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Sample records for regulatory factors regulate

  1. Interferon regulatory factor 6 regulates keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Leah C.; Naridze, Rachelle L.; DeMali, Kris A.; Lusche, Daniel F.; Kuhl, Spencer; Soll, David R.; Schutte, Brian C.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon regulatory factor 6 (Irf6) regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Irf6 regulates cellular migration and adhesion. Irf6-deficient embryos at 10.5 days post-conception failed to close their wound compared with wild-type embryos. In vitro, Irf6-deficient murine embryonic keratinocytes were delayed in closing a scratch wound. Live imaging of the scratch showed deficient directional migration and reduced speed in cells lacking Irf6. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions were investigated. We show that wild-type and Irf6-deficient keratinocytes adhere similarly to all matrices after 60 min. However, Irf6-deficient keratinocytes were consistently larger and more spread, a phenotype that persisted during the scratch-healing process. Interestingly, Irf6-deficient keratinocytes exhibited an increased network of stress fibers and active RhoA compared with that observed in wild-type keratinocytes. Blocking ROCK, a downstream effector of RhoA, rescued the delay in closing scratch wounds. The expression of Arhgap29, a Rho GTPase-activating protein, was reduced in Irf6-deficient keratinocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that Irf6 functions through the RhoA pathway to regulate cellular migration. PMID:24777480

  2. Myogenic regulatory transcription factors regulate growth in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tenente, Inês M; Hayes, Madeline N; Ignatius, Myron S; McCarthy, Karin; Yohe, Marielle; Sindiri, Sivasish; Gryder, Berkley; Oliveira, Mariana L; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Tang, Qin; Chen, Eleanor Y; Petur Nielsen, G; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric malignacy of muscle with myogenic regulatory transcription factors MYOD and MYF5 being expressed in this disease. Consensus in the field has been that expression of these factors likely reflects the target cell of transformation rather than being required for continued tumor growth. Here, we used a transgenic zebrafish model to show that Myf5 is sufficient to confer tumor-propagating potential to RMS cells and caused tumors to initiate earlier and have higher penetrance. Analysis of human RMS revealed that MYF5 and MYOD are mutually-exclusively expressed and each is required for sustained tumor growth. ChIP-seq and mechanistic studies in human RMS uncovered that MYF5 and MYOD bind common DNA regulatory elements to alter transcription of genes that regulate muscle development and cell cycle progression. Our data support unappreciated and dominant oncogenic roles for MYF5 and MYOD convergence on common transcriptional targets to regulate human RMS growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19214.001 PMID:28080960

  3. Interferon regulatory factor 7 functions as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding-induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBα(S32A/S36A) super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-β(S177E/S181E) (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  4. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Functions as a Novel Negative Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding–induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBαS32A/S36A super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-βS177E/S181E (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24396025

  5. Interferon regulatory factor 8 regulates pathways for antigen presentation in myeloid cells and during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Jean-François; Kapoustina, Oxana; Langlais, David; Ruddy, Rebecca; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Bae-Hoon; MacMicking, John D; Giguère, Vincent; Gros, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8) plays an important role in defenses against intracellular pathogens, including several aspects of myeloid cells function. It is required for ontogeny and maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells, for activation of anti-microbial defenses, and for production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) in response to interferon gamma (IFNγ) and protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcriptional programs and cellular pathways that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ and that are important for defenses against M. tuberculosis are poorly understood. These were investigated by transcript profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip). Studies in primary macrophages identified 368 genes that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ/CpG and that behave as stably segregating expression signatures (eQTLs) in F2 mice fixed for a wild-type or mutant allele at IRF8. A total of 319 IRF8 binding sites were identified on promoters genome-wide (ChIP-chip) in macrophages treated with IFNγ/CpG, defining a functional G/AGAAnTGAAA motif. An analysis of the genes bearing a functional IRF8 binding site, and showing regulation by IFNγ/CpG in macrophages and/or in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs, revealed a striking enrichment for the pathways of antigen processing and presentation, including multiple structural and enzymatic components of the Class I and Class II MHC (major histocompatibility complex) antigen presentation machinery. Also significantly enriched as IRF8 targets are the group of endomembrane- and phagosome-associated small GTPases of the IRG (immunity-related GTPases) and GBP (guanylate binding proteins) families. These results identify IRF8 as a key regulator of early response pathways in myeloid cells, including phagosome maturation, antigen processing, and antigen presentation by myeloid cells.

  6. Activation and regulation of interferon regulatory factor 4 in HTLV type 1-infected T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Mamane, Y; Grandvaux, N; Bartlett, J; Petropoulos, L; Lin, R; Hiscott, J

    2000-11-01

    The human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive and fatal leukemia of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and is also associated with a neurological demyelinating disease, tropical spastic paraparesis. The oncogenic potential of HTLV-1 resides in the 353-aa, 40-kDa viral Tax oncoprotein, a positive regulator of viral gene transcription. A novel member of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of transcription factors, IRF-4, was shown to be constitutively produced in HTLV-1-infected cells. IRF-4 is transiently expressed in anti-CD3 and PMA/ionomycin-stimulated T lymphocytes but not in continuous non-Tax-expressing T cell lines. In transient coexpression assays, HTLV-1 Tax protein induced the 1. 2-kb IRF-4 promoter, indicating that Tax functions as an indirect trans-activator of the IRF-4 gene. Furthermore, IRF-4 levels in HTLV-1-infected cells appear to be proportional to the level of Tax expression, suggesting a role for IRF-4 in T cell transformation. In an effort to further characterize IRF-4 function, we identified a novel interaction between IRF-4 and FKBP52, a 59-kDa member of the immunophilin family with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity (PPIase). IRF-4-FKBP52 association inhibited the interaction between IRF-4 and its DNA-binding partner PU.1, as well as the trans-activation function of IRF-4/PU.1. FKBP52 association resulted in a structural modification of IRF-4, detectable by immunoblot analysis and by IRF-4 partial proteolysis. These results demonstrate a novel posttranslational mechanism of transcriptional control, mediated through the interaction of an immunophilin with a transcriptional regulator.

  7. Dynamic Evolution of Immune System Regulators: The History of the Interferon Regulatory Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiří; Hrdličková, Radmila

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript presents the first extensive phylogenetics analysis of a key family of immune regulators, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. The IRF family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress responses, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Several times during their evolution, the IRF genes have undergone expansion and diversification. These genes were also completely lost on two separate occasions in large groups of metazoans. The origin of the IRF family coincides with the appearance of multicellularity in animals. IRF genes are present in all principal metazoan groups, including sea sponges, placozoans, comb jellies, cnidarians, and bilaterians. Although the number of IRF family members does not exceed two in sponges and placozoans, this number reached five in cnidarians. At least four additional independent expansions lead up to 11 members in different groups of bilaterians. In contrast, the IRF genes either disappeared or mutated beyond recognition in roundworms and insects, the two groups that include most of the metazoan species. The IRF family separated very early into two branches ultimately leading to vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 supergroups (SGs). Genes encoding the IRF-SGs are present in all bilaterians and cnidarians. The evolution of vertebrate IRF family members further proceeded with at least two additional steps. First, close to the appearance of the first vertebrate, the IRF family probably expanded to four family members, predecessors of the four vertebrate IRF groups (IRF1, 3, 4, 5 groups). In the second step, 10 vertebrate family members evolved from these four genes, likely as a result of the 2-fold duplication of the entire genome. Interestingly, the IRF family coevolved with the Rel/NF-κB family with which it shares some important evolutionary characteristics, including roles in defense responses, metazoan specificity, extensive diversification in vertebrates, and elimination

  8. Dynamic evolution of immune system regulators: the history of the interferon regulatory factor family.

    PubMed

    Nehyba, Jirí; Hrdlicková, Radmila; Bose, Henry R

    2009-11-01

    This manuscript presents the first extensive phylogenetics analysis of a key family of immune regulators, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. The IRF family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress responses, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Several times during their evolution, the IRF genes have undergone expansion and diversification. These genes were also completely lost on two separate occasions in large groups of metazoans. The origin of the IRF family coincides with the appearance of multicellularity in animals. IRF genes are present in all principal metazoan groups, including sea sponges, placozoans, comb jellies, cnidarians, and bilaterians. Although the number of IRF family members does not exceed two in sponges and placozoans, this number reached five in cnidarians. At least four additional independent expansions lead up to 11 members in different groups of bilaterians. In contrast, the IRF genes either disappeared or mutated beyond recognition in roundworms and insects, the two groups that include most of the metazoan species. The IRF family separated very early into two branches ultimately leading to vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 supergroups (SGs). Genes encoding the IRF-SGs are present in all bilaterians and cnidarians. The evolution of vertebrate IRF family members further proceeded with at least two additional steps. First, close to the appearance of the first vertebrate, the IRF family probably expanded to four family members, predecessors of the four vertebrate IRF groups (IRF1, 3, 4, 5 groups). In the second step, 10 vertebrate family members evolved from these four genes, likely as a result of the 2-fold duplication of the entire genome. Interestingly, the IRF family coevolved with the Rel/NF-kappaB family with which it shares some important evolutionary characteristics, including roles in defense responses, metazoan specificity, extensive diversification in vertebrates, and

  9. Differential regulation analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory mechanism involving transcription factors and microRNAs in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanxue; Li, Junyi; Dai, Wentao; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most incident malignancies in the world. Although lots of featured genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to be associated with gastric carcinogenesis, underlying regulatory mechanisms still remain unclear. In order to explore the dysfunctional mechanisms of GC, we developed a novel approach to identify carcinogenesis relevant regulatory relationships, which is characterized by quantifying the difference of regulatory relationships between stages. Firstly, we applied the strategy of differential coexpression analysis (DCEA) to transcriptomic datasets including paired mRNA and miRNA of gastric samples to identify a set of genes/miRNAs related to gastric cancer progression. Based on these genes/miRNAs, we constructed conditional combinatorial gene regulatory networks (cGRNs) involving both transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs. Enrichment of known cancer genes/miRNAs and predicted prognostic genes/miRNAs was observed in each cGRN. Then we designed a quantitative method to measure differential regulation level of every regulatory relationship between normal and cancer, and the known cancer genes/miRNAs proved to be ranked significantly higher. Meanwhile, we defined differentially regulated link (DRL) by combining differential regulation, differential expression and the regulation contribution of the regulator to the target. By integrating survival analysis and DRL identification, three master regulators TCF7L1, TCF4, and MEIS1 were identified and testable hypotheses of dysfunctional mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis related to them were generated. The fine-tuning effects of miRNAs were also observed. We propose that this differential regulation network analysis framework is feasible to gain insights into dysregulated mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis and other phenotypic changes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M; Antony, Paul M; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; Del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels.

  12. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M.; Antony, Paul M.; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  13. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  14. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  15. Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) Directly Regulates Osteogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Alonso, Veronica; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina; Henderson, Sarah E.; Almarza, Alejandro J.; Friedman, Peter A.; Blair, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Bone formation requires synthesis, secretion, and mineralization of matrix. Deficiencies in these processes produce bone defects. The absence of the PDZ domain protein Na+/H+ exchange regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) in mice, or its mutation in humans, causes osteomalacia believed to reflect renal phosphate wasting. We show that NHERF1 is expressed by mineralizing osteoblasts and organizes Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) and the PTH receptor. NHERF1-null mice display reduced bone formation and wide mineralizing fronts despite elimination of phosphate wasting by dietary supplementation. Bone mass was normal, reflecting coordinated reduction of bone resorption and formation. NHERF1-null bone had decreased strength, consistent with compromised matrix quality. Mesenchymal stem cells from NHERF1-null mice showed limited osteoblast differentiation but enhanced adipocyte differentiation. PTH signaling and Na+/H+ exchange were dysregulated in these cells. Osteoclast differentiation from monocytes was unaffected. Thus, NHERF1 is required for normal osteoblast differentiation and matrix synthesis. In its absence, compensatory mechanisms maintain bone mass, but bone strength is reduced. PMID:23109343

  16. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 signaling regulates the switch between autophagy and apoptosis to determine breast cancer cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Roberts, Jessica L.; Cook, Katherine L.; Chen, Chun; Shajahan-Haq, Ayesha N.; Axelrod, Margaret; Wärri, Anni; Riggins, Rebecca B.; Jin, Lu; Haddad, Bassem R.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Baumann, William T.; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is a tumor suppressor that regulates cell fate in several cell types. Here we report an inverse correlation in expression of nuclear IRF1 and the autophagy regulator ATG7 in human breast cancer cells that directly impacts their cell fate. In mice harboring mutant Atg7, nuclear IRF1 was increased in mammary tumors, spleen, and kidney. Mechanistic investigations identified ATG7 and the cell death modulator Beclin-1 (BECN1) as negative regulators of IRF1. Silencing ATG7 or BECN1 caused estrogen receptor-α (ERα) to exit the nucleus at the time when IRF1 nuclear localization occurred. Conversely, silencing IRF1 promoted autophagy by increasing BECN1 and blunting IGF-1 receptor and mTOR survival signaling. Loss of IRF1 promoted resistance to anti-estrogens, whereas combined silencing of ATG7 and IRF1 restored sensitivity to these agents. Using a mathematical model to prompt signaling hypotheses, we developed evidence that ATG7 silencing could resensitize IRF1-attenuated cells to apoptosis through mechanisms that involve other estrogen-regulated genes. Overall, our work shows how inhibiting the autophagy proteins ATG7 and BECN1 can regulate IRF1 dependent and independent signaling pathways in ways that engender a new therapeutic strategy to attack breast cancer. PMID:25576084

  17. Sleep regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T

    2014-01-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The pro- gram core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Knowledge of the factors that regulate the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and factors that can affect this regulation forms the basis for diagnosis and treatment of the many common disorders of sleep.

  18. Basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransport activity is regulated by the dissociable Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Angelito A.; Kear, Felicidad T.; Santos, Anna V.P.; Ma, Jianfei; Steplock, Debra; Robey, R. Brooks; Weinman, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    In the renal proximal tubule, the activities of the basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransporter (NBC) and the apical Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3) uniformly vary in parallel, suggesting that they are coordinately regulated. PKA-mediated inhibition of NHE3 is mediated by a PDZ motif–containing protein, the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHE-RF). Given the common inhibition of these transporters after protein kinase A (PKA) activation, we sought to determine whether NHE-RF also plays a role in PKA-regulated NBC activity. Renal cortex immunoblot analysis using anti-peptide antibodies directed against rabbit NHE-RF demonstrated the presence of this regulatory factor in both brush-border membranes (BBMs) and basolateral membranes (BLMs). Using a reconstitution assay, we found that limited trypsin digestion of detergent solubilized rabbit renal BLM preparations resulted in NBC activity that was unaffected by PKA activation. Co-reconstitution of these trypsinized preparations with a recombinant protein corresponding to wild-type rabbit NHE-RF restored the inhibitory effect of PKA on NBC activity in a concentration-dependent manner. NBC activity was inhibited 60% by 10–8M NHE-RF; this effect was not observed in the absence of PKA. Reconstitution with heat-denatured NHE-RF also failed to attenuate NBC activity. To establish further a physiologic role for NHE-RF in NBC regulation, the renal epithelial cell line B-SC-1, which lacks detectable endogenous NHE-RF expression, was engineered to express stably an NHE-RF transgene. NHE-RF–expressing B-SC-1 cells (B-SC-RF) exhibited markedly lower basal levels of NBC activity than did wild-type controls. Inhibition of NBC activity in B-SC-RF cells was enhanced after 10 μM of forskolin treatment, consistent with a postulated role for NHE-RF in mediating the inhibition of NBC activity by PKA. These findings not only suggest NHE-RF involvement in PKA-regulated NBC activity, but also provide a unique molecular mechanism whereby

  19. Virulence factor regulation and regulatory networks in Streptococcus pyogenes and their impact on pathogen-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Kreikemeyer, Bernd; McIver, Kevin S; Podbielski, Andreas

    2003-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is a very important human pathogen with remarkable adaptation capabilities. Survival within the harsh host surroundings requires sensing potential on the bacterial side, which leads in particular to coordinately regulated virulence factor expression. GAS 'stand-alone' response regulators (RRs) and two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) link the signals from the host environment with adaptive responses of the bacterial cell. Numerous putative regulatory systems emerged from GAS genome sequences. Only three RRs [Mga, RofA-like protein (RALP) and Rgg/RopB] and three TCSs (CsrRS/CovRS, FasBCAX and Ihk/Irr) have been studied in some detail with respect to their growth-phase-dependent activity and their influence on GAS-host cell interaction. In particular, the Mga-, RALP- and Rgg/RopB-regulated pathways display interconnected activities that appear to influence GAS colonization, persistence and spreading mechanisms, in a growth-phase-related fashion. Here, we have summarized our current knowledge about these RRs and TCSs to highlight the questions that should be addressed in future research on GAS pathogenicity.

  20. Characterization of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) FoxD5 and its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Yuqing; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Peijun; Xu, Yongli

    2012-03-01

    As one member of winged helix domain transcription factors, FoxD5 was reported to be a trunk organizer. Recent study showed that zebrafish foxd5 is expressed in the somites. To further understand the function of FoxD5 in fish muscle development, the FoxD5 gene was isolated from flounder. Its expression pattern was analyzed by in situ hybridization, while its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor, MyoD, was analyzed by ectopic expression. It showed that flounder FoxD5 was firstly expressed in the tailbud, adaxial cells, and neural plate of the head. In flounder embryo, FoxD5 is expressed not only in forebrain but also in somite cells that will form muscle in the future. When flounder FoxD5 was over-expressed in zebrafish by microinjection, the expression of zebrafish MyoD in the somites was reduced, suggesting that FoxD5 is involved in myogenesis by regulating the expression of MyoD.

  1. Store-operated Ca2+ Entry-associated Regulatory factor (SARAF) Plays an Important Role in the Regulation of Arachidonate-regulated Ca2+ (ARC) Channels.

    PubMed

    Albarran, Letizia; Lopez, Jose J; Woodard, Geoffrey E; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-03-25

    The store-operated Ca(2+)entry-associated regulatory factor (SARAF) has recently been identified as a STIM1 regulatory protein that facilitates slow Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of store-operated Ca(2+)entry (SOCE). Both the store-operated channels and the store-independent arachidonate-regulated Ca(2+)(ARC) channels are regulated by STIM1. In the present study, we show that, in addition to its location in the endoplasmic reticulum, SARAF is constitutively expressed in the plasma membrane, where it can interact with plasma membrane (PM)-resident ARC forming subunits in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Using siRNA-based and overexpression approaches we report that SARAF negatively regulates store-independent Ca(2+)entry via the ARC channels. Arachidonic acid (AA) increases the association of PM-resident SARAF with Orai1. Finally, our results indicate that SARAF modulates the ability of AA to promote cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. In addition to revealing new insight into the biology of ARC channels in neuroblastoma cells, these findings provide evidence for an unprecedented location of SARAF in the plasma membrane.

  2. Interferon-regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) regulates bevacizumab induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Verlene; Tiao, Ningyi; de Groot, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Antiangiogenic therapy is commonly being used for the treatment of glioblastoma. However, the benefits of angiogenesis inhibitors are typically transient and resistance often develops. Determining the mechanism of treatment failure of the VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab for malignant glioma would provide insight into approaches to overcome therapeutic resistance. Experimental Design In this study, we evaluated the effects of bevacizumab on the autophagy of glioma cells and determined target genes involving in the regulation of bevacizumab-induced autophagy. Results We demonstrated that bevacizumab treatment increased expression of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation in cell culture experiments as well as in in vivo studies. Gene expression profile analysis performed on murine xenograft models of glioblastoma showed increased transcriptional levels of STAT1/IRF1 signaling in bevacizumab resistant tumors compared to control tumors. In vitro experiments showed that bevacizumab treatment increased IRF1 expression in a dose and time dependent manner, which was coincident with bevacizumab-mediated autophagy. Down regulation of IRF1 by shRNA blocked autophagy and increased AIF-dependent apoptosis in bevacizumab-treated glioma cells. Consistently, IRF1 depletion increased the efficacy of anti-VEGF therapy in a glioma xenograft model, which was due to less bevacizumab-promoted autophagy and increased apoptosis in tumors with down-regulated IRF1. Conclusions These data suggest that IRF1 may regulate bevacizumab-induced autophagy, and may be one important mediator of glioblastoma resistant to bevacizumab. PMID:26362401

  3. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  4. The EBV Latent Antigen 3C Inhibits Apoptosis through Targeted Regulation of Interferon Regulatory Factors 4 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie; Cai, Qiliang; Saha, Abhik; Jha, Hem Chandra; Dzeng, Richard Kuo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to a broad spectrum of B-cell malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an encoded latent antigen required for growth transformation of primary human B-lymphocytes. Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and 8 (IRF8) are transcription factors of the IRF family that regulate diverse functions in B cell development. IRF4 is an oncoprotein with anti-apoptotic properties and IRF8 functions as a regulator of apoptosis and tumor suppressor in many hematopoietic malignancies. We now demonstrate that EBNA3C can contribute to B-cell transformation by modulating the molecular interplay between cellular IRF4 and IRF8. We show that EBNA3C physically interacts with IRF4 and IRF8 with its N-terminal domain in vitro and forms a molecular complex in cells. We identified the Spi-1/B motif of IRF4 as critical for EBNA3C interaction. We also demonstrated that EBNA3C can stabilize IRF4, which leads to downregulation of IRF8 by enhancing its proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, si-RNA mediated knock-down of endogenous IRF4 results in a substantial reduction in proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), as well as augmentation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. IRF4 knockdown also showed reduced expression of its targeted downstream signalling proteins which include CDK6, Cyclin B1 and c-Myc all critical for cell proliferation. These studies provide novel insights into the contribution of EBNA3C to EBV-mediated B-cell transformation through regulation of IRF4 and IRF8 and add another molecular link to the mechanisms by which EBV dysregulates cellular activities, increasing the potential for therapeutic intervention against EBV-associated cancers. PMID:23658517

  5. Dynamic Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 association and dissociation regulate parathyroid hormone receptor trafficking at membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Wang, Bin; Watkins, Simon C; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-10-07

    Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1) is a cytoplasmic PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zona occludens) protein that assembles macromolecular complexes and determines the localization, trafficking, and signaling of select G protein-coupled receptors and other membrane-delimited proteins. The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR), which regulates mineral ion homeostasis and bone turnover, is a G protein-coupled receptor harboring a PDZ-binding motif that enables association with NHERF1 and tethering to the actin cytoskeleton. NHERF1 interactions with the PTHR modify its trafficking and signaling. Here, we characterized by live cell imaging the mechanism whereby NHERF1 coordinates the interactions of multiple proteins, as well as the fate of NHERF1 itself upon receptor activation. Upon PTHR stimulation, NHERF1 rapidly dissociates from the receptor and induces receptor aggregation in long lasting clusters that are enriched with the actin-binding protein ezrin and with clathrin. After NHERF1 dissociates from the PTHR, ezrin then directly interacts with the PTHR to stabilize the PTHR at the cell membrane. Recruitment of β-arrestins to the PTHR is delayed until NHERF1 dissociates from the receptor, which is then trafficked to clathrin for internalization. The ability of NHERF to interact dynamically with the PTHR and cognate adapter proteins regulates receptor trafficking and signaling in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner.

  6. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. © The Author(s).

  7. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.—Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. PMID:27451412

  8. Antagonistic regulation of p57kip2 by Hes/Hey downstream of Notch signaling and muscle regulatory factors regulates skeletal muscle growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Zalc, Antoine; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Auradé, Frédéric; Bröhl, Dominique; Chang, Ted; Mademtzoglou, Despoina; Mourikis, Philippos; Yao, Zizhen; Cao, Yi; Birchmeier, Carmen; Relaix, Frédéric

    2014-07-01

    A central question in development is to define how the equilibrium between cell proliferation and differentiation is temporally and spatially regulated during tissue formation. Here, we address how interactions between cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors essential for myogenic growth arrest (p21(cip1) and p57(kip2)), the Notch pathway and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) orchestrate the proliferation, specification and differentiation of muscle progenitor cells. We first show that cell cycle exit and myogenic differentiation can be uncoupled. In addition, we establish that skeletal muscle progenitor cells require Notch signaling to maintain their cycling status. Using several mouse models combined with ex vivo studies, we demonstrate that Notch signaling is required to repress p21(cip1) and p57(kip2) expression in muscle progenitor cells. Finally, we identify a muscle-specific regulatory element of p57(kip2) directly activated by MRFs in myoblasts but repressed by the Notch targets Hes1/Hey1 in progenitor cells. We propose a molecular mechanism whereby information provided by Hes/Hey downstream of Notch as well as MRF activities are integrated at the level of the p57(kip2) enhancer to regulate the decision between progenitor cell maintenance and muscle differentiation. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A.; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia. PMID:27055101

  10. Determination of a Comprehensive Alternative Splicing Regulatory Network and Combinatorial Regulation by Key Factors during the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yueqin; Park, Juw Won; Bebee, Thomas W.; Warzecha, Claude C.; Guo, Yang; Shang, Xuequn

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential biological process during embryonic development that is also implicated in cancer metastasis. While the transcriptional regulation of EMT has been well studied, the role of alternative splicing (AS) regulation in EMT remains relatively uncharacterized. We previously showed that the epithelial cell-type-specific proteins epithelial splicing regulatory proteins 1 (ESRP1) and ESRP2 are important for the regulation of many AS events that are altered during EMT. However, the contributions of the ESRPs and other splicing regulators to the AS regulatory network in EMT require further investigation. Here, we used a robust in vitro EMT model to comprehensively characterize splicing switches during EMT in a temporal manner. These investigations revealed that the ESRPs are the major regulators of some but not all AS events during EMT. We determined that the splicing factor RBM47 is downregulated during EMT and also regulates numerous transcripts that switch splicing during EMT. We also determined that Quaking (QKI) broadly promotes mesenchymal splicing patterns. Our study highlights the broad role of posttranscriptional regulation during the EMT and the important role of combinatorial regulation by different splicing factors to fine tune gene expression programs during these physiological and developmental transitions. PMID:27044866

  11. Matrix Factorization for Transcriptional Regulatory Network Inference

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Fertig, Elana J.

    2013-01-01

    Inference of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks (TRNs) provides insight into the mechanisms driving biological systems, especially mammalian development and disease. Many techniques have been developed for TRN estimation from indirect biochemical measurements. Although successful when initially tested in model organisms, these regulatory models often fail when applied to data from multicellular organisms where multiple regulation and gene reuse increase dramatically. Non-negative matrix factorization techniques were initially introduced to find non-orthogonal patterns in data, making them ideal techniques for inference in cases of multiple regulation. We review these techniques and their application to TRN analysis. PMID:25364782

  12. Iron- and Quorum-sensing Signals Converge on Small Quorum-regulatory RNAs for Coordinated Regulation of Virulence Factors in Vibrio vulnificus*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yancheng; Kim, In Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that causes human infections resulting in high mortality. This pathogen harbors five quorum-regulatory RNAs (Qrr1–5) that affect the expression of pathogenicity genes by modulating the expression of the master regulator SmcR. The qrr genes are activated by phosphorylated LuxO to different degrees; qrr2 is strongly activated; qrr3 and qrr5 are moderately activated, and qrr1 and qrr4 are marginally activated and are the only two that do not respond to cell density-dependent regulation. Qrrs function redundantly to inhibit SmcR at low cell density and fully repress when all five are activated. In this study, we found that iron inhibits qrr expression in three distinct ways. First, the iron-ferric uptake regulator (Fur) complex directly binds to qrr promoter regions, inhibiting LuxO activation by competing with LuxO for cis-acting DNA elements. Second, qrr transcription is repressed by iron independently of Fur. Third, LuxO expression is repressed by iron independently of Fur. We also found that, under iron-limiting conditions, the five Qrrs functioned additively, not redundantly, to repress SmcR, suggesting that cells lacking iron enter a high cell density mode earlier and could thereby modulate expression of virulence factors sooner. This study suggests that iron and quorum sensing, along with their cognate regulatory circuits, are linked together in the coordinated expression of virulence factors. PMID:27151217

  13. Iron- and Quorum-sensing Signals Converge on Small Quorum-regulatory RNAs for Coordinated Regulation of Virulence Factors in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yancheng; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that causes human infections resulting in high mortality. This pathogen harbors five quorum-regulatory RNAs (Qrr1-5) that affect the expression of pathogenicity genes by modulating the expression of the master regulator SmcR. The qrr genes are activated by phosphorylated LuxO to different degrees; qrr2 is strongly activated; qrr3 and qrr5 are moderately activated, and qrr1 and qrr4 are marginally activated and are the only two that do not respond to cell density-dependent regulation. Qrrs function redundantly to inhibit SmcR at low cell density and fully repress when all five are activated. In this study, we found that iron inhibits qrr expression in three distinct ways. First, the iron-ferric uptake regulator (Fur) complex directly binds to qrr promoter regions, inhibiting LuxO activation by competing with LuxO for cis-acting DNA elements. Second, qrr transcription is repressed by iron independently of Fur. Third, LuxO expression is repressed by iron independently of Fur. We also found that, under iron-limiting conditions, the five Qrrs functioned additively, not redundantly, to repress SmcR, suggesting that cells lacking iron enter a high cell density mode earlier and could thereby modulate expression of virulence factors sooner. This study suggests that iron and quorum sensing, along with their cognate regulatory circuits, are linked together in the coordinated expression of virulence factors.

  14. Current Regulations and Regulatory Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site will provide basic information on clean air permitting under the title V operating permits program, provide access to state and regional permitting programs, and maintain access to proposed and final regulatory requirements.

  15. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4(+) T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor mediated proliferation depends on increased lipid droplet density regulated via a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/Sirtuin6

    SciTech Connect

    Penrose, Harrison; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe; Makboul, Rania; Chadalawada, Gita; Chen, Ying; Crawford, Susan E.; Savkovic, Suzana D.

    2016-01-15

    The proliferation of colon cancer cells is mediated in part by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and requires sustained levels of cellular energy to meet its high metabolic needs. Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) are a source of energy used for various cellular functions and they are elevated in density in human cancer, yet their regulation and function are not well understood. Here, in human colon cancer cells, EGF stimulates increases in LD density, which depends on EGFR expression and activation as well as the individual cellular capacity for lipid synthesis. Increases in LDs are blockaded by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 synthesis, supporting their dependency on select upstream pathways. In colon cancer cells, silencing of the FOXO3 transcription factor leads to down regulation of SIRT6, a negative regulator of lipid synthesis, and consequent increases in the LD coat protein PLIN2, revealing that increases in LDs depend on loss of FOXO3/SIRT6. Moreover, EGF stimulates loss of FOXO3/SIRT6, which is blockaded by the inhibition of upstream pathways as well as lipid synthesis, revealing existence of a negative regulatory loop between LDs and FOXO3/SIRT6. Elevated LDs are utilized by EGF treatment and their depletion through the inhibition of lipid synthesis or silencing of PLIN2 significantly attenuates proliferation. This novel mechanism of proliferative EGFR signaling leading to elevated LD density in colon cancer cells could potentially be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of tumor progression. - Highlights: • In colon cancer cells, EGFR activation leads to increases in LD density. • EGFR signaling includes PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 leading to lipid synthesis. • Increases in LDs are controlled by a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/SIRT6. • EGFR mediated colon cancer cell proliferation depends on increased LD density.

  17. The stress-regulatory transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4 regulate fatty acid oxidation in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Rajvanshi, Praveen Kumar; Arya, Madhuri; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2017-09-18

    The transcription factors multicopy suppressor of SNF1 mutation (Msn) Msn2 and Msn4 bind the stress-response element in gene promoters in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the roles of Msn2/4 in primary metabolic pathways such as fatty acid β-oxidation are unclear. Here, in silico analysis revealed that the promoters of most genes involved in the biogenesis, function, and regulation of the peroxisome contain Msn2/4 binding sites. We also found that transcript levels of MSN2/MSN4 are increased in glucose-depletion conditions and that during growth in nonpreferred carbon sources, Msn2 is constantly localized to the nucleus in wildtype cells. Of note, the double mutant msn2Δmsn4Δ exhibited a severe growth defect when grown with oleic acid as the sole carbon source and had reduced transcript levels of major β-oxidation genes. ChIP indicated that Msn2 has increased occupancy on the promoters of β-oxidation genes in glucose-depleted conditions, and in vivo reporter genes analysis indicated reduced expression of these genes in msn2Δmsn4Δ cells. Moreover, mobility shift assays revealed that Msn4 binds β-oxidation gene promoters. Immunofluorescence microscopy with anti-peroxisome membrane protein antibodies disclosed that the msn2Δmsn4Δ strain had fewer peroxisomes than the wildtype, and lipid analysis indicated that the msn2Δmsn4Δ strain had increased triacylglycerol and steryl ester levels. Collectively, our data suggest that Msn2/Msn4 transcription factors activate expression of the genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. As glucose sensing, signaling, and fatty acid β-oxidation pathways are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes, the msn2Δmsn4Δ strain could therefore be a good model system for further study of these critical processes. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Contributions of two-component regulatory systems, alternative sigma factors, and negative regulators to Listeria monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D; Bowen, Barbara M; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-02-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative sigma factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of sigmaB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4 degrees C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (10(8) CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 10(8) CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative sigma factors (DeltasigH, DeltasigC, and DeltasigL), a negative regulator (DeltactsR), regulators of sigmaB (DeltarsbT and DeltarsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (DeltalisR, Deltalmo1172, and Deltalmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4 degrees C. The growth defect for DeltasigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4 degrees C over 84 days, only the DeltactsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (DeltasigB, DeltasigC, and Deltalmo1172). With a 10(8) CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37 degrees C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4

  19. Multilayered Control of Alternative Splicing Regulatory Networks by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Weatheritt, Robert J; Hirsch, Calley L; Ha, Kevin C H; Radovani, Ernest; Nabeel-Shah, Syed; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; Wang, Juli; O'Hanlon, Dave; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Zheng, Hong; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Magomedova, Lilia; Cummins, Carolyn L; Hughes, Timothy R; Greenblatt, Jack F; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Moffat, Jason; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2017-02-02

    Networks of coordinated alternative splicing (AS) events play critical roles in development and disease. However, a comprehensive knowledge of the factors that regulate these networks is lacking. We describe a high-throughput system for systematically linking trans-acting factors to endogenous RNA regulatory events. Using this system, we identify hundreds of factors associated with diverse regulatory layers that positively or negatively control AS events linked to cell fate. Remarkably, more than one-third of the regulators are transcription factors. Further analyses of the zinc finger protein Zfp871 and BTB/POZ domain transcription factor Nacc1, which regulate neural and stem cell AS programs, respectively, reveal roles in controlling the expression of specific splicing regulators. Surprisingly, these proteins also appear to regulate target AS programs via binding RNA. Our results thus uncover a large "missing cache" of splicing regulators among annotated transcription factors, some of which dually regulate AS through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  20. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) interacts with regulated in development and DNA damage response 2 (REDD2) in the cytoplasm of mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish; Rath, Pramod C

    2014-04-01

    IRF-1 is a critical hematopoietic transcription factor, which regulates cell growth, development of immune cells, immune response, tumor suppression, apoptosis and autophagy in mammalian cells. Protein-protein interactions of IRF-1 in mouse bone marrow cells (BMCs) by GST-IRF-1 pull-down followed by mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and colocalization show that regulated in development and DNA damage response 2 (REDD2) is an IRF-1-interacting protein. REDD2 is a highly conserved mammalian regulatory protein of the TSC2/mTOR pathway. It is structurally similar to REDD1 but has a distinct loop region. Cellular IRF-1 and REDD2 complex is present in the cytoplasm of BMCs as distinct speckles in punctate pattern. In vitro interaction of recombinant IRF-1 and REDD2 shows their physical interaction. Taken together, our results suggest that IRF-1 physically interacts with REDD2 in the large cytoplasmic protein complex, which may function as cellular signaling proteins for 'cross-talk' of mTOR and cytokine pathways during regulation of cell growth/proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy of mammalian bone marrow cells during health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissection of the regulatory mechanism of a heat-shock responsive promoter in Haloarchaea: a new paradigm for general transcription factor directed archaeal gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhe; Han, Jing; Zhou, Ligang; Coker, James A.; DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Xiang, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Multiple general transcription factors (GTFs), TBP and TFB, are present in many haloarchaea, and are deemed to accomplish global gene regulation. However, details and the role of GTF-directed transcriptional regulation in stress response are still not clear. Here, we report a comprehensive investigation of the regulatory mechanism of a heat-induced gene (hsp5) from Halobacterium salinarum. We demonstrated by mutation analysis that the sequences 5′ and 3′ to the core elements (TATA box and BRE) of the hsp5 promoter (Phsp5) did not significantly affect the basal and heat-induced gene expression, as long as the transcription initiation site was not altered. Moreover, the BRE and TATA box of Phsp5 were sufficient to render a nonheat-responsive promoter heat-inducible, in both Haloferax volcanii and Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. DNA–protein interactions revealed that two heat-inducible GTFs, TFB2 from H. volcanii and TFBb from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, could specifically bind to Phsp5 likely in a temperature-dependent manner. Taken together, the heat-responsiveness of Phsp5 was mainly ascribed to the core promoter elements that were efficiently recognized by specific heat-induced GTFs at elevated temperature, thus providing a new paradigm for GTF-directed gene regulation in the domain of Archaea. PMID:18390887

  2. Prediction of cis-regulatory elements for drug-activated transcription factors in the regulation of drug-metabolising enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Podvinec, Michael; Meyer, Urs A

    2006-06-01

    The expression of drug-metabolising enzymes is affected by many endogenous and exogenous factors, including sex, age, diet and exposure to xenobiotics and drugs. To understand fully how the organism metabolises a drug, these alterations in gene expression must be taken into account. The central process, the definition of likely regulatory elements in the genes coding for enzymes and transporters involved in drug disposition, can be vastly accelerated using existing and emerging bioinformatics methods to unravel the regulatory networks causing drug-mediated induction of genes. Here, various approaches to predict transcription factor interactions with regulatory DNA elements are reviewed.

  3. Regulation of expression and function of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) by Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs).

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhigang; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Shen, Wen-Jun; Yun, C Chris; Berlot, Catherine H; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2013-04-19

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) binds HDL and mediates selective delivery of cholesteryl esters (CEs) to the liver, adrenals, and gonads for product formation (bile acids and steroids). Because relatively little is known about SR-BI posttranslational regulation in steroidogenic cells, we examined the roles of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs) in regulating SR-BI expression, SR-BI-mediated selective CE uptake, and steroidogenesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA and protein are expressed at varying levels in model steroidogenic cell lines and the adrenal, with only low expression of PDZK1 (NHERF3) and NHERF4. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP decreased NHERF1 and NHERF2 and increased SR-BI mRNA expression in primary rat granulosa cells and MLTC-1 cells, whereas ACTH had no effect on NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA levels but decreased their protein levels in rat adrenals. Co-immunoprecipitation, colocalization, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and mutational analysis indicated that SR-BI associates with NHERF1 and NHERF2. NHERF1 and NHERF2 down-regulated SR-BI protein expression through inhibition of its de novo synthesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 also inhibited SR-BI-mediated selective CE transport and steroidogenesis, which were markedly attenuated by partial deletions of the PDZ1 or PDZ2 domain of NHERF1, the PDZ2 domain of NHERF2, or the MERM domains of NHERF1/2 or by gene silencing of NHERF1/2. Moreover, an intact COOH-terminal PDZ recognition motif (EAKL) in SR-BI is needed. Transient transfection of hepatic cell lines with NHERF1 or NHERF2 caused a significant reduction in endogenous protein levels of SR-BI. Collectively, these data establish NHERF1 and NHERF2 as SR-BI protein binding partners that play a negative role in the regulation of SR-BI expression, selective CE transport, and steroidogenesis.

  4. Regulation pattern of fish irf4 (the gene encoding IFN regulatory factor 4) by STAT6, c-Rel and IRF4.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun; Guo, Xia; Lu, Long-Feng; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Wu, Nan; Zhang, Yong-An

    2015-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) plays pivotal roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses in mammals. In fish, there are two homologues of irf4, irf4a and irf4b. In this study, we examined the regulatory patterns of zebrafish irf4a and irf4b by STAT6 and c-Rel. Firstly, expression of irf4a and irf4b was monitored in several tissues at mRNA level. By infection with SVCV, irf4a and irf4b were upregulated in both kidney and spleen, and were immediately induced by treatment with poly I:C in ZF4 cells. Moreover, the activation of irf4a promoter was regulated by overexpression of stat6 and c-rel in a cooperation manner, which could be inhibited by mutation of the putative binding sites of STAT6 and c-Rel in irf4a promoter region. However, irf4b promoter was activated slightly only by STAT6 but not c-Rel. Furthermore, overexpression of irf4a inhibited the activation of its own promoter under induction of STAT6 and c-Rel, which was the result of that IRF4a bound to STAT6 and c-Rel directly. In addition, cellular location analysis showed that IRF4a was located only in nuclear region. These data indicate that fish irf4a can also be upregulated by STAT6 and c-Rel. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Virus-activated interferon regulatory factor 7 upregulates expression of the interferon-regulated BST2 gene independently of interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Mercier, Johanne; Cohen, Eric A

    2012-04-01

    BST-2/tetherin is an interferon (IFN)-inducible host restriction factor that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses and functions as a negative-feedback regulator of IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Currently, mechanisms underlying BST2 transcriptional regulation by type I IFN remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the BST2 promoter is a secondary target of the IFN cascade and show that a single IRF binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to IFN-α. Interestingly, expression of IRF-1 or virus-activated forms of IRF-3 and IRF-7 stimulated the BST2 promoter even under conditions where type I IFN signaling was inhibited. Indeed, vesicular stomatitis virus could directly upregulate BST-2 during infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts through a process that required IRF-7 but was independent from the type I IFN cascade; however, in order to achieve optimal BST-2 induction, the type I IFN cascade needed to be engaged through activation of IRF-3. Furthermore, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we show that BST-2 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response since TLR8 and TLR3 agonists, known to trigger pathways that mediate activation of IRF proteins, could upregulate BST-2 prior to engagement of the type I IFN pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that BST2 is activated by the same signals that trigger type I IFN production, outlining a regulatory mechanism ensuring that production of type I IFN and expression of a host restriction factor involved in the IFN negative-feedback loop are closely coordinated.

