation in teleosts.

  11. A single-laboratory validated method for the generation of DNA barcodes for the identification of fish for regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Handy, Sara M; Deeds, Jonathan R; Ivanova, Natalia V; Hebert, Paul D N; Hanner, Robert H; Ormos, Andrea; Weigt, Lee A; Moore, Michelle M; Yancy, Haile F

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is responsible for ensuring that the nation's food supply is safe and accurately labeled. This task is particularly challenging in the case of seafood where a large variety of species are marketed, most of this commodity is imported, and processed product is difficult to identify using traditional morphological methods. Reliable species identification is critical for both foodborne illness investigations and for prevention of deceptive practices, such as those where species are intentionally mislabeled to circumvent import restrictions or for resale as species of higher value. New methods that allow accurate and rapid species identifications are needed, but any new methods to be used for regulatory compliance must be both standardized and adequately validated. "DNA barcoding" is a process by which species discriminations are achieved through the use of short, standardized gene fragments. For animals, a fragment (655 base pairs starting near the 5' end) of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene has been shown to provide reliable species level discrimination in most cases. We provide here a protocol with single-laboratory validation for the generation of DNA barcodes suitable for the identification of seafood products, specifically fish, in a manner that is suitable for FDA regulatory use. PMID:21391497

  12. Demystifying the secret mission of enhancers: linking distal regulatory elements to target genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijing; Berman, Benjamin P.; Farnham, Peggy J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Enhancers are short regulatory sequences bound by sequence-specific transcription factors and play a major role in the spatiotemporal specificity of gene expression patterns in development and disease. While it is now possible to identify enhancer regions genomewide in both cultured cells and primary tissues using epigenomic approaches, it has been more challenging to develop methods to understand the function of individual enhancers because enhancers are located far from the gene(s) that they regulate. However, it is essential to identify target genes of enhancers not only so that we can understand the role of enhancers in disease but also because this information will assist in the development of future therapeutic options. After reviewing models of enhancer function, we discuss recent methods for identifying target genes of enhancers. First, we describe chromatin structure-based approaches for directly mapping interactions between enhancers and promoters. Second, we describe the use of correlation-based approaches to link enhancer state with the activity of nearby promoters and/or gene expression. Third, we describe how to test the function of specific enhancers experimentally by perturbing enhancer–target relationships using high-throughput reporter assays and genome editing. Finally, we conclude by discussing as yet unanswered questions concerning how enhancers function, how target genes can be identified, and how to distinguish direct from indirect changes in gene expression mediated by individual enhancers. PMID:26446758

  13. Demystifying the secret mission of enhancers: linking distal regulatory elements to target genes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijing; Berman, Benjamin P; Farnham, Peggy J

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers are short regulatory sequences bound by sequence-specific transcription factors and play a major role in the spatiotemporal specificity of gene expression patterns in development and disease. While it is now possible to identify enhancer regions genomewide in both cultured cells and primary tissues using epigenomic approaches, it has been more challenging to develop methods to understand the function of individual enhancers because enhancers are located far from the gene(s) that they regulate. However, it is essential to identify target genes of enhancers not only so that we can understand the role of enhancers in disease but also because this information will assist in the development of future therapeutic options. After reviewing models of enhancer function, we discuss recent methods for identifying target genes of enhancers. First, we describe chromatin structure-based approaches for directly mapping interactions between enhancers and promoters. Second, we describe the use of correlation-based approaches to link enhancer state with the activity of nearby promoters and/or gene expression. Third, we describe how to test the function of specific enhancers experimentally by perturbing enhancer-target relationships using high-throughput reporter assays and genome editing. Finally, we conclude by discussing as yet unanswered questions concerning how enhancers function, how target genes can be identified, and how to distinguish direct from indirect changes in gene expression mediated by individual enhancers. PMID:26446758

  14. DNA elements regulating alpha1-tubulin gene induction during regeneration of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed

    Periz, G; Keller, L R

    1997-07-01

    Eukaryotic flagella are complex organelles composed of more than 200 polypeptides. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing synthesis of the flagellar protein subunits and their assembly into this complex organelle. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the premier experimental model system for studying such cellular processes. When acid shocked, C. reinhardtii excises its flagella, rapidly and coordinately activates transcription of a set of flagellar genes, and ultimately regenerates a new flagellar pair. To define functionally the regulatory sequences that govern induction of the set of genes after acid shock, we analyzed the alpha1-tubulin gene promoter. To simplify transcriptional analysis in vivo, we inserted the selectable marker gene ARG7 on the same plasmid with a tagged alpha1-tubulin gene and stably introduced it into C. reinhardtii cells. By deletion of various sequences, two promoter regions (-176 to -122 and -85 to -16) were identified as important for induction of the tagged alpha1-tubulin gene. Deleting the region between -176 and -122 from the transcription start site resulted in an induction level which was only 45 to 70% of that of the resident gene. Deleting the region upstream of -56 resulted in a complete loss of inducibility without affecting basal expression. The alpha1-tubulin promoter region from -85 to -16 conferred partial acid shock inducibility to an arylsulfatase (ARS) reporter gene. These results show that induction of the alpha1-tubulin gene after acid shock is a complex response that requires diverse sequence elements.

  15. DNA elements regulating alpha1-tubulin gene induction during regeneration of eukaryotic flagella.

    PubMed Central

    Periz, G; Keller, L R

    1997-01-01

    Eukaryotic flagella are complex organelles composed of more than 200 polypeptides. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms governing synthesis of the flagellar protein subunits and their assembly into this complex organelle. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the premier experimental model system for studying such cellular processes. When acid shocked, C. reinhardtii excises its flagella, rapidly and coordinately activates transcription of a set of flagellar genes, and ultimately regenerates a new flagellar pair. To define functionally the regulatory sequences that govern induction of the set of genes after acid shock, we analyzed the alpha1-tubulin gene promoter. To simplify transcriptional analysis in vivo, we inserted the selectable marker gene ARG7 on the same plasmid with a tagged alpha1-tubulin gene and stably introduced it into C. reinhardtii cells. By deletion of various sequences, two promoter regions (-176 to -122 and -85 to -16) were identified as important for induction of the tagged alpha1-tubulin gene. Deleting the region between -176 and -122 from the transcription start site resulted in an induction level which was only 45 to 70% of that of the resident gene. Deleting the region upstream of -56 resulted in a complete loss of inducibility without affecting basal expression. The alpha1-tubulin promoter region from -85 to -16 conferred partial acid shock inducibility to an arylsulfatase (ARS) reporter gene. These results show that induction of the alpha1-tubulin gene after acid shock is a complex response that requires diverse sequence elements. PMID:9199320

  16. Chemical Elemental Distribution and Soil DNA Fingerprints Provide the Critical Evidence in Murder Case Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Concheri, Giuseppe; Bertoldi, Daniela; Polone, Elisa; Otto, Stefan; Larcher, Roberto; Squartini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Background The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. Methodology/Principal Findings The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a) elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) approaches, and b) amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA). Conclusions Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping. PMID:21674041

  17. Population genetics and molecular evolution of DNA sequences in transposable elements. I. A simulation framework.

    PubMed

    Kijima, T E; Innan, Hideki

    2013-11-01

    A population genetic simulation framework is developed to understand the behavior and molecular evolution of DNA sequences of transposable elements. Our model incorporates random transposition and excision of transposable element (TE) copies, two modes of selection against TEs, and degeneration of transpositional activity by point mutations. We first investigated the relationships between the behavior of the copy number of TEs and these parameters. Our results show that when selection is weak, the genome can maintain a relatively large number of TEs, but most of them are less active. In contrast, with strong selection, the genome can maintain only a limited number of TEs but the proportion of active copies is large. In such a case, there could be substantial fluctuations of the copy number over generations. We also explored how DNA sequences of TEs evolve through the simulations. In general, active copies form clusters around the original sequence, while less active copies have long branches specific to themselves, exhibiting a star-shaped phylogeny. It is demonstrated that the phylogeny of TE sequences could be informative to understand the dynamics of TE evolution.

  18. An ARS element inhibits DNA replication through a SIR2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Crampton, Amber; Chang, FuJung; Pappas, Donald L; Frisch, Ryan L; Weinreich, Michael

    2008-04-25

    During G1 phase, a prereplicative complex (pre-RC) that determines where DNA synthesis initiates forms at origins. The Sir2p histone deacetylase inhibits pre-RC assembly at a subset of origins, suggesting that Sir2p inhibits DNA replication through a unique aspect of origin structure. Here, we identified five SIR2-sensitive origins on chromosomes III and VI. Linker scan analysis of two origins indicated that they share a common organization, including an inhibitory sequence positioned 3' to the sites of origin recognition complex (ORC) binding and pre-RC assembly. This inhibitory sequence (I(S)) required SIR2 for its activity, suggesting that SIR2 inhibits origins through this sequence. Furthermore, I(S) elements occurred within positioned nucleosomes, and Abf1p-mediated exclusion of nucleosomes from the origin abrogated the inhibition. These data suggest that Sir2p and I(S) elements inhibit origin activity by promoting an unfavorable chromatin structure for pre-RC assembly. PMID:18439895

  19. A survey of ancient conserved non-coding elements in the PAX6 locus reveals a landscape of interdigitated cis-regulatory archipelagos.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shipra; Monahan, Jack; Ravi, Vydianathan; Gautier, Philippe; Murdoch, Emma; Brenner, Sydney; van Heyningen, Veronica; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2014-03-15

    Biological differences between cell types and developmental processes are characterised by differences in gene expression profiles. Gene-distal enhancers are key components of the regulatory networks that specify the tissue-specific expression patterns driving embryonic development and cell fate decisions, and variations in their sequences are a major contributor to genetic disease and disease susceptibility. Despite advances in the methods for discovery of putative cis-regulatory sequences, characterisation of their spatio-temporal enhancer activities in a mammalian model system remains a major bottle-neck. We employed a strategy that combines gnathostome sequence conservation with transgenic mouse and zebrafish reporter assays to survey the genomic locus of the developmental control gene PAX6 for the presence of novel cis-regulatory elements. Sequence comparison between human and the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) revealed several ancient gnathostome conserved non-coding elements (agCNEs) dispersed widely throughout the PAX6 locus, extending the range of the known PAX6 cis-regulatory landscape to contain the full upstream PAX6-RCN1 intergenic region. Our data indicates that ancient conserved regulatory sequences can be tested effectively in transgenic zebrafish even when not conserved in zebrafish themselves. The strategy also allows efficient dissection of compound regulatory regions previously assessed in transgenic mice. Remarkable overlap in expression patterns driven by sets of agCNEs indicates that PAX6 resides in a landscape of multiple tissue-specific regulatory archipelagos. PMID:24440152

  20. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  1. Multiple Herbicide Resistance in Lolium multiflorum and Identification of Conserved Regulatory Elements of Herbicide Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Kristensen, Michael; Kudsk, Per

    2016-01-01

    Herbicide resistance is a ubiquitous challenge to herbicide sustainability and a looming threat to control weeds in crops. Recently four genes were found constituently over-expressed in herbicide resistant individuals of Lolium rigidum, a close relative of Lolium multiflorum. These include two cytochrome P450s, one nitronate monooxygenase and one glycosyl-transferase. Higher expressions of these four herbicide metabolism related (HMR) genes were also observed after herbicides exposure in the gene expression databases, indicating them as reliable markers. In order to get an overview of herbicidal resistance status of L. multiflorum L, 19 field populations were collected. Among these populations, four populations were found to be resistant to acetolactate synthase (ALS) inhibitors while three exhibited resistance to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) inhibitors in our initial screening and dose response study. The genotyping showed the presence of mutations Trp-574-Leu and Ile-2041-Asn in ALS and ACCase, respectively, and qPCR experiments revealed the enhanced expression of HMR genes in individuals of certain resistant populations. Moreover, co-expression networks and promoter analyses of HMR genes in O. sativa and A. thaliana resulted in the identification of a cis-regulatory motif and zinc finger transcription factors. The identified transcription factors were highly expressed similar to HMR genes in response to xenobiotics whereas the identified motif is known to play a vital role in coping with environmental stresses and maintaining genome stability. Overall, our findings provide an important step forward toward a better understanding of metabolism-based herbicide resistance that can be utilized to devise novel strategies of weed management. PMID:27547209

  2. PreCisIon: PREdiction of CIS-regulatory elements improved by gene's positION.

    PubMed

    Elati, Mohamed; Nicolle, Rémy; Junier, Ivan; Fernández, David; Fekih, Rim; Font, Julio; Képès, François

    2013-02-01

    Conventional approaches to predict transcriptional regulatory interactions usually rely on the definition of a shared motif sequence on the target genes of a transcription factor (TF). These efforts have been frustrated by the limited availability and accuracy of TF binding site motifs, usually represented as position-specific scoring matrices, which may match large numbers of sites and produce an unreliable list of target genes. To improve the prediction of binding sites, we propose to additionally use the unrelated knowledge of the genome layout. Indeed, it has been shown that co-regulated genes tend to be either neighbors or periodically spaced along the whole chromosome. This study demonstrates that respective gene positioning carries significant information. This novel type of information is combined with traditional sequence information by a machine learning algorithm called PreCisIon. To optimize this combination, PreCisIon builds a strong gene target classifier by adaptively combining weak classifiers based on either local binding sequence or global gene position. This strategy generically paves the way to the optimized incorporation of any future advances in gene target prediction based on local sequence, genome layout or on novel criteria. With the current state of the art, PreCisIon consistently improves methods based on sequence information only. This is shown by implementing a cross-validation analysis of the 20 major TFs from two phylogenetically remote model organisms. For Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, respectively, PreCisIon achieves on average an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 70 and 60%, a sensitivity of 80 and 70% and a specificity of 60 and 56%. The newly predicted gene targets are demonstrated to be functionally consistent with previously known targets, as assessed by analysis of Gene Ontology enrichment or of the relevant literature and databases.

  3. Identification and characterization of a cis-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient tomore » confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.« less

  4. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C. reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  5. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  6. Male-specific Fruitless isoforms have different regulatory roles conferred by distinct zinc finger DNA binding domains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drosophila melanogaster adult males perform an elaborate courtship ritual to entice females to mate. fruitless (fru), a gene that is one of the key regulators of male courtship behavior, encodes multiple male-specific isoforms (FruM). These isoforms vary in their carboxy-terminal zinc finger domains, which are predicted to facilitate DNA binding. Results By over-expressing individual FruM isoforms in fru-expressing neurons in either males or females and assaying the global transcriptional response by RNA-sequencing, we show that three FruM isoforms have different regulatory activities that depend on the sex of the fly. We identified several sets of genes regulated downstream of FruM isoforms, including many annotated with neuronal functions. By determining the binding sites of individual FruM isoforms using SELEX we demonstrate that the distinct zinc finger domain of each FruM isoforms confers different DNA binding specificities. A genome-wide search for these binding site sequences finds that the gene sets identified as induced by over-expression of FruM isoforms in males are enriched for genes that contain the binding sites. An analysis of the chromosomal distribution of genes downstream of FruM shows that those that are induced and repressed in males are highly enriched and depleted on the X chromosome, respectively. Conclusions This study elucidates the different regulatory and DNA binding activities of three FruM isoforms on a genome-wide scale and identifies genes regulated by these isoforms. These results add to our understanding of sex chromosome biology and further support the hypothesis that in some cell-types genes with male-biased expression are enriched on the X chromosome. PMID:24074028

  7. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Viraj; Valentin, Antonio; Rosati, Margherita; Alicea, Candido; Singh, Ashish K.; Jalah, Rashmi; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Mothe, Beatriz; Brander, Christian; Rolland, Morgane; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24gag elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist. PMID:24465991

  8. Integrative Modeling of eQTLs and Cis-Regulatory Elements Suggests Mechanisms Underlying Cell Type Specificity of eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher D.; Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE) data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human complex phenotypic

  9. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-­turn motif that also occurs in the ‘off’ state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA. PMID:21245530

  10. A recent evolutionary change affects a regulatory element in the human FOXP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Maricic, Tomislav; Günther, Viola; Georgiev, Oleg; Gehre, Sabine; Curlin, Marija; Schreiweis, Christiane; Naumann, Ronald; Burbano, Hernán A; Meyer, Matthias; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Rosas, Antonio; Gajovic, Srecko; Kelso, Janet; Enard, Wolfgang; Schaffner, Walter; Pääbo, Svante

    2013-04-01

    The FOXP2 gene is required for normal development of speech and language. By isolating and sequencing FOXP2 genomic DNA fragments from a 49,000-year-old Iberian Neandertal and 50 present-day humans, we have identified substitutions in the gene shared by all or nearly all present-day humans but absent or polymorphic in Neandertals. One such substitution is localized in intron 8 and affects a binding site for the transcription factor POU3F2, which is highly conserved among vertebrates. We find that the derived allele of this site is less efficient than the ancestral allele in activating transcription from a reporter construct. The derived allele also binds less POU3F2 dimers than POU3F2 monomers compared with the ancestral allele. Because the substitution in the POU3F2 binding site is likely to alter the regulation of FOXP2 expression, and because it is localized in a region of the gene associated with a previously described signal of positive selection, it is a plausible candidate for having caused a recent selective sweep in the FOXP2 gene.