  6. Differential regulation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the central nervous system during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Wang, Jianping; Campbell, Iain L

    2005-06-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the regulation of the interferons (IFNs) and other genes that may have an essential role in antiviral defense in the central nervous system, although this is currently not well defined. Therefore, we examined the regulation of IRF gene expression in the brain during viral infection. Several IRF genes (IRF-2, -3, -5, -7, and -9) were expressed at low levels in the brain of uninfected mice. Following intracranial infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), expression of the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes increased significantly by day 2. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the brain was widespread at sites of LCMV infection, with the highest levels in infiltrating mononuclear cells, microglia/macrophages, and neurons. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression was increased in LCMV-infected brain from IFN-gamma knockout (KO) but not IFN-alpha/betaR KO animals. In the brain, spleen, and liver or cultured glial and spleen cells, IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression increased with delayed kinetics in the absence of STAT1 but not STAT2 following LCMV infection or IFN-alpha treatment, respectively. The stimulation of IRF-7 gene expression by IFN-alpha in glial cell culture was prevented by cycloheximide. Thus, (i) many of the IRF genes were expressed constitutively in the mouse brain; (ii) the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes were upregulated during viral infection, a process dependent on IFN-alpha/beta but not IFN-gamma; and (iii) IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression can be stimulated in a STAT1-independent but STAT2-dependent fashion via unidentified indirect pathways coupled to the activation of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor.

  7. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase VHL Regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α to Maintain Regulatory T Cell Stability and Suppressive Capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee H; Elly, Chris; Park, Yoon; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2015-06-16

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a critical role in immune homeostasis; however, the mechanisms to maintain their function remain unclear. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL is essential for Treg cell function. Mice with Foxp3-restricted VHL deletion displayed massive inflammation associated with excessive Treg cell interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. VHL-deficient Treg cells failed to prevent colitis induction, but converted into Th1-like effector T cells. VHL intrinsically orchestrated such conversion under both steady and inflammatory conditions followed by Foxp3 downregulation, which was reversed by IFN-γ deficiency. Augmented hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-induced glycolytic reprogramming was required for IFN-γ production. Furthermore, HIF-1α bound directly to the Ifng promoter. HIF-1α knockdown or knockout could reverse the increased IFN-γ by VHL-deficient Treg cells and restore their suppressive function in vivo. These findings indicate that regulation of HIF-1α pathway by VHL is crucial to maintain the stability and suppressive function of Foxp3(+) T cells.

  8. E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α to maintain regulatory T cell stability and suppressive capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee H.; Elly, Chris; Park, Yoon; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a critical role in immune homeostasis; however, the mechanisms to maintain their function remain unclear. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL is essential for Treg cell function. Mice with Foxp3-restricted VHL deletion displayed massive inflammation associated with excessive Treg cell interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. VHL-deficient Treg cells failed to prevent colitis induction, but converted into Th1-like effector T cells. VHL intrinsically orchestrated such conversion under both steady and inflammatory conditions followed by Foxp3 downregulation, which was reversed by IFN-γ deficiency. Augmented hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-induced glycolytic reprogramming was required for IFN-γ production. Furthermore, HIF-1α bound directly to the Ifng promoter. HIF-1α knockdown or knockout could reverse the increased IFN-γ by VHL-deficient Treg cells and restore their suppressive function in vivo. These findings indicate that regulation of HIF-1α pathway by VHL is crucial to maintain the stability and suppressive function of Foxp3+ T cells. PMID:26084024

  9. l-Arginine-Dependent Epigenetic Regulation of Interleukin-10, but Not Transforming Growth Factor-β, Production by Neonatal Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Tsai, Ching-Chang; Chang, Ling-Sai; Huang, Hsin-Chun; Cheng, Hsin-Hsin; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yang, Kuender D.; Hsu, Te-Yao

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of diseases in humans, including trauma, certain cancers, and infection, are known to be associated with l-arginine deficiency. In addition, l-arginine must be supplemented by diet during pregnancy to aid fetal development. In conditions of l-arginine depletion, T cell proliferation is impaired. We have previously shown that neonatal blood has lower l-arginine levels than adult blood, which is associated with poor neonatal lymphocyte proliferation, and that l-arginine enhances neonatal lymphocyte proliferation through an interleukin (IL)-2-independent pathway. In this study, we have further investigated how exogenous l-arginine enhances neonatal regulatory T-cells (Tregs) function in relation to IL-10 production under epigenetic regulation. Results showed that cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) produced higher levels of IL-10 than adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by phytohemagglutinin stimulation but not by anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation. Addition of exogenous l-arginine had no effect on transforming growth factor-β production by PBMCs or CBMCs, but enhanced IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs. Further studies showed that IL-10 promoter DNA hypomethylation, rather than histone modification, corresponded to the l-arginine-induced increase in IL-10 production by neonatal CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that l-arginine modulates neonatal Tregs through the regulation of IL-10 promoter DNA methylation. l-arginine supplementation may correct the Treg function in newborns with l-arginine deficiency. PMID:28487700

  10. Protein kinase C phosphorylation disrupts Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 autoinhibition and promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator macromolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianquan; Poulikakos, Poulikos I; Dai, Zhongping; Testa, Joseph R; Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2007-09-14

    An emerging theme in cell signaling is that membrane-bound channels and receptors are organized into supramolecular signaling complexes for optimum function and cross-talk. In this study, we determined how protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation influences the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF) to assemble protein complexes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride ion channel that controls fluid and electrolyte transport across cell membranes. NHERF directs polarized expression of receptors and ion transport proteins in epithelial cells, as well as organizes the homo- and hetero-association of these cell surface proteins. NHERF contains two modular PDZ domains that are modular protein-protein interaction motifs, and a C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that NHERF is a phosphoprotein, but how phosphorylation affects NHERF to assemble macromolecular complexes is unknown. We show that PKC phosphorylates two amino acid residues Ser-339 and Ser-340 in the C-terminal domain of NHERF, but a serine 162 of PDZ2 is specifically protected from being phosphorylated by the intact C-terminal domain. PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant S339D/S340D of NHERF has increased affinity and stoichiometry when binding to C-CFTR. Moreover, solution small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the PDZ2 and C-terminal domains contact each other in NHERF, but such intramolecular domain-domain interactions are released in the PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant indicating that PKC phosphorylation disrupts the autoinhibition interactions in NHERF. The results demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of NHERF functions as an intramolecular switch that regulates the binding capability of PDZ2, and thus controls the stoichiometry of NHERF to assemble protein complexes.

  11. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Two-Component Regulator CarSR Regulates Calcium Homeostasis and Calcium-Induced Virulence Factor Production through Its Regulatory Targets CarO and CarP

    PubMed Central

    Guragain, Manita; King, Michelle M.; Williamson, Kerry S.; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khanam, Sharmily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes severe, life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), endocarditis, wounds, or artificial implants. During CF pulmonary infections, P. aeruginosa often encounters environments where the levels of calcium (Ca2+) are elevated. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa responds to externally added Ca2+ through enhanced biofilm formation, increased production of several secreted virulence factors, and by developing a transient increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, followed by its removal to the basal submicromolar level. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating Ca2+-induced virulence factor production and Ca2+ homeostasis are not known. Here, we characterized the genome-wide transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa to elevated [Ca2+] in both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Among the genes induced by CaCl2 in strain PAO1 was an operon containing the two-component regulator PA2656-PA2657 (here called carS and carR), while the closely related two-component regulators phoPQ and pmrAB were repressed by CaCl2 addition. To identify the regulatory targets of CarSR, we constructed a deletion mutant of carR and performed transcriptome analysis of the mutant strain at low and high [Ca2+]. Among the genes regulated by CarSR in response to CaCl2 are the predicted periplasmic OB-fold protein, PA0320 (here called carO), and the inner membrane-anchored five-bladed β-propeller protein, PA0327 (here called carP). Mutations in both carO and carP affected Ca2+ homeostasis, reducing the ability of P. aeruginosa to export excess Ca2+. In addition, a mutation in carP had a pleotropic effect in a Ca2+-dependent manner, altering swarming motility, pyocyanin production, and tobramycin sensitivity. Overall, the results indicate that the two-component system CarSR is responsible for sensing high levels of external Ca2+ and responding through its regulatory targets that

  12. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information.

  13. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. 76 FR 15891 - Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Patent and Trademark Office 37 CFR Chapter I Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review AGENCY: United... Patent and Trademark Office (``USPTO'' or ``Office'') is preparing a preliminary plan to review its... Regulation and Regulatory Review. The purpose of this regulatory review is to determine whether any of these...

  15. Regulatory coding of lymphoid lineage choice by hematopoietic transcription factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Luigi A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2003-01-01

    During lymphopoiesis, precursor cells negotiate a complex regulatory space, defined by the levels of several competing and cross-regulating transcription factors, before arriving at stable states of commitment to the B-, T- and NK-specific developmental programs. Recent perturbation experiments provide evidence that this space has three major axes, corresponding to the PU.1 versus GATA-1 balance, the intensity of Notch signaling through the CSL pathway, and the ratio of E-box transcription factors to their Id protein antagonists.

  16. Regulatory coding of lymphoid lineage choice by hematopoietic transcription factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Luigi A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2003-01-01

    During lymphopoiesis, precursor cells negotiate a complex regulatory space, defined by the levels of several competing and cross-regulating transcription factors, before arriving at stable states of commitment to the B-, T- and NK-specific developmental programs. Recent perturbation experiments provide evidence that this space has three major axes, corresponding to the PU.1 versus GATA-1 balance, the intensity of Notch signaling through the CSL pathway, and the ratio of E-box transcription factors to their Id protein antagonists.

  17. STREAM: Static Thermodynamic REgulAtory Model of transcription.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Denis C; Bailey, Timothy L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the transcriptional regulation of a gene in detail is a crucial step towards uncovering and ultimately utilizing the regulatory grammar of the genome. Modeling transcriptional regulation using thermodynamic equations has become an increasingly important approach towards this goal. Here, we present stream, the first publicly available framework for modeling, visualizing and predicting the regulation of the transcription rate of a target gene. Given the concentrations of a set of transcription factors (TFs), the TF binding sites (TFBSs) in a regulatory DNA region, and the transcription rate of the target gene, stream will optimize its parameters to generate a model that best fits the input data. This trained model can then be used to (a) validate that the given set of TFs is able to regulate the target gene and (b) to predict the transcription rate under different conditions (e.g. different tissues, knockout/additional TFs or mutated/missing TFBSs). The platform independent executable of stream, as well as a tutorial and the full documentation, are available at http://bioinformatics.org.au/stream/. stream requires Java version 5 or higher.

  18. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex P.; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E.; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K.; Maurano, Matthew T.; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R. Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J.; Akey, Joshua M.; Bender, Michael; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNaseI, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNaseI footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNaseI cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50 base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation, and pluripotency. PMID:22955618

  19. An expansive human regulatory lexicon encoded in transcription factor footprints.

    PubMed

    Neph, Shane; Vierstra, Jeff; Stergachis, Andrew B; Reynolds, Alex P; Haugen, Eric; Vernot, Benjamin; Thurman, Robert E; John, Sam; Sandstrom, Richard; Johnson, Audra K; Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Wang, Hao; Vong, Shinny; Lee, Kristen; Bates, Daniel; Diegel, Morgan; Roach, Vaughn; Dunn, Douglas; Neri, Jun; Schafer, Anthony; Hansen, R Scott; Kutyavin, Tanya; Giste, Erika; Weaver, Molly; Canfield, Theresa; Sabo, Peter; Zhang, Miaohua; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; MacCoss, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M; Bender, M A; Groudine, Mark; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-06

    Regulatory factor binding to genomic DNA protects the underlying sequence from cleavage by DNase I, leaving nucleotide-resolution footprints. Using genomic DNase I footprinting across 41 diverse cell and tissue types, we detected 45 million transcription factor occupancy events within regulatory regions, representing differential binding to 8.4 million distinct short sequence elements. Here we show that this small genomic sequence compartment, roughly twice the size of the exome, encodes an expansive repertoire of conserved recognition sequences for DNA-binding proteins that nearly doubles the size of the human cis-regulatory lexicon. We find that genetic variants affecting allelic chromatin states are concentrated in footprints, and that these elements are preferentially sheltered from DNA methylation. High-resolution DNase I cleavage patterns mirror nucleotide-level evolutionary conservation and track the crystallographic topography of protein-DNA interfaces, indicating that transcription factor structure has been evolutionarily imprinted on the human genome sequence. We identify a stereotyped 50-base-pair footprint that precisely defines the site of transcript origination within thousands of human promoters. Finally, we describe a large collection of novel regulatory factor recognition motifs that are highly conserved in both sequence and function, and exhibit cell-selective occupancy patterns that closely parallel major regulators of development, differentiation and pluripotency.

  20. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  1. Inferring transcription factor collaborations in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Living cells are realized by complex gene expression programs that are moderated by regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). The TFs control the differential expression of target genes in the context of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), either individually or in groups. Deciphering the mechanisms of how the TFs control the expression of target genes is a challenging task, especially when multiple TFs collaboratively participate in the transcriptional regulation. Results We model the underlying regulatory interactions in terms of the directions (activation or repression) and their logical roles (necessary and/or sufficient) with a modified association rule mining approach, called mTRIM. The experiment on Yeast discovered 670 regulatory interactions, in which multiple TFs express their functions on common target genes collaboratively. The evaluation on yeast genetic interactions, TF knockouts and a synthetic dataset shows that our algorithm is significantly better than the existing ones. Conclusions mTRIM is a novel method to infer TF collaborations in transcriptional regulation networks. mTRIM is available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/mTRIM. PMID:24565025

  2. Nampt/visfatin/PBEF affects expression of myogenic regulatory factors and is regulated by interleukin-6 in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Krzysik-Walker, Susan M; Hadley, Jill A; Pesall, Jane E; McFarland, Douglas C; Vasilatos-Younken, Regina; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2011-08-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt/visfatin/PBEF) has been identified as a rate-limiting NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme and an adipokine found in the circulation. Human and chicken skeletal muscles are reported to have the highest level of Nampt expression among various tissues whose functional significance remains undetermined. Expression of Nampt is regulated by interleukin-6 (IL-6), an essential cytokine for postnatal muscle growth in mammals. The objective of the current study was to characterize expression of Nampt in chicken (Gallus gallus) myogenic cells and to determine the effect of Nampt on expression of IL-6, myogenic transcription factors, and glucose uptake. We also sought to determine the effect of IL-6 on Nampt expression in chicken myogenic cells. Nampt mRNA and protein were identified in both myoblasts and myocytes, although expression did not differ between the two cell types. Treatment with recombinant human Nampt was found to decrease myoD and mrf4 expression but to increase myf5 expression in myocytes, while glucose uptake was unaffected. In response to treatment with recombinant Nampt, IL-6 expression in myocytes was increased at 24h but decreased when treated for 48 or 72 h. Forced over-expression of chicken Nampt cDNA significantly decreased myf5 expression in myoblasts. Treatment of myogenic cells with lower levels (1 ng.mL(-1)) of recombinant IL-6 increased Nampt expression, whereas a higher IL-6 concentration (100 ng.mL(-1)) decreased Nampt mRNA abundance. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Nampt, regulated in part by IL-6, alters the expression of key myogenic transcription factors and thereby may influence postnatal myogenesis.

  3. Conformational transitions of the catalytic domain of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase, a key translational regulatory molecule.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, R K; Suresh, C G; Bhosale, Siddharth H; Bhavnani, Varsha; Kumar, Avinash; Gaikwad, Sushama M; Pal, Jayanta K

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI) plays a critical role in the regulation of protein synthesis at the initiation step through phosphorylation of α-subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2). In this study we have cloned and performed biophysical characterization of the kinase catalytic domain (KD) of rabbit HRI. The KD described here comprises kinase 1, the kinase insertion domain (KI) and kinase 2. We report here the existence of an active and stable monomer of HRI (KD). The HRI (KD) containing three tryptophan residues was examined for its conformational transitions occurring under various denaturing conditions using steady-state and time-resolved tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and hydrophobic dye binding. The parameter A and phase diagram analysis revealed multi-state unfolding and existence of three stable intermediates during guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn-HCl) induced unfolding of HRI (KD). The protein treated with 6 M Gdn-HCl showed collisional and static mechanism of acrylamide quenching and the constants (K(sv) = 3.08 M(-1) and K(s)= 5.62 M(-1)) were resolved using time resolved fluorescence titration. Based on pH, guanidine hydrochloride and temperature mediated transitions, HRI (KD) appears to exemplify a rigid molten globule-like intermediate with compact secondary structure, altered tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic patches at pH 3.0. The results indicate the inherent structural stability of HRI (KD), a member of the class of stress response proteins.

  4. Cooperation between myogenic regulatory factors and SIX family transcription factors is important for myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubing; Chu, Alphonse; Chakroun, Imane; Islam, Uzma; Blais, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Precise regulation of gene expression is crucial to myogenesis and is thought to require the cooperation of various transcription factors. On the basis of a bioinformatic analysis of gene regulatory sequences, we hypothesized that myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), key regulators of skeletal myogenesis, cooperate with members of the SIX family of transcription factors, known to play important roles during embryonic skeletal myogenesis. To this day little is known regarding the exact molecular mechanism by which SIX factors regulate muscle development. We have conducted a functional genomic study of the role played by SIX1 and SIX4 during the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts, a model of adult muscle regeneration. We report that SIX factors cooperate with the members of the MRF family to activate gene expression during myogenic differentiation, and that their function is essential to this process. Our findings also support a model where SIX factors function not only ‘upstream’ of the MRFs during embryogenesis, but also ‘in parallel’ to them during myoblast differentiation. We have identified new essential nodes that depend on SIX factor function, in the myogenesis regulatory network, and have uncovered a novel way by which MRF function is modulated during differentiation. PMID:20601407

  5. Regulations.gov Federal Regulatory Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashlin, John; Davis, Richard; Dalecky, Selene; Grasso, Richard; LaPlant, Lisa; Morales, Oscar; Nelson, Jennifer; White, Michael; Whitt, Sharon A.

    2004-01-01

    The Regulations.gov Online Rulemaking Project is 1 of the 24 e-Government Initiatives on the President's Management Agenda (PMA), which was announced by the White House in 2001. The Regulations.gov Web site is the central electronic rulemaking portal for the federal government. Through a single Web site, citizens can search, view, and comment on…

  6. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    PubMed

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-08-21

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  8. Multiple functions of nucleosomes and regulatory factors in transcription.

    PubMed

    Workman, J L; Buchman, A R

    1993-03-01

    The in vivo packaging of DNA with histone proteins to form chromatin makes its transcription a difficult process. Biochemical and genetic studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic details of how transcriptional regulatory factors confront at least two hurdles created by nucleosomes, the primary structural unit of chromatin. Regulatory factors must gain access to their respective binding sites and activate the formation of transcription complexes at core promoter elements. Distinct regulatory factors may be specialized to perform these functions.

  9. Interferon regulatory factor-1 together with reactive oxygen species promotes the acceleration of cell cycle progression by up-regulating the cyclin E and CDK2 genes during high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Liu, Long; Chen, Chao; Chi, Ya-Li; Yang, Xiang-Qun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xiao-Tong; Guo, Shi-Lei; Xiong, Shao-Hu; Shen, Man-Ru; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chuan-Sen; Hu, Kai-Meng

    2013-10-14

    The high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the development of diabetic vascular diseases. In a previous study, we confirmed that Interferon regulatory factor-1 (Irf-1) is a positive regulator of the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. However, the mechanisms remain to be determined. The levels of cyclin/CDK expression in two cell models involving Irf-1 knockdown and overexpression were quantified to explore the relationship between Irf-1 and its downstream effectors under normal or high glucose conditions. Subsequently, cells were treated with high glucose/NAC, normal glucose/H₂O₂, high glucose/U0126 or normal glucose/H₂O₂/U0126 during an incubation period. Then proliferation, cyclin/CDK expression and cell cycle distribution assays were performed to determine whether ROS/Erk1/2 signaling pathway was involved in the Irf-1-induced regulation of VSMC growth under high glucose conditions. We found that Irf-1 overexpression led to down-regulation of cyclin D1/CDK4 and inhibited cell cycle progression in VSMCs under normal glucose conditions. In high glucose conditions, Irf-1 overexpression led to an up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and an acceleration of cell cycle progression, whereas silencing of Irf-1 suppressed the expression of both proteins and inhibited the cell cycle during the high glucose-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with antioxidants prevented the Irf-1 overexpression-induced proliferation of VSMCs, the up-regulation of cyclin E/CDK2 and the acceleration of cell cycle progression in high glucose conditions. In contrast, under normal glucose conditions, H₂O₂ stimulation and Irf-1 overexpression induced cell proliferation, up-regulated cyclin E/CDK2 expression and promoted cell cycle acceleration. In addition, overexpression of Irf-1 promoted the activation of Erk1/2 and when VSMCs overexpressing Irf-1 were treated with U0126, the specific Erk1/2 inhibitor

  10. California environmental regulatory climate: Linking regulation to specific concerns

    SciTech Connect

    Rauh, T.N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper focuses on three areas of change which are aimed at recognizing and taking advantage of the benefits offered by the tremendous body of information and knowledge now available in the realm of environmental protection and regulation: Comprehensive re-evaluation and reform of California`s hazardous waste management regulatory program through the Department of Toxic Substances Control`s (DTSC) Regulatory Structure Update (RSU), which is designed to eliminate unnecessary regulatory burden while retaining requirements needed to protect the citizens and environment of California; Consolidation of governmental oversight functions in the areas of hazardous materials and hazardous waste at the local level through certified unified program agencies (CUPAs), providing for more effective and efficient utilization of limited governmental resources; Development of environmental management standards and systems and compliance assurance plans and programs to shift regulatory emphasis away from pre-operational regulatory agency command and control review and approval towards self-responsibility and self-evaluation on the part of California businesses with regulatory agencies emphasizing compliance assistance and enforcement targeted at bad actors. Together, these program reforms and redirections, when fully implemented, will substantially alter and improve the environmental regulatory climate for California business, while effectively protecting the environment and health of all Californians.

  11. A Novel Function of F-Box Protein FBXO17 in Negative Regulation of Type I IFN Signaling by Recruiting PP2A for IFN Regulatory Factor 3 Deactivation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Di; Wang, Zining; Huang, Anfei; Zhao, Yong; Qin, F Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-15

    The F-box proteins were originally identified as the key component of SKP1-Cullin1-F-box E3 ligase complexes that control the stability of their specific downstream substrates essential for cell growth and survival. However, the involvement of these proteins in type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling during innate immunity has not been investigated. In this study we report that the F-box protein FBXO17 negatively regulates IFN-I signaling triggered by double-strand DNA, RNA, or viral infection. We found that FBXO17 specifically interacts with IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and decreases its dimerization and nuclear translocation. The decrease of IRF3 dimerization and nuclear translocation is due to the recruitment of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) mediated by FBXO17, resulting in IRF3 dephosphorylation. Interestingly, PP2A recruitment does not require the F-box domain but instead the F-box associated region of the protein; thus, the recruitment is independent of the canonical function of the SKP1-Cullin1-F-box family of E3 ligase. Together, our studies identify a previously unreported role of FBXO17 in regulating IFN-I signaling and further demonstrate a novel mechanism for IRF3 deactivation by F-box protein-mediated recruitment of PP2A.

  12. A Novel Function of F-Box Protein FBXO17 in Negative Regulation of Type I IFN Signaling by Recruiting PP2A for IFN Regulatory Factor 3 Deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Di; Wang, Zining; Huang, Anfei

    2017-01-01

    The F-box proteins were originally identified as the key component of SKP1-Cullin1-F-box E3 ligase complexes that control the stability of their specific downstream substrates essential for cell growth and survival. However, the involvement of these proteins in type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling during innate immunity has not been investigated. In this study we report that the F-box protein FBXO17 negatively regulates IFN-I signaling triggered by double-strand DNA, RNA, or viral infection. We found that FBXO17 specifically interacts with IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and decreases its dimerization and nuclear translocation. The decrease of IRF3 dimerization and nuclear translocation is due to the recruitment of protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) mediated by FBXO17, resulting in IRF3 dephosphorylation. Interestingly, PP2A recruitment does not require the F-box domain but instead the F-box associated region of the protein; thus, the recruitment is independent of the canonical function of the SKP1-Cullin1-F-box family of E3 ligase. Together, our studies identify a previously unreported role of FBXO17 in regulating IFN-I signaling and further demonstrate a novel mechanism for IRF3 deactivation by F-box protein-mediated recruitment of PP2A. PMID:27956528

  13. The Toxoplasma Centrocone Houses Cell Cycle Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Naumov, Anatoli; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Kim, Kami; Suvorova, Elena S; White, Michael W

    2017-08-22

    Our knowledge of cell cycle regulatory mechanisms in apicomplexan parasites is very limited. In this study, we describe a novel Toxoplasma gondii factor that has a vital role in chromosome replication and the regulation of cytoplasmic and nuclear mitotic structures, and we named this factor ECR1 for essential for chromosome replication 1. ECR1 was discovered by complementation of a temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant that suffers lethal, uncontrolled chromosome replication at 40°C similar to a ts mutant carrying a defect in topoisomerase. ECR1 is a 52-kDa protein containing divergent RING and TRAF-Sina-like zinc binding domains that are dynamically expressed in the tachyzoite cell cycle. ECR1 first appears in the unique spindle compartment of the Apicomplexa (centrocone) of the nuclear envelope in early S phase and then in the nucleus in late S phase where it reaches maximum expression. Following nuclear division, but before daughter parasites separate from the mother parasite, ECR1 is downregulated and is absent in new daughter parasites. The proteomics of ECR1 identified interactions with the ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation machinery and the minichromosome maintenance complex, and the loss of ECR1 led to increased stability of a key member of this complex, MCM2. ECR1 also forms a stable complex with the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-related kinase, Tgondii Crk5 (TgCrk5), which displays a similar cell cycle expression and localization during tachyzoite replication. Importantly, the localization of ECR1/TgCrk5 in the centrocone indicates that this Apicomplexa-specific spindle compartment houses important regulatory factors that control the parasite cell cycle.IMPORTANCE Parasites of the apicomplexan family are important causes of human disease, including malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Parasite growth is the underlying cause of pathogenesis, yet despite this importance, the molecular basis for parasite replication is poorly understood. Filling

  14. Master regulators, regulatory networks, and pathways of glioblastoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Serdar; Li, Aiguo; Baysan, Mehmet; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor. GBM samples are classified into subtypes based on their transcriptomic and epigenetic profiles. Despite numerous studies to better characterize GBM biology, a comprehensive study to identify GBM subtype- specific master regulators, gene regulatory networks, and pathways is missing. Here, we used FastMEDUSA to compute master regulators and gene regulatory networks for each GBM subtype. We also ran Gene Set Enrichment Analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on GBM expression dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project to compute GBM- and GBM subtype-specific pathways. Our analysis was able to recover some of the known master regulators and pathways in GBM as well as some putative novel regulators and pathways, which will aide in our understanding of the unique biology of GBM subtypes.

  15. Aortic endothelial cells regulate proliferation of human monocytes in vitro via a mechanism synergistic with macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Convergence at the cyclin E/p27(Kip1) regulatory checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Antonov, A S; Munn, D H; Kolodgie, F D; Virmani, R; Gerrity, R G

    1997-06-15

    Monocyte-derived macrophages (Mphis) are pivotal participants in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Evidence from both animal and human plaques indicates that local proliferation may contribute to accumulation of lesion Mphis, and the major Mphi growth factor, macrophage colony stimulating factor (MCSF), is present in atherosclerotic plaques. However, most in vitro studies have failed to demonstrate that human monocytes/Mphis possess significant proliferative capacity. We now report that, although human monocytes cultured in isolation showed only limited MCSF-induced proliferation, monocytes cocultured with aortic endothelial cells at identical MCSF concentrations underwent enhanced (up to 40-fold) and prolonged (21 d) proliferation. In contrast with monocytes in isolation, this was optimal at low seeding densities, required endothelial cell contact, and could not be reproduced by coculture with smooth muscle cells. Intimal Mphi isolated from human aortas likewise showed endothelial cell contact-dependent, MCSF-induced proliferation. Consistent with a two-signal mechanism governing Mphi proliferation, the cell cycle regulatory protein, cyclin E, was rapidly upregulated by endothelial cell contact in an MCSFindependent fashion, but MCSF was required for successful downregulation of the cell cycle inhibitory protein p27(Kip1) before cell cycling. Thus endothelial cells and MCSF differentially and synergistically regulate two Mphi genes critical for progression through the cell cycle.

  16. [Comparative analysis of conservation and regulatory network on core transcription factors in mouse inner ear development].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xin-Huan; Wei, Qin-Jun; Xing, Guang-Qian; Cao, Xin

    2013-10-01

    During vertebrate inner ear development, several core genes, such as Six1, Six4, Pax2, Pax8, Foxi1, Dlx5, Gbx2, Irx2/3, and Msx1, are crucial to the regulation of the otic placode induction. In order to get the gene regulatory network during inner ear development, bioinformatics methods were adopted to analyze conservation and regulation of the core transcription factors in mice. Pax2, Pax8, Foxi1, and Dlx5 remained to be the main regulators during inner ear development, which was consistent with the gene regulatory network from literature. Six1 was regulated by many transcription factors, and Gbx2, Irx2/3, and Msx1 played important roles in the regulatory network. The differences in the constructed regulatory network were reasonably analyzed. It was predicted that Msxl regulated the expression of Six1 and Gbx2. In addition, several transcription factors, such as Sox5, Lhx2, Rax, Otx1, Otx2, Pitxl, Pitx2, Nkx2-5, Irx4, Irx6, Dlx2, Hmx1/2/3, Pou4f3, Pax4 and Tlx2, were found to be involved in the regulatory network. Our results provide an improved understanding of the regulatory mechanism during inner ear development.

  17. Innovative farmers and regulatory gatekeepers: Genetically modified crops regulation and adoption in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Sinebo, Woldeyesus; Maredia, Karim

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The regulation of genetically modified (GM) crops is a topical issue in agriculture and environment over the past 2 decades. The objective of this paper is to recount regulatory and adoption practices in some developing countries that have successfully adopted GM crops so that aspiring countries may draw useful lessons and best practices for their biosafatey regulatory regimes. The first 11 mega-GM crops growing countries each with an area of more than one million hectares in 2014 were examined. Only five out of the 11 countries had smooth and orderly adoption of these crops as per the regulatory requirement of each country. In the remaining 6 countries (all developing countries), GM crops were either introduced across borders without official authorization, released prior to regulatory approval or unapproved seeds were sold along with the approved ones in violation to the existing regulations. Rapid expansion of transgenic crops over the past 2 decades in the developing world was a result of an intense desire by farmers to adopt these crops irrespective of regulatory roadblocks. Lack of workable biosafety regulatory system and political will to support GM crops encouraged unauthorized access to GM crop varieties. In certain cases, unregulated access in turn appeared to result in the adoption of substandard or spurious technology which undermined performance and productivity. An optimal interaction among the national agricultural innovation systems, biosafety regulatory bodies, biotech companies and high level policy makers is vital in making a workable regulated progress in the adoption of GM crops. Factoring forgone opportunities to farmers to benefit from GM crops arising from overregulation into biosafety risk analysis and decision making is suggested. Building functional biosafety regulatory systems that balances the needs of farmers to access and utilize the GM technology with the regulatory imperatives to ensure adequate safety to the environment

  18. Innovative farmers and regulatory gatekeepers: Genetically modified crops regulation and adoption in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sinebo, Woldeyesus; Maredia, Karim

    2016-01-02

    The regulation of genetically modified (GM) crops is a topical issue in agriculture and environment over the past 2 decades. The objective of this paper is to recount regulatory and adoption practices in some developing countries that have successfully adopted GM crops so that aspiring countries may draw useful lessons and best practices for their biosafatey regulatory regimes. The first 11 mega-GM crops growing countries each with an area of more than one million hectares in 2014 were examined. Only five out of the 11 countries had smooth and orderly adoption of these crops as per the regulatory requirement of each country. In the remaining 6 countries (all developing countries), GM crops were either introduced across borders without official authorization, released prior to regulatory approval or unapproved seeds were sold along with the approved ones in violation to the existing regulations. Rapid expansion of transgenic crops over the past 2 decades in the developing world was a result of an intense desire by farmers to adopt these crops irrespective of regulatory roadblocks. Lack of workable biosafety regulatory system and political will to support GM crops encouraged unauthorized access to GM crop varieties. In certain cases, unregulated access in turn appeared to result in the adoption of substandard or spurious technology which undermined performance and productivity. An optimal interaction among the national agricultural innovation systems, biosafety regulatory bodies, biotech companies and high level policy makers is vital in making a workable regulated progress in the adoption of GM crops. Factoring forgone opportunities to farmers to benefit from GM crops arising from overregulation into biosafety risk analysis and decision making is suggested. Building functional biosafety regulatory systems that balances the needs of farmers to access and utilize the GM technology with the regulatory imperatives to ensure adequate safety to the environment and human

  19. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Bacterial Response Regulators: Versatile Regulatory Strategies from Common Domains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rong; Mack, Timothy R.; Stock, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Response regulators (RRs) comprise a major family of signaling proteins in prokaryotes. A modular architecture which consists of a conserved receiver domain and a variable effector domain allows RRs to function as phosphorylation-regulated switches that couple a wide variety of cellular behaviors to environmental cues. Recently, advances have been made in understanding RR functions both at genome-wide and molecular levels. Global techniques have been developed to analyze RR input and output, expanding the scope of characterization of these versatile components. Meanwhile, structural studies have revealed that despite common structures and mechanisms of function within individual domains, a range of interactions between receiver and effector domains confer great diversity in regulatory strategies, optimizing individual RRs for the specific regulatory needs of different signaling systems. PMID:17433693

  1. Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Promotes Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, Pierre; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Cuda, Carla M.; Dominguez, Salina; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Monach, Paul; Lafyatis, Robert; Rice, Lisa M.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Baum, Rebecca; Richez, Christophe; Perlman, Harris; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Polymorphisms in the transcription factor IRF5 are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. This study was done to determine the role of IRF5 in arthritis development. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in mice deficient in IRF5, or lacking IRF5 only in myeloid cells, and arthritis severity was evaluated. K/BxN arthritis was also induced in mice deficient in TRIF, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 to determine pathways through which IRF5 might promote arthritis. In-vitro studies were performed to determine the role of IRF5 in IL-1 receptor and TLR signaling. Results Arthritis severity was reduced in IRF5-deficient, TRIF-deficient, TLR3-deficient and TLR7-deficient mice. The expression of multiple genes regulating neutrophil recruitment or function and bioactive IL-1β formation was reduced in the joints during active arthritis in IRF5-deficient mice. In vitro studies showed that TLR7 and the TRIF-dependent TLR3 pathway induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production in disease relevant cell types in an IRF5-dependent manner. Conclusion IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory arthritis. This is likely due at least in part to the role of IRF5 in mediating pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream of TLR7 and TLR3. As TLR7 and TLR3 are both RNA-sensing TLRs, this suggests that endogenous RNA ligands present in the inflamed joint promote arthritis development. These findings may be relevant to human RA as RNA capable of activating TLR7 and TLR3 is present in synovial fluid and TLR7 and TLR3 are upregulated in the joints of RA patients. PMID:26315890

  2. Statistical inference of regulatory networks for circadian regulation.

    PubMed

    Aderhold, Andrej; Husmeier, Dirk; Grzegorczyk, Marco

    2014-06-01

    We assess the accuracy of various state-of-the-art statistics and machine learning methods for reconstructing gene and protein regulatory networks in the context of circadian regulation. Our study draws on the increasing availability of gene expression and protein concentration time series for key circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, gene expression and protein concentration time series are simulated from a recently published regulatory network of the circadian clock in A. thaliana, in which protein and gene interactions are described by a Markov jump process based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. We closely follow recent experimental protocols, including the entrainment of seedlings to different light-dark cycles and the knock-out of various key regulatory genes. Our study provides relative network reconstruction accuracy scores for a critical comparative performance evaluation, and sheds light on a series of highly relevant questions: it quantifies the influence of systematically missing values related to unknown protein concentrations and mRNA transcription rates, it investigates the dependence of the performance on the network topology and the degree of recurrency, it provides deeper insight into when and why non-linear methods fail to outperform linear ones, it offers improved guidelines on parameter settings in different inference procedures, and it suggests new hypotheses about the structure of the central circadian gene regulatory network in A. thaliana.

  3. MALT1 is an intrinsic regulator of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Brüstle, A; Brenner, D; Knobbe-Thomsen, C B; Cox, M; Lang, P A; Lang, K S; Mak, T W

    2015-09-25

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and their absence or dysfunction can lead to autoimmunity. However, the molecular pathways that govern Treg biology remain obscure. In this study, we show that the nuclear factor-κB signalling mediator mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1) is an important novel regulator of both Tregs originating in the thymus ('natural' or nTregs) and Tregs induced to differentiate from naive thymocyte helper (Th) cells in the periphery ('induced' or iTregs). Our examination of mice deficient for MALT1 revealed that these mutants have a reduced number of total Tregs. In young Malt1(-/-) mice, nTregs are totally absent and iTreg are diminished in the periphery. Interestingly, total Treg numbers increase in older Malt1(-/-) mice as well as in Malt1(-/-) mice subjected to experimentally induced inflammation. iTregs isolated from WT and Malt1(-/-) mice were indistinguishable with respect to their ability to suppress the activities of effector T cells, but Malt1(-/-) iTregs expressed higher levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Treatment of WT and Malt1(-/-) Th cells in vitro with the TLR2 ligand Pam3Cys strongly enhanced the induction and proliferation of Malt1(-/-) iTregs. Our data suggest that MALT1 supports nTreg development in the thymus but suppresses iTreg induction in the periphery during inflammation. Our data position MALT1 as a key molecule that contributes to immune tolerance at steady-state while facilitating immune reactivity under stress conditions.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 25 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cdd.2015.104.

  4. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli. PMID:24396271

  5. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-09-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli.

  6. Search for regulatory factors of the pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, Naoto; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Hiroto; SHIBUYA, Shiori; YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; KANNO, Naoko; HORIGUCHI, Kotaro; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1, a factor important for pituitary organogenesis, appears on rat embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in SOX2-expressing stem/progenitor cells and always coexists with SOX2 throughout life. PROP1-positive cells at one point occupy all cells in Rathke’s pouch, followed by a rapid decrease in their number. Their regulatory factors, except for RBP-J, have not yet been clarified. This study aimed to use the 3 kb upstream region and 1st intron of mouse prop1 to pinpoint a group of factors selected on the basis of expression in the early pituitary gland for expression of Prop1. Reporter assays for SOX2 and RBP-J showed that the stem/progenitor marker SOX2 has cell type-dependent inhibitory and activating functions through the proximal and distal upstream regions of Prop1, respectively, while RBP-J had small regulatory activity in some cell lines. Reporter assays for another 39 factors using the 3 kb upstream regions in CHO cells ultimately revealed that 8 factors, MSX2, PAX6, PIT1, PITX1, PITX2, RPF1, SOX8 and SOX11, but not RBP-J, regulate Prop1 expression. Furthermore, a synergy effect with SOX2 was observed for an additional 10 factors, FOXJ1, HES1, HEY1, HEY2, KLF6, MSX1, RUNX1, TEAD2, YBX2 and ZFP36Ll, which did not show substantial independent action. Thus, we demonstrated 19 candidates, including SOX2, to be regulatory factors of Prop1 expression. PMID:26640231

  7. Loregic: A Method to Characterize the Cooperative Logic of Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daifeng; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Sisu, Cristina; Cheng, Chao; Rozowsky, Joel; Meyerson, William; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    The topology of the gene-regulatory network has been extensively analyzed. Now, given the large amount of available functional genomic data, it is possible to go beyond this and systematically study regulatory circuits in terms of logic elements. To this end, we present Loregic, a computational method integrating gene expression and regulatory network data, to characterize the cooperativity of regulatory factors. Loregic uses all 16 possible two-input-one-output logic gates (e.g. AND or XOR) to describe triplets of two factors regulating a common target. We attempt to find the gate that best matches each triplet’s observed gene expression pattern across many conditions. We make Loregic available as a general-purpose tool (github.com/gersteinlab/loregic). We validate it with known yeast transcription-factor knockout experiments. Next, using human ENCODE ChIP-Seq and TCGA RNA-Seq data, we are able to demonstrate how Loregic characterizes complex circuits involving both proximally and distally regulating transcription factors (TFs) and also miRNAs. Furthermore, we show that MYC, a well-known oncogenic driving TF, can be modeled as acting independently from other TFs (e.g., using OR gates) but antagonistically with repressing miRNAs. Finally, we inter-relate Loregic’s gate logic with other aspects of regulation, such as indirect binding via protein-protein interactions, feed-forward loop motifs and global regulatory hierarchy. PMID:25884877

  8. A role for the transcription factor Helios in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Goldberg, Monica V.; Harris, Timothy J.; Yen, Hung-Rong; Bruno, Tullia C.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Hipkiss, Edward L.; Pyle, Kristin J.; Wada, Satoshi; Pan, Fan; Pardoll, Drew M.; Drake, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Relative up-regulation of the Ikaros family transcription factor Helios in natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been reported by several groups. However, a role for Helios in regulatory T cells has not yet been described. Here, we show that Helios is upregulated in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicated that Helios binds to the FoxP3 promoter. These data were further corroborated by experiments showing that knocking-down Helios with siRNA oligonucleotides results in down-regulation of FoxP3. Functionally, we found that suppression of Helios message in CD4+CD25+ T cells significantly attenuates their suppressive function. Taken together, these data suggest that Helios may play an important role in regulatory T cell function and support the concept that Helios may be a novel target to manipulate Treg activity in a clinical setting. PMID:20226531

  9. Regulation and secretion of Xanthomonas virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Daniela; Bonas, Ulla

    2010-03-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas cause a variety of diseases in economically important monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous crop plants worldwide. Successful infection and bacterial multiplication in the host tissue often depend on the virulence factors secreted including adhesins, polysaccharides, LPS and degradative enzymes. One of the key pathogenicity factors is the type III secretion system, which injects effector proteins into the host cell cytosol to manipulate plant cellular processes such as basal defense to the benefit of the pathogen. The coordinated expression of bacterial virulence factors is orchestrated by quorum-sensing pathways, multiple two-component systems and transcriptional regulators such as Clp, Zur, FhrR, HrpX and HpaR. Furthermore, virulence gene expression is post-transcriptionally controlled by the RNA-binding protein RsmA. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the infection strategies and regulatory networks controlling secreted virulence factors from Xanthomonas species.

  10. Regulatory Network Structure as a Dominant Determinant of Transcription Factor Evolutionary Rate

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Xia, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks has thus far mostly been studied at the level of cis-regulatory elements. To gain a complete understanding of regulatory network evolution we must also study the evolutionary role of trans-factors, such as transcription factors (TFs). Here, we systematically assess genomic and network-level determinants of TF evolutionary rate in yeast, and how they compare to those of generic proteins, while carefully controlling for differences of the TF protein set, such as expression level. We found significantly distinct trends relating TF evolutionary rate to mRNA expression level, codon adaptation index, the evolutionary rate of physical interaction partners, and, confirming previous reports, to protein-protein interaction degree and regulatory in-degree. We discovered that for TFs, the dominant determinants of evolutionary rate lie in the structure of the regulatory network, such as the median evolutionary rate of target genes and the fraction of species-specific target genes. Decomposing the regulatory network by edge sign, we found that this modular evolution of TFs and their targets is limited to activating regulatory relationships. We show that fast evolving TFs tend to regulate other TFs and niche-specific processes and that their targets show larger evolutionary expression changes than targets of other TFs. We also show that the positive trend relating TF regulatory in-degree and evolutionary rate is likely related to the species-specificity of the transcriptional regulation modules. Finally, we discuss likely causes for TFs' different evolutionary relationship to the physical interaction network, such as the prevalence of transient interactions in the TF subnetwork. This work suggests that positive and negative regulatory networks follow very different evolutionary rules, and that transcription factor evolution is best understood at a network- or systems-level. PMID:23093926

  11. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  12. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years.

  13. HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    HAWKINS AR

    2007-09-24

    Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper

  14. Inflammation, Self-Regulation, and Health: An Immunologic Model of Self-Regulatory Failure.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Slavich, George M

    2017-07-01

    Self-regulation is a fundamental human process that refers to multiple complex methods by which individuals pursue goals in the face of distractions. Whereas superior self-regulation predicts better academic achievement, relationship quality, financial and career success, and lifespan health, poor self-regulation increases a person's risk for negative outcomes in each of these domains and can ultimately presage early mortality. Given its centrality to understanding the human condition, a large body of research has examined cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of self-regulation. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to specific biologic processes that may underlie self-regulation. We address this latter issue in the present review by examining the growing body of research showing that components of the immune system involved in inflammation can alter neural, cognitive, and motivational processes that lead to impaired self-regulation and poor health. Based on these findings, we propose an integrated, multilevel model that describes how inflammation may cause widespread biobehavioral alterations that promote self-regulatory failure. This immunologic model of self-regulatory failure has implications for understanding how biological and behavioral factors interact to influence self-regulation. The model also suggests new ways of reducing disease risk and enhancing human potential by targeting inflammatory processes that affect self-regulation.

  15. Cell-type specific cis-regulatory networks: insights from Hox transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Maria; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are a prominent class of transcription factors that specify cell and tissue identities in animal embryos. In sharp contrast to tissue-specifically expressed transcription factors, which coordinate regulatory pathways leading to the differentiation of a selected tissue, Hox proteins are active in many different cell types but are nonetheless able to differentially regulate gene expression in a context-dependent manner. This particular feature makes Hox proteins ideal candidates for elucidating the mechanisms employed by transcription factors to achieve tissue-specific functions in multi-cellular organisms. Here we discuss how the recent genome-wide identification and characterization of Hox cis-regulatory elements has provided insight concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the high spatiotemporal specificity of Hox proteins. In particular, it was shown that Hox transcriptional outputs depend on the cell-type specific interplay of the different Hox proteins with co-regulatory factors as well as with epigenetic modifiers. Based on these observations it becomes clear that cell-type specific approaches are required for dissecting the tissue-specific Hox regulatory code. Identification and comparative analysis of Hox cis-regulatory elements driving target gene expression in different cell types in combination with analyses on how cofactors, epigenetic modifiers and protein-protein interactions mediate context-dependent Hox function will elucidate the mechanistic basis of tissue-specific gene regulation.

  16. Identifying global regulators in transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2003-10-01

    The machinery for cells to take decisions, when environmental conditions change, includes protein-DNA interactions defined by transcriptional factors and their targets around promoters. Properties of global regulators are revised attempting to reach diagnostic explicit criteria for their definition and eventual future computational identification. These include among others, the number of regulated genes, the number and type of co-regulators, the different sigma-classes of promoters and the number of transcriptional factors they regulate, the size of the evolutionary family they belong to, and the variety of conditions where they exert their control. As a consequence, global versus local regulation can be identified, as shown for Escherichia coli and eventually in other genomes.

  17. Comparative genomic analysis of NAC transcriptional factors to dissect the regulatory mechanisms for cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongxia; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Wenying; Syrenne, Ryan D; Yuan, Joshua S; Su, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    NAC domain transcription factors are important transcriptional regulators involved in plant growth, development and stress responses. Recent studies have revealed several classes of NAC transcriptional factors crucial for controlling secondary cell wall biosynthesis. These transcriptional factors mainly include three classes, SND, NST and VND. Despite progress, most current analysis is carried out in the model plant Arabidopsis. Moreover, many downstream genes regulated by these transcriptional factors are still not clear. In order to identify the key homologue genes across species and discover the network controlling cell wall biosynthesis, we carried out comparative genome analysis of NST, VND and SND genes across 19 higher plant species along with computational modelling of genes regulated or co-regulated with these transcriptional factors. The comparative genome analysis revealed that evolutionarily the secondary-wall-associated NAC domain transcription factors first appeared in Selaginella moellendorffii. In fact, among the three groups, only VND genes appeared in S. moellendorffii, which is evolutionarily earlier than the other two groups. The Arabidopsis and rice gene expression analysis showed specific patterns of the secondary cell wall-associated NAC genes (SND, NST and VND). Most of them were preferentially expressed in the stem, especially the second internodes. Furthermore, comprehensive co-regulatory network analysis revealed that the SND and MYB genes were co-regulated, which indicated the coordinative function of these transcriptional factors in modulating cell wall biosynthesis. In addition, the co-regulatory network analysis revealed many novel genes and pathways that could be involved in cell wall biosynthesis and its regulation. The gene ontology analysis also indicated that processes like carbohydrate synthesis, transport and stress response, are coordinately regulated toward cell wall biosynthesis. Overall, we provided a new insight into the

  18. 77 FR 7930 - Improving Government Regulations; Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact: Ynette R. Shelkin, Editor, Defense Acquisition... Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact: Mary Overstreet, Department of Defense... Analysis Required: Yes. Agency Contact: Ynette R. Shelkin, Editor, Defense Acquisition Regulations System...

  19. 75 FR 4305 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning the Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Chapter III Regulatory Guidance Concerning the Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Texting by Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of regulatory...

  20. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E.; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics. PMID:27029515

  1. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-03-31

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics.

  2. Duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor drives the emergence of a new regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Pougach, Ksenia; Voet, Arnout; Kondrashov, Fyodor A.; Voordeckers, Karin; Christiaens, Joaquin F.; Baying, Bianka; Benes, Vladimir; Sakai, Ryo; Aerts, Jan; Zhu, Bo; Van Dijck, Patrick; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of new genes throughout evolution requires rewiring and extension of regulatory networks. However, the molecular details of how the transcriptional regulation of new gene copies evolves remain largely unexplored. Here we show how duplication of a transcription factor gene allowed the emergence of two independent regulatory circuits. Interestingly, the ancestral transcription factor was promiscuous and could bind different motifs in its target promoters. After duplication, one paralogue evolved increased binding specificity so that it only binds one type of motif, whereas the other copy evolved a decreased activity so that it only activates promoters that contain multiple binding sites. Interestingly, only a few mutations in both the DNA-binding domains and in the promoter binding sites were required to gradually disentangle the two networks. These results reveal how duplication of a promiscuous transcription factor followed by concerted cis and trans mutations allows expansion of a regulatory network. PMID:25204769

  3. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs. PMID:27095575

  4. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    PubMed

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  5. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Gavin M.; Wilson, Michael D.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions. We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  6. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  7. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. 7 CFR 4284.906 - State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State laws, local laws, regulatory commission...-Added Producer Grant Program General § 4284.906 State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations. If there are conflicts between this subpart and State or local laws or regulatory...

  9. 7 CFR 4284.906 - State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false State laws, local laws, regulatory commission...-Added Producer Grant Program General § 4284.906 State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations. If there are conflicts between this subpart and State or local laws or regulatory...

  10. 7 CFR 4284.906 - State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false State laws, local laws, regulatory commission...-Added Producer Grant Program General § 4284.906 State laws, local laws, regulatory commission regulations. If there are conflicts between this subpart and State or local laws or regulatory...

  11. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qiu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juarez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barrett, Christian; Lovley, Derek; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  12. Regulatory Impact Analysis: a new tool for better regulation at ANVISA.

    PubMed

    Alves, Flávia Neves Rocha; Peci, Alketa

    2011-08-01

    Regulatory Impact Analysis, which is recommended to regulatory departments, aims to improve regulatory quality by providing information about the costs and benefits of regulation as well as solutions to current issues to enhance the decision-making process. This article discusses the importance of Regulatory Impact Analysis in the context of the National Agency for Sanitary Surveillance performance as well as the agency's current phase of regulation improvement and strengthening. Also, the main definitions related to the regulatory field as well as some international case experiences are presented.

  13. The effect of hyperammonemia on myostatin and myogenic regulatory factor gene expression in broiler embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R.A.; Ashwell, C.M.; Dasarathy, S.; Mozdziak, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is facilitated by four myogenic regulatory factors and is significantly inhibited by myostatin. The objective of the current study was to examine embryonic gene regulation of myostatin/myogenic regulatory factors, and subsequent manipulations of protein synthesis, in broiler embryos under induced hyperammonemia. Broiler eggs were injected with ammonium acetate solution four times over 48 hours beginning on either embryonic day (ED) 15 or 17. Serum ammonia concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos for both ED17 and ED19 collected samples when compared to sham-injected controls. Expression of mRNA, extracted from pectoralis major of experimental and control embryos, was measured using real-time quantitative PCR for myostatin, myogenic regulatory factors myogenic factor 5, myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, myogenic regulatory factor 4, and paired box 7. A significantly lower (P < 0.01) myostatin expression was accompanied by a higher serum ammonia concentration in both ED17 and ED19 collected samples. Myogenic factor 5 expression was higher (P < 0.05) in ED17 collected samples administered ammonium acetate. In both ED17 and ED19 collected samples, myogenic regulatory factor 4 was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos. No significant difference was seen in myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, or paired box 7 expression between treatment groups for either age of sample collection. Additionally, there was no significant difference in BrdU staining of histological samples taken from treated and control embryos. Myostatin protein levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis, and also showed lower myostatin expression (P < 0.05). Overall, it appears possible to inhibit myostatin expression through hyperammonemia, which is expected to have a positive effect on embryonic myogenesis and postnatal muscle growth. PMID:25689990

  14. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  15. REGULATORY OR REGULATING PUBLICS? THE EUROPEAN UNION'S REGULATION OF EMERGING HEALTH TECHNOLOGIES AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION

    PubMed Central

    Flear, Mark L.; Pickersgill, Martyn D.

    2013-01-01

    ‘Citizen participation’ includes various participatory techniques and is frequently viewed as an unproblematic and important social good when used as part of the regulation of the innovation and implementation of science and technology. This is perhaps especially evident in debates around ‘anticipatory governance’ or ‘upstream engagement’. Here, we interrogate this thesis using the example of the European Union's regulation of emerging health technologies (such as nanotechnology). In this case, citizen participation in regulatory debate is concerned with innovative objects for medical application that are considered to be emergent or not yet concrete. Through synthesising insights from law, regulatory studies, critical theory, and science and technology studies, we seek to cast new light on the promises, paradoxes, and pitfalls of citizen participation as a tool or technology of regulation in itself. As such we aim to generate a new vantage point from which to view the values and sociotechnical imaginaries that are both ‘designed-in’ and ‘designed-out’ of citizen participation. In so doing, we show not only how publics (do not) regulate technologies, but also how citizens themselves are regulated through the techniques of participation. PMID:23222171

  16. Coelectrotransfer to skeletal muscle of three plasmids coding for antiangiogenic factors and regulatory factors of the tetracycline-inducible system: tightly regulated expression, inhibition of transplanted tumor growth, and antimetastatic effect.

    PubMed

    Martel-Renoir, Dominique; Trochon-Joseph, Véronique; Galaup, Ariane; Bouquet, Céline; Griscelli, Franck; Opolon, Paule; Opolon, David; Connault, Elisabeth; Mir, Lluis; Perricaudet, Michel

    2003-09-01

    We describe an approach employing intramuscular plasmid electrotransfer to deliver secretable forms of K1-5 and K1-3-HSA (a fusion of K1-3 with human serum albumin), which span, respectively, five and three of the five kringle domains of plasminogen. A tetracycline-inducible system (Tet-On) composed of three plasmids coding, respectively, for the transgene, the tetracycline transcriptional activator rtTA, and the silencer tTS was employed. K1-3-HSA and K1-5, produced from C2C12 muscle cells, were found to inhibit endothelial cell (HMEC-1) proliferation by 30 and 51%, respectively. In vivo, the expression of the transgene upon doxycycline stimulation was rapid, stable, and tightly regulated (no background expression) and could be maintained for at least 3 months. Blood half-lives of 2.1 and 3.7 days were found for K1-5 and K1-3-HSA, respectively. The K1-5 protein was secreted from muscle into blood at a level of 45 ng/ml, which was sufficient to inhibit MDA-MB-231 tumor growth by 81% in nude mice and B16-F10 melanoma cell lung invasion in C57BL/6 mice by 73%. PECAM-1 immunostaining studies revealed modest tumor vasculature in mice expressing K1-5. In contrast, K1-3-HSA, although secreted into blood at much higher level (250 ng/ml) than K1-5, had no effect on tumor growth.

  17. Decoding the regulatory landscape of melanoma reveals TEADS as regulators of the invasive cell state.

    PubMed

    Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichova, Hana; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Dewaele, Michael; Rambow, Florian; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Luciani, Flavie; Van den Mooter, Laura; Claerhout, Sofie; Fiers, Mark; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem-Elias; Herrmann, Carl; Halder, Georg; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2015-04-09

    Transcriptional reprogramming of proliferative melanoma cells into a phenotypically distinct invasive cell subpopulation is a critical event at the origin of metastatic spreading. Here we generate transcriptome, open chromatin and histone modification maps of melanoma cultures; and integrate this data with existing transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles from tumour biopsies to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying this key reprogramming event. This shows thousands of genomic regulatory regions underlying the proliferative and invasive states, identifying SOX10/MITF and AP-1/TEAD as regulators, respectively. Knockdown of TEADs shows a previously unrecognized role in the invasive gene network and establishes a causative link between these transcription factors, cell invasion and sensitivity to MAPK inhibitors. Using regulatory landscapes and in silico analysis, we show that transcriptional reprogramming underlies the distinct cellular states present in melanoma. Furthermore, it reveals an essential role for the TEADs, linking it to clinically relevant mechanisms such as invasion and resistance.

  18. Decoding the regulatory landscape of melanoma reveals TEADS as regulators of the invasive cell state

    PubMed Central

    Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichova, Hana; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Dewaele, Michael; Rambow, Florian; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Luciani, Flavie; Van den Mooter, Laura; Claerhout, Sofie; Fiers, Mark; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem-Elias; Herrmann, Carl; Halder, Georg; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming of proliferative melanoma cells into a phenotypically distinct invasive cell subpopulation is a critical event at the origin of metastatic spreading. Here we generate transcriptome, open chromatin and histone modification maps of melanoma cultures; and integrate this data with existing transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles from tumour biopsies to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying this key reprogramming event. This shows thousands of genomic regulatory regions underlying the proliferative and invasive states, identifying SOX10/MITF and AP-1/TEAD as regulators, respectively. Knockdown of TEADs shows a previously unrecognized role in the invasive gene network and establishes a causative link between these transcription factors, cell invasion and sensitivity to MAPK inhibitors. Using regulatory landscapes and in silico analysis, we show that transcriptional reprogramming underlies the distinct cellular states present in melanoma. Furthermore, it reveals an essential role for the TEADs, linking it to clinically relevant mechanisms such as invasion and resistance. PMID:25865119

  19. Coordinated regulatory variation associated with gestational hyperglycaemia regulates expression of the novel hexokinase HKDC1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cong; Ludvik, Anton E; Arlotto, Michelle E; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Armstrong, Loren L; Scholtens, Denise M; Brown, Christopher D; Newgard, Christopher B; Becker, Thomas C; Layden, Brian T; Lowe, William L; Reddy, Timothy E

    2015-02-04

    Maternal glucose levels during pregnancy impact the developing fetus, affecting metabolic health both early and later on in life. Both genetic and environmental factors influence maternal metabolism, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms that alter glucose metabolism during pregnancy. Here, we report that haplotypes previously associated with gestational hyperglycaemia in the third trimester disrupt regulatory element activity and reduce expression of the nearby HKDC1 gene. We further find that experimentally reducing or increasing HKDC1 expression reduces or increases hexokinase activity, respectively, in multiple cellular models; in addition, purified HKDC1 protein has hexokinase activity in vitro. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism of gestational glucose regulation in which the effects of genetic variants in multiple regulatory elements alter glucose homeostasis by coordinately reducing expression of the novel hexokinase HKDC1.

  20. 3 CFR 13579 - Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011. Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies 13579 Order 13579 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13579 of July 11, 2011 EO 13579 Regulation and Independent Regulatory Agencies By...

  1. 3 CFR 13563 - Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011. Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Executive Order 13563 of January 18, 2011. Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review 13563 Order 13563 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order... improve regulation and regulatory review, it is hereby ordered as follows: Section 1. General...

  2. Patterns of Positive Selection of the Myogenic Regulatory Factor Gene Family in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao; Yu, Qi; Huang, Ling; Liu, Qing-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The functional divergence of transcriptional factors is critical in the evolution of transcriptional regulation. However, the mechanism of functional divergence among these factors remains unclear. Here, we performed an evolutionary analysis for positive selection in members of the myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) gene family of vertebrates. We selected 153 complete vertebrate MRF nucleotide sequences from our analyses, which revealed substantial evidence of positive selection. Here, we show that sites under positive selection were more frequently detected and identified from the genes encoding the myogenic differentiation factors (MyoG and Myf6) than the genes encoding myogenic determination factors (Myf5 and MyoD). Additionally, the functional divergence within the myogenic determination factors or differentiation factors was also under positive selection pressure. The positive selection sites were more frequently detected from MyoG and MyoD than Myf6 and Myf5, respectively. Amino acid residues under positive selection were identified mainly in their transcription activation domains and on the surface of protein three-dimensional structures. These data suggest that the functional gain and divergence of myogenic regulatory factors were driven by distinct positive selection of their transcription activation domains, whereas the function of the DNA binding domains was conserved in evolution. Our study evaluated the mechanism of functional divergence of the transcriptional regulation factors within a family, whereby the functions of their transcription activation domains diverged under positive selection during evolution. PMID:24651579

  3. Comparative analysis of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Vargas, Lev; Santillán, Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Background The regulatory interactions between transcription factors (TF) and regulated genes (RG) in a species genome can be lumped together in a single directed graph. The TF's and RG's conform the nodes of this graph, while links are drawn whenever a transcription factor regulates a gene's expression. Projections onto TF nodes can be constructed by linking every two nodes regulating a common gene. Similarly, projections onto RG nodes can be made by linking every two regulated genes sharing at least one common regulator. Recent studies of the connectivity pattern in the transcription-factor regulatory network of many organisms have revealed some interesting properties. However, the differences between TF and RG nodes have not been widely explored. Results After analysing the RG and TF projections of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found several common characteristic as well as some noticeable differences. To better understand these differences, we compared the properties of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae RG- and TF-projected networks with those of the corresponding projections built from randomized versions of the original bipartite networks. These last results indicate that the observed differences are mostly due to the very different ratios of TF to RG counts of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae bipartite networks, rather than to their having different connectivity patterns. Conclusion Since E. coli is a prokaryotic organism while S. cerevisiae is eukaryotic, there are important differences between them concerning processing of mRNA before translation, DNA packing, amount of junk DNA, and gene regulation. From the results in this paper we conclude that the most important effect such differences have had on the development of the corresponding transcription-factor gene regulatory networks is their very different ratios of TF to RG numbers. This ratio is more than three times larger in S

  4. Bim Nuclear Translocation and Inactivation by Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Nicholas, John

    2010-01-01

    Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of the host cell. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) uses several strategies to block the host's innate antiviral defenses via interference with interferon and apoptotic signaling. Contributors include the four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs 1–4), which function in dominant negative fashion to block cellular IRF activities in addition to targeting IRF signaling-induced proteins such as p53 and inhibiting other inducers of apoptosis such as TGFβ receptor-activated Smad transcription factors. Here we identify direct targeting by vIRF-1 of BH3-only pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim, a key negative regulator of HHV-8 replication, to effect its inactivation via nuclear translocation. vIRF-1-mediated relocalization of Bim was identified in transfected cells, by both immunofluorescence assay and western analysis of fractionated cell extracts. Also, co-localization of vIRF-1 and Bim was detected in nuclei of lytically infected endothelial cells. In vitro co-precipitation assays using purified vIRF-1 and Bim revealed direct interaction between the proteins, and Bim-binding residues of vIRF-1 were mapped by deletion and point mutagenesis. Generation and experimental utilization of Bim-refractory vIRF-1 variants revealed the importance of vIRF-1:Bim interaction, specifically, in pro-replication and anti-apoptotic activity of vIRF-1. Furthermore, blocking of the interaction with cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the Bim-binding region of vIRF-1 confirmed the relevance of vIRF-1:Bim association to vIRF-1 pro-replication activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IRF protein that interacts with a Bcl-2 family member and of nuclear sequestration of Bim or any other member of the family as a means of inactivation. The data presented reveal a novel mechanism utilized by a virus to control replication

  5. Putative Regulatory Factors Associated with Intramuscular Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Aline S. M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Koltes, James E.; Fritz-Waters, Eric R.; Lanna, Dante P. D.; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B.; Oliveira, Priscila S. N.; Reecy, James M.; Coutinho, Luiz L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  6. Thymic Versus Induced Regulatory T Cells – Who Regulates the Regulators?

    PubMed Central

    Povoleri, Giovanni Antonio Maria; Scottà, Cristiano; Nova-Lamperti, Estefania Andrea; John, Susan; Lombardi, Giovanna; Afzali, Behdad

    2013-01-01

    Physiological health must balance immunological responsiveness against foreign pathogens with tolerance toward self-components and commensals. Disruption of this balance causes autoimmune diseases/chronic inflammation, in case of excessive immune responses, and persistent infection/immunodeficiency if regulatory components are overactive. This homeostasis occurs at two different levels: at a resting state to prevent autoimmune disease, as autoreactive effector T-cells (Teffs) are only partially deleted in the thymus, and during inflammation to prevent excessive tissue injury, contract the immune response, and enable tissue repair. Adaptive immune cells with regulatory function (“regulatory T-cells”) are essential to control Teffs. Two sets of regulatory T cell are required to achieve the desired control: those emerging de novo from embryonic/neonatal thymus (“thymic” or tTregs), whose function is to control autoreactive Teffs to prevent autoimmune diseases, and those induced in the periphery (“peripheral” or pTregs) to acquire regulatory phenotype in response to pathogens/inflammation. The differentiation mechanisms of these cells determine their commitment to lineage and plasticity toward other phenotypes. tTregs, expressing high levels of IL-2 receptor alpha chain (CD25), and the transcription factor Foxp3, are the most important, since mutations or deletions in these genes cause fatal autoimmune diseases in both mice and men. In the periphery, instead, Foxp3+ pTregs can be induced from naïve precursors in response to environmental signals. Here, we discuss molecular signatures and induction processes, mechanisms and sites of action, lineage stability, and differentiating characteristics of both Foxp3+ and Foxp3− populations of regulatory T cells, derived from the thymus or induced peripherally. We relate these predicates to programs of cell-based therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and induction of tolerance to transplants. PMID

  7. Arabidopsis Ensemble Reverse-Engineered Gene Regulatory Network Discloses Interconnected Transcription Factors in Oxidative Stress[W

    PubMed Central

    Vermeirssen, Vanessa; De Clercq, Inge; Van Parys, Thomas; Van Breusegem, Frank; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The abiotic stress response in plants is complex and tightly controlled by gene regulation. We present an abiotic stress gene regulatory network of 200,014 interactions for 11,938 target genes by integrating four complementary reverse-engineering solutions through average rank aggregation on an Arabidopsis thaliana microarray expression compendium. This ensemble performed the most robustly in benchmarking and greatly expands upon the availability of interactions currently reported. Besides recovering 1182 known regulatory interactions, cis-regulatory motifs and coherent functionalities of target genes corresponded with the predicted transcription factors. We provide a valuable resource of 572 abiotic stress modules of coregulated genes with functional and regulatory information, from which we deduced functional relationships for 1966 uncharacterized genes and many regulators. Using gain- and loss-of-function mutants of seven transcription factors grown under control and salt stress conditions, we experimentally validated 141 out of 271 predictions (52% precision) for 102 selected genes and mapped 148 additional transcription factor-gene regulatory interactions (49% recall). We identified an intricate core oxidative stress regulatory network where NAC13, NAC053, ERF6, WRKY6, and NAC032 transcription factors interconnect and function in detoxification. Our work shows that ensemble reverse-engineering can generate robust biological hypotheses of gene regulation in a multicellular eukaryote that can be tested by medium-throughput experimental validation. PMID:25549671

  8. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  9. What explains regulatory failure? Analysing the architecture of health care regulation in two Indian states.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Kabir; Saligram, Prasanna S; Hort, Krishna

    2015-02-01

    Regulating health care is a pre-eminent policy challenge in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), particularly those with a strong private health sector. Yet, the regulatory approaches instituted in these countries have often been reported to be ineffective-India being exemplary. There is limited empirical research on the architecture and processes of health care regulation in LMIC that would explain these regulatory failures. We undertook a research study in two Indian states, with the aims of (1) mapping the organizations engaged with, and the written policies focused on health care regulation, (2) identifying gaps in the design and implementation of policies for health care regulation and (3) investigating underlying reasons for the identified gaps. We adopted a stepped research approach and applied a framework of basic regulatory functions for health care, to assess prevailing gaps in policy design and implementation. Qualitative research methods were employed including in-depth interviews with 32 representatives of regulatory organizations and document review. Several gaps in policy design were observed across both states, with a number of basic regulatory functions not underwritten in law, nor assigned to a regulatory organization to enact. In some instances the contents of regulatory policies had been weakened or diluted, rendering them less effective. Implementation gaps were also extensively reported in both states. Regulatory gaps were underpinned by human resource constraints, ambivalence in the roles of regulatory organizations, ineffective co-ordination between regulatory groups and extensive contestation of regulatory policies by private stakeholders. The findings are instructive that prevailing arrangements for health care regulation are ill equipped to enact several basic functions, and further that the performance of regulatory organizations is subject to pressures and distortions similar to those characterizing the wider health system

  10. The regulation and regulatory role of collagenase in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Walling, H. W.; Bloch, S. R.; Omura, T. H.; Chan, P. T.; Pearman, A. T.; Chou, W. Y.

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial collagenase plays an important role in both the normal and pathological remodeling of collagenous extracellular matrices, including skeletal tissues. The enzyme is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases. Only one rodent interstitial collagenase has been found but there are two human enzymes, human collagenase-1 and -3, the latter being the homologue of the rat enzyme. In developing rat and mouse bone, collagenase is expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, a situation that is replicated in a fracture callus. Cultured osteoblasts derived from neonatal rat calvariae show greater amounts of collagenase transcripts late in differentiation. These levels can be regulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH), retinoic acid, and insulin-like growth factors, as well as the degree of matrix mineralization. Much of the work on collagenase in bone has been derived from studies on the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR 106-01. All bone-resorbing agents stimulate these cells to produce collagenase mRNA and protein, with PTH being the most potent stimulator. Determination of secreted levels of collagenase has been difficult because UMR cells, normal rat osteoblasts, and rat fibroblasts possess a scavenger receptor that removes the enzyme from the extracellular space, internalizes and degrades it, thus imposing another level of control. PTH can also regulate the abundance of the receptor as well as the expression and synthesis of the enzyme. Regulation of the collagenase gene by PTH appears to involve the cAMP pathway as well as a primary response gene, possibly Fos, which then contributes to induction of the collagenase gene. The rat collagenase gene contains an activator protein-1 sequence that is necessary for basal expression, but other promoter regions may also participate in PTH regulation. Thus, there are many levels of regulation of collagenase in bone perhaps constraining what would otherwise be a rampant enzyme.

  11. The regulation and regulatory role of collagenase in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, N. C.; Walling, H. W.; Bloch, S. R.; Omura, T. H.; Chan, P. T.; Pearman, A. T.; Chou, W. Y.

    1996-01-01

    Interstitial collagenase plays an important role in both the normal and pathological remodeling of collagenous extracellular matrices, including skeletal tissues. The enzyme is a member of the family of matrix metalloproteinases. Only one rodent interstitial collagenase has been found but there are two human enzymes, human collagenase-1 and -3, the latter being the homologue of the rat enzyme. In developing rat and mouse bone, collagenase is expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes, a situation that is replicated in a fracture callus. Cultured osteoblasts derived from neonatal rat calvariae show greater amounts of collagenase transcripts late in differentiation. These levels can be regulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH), retinoic acid, and insulin-like growth factors, as well as the degree of matrix mineralization. Much of the work on collagenase in bone has been derived from studies on the rat osteosarcoma cell line, UMR 106-01. All bone-resorbing agents stimulate these cells to produce collagenase mRNA and protein, with PTH being the most potent stimulator. Determination of secreted levels of collagenase has been difficult because UMR cells, normal rat osteoblasts, and rat fibroblasts possess a scavenger receptor that removes the enzyme from the extracellular space, internalizes and degrades it, thus imposing another level of control. PTH can also regulate the abundance of the receptor as well as the expression and synthesis of the enzyme. Regulation of the collagenase gene by PTH appears to involve the cAMP pathway as well as a primary response gene, possibly Fos, which then contributes to induction of the collagenase gene. The rat collagenase gene contains an activator protein-1 sequence that is necessary for basal expression, but other promoter regions may also participate in PTH regulation. Thus, there are many levels of regulation of collagenase in bone perhaps constraining what would otherwise be a rampant enzyme.

  12. CisMapper: predicting regulatory interactions from transcription factor ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy; Bodén, Mikael; Bailey, Timothy L

    2016-10-24

    Identifying the genomic regions and regulatory factors that control the transcription of genes is an important, unsolved problem. The current method of choice predicts transcription factor (TF) binding sites using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), and then links the binding sites to putative target genes solely on the basis of the genomic distance between them. Evidence from chromatin conformation capture experiments shows that this approach is inadequate due to long-distance regulation via chromatin looping. We present CisMapper, which predicts the regulatory targets of a TF using the correlation between a histone mark at the TF's bound sites and the expression of each gene across a panel of tissues. Using both chromatin conformation capture and differential expression data, we show that CisMapper is more accurate at predicting the target genes of a TF than the distance-based approaches currently used, and is particularly advantageous for predicting the long-range regulatory interactions typical of tissue-specific gene expression. CisMapper also predicts which TF binding sites regulate a given gene more accurately than using genomic distance. Unlike distance-based methods, CisMapper can predict which transcription start site of a gene is regulated by a particular binding site of the TF.

  13. The transcription factor regulatory factor X1 increases the expression of neuronal glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-07-28

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) play an important role in maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. However, very few studies have investigated the regulation of EAAT expression. A binding sequence for the regulatory factor X1 (RFX1) exists in the promoter region of the gene encoding for EAAT3, a neuronal EAAT, but not in the promoter regions of the genes encoding for EAAT1 and EAAT2, two glial EAATs. RFX proteins are transcription factors binding to X-boxes of DNA sequences. Although RFX proteins are necessary for the normal function of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, their roles in the mammalian brain are not known. We showed that RFX1 increased EAAT3 expression and activity in C6 glioma cells. RFX1 binding complexes were found in the nuclear extracts of C6 cells. The activity of EAAT3 promoter as measured by luciferase reporter activity was increased by RFX1 in C6 cells and the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. However, RFX1 did not change the expression of EAAT2 proteins in the NRK52E cells. RFX1 proteins were expressed in the neurons of rat brain. A high expression level of RFX1 proteins was found in the neurons of cerebral cortex and Purkinje cells. Knockdown of the RFX1 expression by RFX1 antisense oligonucleotides decreased EAAT3 expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. These results suggest that RFX1 enhances the activity of EAAT3 promoter to increase the expression of EAAT3 proteins. This study provides initial evidence for the regulation of gene expression in the nervous cells by RFX1.

  14. [ASSESSMENT OF EXTREME FACTORS OF SHIFT WORK IN ARCTIC CONDITIONS BY WORKERS WITH DIFFERENT REGULATORY PROCESSES].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Ya A; Simonova, N N

    2016-01-01

    A man working on a shift basis in the Arctic, every day is under the influence of various extreme factors which are inevitable for oil and gas indudtry. To adapt to shift work employees use various resources of the individual. The purpose of research is the determination of personal resources of shift workers to overcome the adverse factors of the environment in the Arctic. The study involved 191 builder of main gas pipelines, working in shifts in the Tyumen region (the length of the shift 52 days of arrival) at the age of 23 to 59 (mean age 34.9 ± 8.1) years. Methods: psychological testing, questioning, observation, descriptive statistics, discriminant step by step analysis. There was revealed the correlation between the subjective assessment of the majority of adverse climatic factors in the regulatory process "assessment of results"; production factors--regulatory processes such as flexibility, autonomy, simulation, and the general level of self-regulation; social factors are more associated with the severity of such regulatory processes, flexibility and evaluation of results.

  15. Effects of regulatory factors on engineered cardiac tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingyu; Park, Hyoungshin; Engelmayr, George C; Moretti, Matteo; Freed, Lisa E

    2007-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that supplemental regulatory factors can improve the contractile properties and viability of cardiac tissue constructs cultured in vitro. Neonatal rat heart cells were cultured on porous collagen sponges for up to 8 days in basal medium or medium supplemented with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), insulin-transferrin-selenium (ITS), platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF), or angiopoietin-1 (ANG). IGF and ITS enhanced contractile properties of the 8-day constructs significantly more than with unsupplemented controls according to contractile amplitude and excitation threshold, and IGF also significantly increased the amount of cardiac troponin-I and enhanced cell viability according to different assays (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL)). PDGF significantly increased the contractile amplitude of 4-day constructs and enhanced cell viability according to MTT, LDH, and TUNEL; ANG enhanced cell viability according to the LDH assay. Our results demonstrate that supplemental regulatory molecules can differentially enhance properties of cardiac tissue constructs and imply that these constructs can provide a platform for systematic in vitro studies of the effects of complex stimuli that occur in vivo to improve our basic understanding of cardiogenesis and identify underlying mechanisms that can potentially be exploited to enhance myocardial regeneration.

  16. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  17. HIV-1 Vpu Does Not Degrade Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that HIV-1 Vpu mediates the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) to avoid innate immune sensing. Here, we show that Vpu does not deplete IRF-3 from transfected cell lines or HIV-1-infected primary cells. Furthermore, the Vpu-dependent suppression of beta interferon expression described in previous studies could be ascribed to inhibition of NF-κB activation. Thus, Vpu suppresses innate immune activation through inhibition of NF-κB rather than degradation of IRF-3. PMID:23552418

  18. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  19. Local retrograde and destination transfer of physiological regulators as an important regulatory system and its role. Facts and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Krzymowski, T; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S

    2012-02-01

    In recent decades, among many physiological regulatory systems operating as local and central controls, the mechanism of the local regulatory system based on the uptake and retrograde transfer of hormones and other physiological regulators to the places of their secretion or their destination transfer to nearby structures has become precisely understood. The system of the retrograde transfer and local destination transfer of the physiological regulators, situated between endocrine and paracrine regulation, operates primarily on the basis of specific morphological adaptations of the local blood circulatory system and lymphatic system. These adaptations enable the transfer of the regulatory molecules through the walls of blood and lymph vessels and locally increase their concentrations in the arterial blood supplying the organ secreting them (retrograde transfer) or a nearby organ (destination transfer). Extensive studies on the structure and functions of the retrograde and destination transfer system have focused on several key areas: the female and male reproductive organs, the perihypophyseal vascular complex (the venous cavernous sinus and the internal carotid artery or the rete mirabile of the internal carotid artery or maxillary artery), and the periophthalmic vascular complex (the venous ophthalmic sinus or plexus and the rete mirabile of the external ophthalmic artery). The local retrograde transfer of regulatory molecules not only allows them to be reused but also influences their production by a feedback mechanism. The local destination transfer of physiological regulators can selectively supply nearby organs with certain regulatory factors and thereby affect their function. Many observations indicate that the retrograde and local destination transfer of hormones and other biologically active substances may be a universal physiological regulatory mechanism, operating with only minor modifications in various species of animals and in humans. This review

  20. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  1. Reconstructing genome-wide regulatory network of E. coli using transcriptome data and predicted transcription factor activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks play essential roles in living organisms to control growth, keep internal metabolism running and respond to external environmental changes. Understanding the connections and the activity levels of regulators is important for the research of gene regulatory networks. While relevance score based algorithms that reconstruct gene regulatory networks from transcriptome data can infer genome-wide gene regulatory networks, they are unfortunately prone to false positive results. Transcription factor activities (TFAs) quantitatively reflect the ability of the transcription factor to regulate target genes. However, classic relevance score based gene regulatory network reconstruction algorithms use models do not include the TFA layer, thus missing a key regulatory element. Results This work integrates TFA prediction algorithms with relevance score based network reconstruction algorithms to reconstruct gene regulatory networks with improved accuracy over classic relevance score based algorithms. This method is called Gene expression and Transcription factor activity based Relevance Network (GTRNetwork). Different combinations of TFA prediction algorithms and relevance score functions have been applied to find the most efficient combination. When the integrated GTRNetwork method was applied to E. coli data, the reconstructed genome-wide gene regulatory network predicted 381 new regulatory links. This reconstructed gene regulatory network including the predicted new regulatory links show promising biological significances. Many of the new links are verified by known TF binding site information, and many other links can be verified from the literature and databases such as EcoCyc. The reconstructed gene regulatory network is applied to a recent transcriptome analysis of E. coli during isobutanol stress. In addition to the 16 significantly changed TFAs detected in the original paper, another 7 significantly changed TFAs have been detected by

  2. Agouti regulates adipocyte transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, R L; Stephens, J M

    2001-04-01

    Agouti is a secreted paracrine factor that regulates pigmentation in hair follicle melanocytes. Several dominant mutations cause ectopic expression of agouti, resulting in a phenotype characterized by yellow fur, adult-onset obesity and diabetes, increased linear growth and skeletal mass, and increased susceptibility to tumors. Humans also produce agouti protein, but the highest levels of agouti in humans are found in adipose tissue. To mimic the human agouti expression pattern in mice, transgenic mice (aP2-agouti) that express agouti in adipose tissue were generated. The transgenic mice develop a mild form of obesity, and they are sensitized to the action of insulin. We correlated the levels of specific regulators of insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation with these phenotypic changes in adipose tissue. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma protein levels were elevated in the transgenic mice. Treatment of mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes recapitulated these effects. These data demonstrate that agouti has potent effects on adipose tissue. We hypothesize that agouti increases adiposity and promotes insulin sensitivity by acting directly on adipocytes via PPAR-gamma.