  11. Structure of an RNA dimer of a regulatory element from human thymidylate synthase mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey; McLean, Jaime; Hermann, Thomas

    2011-09-27

    A sequence around the start codon of the mRNA of human thymidylate synthase (TS) folds into a secondary-structure motif in which the initiation site is sequestered in a metastable hairpin. Binding of the protein to its own mRNA at the hairpin prevents the production of TS through a translation-repression feedback mechanism. Stabilization of the mRNA hairpin by other ligands has been proposed as a strategy to reduce TS levels in anticancer therapy. Rapidly proliferating cells require high TS activity to maintain the production of thymidine as a building block for DNA synthesis. The crystal structure of a model oligonucleotide (TS1) that represents the TS-binding site of the mRNA has been determined. While fluorescence studies showed that the TS1 RNA preferentially adopts a hairpin structure in solution, even at high RNA concentrations, an asymmetric dimer of two hybridized TS1 strands was obtained in the crystal. The TS1 dimer contains an unusual S-turn motif that also occurs in the 'off' state of the human ribosomal decoding site RNA.

  12. Characterisation of a DNA sequence element that directs Dictyostelium stalk cell-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, A; Zhukovskaya, N; Kawata, T; Bozzaro, S; Williams, J

    2000-12-01

    The ecmB gene of Dictyostelium is expressed at culmination both in the prestalk cells that enter the stalk tube and in ancillary stalk cell structures such as the basal disc. Stalk tube-specific expression is regulated by sequence elements within the cap-site proximal part of the promoter, the stalk tube (ST) promoter region. Dd-STATa, a member of the STAT transcription factor family, binds to elements present in the ST promoter-region and represses transcription prior to entry into the stalk tube. We have characterised an activatory DNA sequence element, that lies distal to the repressor elements and that is both necessary and sufficient for expression within the stalk tube. We have mapped this activator to a 28 nucleotide region (the 28-mer) within which we have identified a GA-containing sequence element that is required for efficient gene transcription. The Dd-STATa protein binds to the 28-mer in an in vitro binding assay, and binding is dependent upon the GA-containing sequence. However, the ecmB gene is expressed in a Dd-STATa null mutant, therefore Dd-STATa cannot be responsible for activating the 28-mer in vivo. Instead, we identified a distinct 28-mer binding activity in nuclear extracts from the Dd-STATa null mutant, the activity of this GA binding activity being largely masked in wild type extracts by the high affinity binding of the Dd-STATa protein. We suggest, that in addition to the long range repression exerted by binding to the two known repressor sites, Dd-STATa inhibits transcription by direct competition with this putative activator for binding to the GA sequence.

  13. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  14. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  15. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  16. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  17. In vivo redundant function of the 3' IgH regulatory element HS3b in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bébin, Anne-Gaëlle; Carrion, Claire; Marquet, Marie; Cogné, Nadine; Lecardeur, Sandrine; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric

    2010-04-01

    In the mouse, the regulatory region located at the 3' end of the IgH locus includes four transcriptional enhancers: HS3a, HS1-2, HS3b, and HS4; the first three lie in a quasi-palindromic structure. Although the upstream elements HS3a and HS1-2 proved dispensable for Ig expression and class switch recombination (CSR), the joint deletion of HS3b and HS4 led to a consistent decrease in IgH expression in resting B cells and to a major CSR defect. Within this pair of distal enhancers, it was questionable whether HS3b and HS4 could be considered individually as elements critical for IgH expression and/or CSR. Studies in HS4-deficient mice recently revealed the role of HS4 as restricted to Igmicro-chain expression from the pre-B to the mature B cell stage and left HS3b as the last candidate for CSR regulation. Our present study finally invalidates the hypothesis that CSR could mostly rely on HS3b itself. B cells from HS3b-deficient animals undergo normal proliferation, germline transcription, and CSR upon in vitro stimulation with LPS; in vivo Ag-specific responses are not affected. In conclusion, our study highlights a major effect of the global ambiance of the IgH locus; enhancers demonstrated as being strongly synergistic in transgenes turn out to be redundant in their endogenous context.

  18. Thermodynamics of cooperative DNA recognition at a replication origin and transcription regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo

    2010-12-01

    Binding cooperativity guides the formation of protein-nucleic acid complexes, in particular those that are highly regulated such as replication origins and transcription sites. Using the DNA binding domain of the origin binding and transcriptional regulator protein E2 from human papillomavirus type 16 as model, and through isothermal titration calorimetry analysis, we determined a positive, entropy-driven cooperativity upon binding of the protein to its cognate tandem double E2 site. This cooperativity is associated with a change in DNA structure, where the overall B conformation is maintained. Two homologous E2 domains, those of HPV18 and HPV11, showed that the enthalpic-entropic components of the reaction and DNA deformation can diverge. Because the DNA binding helix is almost identical in the three domains, the differences must lie dispersed throughout this unique dimeric β-barrel fold. This is in surprising agreement with previous results for this domain, which revealed a strong coupling between global dynamics and DNA recognition.

  19. Molecular stripping in the NF-κB/IκB/DNA genetic regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Potoyan, Davit A; Zheng, Weihua; Komives, Elizabeth A; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Genetic switches based on the [Formula: see text] system are master regulators of an array of cellular responses. Recent kinetic experiments have shown that [Formula: see text] can actively remove NF-κB bound to its genetic sites via a process called "molecular stripping." This allows the [Formula: see text] switch to function under kinetic control rather than the thermodynamic control contemplated in the traditional models of gene switches. Using molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained predictive energy landscape models for the constituent proteins by themselves and interacting with the DNA we explore the functional motions of the transcription factor [Formula: see text] and its various binary and ternary complexes with DNA and the inhibitor IκB. These studies show that the function of the [Formula: see text] genetic switch is realized via an allosteric mechanism. Molecular stripping occurs through the activation of a domain twist mode by the binding of [Formula: see text] that occurs through conformational selection. Free energy calculations for DNA binding show that the binding of [Formula: see text] not only results in a significant decrease of the affinity of the transcription factor for the DNA but also kinetically speeds DNA release. Projections of the free energy onto various reaction coordinates reveal the structural details of the stripping pathways.

  20. Regulatory mechanisms of RNA function: emerging roles of DNA repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jobert, Laure; Nilsen, Hilde

    2014-07-01

    The acquisition of an appropriate set of chemical modifications is required in order to establish correct structure of RNA molecules, and essential for their function. Modification of RNA bases affects RNA maturation, RNA processing, RNA quality control, and protein translation. Some RNA modifications are directly involved in the regulation of these processes. RNA epigenetics is emerging as a mechanism to achieve dynamic regulation of RNA function. Other modifications may prevent or be a signal for degradation. All types of RNA species are subject to processing or degradation, and numerous cellular mechanisms are involved. Unexpectedly, several studies during the last decade have established a connection between DNA and RNA surveillance mechanisms in eukaryotes. Several proteins that respond to DNA damage, either to process or to signal the presence of damaged DNA, have been shown to participate in RNA quality control, turnover or processing. Some enzymes that repair DNA damage may also process modified RNA substrates. In this review, we give an overview of the DNA repair proteins that function in RNA metabolism. We also discuss the roles of two base excision repair enzymes, SMUG1 and APE1, in RNA quality control.

  1. Detecting the limits of regulatory element conservation anddivergence estimation using pairwise and multiple alignments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Daniel A.; Moses, Alan M.; Iyer, Venky N.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2006-08-14

    Background: Molecular evolutionary studies of noncodingsequences rely on multiple alignments. Yet how multiple alignmentaccuracy varies across sequence types, tree topologies, divergences andtools, and further how this variation impacts specific inferences,remains unclear. Results: Here we develop a molecular evolutionsimulation platform, CisEvolver, with models of background noncoding andtranscription factor binding site evolution, and use simulated alignmentsto systematically examine multiple alignment accuracy and its impact ontwo key molecular evolutionary inferences: transcription factor bindingsite conservation and divergence estimation. We find that the accuracy ofmultiple alignments is determined almost exclusively by the pairwisedivergence distance of the two most diverged species and that additionalspecies have a negligible influence on alignment accuracy. Conservedtranscription factor binding sites align better than surroundingnoncoding DNA yet are often found to be misaligned at relatively shortdivergence distances, such that studies of binding site gain and losscould easily be confounded by alignment error. Divergence estimates frommultiple alignments tend to be overestimated at short divergencedistances but reach a tool specific divergence at which they cease toincrease, leading to underestimation at long divergences. Our moststriking finding was that overall alignment accuracy, binding sitealignment accuracy and divergence estimation accuracy vary greatly acrossbranches in a tree and are most accurate for terminal branches connectingsister taxa and least accurate for internal branches connectingsub-alignments. Conclusions: Our results suggest that variation inalignment accuracy can lead to errors in molecular evolutionaryinferences that could be construed as biological variation. Thesefindings have implications for which species to choose for analyses, whatkind of errors would be expected for a given set of species and howmultiple alignment tools and

  2. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    PubMed

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  3. Comparative study and prediction of DNA fragments associated with various elements of the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Glazko, G V; Rogozin, I B; Glazkov, M V

    2001-02-16

    Scaffold/matrix-associated region (S/MAR) sequences are DNA regions that are attached to the nuclear matrix, and participate in many cellular processes. The nuclear matrix is a complex structure consisting of various elements. In this paper we compared frequencies of simple nucleotide motifs in S/MAR sequences and in sequences extracted directly from various nuclear matrix elements, such as nuclear lamina, cores of rosette-like structures, synaptonemal complex. Multivariate linear discriminant analysis revealed significant differences between these sequences. Based on this result we have developed a program, ChrClass (Win/NT version, ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/chrclass/chrclass.zip), for the prediction of the regions associated with various elements of the nuclear matrix in a query sequence. Subsequently, several test samples were analyzed by using two S/MAR prediction programs (a ChrClass and MAR-Finder) and a simple MRS criterion (S/MAR recognition signature) indicating the presence of S/MARs. Some overlap between the predictions of all MAR prediction tools has been found. Simultaneous use of the ChrClass, MRS criterion and MAR-Finder programs may help to obtain a more clearcut picture of S/MAR distribution in a query sequence. In general, our results suggest that the proportion of missed S/MARs is lower for ChrClass, whereas the proportion of wrong S/MARs is lower for MAR-Finder and MRS.

  4. GAGA factor binding to DNA via a single trinucleotide sequence element.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, R C; Lis, J T

    1998-01-01

    GAGA transcription factor (GAF) is an essential protein in Drosophila , important for the transcriptional regulation of numerous genes. GAF binds to GA repeats in the promoters of these genes via a DNA-binding domain containing a single zinc finger. While GAF binding sites are typically composed of 3.5 GA repeats, the Drosophila hsp70 gene contains much smaller elements, some of which are as little as three bases (GAG) in length. Interestingly, the binding of GAF to more distant trinucleotide elements is relatively strong and not appreciably affected by the removal of larger GA arrays in the promoter. Moreover, a simple synthetic GAG sequence is sufficient to bind GAF in vitro . Here we directly compare the affinity of GAF for different sequence elements by immunoprecipitation and gel mobility shift analysis. Furthermore, our measures of the concentration of GAF in vivo indicate that it is a highly abundant nuclear protein, prevalent enough to occupy a sizable fraction of correspondingly abundant trinucleotide sites. PMID:9592153

  5. Identification of positive and negative regulatory elements governing cell-type-specific expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, M R; Gaugler, L; Deagostini-Bazin, H; Bally-Cuif, L; Goridis, C

    1990-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is one of the most prevalent cell adhesion molecules in vertebrates. Its expression is subject to complex cell-type- and developmental-stage-dependent regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, we analyzed the promoter region of the mouse NCAM gene. The NCAM promoter did not contain a typical TATA box. Transcription started at several sites that were used indiscriminately by different cell types, implying that the different NCAM isoforms are expressed from a single promoter. Sequences responsible for both promotion and inhibition of transcription resided within 840 base pairs upstream of the main transcriptional start site. The sequence from positions -645 to -37 relative to the translation initiation site directed high levels of expression in NCAM-expressing N2A cells. The same fragment was six times less active but still significantly active in L cells, but this activity was repressed by inclusion of an additional upstream segment. We mapped eight domains of interactions with nuclear proteins within the 840-base-pair region. The segment with maximum promoter activity contained two adjacent footprints, the occupation of which appeared to be mutually exclusive. One of them corresponded to an Sp1-factor-binding consensus site, the other one bound a factor with nuclear factor I activity. The single protected domain in the fragment harboring a repressor activity consisted of a GGA repeat resembling negative regulatory elements in other promoters. Three adjacent binding sites occupied an A + T-rich segment and contained ATTA motifs also found in the recognition elements of homeodomain proteins. These results show that negative and positive elements interact to regulate the tissue-specific patterns of expression of the NCAM gene and indicate that a factor related to nuclear factor I is involved in its transcriptional control. Images PMID:2325642

  6. UV-B-induced DNA damage mediates expression changes of cell cycle regulatory genes in Arabidopsis root tips.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Björn, Lars Olof; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-04-01

    Even though a number of studies have shown that UV-B radiation inhibits plant growth and regulates the cell cycle progress, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms. Here, we developed a synchronous root-tip cell system to investigate expression changes of cell cycle marker genes and DNA damage under UV-B radiation. Expression analysis of cell cycle marker genes revealed that G1-to-S transition in root-tip cells was accomplished within 6 h. In the in vivo synchronous root-tip cells, high level of UV-B radiation (0.45 W m(-2)) induced expression changes of the cell cycle regulatory genes. Genes involved in G1-to-S transition, Histone H4 and E2Fa, were down-regulated by UV-B radiation during 2-6 h; whereas transcripts for KRP2, a negative regulator of G1-to-S transition, were up-regulated by UV-B at 2 h. The peak time for transcript level of CYCD3;1, a positive factor in G1-to-S transition, was delayed by UV-B radiation. Interestingly, a medium level of UV-B radiation (0.25 W m(-2)) did not change the expression of these genes in root tip cells from wild type. However, cell cycle regulatory genes were greatly affected in uvh1 mutant, which exhibited higher content of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Ascorbic acid treatment did not change the expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes that were affected by high-level UV-B. Our results implied that UV-B-induced DNA damage results in the delay of G1-to-S transition of plant cell cycle. UV-B-induced G1-to-S arrest may be a protective mechanism that prevents cells with damaged DNA from dividing and may explain the plant growth inhibition under increased solar UV-B radiation.