  3. Function and mechanism by which interferon regulatory factor-1 inhibits oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, FEI-FEI; JIANG, GUAN; XU, KERUI; ZHENG, JUN-NIAN

    2013-01-01

    The present review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechnisms by which interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 inhibits oncogenesis. IRF-1 is associated with regulation of interferon α and β transcription. In addition, numerous clinical studies have indicated that IRF-1 gene deletion or rearrangement correlates with development of specific forms of human cancer. IRF-1 has been revealed to exhibit marked functional diversity in the regulation of oncogenesis. IRF-1 activates a set of target genes associated with regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and the immune response. The role of IRF-1 in the regulation of various types of human tumor has important implications for understanding the susceptibility and progression of cancer. In addition, an improved understanding of the role of IRF-1 in the pathological processes that lead to human malignant diseases may aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23420765

  4. Interplay of mitochondria apoptosis regulatory factors and microRNAs in valvular heart disease.

    PubMed

    Jan, Muhammad Ishtiaq; Khan, Riaz Anwar; Ali, Tahir; Bilal, Muhammad; Bo, Long; Sajid, Abdul; Malik, Abdul; Urehman, Naseeb; Waseem, Nayyar; Nawab, Javed; Ali, Murad; Majeed, Abdul; Ahmad, Hamid; Aslam, Sohail; Hamera, Sadia; Sultan, Aneesa; Anees, Mariam; Javed, Qamar; Murtaza, Iram

    2017-09-06

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is an active process involving a wide range of pathological changes. The major complications of VHD are stenosis and regurgitation, which are macroscopic phenomena, induced in part through cellular changes. Altered expression of mitochondria associated genes causes membrane potential depolarization, leading to the increased levels of apoptosis observed in cardiac dysfunction. Objective of this study is to find molecular medicine candidates that can control expression of the key mitochondria apoptosis regulatory genes. Present study aims to assess the way microRNA are involved in regulating mitochondrial apoptosis regulatory genes and observation of their expression in the heart valve dysfunction. Apoptotic genes PUMA and DRP1 were found to be highly expressed, whereas anti-apoptotic gene ARC was down regulated. The expression level of GATA-4 transcription factor was also reduced in cardiac valve tissues. MicroRNAs miR-15a and miR-29a were repressed, while miR-214 was up regulated. Furthermore, study showed that PUMA, DRP1 and ARC expression might be attenuated by their respective miRNAs. Our results indicate that mitochondria regulatory genes might be controlled by miR-15a, miR-29a and miR-214, in VHD patients. Present study may provide platform for future research regarding potential therapeutic role of miRNAs in CVDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcription factor MITF and remodeller BRG1 define chromatin organisation at regulatory elements in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Koludrovic, Dana; Keime, Céline; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Seberg, Hannah; Van Otterloo, Eric; Imrichova, Hana; Siddaway, Robert; Aerts, Stein; Cornell, Robert A; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-03-24

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is the master regulator of the melanocyte lineage. To understand how MITF regulates transcription, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to define a comprehensive MITF interactome identifying novel cofactors involved in transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin organisation. We show that MITF interacts with a PBAF chromatin remodelling complex comprising BRG1 and CHD7. BRG1 is essential for melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and for normal melanocyte development in vivo. MITF and SOX10 actively recruit BRG1 to a set of MITF-associated regulatory elements (MAREs) at active enhancers. Combinations of MITF, SOX10, TFAP2A, and YY1 bind between two BRG1-occupied nucleosomes thus defining both a signature of transcription factors essential for the melanocyte lineage and a specific chromatin organisation of the regulatory elements they occupy. BRG1 also regulates the dynamics of MITF genomic occupancy. MITF-BRG1 interplay thus plays an essential role in transcription regulation in melanoma.

  6. Functional interaction of hepatic nuclear factor-4 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha in CYP7A1 regulation is inhibited by a key lipogenic activator, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c.

    PubMed

    Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Fang, Sungsoon; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2007-11-01

    Insulin inhibits transcription of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1), a key gene in bile acid synthesis, and the hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4) site in the promoter was identified as a negative insulin response sequence. Using a fasting/feeding protocol in mice and insulin treatment in HepG2 cells, we explored the inhibition mechanisms. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), an insulin-induced lipogenic factor, inversely correlated with Cyp7a1 expression in mouse liver. Interaction of HNF-4 with its coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), was observed in livers of fasted mice and was reduced after feeding. Conversely, HNF-4 interaction with SREBP-1c was increased after feeding. In vitro studies suggested that SREBP-1c competed with PGC-1alpha for direct interaction with the AF2 domain of HNF-4. Reporter assays showed that SREBP-1c, but not of a SREBP-1c mutant lacking the HNF-4 interacting domain, inhibited HNF-4/PGC-1alpha transactivation of Cyp7a1. SREBP-1c also inhibited PGC-1alpha-coactivation of estrogen receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and farnesoid X receptor, implying inhibition of HNF-4 by SREBP-1c could extend to other nuclear receptors. In chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, HNF-4 binding to the promoter was not altered, but PGC-1alpha was dissociated, SREBP-1c and histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2) were recruited, and acetylation of histone H3 was decreased upon feeding. Adenovirus-mediated expression of a SREBP-1c dominant-negative mutant, which blocks the interaction of SREBP-1c and HNF-4, partially but significantly reversed the inhibition of Cyp7a1 after feeding. Our data show that SREBP-1c functions as a non-DNA-binding inhibitor and mediates, in part, suppression of Cyp7a1 by blocking functional interaction of HNF-4 and PGC-1alpha. This mechanism may be relevant to known repression of many other HNF-4 target genes upon

  7. Regulatory factors controlling transcription of Saccharomyces cerevisiae IXR1 by oxygen levels: a model of transcriptional adaptation from aerobiosis to hypoxia implicating ROX1 and IXR1 cross-regulation.

    PubMed

    Castro-Prego, Raquel; Lamas-Maceiras, Mónica; Soengas, Pilar; Carneiro, Isabel; González-Siso, Isabel; Cerdán, M Esperanza

    2009-12-14

    Ixr1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been previously studied because it binds to DNA containing intrastrand cross-links formed by the anticancer drug cisplatin. Ixr1p is also a transcriptional regulator of anaerobic/hypoxic genes, such as SRP1/TIR1, which encodes a stress-response cell wall manoprotein, and COX5B, which encodes the Vb subunit of the mitochondrial complex cytochrome c oxidase. However, factors controlling IXR1 expression remained unexplored. In the present study we show that IXR1 mRNA levels are controlled by oxygen availability and increase during hypoxia. In aerobiosis, low levels of IXR1 expression are maintained by Rox1p repression through the general co-repressor complex Tup1-Ssn6. Ixr1p itself is necessary for full IXR1 expression under hypoxic conditions. Deletion analyses have identified the region in the IXR1 promoter responsible for this positive auto-control (nucleotides -557 to -376). EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) and ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) assays show that Ixr1p binds to the IXR1 promoter both in vitro and in vivo. Ixr1p is also required for hypoxic repression of ROX1 and binds to its promoter. UPC2 deletion has opposite effects on IXR1 and ROX1 transcription during hypoxia. Ixr1p is also necessary for resistance to oxidative stress generated by H2O2. IXR1 expression is moderately activated by H2O2 and this induction is Yap1p-dependent. A model of IXR1 regulation as a relay for sensing different signals related to change in oxygen availability is proposed. In this model, transcriptional adaptation from aerobiosis to hypoxia depends on ROX1 and IXR1 cross-regulation.

  8. Transcription factor abundance controlled by an auto-regulatory mechanism involving a transcription start site switch.

    PubMed

    Ngondo, Richard Patryk; Carbon, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A transcriptional feedback loop is the simplest and most direct means for a transcription factor to provide an increased stability of gene expression. In this work performed in human cells, we reveal a new negative auto-regulatory mechanism involving an alternative transcription start site (TSS) usage. Using the activating transcription factor ZNF143 as a model, we show that the ZNF143 low-affinity binding sites, located downstream of its canonical TSS, play the role of protein sensors to induce the up- or down-regulation of ZNF143 gene expression. We uncovered that the TSS switch that mediates this regulation implies the differential expression of two transcripts with an opposite protein production ability due to their different 5' untranslated regions. Moreover, our analysis of the ENCODE data suggests that this mechanism could be used by other transcription factors to rapidly respond to their own aberrant expression level.

  9. Regulatory network analysis reveals novel regulators of seed desiccation tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    González-Morales, Sandra Isabel; Chávez-Montes, Ricardo A.; Hayano-Kanashiro, Corina; Alejo-Jacuinde, Gerardo; Rico-Cambron, Thelma Y.; de Folter, Stefan; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Desiccation tolerance (DT) is a remarkable process that allows seeds in the dry state to remain viable for long periods of time that in some instances exceed 1,000 y. It has been postulated that seed DT evolved by rewiring the regulatory and signaling networks that controlled vegetative DT, which itself emerged as a crucial adaptive trait of early land plants. Understanding the networks that regulate seed desiccation tolerance in model plant systems would provide the tools to understand an evolutionary process that played a crucial role in the diversification of flowering plants. In this work, we used an integrated approach that included genomics, bioinformatics, metabolomics, and molecular genetics to identify and validate molecular networks that control the acquisition of DT in Arabidopsis seeds. Two DT-specific transcriptional subnetworks were identified related to storage of reserve compounds and cellular protection mechanisms that act downstream of the embryo development master regulators LEAFY COTYLEDON 1 and 2, FUSCA 3, and ABSCICIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3. Among the transcription factors identified as major nodes in the DT regulatory subnetworks, PLATZ1, PLATZ2, and AGL67 were confirmed by knockout mutants and overexpression in a desiccation-intolerant mutant background to play an important role in seed DT. Additionally, we found that constitutive expression of PLATZ1 in WT plants confers partial DT in vegetative tissues. PMID:27551092

  10. Regulatory impact analysis of the proposed acid-rain implementation regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-16

    This regulatory impact analysis (RIA) was developed in response to Executive Order (EO) 12291, which requires Federal Agencies to assess the costs, benefits, and impacts of all 'major' regulations. In compliance with EO 12291, this RIA assesses costs, benefits and impacts for the important provisions of Title IV. EPA divided its analysis of the Acid Rain Program into two parts. First, EPA analyzed the effects of the statute in the absence of any implementation regulations. In the second part of the analysis, EPA examined a 'regulatory' case that included both the SO2 reductions and the implementation regulations. By comparing costs under the regulatory case to those under the absent regulations case, EPA was able to isolate the incremental savings provided by the regulations. At the same time, by combining the two parts of the analysis, EPA was able to show the total costs imposed by the Acid Rain Program (the statute and the regulations) as a whole.

  11. Transcriptional Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Transcription Factor Regulation and Function, Mechanisms of Initiation, and Roles of Activators and Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven; Young, Elton T.

    2011-01-01

    Here we review recent advances in understanding the regulation of mRNA synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms have been conserved in all eukaryotes, and budding yeast has been at the forefront in the discovery and dissection of these conserved mechanisms. Topics covered include upstream activation sequence and promoter structure, transcription factor classification, and examples of regulated transcription factor activity. We also examine advances in understanding the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, conserved coactivator complexes, transcription activation domains, and the cooperation of these factors in gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22084422

  12. Individual Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 Thiol Residues Are Not Critical for Its Activation Following Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo. PMID:22817838

  13. Individual interferon regulatory factor-3 thiol residues are not critical for its activation following virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo.

  14. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  16. Unity power factor switching regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A single or multiphase boost chopper regulator operating with unity power factor, for use such as to charge a battery is comprised of a power section for converting single or multiphase line energy into recharge energy including a rectifier (10), one inductor (L.sub.1) and one chopper (Q.sub.1) for each chopper phase for presenting a load (battery) with a current output, and duty cycle control means (16) for each chopper to control the average inductor current over each period of the chopper, and a sensing and control section including means (20) for sensing at least one load parameter, means (22) for producing a current command signal as a function of said parameter, means (26) for producing a feedback signal as a function of said current command signal and the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, means (28) for sensing current through said inductor, means (18) for comparing said feedback signal with said sensed current to produce, in response to a difference, a control signal applied to the duty cycle control means, whereby the average inductor current is proportionate to the average rectifier voltage output over each period of the chopper, and instantaneous line current is thereby maintained proportionate to the instantaneous line voltage, thus achieving a unity power factor. The boost chopper is comprised of a plurality of converters connected in parallel and operated in staggered phase. For optimal harmonic suppression, the duty cycles of the switching converters are evenly spaced, and by negative coupling between pairs 180.degree. out-of-phase, peak currents through the switches can be reduced while reducing the inductor size and mass.

  17. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M. Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:28005952

  18. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches.

  19. Overexpression of Antiangiogenic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Isoform and Splicing Regulatory Factors in Oral, Laryngeal and Pharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed

    Biselli-Chicote, Patrícia Matos; Biselli, Joice Matos; Cunha, Bianca R; Castro, Rodrigo; Maniglia, José Victor; Neto, Dalísio de Santi; Tajara, Eloiza Helena; Góis Filho, José Franscisco de; Fukuyama, Erica Erina; Pavarino, Érika Cristina; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny Maria

    2017-08-27

    Background: Overexpression of proangiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor A family VEGFAxxx is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. The role of the alternatively spliced antiangiogenic family VEGFAxxxb is poorly investigated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). The antiangiogenic isoform binds to bevacizumab and its expression level could influence the treatment response and progression-free survival. In this study, the relative expression of VEGFAxxx and VEGFA165b isoforms and splicing regulatory factors genes was investigated in a series of HNSCCs. Methods: VEGFAxxx, VEGFA165b, SRSF6, SRSF5, SRSF1 and SRPK1 gene expression was quantified by quantitative real time PCR in 53 tissue samples obtained by surgery from HNSCC patients. Protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Results: VEGFAxxx and VEGFA165b were overexpressed in HNSCCs. Elevated protein expression was also confirmed. However, VEGFA isoforms demonstrated differential expression according to anatomical sites. VEGFAxxx was overexpressed in pharyngeal tumors while the VEGFA165b isoform was up-regulated in oral tumors. The VEGFA165b isoform was also positively correlated with expression of the splicing regulatory genes SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF5. Conclusions: We concluded that VEGFAxxx and VEGFA165b isoforms are overexpressed in HNSCCs and the splicing regulatory factors SRSF1, SRSF6, SRSF5 and SRPK1 may contribute to alternative splicing of the VEGFA gene. The findings for the differential expression of the antiangiogenic isoform in HNSCCs could facilitate effective therapeutic strategies for the management of these tumors. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Transcriptional Regulation by Competing Transcription Factor Modules

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Rutger; Tans, Sander; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2006-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input–output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits. PMID:17140283

  1. Deciphering RNA Regulatory Elements Involved in the Developmental and Environmental Gene Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a vector-borne parasite with intricate life cycle that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This pathogen relies on fine regulation of gene expression to respond and adapt to variable environments, with implications in transmission and infectivity. However, the involved regulatory elements and their mechanisms of actions are largely unknown. Here, benefiting from a new graph-based approach for finding functional regulatory elements in RNA (GRAFFER), we have predicted 88 new RNA regulatory elements that are potentially involved in the gene regulatory network of T. brucei. We show that many of these newly predicted elements are responsive to both transcriptomic and proteomic changes during the life cycle of the parasite. Moreover, we found that 11 of predicted elements strikingly resemble previously identified regulatory elements for the parasite. Additionally, comparison with previously predicted motifs on T. brucei suggested the superior performance of our approach based on the current limited knowledge of regulatory elements in T. brucei.

  2. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; ...

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions thatmore » mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.« less

  3. Evolution of context dependent regulation by expansion of feast/famine regulatory proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisier, Christopher L.; Lo, Fang -Yin; Ashworth, Justin; Brooks, Aaron N.; Beer, Karlyn D.; Kaur, Amardeep; Pan, Min; Reiss, David J.; Facciotti, Marc T.; Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-11-14

    Expansion of transcription factors is believed to have played a crucial role in evolution of all organisms by enabling them to deal with dynamic environments and colonize new environments. We investigated how the expansion of the Feast/Famine Regulatory Protein (FFRP) or Lrp-like proteins into an eight-member family in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 has aided in niche-adaptation of this archaeon to a complex and dynamically changing hypersaline environment. We mapped genome-wide binding locations for all eight FFRPs, investigated their preference for binding different effector molecules, and identified the contexts in which they act by analyzing transcriptional responses across 35 growth conditions that mimic different environmental and nutritional conditions this organism is likely to encounter in the wild. Integrative analysis of these data constructed an FFRP regulatory network with conditionally active states that reveal how interrelated variations in DNA-binding domains, effector-molecule preferences, and binding sites in target gene promoters have tuned the functions of each FFRP to the environments in which they act. We demonstrate how conditional regulation of similar genes by two FFRPs, AsnC (an activator) and VNG1237C (a repressor), have striking environment-specific fitness consequences for oxidative stress management and growth, respectively. This study provides a systems perspective into the evolutionary process by which gene duplication within a transcription factor family contributes to environment-specific adaptation of an organism.

  4. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, Ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-11-26

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures.

  5. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  6. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Veber, Philippe; Guziolowski, Carito; Le Borgne, Michel; Radulescu, Ovidiu; Siegel, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges), and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions), by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions). In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine a significant portion of

  7. Clinical trials in "emerging markets": regulatory considerations and other factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Romi; Wang, Ouhong

    2013-11-01

    Clinical studies are being placed in emerging markets as part of global drug development programs to access large pool of eligible patients and to benefit from a cost effective structure. However, over the last few years, the definition of "emerging markets" is being revisited, especially from a regulatory perspective. For purposes of this article, countries outside US, EU and the traditional "western countries" are discussed. Multiple factors are considered for placement of clinical studies such as adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP), medical infrastructure & standard of care, number of eligible patients, etc. This article also discusses other quantitative factors such as country's GDP, patent applications, healthcare expenditure, healthcare infrastructure, corruption, innovation, etc. These different factors and indexes are correlated to the number of clinical studies ongoing in the "emerging markets". R&D, healthcare expenditure, technology infrastructure, transparency, and level of innovation, show a significant correlation with the number of clinical trials being conducted in these countries. This is the first analysis of its kind to evaluate and correlate the various other factors to the number of clinical studies in a country.

  8. Immunomodulation in host-protective immune response against murine tuberculosis through regulation of the T regulatory cell function.

    PubMed

    Das, Shibali; Halder, Kuntal; Goswami, Avranil; Chowdhury, Bidisha Paul; Pal, Nishith K; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is characterized by an infection in lung and spleen. In the present study, we have elucidated the mechanism by which Mycobacterium indicus pranii renders protection in in vivo Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. We observed that Mycobacterium indicus pranii treated infected C57BL/6 mice showed a strong host-protective Th1 immune response along with a marked decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines, TGF-β, and IL-10-secreting CD4(+) T cells. This Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated decrease in immunosuppressive cytokines was correlated with the reduction in the elevated frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T regulatory cells, along with the reduced TGF-β production from these T regulatory cells in tuberculosis-infected mice. This reduction in the T regulatory cell population was a result of effective modulation of STAT4-STAT5 transcription factor counter-regulation by Mycobacterium indicus pranii, which in turn, reduced the immunosuppressive activity of T regulatory cells. Thus, these findings put forward a detailed mechanistic insight into Mycobacterium indicus pranii mediated regulation of the T regulatory cell functioning during experimental murine tuberculosis, which might be helpful in combating Mycobacterium-induced pathogenesis.

  9. Highly accessible AU-rich regions in 3’ untranslated regions are hotspots for binding of regulatory factors

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is regarded as one of the major processes involved in the regulation of gene expression. It is mainly performed by RNA binding proteins and microRNAs, which target RNAs and typically affect their stability. Recent efforts from the scientific community have aimed at understanding post-transcriptional regulation at a global scale by using high-throughput sequencing techniques such as cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP), which facilitates identification of binding sites of these regulatory factors. However, the diversity in the experimental procedures and bioinformatics analyses has hindered the integration of multiple datasets and thus limited the development of an integrated view of post-transcriptional regulation. In this work, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets from 49 different RBPs in HEK293 cells to shed light on the complex interactions that govern post-transcriptional regulation. By developing a more stringent CLIP analysis pipeline we have discovered the existence of conserved regulatory AU-rich regions in the 3’UTRs where miRNAs and RBPs that regulate several processes such as polyadenylation or mRNA stability bind. Analogous to promoters, many factors have binding sites overlapping or in close proximity in these hotspots and hence the regulation of the mRNA may depend on their relative concentrations. This hypothesis is supported by RBP knockdown experiments that alter the relative concentration of RBPs in the cell. Upon AGO2 knockdown (KD), transcripts containing “free” target sites show increased expression levels compared to those containing target sites in hotspots, which suggests that target sites within hotspots are less available for miRNAs to bind. Interestingly, these hotspots appear enriched in genes with regulatory functions such as DNA binding and RNA binding. Taken together, our results suggest that hotspots are functional regulatory elements that define an extra layer

  10. Supporting the self-regulatory resource: does conscious self-regulation incidentally prime nonconscious support processes?

    PubMed

    Dorris, Derek C

    2009-11-01

    Ego-depletion (depletion of self-regulatory strength) can impair conscious efforts at self-regulation. Research into nonconscious self-regulation has demonstrated that preconscious automaticity and implementation intentions can automatically carry out regulatory tasks during times of ego-depletion. However, preconscious automaticity can only emerge during well-practiced tasks while implementation intentions can only support tasks that have been explicitly planned. Thus, when it comes to supporting the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour during times of ego-depletion these processes should be ineffective. However, it is argued here that because the conscious self-regulation of nonroutine and unplanned behaviour can incidentally prime the underlying mental representations those primed representations can be postconsciously re-activated to support that behaviour during times of ego-depletion. Postconscious self-regulation might, therefore, support a type of self-regulatory behaviour that has, thus far, not been associated with any form of support.

  11. Pesticide regulations for agriculture: Chemically flawed regulatory practice.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Donald S; Bruccoleri, Aldo G

    2016-08-02

    Two categories of pesticide soil models now exist. Government regulatory agencies use pesticide fate and transport hydrology models, including versions of PRZM.gw. They have good descriptions of pesticide transport by water flow. Their descriptions of chemical mechanisms are unrealistic, having been postulated using the universally accepted but incorrect pesticide soil science. The objective of this work is to report experimental tests of a pesticide soil model in use by regulatory agencies and to suggest possible improvements. Tests with experimentally based data explain why PRZM.gw predictions can be wrong by orders of magnitude. Predictive spreadsheet models are the other category. They are experimentally based, with chemical stoichiometry applied to integral kinetic rate laws for sorption, desorption, intra-particle diffusion, and chemical reactions. They do not account for pesticide transport through soils. Each category of models therefore lacks what the other could provide. They need to be either harmonized or replaced. Some preliminary tests indicate that an experimental mismatch between the categories of models will have to be resolved. Reports of pesticides in the environment and the medical problems that overlap geographically indicate that government regulatory practice needs to account for chemical kinetics and mechanisms. Questions about possible cause and effect links could then be investigated.

  12. Characterization of 5'-regulatory region of human myostatin gene: regulation by dexamethasone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Mallidis, C; Artaza, J; Taylor, W; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N; Bhasin, S

    2001-12-01

    We cloned and characterized a 3.3-kb fragment containing the 5'-regulatory region of the human myostatin gene. The promoter sequence contains putative muscle growth response elements for glucocorticoid, androgen, thyroid hormone, myogenic differentiation factor 1, myocyte enhancer factor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, and nuclear factor-kappaB. To identify sites important for myostatin's gene transcription and regulation, eight deletion constructs were placed in C(2)C(12) and L6 skeletal muscle cells. Transcriptional activity of the constructs was found to be significantly higher in myotubes compared with that of myoblasts. To investigate whether glucocorticoids regulate myostatin gene expression, we incubated both cell lines with dexamethasone. On both occasions, dexamethasone dose dependently increased both the promoter's transcriptional activity and the endogenous myostatin expression. The effects of dexamethasone were blocked when the cells were coincubated with the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-486. These findings suggest that glucocorticoids upregulate myostatin expression by inducing gene transcription, possibly through a glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pathway. We speculate that glucocorticoid-associated muscle atrophy might be due in part to the upregulation of myostatin expression.

  13. Functional domains of interferon regulatory factor I (IRF-1).

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, F; Kirchhoff, S; Posern, G; Köster, M; Oumard, A; Sharf, R; Levi, B Z; Hauser, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors among which are IRF-1, IRF-2, and IFN consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP). These factors share sequence homology in the N-terminal DNA-binding domain. IRF-1 and IRF-2 are further related and have additional homologous sequences within their C-termini. Whereas IRF-2 and ICSBP are identified as transcriptional repressors, IRF-1 is an activator. In the present work, the identification of functional domains in murine IRF-1 with regard to DNA-binding, nuclear translocation, heterodimerization with ICSBP and transcriptional activation are demonstrated. The minimal DNA-binding domain requires the N-terminal 124 amino acids plus an arbitrary C-terminal extension. By using mutants of IRF-1 fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein and monitoring their distribution in living cells, a nuclear location signal (NLS) was identified and found to be sufficient for nuclear translocation. Heterodimerization was confirmed by a two-hybrid system adapted to mammalian cells. The heterodimerization domain in IRF-1 was defined by studies in vitro and was shown to be homologous with a sequence in IRF-2, suggesting that IRF-2 also heterodimerizes with ICSBP through this sequence. An acidic domain in IRF-1 was found to be required and to be sufficient for transactivation. Epitope mapping of IRF-1 showed that regions within the NLS, the heterodimerization domain and the transcriptional activation domain are exposed for possible contacts with interacting proteins. PMID:9742224

  14. The regulatory repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-lactamase regulator AmpR includes virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  15. The Regulatory Repertoire of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpC ß-Lactamase Regulator AmpR Includes Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Smith, Roger; Narasimhan, Giri; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2012-01-01

    In Enterobacteriaceae, the transcriptional regulator AmpR, a member of the LysR family, regulates the expression of a chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC. The regulatory repertoire of AmpR is broader in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen responsible for numerous acute and chronic infections including cystic fibrosis. In addition to regulating ampC, P. aeruginosa AmpR regulates the sigma factor AlgT/U and production of some quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factors. In order to better understand the ampR regulon, we compared the transcriptional profile generated using DNA microarrays of the prototypic P. aeruginosa PAO1 strain with its isogenic ampR deletion mutant, PAOΔampR. Transcriptome analysis demonstrates that the AmpR regulon is much more extensive than previously thought, with the deletion of ampR influencing the differential expression of over 500 genes. In addition to regulating resistance to β-lactam antibiotics via AmpC, AmpR also regulates non-β-lactam antibiotic resistance by modulating the MexEF-OprN efflux pump. Other virulence mechanisms including biofilm formation and QS-regulated acute virulence factors are AmpR-regulated. Real-time PCR and phenotypic assays confirmed the microarray data. Further, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrate that a functional AmpR is required for P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. AmpR, a member of the core genome, also regulates genes in the regions of genome plasticity that are acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Further, we show differential regulation of other transcriptional regulators and sigma factors by AmpR, accounting for the extensive AmpR regulon. The data demonstrates that AmpR functions as a global regulator in P. aeruginosa and is a positive regulator of acute virulence while negatively regulating biofilm formation, a chronic infection phenotype. Unraveling this complex regulatory circuit will provide a better understanding of the bacterial response to antibiotics and how the

  16. Six2 and Wnt regulate self-renewal and commitment of nephron progenitors through shared gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo-Seop; Ma, Wenxiu; O’Brien, Lori L.; Chung, Eunah; Guo, Jin-Jin; Cheng, Jr-Gang; Valerius, M. Todd; McMahon, Jill A.; Wong, Wing Hung; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY A balance between Six2-dependent self-renewal and canonical Wnt signaling-directed commitment regulates mammalian nephrogenesis. Intersectional studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptional profiling identified direct target genes shared by each pathway within nephron progenitors. Wnt4 and Fgf8 are essential for progenitor commitment; cis-regulatory modules flanking each gene are co-bound by Six2 and β-catenin, and dependent on conserved Lef/Tcf binding sites for activity. In vitro and in vivo analyses suggest that Six2 and Lef/Tcf factors form a regulatory complex that promotes progenitor maintenance while entry of β-catenin into this complex promotes nephrogenesis. Alternative transcriptional responses associated with Six2 and β-catenin co-binding events occur through non-Lef/Tcf DNA binding mechanisms highlighting the regulatory complexity downstream of Wnt signaling in the developing mammalian kidney. PMID:22902740

  17. Uncovering MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Networks in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingchun; Gong, Xue; Purow, Benjamin; Zhao, Zhongming

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain tumor in humans. Recent studies revealed that patterns of microRNA (miRNA) expression in GBM tissue samples are different from those in normal brain tissues, suggesting that a number of miRNAs play critical roles in the pathogenesis of GBM. However, little is yet known about which miRNAs play central roles in the pathology of GBM and their regulatory mechanisms of action. To address this issue, in this study, we systematically explored the main regulation format (feed-forward loops, FFLs) consisting of miRNAs, transcription factors (TFs) and their impacting GBM-related genes, and developed a computational approach to construct a miRNA-TF regulatory network. First, we compiled GBM-related miRNAs, GBM-related genes, and known human TFs. We then identified 1,128 3-node FFLs and 805 4-node FFLs with statistical significance. By merging these FFLs together, we constructed a comprehensive GBM-specific miRNA-TF mediated regulatory network. Then, from the network, we extracted a composite GBM-specific regulatory network. To illustrate the GBM-specific regulatory network is promising for identification of critical miRNA components, we specifically examined a Notch signaling pathway subnetwork. Our follow up topological and functional analyses of the subnetwork revealed that six miRNAs (miR-124, miR-137, miR-219-5p, miR-34a, miR-9, and miR-92b) might play important roles in GBM, including some results that are supported by previous studies. In this study, we have developed a computational framework to construct a miRNA-TF regulatory network and generated the first miRNA-TF regulatory network for GBM, providing a valuable resource for further understanding the complex regulatory mechanisms in GBM. The observation of critical miRNAs in the Notch signaling pathway, with partial verification from previous studies, demonstrates that our network-based approach is promising for the identification of new and important

  18. Detecting regulatory gene-environment interactions with unmeasured environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Nicoló; Lippert, Christoph; Borgwardt, Karsten; Lawrence, Neil D; Stegle, Oliver

    2013-06-01

    Genomic studies have revealed a substantial heritable component of the transcriptional state of the cell. To fully understand the genetic regulation of gene expression variability, it is important to study the effect of genotype in the context of external factors such as alternative environmental conditions. In model systems, explicit environmental perturbations have been considered for this purpose, allowing to directly test for environment-specific genetic effects. However, such experiments are limited to species that can be profiled in controlled environments, hampering their use in important systems such as human. Moreover, even in seemingly tightly regulated experimental conditions, subtle environmental perturbations cannot be ruled out, and hence unknown environmental influences are frequent. Here, we propose a model-based approach to simultaneously infer unmeasured environmental factors from gene expression profiles and use them in genetic analyses, identifying environment-specific associations between polymorphic loci and individual gene expression traits. In extensive simulation studies, we show that our method is able to accurately reconstruct environmental factors and their interactions with genotype in a variety of settings. We further illustrate the use of our model in a real-world dataset in which one environmental factor has been explicitly experimentally controlled. Our method is able to accurately reconstruct the true underlying environmental factor even if it is not given as an input, allowing to detect genuine genotype-environment interactions. In addition to the known environmental factor, we find unmeasured factors involved in novel genotype-environment interactions. Our results suggest that interactions with both known and unknown environmental factors significantly contribute to gene expression variability. and implementation: Software available at http://pmbio.github.io/envGPLVM/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Current Regulation of Private Police: Regulatory Agency Experience and Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakalik, James S.; Wildhorn, Sorrel

    This report is the third in a series of five describing a 16-month study of the nature and extent of the private police industry in the United States, its problems, present regulation, and the laws impinging on it. Licensing and regulation of the industry in every state and several cities are described in this volume. Extensive tables present the…

  20. Childcare Regulations: Regulatory Enforcement in Ireland. What Happens When the Inspector Calls?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Childcare regulations ensure children's rights to Early Childhood Care and Education settings that protect them from harm and promote their healthy development. To ensure that settings comply, power is vested with regulatory bodies that are tasked with enforcing regulations. Using a qualitative methodology, 43 interviews were undertaken with Early…

  1. Childcare Regulations: Regulatory Enforcement in Ireland. What Happens When the Inspector Calls?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moloney, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Childcare regulations ensure children's rights to Early Childhood Care and Education settings that protect them from harm and promote their healthy development. To ensure that settings comply, power is vested with regulatory bodies that are tasked with enforcing regulations. Using a qualitative methodology, 43 interviews were undertaken with Early…

  2. Chromatin Properties of Regulatory DNA Probed by Manipulation of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs. PMID:24918633

  3. Systematic Discovery of Archaeal Transcription Factor Functions in Regulatory Networks through Quantitative Phenotyping Analysis.

    PubMed

    Darnell, Cynthia L; Tonner, Peter D; Gulli, Jordan G; Schmidler, Scott C; Schmid, Amy K

    2017-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are critical for dynamic transcriptional responses to environmental stress. However, the mechanisms by which GRN regulation adjusts physiology to enable stress survival remain unclear. Here we investigate the functions of transcription factors (TFs) within the global GRN of the stress-tolerant archaeal microorganism Halobacterium salinarum. We measured growth phenotypes of a panel of TF deletion mutants in high temporal resolution under heat shock, oxidative stress, and low-salinity conditions. To quantitate the noncanonical functional forms of the growth trajectories observed for these mutants, we developed a novel modeling framework based on Gaussian process regression and functional analysis of variance (FANOVA). We employ unique statistical tests to determine the significance of differential growth relative to the growth of the control strain. This analysis recapitulated known TF functions, revealed novel functions, and identified surprising secondary functions for characterized TFs. Strikingly, we observed that the majority of the TFs studied were required for growth under multiple stress conditions, pinpointing regulatory connections between the conditions tested. Correlations between quantitative phenotype trajectories of mutants are predictive of TF-TF connections within the GRN. These phenotypes are strongly concordant with predictions from statistical GRN models inferred from gene expression data alone. With genome-wide and targeted data sets, we provide detailed functional validation of novel TFs required for extreme oxidative stress and heat shock survival. Together, results presented in this study suggest that many TFs function under multiple conditions, thereby revealing high interconnectivity within the GRN and identifying the specific TFs required for communication between networks responding to disparate stressors. IMPORTANCE To ensure survival in the face of stress, microorganisms employ inducible damage repair

  4. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001 PMID:24867637

  5. Caveolin-1 regulates TCR signal strength and regulatory T-cell differentiation into alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Schönle, Anne; Hartl, Frederike A; Mentzel, Jan; Nöltner, Theresa; Rauch, Katharina S; Prestipino, Alessandro; Wohlfeil, Sebastian A; Apostolova, Petya; Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Fehrenbach, Kerstin; Guadamillas, Marta C; Follo, Marie; Prinz, Gabriele; Ruess, Ann-Katrin; Pfeifer, Dietmar; del Pozo, Miguel Angel; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Duyster, Justus; Hippen, Keli I; Blazar, Bruce R; Schachtrup, Kristina; Minguet, Susana; Zeiser, Robert

    2016-04-14

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a key organizer of membrane specializations and a scaffold protein that regulates signaling in multiple cell types. We found increased Cav-1 expression in human and murine T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Indeed, Cav-1(-/-)donor T cells caused less severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and yielded higher numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs) compared with controls. Depletion of Tregs from the graft abrogated this protective effect. Correspondingly, Treg frequencies increased when Cav-1(-/-)T cells were exposed to transforming growth factor-β/T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 activation or alloantigen stimulation in vitro compared with wild-type T cells. Mechanistically, we found that the phosphorylation of Cav-1 is dispensable for the control of T-cell fate by using a nonphosphorylatable Cav-1 (Y14F/Y14F) point-mutation variant. Moreover, the close proximity of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) to the TCR induced by TCR-activation was reduced in Cav-1(-/-)T cells. Therefore, less TCR/Lck clustering results in suboptimal activation of the downstream signaling events, which correlates with the preferential development into a Treg phenotype. Overall, we report a novel role for Cav-1 in TCR/Lck spatial distribution upon TCR triggering, which controls T-cell fate toward a regulatory phenotype. This alteration translated into a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and reduced GVHD in vivo.

  6. Extracytoplasmic function σ factors of the widely distributed group ECF41 contain a fused regulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    Wecke, Tina; Halang, Petra; Staroń, Anna; Dufour, Yann S; Donohue, Timothy J; Mascher, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria need signal transducing systems to respond to environmental changes. Next to one- and two-component systems, alternative σ factors of the extra-cytoplasmic function (ECF) protein family represent the third fundamental mechanism of bacterial signal transduction. A comprehensive classification of these proteins identified more than 40 phylogenetically distinct groups, most of which are not experimentally investigated. Here, we present the characterization of such a group with unique features, termed ECF41. Among analyzed bacterial genomes, ECF41 σ factors are widely distributed with about 400 proteins from 10 different phyla. They lack obvious anti-σ factors that typically control activity of other ECF σ factors, but their structural genes are often predicted to be cotranscribed with carboxymuconolactone decarboxylases, oxidoreductases, or epimerases based on genomic context conservation. We demonstrate for Bacillus licheniformis and Rhodobacter sphaeroides that the corresponding genes are preceded by a highly conserved promoter motif and are the only detectable targets of ECF41-dependent gene regulation. In contrast to other ECF σ factors, proteins of group ECF41 contain a large C-terminal extension, which is crucial for σ factor activity. Our data demonstrate that ECF41 σ factors are regulated by a novel mechanism based on the presence of a fused regulatory domain. PMID:22950025

  7. Cis-regulatory RNA elements that regulate specialized ribosome activity

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Shifeng; Barna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that the ribosome itself can play a highly regulatory role in the specialized translation of specific subpools of mRNAs, in particular at the level of ribosomal proteins (RP). However, the mechanism(s) by which this selection takes place has remained poorly understood. In our recent study, we discovered a combination of unique RNA elements in the 5′UTRs of mRNAs that allows for such control by the ribosome. These mRNAs contain a Translation Inhibitory Element (TIE) that inhibits general cap-dependent translation, and an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that relies on a specific RP for activation. The unique combination of an inhibitor of general translation and an activator of specialized translation is key to ribosome-mediated control of gene expression. Here we discuss how these RNA regulatory elements provide a new level of control to protein expression and their implications for gene expression, organismal development and evolution. PMID:26327194

  8. The Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors of KSHV: Immunosuppressors or Oncogenes?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Sarah R.; Damania, Blossom

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a large double-stranded DNA gammaherpesvirus, and the etiological agent for three human malignancies: Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman’s disease. To establish and maintain infection, KSHV has evolved unique mechanisms to evade the host immune response. Cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a critical part of the host anti-viral immune response. KSHV encodes four homologs of IRFs, vIRF1–4, which inhibit the activity of their cellular counterparts. vIRF1, 2, and 3 have been shown to interact directly with cellular IRFs. Additionally, the vIRFs have other functions such as modulation of Myc, p53, Notch, transforming growth factor-β, and NF-κB signaling. These activities of vIRFs may contribute to KSHV tumorigenesis. KSHV vIRF1 and vIRF3 have been implicated as oncogenes, making the understanding of KSHV vIRF function vital to understanding KSHV pathogenesis. PMID:22566809

  9. TRAF3 regulates the effector function of regulatory T cells and humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jae-Hoon; Hu, Hongbo; Jin, Jin; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Xiao, Yichuan; Gilbert, Brian E.; Brink, Robert; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control different aspects of immune responses, but how the effector functions of Treg cells are regulated is incompletely understood. Here we identified TNF receptor–associated factor 3 (TRAF3) as a regulator of Treg cell function. Treg cell–specific ablation of TRAF3 impaired CD4 T cell homeostasis, characterized by an increase in the Th1 type of effector/memory T cells. Moreover, the ablation of TRAF3 in Treg cells resulted in increased antigen-stimulated activation of follicular T helper cells (TFH cells), coupled with heightened formation of germinal centers and production of high-affinity IgG antibodies. Although the loss of TRAF3 did not reduce the overall frequency of Treg cells, it attenuated the antigen-stimulated production of follicular Treg cells (TFR cells). TRAF3 signaling in Treg cells was required to maintain high level expression of inducible co-stimulator (ICOS), which in turn was required for TFR cell generation and inhibition of antibody responses. These findings establish TRAF3 as a mediator of Treg cell function in the regulation of antibody responses and suggest a role for TRAF3 in mediating ICOS expression in Treg cells. PMID:24378539

  10. Scientists versus regulators: precaution, novelty & regulatory oversight as predictors of perceived risks of engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Beaudrie, Christian E H; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of 'nano experts' to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N = 404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development.

  11. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  12. Finding subtypes of transcription factor motif pairs with distinct regulatory roles

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Abha Singh; Kaminski, Naftali; Benos, Panayiotis V.

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences bound by a transcription factor (TF) are presumed to contain sequence elements that reflect its DNA binding preferences and its downstream-regulatory effects. Experimentally identified TF binding sites (TFBSs) are usually similar enough to be summarized by a ‘consensus’ motif, representative of the TF DNA binding specificity. Studies have shown that groups of nucleotide TFBS variants (subtypes) can contribute to distinct modes of downstream regulation by the TF via differential recruitment of cofactors. A TFA may bind to TFBS subtypes a1 or a2 depending on whether it associates with cofactors TFB or TFC, respectively. While some approaches can discover motif pairs (dyads), none address the problem of identifying ‘variants’ of dyads. TFs are key components of multiple regulatory pathways targeting different sets of genes perhaps with different binding preferences. Identifying the discriminating TF–DNA associations that lead to the differential downstream regulation is thus essential. We present DiSCo (Discovery of Subtypes and Cofactors), a novel approach for identifying variants of dyad motifs (and their respective target sequence sets) that are instrumental for differential downstream regulation. Using both simulated and experimental datasets, we demonstrate how current motif discovery can be successfully leveraged to address this question. PMID:21486752

  13. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor: Key Players in Plant Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Abdul F. A.; Sajad, Muhammad; Nazaruddin, Nazaruddin; Fauzi, Izzat A.; Murad, Abdul M. A.; Zainal, Zamri; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2017-01-01

    Recent achievements in plant microRNA (miRNA), a large class of small and non-coding RNAs, are very exciting. A wide array of techniques involving forward genetic, molecular cloning, bioinformatic analysis, and the latest technology, deep sequencing have greatly advanced miRNA discovery. A tiny miRNA sequence has the ability to target single/multiple mRNA targets. Most of the miRNA targets are transcription factors (TFs) which have paramount importance in regulating the plant growth and development. Various families of TFs, which have regulated a range of regulatory networks, may assist plants to grow under normal and stress environmental conditions. This present review focuses on the regulatory relationships between miRNAs and different families of TFs like; NF-Y, MYB, AP2, TCP, WRKY, NAC, GRF, and SPL. For instance NF-Y play important role during drought tolerance and flower development, MYB are involved in signal transduction and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, AP2 regulate the floral development and nodule formation, TCP direct leaf development and growth hormones signaling. WRKY have known roles in multiple stress tolerances, NAC regulate lateral root formation, GRF are involved in root growth, flower, and seed development, and SPL regulate plant transition from juvenile to adult. We also studied the relation between miRNAs and TFs by consolidating the research findings from different plant species which will help plant scientists in understanding the mechanism of action and interaction between these regulators in the plant growth and development under normal and stress environmental conditions. PMID:28446918

  14. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  15. Beyond regulatory compression: confronting the liminal spaces of health research regulation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Alexander, Samuel; Dove, Edward S.; Fletcher, Isabel; Ganguli Mitra, Agomoni; McMillan, Catriona; Laurie, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biomedicine and the life sciences continuously rearrange the relationship between culture and biology. In consequence, we increasingly look for a suitable regulatory response to reduce perceived uncertainty and instability. This article examines the full implications of this ‘regulatory turn’ by drawing on the anthropological concept of liminality. We offer the term ‘regulatory compression’ to characterise the effects of extant regulatory approaches on health research practices. With its focus on transformation and the ‘in-between’, liminality allows us to see how regulatory frameworks rely on a silo-based approach to classifying and regulating research objects such that they: (1) limit the flexibility necessary in clinical and laboratory research; (2) result in the emergence of unregulated spaces that lie between the bounded regulatory spheres; and (3) curtail modes of public participation in the health research enterprise. We suggest there is a need to develop the notion of ‘processual regulation’, a novel framework that requires a temporal-spatial examination of regulatory spaces and practices as these are experienced by all actors, including the relationship of actors with the objects of regulation. PMID:28058061

  16. Transcription factor clusters regulate genes in eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Erik G; Friemann, Rosmarie; Hohmann, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Transcription is regulated through binding factors to gene promoters to activate or repress expression, however, the mechanisms by which factors find targets remain unclear. Using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we determined in vivo stoichiometry and spatiotemporal dynamics of a GFP tagged repressor, Mig1, from a paradigm signaling pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find the repressor operates in clusters, which upon extracellular signal detection, translocate from the cytoplasm, bind to nuclear targets and turnover. Simulations of Mig1 configuration within a 3D yeast genome model combined with a promoter-specific, fluorescent translation reporter confirmed clusters are the functional unit of gene regulation. In vitro and structural analysis on reconstituted Mig1 suggests that clusters are stabilized by depletion forces between intrinsically disordered sequences. We observed similar clusters of a co-regulatory activator from a different pathway, supporting a generalized cluster model for transcription factors that reduces promoter search times through intersegment transfer while stabilizing gene expression. PMID:28841133

  17. Interactive cooperation and hierarchical operation of microRNA and transcription factor crosstalk in human transcriptional regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Gov, Esra; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2016-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression is an essential cellular process that is arranged by transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNA) and their target genes through a variety of mechanisms. Here, we set out to reconstruct a comprehensive transcriptional regulatory network of Homo sapiens consisting of experimentally verified regulatory information on miRNAs, TFs and their target genes. We have performed topological analyses to elucidate the transcriptional regulatory roles of miRNAs and TFs. When we thoroughly investigated the network motifs, different gene regulatory scenarios were observed; whereas, mutual TF-miRNA regulation (interactive cooperation) and hierarchical operation where miRNAs were the upstream regulators of TFs came into prominence. Otherwise, biological process specific subnetworks were also constructed and integration of gene and miRNA expression data on ovarian cancer was achieved as a case study to observe dynamic patterns of the gene expression. Meanwhile, both co-operation and hierarchical operation types were determined in active ovarian cancer and process-specific subnetworks. In addition, the analysis showed that multiple signals from miRNAs were integrated by TFs. Our results demonstrate new insights on the architecture of the human transcriptional regulatory network, and here we present some lessons we gained from deciphering the reciprocal interplay between miRNAs, TFs and their target genes.

  18. Regulatory focus and generalized trust: the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on trusting others

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Johannes; Mayo, Ruth; Greifeneder, Rainer; Pfattheicher, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The current research suggests that taking self-regulatory mechanisms into account provides insights regarding individuals’ responses to threats in social interactions. In general, based on the notion that a prevention-focused orientation of self-regulation is associated with a need for security and a vigilant tendency to avoid losses and other types of negative events we advocate that a prevention-focused orientation, both as a disposition as well as a situationally induced state, lowers generalized trust, thus hindering cooperation within social interactions that entail threats. Specifically, we found that the more individuals’ habitual self-regulatory orientation is dominated by a prevention focus, the less likely they are to score high on a self-report measure of generalized trust (Study 1), and to express trust in a trust game paradigm as manifested in lower sums of transferred money (Studies 2 and 3). Similar findings were found when prevention focus was situationally manipulated (Study 4). Finally, one possible factor underlying the impact of prevention-focused self-regulation on generalized trust was demonstrated as individuals with a special sensitivity to negative information were significantly affected by a subtle prevention focus manipulation (versus control condition) in that they reacted with reduced trust in the trust game (Study 5). In sum, the current findings document the crucial relevance of self-regulatory orientations as conceptualized in regulatory focus theory regarding generalized trust and responses to threats within a social interaction. The theoretical and applied implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25852585

  19. A pineal regulatory element (PIRE) mediates transactivation by the pineal/retina-specific transcription factor CRX.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Chen, S; Wang, Q; Zack, D J; Snyder, S H; Borjigin, J

    1998-02-17

    The circadian hormone melatonin is synthesized predominantly in the pineal gland by the actions of two pineal-specific enzymes: serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT). Pineal night-specific ATPase (PINA), another pineal- and night-specific protein we recently identified, is produced as a truncated form of the Wilson disease gene (Atp7b) product. To identify the regulatory elements required for pineal-specific gene expression, we isolated sequences upstream of the rat PINA gene and discovered a cis-acting element that is recognized by a novel pineal/retina-specific nuclear factor. This pineal regulatory element (PIRE) has a consensus of TAATC/T and is present in six copies in the 5' regulatory region of the PINA gene, at least three copies in the rat NAT promoter, and at least one copy in each of the putative HIOMT promoters A and B. A recently identified retina-specific protein, cone rod homeobox (CRX), binds to PIRE in vitro and transactivates PIRE-reporter constructs. These data suggest that Crx may play a crucial role in regulating pineal gene expression through interactions with PIRE.

  20. A pineal regulatory element (PIRE) mediates transactivation by the pineal/retina-specific transcription factor CRX

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Shiming; Wang, Qingliang; Zack, Donald J.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Borjigin, Jimo

    1998-01-01

    The circadian hormone melatonin is synthesized predominantly in the pineal gland by the actions of two pineal-specific enzymes: serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) and hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT). Pineal night-specific ATPase (PINA), another pineal- and night-specific protein we recently identified, is produced as a truncated form of the Wilson disease gene (Atp7b) product. To identify the regulatory elements required for pineal-specific gene expression, we isolated sequences upstream of the rat PINA gene and discovered a cis-acting element that is recognized by a novel pineal/retina-specific nuclear factor. This pineal regulatory element (PIRE) has a consensus of TAATC/T and is present in six copies in the 5′ regulatory region of the PINA gene, at least three copies in the rat NAT promoter, and at least one copy in each of the putative HIOMT promoters A and B. A recently identified retina-specific protein, cone rod homeobox (CRX), binds to PIRE in vitro and transactivates PIRE-reporter constructs. These data suggest that Crx may play a crucial role in regulating pineal gene expression through interactions with PIRE. PMID:9465110

  1. 76 FR 8940 - Regulatory Review of Existing DOT Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... agencies or state, local, or tribal governmental ] bodies; (8) simplify or clarify language in regulations... and Executive Order 12866. Generally, the agencies have divided their rules into 10 different groups... maintain a consistent culture of retrospective review and analysis. Thus, to implement Executive...

  2. Arenavirus nucleoprotein targets interferon regulatory factor-activating kinase IKKε.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Pasqual, Giulia; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses perturb innate antiviral defense by blocking induction of type I interferon (IFN) production. Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to block activation and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to virus infection. Here, we sought to identify cellular factors involved in innate antiviral signaling targeted by arenavirus NP. Consistent with previous studies, infection with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) prevented phosphorylation of IRF3 in response to infection with Sendai virus, a strong inducer of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway of innate antiviral signaling. Using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we found that LCMV NP associates with the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase IKKε but that, rather unexpectedly, LCMV NP did not bind to the closely related TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1). The NP-IKKε interaction was highly conserved among arenaviruses from different clades. In LCMV-infected cells, IKKε colocalized with NP but not with MAVS located on the outer membrane of mitochondria. LCMV NP bound the kinase domain (KD) of IKKε (IKBKE) and blocked its autocatalytic activity and its ability to phosphorylate IRF3, without undergoing phosphorylation. Together, our data identify IKKε as a novel target of arenavirus NP. Engagement of NP seems to sequester IKKε in an inactive complex. Considering the important functions of IKKε in innate antiviral immunity and other cellular processes, the NP-IKKε interaction likely plays a crucial role in arenavirus-host interaction.

  3. Discovering transcription factor regulatory targets using gene expression and binding data.

    PubMed

    Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Zhou, Jie; White, Kevin P; Sciammas, Roger; Dinner, Aaron R

    2012-01-15

    Identifying the target genes regulated by transcription factors (TFs) is the most basic step in understanding gene regulation. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), enable mapping TF binding sites genome wide, but it is not possible to infer function from binding alone. This is especially true in mammalian systems, where regulation often occurs through long-range enhancers in gene-rich neighborhoods, rather than proximal promoters, preventing straightforward assignment of a binding site to a target gene. We present EMBER (Expectation Maximization of Binding and Expression pRofiles), a method that integrates high-throughput binding data (e.g. ChIP-chip or ChIP-seq) with gene expression data (e.g. DNA microarray) via an unsupervised machine learning algorithm for inferring the gene targets of sets of TF binding sites. Genes selected are those that match overrepresented expression patterns, which can be used to provide information about multiple TF regulatory modes. We apply the method to genome-wide human breast cancer data and demonstrate that EMBER confirms a role for the TFs estrogen receptor alpha, retinoic acid receptors alpha and gamma in breast cancer development, whereas the conventional approach of assigning regulatory targets based on proximity does not. Additionally, we compare several predicted target genes from EMBER to interactions inferred previously, examine combinatorial effects of TFs on gene regulation and illustrate the ability of EMBER to discover multiple modes of regulation. All code used for this work is available at http://dinner-group.uchicago.edu/downloads.html.

  4. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Anderson, Ana C

    2015-11-02

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings.

  5. TIGIT predominantly regulates the immune response via regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurtulus, Sema; Sakuishi, Kaori; Ngiow, Shin-Foong; Joller, Nicole; Tan, Dewar J.; Teng, Michele W.L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Anderson, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Coinhibitory receptors are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Upregulation of these receptors on effector T cells terminates T cell responses, while their expression on Tregs promotes their suppressor function. Understanding the function of coinhibitory receptors in effector T cells and Tregs is crucial, as therapies that target coinhibitory receptors are currently at the forefront of treatment strategies for cancer and other chronic diseases. T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is a recently identified coinhibitory receptor that is found on the surface of a variety of lymphoid cells, and its role in immune regulation is just beginning to be elucidated. We examined TIGIT-mediated immune regulation in different murine cancer models and determined that TIGIT marks the most dysfunctional subset of CD8+ T cells in tumor tissue as well as tumor-tissue Tregs with a highly active and suppressive phenotype. We demonstrated that TIGIT signaling in Tregs directs their phenotype and that TIGIT primarily suppresses antitumor immunity via Tregs and not CD8+ T cells. Moreover, TIGIT+ Tregs upregulated expression of the coinhibitory receptor TIM-3 in tumor tissue, and TIM-3 and TIGIT synergized to suppress antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into how TIGIT regulates immune responses in chronic disease settings. PMID:26413872

  6. Interferon regulatory factors: at the crossroads of immunity, metabolism, and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Nian; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Li, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    The interferon-regulatory factor (IRF) family comprises nine members in mammals. Although this transcription factor family was originally thought to function primarily in the immune system, contributing to both the innate immune response and the development of immune cells, recent advances have revealed that IRFs plays critical roles in other biological processes, such as metabolism. Accordingly, abnormalities in the expression and/or function of IRFs have increasingly been linked to disease. Herein, we provide an update on the recent progress regarding the regulation of immune responses and immune cell development associated with IRFs. Additionally, we discuss the relationships between IRFs and immunity, metabolism, and disease, with a particular focus on the role of IRFs as stress sensors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases.

  7. Regulation of plant growth and development by the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR and GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR duo.

    PubMed

    Hoe Kim, Jeong; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of gene expression and play pivotal roles in all aspects of living organisms. Therefore, identification and functional characterization of transcription factors is a prerequisite step toward understanding life. This article reviews molecular and biological functions of the two transcription regulator families, GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) and GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR (GIF), which have only recently been recognized. A myriad of experimental evidence clearly illustrates that GRF and GIF are bona fide partner proteins and form a plant-specific transcriptional complex. One of the most conspicuous outcomes from this research field is that the GRF-GIF duo endows the primordial cells of vegetative and reproductive organs with a meristematic specification state, guaranteeing the supply of cells for organogenesis and successful reproduction. It has recently been shown that GIF1 proteins, also known as ANGUSTIFOLIA3, recruit chromatin remodelling complexes to target genes, and that AtGRF expression is directly activated by the floral identity factors, APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3, providing an important insight into understanding of the action of GRF-GIF. Moreover, GRF genes are extensively subjected to post-transcriptional control by microRNA396, revealing the presence of a complex regulatory circuit in regulation of plant growth and development by the GRF-GIF duo. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor-2 in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, M; Ito, H; Nakamura, Y; Wate, R; Kaneko, S; Nakano, S; Matsumoto, S; Kusaka, H

    2011-04-01

    Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor-2 (Smurf2) is an E3 ligase that belongs to the HECT domain ubiquitin ligase family. Smurf2 can interact with Smad proteins and promote their ubiquitin-dependent degradation, thereby controlling the cellular levels of these signalling mediators. Phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3) was recently identified in phosphorylated tau (phospho-tau) inclusions in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). As Smurf2 is the E3 ligase of pSmad2, we aimed at investigating the relationship among Smurf2, pSmad2/3 and phospho-tau in this study. The brains of six PSP and three control patients without neurological disorder were investigated by immunohistochemical analysis. In the control subjects, Smurf2 immunoreactivity was not demonstrable in the neurones and glial cells, and that for pSmad2/3 was observed exclusively in neuronal and glial nuclei. In PSP patients, the pathognomonic neuronal and glial phospho-tau inclusions were immunopositive for both Smurf2 and pSmad2/3. The intensity of pSmad2/3 immunosignals of neuronal and glial nuclei containing phospho-tau inclusions was less than that for the cells without the inclusions. Triple immunofluorescence staining for Smurf2, pSmad2/3 and phospho-tau revealed co-localization of these proteins within the neuronal and glial inclusions; and in some globose neurofibrillary tangles, the Smurf2 immunoreactivity appeared more centrally distributed than that of pSmad2/3 and phospho-tau. This is the first demonstration of the presence of Smurf2 immunoreactivity in the phospho-tau inclusions in PSP. These findings suggest that Smurf2 plays a significant role in the pathomechanism of PSP by causing abnormal redistribution of neuronal nuclear pSmad2/3 to the cytoplasm. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2011 British Neuropathological Society.

  9. Regulatory role of the respiratory supercomplex factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rydström Lundin, Camilla; Ott, Martin; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory supercomplex factors (Rcf) 1 and 2 mediate supramolecular interactions between mitochondrial complexes III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase; cyt. bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase; CytcO). In addition, removal of these polypeptides results in decreased activity of CytcO, but not of cyt. bc1. In the present study, we have investigated the kinetics of ligand binding, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2, and the linked cyt. bc1-CytcO quinol oxidation-oxygen-reduction activities in mitochondria in which Rcf1 or Rcf2 were removed genetically (strains rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ, respectively). The data show that in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, in a significant fraction of the population, ligand binding occurs over a time scale that is ∼100-fold faster (τ ≅ 100 μs) than observed with the wild-type mitochondria (τ ≅ 10 ms), indicating structural changes. This effect is specific to removal of Rcf and not dissociation of the cyt. bc1–CytcO supercomplex. Furthermore, in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2 was incomplete. This observation indicates that the lower activity of CytcO is caused by a fraction of inactive CytcO rather than decreased CytcO activity of the entire population. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Rcf1 polypeptide mediates formation of an electron-transfer bridge from cyt. bc1 to CytcO via a tightly bound cyt. c. We discuss the significance of the proposed regulatory mechanism of Rcf1 and Rcf2 in the context of supramolecular interactions between cyt. bc1 and CytcO. PMID:27432958

  10. Genome context as a predictive tool for identifying regulatory targets of the TetR family transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang Kyun; Cuthbertson, Leslie; Nodwell, Justin R

    2012-01-01

    TetR family transcriptional regulators (TFRs) are found in most bacteria and archea. Most of the family members that have been investigated to date are repressors of their target genes, and the majority of these, like the well-characterized protein TetR, regulate genes that encode transmembrane efflux pumps. In many cases repression by TFR proteins is reversed through the direct binding of a small-molecule ligand. The number of TFRs in the public database has grown rapidly as a result of genome sequencing and there are now thousands of family members; however virtually nothing is known about the biology and biochemistry they regulate. Generally applicable methods for predicting their regulatory targets would assist efforts to characterize the family. Here, we investigate chromosomal context of 372 TFRs from three Streptomyces species. We find that the majority (250 TFRs) are transcribed divergently from one neighboring gene, as is the case for TetR and its target tetA. We explore predicted target gene product identity and intergenic separation to see which either correlates with a direct regulatory relationship. While intergenic separation is a critical factor in regulatory prediction the identity of the putative target gene product is not. Our data suggest that those TFRs that are <200 bp from their divergently oriented neighbors are most likely to regulate them. These target genes include membrane proteins (26% of which 22% are probable membrane-associated pumps), enzymes (60%), other proteins such as transcriptional regulators (1%), and proteins having no predictive sequence motifs (13%). In addition to establishing a solid foundation for identifying targets for TFRs of unknown function, our analysis demonstrates a much greater diversity of TFR-regulated biochemical functions.

  11. Gene regulatory network plasticity predates a switch in function of a conserved transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Nocedal, Isabel; Mancera, Eugenio; Johnson, Alexander D

    2017-03-22

    The rewiring of gene regulatory networks can generate phenotypic novelty. It remains an open question, however, how the large number of connections needed to form a novel network arise over evolutionary time. Here, we address this question using the network controlled by the fungal transcription regulator Ndt80. This conserved protein has undergone a dramatic switch in function-from an ancestral role regulating sporulation to a derived role regulating biofilm formation. This switch in function corresponded to a large-scale rewiring of the genes regulated by Ndt80. However, we demonstrate that the Ndt80-target gene connections were undergoing extensive rewiring prior to the switch in Ndt80's regulatory function. We propose that extensive drift in the Ndt80 regulon allowed for the exploration of alternative network structures without a loss of ancestral function, thereby facilitating the formation of a network with a new function.

  12. MoD Tools: regulatory motif discovery in nucleotide sequences from co-regulated or homologous genes

    PubMed Central

    Pavesi, Giulio; Mereghetti, Paolo; Zambelli, Federico; Stefani, Marco; Mauri, Giancarlo; Pesole, Graziano

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the complex mechanisms regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels is one of the greatest challenges of the post-genomic era. The MoD (MOtif Discovery) Tools web server comprises a set of tools for the discovery of novel conserved sequence and structure motifs in nucleotide sequences, motifs that in turn are good candidates for regulatory activity. The server includes the following programs: Weeder, for the discovery of conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in nucleotide sequences from co-regulated genes; WeederH, for the discovery of conserved TFBSs and distal regulatory modules in sequences from homologous genes; RNAProfile, for the discovery of conserved secondary structure motifs in unaligned RNA sequences whose secondary structure is not known. In this way, a given gene can be compared with other co-regulated genes or with its homologs, or its mRNA can be analyzed for conserved motifs regulating its post-transcriptional fate. The web server thus provides researchers with different strategies and methods to investigate the regulation of gene expression, at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Available at and . PMID:16845071

  13. State regulatory board structure, regulations, and nurse practitioner availability.

    PubMed

    Wilken, M

    1995-10-01

    State boards of nursing (BON) and medicine (BOM) promulgate regulations that affect nurse practitioners (NPs). Certain characteristics of board structure have an impact on two potential barriers to NP practice: the absence of direct third-party reimbursement and authority to prescribe. The percentage of consumers on BONs and BOMs increases the likelihood of direct third-party reimbursement for NPs. The presence of an NP committee providing input to a board increases the likelihood of authority to prescribe for NPs. The availability of NPs is enhanced by the presence of NP educational programs in the state, the level of effort by the state related to NP recruitment and retention, and the presence of direct third-party reimbursement.

  14. 76 FR 38597 - Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 383 and 390 Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators of Certain Farm Vehicles and Off-Road Agricultural Equipment AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice...

  15. 76 FR 50433 - Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 383 and 390 Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators of Certain Farm Vehicles and Off-Road Agricultural Equipment AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of...

  16. Expression of myogenic regulatory factors and myo-endothelial remodeling in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Wanschitz, Julia V; Dubourg, Odile; Lacene, Emmanuelle; Fischer, Michael B; Höftberger, Romana; Budka, Herbert; Romero, Norma B; Eymard, Bruno; Herson, Serge; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Voit, Thomas; Benveniste, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Muscle repair relies on coordinated activation and differentiation of satellite cells, a process that is unable to counterbalance progressive degeneration in sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). To explore features of myo regeneration, the expression of myogenic regulatory factors Pax7, MyoD and Myogenin and markers of regenerating fibers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in s-IBM muscle compared with polymyositis, dermatomyositis, muscular dystrophy and age-matched controls. In addition, the capillary density and number of interstitial CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells was determined by double-immunoflourescence staining. Satellite cells and regenerating fibers were significantly increased in s-IBM similar to other inflammatory myopathies and correlated with the intensity of inflammation (R>0.428). Expression of MyoD, visualizing activated satellite cells and proliferating myoblasts, was lower in s-IBM compared to polymyosits. In contrast, Myogenin a marker of myogenic cell differentiation was strongly up-regulated in s-IBM muscle. The microvascular architecture in s-IBM was distorted, although the capillary density was normal. Notably, CD34(+) hematopoietic cells were significantly increased in the interstitial compartment. Our findings indicate profound myo-endothelial remodeling of s-IBM muscle concomitant to inflammation. An altered expression of myogenic regulatory factors involved in satellite cell activation and differentiation, however, might reflect perturbations of muscle repair in s-IBM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regeneration: interplay between the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Gailly, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle can regenerate in response to muscle damage. This ability is conferred by the presence of myogenic stem cells called satellite cells. In response to stimuli such as injury or exercise, these cells become activated and express myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), i.e., transcription factors of the myogenic lineage including Myf5, MyoD, myogenin, and Mrf4 to proliferate and differentiate into myofibers. The MRF family of proteins controls the transcription of important muscle-specific proteins such as myosin heavy chain and muscle creatine kinase. Different growth factors are secreted during muscle repair among which insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are the only ones that promote both muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and that play a key role in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy. Different isoforms of IGFs are expressed during muscle repair: IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, or IGF-IEc (also known as mechano growth factor, MGF) and IGF-II. MGF is expressed first and is observed in satellite cells and in proliferating myoblasts whereas IGF-Ia and IGF-II expression occurs at the state of muscle fiber formation. Interestingly, several studies report the induction of MRFs in response to IGFs stimulation. Inversely, IGFs expression may also be regulated by MRFs. Various mechanisms are proposed to support these interactions. In this review, we describe the general process of muscle hypertrophy and regeneration and decipher the interactions between the two groups of factors involved in the process.

  18. Abf1 and other general regulatory factors control ribosome biogenesis gene expression in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Maria Cristina; Fermi, Beatrice; Spagnoli, Gloria; Levati, Elisabetta; Rubbi, Ludmilla; Ferrari, Roberto; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2017-05-05

    Ribosome biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a regulon of >200 genes (Ribi genes) coordinately regulated in response to nutrient availability and cellular growth rate. Two cis-acting elements called PAC and RRPE are known to mediate Ribi gene repression in response to nutritional downshift. Here, we show that most Ribi gene promoters also contain binding sites for one or more General Regulatory Factors (GRFs), most frequently Abf1 and Reb1, and that these factors are enriched in vivo at Ribi promoters. Abf1/Reb1/Tbf1 promoter association was required for full Ribi gene expression in rich medium and for its modulation in response to glucose starvation, characterized by a rapid drop followed by slow recovery. Such a response did not entail changes in Abf1 occupancy, but it was paralleled by a quick increase, followed by slow decrease, in Rpd3L histone deacetylase occupancy. Remarkably, Abf1 site disruption also abolished Rpd3L complex recruitment in response to starvation. Extensive mutational analysis of the DBP7 promoter revealed a complex interplay of Tbf1 sites, PAC and RRPE in the transcriptional regulation of this Ribi gene. Our observations point to GRFs as new multifaceted players in Ribi gene regulation both during exponential growth and under repressive conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. A regulatory cascade of three transcription factors in a single specific neuron, DVC, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huiyun; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Hope, Ian A

    2012-02-15

    Homeobox proteins are critical regulators of developmental gene transcription and cell specification. Many insights into transcriptional regulation have been gained from studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We investigated the expression and regulation of the C. elegans homeobox gene ceh-63, which encodes a single-homeodomain transcription factor of 152 amino acids. ceh-63 is expressed in the interneuron DVC in both sexes, from late embryogenesis through adulthood, and two pairs of uterine cells in reproductive hermaphrodites only. A reporter gene fusion, encoding GFP fused to the full-length CEH-63, also drove weak inconsistent expression in additional unidentified cells in the head and tail. A potential ceh-63 null mutant had no obvious abnormalities, except for a possible increase in subtle defects of the DVC axon projection. No behavioural responses were observed upon either laser ablation of DVC or activation of DVC through light stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 specifically expressed in this neuron. The function of DVC therefore remains enigmatic. A transcriptional regulatory cascade operating in DVC was defined from the LIM-homeodomain protein CEH-14 through CEH-63 to the helix-turn-helix transcription factor MBR-1. Both CEH-14 and CEH-63 individually bound the mbr-1 promoter in a yeast one-hybrid assay. A model is proposed suggesting that CEH-14 activates ceh-63 and then along with CEH-63 co-ordinately activates mbr-1.

  20. A regulatory cascade of three transcription factors in a single specific neuron, DVC, in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Huiyun; Reece-Hoyes, John S.; Walhout, Albertha J.M.; Hope, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Homeobox proteins are critical regulators of developmental gene transcription and cell specification. Many insights into transcriptional regulation have been gained from studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We investigated the expression and regulation of the C. elegans homeobox gene ceh-63, which encodes a single-homeodomain transcription factor of 152 amino acids. ceh-63 is expressed in the interneuron DVC in both sexes, from late embryogenesis through adulthood, and two pairs of uterine cells in reproductive hermaphrodites only. A reporter gene fusion, encoding GFP fused to the full-length CEH-63, also drove weak inconsistent expression in additional unidentified cells in the head and tail. A potential ceh-63 null mutant had no obvious abnormalities, except for a possible increase in subtle defects of the DVC axon projection. No behavioural responses were observed upon either laser ablation of DVC or activation of DVC through light stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 specifically expressed in this neuron. The function of DVC therefore remains enigmatic. A transcriptional regulatory cascade operating in DVC was defined from the LIM-homeodomain protein CEH-14 through CEH-63 to the helix–turn–helix transcription factor MBR-1. Both CEH-14 and CEH-63 individually bound the mbr-1 promoter in a yeast one-hybrid assay. A model is proposed suggesting that CEH-14 activates ceh-63 and then along with CEH-63 co-ordinately activates mbr-1. PMID:22207033

  1. Scientists versus Regulators: Precaution, Novelty & Regulatory Oversight as Predictors of Perceived Risks of Engineered Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Beaudrie, Christian E. H.; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of ‘nano experts’ to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N = 404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development. PMID:25222742

  2. Comprehensive dissection of transcriptome data and regulatory factors in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Bijan; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein; Wee, Ping; Mahdiuni, Hamid

    2017-04-12

    Features of pancreatic cancers include high mortality rates caused by rapid tumor progression and a lack of effective therapy. Underpinning the molecular mechanisms involved in the alteration of the gene expression program in the pancreatic cancer remains to be understood. In the current study we performed a comprehensive analysis using 282 pancreatic tumor and normal samples from seven independent expression data sets to provide a better view on the interactions between different transcription factors (TFs) and the most affected biological pathways in pancreatic cancer. We highlighted common differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and common affected processes within pancreatic cancer samples. We revealed 16 main DE-TFs that regulated gene expression alterations as well as the most significant processes in pancreatic cancer compared to normal cells. For example, we found the upregulated FOXM1 to be a top regulator of pancreatic cellular transformation based on results from different analyses, including from its regulation of gene regulatory networks, its presence in protein complex, its significant regulation of genes related to cancer pathways, and its regulation of most of the identified DE-TFs. Furthermore, we provided a model and assessed the role of different DE-TFs in the regulation of the most affected pancreatic- and cancer-specific processes. In conclusion, our bioinformatics meta-analysis of high throughput expression data sets, besides clarifying common affected genes and pathways, also showed the mechanisms involved in regulating these common profiles. Our results, especially for DE-TFs, could potentially be useful for screening for pancreatic cancer, and for confirming or determining novel pharmacological targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Catecholamine Stress Hormones Regulate Cellular Iron Homeostasis by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism Mediated by Iron Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tapryal, Nisha; Vivek G, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate availability of iron is important for cellular energy metabolism. Catecholamines such as epinephrine and norepinephrine promote energy expenditure to adapt to conditions that arose due to stress. To restore the energy balance, epinephrine/norepinephrine-exposed cells may face higher iron demand. So far, no direct role of epinephrine/norepinephrine in cellular iron homeostasis has been reported. Here we show that epinephrine/norepinephrine regulates iron homeostasis components such as transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H in hepatic and skeletal muscle cells by promoting the binding of iron regulatory proteins to iron-responsive elements present in the UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H transcripts. Increased transferrin receptor-1, decreased ferritin-H, and increased iron-responsive element-iron regulatory protein interaction are also observed in liver and muscle tissues of epinephrine/norepinephrine-injected mice. We demonstrate the role of epinephrine/norepinephrine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in converting cytosolic aconitase (ACO1) into iron regulatory protein-1 to bind iron-responsive elements present in UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H. Our study further reveals that mitochondrial iron content and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) activity are elevated by epinephrine/norepinephrine that are blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and iron regulatory protein-1 siRNA, suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species and iron regulatory protein-1 in this mechanism. This study reveals epinephrine and norepinephrine as novel regulators of cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25572399

  4. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located -527 bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. PMID:26896592

  5. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon; Rifkin, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located 527bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Product feedback regulation implicated in translational control of the Trypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase regulatory subunit prozyme

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yanjing; Nguyen, Suong; Kim, Sok Ho; Volkov, Oleg A.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Human African sleeping sickness (HAT) is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. Polyamine biosynthesis is an important drug target in the treatment of HAT. Previously we showed that trypanosomatid S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of the polyamine spermidine, is activated by heterodimer formation with an inactive paralog termed prozyme. Furthermore, prozyme protein levels were regulated in response reduced AdoMetDC activity. Herein we show that T. brucei encodes three prozyme transcripts. The 3’UTRs of these transcripts were mapped and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter constructs were used to identify a 1.2 kb region that contained a 3’UTR prozyme regulatory element sufficient to up regulate CAT protein levels (but not RNA) upon AdoMetDC inhibition, supporting the hypothesis that prozyme expression is regulated translationally. To gain insight into trans-acting factors, genetic rescue of AdoMetDC RNAi knockdown lines with human AdoMetDC was performed leading to rescue of the cell growth block, and restoration of prozyme protein to wild-type levels. Polyamine and AdoMet metabolite analysis showed that prozyme protein levels were inversely proportional to intracellular levels of decarboxylated AdoMet (dcAdoMet). These data suggest that prozyme translation may be regulated by dcAdoMet, a metabolite not previously identified to play a regulatory role. PMID:23634831

  7. Stress-induced Start Codon Fidelity Regulates Arsenite-inducible Regulatory Particle-associated Protein (AIRAP) Translation*

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Lolita; Braunstein, Ilana; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    Initial steps in protein synthesis are highly regulated processes as they define the reading frame of the translation machinery. Eukaryotic translation initiation is a process facilitated by numerous factors (eIFs), aimed to form a “scanning” mechanism toward the initiation codon. Translation initiation of the main open reading frame (ORF) in an mRNA transcript has been reported to be regulated by upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in a manner of re-initiation. This mode of regulation is governed by the phosphorylation status of eIF2α and controlled by cellular stresses. Another mode of translational initiation regulation is leaky scanning, and this regulatory process has not been extensively studied. We have identified arsenite-inducible regulatory particle-associated protein (AIRAP) transcript to be translationally induced during arsenite stress conditions. AIRAP transcript contains a single uORF in a poor-kozak context. AIRAP translation induction is governed by means of leaky scanning and not re-initiation. This induction of AIRAP is solely dependent on eIF1 and the uORF kozak context. We show that eIF1 is phosphorylated under specific conditions that induce protein misfolding and have biochemically characterized this site of phosphorylation. Our data indicate that leaky scanning like re-initiation is responsive to stress conditions and that leaky scanning can induce ORF translation by bypassing poor kozak context of a single uORF transcript. PMID:24898249

  8. Are regulatory strategies necessary in the regulation of accuracy? The effect of direct-access answers.

    PubMed

    Luna, Karlos; Martín-Luengo, Beatriz; Brewer, Neil

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that, when people asked to retrieve something from memory have the chance to regulate memory accuracy, the accuracy of their final report increases. Such regulation of accuracy can be made through one of several strategies: the report option, the grain-size option, or the plurality option. However, sometimes an answer can be directly accessed and reported without resorting to such strategies. The direct-access answers are expected to be fast, have high accuracy, and be rated with high probabilities of being correct. Thus, direct-access answers alone could explain the increase of accuracy that has been considered the outcome of regulatory strategies. If so, regulatory strategies may not be needed to explain the previous results. In two experiments, we disentangled the effects of direct-access answers and regulatory strategies in the increase of accuracy. We identified a subset of direct-access answers, and then examined the regulation of accuracy with the plurality option when they were removed. Participants answered questions with six (Exp. 1) or five (Exp. 2) alternatives. Their task was, first, to select as many alternatives as they wanted and, second, to select only two or four alternatives. The results showed that the direct-access answer affected the regulation of accuracy and made it easier. However, the results also showed that regulatory strategies, in this case the plurality option, are needed to explain why the accuracy of final report increases after successful regulation. This research highlighted the relevance of taking direct-access answers into account in the study of the regulation of accuracy.

  9. Interferon regulatory factor 5 gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hammad, A; Mossad, Y M; Nasef, N; Eid, R

    2017-01-01

    Background Increased expression of interferon-inducible genes is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the transcription factors regulating interferon and was proved to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE in different populations. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and SLE susceptibility in a cohort of Egyptian children and to investigate their association with clinico-pathological features, especially lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods Typing of interferon regulatory factor 5 rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714 polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for 100 children with SLE and 100 matched healthy controls. Results Children with SLE had more frequent T allele and TT genotype of rs2004640 ( Pc = 0.003 and 0.024, respectively) compared to controls. Patients with nephritis had more frequent T allele of rs2004640 compared to controls ( Pc = 0.003). However the allele and genotype frequencies of the three studied polymorphisms did not show any difference in patients with nephritis in comparison to those without nephritis. Haplotype GTA of rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714, respectively, was more frequent in lupus patients in comparison to controls ( p = 0.01) while the haplotype GGG was more frequent in controls than lupus patients ( p = 0.011). Conclusion The rs2004640 T allele and TT genotype and GTA haplotype of rs rs10954213, rs2004640, and rs2280714, respectively, can be considered as risk factors for the development of SLE. The presence of the rs2004640 T allele increases the risk of nephritis development in Egyptian children with SLE.

  10. The ETS Family Transcription Factor ELK-1 Regulates Induction of the Cell Cycle-regulatory Gene p21Waf1/Cip1 and the BAX Gene in Sodium Arsenite-exposed Human Keratinocyte HaCaT Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon Young; Kim, Chang Gun; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN1A), often referred to as p21Waf1/Cip1 (p21), is induced by a variety of environmental stresses. Transcription factor ELK-1 is a member of the ETS oncogene superfamily. Here, we show that ELK-1 directly trans-activates the p21 gene, independently of p53 and EGR-1, in sodium arsenite (NaASO2)-exposed HaCaT cells. Promoter deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified the presence of an ELK-1-binding core motif between −190 and −170 bp of the p21 promoter that confers inducibility by NaASO2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift analyses confirmed the specific binding of ELK-1 to its putative binding sequence within the p21 promoter. In addition, NaASO2-induced p21 promoter activity was enhanced by exogenous expression of ELK-1 and reduced by expression of siRNA targeted to ELK-1 mRNA. The importance of ELK-1 in response to NaASO2 was further confirmed by the observation that stable expression of ELK-1 siRNA in HaCaT cells resulted in the attenuation of NaASO2-induced p21 expression. Although ELK-1 was activated by ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK in response to NaASO2, ELK-1-mediated activation of the p21 promoter was largely dependent on ERK. In addition, EGR-1 induced by ELK-1 seemed to be involved in NaASO2-induced expression of BAX. This supports the view that the ERK/ELK-1 cascade is involved in p53-independent induction of p21 and BAX gene expression. PMID:21642427

  11. The ETS family transcription factor ELK-1 regulates induction of the cell cycle-regulatory gene p21(Waf1/Cip1) and the BAX gene in sodium arsenite-exposed human keratinocyte HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soon Young; Kim, Chang Gun; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han

    2011-07-29

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKN1A), often referred to as p21(Waf1/Cip1) (p21), is induced by a variety of environmental stresses. Transcription factor ELK-1 is a member of the ETS oncogene superfamily. Here, we show that ELK-1 directly trans-activates the p21 gene, independently of p53 and EGR-1, in sodium arsenite (NaASO(2))-exposed HaCaT cells. Promoter deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis identified the presence of an ELK-1-binding core motif between -190 and -170 bp of the p21 promoter that confers inducibility by NaASO(2). Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift analyses confirmed the specific binding of ELK-1 to its putative binding sequence within the p21 promoter. In addition, NaASO(2)-induced p21 promoter activity was enhanced by exogenous expression of ELK-1 and reduced by expression of siRNA targeted to ELK-1 mRNA. The importance of ELK-1 in response to NaASO(2) was further confirmed by the observation that stable expression of ELK-1 siRNA in HaCaT cells resulted in the attenuation of NaASO(2)-induced p21 expression. Although ELK-1 was activated by ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK in response to NaASO(2), ELK-1-mediated activation of the p21 promoter was largely dependent on ERK. In addition, EGR-1 induced by ELK-1 seemed to be involved in NaASO(2)-induced expression of BAX. This supports the view that the ERK/ELK-1 cascade is involved in p53-independent induction of p21 and BAX gene expression.