  7. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  8. A novel tumor necrosis factor-responsive transcription factor which recognizes a regulatory element in hemopoietic growth factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Pell, L.M.; Kuczek, E.S.; Occhiodoro, F.S.; Dunn, S.M.; Vadas, M.A. ); Lenardo, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    A conserved DNA sequence element, termed cytokine 1 (CK-1), is found in the promoter regions of many hemopoietic growth factor (HGF) genes. Mutational analyses and modification interference experiments show that this sequence specifically binds a nuclear transcription factor, NF-GMa, which is a protein with a molecular mass of 43 kilodaltons. It interacts with different affinities with the CK-1-like sequence from a number of HGF genes, including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF, interleukin 3 (IL-3), and IL-5. The authors show that the level of NF-GMa binding is induced in embryonic fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) treatment and that the CK-1 sequence from the G-CSF gene is a TNF-{alpha}-responsive enhancer in these cells.

  9. Crystal structure of a DNA aptamer bound to PvLDH elucidates novel single-stranded DNA structural elements for folding and recognition

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Jin; Ban, Changill

    2016-01-01

    Structural elements are key elements for understanding single-stranded nucleic acid folding. Although various RNA structural elements have been documented, structural elements of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) have rarely been reported. Herein, we determined a crystal structure of PvLDH in complex with a DNA aptamer called pL1. This aptamer folds into a hairpin-bulge contact by adopting three novel structural elements, viz, DNA T-loop-like motif, base–phosphate zipper, and DNA G·G metal ion zipper. Moreover, the pL1:PvLDH complex shows unique properties compared with other protein:nucleic acid complexes. Generally, extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds occur between unpaired nucleotides and proteins for specific recognitions. Although most protein-interacting nucleotides of pL1 are unpaired nucleotides, pL1 recognizes PvLDH by predominant shape complementarity with many bridging water molecules owing to the combination of three novel structural elements making protein-binding unpaired nucleotides stable. Moreover, the additional set of Plasmodium LDH residues which were shown to form extensive hydrogen bonds with unpaired nucleotides of 2008s does not participate in the recognition of pL1. Superimposition of the pL1:PvLDH complex with hLDH reveals steric clashes between pL1 and hLDH in contrast with no steric clashes between 2008s and hLDH. Therefore, specific protein recognition mode of pL1 is totally different from that of 2008s. PMID:27725738

  10. Improving the safety of viral DNA vaccines: development of vectors containing both 5' and 3' homologous regulatory sequences from non-viral origin.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, A; Encinas, P; García-Valtanen, P; Gomez-Casado, E; Coll, J M; Estepa, A

    2013-04-01

    Although some DNA vaccines have proved to be very efficient in field trials, their authorisation still remains limited to a few countries. This is in part due to safety issues because most of them contain viral regulatory sequences to driving the expression of the encoded antigen. This is the case of the only DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus (a negative ssRNA virus), authorised in Canada, despite the important economic losses that these viruses cause to aquaculture all over the world. In an attempt to solve this problem and using as a model a non-authorised, but efficient DNA vaccine against the fish rhabdovirus, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), we developed a plasmid construction containing regulatory sequences exclusively from fish origin. The result was an "all-fish vector", named pJAC-G, containing 5' and 3' regulatory sequences of β-acting genes from carp and zebrafish, respectively. In vitro and in vivo, pJAC-G drove a successful expression of the VHSV glycoprotein G (G), the only antigen of the virus conferring in vivo protection. Furthermore, and by means of in vitro fusion assays, it was confirmed that G protein expressed from pJAC-G was fully functional. Altogether, these results suggest that DNA vaccines containing host-homologous gene regulatory sequences might be useful for developing safer DNA vaccines, while they also might be useful for basic studies.

  11. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  12. Shared Enhancer Activity in the Limbs and Phallus and Functional Divergence of a Limb-Genital cis-Regulatory Element in Snakes.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos R; Mihala, Alexandra G; Park, Sungdae; Wang, Jialiang S; Johnson, Kenji K; Lauderdale, James D; Menke, Douglas B

    2015-10-12

    The amniote phallus and limbs differ dramatically in their morphologies but share patterns of signaling and gene expression in early development. Thus far, the extent to which genital and limb transcriptional networks also share cis-regulatory elements has remained unexplored. We show that many limb enhancers are retained in snake genomes, suggesting that these elements may function in non-limb tissues. Consistent with this, our analysis of cis-regulatory activity in mice and Anolis lizards reveals that patterns of enhancer activity in embryonic limbs and genitalia overlap heavily. In mice, deletion of HLEB, an enhancer of Tbx4, produces defects in hindlimbs and genitalia, establishing the importance of this limb-genital enhancer for development of these different appendages. Further analyses demonstrate that the HLEB of snakes has lost hindlimb enhancer function while retaining genital activity. Our findings identify roles for Tbx4 in genital development and highlight deep similarities in cis-regulatory activity between limbs and genitalia.

  13. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  14. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  15. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  16. Relaxase DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing that involve different sequence elements of the nic site.

    PubMed

    Lucas, María; González-Pérez, Blanca; Cabezas, Matilde; Moncalian, Gabriel; Rivas, Germán; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-03-19

    TrwC, the relaxase of plasmid R388, catalyzes a series of concerted DNA cleavage and strand transfer reactions on a specific site (nic) of its origin of transfer (oriT). nic contains the cleavage site and an adjacent inverted repeat (IR(2)). Mutation analysis in the nic region indicated that recognition of the IR(2) proximal arm and the nucleotides located between IR(2) and the cleavage site were essential for supercoiled DNA processing, as judged either by in vitro nic cleavage or by mobilization of a plasmid containing oriT. Formation of the IR(2) cruciform and recognition of the distal IR(2) arm and loop were not necessary for these reactions to take place. On the other hand, IR(2) was not involved in TrwC single-stranded DNA processing in vitro. For single-stranded DNA nic cleavage, TrwC recognized a sequence embracing six nucleotides upstream of the cleavage site and two nucleotides downstream. This suggests that TrwC DNA binding and cleavage are two distinguishable steps in conjugative DNA processing and that different sequence elements are recognized by TrwC in each step. IR(2)-proximal arm recognition was crucial for the initial supercoiled DNA binding. Subsequent recognition of the adjacent single-stranded DNA binding site was required to position the cleavage site in the active center of the protein so that the nic cleavage reaction could take place.

  17. Identification of regulatory elements in the AGT1 promoter of ale and lager strains of brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Vidgren, Virve; Kankainen, Matti; Londesborough, John; Ruohonen, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Agt1 is an interesting α-glucoside transporter for the brewing industry, as it efficiently transports maltotriose, a sugar often remaining partly unused during beer fermentation. It has been shown that on maltose the expression level of AGT1 is much higher in ale strains than in lager strains, and that glucose represses the expression, particularly in the ale strains. In the present study the regulatory elements of the AGT1 promoter of one ale and two lager strains were identified by computational methods. Promoter regions up to 1.9 kbp upstream of the AGT1 gene were sequenced from the three brewer's yeast strains and the laboratory yeast strain CEN.PK-1D. The promoter sequence of the laboratory strain was identical to the AGT1 promoter of strain S288c of the Saccharomyces Genome Database, whereas the promoter sequences of the industrial strains diverged markedly from the S288c strain. The AGT1 promoter regions of the ale and lager strains were for the most part identical to each other, except for one 22 bp deletion and two 94 and 95 bp insertions in the ale strain. Computational analyses of promoter elements revealed that the promoter sequences contained several Mig1- and MAL-activator binding sites, as was expected. However, some of the Mig1 and MAL-activator binding sites were located on the two insertions of the ale strain, and thus offered a plausible explanation for the different expression pattern of the AGT1 gene in the ale strains. Accordingly, functional analysis of A60 ale and A15 lager strain AGT1 promoters fused to GFP (encoding the green fluorescent protein) showed a significant difference in the ability of these two promoters to drive GFP expression. Under the control of the AGT1 promoter of the ale strain the emergence of GFP was strongly induced by maltose, whereas only a low level of GFP was detected with the construct carrying the AGT1 promoter of the lager strain. Thus, the extra MAL-activator binding element, present in the AGT1 promoter of

  18. Proteins bound at adjacent DNA elements act synergistically to regulate human proenkephalin cAMP inducible transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Comb, M; Mermod, N; Hyman, S E; Pearlberg, J; Ross, M E; Goodman, H M

    1988-01-01

    Synthesis of the endogenous opioid precursor, proenkephalin, is regulated by neurotransmitters and membrane depolarization. These events act through second messenger dependent signal transduction pathways via a short inducible DNA enhancer to regulate transcription of the proenkephalin gene. Two DNA elements located within this enhancer are essential for the transcriptional response to cAMP and phorbol ester. Inactivation of either element by mutation or by alteration of their stereospecific alignment eliminates inducible enhancer activity. The promoter distal element, ENKCRE-1, in the absence of a functional adjacent ENKCRE-2 element, has no inherent capacity to activate transcription. However, in the presence of a functional ENKCRE-2 element, this element synergistically augments cAMP and phorbol ester inducible transcription. The promoter proximal element, ENKCRE-2, is essential for both basal and regulated enhancer function. Four different protein factors found in HeLa cell nuclear extracts bind in vitro to the enhancer region. ENKTF-1, a novel enhancer binding protein, binds to the DNA region encompassing ENKCRE-1. The transcription factors AP-1 and AP-4 bind to overlapping sites spanning ENKCRE-2, and a fourth transcription factor, AP-2, binds to a site immediately downstream of ENKCRE-2. The binding of ENKTF-1 to mutant ENKCRE-1 sequences in vitro correlates with the in vivo inducibility of the mutant elements suggesting that ENKTF-1 acts in combination with factors that recognize the ENKCRE-2 domain to regulate cAMP inducible transcription. Together, the two DNA elements, ENKCRE-1 and ENKCRE-2 and the protein factors with which they interact, play a critical role in the transduction and reception of signals transmitted from cell surface receptors to the proenkephalin nuclear transcription complex. Images PMID:2850173

  19. Spontaneous germline excision of Tol1, a DNA-based transposable element naturally occurring in the medaka fish genome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Koga, Hajime; Nakamura, Kodai; Fujita, Akiko; Hattori, Akimasa; Matsuda, Masaru; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-04-01

    DNA-based transposable elements are ubiquitous constituents of eukaryotic genomes. Vertebrates are, however, exceptional in that most of their DNA-based elements appear to be inactivated. The Tol1 element of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, is one of the few elements for which copies containing an undamaged gene have been found. Spontaneous transposition of this element in somatic cells has previously been demonstrated, but there is only indirect evidence for its germline transposition. Here, we show direct evidence of spontaneous excision in the germline. Tyrosinase is the key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. In an albino laboratory strain of medaka fish, which is homozygous for a mutant tyrosinase gene in which a Tol1 copy is inserted, we identified de novo reversion mutations related to melanin pigmentation. The gamete-based reversion rate was as high as 0.4%. The revertant fish carried the tyrosinase gene from which the Tol1 copy had been excised. We previously reported the germline transposition of Tol2, another DNA-based element that is thought to be a recent invader of the medaka fish genome. Tol1 is an ancient resident of the genome. Our results indicate that even an old element can contribute to genetic variation in the host genome as a natural mutator.

  20. Germ line and embryonic expression of Fex, a member of the Drosophila F-element retrotransposon family, is mediated by an internal cis-regulatory control region.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, B; Fellert, S; Taubert, H; Hoch, M

    1996-01-01

    The F elements of Drosophila melanogaster belong to the superfamily of long interspersed nucleotide element retrotransposons. To date, F-element transcription has not been detected in flies. Here we describe the isolation of a member of the F-element family, termed Fex, which is transcribed in specific cells of the female and male germ lines and in various tissues during embryogenesis of D. melanogaster. Sequence analysis revealed that this element contains two complete open reading frames coding for a putative nucleic acid-binding protein and a putative reverse transcriptase. Functional analysis of the 5' region, using germ line transformation of Fex-lacZ reporter gene constructs, demonstrates that major aspects of tissue-specific Fex expression are controlled by internal cis-acting elements that lie in the putative coding region of open reading frame 1. These sequences mediate dynamic gene expression in eight expression domains during embryonic and germ line development. The capacity of the cis-regulatory region of the Fex element to mediate such complex expression patterns is unique among members of the long interspersed nucleotide element superfamily of retrotransposons and is reminiscent of regulatory regions of developmental control genes. PMID:8649411

  1. Modular changes of cis-regulatory elements from two functional Pit1 genes in the duplicated genome of Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Kausel, G; Salazar, M; Castro, L; Vera, T; Romero, A; Muller, M; Figueroa, J

    2006-10-15

    The pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit1 is involved in its own regulation and in a network of transcriptional regulation of hypothalamo-hypophyseal factors including prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH). In the ectotherm teleost Cyprinus carpio, Pit1 plays an important role in regulation of the adaptive response to seasonal environmental changes. Two Pit1 genes exist in carp, a tetraploid vertebrate and transcripts of both genes were detected by RT-PCR analysis. Powerful comparative analyses of the 5'-flanking regions revealed copy specific changes comprising modular functional units in the naturally evolved promoters. These include the precise replacement of four nucleotides around the transcription start site embedded in completely conserved regions extending upstream of the TATA-box, an additional transcription factor binding site in the 5'-UTR of gene-I and, instead, duplication of a 9 bp element in gene-II. Binding of nuclear factors was assessed by electro mobility shift assays using extracts from rat pituitary cells and carp pituitary. Binding was confirmed at one conserved Pit1, one conserved CREB and one consensus MTF1. Interestingly, two functional Pit1 sites and one putative MTF1 binding site are unique to the Pit1 gene-I. In situ hybridization experiments revealed that the expression of gene-I in winter carp was significantly stronger than that of gene-II. Our data suggest that the specific control elements identified in the proximal regulatory region are physiologically relevant for the function of the duplicated Pit1 genes in carp and highlight modular changes in the architecture of two Pit1 genes that evolved for at least 12 MYA in the same organism.

  2. Hepatic PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status via insulin and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c.