  12. Human CHAC1 Protein Degrades Glutathione, and mRNA Induction Is Regulated by the Transcription Factors ATF4 and ATF3 and a Bipartite ATF/CRE Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Rebecca R; Prescott, Eugenia T; Sylvester, Charity F; Higdon, Ashlee N; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S; Mungrue, Imran N

    2015-06-19

    Using an unbiased systems genetics approach, we previously predicted a role for CHAC1 in the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, linked functionally to activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) following treatment with oxidized phospholipids, a model for atherosclerosis. Mouse and yeast CHAC1 homologs have been shown to degrade glutathione in yeast and a cell-free system. In this report, we further defined the ATF4-CHAC1 interaction by cloning the human CHAC1 promoter upstream of a luciferase reporter system for in vitro assays in HEK293 and U2OS cells. Mutation and deletion analyses defined two major cis DNA elements necessary and sufficient for CHAC1 promoter-driven luciferase transcription under conditions of ER stress or ATF4 coexpression: the -267 ATF/cAMP response element (CRE) site and a novel -248 ATF/CRE modifier (ACM) element. We also examined the ability of the CHAC1 ATF/CRE and ACM sequences to bind ATF4 and ATF3 using immunoblot-EMSA and confirmed ATF4, ATF3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β binding at the human CHAC1 promoter in the proximity of the ATF/CRE and ACM using ChIP. To further validate the function of CHAC1 in a human cell model, we measured glutathione levels in HEK293 cells with enhanced CHAC1 expression. Overexpression of CHAC1 led to a robust depletion of glutathione, which was alleviated in a CHAC1 catalytic mutant. These results suggest an important role for CHAC1 in oxidative stress and apoptosis with implications for human health and disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Human CHAC1 Protein Degrades Glutathione, and mRNA Induction Is Regulated by the Transcription Factors ATF4 and ATF3 and a Bipartite ATF/CRE Regulatory Element*

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Rebecca R.; Prescott, Eugenia T.; Sylvester, Charity F.; Higdon, Ashlee N.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Mungrue, Imran N.

    2015-01-01

    Using an unbiased systems genetics approach, we previously predicted a role for CHAC1 in the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, linked functionally to activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) following treatment with oxidized phospholipids, a model for atherosclerosis. Mouse and yeast CHAC1 homologs have been shown to degrade glutathione in yeast and a cell-free system. In this report, we further defined the ATF4-CHAC1 interaction by cloning the human CHAC1 promoter upstream of a luciferase reporter system for in vitro assays in HEK293 and U2OS cells. Mutation and deletion analyses defined two major cis DNA elements necessary and sufficient for CHAC1 promoter-driven luciferase transcription under conditions of ER stress or ATF4 coexpression: the −267 ATF/cAMP response element (CRE) site and a novel −248 ATF/CRE modifier (ACM) element. We also examined the ability of the CHAC1 ATF/CRE and ACM sequences to bind ATF4 and ATF3 using immunoblot-EMSA and confirmed ATF4, ATF3, and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β binding at the human CHAC1 promoter in the proximity of the ATF/CRE and ACM using ChIP. To further validate the function of CHAC1 in a human cell model, we measured glutathione levels in HEK293 cells with enhanced CHAC1 expression. Overexpression of CHAC1 led to a robust depletion of glutathione, which was alleviated in a CHAC1 catalytic mutant. These results suggest an important role for CHAC1 in oxidative stress and apoptosis with implications for human health and disease. PMID:25931127

  14. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-08-27

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation.

  15. Creating and validating cis-regulatory maps of tissue-specific gene expression regulation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Timothy R.; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Predicting which genomic regions control the transcription of a given gene is a challenge. We present a novel computational approach for creating and validating maps that associate genomic regions (cis-regulatory modules–CRMs) with genes. The method infers regulatory relationships that explain gene expression observed in a test tissue using widely available genomic data for ‘other’ tissues. To predict the regulatory targets of a CRM, we use cross-tissue correlation between histone modifications present at the CRM and expression at genes within 1 Mbp of it. To validate cis-regulatory maps, we show that they yield more accurate models of gene expression than carefully constructed control maps. These gene expression models predict observed gene expression from transcription factor binding in the CRMs linked to that gene. We show that our maps are able to identify long-range regulatory interactions and improve substantially over maps linking genes and CRMs based on either the control maps or a ‘nearest neighbor’ heuristic. Our results also show that it is essential to include CRMs predicted in multiple tissues during map-building, that H3K27ac is the most informative histone modification, and that CAGE is the most informative measure of gene expression for creating cis-regulatory maps. PMID:25200088

  16. Creating and validating cis-regulatory maps of tissue-specific gene expression regulation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy R; Bailey, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    Predicting which genomic regions control the transcription of a given gene is a challenge. We present a novel computational approach for creating and validating maps that associate genomic regions (cis-regulatory modules-CRMs) with genes. The method infers regulatory relationships that explain gene expression observed in a test tissue using widely available genomic data for 'other' tissues. To predict the regulatory targets of a CRM, we use cross-tissue correlation between histone modifications present at the CRM and expression at genes within 1 Mbp of it. To validate cis-regulatory maps, we show that they yield more accurate models of gene expression than carefully constructed control maps. These gene expression models predict observed gene expression from transcription factor binding in the CRMs linked to that gene. We show that our maps are able to identify long-range regulatory interactions and improve substantially over maps linking genes and CRMs based on either the control maps or a 'nearest neighbor' heuristic. Our results also show that it is essential to include CRMs predicted in multiple tissues during map-building, that H3K27ac is the most informative histone modification, and that CAGE is the most informative measure of gene expression for creating cis-regulatory maps.

  17. Rapid male-specific regulatory divergence and down regulation of spermatogenesis genes in Drosophila species hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids.

  18. Rapid Male-Specific Regulatory Divergence and Down Regulation of Spermatogenesis Genes in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Jennifer; Gomes, Suzanne; Civetta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In most crosses between closely related species of Drosophila, the male hybrids are sterile and show postmeiotic abnormalities. A series of gene expression studies using genomic approaches have found significant down regulation of postmeiotic spermatogenesis genes in sterile male hybrids. These results have led some to suggest a direct relationship between down regulation in gene expression and hybrid sterility. An alternative explanation to a cause-and-effect relationship between misregulation of gene expression and male sterility is rapid divergence of male sex regulatory elements leading to incompatible interactions in an interspecies hybrid genome. To test the effect of regulatory divergence in spermatogenesis gene expression, we isolated 35 fertile D. simulans strains with D. mauritiana introgressions in either the X, second or third chromosome. We analyzed gene expression in these fertile hybrid strains for a subset of spermatogenesis genes previously reported as significantly under expressed in sterile hybrids relative to D. simulans. We found that fertile autosomal introgressions can cause levels of gene down regulation similar to that of sterile hybrids. We also found that X chromosome heterospecific introgressions cause significantly less gene down regulation than autosomal introgressions. Our results provide evidence that rapid male sex gene regulatory divergence can explain misexpression of spermatogenesis genes in hybrids. PMID:23593487

  19. MYCN promotes neuroblastoma malignancy by establishing a regulatory circuit with transcription factor AP4

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chengyuan; Yu, Denise M.T.; Gherardi, Samuele; Koach, Jessica; Milazzo, Giorgio; Gamble, Laura; Liu, Bing; Valli, Emanuele; Russell, Amanda J.; London, Wendy B.; Liu, Tao; Cheung, Belamy B.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Perini, Giovanni; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D.

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of the MYCN oncogene, a member of the MYC family of transcriptional regulators, is one of the most powerful prognostic markers identified for poor outcome in neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood. While MYCN has been established as a key driver of malignancy in neuroblastoma, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Transcription factor activating enhancer binding protein-4 (TFAP4) has been reported to be a direct transcriptional target of MYC. We show for the first time that high expression of TFAP4 in primary neuroblastoma patients is associated with poor clinical outcome. siRNA-mediated suppression of TFAP4 in MYCN-expressing neuroblastoma cells led to inhibition of cell proliferation and migration. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that TFAP4 expression is positively regulated by MYCN. Microarray analysis identified genes regulated by both MYCN and TFAP4 in neuroblastoma cells, including Phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase-2 (PRPS2) and Syndecan-1 (SDC1), which are involved in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Overall this study suggests a regulatory circuit in which MYCN by elevating TFAP4 expression, cooperates with it to control a specific set of genes involved in tumor progression. These findings highlight the existence of a MYCN-TFAP4 axis in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for aggressive forms of this disease. PMID:27448979

  20. Modulation of neoplastic gene regulatory pathways by the RNA-binding factor AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA-binding protein AUF1 regulates the expression of many key players in cancer including proto-oncogenes, regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, principally by directing the decay kinetics of their encoded mRNAs. Most studies support an mRNA-destabilizing role for AUF1, although other findings suggest additional functions for this factor. In this review, we explore how changes in AUF1 isoform distribution, subcellular localization, and post-translational protein modifications can influence the metabolism of targeted mRNAs. However, several lines of evidence also support a role for AUF1 in the initiation and/or development of cancer. Many AUF1-targeted transcripts encode products that control pro- and anti-oncogenic processes. Also, overexpression of AUF1 enhances tumorigenesis in murine models, and AUF1 levels are enhanced in some tumors. Finally, signaling cascades that modulate AUF1 function are deregulated in some cancerous tissues. Together, these features suggest that AUF1 may play a prominent role in regulating the expression of many genes that can contribute to tumorigenic phenotypes, and that this post-transcriptional regulatory control point may be subverted by diverse mechanisms in neoplasia. PMID:21622178

  1. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  2. Differential regulation of native estrogen receptor-regulatory elements by estradiol, tamoxifen, and raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Levy, Nitzan; Tatomer, Dierdre; Herber, Candice B; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Tang, Hui; Sargeant, Toby; Ball, Lonnele J; Summers, Jonathan; Speed, Terence P; Leitman, Dale C

    2008-02-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate gene transcription by interacting with regulatory elements. Most information regarding how ER activates genes has come from studies using a small set of target genes or simple consensus sequences such as estrogen response element, activator protein 1, and Sp1 elements. However, these elements cannot explain the differences in gene regulation patterns and clinical effects observed with estradiol (E(2)) and selective estrogen receptor modulators. To obtain a greater understanding of how E(2) and selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially regulate genes, it is necessary to investigate their action on a more comprehensive set of native regulatory elements derived from ER target genes. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation-cloning and sequencing to isolate 173 regulatory elements associated with ERalpha. Most elements were found in the introns (38%) and regions greater than 10 kb upstream of the transcription initiation site (38%); 24% of the elements were found in the proximal promoter region (<10 kb). Only 11% of the elements contained a classical estrogen response element; 23% of the elements did not have any known response elements, including one derived from the naked cuticle homolog gene, which was associated with the recruitment of p160 coactivators. Transfection studies found that 80% of the 173 elements were regulated by E(2), raloxifene, or tamoxifen with ERalpha or ERbeta. Tamoxifen was more effective than raloxifene at activating the elements with ERalpha, whereas raloxifene was superior with ERbeta. Our findings demonstrate that E(2), tamoxifen, and raloxifene differentially regulate native ER-regulatory elements isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation with ERalpha and ERbeta.

  3. ATF2, a paradigm of the multifaceted regulation of transcription factors in biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory; Ronai, Ze'ev; Lau, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Stringent transcriptional regulation is crucial for normal cellular biology and organismal development. Perturbations in the proper regulation of transcription factors can result in numerous pathologies, including cancer. Thus, understanding how transcription factors are regulated and how they are dysregulated in disease states is key to the therapeutic targeting of these factors and/or the pathways that they regulate. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) has been studied in a number of developmental and pathological conditions. Recent findings have shed light on the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that influence ATF2 function, and thus, the transcriptional programs coordinated by ATF2. Given our current knowledge of its multiple levels of regulation and function, ATF2 represents a paradigm for the mechanistic complexity that can regulate transcription factor function. Thus, increasing our understanding of the regulation and function of ATF2 will provide insights into fundamental regulatory mechanisms that influence how cells integrate extracellular and intracellular signals into a genomic response through transcription factors. Characterization of ATF2 dysfunction in the context of pathological conditions, particularly in cancer biology and response to therapy, will be important in understanding how pathways controlled by ATF2 or other transcription factors might be therapeutically exploited. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently known upstream regulators and downstream targets of ATF2.

  4. Regulation of Apetala2/Ethylene Response Factors in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phukan, Ujjal J.; Jeena, Gajendra S.; Tripathi, Vineeta; Shukla, Rakesh K.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple environmental stresses affect growth and development of plants. Plants try to adapt under these unfavorable condition through various evolutionary mechanisms like physiological and biochemical alterations connecting various network of regulatory processes. Transcription factors (TFs) like APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTORS (AP2/ERFs) are an integral component of these signaling cascades because they regulate expression of a wide variety of down stream target genes related to stress response and development through different mechanism. This downstream regulation of transcript does not always positively or beneficially affect the plant but also they display some developmental defects like senescence and reduced growth under normal condition or sensitivity to stress condition. Therefore, tight auto/cross regulation of these TFs at transcriptional, translational and domain level is crucial to understand. The present manuscript discuss the multiple regulation and advantage of plasticity and specificity of these family of TFs to a wide or single downstream target(s) respectively. We have also discussed the concern which comes with the unwanted associated traits, which could only be averted by further study and exploration of these AP2/ERFs. PMID:28270817

  5. Specific detection of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5): A case of antibody inequality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; De, Saurav; Li, Dan; Song, Su; Matta, Bharati; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a member of the IRF family of transcription factors. IRF5 was first identified and characterized as a transcriptional regulator of type I interferon expression after virus infection. In addition to its critical role(s) in the regulation and development of host immunity, subsequent studies revealed important roles for IRF5 in autoimmunity, cancer, obesity, pain, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism. Based on these important disease-related findings, a large number of commercial antibodies have become available to study the expression and function of IRF5. Here we validate a number of these antibodies for the detection of IRF5 by immunoblot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry using well-established positive and negative controls. Somewhat surprising, the majority of commercial antibodies tested were unable to specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5. We present data on antibodies that do specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5 in a particular application. These findings reiterate the importance of proper controls and molecular weight standards for the analysis of protein expression. Given that dysregulated IRF5 expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including autoimmune and cancer, results indicate that caution should be used in the evaluation and interpretation of IRF5 expression analysis. PMID:27481535

  6. Origin of a novel regulatory module by duplication and degeneration of an ancient plant transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Sandra K; Ryan, Joseph G; Conway, Stephanie J; Brenner, Eric; Burris, Kellie P; Burris, Jason N; Chen, Tao; Edger, Patrick P; Graham, Sean W; Leebens-Mack, James H; Pires, J Chris; Rothfels, Carl J; Sigel, Erin M; Stevenson, Dennis W; Neal Stewart, C; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Bowman, John L

    2014-12-01

    It is commonly believed that gene duplications provide the raw material for morphological evolution. Both the number of genes and size of gene families have increased during the diversification of land plants. Several small proteins that regulate transcription factors have recently been identified in plants, including the LITTLE ZIPPER (ZPR) proteins. ZPRs are post-translational negative regulators, via heterodimerization, of class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (C3HDZ) proteins that play a key role in directing plant form and growth. We show that ZPR genes originated as a duplication of a C3HDZ transcription factor paralog in the common ancestor of euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants). The ZPRs evolved by degenerative mutations resulting in loss all of the C3HDZ functional domains, except the leucine zipper that modulates dimerization. ZPRs represent a novel regulatory module of the C3HDZ network unique to the euphyllophyte lineage, and their origin correlates to a period of rapid morphological changes and increased complexity in land plants. The origin of the ZPRs illustrates the significance of gene duplications in creating developmental complexity during land plant evolution that likely led to morphological evolution.

  7. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  8. Nuclear Transport Factors: Global Regulation of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Douglass J.; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear transport receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator the γ-TuRC complex and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores towards the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic. PMID:25982429

  9. Evidence that a transcription factor regulatory network coordinates oxidative stress response and secondary metabolism in aspergilli

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V; Wee, Josephine; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    The mycotoxin aflatoxin is a secondary metabolite and potent human carcinogen. We investigated one mechanism that links stress response with coordinate activation of genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that AtfB, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, is a master co-regulator that binds promoters of early (fas-1), middle (ver-1), and late (omtA) aflatoxin biosynthetic genes as well as stress-response genes (mycelia-specific cat1 and mitochondria-specific Mn sod) at cAMP response element motifs. A novel conserved motif 5′-T/GNT/CAAG CCNNG/AA/GC/ANT/C-3′ was identified in promoters of the aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes. A search for transcription factors identified SrrA as a transcription factor that could bind to the motif. Moreover, we also identified a STRE motif (5′-CCCCT-3′) in promoters of aflatoxin biosynthetic and stress-response genes, and competition EMSA suggested that MsnA binds to this motif. Our study for the first time provides strong evidence to suggest that at least four transcription factors (AtfB, SrrA, AP-1, and MsnA) participate in a regulatory network that induces aflatoxin biosynthesis as part of the cellular response to oxidative stress in A. parasiticus. PMID:23281343

  10. External and internal factors regulating photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, R.O.; Sheriff, D.W.; Hollinger, D.Y.; Thomas, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Photosynthesis is simultaneously regulated by many factors. Environmental factors, consisting primarily of light, water, heat, carbon dioxide, and other gases, can have direct effects on photosynthesis when they alter rates of chemical processes in the photosynthetic pathway. Environmental factors, along with nutrients and sink demands for carbohydrates, may also have indirect effects on photosynthesis. Indirect effects are the result of changes in nonphotosynthetic processes that, in turn, alter the rate of photosynthesis. A final category of regulators, photosynthetic framework, consists of substances that compose the physiologically active compounds and structures that form the basis of the light and dark reactions responsible for photosynthesis. The framework determines the photosynthetic capacity of a plant or organ, i.e., the rate of photosynthesis achievable when direct and indirect effects are nonlimiting. In this chapter we have divided the discussion of factors that regulate photosynthesis in conifers into these three categories, framework, direct effects, and indirect effects, because of an expanding appreciation in the field of environmental physiology that external and internal factors can simultaneously regulate photosynthesis by both direct and indirect means. We offer this outline as a logical way of presenting and discussing these issues.

  11. Cross regulation between Candida albicans catalytic and regulatory subunits of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, Romina; Kronberg, Florencia; Biondi, Ricardo M; Hernández, Alejandra I; Passeron, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In the pathogen Candida albicans protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit is encoded by two genes TPK1 and TPK2 and the regulatory subunit by one gene, BCY1. PKA mediates several cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and the yeast to hyphae transition, a key factor for C. albicans virulence. The catalytic isoforms Tpk1p and Tpk2p share redundant functions in vegetative growth and hyphal development, though they differentially regulate glycogen metabolism, the stress response pathway and pseudohyphal formation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae it was earlier reported that BCY1 overexpression not only increased the amount of TPK3 mRNA but also its catalytic activity. In C. albicans a significant decrease in Bcy1p expression levels was already observed in tpk2Δ null strains. In this work we showed that the upregulation in Bcy1p expression was observed in a set of strains having a TPK1 or TPK2 allele reintegrated in its own locus, as well as in strains expressing the TPKs under the control of the constitutive ACT1 promoter. To confirm the cross regulation event between Bcy1p and Tpkp expression we generated a mutant strain with the lowest PKA activity carrying one TPK1 and a unique BCY1 allele with the aim to obtain two derived strains in which BCY1 or TPK1 were placed under their own promoters inserted in the RPS10 neutral locus. We found that placing one copy of BCY1 upregulated the levels of Tpk1p and its catalytic activity; while TPK1 insertion led to an increase in BCY1 mRNA, Bcy1p and in a high cAMP binding activity. Our results suggest that C. albicans cells were able to compensate for the increased levels of either Tpk1p or Tpk2p subunits with a corresponding elevation of Bcy1 protein levels and vice versa, implying a tightly regulated mechanism to balance holoenzyme formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4+ T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1−/−) developed T cell–mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by functional wild-type T reg cells. Spleens of Ets-1−/− mice contained mostly activated T cells, including Th2-polarized CD4+ cells and had reduced percentages of T reg cells. Splenic and thymic Ets-1−/− T reg cells expressed low levels of Foxp3 and displayed the CD103 marker that characterizes antigen-experienced T reg cells. Thymic development of Ets-1−/− T reg cells appeared intrinsically altered as Foxp3-expressing cells differentiate poorly in mixed fetal liver reconstituted chimera and fetal thymic organ culture. Ets-1−/− T reg cells showed decreased in vitro suppression activity and did not protect Rag2−/− hosts from naive T cell–induced inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, in T reg cells, Ets-1 interacted with the Foxp3 intronic enhancer and was required for demethylation of this regulatory sequence. These data demonstrate that Ets-1 is required for the development of natural T reg cells and suggest a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of Foxp3 expression. PMID:20855499

  13. Autophagy Regulatory Network — A systems-level bioinformatics resource for studying the mechanism and regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Türei, Dénes; Földvári-Nagy, László; Fazekas, Dávid; Módos, Dezső; Kubisch, János; Kadlecsik, Tamás; Demeter, Amanda; Lenti, Katalin; Csermely, Péter; Vellai, Tibor; Korcsmáros, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a complex cellular process having multiple roles, depending on tissue, physiological, or pathological conditions. Major post-translational regulators of autophagy are well known, however, they have not yet been collected comprehensively. The precise and context-dependent regulation of autophagy necessitates additional regulators, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional components that are listed in various datasets. Prompted by the lack of systems-level autophagy-related information, we manually collected the literature and integrated external resources to gain a high coverage autophagy database. We developed an online resource, Autophagy Regulatory Network (ARN; http://autophagy-regulation.org), to provide an integrated and systems-level database for autophagy research. ARN contains manually curated, imported, and predicted interactions of autophagy components (1,485 proteins with 4,013 interactions) in humans. We listed 413 transcription factors and 386 miRNAs that could regulate autophagy components or their protein regulators. We also connected the above-mentioned autophagy components and regulators with signaling pathways from the SignaLink 2 resource. The user-friendly website of ARN allows researchers without computational background to search, browse, and download the database. The database can be downloaded in SQL, CSV, BioPAX, SBML, PSI-MI, and in a Cytoscape CYS file formats. ARN has the potential to facilitate the experimental validation of novel autophagy components and regulators. In addition, ARN helps the investigation of transcription factors, miRNAs and signaling pathways implicated in the control of the autophagic pathway. The list of such known and predicted regulators could be important in pharmacological attempts against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25635527

  14. Genome-wide survey of tissue-specific microRNA and transcription factor regulatory networks in 12 tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiyun; Maki, Miranda; Ding, Ruofan; Yang, Yalan; zhang, Bao; Xiong, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific miRNAs (TS miRNA) specifically expressed in particular tissues play an important role in tissue identity, differentiation and function. However, transcription factor (TF) and TS miRNA regulatory networks across multiple tissues have not been systematically studied. Here, we manually extracted 116 TS miRNAs and systematically investigated the regulatory network of TF-TS miRNA in 12 human tissues. We identified 2,347 TF-TS miRNA regulatory relations and revealed that most TF binding sites tend to enrich close to the transcription start site of TS miRNAs. Furthermore, we found TS miRNAs were regulated widely by non-tissue specific TFs and the tissue-specific expression level of TF have a close relationship with TF-genes regulation. Finally, we describe TSmiR (http://bioeng.swjtu.edu.cn/TSmiR), a novel and web-searchable database that houses interaction maps of TF-TS miRNA in 12 tissues. Taken together, these observations provide a new suggestion to better understand the regulatory network and mechanisms of TF-TS miRNAs underlying different tissues. PMID:24889152

  15. PlantTFDB 4.0: toward a central hub for transcription factors and regulatory interactions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinpu; Tian, Feng; Yang, De-Chang; Meng, Yu-Qi; Kong, Lei; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2017-01-01

    With the goal of providing a comprehensive, high-quality resource for both plant transcription factors (TFs) and their regulatory interactions with target genes, we upgraded plant TF database PlantTFDB to version 4.0 (http://planttfdb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/). In the new version, we identified 320 370 TFs from 165 species, presenting a more comprehensive genomic TF repertoires of green plants. Besides updating the pre-existing abundant functional and evolutionary annotation for identified TFs, we generated three new types of annotation which provide more directly clues to investigate functional mechanisms underlying: (i) a set of high-quality, non-redundant TF binding motifs derived from experiments; (ii) multiple types of regulatory elements identified from high-throughput sequencing data; (iii) regulatory interactions curated from literature and inferred by combining TF binding motifs and regulatory elements. In addition, we upgraded previous TF prediction server, and set up four novel tools for regulation prediction and functional enrichment analyses. Finally, we set up a novel companion portal PlantRegMap (http://plantregmap.cbi.pku.edu.cn) for users to access the regulation resource and analysis tools conveniently. PMID:27924042

  16. Social insect genomes exhibit dramatic evolution in gene composition and regulation while preserving regulatory features linked to sociality.

    PubMed

    Simola, Daniel F; Wissler, Lothar; Donahue, Greg; Waterhouse, Robert M; Helmkampf, Martin; Roux, Julien; Nygaard, Sanne; Glastad, Karl M; Hagen, Darren E; Viljakainen, Lumi; Reese, Justin T; Hunt, Brendan G; Graur, Dan; Elhaik, Eran; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Wen, Jiayu; Parker, Brian J; Cash, Elizabeth; Privman, Eyal; Childers, Christopher P; Muñoz-Torres, Monica C; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Currie, Cameron R; Elsik, Christine G; Suen, Garret; Goodisman, Michael A D; Keller, Laurent; Liebig, Jürgen; Rawls, Alan; Reinberg, Danny; Smith, Chris D; Smith, Chris R; Tsutsui, Neil; Wurm, Yannick; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Berger, Shelley L; Gadau, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    Genomes of eusocial insects code for dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity and social organization. We compared the genomes of seven ants, the honeybee, and various solitary insects to examine whether eusocial lineages share distinct features of genomic organization. Each ant lineage contains ∼4000 novel genes, but only 64 of these genes are conserved among all seven ants. Many gene families have been expanded in ants, notably those involved in chemical communication (e.g., desaturases and odorant receptors). Alignment of the ant genomes revealed reduced purifying selection compared with Drosophila without significantly reduced synteny. Correspondingly, ant genomes exhibit dramatic divergence of noncoding regulatory elements; however, extant conserved regions are enriched for novel noncoding RNAs and transcription factor-binding sites. Comparison of orthologous gene promoters between eusocial and solitary species revealed significant regulatory evolution in both cis (e.g., Creb) and trans (e.g., fork head) for nearly 2000 genes, many of which exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results emphasize that genomic changes can occur remarkably fast in ants, because two recently diverged leaf-cutter ant species exhibit faster accumulation of species-specific genes and greater divergence in regulatory elements compared with other ants or Drosophila. Thus, while the "socio-genomes" of ants and the honeybee are broadly characterized by a pervasive pattern of divergence in gene composition and regulation, they preserve lineage-specific regulatory features linked to eusociality. We propose that changes in gene regulation played a key role in the origins of insect eusociality, whereas changes in gene composition were more relevant for lineage-specific eusocial adaptations.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  18. Unraveling the regulatory network of the MADS box transcription factor RIN in fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guozheng; Wang, Yuying; Cao, Baohua; Wang, Weihao; Tian, Shiping

    2012-04-01

    The MADS box transcription factor RIN is a global regulator of fruit ripening. However, the direct targets modulated by RIN and the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation remain largely unknown. Here we identified 41 protein spots representing 35 individual genes as potential targets of RIN by comparative proteomic analysis of a rin mutant in tomato fruits. Gene expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of 26 genes correlated well with the protein level. After examining the promoter regions of the candidate genes, a variable number of RIN binding sites were found. Five genes (E8, TomloxC, PNAE, PGK and ADH2) were identified as novel direct targets of RIN by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The results of a gel mobility shift assay confirmed the direct binding of RIN to the promoters of these genes. Of the direct target genes, TomloxC and ADH2, which encode lipoxygenase (LOX) and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, are critical for the production of characteristic tomato aromas derived from LOX pathway. Further study indicated that RIN also directly regulates the expression of HPL, which encodes hydroperoxide lyase, another rate-limiting enzyme in the LOX pathway. Loss of function of RIN causes de-regulation of the LOX pathway, leading to a specific defect in the generation of aroma compounds derived from this pathway. These results indicate that RIN modulates aroma formation by direct and rigorous regulation of expression of genes in the LOX pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that the regulatory effect of RIN on fruit ripening is achieved by targeting specific molecular pathways. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  20. Complex Regulatory Network Controls Initial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation in Escherichia coli via Regulation of the csgD Gene

    PubMed Central

    Prigent-Combaret, Claire; Brombacher, Eva; Vidal, Olivier; Ambert, Arnaud; Lejeune, Philippe; Landini, Paolo; Dorel, Corinne

    2001-01-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop. PMID:11717281

  1. Complex regulatory network controls initial adhesion and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli via regulation of the csgD gene.

    PubMed

    Prigent-Combaret, C; Brombacher, E; Vidal, O; Ambert, A; Lejeune, P; Landini, P; Dorel, C

    2001-12-01

    The Escherichia coli OmpR/EnvZ two-component regulatory system, which senses environmental osmolarity, also regulates biofilm formation. Up mutations in the ompR gene, such as the ompR234 mutation, stimulate laboratory strains of E. coli to grow as a biofilm community rather than in a planktonic state. In this report, we show that the OmpR234 protein promotes biofilm formation by binding the csgD promoter region and stimulating its transcription. The csgD gene encodes the transcription regulator CsgD, which in turn activates transcription of the csgBA operon encoding curli, extracellular structures involved in bacterial adhesion. Consistent with the role of the ompR gene as part of an osmolarity-sensing regulatory system, we also show that the formation of biofilm by E. coli is inhibited by increasing osmolarity in the growth medium. The ompR234 mutation counteracts adhesion inhibition by high medium osmolarity; we provide evidence that the ompR234 mutation promotes biofilm formation by strongly increasing the initial adhesion of bacteria to an abiotic surface. This increase in initial adhesion is stationary phase dependent, but it is negatively regulated by the stationary-phase-specific sigma factor RpoS. We propose that this negative regulation takes place via rpoS-dependent transcription of the transcription regulator cpxR; cpxR-mediated repression of csgB and csgD promoters is also triggered by osmolarity and by curli overproduction, in a feedback regulation loop.

  2. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  3. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R R; Standley, Daron M; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2014-04-08

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression.

  4. Priming of human monocytes for enhanced lipopolysaccharide responses: expression of alpha interferon, interferon regulatory factors, and tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M P; Zoon, K C

    1993-01-01

    Culture of human monocytes with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) results in a primed state, during which these cells express heightened responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The production of IFN-alpha in response to LPS by human monocytes has an absolute requirement for priming. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression is also greatly enhanced in primed monocytes after LPS stimulation, but unlike IFN-alpha, TNF is readily expressed in unprimed monocytes as well. In an effort to determine the molecular events associated with IFN-alpha induction in this system, freshly isolated human monocytes were primed by culture with either IFN-gamma or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with LPS; expression of IFN-alpha subtype 2 (IFN-alpha 2), IFN regulatory factors (IRFs), and TNF was assessed by Northern (RNA blot) analysis. IRF-1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in monocytes and is regulated by both LPS and priming cytokines, but its expression alone does not correlate with the induction of IFN-alpha 2 expression. IRF-2 mRNA is expressed in a more gradual manner following LPS stimulation, implying a possible feedback mechanism for inhibiting IFN-alpha expression. However, nuclear run-on analysis indicates that IFN-alpha 2 is not transcriptionally modulated in this system, in striking contrast to TNF, which is clearly regulated at the transcriptional level. In addition, IFN-alpha 2 mRNA accumulation is superinduced when primed monocytes are treated with LPS plus cycloheximide, while TNF mRNA is relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate that priming can affect subsequent LPS-induced gene expression at different levels in human monocytes. Images PMID:8335353

  5. The Canadian Natural Health Products (NHP) regulations: industry perceptions and compliance factors

    PubMed Central

    Laeeque, Hina; Boon, Heather; Kachan, Natasha; Cohen, Jillian Clare; D'Cruz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Background The use of natural health products, such as vitamins, minerals, and herbs, by Canadians has been increasing with time. As a result of consumer concern about the quality of these products, the Canadian Department of Health created the Natural Health Products (NHP) Regulations. The new Canadian regulations raise questions about whether and how the NHP industry will be able to comply and what impact they will have on market structure. The objectives of this study were to explore who in the interview sample is complying with Canada's new NHP Regulations (i.e., submitted product licensing applications on time); and explore the factors that affect regulatory compliance. Methods Twenty key informant interviews were conducted with employees of the NHP industry. The structured interviews focused on the level of satisfaction with the Regulations and perceptions of compliance and non-compliance. Interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed verbatim. Data were independently coded, using qualitative content analysis. Team meetings were held after every three to four interviews to discuss emerging themes. Results The major finding of this study is that most (17 out of 20) companies interviewed were beginning to comply with the new regulatory regime. The factors that contribute to likelihood of regulatory compliance were: perceptions and knowledge of the regulations and business size. Conclusion The Canadian case can be instructive for other countries seeking to implement regulatory standards for natural health products. An unintended consequence of the Canadian NHP regulations may be the exit of smaller firms, leading to industry consolidation. PMID:16734916

  6. The leucine-responsive regulatory protein, a global regulator of metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, J M; Matthews, R G

    1994-01-01

    The leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) regulates the expression of more than 40 genes and proteins in Escherichia coli. Among the operons that are positively regulated by Lrp are operons involved in amino acid biosynthesis (ilvIH, serA)), in the biosynthesis of pili (pap, fan, fim), and in the assimilation of ammonia (glnA, gltBD). Negatively regulated operons include operons involved in amino acid catabolism (sdaA, tdh) and peptide transport (opp) and the operon coding for Lrp itself (lrp). Detailed studies of a few members of the regulon have shown that Lrp can act directly to activate or repress transcription of target operons. A substantial fraction of operons regulated by Lrp are also regulated by leucine, and the effect of leucine on expression of these operons requires a functional Lrp protein. The patterns of regulation are surprising and interesting: in some cases activation or repression mediated by Lrp is antagonized by leucine, in other cases Lrp-mediated activation or repression is potentiated by leucine, and in still other cases leucine has no effect on Lrp-mediated regulation. Current research is just beginning to elucidate the detailed mechanisms by which Lrp can mediate such a broad spectrum of regulatory effects. Our view of the role of Lrp in metabolism may change as more members of the regulon are identified and their regulation characterized, but at this point Lrp seems to be important in regulating nitrogen metabolism and one-carbon metabolism, permitting adaptations to feast and to famine. PMID:7968922

  7. Complex quorum-sensing regulatory systems regulate bacterial growth and symbiotic nodulation in Mesorhizobium tianshanense.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Menghua; Zheng, Huiming; Zhang, Jiang; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2009-03-01

    LuxR/LuxI-type quorum-sensing systems have been shown to be important for symbiotic interactions between a number of rhizobium species and host legumes. In this study, we found that different isolates of Mesorhizobium tianshanense, a moderately-growing Rhizobium that forms nodules on a number of types of licorice plants, produces several different N-acyl homoserine lactone-like molecules. In M. tianshanense CCBAU060A, we performed a genetic screen and identified a network of regulatory components including a set of LuxI/LuxR-family regulators as well as a MarR-family regulator that is required for quorum-sensing regulation. Furthermore, compared with the wild-type strains, quorum-sensing deficient mutants showed a reduced growth rate and were defective in nodule formation on their host plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis. These data suggest that different M. tianshanense strains may use diverse quorum-sensing systems to regulate symbiotic process.

  8. Regulation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of regulatory T-cells and Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, Nina; Robins, R Adrian; Corne, Jonathan; Fairclough, Lucy

    2010-04-20

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is an inflammatory disorder of the airways, which is associated with irreversible airway obstruction. The pathological hallmarks of COPD are destruction of the lung parenchyma (pulmonary emphysema), inflammation of the central airways (chronic bronchitis) and inflammation of the peripheral airways (respiratory bronchiolitis). Tobacco smoking is established as the main aetiological factor for COPD. A maladaptive modulation of inflammatory responses to inhalation of noxious particles and gases is generally accepted as being a key central pathogenic process; however, the precise regulatory mechanisms of the disease are poorly understood. Two cell types are known to be important in immune regulation, namely regulatory T-cells and the newly identified Th17 (T-helper 17) cells. Both types of cells are subsets of CD4 T-lymphocytes and modulate the immune response through secretion of cytokines, for example IL (interleukin)-10 and IL-17 respectively. The present review will begin by describing the current understanding of inflammatory cell involvement in the disease process, and then focus on the possible role of subsets of regulatory and helper T-cells in COPD.

  9. Identification of the Staphylococcus aureus vfrAB Operon, a Novel Virulence Factor Regulatory Locus

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Seth M.; Hall, Pamela R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    During a screen of the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library, we identified 71 mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus genome that altered hemolysis on blood agar medium. Although many of these mutations disrupted genes known to affect the production of alpha-hemolysin, two of them were associated with an apparent operon, designated vfrAB, that had not been characterized previously. Interestingly, a ΔvfrB mutant exhibited only minor effects on the transcription of the hla gene, encoding alpha-hemolysin, when grown in broth, as well as on RNAIII, a posttranscriptional regulatory RNA important for alpha-hemolysin translation, suggesting that VfrB may function at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, a ΔvfrB mutant had increased aur and sspAB protease expression under these conditions. However, disruption of the known secreted proteases in the ΔvfrB mutant did not restore hemolytic activity in the ΔvfrB mutant on blood agar. Further analysis revealed that, in contrast to the minor effects of VfrB on hla transcription when strains were cultured in liquid media, the level of hla transcription was decreased 50-fold in the absence of VfrB on solid media. These results demonstrate that while VfrB represses protease expression when strains are grown in broth, hla regulation is highly responsive to factors associated with growth on solid media. Intriguingly, the ΔvfrB mutant displayed increased pathogenesis in a model of S. aureus dermonecrosis, further highlighting the complexity of VfrB-dependent virulence regulation. The results of this study describe a phenotype associated with a class of highly conserved yet uncharacterized proteins found in Gram-positive bacteria, and they shed new light on the regulation of virulence factors necessary for S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:24549328

  10. Interferon regulatory factor 4 attenuates Notch signaling to suppress the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vipul; Shukla, Ashima; Joshi, Shantaram S; Lu, Runqing

    2016-07-05

    Molecular pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is not fully elucidated. Genome wide association studies have linked Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) to the development of CLL. We recently established a causal relationship between low levels of IRF4 and development of CLL. However, the molecular mechanism through which IRF4 suppresses CLL development remains unclear. Deregulation of Notch signaling pathway has been identified as one of the most recurrent molecular anomalies in the pathogenesis of CLL. Yet, the role of Notch signaling as well as its regulation during CLL development remains poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that IRF4 deficient mice expressing immunoglobulin heavy chain Vh11 (IRF4-/-Vh11) developed spontaneous CLL with complete penetrance. In this study, we show that elevated Notch2 expression and the resulting hyperactivation of Notch signaling are common features of IRF4-/-Vh11 CLL cells. Our studies further reveal that Notch signaling is indispensable for CLL development in the IRF4-/-Vh11 mice. Moreover, we identify E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4, which targets Notch for degradation, as a direct target of IRF4 in CLL cells and their precursors. Collectively, our studies provide the first in vivo evidence for an essential role of Notch signaling in the development of CLL and establish IRF4 as a critical regulator of Notch signaling during CLL development.

  11. Does the Transcription Factor NemR Use a Regulatory Sulfenamide Bond to Sense Bleach?

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael Jeffrey; Li, Yan; Leichert, Lars Ingo-Ole; Xu, Zhaohui; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-09-20

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS), such as hypochlorous acid (i.e., bleach), are antimicrobial oxidants produced by the innate immune system. Like many redox-regulated transcription factors, the Escherichia coli repressor NemR responds to RCS by using the reversible oxidation of highly conserved cysteines to alter its DNA-binding affinity. However, earlier work showed that RCS response in NemR does not depend on any commonly known oxidative cysteine modifications. We have now determined the crystal structure of NemR, showing that the regulatory cysteine, Cys106, is in close proximity to a highly conserved lysine (Lys175). We used crystallographic, biochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses to analyze the role of this lysine residue in RCS sensing. Based on our results, we hypothesize that RCS treatment of NemR results in the formation of a reversible Cys106-Lys175 sulfenamide bond. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a protein whose function is regulated by a cysteine-lysine sulfenamide thiol switch, constituting a novel addition to the biological repertoire of functional redox switches.