    PubMed

    Costet, Philippe; Cariou, Bertrand; Lambert, Gilles; Lalanne, Florent; Lardeux, Bernard; Jarnoux, Anne-Laure; Grefhorst, Aldo; Staels, Bart; Krempf, Michel

    2006-03-10

    Familial autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia is associated with high risk for cardiovascular accidents and is related to mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor or its ligand apolipoprotein B (apoB). Mutations in a third gene, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9), were recently associated to this disease. PCSK9 acts as a natural inhibitor of the low density lipoprotein receptor pathway, and both genes are regulated by depletion of cholesterol cell content and statins, via sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP). Here we investigated the regulation of PCSK9 gene expression during nutritional changes. We showed that PCSK9 mRNA quantity is decreased by 73% in mice after 24 h of fasting, leading to a 2-fold decrease in protein level. In contrast PCSK9 expression was restored upon high carbohydrate refeeding. PCSK9 mRNA increased by 4-5-fold in presence of insulin in rodent primary hepatocytes, whereas glucose had no effect. Moreover, insulin up-regulated hepatic PCSK9 expression in vivo during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in mice. Adenoviral mediated overexpression of a dominant or negative form of SREBP-1c confirmed the implication of this transcription factor in insulin-mediated stimulation of PCSK9 expression. Liver X receptor agonist T0901317 also regulated PCSK9 expression via this same pathway (a 2-fold increase in PCSK9 mRNA of primary hepatocytes cultured for 24 h in presence of 1 microm T0901317). As our last investigation, we isolated PCSK9 proximal promoter and verified the functionality of a SREBP-1c responsive element located from 335 bp to 355 bp upstream of the ATG. Together, these results show that PCSK9 expression is regulated by nutritional status and insulinemia. PMID:16407292

  3. A Phox2- and Hand2-dependent Hand1 cis-regulatory element reveals a unique gene dosage requirement for Hand2 during sympathetic neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vincentz, Joshua W; VanDusen, Nathan J; Fleming, Andrew B; Rubart, Michael; Firulli, Beth A; Howard, Marthe J; Firulli, Anthony B

    2012-02-01

    Neural crest cell specification and differentiation to a sympathetic neuronal fate serves as an important model for neurogenesis and depends upon the function of both bHLH transcription factors, notably Hand2, and homeodomain transcription factors, including Phox2b. Here, we define a 1007 bp cis-regulatory element 5' of the Hand1 gene sufficient to drive reporter expression within the sympathetic chain of transgenic mice. Comparative genomic analyses uncovered evolutionarily conserved consensus-binding sites within this element, which chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirm are bound by Hand2 and Phox2b. Mutational analyses revealed that the conserved Phox2 and E-box binding sites are necessary for proper cis-regulatory element activity, and expression analyses on both Hand2 conditionally null and hypomorphic backgrounds demonstrate that Hand2 is required for reporter activation in a gene dosage-dependent manner. We demonstrate that Hand2 and Hand1 differentially bind the E-boxes in this cis-regulatory element, establishing molecular differences between these two factors. Finally, we demonstrate that Hand1 is dispensable for normal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) expression in sympathetic neurons, even when Hand2 gene dosage is concurrently reduced by half. Together, these data define a tissue-specific Hand1 cis-regulatory element controlled by two factors essential for the development of the sympathetic nervous system and provide in vivo regulatory evidence to support previous findings that Hand2, rather than Hand1, is predominantly responsible for regulating TH, DBH, and Hand1 expression in developing sympathetic neurons.

  4. Ubiquitous and gene-specific regulatory 5' sequences in a sea urchin histone DNA clone coding for histone protein variants.

    PubMed Central

    Busslinger, M; Portmann, R; Irminger, J C; Birnstiel, M L

    1980-01-01

    The DNA sequences of the entire structural H4, H3, H2A and H2B genes and of their 5' flanking regions have been determined in the histone DNA clone h19 of the sea urchin Psammechinus miliaris. In clone h19 the polarity of transcription and the relative arrangement of the histone genes is identical to that in clone h22 of the same species. The histone proteins encoded by h19 DNA differ in their primary structure from those encoded by clone h22 and have been compared to histone protein sequences of other sea urchin species as well as other eukaryotes. A comparative analysis of the 5' flanking DNA sequences of the structural histone genes in both clones revealed four ubiquitous sequence motifs; a pentameric element GATCC, followed at short distance by the Hogness box GTATAAATAG, a conserved sequence PyCATTCPu, in or near which the 5' ends of the mRNAs map in h22 DNA and lastly a sequence A, containing the initiation codon. These sequences are also found, sometimes in modified version, in front of other eukaryotic genes transcribed by polymerase II. When prelude sequences of isocoding histone genes in clone h19 and h22 are compared areas of homology are seen to extend beyond the ubiquitous sequence motifs towards the divergent AT-rich spacer and terminate between approximately 140 and 240 nucleotides away from the structural gene. These prelude regions contain quite large conservative sequence blocks which are specific for each type of histone genes. Images PMID:7443547

  5. Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein Regulates the Expression and Metabolic Functions of Wild-Type and Oncogenic IDH1.

    PubMed

    Ricoult, Stéphane J H; Dibble, Christian C; Asara, John M; Manning, Brendan D

    2016-09-15

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) is a major transcriptional regulator of the enzymes underlying de novo lipid synthesis. However, little is known about the SREBP-mediated control of processes that indirectly support lipogenesis, for instance, by supplying reducing power in the form of NAPDH or directing carbon flux into lipid precursors. Here, we characterize isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) as a transcriptional target of SREBP across a spectrum of cancer cell lines and human cancers. IDH1 promotes the synthesis of lipids specifically from glutamine-derived carbons. Neomorphic mutations in IDH1 occur frequently in certain cancers, leading to the production of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). We found that SREBP induces the expression of oncogenic IDH1 and influences 2-HG production from glucose. Treatment of cells with 25-hydroxycholesterol or statins, which respectively inhibit or activate SREBP, further supports SREBP-mediated regulation of IDH1 and, in cells with oncogenic IDH1, carbon flux into 2-HG. PMID:27354064

  6. Combining Hi-C data with phylogenetic correlation to predict the target genes of distal regulatory elements in human genome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yulan; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Tian, Weidong

    2013-12-01

    Defining the target genes of distal regulatory elements (DREs), such as enhancer, repressors and insulators, is a challenging task. The recently developed Hi-C technology is designed to capture chromosome conformation structure by high-throughput sequencing, and can be potentially used to determine the target genes of DREs. However, Hi-C data are noisy, making it difficult to directly use Hi-C data to identify DRE-target gene relationships. In this study, we show that DREs-gene pairs that are confirmed by Hi-C data are strongly phylogenetic correlated, and have thus developed a method that combines Hi-C read counts with phylogenetic correlation to predict long-range DRE-target gene relationships. Analysis of predicted DRE-target gene pairs shows that genes regulated by large number of DREs tend to have essential functions, and genes regulated by the same DREs tend to be functionally related and co-expressed. In addition, we show with a couple of examples that the predicted target genes of DREs can help explain the causal roles of disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the DREs. As such, these predictions will be of importance not only for our understanding of the function of DREs but also for elucidating the causal roles of disease-associated noncoding single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

  7. Enhancing Transgene Expression from Recombinant AAV8 Vectors in Different Tissues Using Woodchuck Hepatitis Virus Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhang, Fangfang; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been utilized extensively in gene therapy and gene function studies, as strong transgene expression is a prerequisite for positive outcomes. AAV8 was reported as the most efficient AAV serotype for transduction of the liver, brain and muscle compared with other serotypes. However, AAV8-mediated transduction of human hepatocytes is rather poor with approximately 20-fold lower efficiency compared with that of mouse hepatocytes. Therefore, we applied the woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) to enhance AAV8-mediated transgene expression driven by a combination promoter (CAG promoter) with a CMV-IE enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter for a more efficient viral vector. Transgene expression from recombinant AAV8 (rAAV8) vectors harboring a red fluorescent protein (RFP) reporter gene with or without WPRE were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results demonstrated that WPRE improved AAV8-mediated RFP expression in different cell lines with clear increases of transgene expression in the liver, brain or muscle of animals. The findings of this study will help to substantially reduce the quantity of viral particles that must be injected in order to reach a therapeutic level of transgene expression in gene therapy. Consequently, such dose reductions may lessen the potential risks associated with high doses of viral vectors. PMID:27076785

  8. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  9. Pi class glutathione S-transferase genes are regulated by Nrf 2 through an evolutionarily conserved regulatory element in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Takagi, Yaeko; Osanai, Hitoshi; Li, Li; Takeuchi, Miki; Katoh, Yasutake; Kobayashi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    Pi class GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) are a member of the vertebrate GST family of proteins that catalyse the conjugation of GSH to electrophilic compounds. The expression of Pi class GST genes can be induced by exposure to electrophiles. We demonstrated previously that the transcription factor Nrf 2 (NF-E2 p45-related factor 2) mediates this induction, not only in mammals, but also in fish. In the present study, we have isolated the genomic region of zebrafish containing the genes gstp1 and gstp2. The regulatory regions of zebrafish gstp1 and gstp2 have been examined by GFP (green fluorescent protein)-reporter gene analyses using microinjection into zebrafish embryos. Deletion and point-mutation analyses of the gstp1 promoter showed that an ARE (antioxidant-responsive element)-like sequence is located 50 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site which is essential for Nrf 2 transactivation. Using EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) analysis we showed that zebrafish Nrf 2–MafK heterodimer specifically bound to this sequence. All the vertebrate Pi class GST genes harbour a similar ARE-like sequence in their promoter regions. We propose that this sequence is a conserved target site for Nrf 2 in the Pi class GST genes. PMID:15654768

  10. Expression and purification of the cynR regulatory gene product: CynR is a DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lamblin, A F; Fuchs, J A

    1993-01-01

    The CynR protein, a member of the LysR family, positively regulates the Escherichia coli cyn operon and negatively autoregulates its own transcription. By S1 mapping analysis, the in vivo cynR transcription start site was located 63 bp upstream of the cynTSX operon transcription start site. Topologically, the cynR and cynTSX promoters overlap and direct transcription in opposite directions. The CynR translation initiation codon was identified by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, and the CynR coding sequence was cloned under the control of a T7 phage promoter. The CynR protein was stably expressed at a high level with a T7 RNA polymerase-T7 phage promoter system. Purification by ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography, and ammonium sulfate fractionation yielded pure CynR protein. Gel shift assays confirmed that CynR is a DNA-binding protein like the other members of the LysR family. The CynR regulatory protein binds specifically to a 136-bp DNA fragment encompassing both the cynR and the cynTSX promoters. Images PMID:8253686

  11. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies hypomethylated genes regulated by FOXP3 in human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Naselli, Gaetano; Qian, Junyan; Chopin, Michael; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia; Harrison, Leonard C

    2013-10-17

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) prevent the emergence of autoimmune disease. Prototypic natural Treg (nTreg) can be reliably identified by demethylation at the Forkhead-box P3 (FOXP3) locus. To explore the methylation landscape of nTreg, we analyzed genome-wide methylation in human naive nTreg (rTreg) and conventional naive CD4(+) T cells (Naive). We detected 2315 differentially methylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides (CpGs) between these 2 cell types, many of which clustered into 127 regions of differential methylation (RDMs). Activation changed the methylation status of 466 CpGs and 18 RDMs in Naive but did not alter DNA methylation in rTreg. Gene-set testing of the 127 RDMs showed that promoter methylation and gene expression were reciprocally related. RDMs were enriched for putative FOXP3-binding motifs. Moreover, CpGs within known FOXP3-binding regions in the genome were hypomethylated. In support of the view that methylation limits access of FOXP3 to its DNA targets, we showed that increased expression of the immune suppressive receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT), which delineated Treg from activated effector T cells, was associated with hypomethylation and FOXP3 binding at the TIGIT locus. Differential methylation analysis provides insight into previously undefined human Treg signature genes and their mode of regulation.

  12. Short interspersed DNA elements and miRNAs: a novel hidden gene regulation layer in zebrafish?

    PubMed

    Scarpato, Margherita; Angelini, Claudia; Cocca, Ennio; Pallotta, Maria M; Morescalchi, Maria A; Capriglione, Teresa

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated by in silico analysis the possible correlation between microRNAs (miRNAs) and Anamnia V-SINEs (a superfamily of short interspersed nuclear elements), which belong to those retroposon families that have been preserved in vertebrate genomes for millions of years and are actively transcribed because they are embedded in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of several genes. We report the results of the analysis of the genomic distribution of these mobile elements in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and discuss their involvement in generating miRNA gene loci. The computational study showed that the genes predicted to bear V-SINEs can be targeted by miRNAs with a very high hybridization E-value. Gene ontology analysis indicates that these genes are mainly involved in metabolic, membrane, and cytoplasmic signaling pathways. Nearly all the miRNAs that were predicted to target the V-SINEs of these genes, i.e., miR-338, miR-9, miR-181, miR-724, miR-735, and miR-204, have been validated in similar regulatory roles in mammals. The large number of genes bearing a V-SINE involved in metabolic and cellular processes suggests that V-SINEs may play a role in modulating cell responses to different stimuli and in preserving the metabolic balance during cell proliferation and differentiation. Although they need experimental validation, these preliminary results suggest that in the genome of D. rerio, as in other TE families in vertebrates, the preservation of V-SINE retroposons may also have been favored by their putative role in gene network modulation. PMID:26363800

  13. DNA methylation as a regulatory mechanism in rat gamma-crystallin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Peek, R; Niessen, R W; Schoenmakers, J G; Lubsen, N H

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the methylation state of the rat gamma-crystallin genes in DNA from lens cells at different developmental stages as well as from kidney and heart cells. A clear correlation between the extent of demethylation of the promoter and 5' gene regions and the expression of these genes was observed. No change in the methylation state of the far upstream or 3' regions of the genes was seen. The demethylation of the promoter region was shown to occur during the differentiation from the lens epithelial to the lens fiber cell. The effect of cytosine methylation on gamma-crystallin promoter activity was tested by measuring gamma-crystallin promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fusion gene expression after in vitro primed repair synthesis of the promoter region in the presence of either dCTP or 5mdCTP. The hemimethylated promoter was no longer capable of promoting high CAT activity after introduction into lens-like cells. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA demethylation may be the determining step in the developmental stage-specific expression of the rat gamma-crystallin genes. Images PMID:2011513

  14. Regulated tissue-specific alternative splicing of enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenes conferred by alpha-tropomyosin regulatory elements in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Peter D; Smith, Christopher W J; Kemp, Paul

    2004-08-27

    The mutually exclusive exons 2 and 3 of alpha-tropomyosin (alphaTM) have been used as a model system for strictly regulated alternative splicing. Exon 2 inclusion is only observed at high levels in smooth muscle (SM) tissues, whereas striated muscle and non-muscle cells use predominantly exon 3. Experiments in cell culture have shown that exon 2 selection results from repression of exon 3 and that this repression is mediated by regulatory elements flanking exon 3. We have now tested the cell culture-derived model in transgenic mice. We show that by harnessing the intronic splicing regulatory elements, expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein transgene with a constitutively active promoter can be restricted to SM cells. Splicing of both endogenous alphaTM and a series of transgenes carrying regulatory element mutations was analyzed by reverse transcriptasePCR. These studies indicated that although SM-rich tissues are equipped to regulate splicing of high levels of endogenous or transgene alphaTM RNA, other non-SM tissues such as spleen, which express lower amounts of alphaTM, also splice significant proportions of exon 2, and this splicing pattern can be recapitulated by transgenes expressed at low levels. We confirm the importance in vivo of the negatively acting regulatory elements for regulated skipping of exon 3. Moreover, we provide evidence that some of the regulatory factors responsible for exon 3 skipping appear to be titratable, with loss of regulated splicing sometimes being associated with high transgene expression levels. PMID:15194683

  15. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1): A DNA-damage induced microtubule regulatory gene.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice; Bernard, Ora

    2013-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle relies heavily on the mechanical forces vested by the dynamic rearrangement of the microtubule (MT) network. Tubulin Polymerization promoting Protein 1 (TPPP1) alters MT dynamics by driving MT polymerization as well as stabilization, via increasing MT acetylation. It increases MT rigidity, which results in reduced cell proliferation through downregulation of G1/S-phase and mitosis to G1-phase cell cycle transitioning. In this communication, we provide further evidence that TPPP1 may be an important regulator of genomic homeostasis. Our preliminary data show that long-term TPPP1 overexpression reduces cell viability via induction of apoptotic cell death pathways. Moreover, induction of DNA-damage results in increased TPPP1 expression, which is inhibited in the absence of expression of the tumor suppressor p53.

  16. Expression of AtWRKY33 encoding a pathogen- or PAMP-responsive WRKY transcription factor is regulated by a composite DNA motif containing W box elements.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Bernadette; Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Rivory, Gaelle; Brümmer, Janna; Schmelzer, Elmon; Logemann, Elke; Somssich, Imre E

    2007-04-01

    WRKY transcription factors regulate distinct parts of the plant defense transcriptome. Expression of many WRKY genes themselves is induced by pathogens or pathogen-mimicking molecules. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis WRKY33 responds to various stimuli associated with plant defense as well as to different kinds of phytopathogens. Although rapid pathogen-induced AtWRKY33 expression does not require salicylic acid (SA) signaling, it is dependent on PAD4, a key regulator upstream of SA. Activation of AtWRKY33 is independent of de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that it is at least partly under negative regulatory control. We show that a set of three WRKY-specific cis-acting DNA elements (W boxes) within the AtWRKY33 promoter is required for efficient pathogen- or PAMP-triggered gene activation. This strongly indicates that WRKY transcription factors are major components of the regulatory machinery modulating immediate to early expression of this gene in response to pathogen attack.

  17. Capicua DNA-binding sites are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ajuria, Leiore; Nieva, Claudia; Winkler, Clint; Kuo, Dennis; Samper, Núria; Andreu, María José; Helman, Aharon; González-Crespo, Sergio; Paroush, Ze'ev; Courey, Albert J; Jiménez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling pathways play key functions in metazoan development, but how they control expression of downstream genes is not well understood. In Drosophila, it is generally assumed that most transcriptional responses to RTK signal activation depend on binding of Ets-family proteins to specific cis-acting sites in target enhancers. Here, we show that several Drosophila RTK pathways control expression of downstream genes through common octameric elements that are binding sites for the HMG-box factor Capicua, a transcriptional repressor that is downregulated by RTK signaling in different contexts. We show that Torso RTK-dependent regulation of terminal gap gene expression in the early embryo critically depends on Capicua octameric sites, and that binding of Capicua to these sites is essential for recruitment of the Groucho co-repressor to the huckebein enhancer in vivo. We then show that subsequent activation of the EGFR RTK pathway in the neuroectodermal region of the embryo controls dorsal-ventral gene expression by downregulating the Capicua protein, and that this control also depends on Capicua octameric motifs. Thus, a similar mechanism of RTK regulation operates during subdivision of the anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral embryonic axes. We also find that identical DNA octamers mediate Capicua-dependent regulation of another EGFR target in the developing wing. Remarkably, a simple combination of activator-binding sites and Capicua motifs is sufficient to establish complex patterns of gene expression in response to both Torso and EGFR activation in different tissues. We conclude that Capicua octamers are general response elements for RTK signaling in Drosophila.

  18. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Rahul; Beer, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix) rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  19. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space

    PubMed Central

    Karnik, Rahul; Beer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix) rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs. PMID:26465884

  20. The organization structure and regulatory elements of Chlamydomonas histone genes reveal features linking plant and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Fabry, S; Müller, K; Lindauer, A; Park, P B; Cornelius, T; Schmitt, R

    1995-09-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains approximately 15 gene clusters of the nucleosomal (or core) histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 genes and at least one histone H1 gene. Seven non-allelic histone gene loci were isolated from a genomic library, physically mapped, and the nucleotide sequences of three isotypes of each core histone gene species and one linked H1 gene determined. The core histone genes are organized in clusters of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 pairs, in which each gene pair shows outwardly divergent transcription from a short (< 300 bp) intercistronic region. These intercistronic regions contain typically conserved promoter elements, namely a TATA-box and the three motifs TGGCCAG-G(G/C)-CGAG, CGTTGACC and CGGTTG. Different from the genes of higher plants, but like those of animals and the related alga Volvox, the 3' untranslated regions contain no poly A signal, but a palindromic sequence (3' palindrome) essential for mRNA processing is present. One single H1 gene was found in close linkage to a H2A-H2B pair. The H1 upstream region contains the octameric promoter element GGTTGACC (also found upstream of the core histone genes) and two specific sequence motifs that are shared only with the Volvox H1 promoters. This suggests differential transcription of the H1 and the core histone genes. The H1 gene is interrupted by two introns. Unlike Volvox H3 genes, the three sequenced H3 isoforms are intron-free. Primer-directed PCR of genomic DNA demonstrated, however, that at least 8 of the about 15 H3 genes do contain one intron at a conserved position. In synchronized C. reinhardtii cells, H4 mRNA levels (representative of all core histone mRNAs) peak during cell division, suggesting strict replication-dependent gene control. The derived peptide sequences place C. reinhardtii core histones closer to plants than to animals, except that the H2A histones are more animal-like. The peptide sequence of histone H1 is closely related to the V. carteri VH1-II

  1. The organization structure and regulatory elements of Chlamydomonas histone genes reveal features linking plant and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Fabry, S; Müller, K; Lindauer, A; Park, P B; Cornelius, T; Schmitt, R

    1995-09-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains approximately 15 gene clusters of the nucleosomal (or core) histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 genes and at least one histone H1 gene. Seven non-allelic histone gene loci were isolated from a genomic library, physically mapped, and the nucleotide sequences of three isotypes of each core histone gene species and one linked H1 gene determined. The core histone genes are organized in clusters of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 pairs, in which each gene pair shows outwardly divergent transcription from a short (< 300 bp) intercistronic region. These intercistronic regions contain typically conserved promoter elements, namely a TATA-box and the three motifs TGGCCAG-G(G/C)-CGAG, CGTTGACC and CGGTTG. Different from the genes of higher plants, but like those of animals and the related alga Volvox, the 3' untranslated regions contain no poly A signal, but a palindromic sequence (3' palindrome) essential for mRNA processing is present. One single H1 gene was found in close linkage to a H2A-H2B pair. The H1 upstream region contains the octameric promoter element GGTTGACC (also found upstream of the core histone genes) and two specific sequence motifs that are shared only with the Volvox H1 promoters. This suggests differential transcription of the H1 and the core histone genes. The H1 gene is interrupted by two introns. Unlike Volvox H3 genes, the three sequenced H3 isoforms are intron-free. Primer-directed PCR of genomic DNA demonstrated, however, that at least 8 of the about 15 H3 genes do contain one intron at a conserved position. In synchronized C. reinhardtii cells, H4 mRNA levels (representative of all core histone mRNAs) peak during cell division, suggesting strict replication-dependent gene control. The derived peptide sequences place C. reinhardtii core histones closer to plants than to animals, except that the H2A histones are more animal-like. The peptide sequence of histone H1 is closely related to the V. carteri VH1-II

  2. Chromatin Heterogeneity and Distribution of Regulatory Elements in the Late-Replicating Intercalary Heterochromatin Domains of Drosophila melanogaster Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshko, Varvara A.; Levitsky, Viktor G.; Zykova, Tatyana Yu.; Antonenko, Oksana V.; Belyaeva, Elena S.; Zhimulev, Igor F.

    2016-01-01

    Late-replicating domains (intercalary heterochromatin) in the Drosophila genome display a number of features suggesting their organization is quite unique. Typically, they are quite large and encompass clusters of functionally unrelated tissue-specific genes. They correspond to the topologically associating domains and conserved microsynteny blocks. Our study aims at exploring further details of molecular organization of intercalary heterochromatin and has uncovered surprising heterogeneity of chromatin composition in these regions. Using the 4HMM model developed in our group earlier, intercalary heterochromatin regions were found to host chromatin fragments with a particular epigenetic profile. Aquamarine chromatin fragments (spanning 0.67% of late-replicating regions) are characterized as a class of sequences that appear heterogeneous in terms of their decompactization. These fragments are enriched with enhancer sequences and binding sites for insulator proteins. They likely mark the chromatin state that is related to the binding of cis-regulatory proteins. Malachite chromatin fragments (11% of late-replicating regions) appear to function as universal transitional regions between two contrasting chromatin states. Namely, they invariably delimit intercalary heterochromatin regions from the adjacent active chromatin of interbands. Malachite fragments also flank aquamarine fragments embedded in the repressed chromatin of late-replicating regions. Significant enrichment of insulator proteins CP190, SU(HW), and MOD2.2 was observed in malachite chromatin. Neither aquamarine nor malachite chromatin types appear to correlate with the positions of highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE) that are typically replete in intercalary heterochromatin. Malachite chromatin found on the flanks of intercalary heterochromatin regions tends to replicate earlier than the malachite chromatin embedded in intercalary heterochromatin. In other words, there exists a gradient of

  3. Chromatin Heterogeneity and Distribution of Regulatory Elements in the Late-Replicating Intercalary Heterochromatin Domains of Drosophila melanogaster Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Khoroshko, Varvara A; Levitsky, Viktor G; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Antonenko, Oksana V; Belyaeva, Elena S; Zhimulev, Igor F

    2016-01-01

    Late-replicating domains (intercalary heterochromatin) in the Drosophila genome display a number of features suggesting their organization is quite unique. Typically, they are quite large and encompass clusters of functionally unrelated tissue-specific genes. They correspond to the topologically associating domains and conserved microsynteny blocks. Our study aims at exploring further details of molecular organization of intercalary heterochromatin and has uncovered surprising heterogeneity of chromatin composition in these regions. Using the 4HMM model developed in our group earlier, intercalary heterochromatin regions were found to host chromatin fragments with a particular epigenetic profile. Aquamarine chromatin fragments (spanning 0.67% of late-replicating regions) are characterized as a class of sequences that appear heterogeneous in terms of their decompactization. These fragments are enriched with enhancer sequences and binding sites for insulator proteins. They likely mark the chromatin state that is related to the binding of cis-regulatory proteins. Malachite chromatin fragments (11% of late-replicating regions) appear to function as universal transitional regions between two contrasting chromatin states. Namely, they invariably delimit intercalary heterochromatin regions from the adjacent active chromatin of interbands. Malachite fragments also flank aquamarine fragments embedded in the repressed chromatin of late-replicating regions. Significant enrichment of insulator proteins CP190, SU(HW), and MOD2.2 was observed in malachite chromatin. Neither aquamarine nor malachite chromatin types appear to correlate with the positions of highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNE) that are typically replete in intercalary heterochromatin. Malachite chromatin found on the flanks of intercalary heterochromatin regions tends to replicate earlier than the malachite chromatin embedded in intercalary heterochromatin. In other words, there exists a gradient of

  4. An active DNA transposon nDart causing leaf variegation and mutable dwarfism and its related elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsugane, Kazuo; Maekawa, Masahiko; Takagi, Kyoko; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Qian, Qian; Eun, Chang-Ho; Iida, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    While characterized mutable alleles caused by DNA transposons have been abundant in maize since the discovery of Dissociation conferring variegation by Barbara McClintock, only a few mutable alleles have been described in rice even though the rice genome contains various transposons. Here, we show that a spontaneous mutable virescent allele, pyl-v, is caused by the disruption of the nuclear-coded essential chloroplast protease gene, OsClpP5, due to insertion of a 607-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, non-autonomous DNA-based active rice transposon one (nDart1), belonging to the hAT superfamily. The transposition of nDart1 can be induced by crossing with a line containing an autonomous element, aDart, and stabilized by segregating out of aDart. We also identified a novel mutable dwarf allele thl-m caused by an insertion of nDart1. The japonica cultivar Nipponbare carries no aDart, although it contains epigenetically silenced Dart element(s), which can be activated by 5-azacytidine. Nipponbare bears four subgroups of about 3.6-kb Dart-like sequences, three of which contain potential transposase genes, and around 3.6-kb elements without an apparent transposase gene, as well as three subgroups of about 0.6-kb nDart1-related elements that are all internal deletions of the Dart-like sequences. Both nDart1 and 3.6-kb Dart-like elements were also present in indica varieties 93-11 and Kasalath. nDart1 appears to be the most active mutagen among nDart1-related elements contributing to generating natural variations. A candidate for an autonomous element, aDart, and a possible application of nDart1 for transposon tagging are discussed. PMID:16367953

  5. An active DNA transposon nDart causing leaf variegation and mutable dwarfism and its related elements in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsugane, Kazuo; Maekawa, Masahiko; Takagi, Kyoko; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Qian, Qian; Eun, Chang-Ho; Iida, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    While characterized mutable alleles caused by DNA transposons have been abundant in maize since the discovery of Dissociation conferring variegation by Barbara McClintock, only a few mutable alleles have been described in rice even though the rice genome contains various transposons. Here, we show that a spontaneous mutable virescent allele, pyl-v, is caused by the disruption of the nuclear-coded essential chloroplast protease gene, OsClpP5, due to insertion of a 607-bp non-autonomous DNA transposon, non-autonomous DNA-based active rice transposon one (nDart1), belonging to the hAT superfamily. The transposition of nDart1 can be induced by crossing with a line containing an autonomous element, aDart, and stabilized by segregating out of aDart. We also identified a novel mutable dwarf allele thl-m caused by an insertion of nDart1. The japonica cultivar Nipponbare carries no aDart, although it contains epigenetically silenced Dart element(s), which can be activated by 5-azacytidine. Nipponbare bears four subgroups of about 3.6-kb Dart-like sequences, three of which contain potential transposase genes, and around 3.6-kb elements without an apparent transposase gene, as well as three subgroups of about 0.6-kb nDart1-related elements that are all internal deletions of the Dart-like sequences. Both nDart1 and 3.6-kb Dart-like elements were also present in indica varieties 93-11 and Kasalath. nDart1 appears to be the most active mutagen among nDart1-related elements contributing to generating natural variations. A candidate for an autonomous element, aDart, and a possible application of nDart1 for transposon tagging are discussed.

  6. A baculovirus photolyase with DNA repair activity and circadian clock regulatory function.

    PubMed

    Biernat, Magdalena A; Eker, André P M; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Chaves, Inês

    2012-02-01

    Cryptochromes and photolyases belong to the same family of flavoproteins but, despite being structurally conserved, display distinct functions. Photolyases use visible light to repair ultraviolet-induced DNA damage. Cryptochromes, however, function as blue-light receptors, circadian photoreceptors, or repressors of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer, the transcription activator controlling the molecular circadian clock. Here, we present evidence that the functional divergence between cryptochromes and photolyases is not so univocal. Chrysodeixis chalcites nucleopolyhedrovirus possesses 2 photolyase-like genes: phr1 and phr2. We show that PHR1 and PHR2 are able to bind the CLOCK protein. Only for PHR2, however, the physical interaction with CLOCK represses CLOCK/BMAL1-driven transcription. This result shows that binding of photolyase per se is not sufficient to inhibit the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer. PHR2, furthermore, affects the oscillation of immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts, suggesting that PHR2 can regulate the molecular circadian clock. These findings are relevant for further understanding the evolution of cryptochromes and photolyases as well as behavioral changes induced in insects by baculoviruses. PMID:22306969

  7. Hundreds of Circular Novel Plasmids and DNA Elements Identified in a Rat Cecum Metamobilome

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Tue Sparholt; Xu, Zhuofei; Hansen, Martin Asser; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches are widespread in microbiological research, but so far, the knowledge on extrachromosomal DNA diversity and composition has largely remained dependant on cultivating host organisms. Even with the emergence of metagenomics, complete circular sequences are rarely identified, and have required manual curation. We propose a robust in silico procedure for identifying complete small plasmids in metagenomic datasets from whole genome shotgun sequencing. From one very pure and exhaustively sequenced metamobilome from rat cecum, we identified a total of 616 circular sequences, 160 of which were carrying a gene with plasmid replication domain. Further homology analyses indicated that the majority of these plasmid sequences are novel. We confirmed the circularity of the complete plasmid candidates using an inverse-type PCR approach on a subset of sequences with 95% success, confirming the existence and length of discrete sequences. The implication of these findings is a broadened understanding of the traits of circular elements in nature and the possibility of massive data mining in existing metagenomic datasets to discover novel pools of complete plasmids thus vastly expanding the current plasmid database. PMID:24503942

  8. Fine-scale map of encyclopedia of DNA elements regions in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeon-Kyeong; Ke, Xiayi; Hong, Sungwoo; Jang, Hye-Yoon; Park, Kyunghee; Kim, Sook; Ahn, TaeJin; Lee, Yeun-Du; Song, Okryeol; Rho, Na-Young; Lee, Moon Sue; Lee, Yeon-Su; Kim, Jaeheup; Kim, Young J; Yang, Jun-Mo; Song, Kyuyoung; Kimm, Kyuchan; Weir, Bruce; Cardon, Lon R; Lee, Jong-Eun; Hwang, Jung-Joo

    2006-09-01

    The International HapMap Project aims to generate detailed human genome variation maps by densely genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CEPH, Chinese, Japanese, and Yoruba samples. This will undoubtedly become an important facility for genetic studies of diseases and complex traits in the four populations. To address how the genetic information contained in such variation maps is transferable to other populations, the Korean government, industries, and academics have launched the Korean HapMap project to genotype high-density Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) regions in 90 Korean individuals. Here we show that the LD pattern, block structure, haplotype diversity, and recombination rate are highly concordant between Korean and the two HapMap Asian samples, particularly Japanese. The availability of information from both Chinese and Japanese samples helps to predict more accurately the possible performance of HapMap markers in Korean disease-gene studies. Tagging SNPs selected from the two HapMap Asian maps, especially the Japanese map, were shown to be very effective for Korean samples. These results demonstrate that the HapMap variation maps are robust in related populations and will serve as an important resource for the studies of the Korean population in particular.