  12. Does the Transcription Factor NemR Use a Regulatory Sulfenamide Bond to Sense Bleach?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael Jeffrey; Li, Yan; Leichert, Lars Ingo-Ole

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reactive chlorine species (RCS), such as hypochlorous acid (i.e., bleach), are antimicrobial oxidants produced by the innate immune system. Like many redox-regulated transcription factors, the Escherichia coli repressor NemR responds to RCS by using the reversible oxidation of highly conserved cysteines to alter its DNA-binding affinity. However, earlier work showed that RCS response in NemR does not depend on any commonly known oxidative cysteine modifications. We have now determined the crystal structure of NemR, showing that the regulatory cysteine, Cys106, is in close proximity to a highly conserved lysine (Lys175). We used crystallographic, biochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses to analyze the role of this lysine residue in RCS sensing. Based on our results, we hypothesize that RCS treatment of NemR results in the formation of a reversible Cys106-Lys175 sulfenamide bond. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a protein whose function is regulated by a cysteine–lysine sulfenamide thiol switch, constituting a novel addition to the biological repertoire of functional redox switches. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 747–754. PMID:25867078

  13. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  14. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  15. Robust dynamic balance of AP-1 transcription factors in a neuronal gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The octapeptide Angiotensin II is a key hormone that acts via its receptor AT1R in the brainstem to modulate the blood pressure control circuits and thus plays a central role in the cardiac and respiratory homeostasis. This modulation occurs via activation of a complex network of signaling proteins and transcription factors, leading to changes in levels of key genes and proteins. AT1R initiated activity in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), which regulates blood pressure, has been the subject of extensive molecular analysis. But the adaptive network interactions in the NTS response to AT1R, plausibly related to the development of hypertension, are not understood. Results We developed and analyzed a mathematical model of AT1R-activated signaling kinases and a downstream gene regulatory network, with structural basis in our transcriptomic data analysis and literature. To our knowledge, our report presents the first computational model of this key regulatory network. Our simulations and analysis reveal a dynamic balance among distinct dimers of the AP-1 family of transcription factors. We investigated the robustness of this behavior to simultaneous perturbations in the network parameters using a novel multivariate approach that integrates global sensitivity analysis with decision-tree methods. Our analysis implicates a subset of Fos and Jun dependent mechanisms, with dynamic sensitivities shifting from Fos-regulating kinase (FRK)-mediated processes to those downstream of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Decision-tree analysis indicated that while there may be a large combinatorial functional space feasible for neuronal states and parameters, the network behavior is constrained to a small set of AP-1 response profiles. Many of the paths through the combinatorial parameter space lead to a dynamic balance of AP-1 dimer forms, yielding a robust AP-1 response counteracting the biological variability. Conclusions Based on the simulation and analysis results, we

  16. An Ethylene-Induced Regulatory Module Delays Flower Senescence by Regulating Cytokinin Content1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Ma, Nan; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Ming

    2017-01-01

    In many plant species, including rose (Rosa hybrida), flower senescence is promoted by the gaseous hormone ethylene and inhibited by the cytokinin (CTK) class of hormones. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these antagonistic effects are not well understood. In this study, we characterized the association between a pathogenesis-related PR-10 family gene from rose (RhPR10.1) and the hormonal regulation of flower senescence. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis showed that RhPR10.1 was expressed at high levels during senescence in different floral organs, including petal, sepal, receptacle, stamen, and pistil, and that expression was induced by ethylene treatment. Silencing of RhPR10.1 expression in rose plants by virus-induced gene silencing accelerated flower senescence, which was accompanied by a higher ion leakage rate in the petals, as well as increased expression of the senescence marker gene RhSAG12. CTK content and the expression of three CTK signaling pathway genes were reduced in RhPR10.1-silenced plants, and the accelerated rate of petal senescence that was apparent in the RhPR10.1-silenced plants was restored to normal levels by CTK treatment. Finally, RhHB6, a homeodomain-Leu zipper I transcription factor, was observed to bind to the RhPR10.1 promoter, and silencing of its expression also promoted flower senescence. Our results reveal an ethylene-induced RhHB6-RhPR10.1 regulatory module that functions as a brake of ethylene-promoted senescence through increasing the CTK content. PMID:27879388

  17. Gene regulatory network plasticity predates a switch in function of a conserved transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Nocedal, Isabel; Mancera, Eugenio; Johnson, Alexander D

    2017-01-01

    The rewiring of gene regulatory networks can generate phenotypic novelty. It remains an open question, however, how the large number of connections needed to form a novel network arise over evolutionary time. Here, we address this question using the network controlled by the fungal transcription regulator Ndt80. This conserved protein has undergone a dramatic switch in function—from an ancestral role regulating sporulation to a derived role regulating biofilm formation. This switch in function corresponded to a large-scale rewiring of the genes regulated by Ndt80. However, we demonstrate that the Ndt80-target gene connections were undergoing extensive rewiring prior to the switch in Ndt80’s regulatory function. We propose that extensive drift in the Ndt80 regulon allowed for the exploration of alternative network structures without a loss of ancestral function, thereby facilitating the formation of a network with a new function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23250.001 PMID:28327289

  18. Scientific foundation of regulating ionizing radiation: application of metrics for evaluation of regulatory science information.

    PubMed

    Moghissi, A Alan; Gerraa, Vikrham Kumar; McBride, Dennis K; Swetnam, Michael

    2014-11-01

    This paper starts by describing the historical evolution of assessment of biologic effects of ionizing radiation leading to the linear non-threshold (LNT) system currently used to regulate exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper describes briefly the concept of Best Available Science (BAS) and Metrics for Evaluation of Scientific Claims (MESC) derived for BAS. It identifies three phases of regulatory science consisting of the initial phase, when the regulators had to develop regulations without having the needed scientific information; the exploratory phase, when relevant tools were developed; and the standard operating phase, when the tools were applied to regulations. Subsequently, an attempt is made to apply the BAS/MESC system to various stages of LNT. This paper then compares the exposure limits imposed by regulatory agencies and also compares them with naturally occurring radiation at several cities. Controversies about LNT are addressed, including judgments of the U.S. National Academies and their French counterpart. The paper concludes that, based on the BAS/MESC system, there is no disagreement between the two academies on the scientific foundation of LNT; instead, the disagreement is based on their judgment or speculation.

  19. [Main virulence factors of Listeria monocytogenes and its regulation].

    PubMed

    Vera, Alejandra; González, Gerardo; Domínguez, Mariana; Bello, Helia

    2013-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenesis a facultative intracellular pathogen, ubiquitous and aetiological agent of listeriosis. The main way of acquisition is the consumption of contaminated food and can cause serious medical conditions such as septicemia, meningitis and gastroenteritis, especially in children, immunocompromised individuals and seniors and abortions in pregnant women. An increase in cases of listeriosis worldwide has been reported and it is estimated that its prevalence in developed countries is in the range of 2 to 15 cases per one million population. This microorganism is characterized for the transition from the environment into the eukaryotic cell. Several virulence factors have been involved in the intracellular cycle that are regulated, primarily, by the PrfA protein, which in turn is regulated by different mechanisms operating at the transcriptional, translational and post-translational levels. Additionally, other regulatory mechanisms have been described as sigma factor, system VirR/S and antisense RNA, but PrfA is the most important control mechanism and is required for the expression of essential virulence factors for the intracellular cycle.

  20. RNA-Sequencing Analysis Reveals a Regulatory Role for Transcription Factor Fezf2 in the Mature Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Clare, Alison J; Wicky, Hollie E; Empson, Ruth M; Hughes, Stephanie M

    2017-01-01

    Forebrain embryonic zinc finger (Fezf2) encodes a transcription factor essential for the specification of layer 5 projection neurons (PNs) in the developing cerebral cortex. As with many developmental transcription factors, Fezf2 continues to be expressed into adulthood, suggesting it remains crucial to the maintenance of neuronal phenotypes. Despite the continued expression, a function has yet to be explored for Fezf2 in the PNs of the developed cortex. Here, we investigated the role of Fezf2 in mature neurons, using lentiviral-mediated delivery of a shRNA to conditionally knockdown the expression of Fezf2 in the mouse primary motor cortex (M1). RNA-sequencing analysis of Fezf2-reduced M1 revealed significant changes to the transcriptome, identifying a regulatory role for Fezf2 in the mature M1. Kyoto Encyclopedia Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses of Fezf2-regulated genes indicated a role in neuronal signaling and plasticity, with significant enrichment of neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules and calcium signaling pathways. Gene Ontology analysis supported a functional role for Fezf2-regulated genes in neuronal transmission and additionally indicated an importance in the regulation of behavior. Using the mammalian phenotype ontology database, we identified a significant overrepresentation of Fezf2-regulated genes associated with specific behavior phenotypes, including associative learning, social interaction, locomotor activation and hyperactivity. These roles were distinct from that of Fezf2-regulated genes identified in development, indicating a dynamic transition in Fezf2 function. Together our findings demonstrate a regulatory role for Fezf2 in the mature brain, with Fezf2-regulated genes having functional roles in sustaining normal neuronal and behavioral phenotypes. These results support the hypothesis that developmental transcription factors are important for maintaining neuron transcriptomes and that disruption of their

  1. Proteolytic Processing Regulates Placental Growth Factor Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Willenborg, Sebastian; Koch, Manuel; Zwolanek, Daniela; Müller, Stefan; Becker, Ann-Kathrin A.; Metzger, Stephanie; Ehrbar, Martin; Kurschat, Peter; Hellmich, Martin; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.; Eming, Sabine A.

    2013-01-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) is a critical mediator of blood vessel formation, yet mechanisms of its action and regulation are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that proteolytic processing regulates the biological activity of PlGF. Specifically, we show that plasmin processing of PlGF-2 yields a protease-resistant core fragment comprising the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 binding site but lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain encoding the heparin-binding domain and an 8-amino acid peptide encoded by exon 7. We have identified plasmin cleavage sites, generated a truncated PlGF118 isoform mimicking plasmin-processed PlGF, and explored its biological function in comparison with that of PlGF-1 and -2. The angiogenic responses induced by the diverse PlGF forms were distinct. Whereas PlGF-2 increased endothelial cell chemotaxis, vascular sprouting, and granulation tissue formation upon skin injury, these activities were abrogated following plasmin digestion. Investigation of PlGF/Neuropilin-1 binding and function suggests a critical role for heparin-binding domain/Neuropilin-1 interaction and its regulation by plasmin processing. Collectively, here we provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of PlGF-2/Neuropilin-1-mediated tissue vascularization and growth. PMID:23645683

  2. Opposing Roles for Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3) and Type I Interferon Signaling during Plague

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ami A.; Lee-Lewis, Hanni; Anderson, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFN-I) broadly control innate immunity and are typically transcriptionally induced by Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs) following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors within the cytosol of host cells. For bacterial infection, IFN-I signaling can result in widely variant responses, in some cases contributing to the pathogenesis of disease while in others contributing to host defense. In this work, we addressed the role of type I IFN during Yersinia pestis infection in a murine model of septicemic plague. Transcription of IFN-β was induced in vitro and in vivo and contributed to pathogenesis. Mice lacking the IFN-I receptor, Ifnar, were less sensitive to disease and harbored more neutrophils in the later stage of infection which correlated with protection from lethality. In contrast, IRF-3, a transcription factor commonly involved in inducing IFN-β following bacterial infection, was not necessary for IFN production but instead contributed to host defense. In vitro, phagocytosis of Y. pestis by macrophages and neutrophils was more effective in the presence of IRF-3 and was not affected by IFN-β signaling. This activity correlated with limited bacterial growth in vivo in the presence of IRF-3. Together the data demonstrate that IRF-3 is able to activate pathways of innate immunity against bacterial infection that extend beyond regulation of IFN-β production. PMID:22911267

  3. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 controls TH1 cell effector function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Justus; Schumacher, Valéa; Ahrens, Stefanie; Käding, Nadja; Feldhoff, Lea Marie; Huber, Magdalena; Rupp, Jan; Raczkowski, Friederike; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is essential for TH2 and TH17 cell formation and controls peripheral CD8+ T cell differentiation. We used Listeria monocytogenes infection to characterize the function of IRF4 in TH1 responses. IRF4−/− mice generated only marginal numbers of listeria-specific TH1 cells. After transfer into infected mice, IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells failed to differentiate into TH1 cells as indicated by reduced T-bet and IFN-γ expression, and showed limited proliferation. Activated IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited diminished uptake of the glucose analog 2-NBDG, limited oxidative phosphorylation and strongly reduced aerobic glycolysis. Insufficient metabolic adaptation contributed to the limited proliferation and TH1 differentiation of IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells. Our study identifies IRF4 as central regulator of TH1 responses and cellular metabolism. We propose that this function of IRF4 is fundamental for the initiation and maintenance of all TH cell responses. PMID:27762344

  4. Protective role of interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated signaling against prion infection.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C)) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrP(Sc) was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrP(Sc) formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  5. Protective Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Mediated Signaling against Prion Infection

    PubMed Central

    Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrPSc was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrPSc formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:22379081

  6. Sodium Lactate Negatively Regulates Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 Biofilm Formation via a Three-Component Regulatory System (LrbS-LrbA-LrbR).

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Yang, Jinshui; Liu, Liang; Li, Baozhen; Yuan, Hongli; Liu, Weijie

    2017-07-15

    The capability of biofilm formation has a major impact on the industrial and biotechnological applications of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. However, the detailed regulatory mechanisms underlying biofilm formation in this strain remain largely unknown. In the present report, we describe a three-component regulatory system which negatively regulates the biofilm formation of S. putrefaciens CN32. This system consists of a histidine kinase LrbS (Sputcn32_0303) and two cognate response regulators, including a transcription factor, LrbA (Sputcn32_0304), and a phosphodiesterase, LrbR (Sputcn32_0305). LrbS responds to the signal of the carbon source sodium lactate and subsequently activates LrbA. The activated LrbA then promotes the expression of lrbR, the gene for the other response regulator. The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase LrbR, containing an EAL domain, decreases the concentration of intracellular c-di-GMP, thereby negatively regulating biofilm formation. In summary, the carbon source sodium lactate acts as a signal molecule that regulates biofilm formation via a three-component regulatory system (LrbS-LrbA-LrbR) in S. putrefaciens CN32.IMPORTANCE Biofilm formation is a significant capability used by some bacteria to survive in adverse environments. Numerous environmental factors can affect biofilm formation through different signal transduction pathways. Carbon sources are critical nutrients for bacterial growth, and their concentrations and types significantly influence the biomass and structure of biofilms. However, knowledge about the underlying mechanism of biofilm formation regulation by carbon source is still limited. This work elucidates a modulation pattern of biofilm formation negatively regulated by sodium lactate as a carbon source via a three-component regulatory system in S. putrefaciens CN32, which may serve as a good example for studying how the carbon sources impact biofilm development in other bacteria. Copyright

  7. RegTransBase--a database of regulatory sequences and interactions based on literature: a resource for investigating transcriptional regulation in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Michael J; Novichkov, Pavel N; Kazakov, Alexey E; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Arkin, Adam P; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Dubchak, Inna

    2013-04-02

    Due to the constantly growing number of sequenced microbial genomes, comparative genomics has been playing a major role in the investigation of regulatory interactions in bacteria. Regulon inference mostly remains a field of semi-manual examination since absence of a knowledgebase and informatics platform for automated and systematic investigation restricts opportunities for computational prediction. Additionally, confirming computationally inferred regulons by experimental data is critically important. RegTransBase is an open-access platform with a user-friendly web interface publicly available at http://regtransbase.lbl.gov. It consists of two databases - a manually collected hierarchical regulatory interactions database based on more than 7000 scientific papers which can serve as a knowledgebase for verification of predictions, and a large set of curated by experts transcription factor binding sites used in regulon inference by a variety of tools. RegTransBase captures the knowledge from published scientific literature using controlled vocabularies and contains various types of experimental data, such as: the activation or repression of transcription by an identified direct regulator; determination of the transcriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directly binding to DNA or RNA; mapping of binding sites for a regulatory protein; characterization of regulatory mutations. Analysis of the data collected from literature resulted in the creation of Putative Regulons from Experimental Data that are also available in RegTransBase. RegTransBase is a powerful user-friendly platform for the investigation of regulation in prokaryotes. It uses a collection of validated regulatory sequences that can be easily extracted and used to infer regulatory interactions by comparative genomics techniques thus assisting researchers in the interpretation of transcriptional regulation data.

  8. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture.

  9. Brucella BioR regulator defines a complex regulatory mechanism for bacterial biotin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feng, Youjun; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huimin; Chen, Zeliang; Srinivas, Swaminath

    2013-08-01

    The enzyme cofactor biotin (vitamin H or B7) is an energetically expensive molecule whose de novo biosynthesis requires 20 ATP equivalents. It seems quite likely that diverse mechanisms have evolved to tightly regulate its biosynthesis. Unlike the model regulator BirA, a bifunctional biotin protein ligase with the capability of repressing the biotin biosynthetic pathway, BioR has been recently reported by us as an alternative machinery and a new type of GntR family transcriptional factor that can repress the expression of the bioBFDAZ operon in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, quite unusually, a closely related human pathogen, Brucella melitensis, has four putative BioR-binding sites (both bioR and bioY possess one site in the promoter region, whereas the bioBFDAZ [bio] operon contains two tandem BioR boxes). This raised the question of whether BioR mediates the complex regulatory network of biotin metabolism. Here, we report that this is the case. The B. melitensis BioR ortholog was overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, and its solution structure was found to be dimeric. Functional complementation in a bioR isogenic mutant of A. tumefaciens elucidated that Brucella BioR is a functional repressor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the four predicted BioR sites of Brucella plus the BioR site of A. tumefaciens can all interact with the Brucella BioR protein. In a reporter strain that we developed on the basis of a double mutant of A. tumefaciens (the ΔbioR ΔbioBFDA mutant), the β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity of three plasmid-borne transcriptional fusions (bioBbme-lacZ, bioYbme-lacZ, and bioRbme-lacZ) was dramatically decreased upon overexpression of Brucella bioR. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that the expression of bioBFDA and bioY is significantly elevated upon removal of bioR from B. melitensis. Together, we conclude that Brucella BioR is not only a negative autoregulator but also a repressor of

  10. Brucella BioR Regulator Defines a Complex Regulatory Mechanism for Bacterial Biotin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huimin; Srinivas, Swaminath

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme cofactor biotin (vitamin H or B7) is an energetically expensive molecule whose de novo biosynthesis requires 20 ATP equivalents. It seems quite likely that diverse mechanisms have evolved to tightly regulate its biosynthesis. Unlike the model regulator BirA, a bifunctional biotin protein ligase with the capability of repressing the biotin biosynthetic pathway, BioR has been recently reported by us as an alternative machinery and a new type of GntR family transcriptional factor that can repress the expression of the bioBFDAZ operon in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, quite unusually, a closely related human pathogen, Brucella melitensis, has four putative BioR-binding sites (both bioR and bioY possess one site in the promoter region, whereas the bioBFDAZ [bio] operon contains two tandem BioR boxes). This raised the question of whether BioR mediates the complex regulatory network of biotin metabolism. Here, we report that this is the case. The B. melitensis BioR ortholog was overexpressed and purified to homogeneity, and its solution structure was found to be dimeric. Functional complementation in a bioR isogenic mutant of A. tumefaciens elucidated that Brucella BioR is a functional repressor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the four predicted BioR sites of Brucella plus the BioR site of A. tumefaciens can all interact with the Brucella BioR protein. In a reporter strain that we developed on the basis of a double mutant of A. tumefaciens (the ΔbioR ΔbioBFDA mutant), the β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity of three plasmid-borne transcriptional fusions (bioBbme-lacZ, bioYbme-lacZ, and bioRbme-lacZ) was dramatically decreased upon overexpression of Brucella bioR. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses showed that the expression of bioBFDA and bioY is significantly elevated upon removal of bioR from B. melitensis. Together, we conclude that Brucella BioR is not only a negative autoregulator but also a repressor of

  11. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  12. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for the use of Fox genes as phylogenetic markers. Twelve Ae. aegypti Fox genes are expressed within various tissues of adult females, six of which are expressed within the fat body. All six Fox genes expressed in the fat body displayed dynamic expression profiles following a blood meal. We knocked down the ’fat body Foxes’ through RNAi to determine whether these “knockdowns” hindered amino acid-induced vitellogenin gene expression. We also determined the effect of these knockdowns on the number of eggs deposited following a blood meal. Knockdown of FoxN1, FoxN2, FoxL, and FoxO, had a negative effect on amino acid- induced vitellogenin gene expression and resulted in significantly fewer eggs laid. Our analysis stresses the importance of Fox transcription factors in regulating mosquito reproduction. PMID:17681238

  13. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Promotes Keratinocyte Differentiation in Response to Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Jennifer; Scholz, Glen M; Aw, Jiamin; Reynolds, Eric C

    2017-05-01

    We recently demonstrated that the expression of the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) transcription factor in oral keratinocytes was stimulated by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Here, we have established that IRF6 promotes the differentiation of oral keratinocytes in response to P. gingivalis This was evidenced by the IRF6-dependent upregulation of specific markers of keratinocyte terminal differentiation (e.g., involucrin [IVL] and keratin 13 [KRT13]), together with additional transcriptional regulators of keratinocyte differentiation, including Grainyhead-like 3 (GRHL3) and Ovo-like zinc finger 1 (OVOL1). We have previously established that the transactivator function of IRF6 is activated by receptor-interacting protein kinase 4 (RIPK4). Consistently, the silencing of RIPK4 inhibited the stimulation of IVL, KRT13, GRHL3, and OVOL1 gene expression. IRF6 was shown to also regulate the stimulation of transglutaminase-1 (TGM1) gene expression by P. gingivalis, as well as that of small proline-rich proteins (e.g., SPRR1), which are covalently cross-linked by TGM1 to other proteins, including IVL, during cornification. The expression of the tight junction protein occludin (OCLN) was found to also be upregulated in an IRF6-dependent manner. IRF6 was demonstrated to be important for the barrier function of oral keratinocytes; specifically, silencing of IRF6 increased P. gingivalis-induced intercellular permeability and cell invasion. Taken together, our findings potentially position IRF6 as an important mediator of barrier defense against P. gingivalis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory strategies for the sex determination factor transformer-2.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, D; McGuffin, M E; Piskur, J; Yao, J; Baker, B S; Mattox, W

    1997-01-01

    Sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster is regulated by a cascade of splicing factors which direct the sex-specific expression of gene products needed for male and female differentiation. The splicing factor TRA-2 affects sex-specific splicing of multiple pre-mRNAs involved in sexual differentiation. The tra-2 gene itself expresses a complex set of mRNAs generated through alternative processing that collectively encode three distinct protein isoforms. The expression of these isoforms differs in the soma and germ line. In the male germ line the ratio of two isoforms present is governed by autoregulation of splicing. However, the functional significance of multiple TRA-2 isoforms has remained uncertain. Here we have examined whether the structure, function, and regulation of tra-2 are conserved in Drosophila virilis, a species diverged from D. melanogaster by over 60 million years. We find that the D. virilis homolog of tra-2 produces alternatively spliced RNAs encoding a set of protein isoforms analogous to those found in D. melanogaster. When introduced into the genome of D. melanogaster, this homolog can functionally replace the endogenous tra-2 gene for both normal female sexual differentiation and spermatogenesis. Examination of alternative mRNAs produced in D. virilis testes suggests that germ line-specific autoregulation of tra-2 function is accomplished by a strategy similar to that used in D. melanogaster. The similarity in structure and function of the tra-2 genes in these divergent Drosophila species supports the idea that sexual differentiation in D. melanogaster and D. virilis is accomplished under the control of similar regulatory pathways. PMID:9111363

  15. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin; Ding, Zhong Jie; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  16. The MYB107 Transcription Factor Positively Regulates Suberin Biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Mingyue; Hou, Guichuan; Yang, Huijun; ...

    2016-12-13

    Suberin, a lipophilic polymer deposited in the outer integument of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat, represents an essential sealing component controlling water and solute movement and protecting seed from pathogenic infection. Although many genes responsible for suberin synthesis are identified, the regulatory components controlling its biosynthesis have not been definitively determined. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis MYB107 transcription factor acts as a positive regulator controlling suberin biosynthetic gene expression in the seed coat. MYB107 coexpresses with suberin biosynthetic genes in a temporal manner during seed development. Disrupting MYB107 particularly suppresses the expression of genes involved in suberin butmore » not cutin biosynthesis, lowers seed coat suberin accumulation, alters suberin lamellar structure, and consequently renders higher seed coat permeability and susceptibility to abiotic stresses. Furthermore, MYB107 directly binds to the promoters of suberin biosynthetic genes, verifying its primary role in regulating their expression. Identifying MYB107 as a positive regulator for seed coat suberin synthesis offers a basis for discovering the potential transcriptional network behind one of the most abundant lipid-based polymers in nature.« less

  17. The MYB107 Transcription Factor Positively Regulates Suberin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Mingyue; Hou, Guichuan; Yang, Huijun; Zhang, Xuebin; Cai, Yuanheng; Kai, Guoyin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2016-12-13

    Suberin, a lipophilic polymer deposited in the outer integument of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat, represents an essential sealing component controlling water and solute movement and protecting seed from pathogenic infection. Although many genes responsible for suberin synthesis are identified, the regulatory components controlling its biosynthesis have not been definitively determined. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis MYB107 transcription factor acts as a positive regulator controlling suberin biosynthetic gene expression in the seed coat. MYB107 coexpresses with suberin biosynthetic genes in a temporal manner during seed development. Disrupting MYB107 particularly suppresses the expression of genes involved in suberin but not cutin biosynthesis, lowers seed coat suberin accumulation, alters suberin lamellar structure, and consequently renders higher seed coat permeability and susceptibility to abiotic stresses. Furthermore, MYB107 directly binds to the promoters of suberin biosynthetic genes, verifying its primary role in regulating their expression. Identifying MYB107 as a positive regulator for seed coat suberin synthesis offers a basis for discovering the potential transcriptional network behind one of the most abundant lipid-based polymers in nature.

  18. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    PubMed

    Davie, Kristofer; Jacobs, Jelle; Atkins, Mardelle; Potier, Delphine; Christiaens, Valerie; Halder, Georg; Aerts, Stein

    2015-02-01

    Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs). When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-)activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling, combined with motif

  19. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP gene expression, and we summarize the findings of transcription factor activity in the IGFBP promoter region. PMID:28116872

  20. Factors Regulating Soil Organic Matter Chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, T.; Gustavsson, M.; Reyier, H.; Rietz, K.; Karlsson, S.; Göransson, C.; Andersson, M.; Öberg, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is a common process in various soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil organic chlorine, knowledge on the processes and regulation of soil organic matter chlorination are modest. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how environmental factors may influence chlorination of organic matter in soil. Four factors were chosen for this study; water content, and nitrogen, organic carbon, and chloride concentrations. The variables are all known in different ways as important for microbes and transformation of chlorine in soil. The soil was collected from 5-15 cm depth in a coniferous forest southeast of Sweden. To test how the selected factors influenced chlorination of organic matter, we used soil laboratory incubations using 36Cl-chloride as a radioisotopic marker. A multivariate factorial design with two levels of i) soil moisture, ii) chloride amendment, iii) nitrogen amendment, and iv) glucose and maltose addition was used to simultaneously test for possible combination effects for all factors. A known radioactivity of 36chloride was added to the soil samples and incubated with four different factor treatments during an incubation period of 15 and 60 days. This presentation will discuss the results of this study including what combination of factors enhanced or hampered chlorination and thereby discuss previous observed variability of organic chlorine and chloride in soil.

  1. Gravity, an Regulation Factor in BMSCs Differentiation to osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huang; Yinghui, Li; Fen, Yang; Zhongquan, Dai

    PURPOSE Most studies of regulatory mechanisms of adult stem cell differentiation are concentrated in chemical factors but few efforts are put into physical factors Recent space life science studies indicate mechanical factors participate in the differentiation of cells The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of simulated microgravity or hypergravity on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells BMSCs METHODOLOGY The BMSCs at day 7 were added osteogenic inducer 10nM dexamethasone 10mM beta -glycerophosphate and 50 mu M asorbic acid-2-phosphate for 7 days and cultured under simulated microgravity or hypergravity 2g for 1 day 3 days 5 days or 7 days RESULTS After treating BMSCs with osteogenic inducer and hypergravity the cells expressed more ColIA1 Cbfa1 and ALP than in single steogenic inducer treatment Reversely the cells treated with osteogenic inducer and simulated microgravity expressed less ColIA1 Cbfa1 and ALP CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that hypergravity promotes the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs and simulated microgravity inhibits this process Gravity is an important regulation factor in BMSCs differentiation to osteoblasts

  2. Regulatory T Cells in HIV Infection: Can Immunotherapy Regulate the Regulator?

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Ancuta, Petronela; Gilmore, Norbert; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a dominant role in self-tolerance and control of autoimmune diseases. These cells also play a pivotal role in chronic viral infections and cancer by limiting immune activation and specific immune response. The role of Tregs in HIV pathogenesis remains poorly understood as their function, changes according to the phases of infection. Tregs can suppress anti-HIV specific responses and conversely can have a beneficial role by reducing the deleterious impact of immune activation. We review the frequency, function and homing potential of Tregs in the blood and lymphoid tissues as well as their interaction with dendritic cells in the context of HIV infection. We also examine the new insights generated by recombinant IL-2 and IL-7 clinical trials in HIV-infected adults, including the immunomodulatory effects of Tregs. Based on their detrimental role in limiting anti-HIV responses, we propose Tregs as potential targets for immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at decreasing Tregs frequency and/or immunosuppressive function. However, such approaches require a better understanding of the time upon infection when interfering with Treg function may not cause a deleterious state of hyperimmune activation. PMID:23251223

  3. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26986359

  4. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  5. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  6. Cofunctional Subpathways Were Regulated by Transcription Factor with Common Motif, Common Family, or Common Tissue.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Shang, Desi; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Yang, Haixiu; Liu, Baoquan; Su, Shengyang; Chen, Lina; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting the characteristics of the transcription factor (TF) regulatory subpathway is helpful for understanding the TF underlying regulatory function in complex biological systems. To gain insight into the influence of TFs on their regulatory subpathways, we constructed a global TF-subpathways network (TSN) to analyze systematically the regulatory effect of common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs on subpathways. We performed cluster analysis to show that the common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs that regulated the same pathway classes tended to cluster together and contribute to the same biological function that led to disease initiation and progression. We analyzed the Jaccard coefficient to show that the functional consistency of subpathways regulated by the TF pairs with common motif, common family, or common tissue was significantly greater than the random TF pairs at the subpathway level, pathway level, and pathway class level. For example, HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha) and NR1I3 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3) were a pair of TFs with common motif, common family, and common tissue. They were involved in drug metabolism pathways and were liver-specific factors required for physiological transcription. In short, we inferred that the cofunctional subpathways were regulated by common-motif, common-family, or common-tissue TFs.

  7. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  8. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato.

  9. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  10. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  11. Ultraviolet B Regulation of Transcription Factor Families

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S.J.; Bowden, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged and repeated exposure of the skin to ultraviolet light (UV) leads not only to aging of the skin but also increases the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Damage of cells induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light both at the DNA level and molecular level initiates the activation of transcription factor pathways, which in turn regulate the expression of a number of genes termed the “UV response genes”. Two such transcription factor families that are activated in this way are those of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) families. These two transcription factor families have been identified to be involved in the processes of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival and therefore play important roles in tumorigenesis. The study of these two transcription factor pathways and the cross-talk between them in response to UVB exposure may help with the development of new chemopreventive strategies for the prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:17979627

  12. PLAC1 expression increases during trophoblast differentiation: evidence for regulatory interactions with the fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) axis.

    PubMed

    Massabbal, Eltayab; Parveen, Shanaz; Weisoly, D L; Nelson, D Michael; Smith, S D; Fant, Michael

    2005-07-01

    PLAC1 is a recently described, trophoblast-specific gene that localizes to a region of the X-chromosome important in placental development. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that PLAC1 polypeptide localizes to the differentiated syncytiotrophoblast throughout gestation (8-41 weeks) as well as a small population of villous cytotrophoblasts. Consistent with these observations, quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that PLAC1 mRNA increases more than 300-fold during cytotrophoblast differentiation in culture to form syncytiotrophoblasts. Agents known to be relevant to trophoblast differentiation were then tested for the ability to influence PLAC1 expression. Fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7), also known as keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), stimulated PLAC1 mRNA expression approximately two-fold in the BeWo(b30) trophoblast cell line. FGF-7 stimulation was significantly inhibited by PD-98059 and wortmannin suggesting mediation via MAP kinase and PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathways. Interestingly, epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment of trophoblasts had no effect on PLAC1 expression alone, but potentiated the effect of FGF-7, suggesting the presence of a regulatory interaction of the two growth factors. FGF-7 and its receptor, FGFR-2b, exhibited spatial overlap with PLAC1 suggesting these regulatory interactions are physiologically relevant during gestation. These data demonstrate PLAC1 expression is upregulated during trophoblast differentiation, localizing primarily to the differentiated syncytiotrophoblast. Furthermore PLAC1 expression is specifically regulated by peptide growth factors relevant to trophoblast differentiation. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  13. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Paige; Moreland, Jessica G.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production. PMID:27035130

  14. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengtao; Lee, Heuiran; Guo, Jie; Neipel, Frank; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ozato, Keiko; Jung, Jae U.

    1998-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of multifunctional cytokines with antiviral activities. The K9 open reading frame of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exhibits significant homology with cellular IFN regulatory factors (IRFs). We have investigated the functional consequence of K9 expression in IFN-mediated signal transduction. Expression of K9 dramatically repressed transcriptional activation induced by IFN-α, -β, and -γ. Further, it induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, resulting in morphologic changes, focus formation, and growth in reduced-serum conditions. The expression of antisense K9 in KSHV-infected BCBL-1 cells consistently increased IFN-mediated transcriptional activation but drastically decreased the expression of certain KSHV genes. Thus, the K9 gene of KSHV encodes the first virus-encoded IRF (v-IRF) which functions as a repressor for cellular IFN-mediated signal transduction. In addition, v-IRF likely plays an important role in regulating KSHV gene expression. These results suggest that KSHV employs an unique mechanism to antagonize IFN-mediated antiviral activity by harboring a functional v-IRF. PMID:9620998

  15. Functional studies of the Ciona intestinalis myogenic regulatory factor reveal conserved features of chordate myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Stephanie A; Colantuono, Bonnie J; Sullivan, Kelly; Khare, Parul; Meedel, Thomas H

    2013-04-15

    Ci-MRF is the sole myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate. In order to investigate its properties we developed a simple in vivo assay based on misexpressing Ci-MRF in the notochord of Ciona embryos. We used this assay to examine the roles of three structural motifs that are conserved among MRFs: an alanine-threonine (Ala-Thr) dipeptide of the basic domain that is known in vertebrates as the myogenic code, a cysteine/histidine-rich (C/H) domain found just N-terminal to the basic domain, and a carboxy-terminal amphipathic α-helix referred to as Helix III. We show that the Ala-Thr dipeptide is necessary for normal Ci-MRF function, and that while eliminating the C/H domain or Helix III individually has no demonstrable effect on Ci-MRF, simultaneous loss of both motifs significantly reduces its activity. Our studies also indicate that direct interaction between CiMRF and an essential E-box of Ciona Troponin I is required for the expression of this muscle-specific gene and that multiple classes of MRF-regulated genes exist in Ciona. These findings are consistent with substantial conservation of MRF-directed myogenesis in chordates and demonstrate for the first time that the Ala/Thr dipeptide of the basic domain of an invertebrate MRF behaves as a myogenic code.

  16. Regulatory Roles of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor BCMA

    PubMed Central

    Coquery, Christine M.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a tumor necrosis family receptor (TNFR) member that is predominantly expressed on terminally differentiated B cells and, upon binding to its ligands B cell activator of the TNF family (BAFF) and a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), delivers pro-survival cell signals. Thus, BCMA is most known for its functional activity in mediating the survival of plasma cells that maintain long-term humoral immunity. The expression of BCMA has been also linked to a number of cancers, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases that suggest additional roles for BCMA activity. Despite the recent advances in our understanding of the roles for the related TNFR members BAFF-R and transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI), the signaling pathway used by BCMA for mediating plasma cell survival as well as its putative function in certain disease states are not well understood. By examining the expression, regulation, and signaling targets of BCMA we may gain further insight into this receptor and how it operates within cells in both health and disease. This information is important for identifying new therapeutic targets that may be relevant in treating diseases that involve the BAFF/APRIL cytokine network. PMID:23237506

  17. Gibberellin as a factor in floral regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Mutasa-Göttgens, Effie; Hedden, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) function not only to promote the growth of plant organs, but also to induce phase transitions during development. Their involvement in flower initiation in long-day (LD) and biennial plants is well established and there is growing insight into the mechanisms by which floral induction is achieved. The extent to which GAs mediate the photoperiodic stimulus to flowering in LD plants is, with a few exceptions, less clear. Despite evidence for photoperiod-enhanced GA biosynthesis in leaves of many LD plants, through up-regulation of GA 20-oxidase gene expression, a function for GAs as transmitted signals from leaves to apices in response to LD has been demonstrated only in Lolium species. In Arabidopsis thaliana, as one of four quantitative floral pathways, GA signalling has a relatively minor influence on flowering time in LD, while in SD, in the absence of the photoperiod flowering pathway, the GA pathway assumes a major role and becomes obligatory. Gibberellins promote flowering in Arabidopsis through the activation of genes encoding the floral integrators SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1), LEAFY (LFY), and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in the inflorescence and floral meristems, and in leaves, respectively. Although GA signalling is not required for floral organ specification, it is essential for the normal growth and development of these organs. The sites of GA production and action within flowers, and the signalling pathways involved are beginning to be revealed.

  18. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide down-regulates expression of GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein.

    PubMed

    Werner, Ernst R; Bahrami, Soheyl; Heller, Regine; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2002-03-22

    GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP) is a 9.7-kDa protein regulating GTP cyclohydrolase I activity in dependence of tetrahydrobiopterin and phenylalanine concentrations, thus enabling stimulation of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis by phenylalanine to ensure its efficient metabolism by phenylalanine hydroxylase. Here, we were interested in regulation of GFRP expression by proinflammatory cytokines and stimuli, which are known to induce GTP cyclohydrolase I expression. Recombinant human GFRP stimulated recombinant human GTP cyclohydrolase I in the presence of phenylalanine and mediated feedback inhibition by tetrahydrobiopterin. Levels of GFRP mRNA in human myelomonocytoma (THP-1) cells remained unaltered by treatment of cells with interferon-gamma or interleukin-1beta, but were significantly down-regulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 microg/ml), without or with cotreatment by interferon-gamma, which strongly up-regulated GTP cyclohydrolase I expression and activity. GFRP expression was also suppressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells treated with 1 microg/ml LPS, as well as in rat tissues 7 h post intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg LPS. THP-1 cells stimulated with interferon-gamma alone showed increased pteridine synthesis by addition of phenylalanine to the culture medium. Cells stimulated with interferon-gamma plus LPS, in contrast, showed phenylalanine-independent pteridine synthesis. These results demonstrate that LPS down-regulates expression of GFRP, thus rendering pteridine synthesis independent of metabolic control by phenylalanine.

  19. Applying and adapting the Swedish regulatory system for decommissioning to nuclear power reactors - The regulator's perspective.

    PubMed

    Amft, Martin; Leisvik, Mathias; Carroll, Simon

    2017-03-16

    Half of the original 13 Swedish nuclear power reactors will be shut down by 2020. The decommissioning of these reactors is a challenge for all parties involved, including the licensees, the waste management system, the financing system, and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM). This paper presents an overview of the Swedish regulations for decommissioning of nuclear facilities. It describes some of the experiences that SSM has gained from the application of these regulations. The focus of the present paper is on administrative aspects of decommissioning, such as SSM's guidelines, the definition of fundamental concepts in the regulatory framework, and a proposed revision of the licensing process according to the Environmental Act. These improvements will help to streamline the administration of the commercial nuclear power plant decommissioning projects that are anticipated to commence in Sweden in the near future.

  20. Compliance strategies and regulatory effectiveness of performance-based regulation of chemical accident risks.

    PubMed

    Chinander, K R; Kleindorfer, P R; Kunreuther, H C

    1998-04-01

    This paper investigates the role that performance-based regulations can play in linking a firm's environmental, health, and safety concerns with their corporate strategy. The specific focus is on the performance standards required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) which require firms that store or use certain chemicals to develop a Risk Management Plan (RMP) for reducing the likelihood and impact of accidents at their plants. Data from a series of case studies and interviews of executives in chemical firms reveal that proactive companies integrated many of the requirements of the CAAA into their management systems prior to the regulatory requirements. Most of these firms tend to be large ones. Small firms often lack the resources to implement these regulations and hence have tended to have a more difficult time with compliance.