  9. A novel cis-acting element required for DNA damage-inducible expression of yeast DIN7

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitani, Ayako; Yoshida, Minoru; Ling Feng

    2008-01-04

    Din7 is a DNA damage-inducible mitochondrial nuclease that modulates the stability of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. How DIN7 gene expression is regulated, however, has remained largely unclear. Using promoter sequence alignment, we found a highly conserved 19-bp sequence in the promoter regions of DIN7 and NTG1, which encodes an oxidative stress-inducible base-excision-repair enzyme. Deletion of the 19-bp sequence markedly reduced the hydroxyurea (HU)-enhanced DIN7 promoter activity. In addition, nuclear fractions prepared from HU-treated cells were used in in vitro band shift assays to reveal the presence of currently unidentified trans-acting factor(s) that preferentially bound to the 19-bp region. These results suggest that the 19-bp sequence is a novel cis-acting element that is required for the regulation of DIN7 expression in response to HU-induced DNA damage.

  10. The adeno-associated virus major regulatory protein Rep78-c-Jun-DNA motif complex modulates AP-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C Krishna; Meyers, Craig; Zhan, De-Jin; You, Hong; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mehta, Jawahar L; Liu, Yong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2003-09-15

    Multiple epidemiologic studies show that adeno-associated virus (AAV) is negatively associated with cervical cancer (CX CA), a cancer which is positively associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Mechanisms for this correlation may be by Rep78's (AAV's major regulatory protein) ability to bind the HPV-16 p97 promoter DNA and inhibit transcription, to bind and interfere with the functions of the E7 oncoprotein of HPV-16, and to bind a variety of HPV-important cellular transcription factors such as Sp1 and TBP. c-Jun is another important cellular factor intimately linked to the HPV life cycle, as well as keratinocyte differentiation and skin development. Skin is the natural host tissue for both HPV and AAV. In this article it is demonstrated that Rep78 directly interacts with c-Jun, both in vitro and in vivo, as analyzed by Western blot, yeast two-hybrid cDNA, and electrophoretic mobility shift-supershift assay (EMSA supershift). Addition of anti-Rep78 antibodies inhibited the EMSA supershift. Investigating the biological implications of this interaction, Rep78 inhibited the c-Jun-dependent c-jun promoter in transient and stable chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assays. Rep78 also inhibited c-Jun-augmented c-jun promoter as well as the HPV-16 p97 promoter activity (also c-Jun regulated) in in vitro transcription assays in T47D nuclear extracts. Finally, the Rep78-c-Jun interaction mapped to the amino-half of Rep78. The ability of Rep78 to interact with c-Jun and down-regulate AP-1-dependent transcription suggests one more mechanism by which AAV may modulate the HPV life cycle and the carcinogenesis process.

  11. Evolution in the block: common elements of 5S rDNA organization and evolutionary patterns in distant fish genera.

    PubMed

    Campo, Daniel; García-Vázquez, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The 5S rDNA is organized in the genome as tandemly repeated copies of a structural unit composed of a coding sequence plus a nontranscribed spacer (NTS). The coding region is highly conserved in the evolution, whereas the NTS vary in both length and sequence. It has been proposed that 5S rRNA genes are members of a gene family that have arisen through concerted evolution. In this study, we describe the molecular organization and evolution of the 5S rDNA in the genera Lepidorhombus and Scophthalmus (Scophthalmidae) and compared it with already known 5S rDNA of the very different genera Merluccius (Merluccidae) and Salmo (Salmoninae), to identify common structural elements or patterns for understanding 5S rDNA evolution in fish. High intra- and interspecific diversity within the 5S rDNA family in all the genera can be explained by a combination of duplications, deletions, and transposition events. Sequence blocks with high similarity in all the 5S rDNA members across species were identified for the four studied genera, with evidences of intense gene conversion within noncoding regions. We propose a model to explain the evolution of the 5S rDNA, in which the evolutionary units are blocks of nucleotides rather than the entire sequences or single nucleotides. This model implies a "two-speed" evolution: slow within blocks (homogenized by recombination) and fast within the gene family (diversified by duplications and deletions).

  12. Regulatory elements in the first intron contribute to transcriptional regulation of the beta 3 tubulin gene by 20-hydroxyecdysone in Drosophila Kc cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bruhat, A; Tourmente, S; Chapel, S; Sobrier, M L; Couderc, J L; Dastugue, B

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the transcriptional regulation of the beta 3 tubulin gene by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-OH-E) in Drosophila Kc cells. A series of hybrid genes with varying tubulin gene lengths driving the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene were constructed. The promoter activity was assayed after transient expression in Kc cells, in the presence or absence of 20-OH-E. We find that 0.91Kb upstream from the transcription start site contain one or several hormone independent positive cis-acting elements, responsible for the constitutive expression of the beta 3 tubulin gene. In the large (4.5 Kb) first intron of this gene, we identified additional hormone dependent negative and positive regulatory elements, which can act in both directions and in a position-independence manner. Then, the negative intron element(s), which repress the transcription in the absence of 20-OH-E has characteristics of silencer. Images PMID:2349088

  13. Variant upstream regulatory region sequences differentially regulate human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication throughout the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Walter G

    2005-05-01

    While the central role of the viral upstream regulatory region (URR) in the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle has been well established, its effects on viral replication factor expression and plasmid replication of HPV type 16 (HPV16) remain unclear. Some nonprototypic variants of HPV16 contain altered URR sequences and are considered to increase the oncogenic risk of infections. To determine the relationship between viral replication and variant URRs, hybrid viral genomes were constructed with the replication-competent HPV16 prototype W12 and analyzed in assays which recapitulate the different phases of normal viral replication. The establishment efficiencies of hybrid HPV16 genomes differed about 20-fold among European prototypes and variants from Africa and America. Generally, European and African genomes exhibited the lowest replication efficiencies. The high replication levels observed with American variants were primarily attributable to their efficient expression of the replication factors E1 and E2. The maintenance levels of these viral genomes varied about fivefold, which correlated with their respective establishment phenotypes and published P(97) activities. Vegetative DNA amplification could also be observed with replicating HPV16 genomes. These results indicate that efficient E1/E2 expression and elevated plasmid replication levels during the persistent stage of infection may comprise a risk factor in HPV16-mediated oncogenesis.

  14. Missense and silent tau gene mutations cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-chromosome 17 type, by affecting multiple alternative RNA splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, I; Poorkaj, P; Hong, M; Nochlin, D; Lee, V M; Bird, T D; Schellenberg, G D

    1999-05-11

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism, chromosome 17 type (FTDP-17) is caused by mutations in the tau gene, and the signature lesions of FTDP-17 are filamentous tau inclusions. Tau mutations may be pathogenic either by altering protein function or gene regulation. Here we show that missense, silent, and intronic tau mutations can increase or decrease splicing of tau exon 10 (E10) by acting on 3 different cis-acting regulatory elements. These elements include an exon splicing enhancer that can either be strengthened (mutation N279(K)) or destroyed (mutation Delta280(K)), resulting in either constitutive E10 inclusion or the exclusion of E10 from tau transcripts. E10 contains a second regulatory element that is an exon splicing silencer, the function of which is abolished by a silent FTDP-17 mutation (L284(L)), resulting in excess E10 inclusion. A third element inhibiting E10 splicing is contained in the intronic sequences directly flanking the 5' splice site of E10 and intronic FTDP-17 mutations in this element enhance E10 inclusion. Thus, tau mutations cause FTDP-17 by multiple pathological mechanisms, which may explain the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in FTDP-17, as exemplified by an unusual family described here with tau pathology as well as amyloid and neuritic plaques.

  15. Structural and dynamic basis of a supercoiling-responsive DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Hun; Yun, Sang Hoon; Sun, Dawei; Lim, Heon M.; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2006-01-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, negative supercoiling of chromosomal DNA acts locally to regulate a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription, replication, recombination and response to environmental stresses. While studying the interaction between the Hin recombinase and mutated versions of its cognate DNA-binding site, we identified a mutated DNA site that binds Hin only when the DNA is supercoiled. To understand the mechanism of this supercoiling-responsive DNA site, we used NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine the solution structures and dynamics of three related DNA oligonucleotides. The supercoiling-responsive DNA site formed a partially unwound and stretched helix and showed significant flexibility and base pair opening kinetics. The single CAG/CTG triplet contained in this DNA sequence displayed the same characteristics as do multiple CAG/CTG repeats, which are associated with several hereditary neuromuscular diseases. It is known that short DNA sequence motifs that have either very high or low bending flexibility occur preferentially at supercoiling-sensitive bacterial and eukaryotic promoters. From our results and these previous data, we propose a model in which supercoiling utilizes the intrinsic flexibility of a short DNA site to switch the local DNA structure from an inefficient conformation for protein binding to an efficient one, or vice versa. PMID:16414956

  16. Genetic flexibility of regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Alexander; Tuboly, Csaba; Horváth, Péter; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-07-20

    Gene regulatory networks are based on simple building blocks such as promoters, transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites on DNA. But how diverse are the functions that can be obtained by different arrangements of promoters and TF binding sites? In this work we constructed synthetic regulatory regions using promoter elements and binding sites of two noninteracting TFs, each sensing a single environmental input signal. We show that simply by combining these three kinds of elements, we can obtain 11 of the 16 Boolean logic gates that integrate two environmental signals in vivo. Further, we demonstrate how combination of logic gates can result in new logic functions. Our results suggest that simple elements of transcription regulation form a highly flexible toolbox that can generate diverse functions under natural selection.

  17. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells responding

  18. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  19. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A.; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J.; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells

  20. Cytoplasmic DNA synthesis in Amoeba proteus. I. On the particulate nature of the DNA-containing elements.

    PubMed

    RABINOVITCH, M; PLAUT, W

    1962-12-01

    The incorporation of tritiated thymidine in Amoeba proteus was reinvestigated in order to see if it could be associated with microscopically detectable structures. Staining experiments with basic dyes, including the fluorochrome acridine orange, revealed the presence of large numbers of 0.3 to 0.5 micro particles in the cytoplasm of all cells studied. The effect of nuclease digestion on the dye affinity of the particles suggests that they contain DNA as well as RNA. Centrifugation of living cells at 10,000 g leads to the sedimentation of the particles in the centrifugal third of the ameba near the nucleus. Analysis of centrifuged cells which had been incubated with H(3)-thymidine showed a very high degree of correlation between the location of the nucleic acid-containing granules and that of acid-insoluble, deoxyribonuclease-sensitive labeled molecules and leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic DNA synthesis in Amoeba proteus occurs in association with these particles.

  1. Essential role of the iron-sulfur cluster binding domain of the primase regulatory subunit Pri2 in DNA replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Huang, Mingxia

    2015-03-01

    DNA primase catalyzes de novo synthesis of a short RNA primer that is further extended by replicative DNA polymerases during initiation of DNA replication. The eukaryotic primase is a heterodimeric enzyme comprising a catalytic subunit Pri1 and a regulatory subunit Pri2. Pri2 is responsible for facilitating optimal RNA primer synthesis by Pri1 and mediating interaction between Pri1 and DNA polymerase α for transition from RNA synthesis to DNA elongation. All eukaryotic Pri2 proteins contain a conserved C-terminal iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster-binding domain that is critical for primase catalytic activity in vitro. Here we show that mutations at conserved cysteine ligands for the Pri2 Fe-S cluster markedly decrease the protein stability, thereby causing S phase arrest at the restrictive temperature. Furthermore, Pri2 cysteine mutants are defective in loading of the entire DNA pol α-primase complex onto early replication origins resulting in defective initiation. Importantly, assembly of the Fe-S cluster in Pri2 is impaired not only by mutations at the conserved cysteine ligands but also by increased oxidative stress in the sod1Δ mutant lacking the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase. Together these findings highlight the critical role of Pri2's Fe-S cluster domain in replication initiation in vivo and suggest a molecular basis for how DNA replication can be influenced by changes in cellular redox state.

  2. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into autosomal sequences: role for DNA elements, chromatin features and chromosomal domains.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Allison M; Chen, Chih-Yu; Lam, Lucia L; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Kobor, Michael S; Brown, Carolyn J

    2014-03-01

    X-chromosome inactivation results in dosage equivalence between the X chromosome in males and females; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes escape silencing and these genes are enriched on the evolutionarily younger short arm of the X chromosome. The spread of inactivation onto translocated autosomal material allows the study of inactivation without the confounding evolutionary history of the X chromosome. The heterogeneity and reduced extent of silencing on autosomes are evidence for the importance of DNA elements underlying the spread of silencing. We have assessed DNA methylation in six unbalanced X-autosome translocations using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array. Two to 42% of translocated autosomal genes showed this mark of silencing, with the highest degree of inactivation observed for trisomic autosomal regions. Generally, the extent of silencing was greatest close to the translocation breakpoint; however, silencing was detected well over 100 kb into the autosomal DNA. Alu elements were found to be enriched at autosomal genes that escaped from inactivation while L1s were enriched at subject genes. In cells without the translocation, there was enrichment of heterochromatic features such as EZH2 and H3K27me3 for those genes that become silenced when translocated, suggesting that underlying chromatin structure predisposes genes towards silencing. Additionally, the analysis of topological domains indicated physical clustering of autosomal genes of common inactivation status. Overall, our analysis indicated a complex interaction between DNA sequence, chromatin features and the three-dimensional structure of the chromosome. PMID:24158853

  3. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into autosomal sequences: role for DNA elements, chromatin features and chromosomal domains

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Allison M.; Chen, Chih-Yu; Lam, Lucia L.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Kobor, Michael S.; Brown, Carolyn J.

    2014-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation results in dosage equivalence between the X chromosome in males and females; however, over 15% of human X-linked genes escape silencing and these genes are enriched on the evolutionarily younger short arm of the X chromosome. The spread of inactivation onto translocated autosomal material allows the study of inactivation without the confounding evolutionary history of the X chromosome. The heterogeneity and reduced extent of silencing on autosomes are evidence for the importance of DNA elements underlying the spread of silencing. We have assessed DNA methylation in six unbalanced X-autosome translocations using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 array. Two to 42% of translocated autosomal genes showed this mark of silencing, with the highest degree of inactivation observed for trisomic autosomal regions. Generally, the extent of silencing was greatest close to the translocation breakpoint; however, silencing was detected well over 100 kb into the autosomal DNA. Alu elements were found to be enriched at autosomal genes that escaped from inactivation while L1s were enriched at subject genes. In cells without the translocation, there was enrichment of heterochromatic features such as EZH2 and H3K27me3 for those genes that become silenced when translocated, suggesting that underlying chromatin structure predisposes genes towards silencing. Additionally, the analysis of topological domains indicated physical clustering of autosomal genes of common inactivation status. Overall, our analysis indicated a complex interaction between DNA sequence, chromatin features and the three-dimensional structure of the chromosome. PMID:24158853

  4. Self-assembly of an oligodeoxyribonucleotide harboring the estrogen response element in the presence of polyamines: ionic, structural, and DNA sequence specificity effects.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S; Thomas, T J; Shirahata, A; Thomas, T

    2000-01-01

    Estrogenic regulation of gene expression is mediated by the binding of the hormone to its specific receptor, estrogen receptor (ER), which undergoes structural and conformational alterations to recognize specific DNA sequences, estrogen response elements (ERE), in responsive genes to trigger a series of events culminating in the transcription of these genes. Polyamines are ubiquitous cellular cations that are important for cell growth and differentiation, and have been shown to participate in estrogenic regulation of gene expression. Polyamine-mediated DNA condensation/aggregation has been studied to understand the ionic and structural requirements for the compaction of DNA. DNA condensation/decondensation may also play a role in transcription and replication. We studied the aggregation of a 38-mer oligonucleotide duplex (ODN) in the presence of natural and synthetic polyamines under different ionic conditions (NaCl, KCl, and K glutamate). Our results showed that an ODN harboring the consensus ERE (ODN1) was 2-fold more susceptible to precipitation by spermine compared to ODN2 containing scrambled sequences, or a mutant ODN (ODN3). The nature of the monovalent cations (Na+ vs K+), and anions (Cl- vs glutamate) also played an important role in the efficacy of a polyamine to precipitate ODNs: potassium glutamate being the least effective in suppressing the ability of spermine to precipitate ODNs. The concentration of polyamines required for precipitating the ODNs increased with monovalent ion concentration in the buffer. With ODN1, a plot of log[spermine4+] at the 50% precipitation concentrations against log[Na+/K+] yielded a straight line, with a slope of 1.8 +/- 0.18, a value comparable to that predicted by the counterion condensation theory (1.85). We also observed significant structural specificity effects of spermine and its analogues [NH2(CH2)3NH(CH2)nNH(CH2)3NH2, where n = 2-9; n = 4 for spermine] on aggregating the ODN1. These results demonstrate DNA sequence

  5. Separate elements of the TERMINAL FLOWER 1 cis-regulatory region integrate pathways to control flowering time and shoot meristem identity.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Fernández-Nohales, Pedro; Doménech, María J; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Bradley, Desmond; Madueño, Francisco

    2016-09-15

    TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is a key regulator of Arabidopsis plant architecture that responds to developmental and environmental signals to control flowering time and the fate of shoot meristems. TFL1 expression is dynamic, being found in all shoot meristems, but not in floral meristems, with the level and distribution changing throughout development. Using a variety of experimental approaches we have analysed the TFL1 promoter to elucidate its functional structure. TFL1 expression is based on distinct cis-regulatory regions, the most important being located 3' of the coding sequence. Our results indicate that TFL1 expression in the shoot apical versus lateral inflorescence meristems is controlled through distinct cis-regulatory elements, suggesting that different signals control expression in these meristem types. Moreover, we identified a cis-regulatory region necessary for TFL1 expression in the vegetative shoot and required for a wild-type flowering time, supporting that TFL1 expression in the vegetative meristem controls flowering time. Our study provides a model for the functional organisation of TFL1 cis-regulatory regions, contributing to our understanding of how developmental pathways are integrated at the genomic level of a key regulator to control plant architecture. PMID:27385013

  6. Separate elements of the TERMINAL FLOWER 1 cis-regulatory region integrate pathways to control flowering time and shoot meristem identity.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Mislata, Antonio; Fernández-Nohales, Pedro; Doménech, María J; Hanzawa, Yoshie; Bradley, Desmond; Madueño, Francisco

    2016-09-15

    TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) is a key regulator of Arabidopsis plant architecture that responds to developmental and environmental signals to control flowering time and the fate of shoot meristems. TFL1 expression is dynamic, being found in all shoot meristems, but not in floral meristems, with the level and distribution changing throughout development. Using a variety of experimental approaches we have analysed the TFL1 promoter to elucidate its functional structure. TFL1 expression is based on distinct cis-regulatory regions, the most important being located 3' of the coding sequence. Our results indicate that TFL1 expression in the shoot apical versus lateral inflorescence meristems is controlled through distinct cis-regulatory elements, suggesting that different signals control expression in these meristem types. Moreover, we identified a cis-regulatory region necessary for TFL1 expression in the vegetative shoot and required for a wild-type flowering time, supporting that TFL1 expression in the vegetative meristem controls flowering time. Our study provides a model for the functional organisation of TFL1 cis-regulatory regions, contributing to our understanding of how developmental pathways are integrated at the genomic level of a key regulator to control plant architecture.

  7. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  8. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  9. Evolutionarily conserved and conformationally constrained short peptides might serve as DNA recognition elements in intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Nitish; Choudhary, Preeti; Pandit, Shashi B; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh

    2014-06-01

    Despite recent advances, it is yet not clear how intrinsically disordered regions in proteins recognize their targets without any defined structures. Short linear motifs had been proposed to mediate molecular recognition by disordered regions; however, the underlying structural prerequisite remains elusive. Moreover, the role of short linear motifs in DNA recognition has not been studied. We report a repertoire of short evolutionarily Conserved Recognition Elements (CoREs) in long intrinsically disordered regions, which have very distinct amino-acid propensities from those of known motifs, and exhibit a strong tendency to retain their three-dimensional conformations compared to adjacent regions. The majority of CoREs directly interact with the DNA in the available 3D structures, which is further supported by literature evidence, analyses of ΔΔG values of DNA-binding energies and threading-based prediction of DNA binding potential. CoREs were enriched in cancer-associated missense mutations, further strengthening their functional nature. Significant enrichment of glycines in CoREs and the preference of glycyl ϕ-Ψ values within the left-handed bridge range in the l-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot suggest that Gly-to-nonGly mutations within CoREs might alter the backbone conformation and consequently the function, a hypothesis that we reconciled using available mutation data. We conclude that CoREs might serve as bait for DNA recognition by long disordered regions and that certain mutations in these peptides can disrupt their DNA binding potential and consequently the protein function. We further hypothesize that the preferred conformations of CoREs and of glycyl residues therein might play an important role in DNA binding. The highly ordered nature of CoREs hints at a therapeutic strategy to inhibit malicious molecular interactions using small molecules mimicking CoRE conformations.

  10. Enhanced efficiency of P-element mediated transgenesis in Drosophila: Microinjection of DNA complexed with nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Sonane, Madhavi; Goyal, Ritu; Chowdhuri, Debapratim K; Ram, Kristipati Ravi; Gupta, Kailash C

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of genetic transformation technology to generate stable transgenics depends upon the successful delivery of plasmid DNA in embryonic cells. The available gene vectors facilitate efficient plasmid DNA delivery to the cellular milieu but are exposed to nuclease degradation. Recent in vitro studies suggest encapsulation of plasmid DNA with nanomaterial(s) for better protection against nucleases. Therefore, in this study, we tested if complexing of free plasmid DNA with linear polyethylenimine (LPEI, 25 kDa) based nanoparticle (LPN) enhances the efficiency of transformation (transgenesis) by using Drosophila based germ-line transformation technology. Here, we show that the LPN-DNA complex not only enhances the efficiency of this transgenic technology at a DNA concentration of 0.04 μg/μl but also reduces the DNA quantity required to generate transgenics by ten folds. This approach has potential applications for other types of transgenesis and nucleic acid injection methods in Drosophila as well as other popular genetic model systems.

  11. Architecture and DNA recognition elements of the Fanconi anemia FANCM-FAAP24 complex.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Rachel; Deans, Andrew J; Swuec, Paolo; Bowles, Maureen; Costa, Alessandro; West, Stephen C; McDonald, Neil Q

    2013-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a disorder associated with a failure in DNA repair. FANCM (defective in FA complementation group M) and its partner FAAP24 target other FA proteins to sites of DNA damage. FANCM-FAAP24 is related to XPF/MUS81 endonucleases but lacks endonucleolytic activity. We report a structure of an FANCM C-terminal fragment (FANCMCTD) bound to FAAP24 and DNA. This S-shaped structure reveals the FANCM (HhH)2 domain is buried, whereas the FAAP24 (HhH)2 domain engages DNA. We identify a second DNA contact and a metal center within the FANCM pseudo-nuclease domain and demonstrate that mutations in either region impair double-stranded DNA binding in vitro and FANCM-FAAP24 function in vivo. We show the FANCM translocase domain lies in proximity to FANCMCTD by electron microscopy and that binding fork DNA structures stimulate its ATPase activity. This suggests a tracking model for FANCM-FAAP24 until an encounter with a stalled replication fork triggers ATPase-mediated fork remodeling. PMID:23932590

  12. Identification of novel regulatory NFAT and TFII-I binding elements in the calbindin-D28k promoter in response to serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Hajibeigi, Asghar; Dioum, Elhadji M; Guo, Jianfei; Öz, Orhan K

    2015-09-25

    Calbindin-D28k, a key regulator of calcium homeostasis plays a cytoprotective role in various tissues. We used serum free (SFM) and charcoal stripped serum (csFBS) culture media as models of cellular stress to modulate calbindin D28k expression and identify regulatory cis-elements and trans-acting factors in kidney and beta cells. The murine calbindin-D28k promoter activity was significantly upregulated under SFM or csFBS condition. Promoter analysis revealed evolutionary conserved regulatory cis-elements and deletion of 23 nt from +117/+139 as critical for basal transcription. Bioinformatics analysis of the promoter revealed conserved NFAT and TFII regulators elements. Forced expression of NFAT stimulated promoter activity. Inhibition of NFAT transcriptional activity by FK506 attenuated calbindin-D28k expression. TFII-I was shown to be necessary for basal promoter activity and to act cooperatively with NFAT. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, NFAT was shown to bind to both proximal and distal promoter regions. ChIP assays also revealed recruitment of TFII to the -36/+139 region. Knockdown of TFII-I decreased promoter activity. In summary, calbindin-D28k expression during serum deprivation is partly regulated by NFAT and TF-II. This regulation may be important in vivo during ischemia and growth factor withdrawal to regulate cellular function and maintenance.

  13. Heavy-ion radiation induces both activation of multiple endogenous transposable elements and alterations in DNA methylation in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Xishan; Xiaolin, Cui; Li, Xiang

    2012-07-01

    Space radiation represents a complex environmental condition in which several interacting factors such as electron, neutron, proton, heavy-ion are involved, which may provoke stress responses and jeopardize genome integrity. Given the inherent property of epigenetic modifications to respond to intrinsic aswell as external perturbations, it is conceivable that epigenetic markers like DNA methylation and transposition may undergo alterations in response to space radiation. Cytosine DNA methylation plays important roles in maintaining genome stability and controlling gene expression. A predominant means for Transposable elements (TEs) to cause genetic instability is via their transpositional activation. To find the detailed molecular characterization of the nature of genomic changes induced by space radiation, the seeds of rice were exposed to 0.02, 0.2, 1, 2 and 20 Gy dose of ^{12}C heavy-ion radiation, respectively. We found that extensive alteration in both DNA methylation and gene expression occurred in rice plants after different dose of heavy-ion radiation. Here we shown that heavy-ion radiation has induced transposition of mPing and Tos17 in rice, which belong to distinct classes including the miniature inverted terminal repeat TEs (MITEs) and long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, respectively. mPing and Tos17 mobility were found to correlate with cytosine methylation alteration detected by MSAP and genetic variation detected by AFLP. The result showed that at least in some cases transposition of TEs was associated with cytosine demethylation within the elements. Our results implicate that the heavy-ion radiation represents a potent mutagenic agent that can cause genomic instabilities by eliciting transposition of endogenous TEs in rice. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation, DNA methylation, Transposable elements, mPing, Tos17

  14. Massively parallel quantification of the regulatory effects of noncoding genetic variation in a human cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vockley, Christopher M.; Guo, Cong; Majoros, William H.; Nodzenski, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Lowe, William L.; Reddy, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel high-throughput method to empirically quantify individual-specific regulatory element activity at the population scale. The approach combines targeted DNA capture with a high-throughput reporter gene expression assay. As demonstration, we measured the activity of more than 100 putative regulatory elements from 95 individuals in a single experiment. In agreement with previous reports, we found that most genetic variants have weak effects on distal regulatory element activity. Because haplotypes are typically maintained within but not between assayed regulatory elements, the approach can be used to identify causal regulatory haplotypes that likely contribute to human phenotypes. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the method to functionally fine map causal regulatory variants in regions of high linkage disequilibrium identified by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses. PMID:26084464

  15. CYTOPLASMIC DNA SYNTHESIS IN AMOEBA PROTEUS. 3. FURTHER STUDIES ON THE NATURE OF THE DNA--CONTAINING ELEMENTS.

    PubMed

    WOLSTENHOLME, D R; PLAUT, W

    1964-09-01

    The application of electron microscope autoradiography to Amoeba proteus cells labeled with tritiated thymidine has permitted the identification of morphologically distinct particles in the cytoplasm as the sites of incorporated DNA precursor. The particles correspond to those previously described from light microscope studies, with respect to both H(3)Tdr incorporation and distribution in centrifugally stratified amoebae. Ingested bacteria differ from the particles, in morphology as well as in the absence of associated label. Attempts to introduce a normal particle labeling pattern by incubating amoebae with labeled sediment derived from used amoeba medium failed. The resultant conclusion, that the particles are maintained in the amoeba by self-duplication, is supported by the presence of particles in configurations suggestive of division.

  16. Identification of a regulatory element responsible for salt induction of rice OsRAV2 through ex situ and in situ promoter analysis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yong-Bo; Li, Juan; Qin, Rui-Ying; Xu, Rong-Fang; Li, Hao; Yang, Ya-Chun; Ma, Hui; Li, Li; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Jian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Salt is a major environmental stress factor that can affect rice growth and yields. Recent studies suggested that members of the AP2/ERF domain-containing RAV (related to ABI3/VP1) TF family are involved in abiotic stress adaptation. However, the transcriptional response of rice RAV genes (OsRAVs) to salt has not yet been fully characterized. In this study, the expression patterns of all five OsRAVs were examined under salt stress. Only one gene, OsRAV2, was stably induced by high-salinity treatment. Further expression profile analyses indicated that OsRAV2 is transcriptionally regulated by salt, but not KCl, osmotic stress, cold or ABA (abscisic acid) treatment. To elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the stress response at the transcriptional level, we isolated and characterized the promoter region of OsRAV2 (P OsRAV2 ). Transgenic analysis indicated that P OsRAV2 is induced by salt stress but not osmotic stress or ABA treatment. Serial 5' deletions and site-specific mutations in P OsRAV2 revealed that a GT-1 element located at position -664 relative to the putative translation start site is essential for the salt induction of P OsRAV2 . The regulatory function of the GT-1 element in the salt induction of OsRAV2 was verified in situ in plants with targeted mutations generated using the CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) system. Taken together, our results indicate that the GT-1 element directly controls the salt response of OsRAV2. This study provides a better understanding of the putative functions of OsRAVs and the molecular regulatory mechanisms of plant genes under salt stress. PMID:26482477

  17. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Fox, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  18. US regulatory system for genetically modified [genetically modified organism (GMO), rDNA or transgenic] crop cultivars.

    PubMed

    McHughen, Alan; Smyth, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of the federal regulatory oversight of plant agricultural biotechnology in the USA, focusing on the scientific and political forces moulding the continually evolving regulatory structure in place today. Unlike most other jurisdictions, the USA decided to adapt pre-existing legislation to encompass products of biotechnology. In so doing, it established an overarching committee (Office of Science and Technology Policy) to study and distribute various regulatory responsibilities amongst relevant agencies: the Food and Drug Administration, Environmental Protection Agency and US Department of Agriculture. This paper reviews the history and procedures of each agency in the execution of its regulatory duties and investigates the advantages and disadvantages of the US regulatory strategy.

  19. ABO alleles are linked with haplotypes of an erythroid cell-specific regulatory element in intron 1 with a few exceptions attributable to genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Sano, R; Takahashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Kubo, R; Kobayashi, M; Takahashi, K; Takeshita, H; Kominato, Y

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigation of transcriptional regulation of the ABO genes has identified a candidate erythroid cell-specific regulatory element, named the +5·8-kb site, in the first intron of ABO. Six haplotypes of the site have been reported previously. The present genetic population study demonstrated that each haplotype was mostly linked with specific ABO alleles with a few exceptions, possibly as a result of hybrid formation between common ABO alleles. Thus, investigation of these haplotypes could provide a clue to further elucidation of ABO alleles.

  20. Mutational analysis of structural elements in a class-I cyclic di-GMP riboswitch to elucidate its regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, Saki; Nishimura, Kei-Ichiro; Kakizawa, Hitoshi; Fujita, Yuki; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2016-09-01

    The Vc2 riboswitch possesses an aptamer domain belonging to the class-I c-di-GMP riboswitch family. This domain has been analysed and the molecular mechanism by which it recognizes the c-di-GMP ligand has been elucidated. On the other hand, the regulatory mechanism of the full-length Vc2 riboswitch to control its downstream open reading frame (ORF) remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed in vivo reporter assays and in vitro biochemical analyses of the full-length riboswitch and its aptamer domain. We evaluated the results of in vivo and in vitro analyses to elucidate the regulatory mechanism of the Vc2 riboswitch. The present results suggest that recognition of c-di-GMP ligand by the Vc2 riboswitch aptamer domain downregulates expression of its downstream ORF primarily at the translational level.

  1. DNA methylation of the allergy regulatory gene interferon gamma varies by age, sex, and tissue type in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Asthma is associated with allergic sensitization in about half of all cases, and asthma phenotypes can vary by age and sex. DNA methylation in the promoter of the allergy regulatory gene interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been linked to the maintenance of allergic immune function in human cell and mouse models. We hypothesized that IFNγ promoter methylation at two well-studied, key cytosine phosphate guanine (CpG) sites (-186 and -54), may differ by age, sex, and airway versus systemic tissue in a cohort of 74 allergic asthmatics. Results After sampling buccal cells, a surrogate for airway epithelial cells, and CD4+ lymphocytes, we found that CD4+ lymphocyte methylation was significantly higher in children compared to adults at both CpG sites (P <0.01). Buccal cell methylation was significantly higher in children at CpG -186 (P = 0.03) but not CpG -54 (P = 0.66). Methylation was higher in males compared to females at both CpG sites in CD4+ lymphocytes (-186: P <0.01, -54: P = 0.02) but not buccal cells (-186: P = 0.14, -54: P = 0.60). In addition, methylation was lower in CD4+ lymphocytes compared to buccal cells (P <0.01) and neighboring CpG sites were strongly correlated in CD4+ lymphocytes (r = 0.84, P <0.01) and weakly correlated in buccal cells (r = 0.24, P = 0.04). At CpG -186, there was significant correlation between CD4+ lymphocytes and buccal cells (r = 0.24, P = 0.04) but not at CpG -54 (r = -0.03, P = 0.78). Conclusions These findings highlight significant age, sex, and tissue-related differences in IFNγ promoter methylation that further our understanding of methylation in the allergic asthma pathway and in the application of biomarkers in clinical research. PMID:24891923

  2. Cysteine residues in the zinc finger and amino acids adjacent to the finger are necessary for DNA binding by the LAC9 regulatory protein of Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Witte, M M; Dickson, R C

    1988-01-01

    LAC9 is a positive regulatory protein that controls transcription of the lactose-galactose regulon in Kluyveromyces lactis. LAC9 is homologous to the GAL4 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both proteins have a single "zinc finger" which plays a role in DNA binding. We previously hypothesized (L. V. Wray, M. M. Witte, R. C. Dickson, and M. I. Riley, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:1111-1121, 1987) that the DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein consisted of the zinc finger as well as a region of amino acids on the carboxyl-terminal side of the zinc finger. In this study we used oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to introduce 13 single-amino-acid changes into the proposed DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein. Variant LAC9 proteins carrying an amino acid substitution in any one of the four highly conserved Cys residues of the zinc finger had reduced DNA-binding activity, suggesting that each Cys is necessary for DNA binding. Three of four variant LAC9 proteins with amino acid substitutions located on the carboxyl-terminal side of the zinc finger had reduced DNA-binding activity. These results support our hypothesis that the DNA-binding domain of the LAC9 protein is composed of the zinc finger and the adjacent region on the carboxyl side of the zinc finger, a region that has the potential to form an alpha-helix. Finally, LAC9 proteins containing His residues substituted for the conserved Cys residues also had reduced DNA-binding activity, indicating that His residues are not equivalent to Cys residues, as had been previously thought. Images PMID:3146691

  3. Distribution of Unlinked Transpositions of a Ds Element from a T-DNA Locus on Tomato Chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Briza, J.; Carroll, B. J.; Klimyuk, V. I.; Thomas, C. M.; Jones, D. A.; Jones, JDG.

    1995-01-01

    In maize, receptor sites for unlinked transpositions of Activator (Ac) elements are not distributed randomly. To test whether the same is true in tomato, the receptor sites for a Dissociation (Ds) element derived from Ac, were mapped for 26 transpositions unlinked to a donor T-DNA locus on chromosome 4. Four independent transposed Dss mapped to sites on chromosome 4 genetically unlinked to the donor T-DNA, consistent with a preference for transposition to unlinked sites on the same chromosome as opposed to sites on other chromosomes. There was little preference among the nondonor chromosomes, except perhaps for chromosome 2, which carried seven transposed Dss, but these could not be proven to be independent. However, these data, when combined with those from other studies in tomato examining the distribution of transposed Acs or Dss among nondonor chromosomes, suggest there may be absolute preferences for transposition irrespective of the chromosomal location of the donor site. If true, transposition to nondonor chromosomes in tomato would differ from that in maize, where the preference seems to be determined by the spatial arrangement of chromosomes in the interphase nucleus. The tomato lines carrying Ds elements at known locations are available for targeted transposon tagging experiments. PMID:8536985

  4. Genome Wide Analysis Reveals Zic3 Interaction with Distal Regulatory Elements of Stage Specific Developmental Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vibhor; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar G.; Orlov, Yuriy; Ravishankar, Ashwini; Prabhakar, Shyam; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Korzh, Vladimir; Mathavan, Sinnakaruppan

    2013-01-01

    Zic3 regulates early embryonic patterning in vertebrates. Loss of Zic3 function is known to disrupt gastrulation, left-right patterning, and neurogenesis. However, molecular events downstream of this transcription factor are poorly characterized. Here we use the zebrafish as a model to study the developmental role of Zic3 in vivo, by applying a combination of two powerful genomics approaches – ChIP-seq and microarray. Besides confirming direct regulation of previously implicated Zic3 targets of the Nodal and canonical Wnt pathways, analysis of gastrula stage embryos uncovered a number of novel candidate target genes, among which were members of the non-canonical Wnt pathway and the neural pre-pattern genes. A similar analysis in zic3-expressing cells obtained by FACS at segmentation stage revealed a dramatic shift in Zic3 binding site locations and identified an entirely distinct set of target genes associated with later developmental functions such as neural development. We demonstrate cis-regulation of several of these target genes by Zic3 using in vivo enhancer assay. Analysis of Zic3 binding sites revealed a distribution biased towards distal intergenic regions, indicative of a long distance regulatory mechanism; some of these binding sites are highly conserved during evolution and act as functional enhancers. This demonstrated that Zic3 regulation of developmental genes is achieved predominantly through long distance regulatory mechanism and revealed that developmental transitions could be accompanied by dramatic changes in regulatory landscape. PMID:24204288

  5. HDA6 Directly Interacts with DNA Methyltransferase MET1 and Maintains Transposable Element Silencing in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuncheng; Yu, Chun-Wei; Duan, Jun; Luo, Ming; Wang, Koching; Tian, Gang; Cui, Yuhai; Wu, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of how the histone deacetylase HDA6 participates in maintaining transposable element (TE) silencing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is not yet defined. In this study, we show that a subset of TEs was transcriptionally reactivated and that TE reactivation was associated with elevated histone H3 and H4 acetylation as well as increased H3K4Me3 and H3K4Me2 in hda6 mutants. Decreased DNA methylation of the TEs was also detected in hda6 mutants, suggesting that HDA6 silences the TEs by regulating histone acetylation and methylation as well as the DNA methylation status of the TEs. Similarly, transcripts of some of these TEs were also increased in the methyltransferase1 (met1) mutant, with decreased DNA methylation. Furthermore, H4 acetylation, H3K4Me3, H3K4Me2, and H3K36Me2 were enriched at the coregulated TEs in the met1 and hda6 met1 mutants. Protein-protein interaction analysis indicated that HDA6 physically interacts with MET1 in vitro and in vivo, and further deletion analysis demonstrated that the carboxyl-terminal region of HDA6 and the bromo-adjacent homology domain of MET1 were responsible for the interaction. These results suggested that HDA6 and MET1 interact directly and act together to silence TEs by modulating DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and histone methylation status. PMID:21994348

  6. Association between birth weight and DNA methylation of IGF2, glucocorticoid receptor and repetitive elements LINE-1 and Alu

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Heather H; Braun, Joe M; Byun, Hyang-Min; Tarantini, Letizia; Mercado, Adriana; Wright, Rosalind J; Schnaas, Lourdes; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M

    2013-01-01

    Aim We examined the association between birth weight and methylation in the imprinted IGF/H19 loci, the nonimprinted gene NR3C1 and repetitive element DNA (LINE-1 and Alu). Materials & methods We collected umbilical cord venous blood from 219 infants born in Mexico City (Mexico) as part of a prospective birth cohort study and analyzed DNA methylation using pyrosequencing. Results Birth weight was not associated with DNA methylation of the regions studied. One of the CpG dinucleotides in the IGF2 imprinting control region (ICR)1 includes a potential C–T SNP. Among individuals with an absence of methylation at this site, probably due to a paternally inherited T allele, birth weight was associated with mean methylation status of both IGF2 ICR1 and ICR2. However, this association would not have survived adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusion While we did not detect an association between DNA methylation and birth weight, our study suggests a potential gene–epigene interaction between a T allele in the IGF2 ICR1 and methylation of ICRs of IGF2, and fetal growth. PMID:23750643

  7. Potential use of DNA barcodes in regulatory science: identification of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Dirty 22," contributors to the spread of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jones, Yolanda L; Peters, Sharla M; Weland, Chris; Ivanova, Natalia V; Yancy, Haile F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibits the distribution of food that is adulterated, and the regulatory mission of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to enforce this Act. FDA field laboratories have identified the 22 most common pests that contribute to the spread of foodborne disease (the "Dirty 22"). The current method of detecting filth and extraneous material (tails, legs, carcasses, etc.) is visual inspection using microscopy. Because microscopy can be time-consuming and may yield inaccurate and/or nonspecific results due to lack of expertise, an alternative method of detecting these adulterants is needed. In this study, we sequenced DNA from the 5' region of the cytochrome oxidase I gene of these 22 common pests that contribute to the spread of foodborne pathogens. Here, we describe the generation of DNA barcodes for all 22 species. To date, this is the first attempt to develop a sequence-based regulatory database and systematic primer strategy to identify these FDA-targeted species. DNA barcoding can be a powerful tool that can aid the FDA in promoting the protection and safety of the U.S. food supply.

  8. A DNA Sequence Element That Advances Replication Origin Activation Time in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Thomas J.; Kolor, Katherine; Fangman, Walton L.; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic origins of DNA replication undergo activation at various times in S-phase, allowing the genome to be duplicated in a temporally staggered fashion. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the activation times of individual origins are not intrinsic to those origins but are instead governed by surrounding sequences. Currently, there are two examples of DNA sequences that are known to advance origin activation time, centromeres and forkhead transcription factor binding sites. By combining deletion and linker scanning mutational analysis with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to measure fork direction in the context of a two-origin plasmid, we have identified and characterized a 19- to 23-bp and a larger 584-bp DNA sequence that are capable of advancing origin activation time. PMID:24022751

  9. Identification of cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat brain creatine kinase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, G M; Molloy, G R; Benfield, P A

    1990-01-01

    The functional organization of the rat brain creatine kinase (ckb) promoter was analyzed by deletion, linker scanning, and substitution mutagenesis. Mutations were introduced into the ckb promoter of hybrid ckb/neo (neomycin resistance gene) genes, and the mutant genes were expressed transiently in HeLa cells. Expression was assayed by primer extension analysis of neo RNA, which allowed the transcription start sites and the amount of transcription to be determined. Transfections and primer extension reactions were internally controlled by simultaneous analysis of transcription from the adenovirus VA gene located on the same plasmid as the hybrid ckb/neo gene. We demonstrate that 195 bp of the ckb promoter is sufficient for efficient in vivo expression in HeLa cells. A nonconsensus TTAA element at -28 bp appears to provide the TATA box function for the ckb promoter in vivo. Two CCAAT elements, one at -84 bp and the other at -54 bp, and a TATAAA TA element (a consensus TATA box sequence) at -66 bp are required for efficient transcription from the TTAA element. In addition, we present evidence that the consensus beta-globin TATA box responds to the TATAAATA element in the same way as the ckb nonconsensus TTAA element. Images PMID:2247071

  10. Germline deletion of Igh 3′ regulatory region elements hs5-7 affects B cell specific regulation, rearrangement and insulation of the Igh locus1

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Sabrina A.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Hassan, Rabih; Ju, Zhongliang; Roa, Sergio; Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Werling, Uwe; Hou, Harry; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Scharff, Matthew; Edelman, Winfried; Feeney, Ann J.; Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements located within a ~28 kb region 3′ of the Igh gene cluster (3′ regulatory region, 3′ RR) are required for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. We previously defined novel DNase I hypersensitive (hs) sites, i.e. hs5-7, immediately downstream of this region. Hs5-7 contains a high density of binding sites for CTCF, a zinc finger protein associated with mammalian insulator activity and is an anchor for interactions with CTCF sites flanking the DH region. To test the function of hs5-7, we have generated mice with an 8 kb deletion encompassing all three hs elements. B cells from hs5-7 KO mice showed a modest increase in expression of the nearest downstream gene. In addition, Igh alleles in hs5-7 KO mice were in a less contracted configuration compared to WT Igh alleles and showed a two-fold increase in the usage of proximal VH7183 gene families. Hs5-7 KO mice were essentially indistinguishable from wild type mice in B cell development, allelic regulation, class switch recombination, and chromosomal looping. We conclude that hs5-7--a high-density CTCF binding region at the 3′ end of the Igh locus--impacts usage of VH regions as far as 500 kb away. PMID:22345664

  11. Deletion of a conserved regulatory element in the Drosophila Adh gene leads to increased alcohol dehydrogenase activity but also delays development.

    PubMed Central

    Parsch, J; Russell, J A; Beerman, I; Hartl, D L; Stephan, W

    2000-0