  1. Regulatory advice and drug development--a case study in negotiating with regulators.

    PubMed

    Seldrup, Jørgen

    2011-06-15

    Regulatory guidance on the development of drugs has existed for well over half a century in some territories. As drug development grew to become global so was born the need for harmonization. Beginning in the 1990 s, the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) developed guidelines which were adopted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the U.S.A., the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the European Union and the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) in Japan. These guidelines are generally not disease specific. A visit to the web sites of any of the aforementioned Agencies or, for that matter other regulatory agencies outside of these, will witness a plethora of additional/separate guidances, some of which are disease specific. In addition to such written guidances, more specific advice (for example, on a drug development program at the end of Phase II) may be requested from the Regulator. Despite the harmonization efforts expressed through ICH, the actual advice given by different regulatory authorities in practical situations, however, may be inconsistent. This paper will describe a case of seeking advice on a Phase III programme from the FDA and the EMA, obtaining different opinions and developing an innovative solution to satisfy both Authorities without necessarily extending development time significantly. The case is chronic kidney disease; the issues concern study design (non-inferiority, margin, etc.); the solution required a non-traditional design and associated sample size considerations. We conclude with some general advice on 'talking to the regulator'. This work was originally presented as a Poster at the Statistical Methods in Biopharmacy, 6th International Meeting, Paris, 21-22 September 2009. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. LEAFY COTYLEDON1-CASEIN KINASE I-TCP15-PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 Network Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis by Regulating Auxin Homeostasis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Min, Ling; Hu, Qin; Li, Yaoyao; Xu, Jiao; Ma, Yizan; Zhu, Longfu; Yang, Xiyan; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an efficient tool for the propagation of plant species and also, a useful model for studying the regulatory networks in embryo development. However, the regulatory networks underlying the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos during SE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) CASEIN KINASE I gene, GhCKI, which is a unique key regulatory factor that strongly affects SE. Overexpressing GhCKI halted the formation of embryoids and plant regeneration because of a block in the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos. In contrast, defective GhCKI in plants facilitated SE. To better understand the mechanism by which GhCKI regulates SE, the regulatory network was analyzed. A direct upstream negative regulator protein, cotton LEAFY COTYLEDON1, was identified to be targeted to a cis-element, CTTTTC, in the promoter of GhCKI. Moreover, GhCKI interacted with and phosphorylated cotton CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF transcription factor15 by coordinately regulating the expression of cotton PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4, finally disrupting auxin homeostasis, which led to increased cell proliferation and aborted somatic embryo formation in GhCKI-overexpressing somatic cells. Our results show a complex process of SE that is negatively regulated by GhCKI through a complex regulatory network. PMID:26491146

  3. LEAFY COTYLEDON1-CASEIN KINASE I-TCP15-PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 Network Regulates Somatic Embryogenesis by Regulating Auxin Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Min, Ling; Hu, Qin; Li, Yaoyao; Xu, Jiao; Ma, Yizan; Zhu, Longfu; Yang, Xiyan; Zhang, Xianlong

    2015-12-01

    Somatic embryogenesis (SE) is an efficient tool for the propagation of plant species and also, a useful model for studying the regulatory networks in embryo development. However, the regulatory networks underlying the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos during SE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe an upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) CASEIN KINASE I gene, GhCKI, which is a unique key regulatory factor that strongly affects SE. Overexpressing GhCKI halted the formation of embryoids and plant regeneration because of a block in the transition from nonembryogenic callus to somatic embryos. In contrast, defective GhCKI in plants facilitated SE. To better understand the mechanism by which GhCKI regulates SE, the regulatory network was analyzed. A direct upstream negative regulator protein, cotton LEAFY COTYLEDON1, was identified to be targeted to a cis-element, CTTTTC, in the promoter of GhCKI. Moreover, GhCKI interacted with and phosphorylated cotton CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF transcription factor15 by coordinately regulating the expression of cotton PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4, finally disrupting auxin homeostasis, which led to increased cell proliferation and aborted somatic embryo formation in GhCKI-overexpressing somatic cells. Our results show a complex process of SE that is negatively regulated by GhCKI through a complex regulatory network.

  4. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingfeng; Yu, Dong; Jin, Yuan; Dou, Lei; Li, Beiping; Wang, Yuelan; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2012-06-06

    Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs.

  5. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Results Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. Conclusions In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs. PMID:22672438

  6. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  7. Ethical and Regulatory Challenges with Autologous Adult Stem Cells: A Comparative Review of International Regulations.

    PubMed

    Lysaght, Tamra; Kerridge, Ian H; Sipp, Douglas; Porter, Gerard; Capps, Benjamin J

    2017-02-28

    Cell and tissue-based products, such as autologous adult stem cells, are being prescribed by physicians across the world for diseases and illnesses that they have neither been approved for or been demonstrated as safe and effective in formal clinical trials. These doctors often form part of informal transnational networks that exploit differences and similarities in the regulatory systems across geographical contexts. In this paper, we examine the regulatory infrastructure of five geographically diverse but socio-economically comparable countries with the aim of identifying similarities and differences in how these products are regulated and governed within clinical contexts. We find that while there are many subtle technical differences in how these regulations are implemented, they are sufficiently similar that it is difficult to explain why these practices appear more prevalent in some countries and not in others. We conclude with suggestions for how international governance frameworks might be improved to discourage the exploitation of vulnerable patient populations while enabling innovation in the clinical application of cellular therapies.

  8. Regulation of interferon gamma signaling by suppressors of cytokine signaling and regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Wilson, Tenisha D; Johnson, Howard M

    2013-12-18

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1(-/-)) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function.

  9. Regulation of Interferon Gamma Signaling by Suppressors of Cytokine Signaling and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Wilson, Tenisha D.; Johnson, Howard M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an indispensable role in the prevention of autoimmune disease, as interferon gamma (IFNγ) mediated, lethal auto-immunity occurs (in both mice and humans) in their absence. In addition, Tregs have been implicated in preventing the onset of autoimmune and auto-inflammatory conditions associated with aberrant IFNγ signaling such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediated endotoxemia. Notably, suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 deficient (SOCS1−/−) mice also succumb to a lethal auto-inflammatory disease, dominated by excessive IFNγ signaling and bearing similar disease course kinetics to Treg deficient mice. Moreover SOCS1 deficiency has been implicated in lupus progression, and increased susceptibility to LPS mediated endotoxemia. Although it has been established that Tregs and SOCS1 play a critical role in the regulation of IFNγ signaling, and the prevention of lethal auto-inflammatory disease, the role of Treg/SOCS1 cross-talk in the regulation of IFNγ signaling has been essentially unexplored. This is especially pertinent as recent publications have implicated a role of SOCS1 in the stability of peripheral Tregs. This review will examine the emerging research findings implicating a critical role of the intersection of the SOCS1 and Treg regulatory pathways in the control of IFN gamma signaling and immune system function. PMID:24391643

  10. Fur homolog regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis virulence under low-iron/heme conditions through a complex regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Ciuraszkiewicz, J; Smiga, M; Mackiewicz, P; Gmiterek, A; Bielecki, M; Olczak, M; Olczak, T

    2014-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of iron and heme uptake that allow P. gingivalis to express virulence factors and survive in the hostile environment of the oral cavity, so we initiated characterization of a P. gingivalis Fur homolog (PgFur). Many Fur paralogs found in microbial genomes, including Bacteroidetes, confirm that Fur proteins have a tendency to be subjected to a sub- or even neofunctionalization process. PgFur revealed extremely high sequence divergence, which could be associated with its functional dissimilarity in comparison with other Fur homologs. A fur mutant strain constructed by insertional inactivation exhibited retarded growth during the early growth phase and a significantly lower tendency to form a homotypic biofilm on abiotic surfaces. The mutant also showed significantly weaker adherence and invasion to epithelial cells and macrophages. Transcripts of many differentially regulated genes identified in the fur mutant strain were annotated as hypothetical proteins, suggesting that PgFur can play a novel role in the regulation of gene expression. Inactivation of the fur gene resulted in decreased hmuY gene expression, increased expression of other hmu components and changes in the expression of genes encoding hemagglutinins and proteases (mainly gingipains), HtrA, some extracytoplasmic sigma factors and two-component systems. Our data suggest that PgFur can influence in vivo growth and virulence, at least in part by affecting iron/heme acquisition, allowing efficient infection through a complex regulatory network.

  11. Self-perceived successful weight regulators are less affected by self-regulatory depletion in the domain of eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Friese, Malte; Engeler, Michèle; Florack, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss and maintenance goals are highly prevalent in many affluent societies, but many weight regulators are not successful in the long term. Research started to reveal psychological mechanisms that help successful weight regulators in being successful. In the present study, we tested the assumption that these mechanisms facilitate successful self-regulation particularly under conditions of self-regulatory depletion. Participants exerted or did not exert self-control in a first task before engaging in a taste test of a tempting but unhealthy food. Participants who had initially exerted self-control ate more than participants in the control condition. This effect was reduced in self-perceived successful weight regulators as compared to perceived unsuccessful self-regulators. A reduced susceptibility to self-regulatory depletion may be an important contributor to long-term weight regulation success in successful weight regulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    PubMed

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections.

  13. Curated collection of yeast transcription factor DNA binding specificity data reveals novel structural and gene regulatory insights

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating gene expression by interacting with cis-regulatory DNA elements associated with their target genes. Recent surveys have examined the DNA binding specificities of most Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFs, but a comprehensive evaluation of their data has been lacking. Results We analyzed in vitro and in vivo TF-DNA binding data reported in previous large-scale studies to generate a comprehensive, curated resource of DNA binding specificity data for all characterized S. cerevisiae TFs. Our collection comprises DNA binding site motifs and comprehensive in vitro DNA binding specificity data for all possible 8-bp sequences. Investigation of the DNA binding specificities within the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) and VHT1 regulator (VHR) TF families revealed unexpected plasticity in TF-DNA recognition: intriguingly, the VHR TFs, newly characterized by protein binding microarrays in this study, recognize bZIP-like DNA motifs, while the bZIP TF Hac1 recognizes a motif highly similar to the canonical E-box motif of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) TFs. We identified several TFs with distinct primary and secondary motifs, which might be associated with different regulatory functions. Finally, integrated analysis of in vivo TF binding data with protein binding microarray data lends further support for indirect DNA binding in vivo by sequence-specific TFs. Conclusions The comprehensive data in this curated collection allow for more accurate analyses of regulatory TF-DNA interactions, in-depth structural studies of TF-DNA specificity determinants, and future experimental investigations of the TFs' predicted target genes and regulatory roles. PMID:22189060

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Is Necessary for Salivary Glands and Pancreas Development.

    PubMed

    Metwalli, K A; Do, M A; Nguyen, K; Mallick, S; Kin, K; Farokhnia, N; Jun, G; Fakhouri, W D

    2017-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 6 ( IRF6) acts as a tumor suppressor and controls cell differentiation in ectodermal and craniofacial tissues by regulating expression of target genes. Haploinsufficiency of IRF6 causes Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndrome, 2 syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate. Around 85% of patients with Van der Woude express pits on the lower lip that continuously or intermittently drain saliva, and patients with the common cleft lip and palate have a higher prevalence of dental caries and gingivitis. This study aims to identify the role of IRF6 in development of exocrine glands, specifically the major salivary glands. Our transgenic mouse model that expresses LacZ reporter under the control of the human IRF6 enhancer element showed high expression of IRF6 in major and minor salivary glands and ducts. Immunostaining data also confirmed the endogenous expression of IRF6 in the developing ductal, serous, and mucous acinar cells of salivary glands. As such, we hypothesized that Irf6 is important for proper development of salivary glands and potentially other exocrine glands. Loss of Irf6 in mice causes an increase in the proliferation level of salivary cells, disorganized branching morphogenesis, and a lack of differentiated mucous acinar cells in submandibular and sublingual glands. Expression and localization of the acinar differentiation marker MIST1 were altered in Irf6-null salivary gland and pancreas. The RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that 168 genes are differentially expressed and confer functions associated with transmembrane transporter activity, spliceosome, and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, expression of genes involved in the EGF pathway-that is, Ereg, Ltbp4, Matn1, Matn3, and Tpo-was decreased at embryonic day 14.5, while levels of apoptotic proteins were elevated at postnatal day 0. In conclusion, our data report a novel role of Irf6 in exocrine gland development and support a rationale for performing exocrine

  15. Interferon-regulatory factors during development of CD4 and CD8 thymocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, A K; Desrois, M; Schmitt-Verhulst, A M

    1997-01-01

    Selection events in the thymus occur at the double-positive CD4+ CD8+ (DP) developmental stage leading either to further differentiation of the CD4+ and CD8+ lineages or to deletion. The interferon-regulatory factor IRF-1 has been implicated in signalling for T-cell death and also in CD8+ thymic differentiation. IRF-1 is an activator and IRF-2 a repressor of gene transcription regulated by type 1 interferons (IFN). To evaluate the role of IRF-1 and IRF-2 in the differentiation of CD4 and CD8 thymocytes, we analysed their DNA-binding activity before and after antigenic stimulation at different stages of thymic development and in peripheral T cells. Unseparated, double-positive and single-positive thymocytes as well as peripheral T lymphocytes from mice transgenic (tg) for a T-cell receptor (TCR), restricted either by major histocompatibility complex class I or class II, were stimulated by their nominal antigen. Our results demonstrate that the DNA-binding activity of IRF-2 and, weakly, that of IRF-1 are inducible in total thymocytes in response to antigen. There is no induction of IRF-1/IRF-2 binding activity at the double-positive stage of thymic development in the MHC class II-restricted model whereas in the MHC class I-restricted model IRF-1/IRF-2 activity is induced weakly. At the single-positive stage, antigen induces the IRF-1/IRF-2 DNA binding in both CD4+ and CD8+ thymocytes, but not in mature lymphocytes from the periphery. This pattern of expression suggests that IRF-1/IRF-2 binding activities resulting from antigen stimulation are developmentally regulated. No evidence for a selective role of IRF-1 in the development of the CD8+ lineage was found, however. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9301521

  16. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A; Dowell, Robin D

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  17. Protecting the public or setting the bar too high? Understanding the causes and consequences of regulatory actions of front-line regulators and specialized drug shop operators in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Wafula, Francis; Molyneux, Catherine; Mackintosh, Maureen; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The problem of poor regulatory compliance has been widely reported across private health providers in developing countries. Less known are the underlying reasons for poor compliance, especially with regards to the roles played by front-line regulatory staff, and the regulatory institution as a whole. We designed a qualitative study to address this gap, with the study questions and tools drawing on a conceptual framework informed by theoretical literature on regulation. Data were collected from specialized drug shops (SDSs) in two rural districts in Western Kenya in 2011 through eight focus group discussions, and from regulatory staff from organizations governing the pharmaceutical sector through a total of 24 in-depth interviews. We found that relationships between front-line regulators and SDS operators were a strong influence on regulatory behaviour, often resulting in non-compliance and perverse outcomes such as corruption. It emerged that separate regulatory streams operated in urban and rural locations, based mainly on differing relationships between the front-line regulators and SDS operators, and on broader factors such as the competition environment and community expectations. Effective incentive structures for regulatory staff were either absent, or poorly linked to performance in regulatory organizations, resulting in divergences between the purposes of the regulatory organization and activities of front-line staff. Given the rural-urban differences in the practice environment, the introduction of lower retail practice requirements for rural SDSs could be considered. This would allow illegally operated shops to be brought within the regulatory framework, facilitating good quality provision of essential commodities to marginalized areas, without lowering the practice requirements for the better complying urban SDSs. In addition, regulatory organizations need to devise incentives that better link the level of effort to rewards such as professional

  18. Protecting the public or setting the bar too high? Understanding the causes and consequences of regulatory actions of front-line regulators and specialized drug shop operators in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Wafula, Francis; Molyneux, Catherine; Mackintosh, Maureen; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-11-01

    The problem of poor regulatory compliance has been widely reported across private health providers in developing countries. Less known are the underlying reasons for poor compliance, especially with regards to the roles played by front-line regulatory staff, and the regulatory institution as a whole. We designed a qualitative study to address this gap, with the study questions and tools drawing on a conceptual framework informed by theoretical literature on regulation. Data were collected from specialized drug shops (SDSs) in two rural districts in Western Kenya in 2011 through eight focus group discussions, and from regulatory staff from organizations governing the pharmaceutical sector through a total of 24 in-depth interviews. We found that relationships between front-line regulators and SDS operators were a strong influence on regulatory behaviour, often resulting in non-compliance and perverse outcomes such as corruption. It emerged that separate regulatory streams operated in urban and rural locations, based mainly on differing relationships between the front-line regulators and SDS operators, and on broader factors such as the competition environment and community expectations. Effective incentive structures for regulatory staff were either absent, or poorly linked to performance in regulatory organizations, resulting in divergences between the purposes of the regulatory organization and activities of front-line staff. Given the rural-urban differences in the practice environment, the introduction of lower retail practice requirements for rural SDSs could be considered. This would allow illegally operated shops to be brought within the regulatory framework, facilitating good quality provision of essential commodities to marginalized areas, without lowering the practice requirements for the better complying urban SDSs. In addition, regulatory organizations need to devise incentives that better link the level of effort to rewards such as professional

  19. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  20. Modulation of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling by Human Herpesvirus 8 Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Keun Young

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains, experimentally also termed mitochondrial detergent-resistant membrane fractions (mDRM), play a role as platforms for recruiting signaling molecules involved in antiviral responses such as apoptosis and innate immunity. Viruses can modulate mitochondrial functions for their own survival and replication. However, viral regulation of the antiviral responses via mDRM remains incompletely understood. Here, we report that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) gene product viral interferon regulatory factor 1 (vIRF-1) is targeted to mDRM during virus replication and negatively regulates the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated antiviral responses. The N-terminal region of vIRF-1 interacts directly with membrane lipids, including cardiolipin. In addition, a GxRP motif within the N terminus of vIRF-1, conserved in the mDRM-targeting region of mitochondrial proteins, including PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and MAVS, was found to be important for vIRF-1 association with mitochondria. Furthermore, MAVS, which has the potential to promote vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM possibly by inducing cardiolipin exposure on the outer membrane of mitochondria, interacts with vIRF-1, which, in turn, inhibits MAVS-mediated antiviral signaling. Consistent with these results, vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM contributes to promotion of HHV-8 productive replication and inhibition of associated apoptosis. Combined, our results suggest novel molecular mechanisms for negative-feedback regulation of MAVS by vIRF-1 during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Successful virus replication is in large part achieved by the ability of viruses to counteract apoptosis and innate immune responses elicited by infection of host cells. Recently, mitochondria have emerged to play a central role in antiviral signaling. In particular, mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains appear to function as platforms in cell apoptosis signaling. However, viral regulation

  1. HIV Vpu Interferes with NF-κB Activity but Not with Interferon Regulatory Factor 3.

    PubMed

    Manganaro, Lara; de Castro, Elisa; Maestre, Ana M; Olivieri, Kevin; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2015-10-01

    The accessory HIV protein Vpu inhibits a number of cellular pathways that trigger host innate restriction mechanisms. HIV Vpu-mediated degradation of tetherin allows efficient particle release and hampers the activation of the NF-κB pathway thereby limiting the expression of proinflammatory genes. In addition, Vpu reduces cell surface expression of several cellular molecules such as newly synthesized CD4. However, the role of HIV Vpu in regulating the type 1 interferon response to viral infection by degradation of the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) has been subject of conflicting reports. We therefore systematically investigated the expression of IRF3 in primary CD4(+) T cells and macrophages infected with HIV at different time points. In addition, we also tested the ability of Vpu to interfere with innate immune signaling pathways such as the NF-κB and the IRF3 pathways. We report here that HIV Vpu failed to degrade IRF3 in infected primary cells. Moreover, we observed that HIV NL4.3 Vpu had no effect on IRF3-dependent gene expression in reporter assays. On the other hand, HIV NL4.3 Vpu downmodulated NF-κB-dependent transcription. Mutation of two serines (positions 52 and 56) involved in the binding of NL4.3 Vpu to the βTrCP ubiquitin ligase abolishes its ability to inhibit NF-κB activity. Taken together, these results suggest that HIV Vpu regulates antiviral innate response in primary human cells by acting specifically on the NF-κB pathway. HIV Vpu plays a pivotal role in enhancing HIV infection by counteraction of Tetherin. However, Vpu also regulates host response to HIV infection by hampering the type 1 interferon response. The molecular mechanism by which Vpu inhibits the interferon response is still controversial. Here we report that Vpu affects interferon expression by inhibiting NF-κB activity without affecting IRF3 levels or activity. These data suggest that Vpu facilitates HIV infection by regulating NF-κB transcription to levels

  2. The regulatory network of B-cell differentiation: a focused view of early B-cell factor 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Boller, Sören; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies have investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of lineage decision in the hematopoietic system. These efforts led to a model in which extrinsic signals and intrinsic cues establish a permissive chromatin context upon which a regulatory network of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers act to guide the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. These networks include lineage-specific factors that further modify the epigenetic landscape and promote the generation of specific cell types. The process of B lymphopoiesis requires a set of transcription factors, including Ikaros, PU.1, E2A, and FoxO1 to ‘prime’ cis-regulatory regions for subsequent activation by the B-lineage-specific transcription factors EBF1 and Pax-5. The expression of EBF1 is initiated by the combined action of E2A and FoxO1, and it is further enhanced and maintained by several positive feedback loops that include Pax-5 and IL-7 signaling. EBF1 acts in concert with Ikaros, PU.1, Runx1, E2A, FoxO1, and Pax-5 to establish the B cell-specific transcription profile. EBF1 and Pax-5 also collaborate to repress alternative cell fates and lock cells into the B-lineage fate. In addition to the functions of EBF1 in establishing and maintaining B-cell identity, EBF1 is required to coordinate differentiation with cell proliferation and survival. PMID:25123279

  3. Sterols regulate 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) via dual sterol regulatory elements: cooperative induction of key enzymes in lipid synthesis by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zerenturk, Eser J; Sharpe, Laura J; Brown, Andrew J

    2012-10-01

    3β-Hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) catalyzes a final step in cholesterol synthesis, and has been ascribed diverse functions, such as being anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory. How this enzyme is regulated transcriptionally by sterols is currently unclear. Some studies have suggested that its expression is regulated by Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs) while another suggests it is through the Liver X Receptor (LXR). However, these transcription factors have opposing effects on cellular sterol levels, so it is likely that one predominates. Here we establish that sterol regulation of DHCR24 occurs predominantly through SREBP-2, and identify the particular region of the DHCR24 promoter to which SREBP-2 binds. We demonstrate that sterol regulation is mediated by two sterol regulatory elements (SREs) in the promoter of the gene, assisted by two nearby NF-Y binding sites. Moreover, we present evidence that the dual SREs work cooperatively to regulate DHCR24 expression by comparison to two known SREBP target genes, the LDL receptor with one SRE, and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1, with two SREs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into the Interferon Regulatory Factor Activation from the Crystal Structure of Dimeric IRF5

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Lam, S; Srinath, H; Jiang, Z; Correia, J; Schiffer, C; Fitzgerald, K; Lin, K; Royer, Jr., W

    2008-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are involved in the innate immune response and are activated by phosphorylation. The structure of a pseudophosphorylated IRF5 activation domain now reveals structural changes in the activated form that would turn an autoinhibitory region into a dimerization interface. In vivo analysis supports the relevance of such a dimer to transcriptional activation.

  5. Macrophage depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration: The roles of regulatory factors for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Linlin; Zeng, Zhigang; Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie

    2017-03-01

    Though macrophages are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration, which is a complex process, the roles and mechanisms of the macrophages in the process of muscle regeneration are still not fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the roles of macrophages and the mechanisms involved in the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. One hundred and twelve C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into muscle contusion and macrophages depleted groups. Their gastrocnemius muscles were harvested at the time points of 12 h, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 d post-injury. The changes in skeletal muscle morphology were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The data showed that CL-liposomes treatment did affect the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MyoD, myogenin) after injury. In addition, CL-liposomes treatment decreased the expression of regulatory factors of muscle regeneration (HGF, uPA, COX-2, IGF-1, MGF, FGF6) and increased the expression of inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES) in the late stage of regeneration. Moreover, there were significant correlations between macrophages and some regulatory factors (such as HGF, uPA) for muscle regeneration. These results suggested that macrophages depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that the regulatory factors for muscle regeneration may play important roles in this process.

  6. The regulatory role of hepatoma-derived growth factor as an angiogenic factor in the eye.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Michelle E; Wang, Weiwen; Chen, Xiuping; Ji, Yanli; Shakya, Akhalesh; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Chenming; Gonzalez, Vivianne; Brewer, Megan; Ma, Jian-Xing; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Fangliang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a mitogen that promotes endothelial proliferation and neuronal survival. Using a unique technology of ligandomics, we recently identified HDGF as a retinal endothelial binding protein. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of HDGF in regulating ocular vasculature and the expression of HDGF in the retina. HDGF expression in the retinal was analyzed with western blot and immunohistochemistry. Angiogenic activity was investigated in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMVECs) with in vitro endothelial proliferation, migration, and permeability assays. In vivo angiogenic activity was quantified with a corneal pocket assay. The Evans blue assay and western blot using anti-mouse albumin were performed to detect the capacity of HDGF to induce retinal vascular leakage. Immunohistochemistry revealed that HDGF is expressed in the retina with a distinct pattern. HDGF was detected in retinal ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer but not in the inner plexiform layer, suggesting that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, of retinal neurons. In contrast to family member HDGF-related protein 3 (HRP-3) that has no expression in photoreceptors, HDGF is also present in the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. This suggests that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm of photoreceptors. In vitro functional assays showed that HDGF induced the proliferation, migration, and permeability of HRMVECs. Corneal pocket assay indicated that HDGF directly stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Intravitreal injection of HDGF significantly induced retinal vascular leakage. These results suggest that HDGF is an angiogenic factor that regulates retinal vasculature in physiologic and pathological conditions. Identification of HDGF by ligandomics and its independent characterization in this study also support the validity of this new technology for systematic

  7. The regulatory role of hepatoma-derived growth factor as an angiogenic factor in the eye

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Michelle E.; Wang, Weiwen; Chen, Xiuping; Ji, Yanli; Shakya, Akhalesh; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Chenming; Gonzalez, Vivianne; Brewer, Megan; Ma, Jian-xing; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a mitogen that promotes endothelial proliferation and neuronal survival. Using a unique technology of ligandomics, we recently identified HDGF as a retinal endothelial binding protein. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of HDGF in regulating ocular vasculature and the expression of HDGF in the retina. Methods HDGF expression in the retinal was analyzed with western blot and immunohistochemistry. Angiogenic activity was investigated in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMVECs) with in vitro endothelial proliferation, migration, and permeability assays. In vivo angiogenic activity was quantified with a corneal pocket assay. The Evans blue assay and western blot using anti-mouse albumin were performed to detect the capacity of HDGF to induce retinal vascular leakage. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that HDGF is expressed in the retina with a distinct pattern. HDGF was detected in retinal ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer but not in the inner plexiform layer, suggesting that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, of retinal neurons. In contrast to family member HDGF-related protein 3 (HRP-3) that has no expression in photoreceptors, HDGF is also present in the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. This suggests that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm of photoreceptors. In vitro functional assays showed that HDGF induced the proliferation, migration, and permeability of HRMVECs. Corneal pocket assay indicated that HDGF directly stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Intravitreal injection of HDGF significantly induced retinal vascular leakage. Conclusions These results suggest that HDGF is an angiogenic factor that regulates retinal vasculature in physiologic and pathological conditions. Identification of HDGF by ligandomics and its independent characterization in this study also support the validity of this

  8. STAT5 proteins are involved in down-regulation of iron regulatory protein 1 gene expression by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Starzynski, Rafal Radoslaw; Gonçalves, Ana Sofia; Muzeau, Françoise; Tyrolczyk, Zofia; Smuda, Ewa; Drapier, Jean-Claude; Beaumont, Carole; Lipinski, Pawel

    2006-12-01

    RNA-binding activity of IRP1 (iron regulatory protein 1) is regulated by the insertion/extrusion of a [4Fe-4S] cluster into/from the IRP1 molecule. NO (nitic oxide), whose ability to activate IRP1 by removing its [4Fe-4S] cluster is well known, has also been shown to down-regulate expression of the IRP1 gene. In the present study, we examine whether this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level. Analysis of the mouse IRP1 promoter sequence revealed two conserved putative binding sites for transcription factor(s) regulated by NO and/or changes in intracellular iron level: Sp1 (promoter-selective transcription factor 1) and MTF1 (metal transcription factor 1), plus GAS (interferon-gamma-activated sequence), a binding site for STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) proteins. In order to define the functional activity of these sequences, reporter constructs were generated through the insertion of overlapping fragments of the mouse IRP1 promoter upstream of the luciferase gene. Transient expression assays following transfection of HuH7 cells with these plasmids revealed that while both the Sp1 and GAS sequences are involved in basal transcriptional activity of the IRP1 promoter, the role of the latter is predominant. Analysis of protein binding to these sequences in EMSAs (electrophoretic mobility-shift assays) using nuclear extracts from mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated to synthesize NO showed a significant decrease in the formation of Sp1-DNA and STAT-DNA complexes, compared with controls. We have also demonstrated that the GAS sequence is involved in NO-dependent down-regulation of IRP1 transcription. Further analysis revealed that levels of STAT5a and STAT5b in the nucleus and cytosol of NO-producing macrophages are substantially lower than in control cells. These findings provide evidence that STAT5 proteins play a role in NO-mediated down-regulation of IRP1 gene expression.

  9. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks.

  10. Crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xiangkai; Li, Bowen; Hu, Fen; Yan, Shufeng; Meloni, Gabriele; Li, Huiliang; Shi, Ning

    2017-06-16

    Myelin-gene Regulatory Factor (MyRF) is one of the master transcription factors controlling myelin formation and development in oligodendrocytes which is crucial for the powerful brain functions. The N-terminal of MyRF, which contains a proline-rich region and a DNA binding domain (DBD), is auto-cleaved from the ER membrane, and then enters the nucleus to participate in transcription regulation of the myelin genes. Here we report the crystal structure of MyRF DBD. It shows an Ig-fold like architecture which consists of two antiparallel β-sheets with 7 main strands, packing against each other, forming a β-sandwich. Compared to its homolog, Ndt80, MyRF has a smaller and less complex DBD lacking the helices and the big loops outside the core. Structural alignment reveals that MyRF DBD possess less interaction sites with DNA than Ndt80 and may bind only at the major groove of DNA. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, agreeing with the previous report that MyRF DBD functions as a trimer. The mutant that we designed based on the structure disturbed trimer formation, but didn't affect the auto-cleavage reaction. It demonstrates that the activation of self-cleavage reaction of MyRF is independent of the presence of its N-terminal DBD homotrimer. The structure reported here will help to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the important roles of MyRF in myelin formation and development.

  11. Oxidatively generated base modifications in DNA: Not only carcinogenic risk factor but also regulatory mark?

    PubMed

    Seifermann, Marco; Epe, Bernd

    2017-06-01

    The generation of DNA modifications in cells is in most cases accidental and associated with detrimental consequences such as increased mutation rates and an elevated risk of malignant transformation. Accordingly, repair enzymes involved in the removal of the modifications have primarily a protective function. Among the well-established exceptions of this rule are 5-methylcytosine and uracil, which are generated in DNA enzymatically under controlled conditions and fulfill important regulatory functions in DNA as epigenetic marks and in antibody diversification, respectively. More recently, considerable evidence has been obtained that also 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), a frequent pro-mutagenic DNA modification generated by endogenous or exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), has distinct roles in the regulation of both transcription and signal transduction. Thus, the activation of transcription by the estrogen receptor, NF-κB, MYC and other transcription factors was shown to depend on the presence of 8-oxoG in the promoter regions and its recognition by the DNA repair glycosylase OGG1. The lysine-specific histone demethylase LSD1, which produces H2O2 as a by-product, was indentified as a local generator of 8-oxoG in some of these cases. In addition, a complex of OGG1 with the excised free substrate base was demonstrated to act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for small GTPases such as Ras, Rac and Rho, thus stimulating signal transduction. The various findings and intriguing novel mechanisms suggested will be described and compared in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  13. Regulatory Mechanisms Involved in the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    of Philosophy, 1996 Dissertation Advisor: Gregory P. Mueller, PhD. Associate Professor Department of Physiology Brain-derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF ...postsynaptic effects of BDNF and GDNF, very few have addressed the regulatory mechanisms involved in the expression of these factors. In phase 1 of the project...five alternate first exons contained in the rat BDNF gene, including a novel one termed exon la, were isolated and found to be individually spliced to

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral IFN regulatory factor 3 stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young C; Joo, Chul-Hyun; Gack, Michaela U; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jung, Jae U

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the master regulator of both developmental and pathologic angiogenesis, composed of an oxygen-sensitive alpha-subunit and a constitutively expressed beta-subunit. HIF-1 activity in tumors depends on the availability of the HIF-1 alpha subunit, the levels of which are increased under hypoxic conditions. Recent studies have shown that HIF-1 plays an important role in KSHV reactivation from latency and pathogenesis. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which KSHV activates HIF-1 activity. Specific interaction between KSHV viral IFN regulatory factor 3 (vIRF3) and the HIF-1 alpha subunit led to the HIF-1 alpha stabilization and transcriptional activation, which induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression and ultimately facilitated endothelial tube formation. Remarkably, the central domain of vIRF3, containing double alpha-helix motifs, was sufficient not only for binding to HIF-1 alpha but also for blocking its degradation in normoxic conditions. This indicates that KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to enhance HIF-1 alpha protein stability and transcriptional activity by incorporating a viral homologue of cellular IRF gene into its genome, which may contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  15. Zinc-controlled gene expression by metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) in a model vertebrate, the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hogstrand, Christer; Zheng, Dongling; Feeney, Graham; Cunningham, Phil; Kille, Peter

    2008-12-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the diverse roles of zinc as a signalling substance in biological systems. Zinc signalling is brought about by changes in intracellular concentrations of labile Zn(2+), resulting in both genomic and non-genomic effects. The genomic responses are largely mediated by MTF1 (metal-regulatory transcription factor 1), which binds to MREs (metal-response elements) in the 5' regulatory region of genes in response to zinc. Treatment of cultured zebrafish ZF4 cells with siRNA (small interfering RNA) to MTF1 changed the transcriptional response to zinc for over 1000 genes, as assessed using an oligonucleotide microarray. From this primary list of MTF1-dependent genes, we identified a relatively small cohort that showed a configuration of MREs in their 5' regulatory regions similar to known MTF1 targets. This group showed a remarkable dominance of nucleic acid-binding proteins and other proteins involved in embryological development, implicating MTF1 as a master regulator of gene expression during development.

  16. PcFKH1, a novel regulatory factor from the forkhead family, controls the biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Estrada, Carlos; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens) is a good example of a biological process subjected to complex global regulatory networks and serves as a model to study fungal secondary metabolism. The winged-helix family of transcription factors recently described, which includes the forkhead type of proteins, is a key type of regulatory proteins involved in this process. In yeasts and humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in different processes (cell cycle regulation, cell death control, pre-mRNA processing and morphogenesis); one member of this family of proteins has been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome (Pc18g00430). In this work, we have characterized this novel transcription factor (named PcFKH1) by generating knock-down mutants and overexpression strains. Results clearly indicate that PcFKH1 positively controls antibiotic biosynthesis through the specific interaction with the promoter region of the penDE gene, thus regulating penDE mRNA levels. PcFKH1 also binds to the pcbC promoter, but with low affinity. In addition, it also controls other ancillary genes of the penicillin biosynthetic process, such as phlA (encoding phenylacetyl CoA ligase) and ppt (encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase). PcFKH1 also plays a role in conidiation and spore pigmentation, but it does not seem to be involved in hyphal morphology or cell division in the improved laboratory reference strain Wisconsin 54-1255. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively coregulated by PcFKH1 and PcRFX1 (another winged-helix transcription factor) in P. chrysogenum provided evidence of the global effect of these transcription factors in P. chrysogenum metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  17. GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein is expressed in serotonin neurons and regulates tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kapatos, G; Hirayama, K; Shimoji, M; Milstien, S

    1999-02-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin, the coenzyme required for hydroxylation of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, regulates its own synthesis through feedback inhibition of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH) mediated by a regulatory subunit, the GTP cyclohydrolase feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). In the liver, L-phenylalanine specifically stimulates tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis by displacing tetrahydrobiopterin from the GTPCH-GFRP complex. To explore the role of this regulatory system in rat brain, we examined the localization of GFRP mRNA using double-label in situ hybridization. GFRP mRNA expression was abundant in serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus but was undetectable in dopamine neurons of the midbrain or norepinephrine neurons of the locus coeruleus. Simultaneous nuclease protection assays for GFRP and GTPCH mRNAs showed that GFRP mRNA is most abundant within the brainstem and that the ratio of GFRP to GTPCH mRNA is much higher than in the ventral midbrain. Two species of GFRP mRNA differing by approximately 20 nucleotides in length were detected in brainstem but not in other tissues, with the longer, more abundant form being common to other brain regions. It is interesting that the pineal and adrenal glands did not contain detectable levels of GFRP mRNA, although GTPCH mRNA was abundant in both. Primary neuronal cultures were used to examine the role of GFRP-mediated regulation of GTPCH on tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis within brainstem serotonin neurons and midbrain dopamine neurons. L-Phenylalanine increased tetrahydrobiopterin levels in serotonin neurons to a maximum of twofold in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas D-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan were without effect. In contrast, tetrahydrobiopterin levels within cultured dopamine neurons were not altered by L-phenylalanine. The time course of this effect was very rapid, with a maximal response observed within 60 min. Inhibitors of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis prevented the L

  18. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  19. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    PubMed

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor.

  20. Signal-dependent regulation of the sea urchin skeletogenic gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongling; Ettensohn, Charles A

    2014-11-01

    The endoskeleton of the sea urchin embryo is produced by primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs). Maternal inputs activate a complex gene regulatory network (GRN) in the PMC lineage in a cell-autonomous fashion during early development, initially creating a uniform population of prospective skeleton-forming cells. Previous studies showed that at post-blastula stages of development, several effector genes in the network exhibit non-uniform patterns of expression, suggesting that their regulation becomes subject to local, extrinsic cues. Other studies have identified the VEGF and MAPK pathways as regulators of PMC migration, gene expression, and biomineralization. In this study, we used whole mount in situ hybridization (WMISH) to examine the spatial expression patterns of 39 PMC-specific/enriched mRNAs in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos at the late gastrula, early prism and pluteus stages. We found that all 39 mRNAs (including several regulatory genes) showed non-uniform patterns of expression within the PMC syncytium, revealing a global shift in the regulation of the skeletogenic GRN from a cell-autonomous to a signal-dependent mode. In general, localized regions of elevated gene expression corresponded to sites of rapid biomineral deposition. We used a VEGFR inhibitor (axitinib) and a MEK inhibitor (U0126) to show that VEGF signaling and the MAPK pathway are essential for maintaining high levels of gene expression in PMCs at the tips of rods that extend from the ventral region of the embryo. These inhibitors affected gene expression in the PMCs in similar ways, suggesting that VEGF acts via the MAPK pathway. In contrast, axitinib and U0126 did not affect the localized expression of genes in PMCs at the tips of the body rods, which form on the dorsal side of the embryo. Our results therefore indicate that multiple signaling pathways regulate the skeletogenic GRN during late stages of embryogenesis-VEGF/MAPK signaling on the ventral side and a separate, unidentified

  1. Establishing a framework for the Ad/abaxial regulatory network of Arabidopsis: ascertaining targets of class III homeodomain leucine zipper and KANADI regulation.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Brenda J; Liu, Tie; Newell, Nicole R; Magnani, Enrico; Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall; Michaels, Scott; Barton, M Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    The broadly conserved Class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) and KANADI transcription factors have opposing and transformational effects on polarity and growth in all tissues and stages of the plant's life. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of how these factors work, we have identified transcripts that change in response to induced HD-ZIPIII or KANADI function. Additional criteria used to identify high-confidence targets among this set were presence of an adjacent HD-ZIPIII binding site, expression enriched within a subdomain of the shoot apical meristem, mutant phenotype showing defect in polar leaf and/or meristem development, physical interaction between target gene product and HD-ZIPIII protein, opposite regulation by HD-ZIPIII and KANADI, and evolutionary conservation of the regulator-target relationship. We find that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI regulate tissue-specific transcription factors involved in subsidiary developmental decisions, nearly all major hormone pathways, and new actors (such as indeterminate domain4) in the ad/abaxial regulatory network. Multiple feedback loops regulating HD-ZIPIII and KANADI are identified, as are mechanisms through which HD-ZIPIII and KANADI oppose each other. This work lays the foundation needed to understand the components, structure, and workings of the ad/abaxial regulatory network directing basic plant growth and development.

  2. Extensive cross-regulation of post-transcriptional regulatory networks in Drosophila

    DOE PAGES

    Stoiber, Marcus H.; Olson, Sara; May, Gemma E.; ...

    2015-08-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs exist as ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). Despite the importance of these complexes in many biological processes, including splicing, polyadenylation, stability, transportation, localization, and translation, their compositions are largely unknown. We affinity-purified 20 distinct RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells under native conditions and identified both the RNA and protein compositions of these RNP complexes. We identified “high occupancy target” (HOT) RNAs that interact with the majority of the RBPs we surveyed. HOT RNAs encode components of the nonsense-mediated decay and splicing machinery, as well as RNA-binding and translation initiation proteins. The RNP complexes contain proteinsmore » and mRNAs involved in RNA binding and post-transcriptional regulation. Genes with the capacity to produce hundreds of mRNA isoforms, ultracomplex genes, interact extensively with heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear proteins (hnRNPs). Our data are consistent with a model in which subsets of RNPs include mRNA and protein products from the same gene, indicating the widespread existence of auto-regulatory RNPs. Lastly, from the simultaneous acquisition and integrative analysis of protein and RNA constituents of RNPs, we identify extensive cross-regulatory and hierarchical interactions in post-transcriptional control.« less

  3. Extensive cross-regulation of post-transcriptional regulatory networks in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiber, Marcus H.; Olson, Sara; May, Gemma E.; Duff, Michael O.; Manent, Jan; Obar, Robert; Guruharsha, K. G.; Bickel, Peter J.; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros; Brown, James B.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2015-08-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs exist as ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs). Despite the importance of these complexes in many biological processes, including splicing, polyadenylation, stability, transportation, localization, and translation, their compositions are largely unknown. We affinity-purified 20 distinct RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) from cultured Drosophila melanogaster cells under native conditions and identified both the RNA and protein compositions of these RNP complexes. We identified “high occupancy target” (HOT) RNAs that interact with the majority of the RBPs we surveyed. HOT RNAs encode components of the nonsense-mediated decay and splicing machinery, as well as RNA-binding and translation initiation proteins. The RNP complexes contain proteins and mRNAs involved in RNA binding and post-transcriptional regulation. Genes with the capacity to produce hundreds of mRNA isoforms, ultracomplex genes, interact extensively with heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear proteins (hnRNPs). Our data are consistent with a model in which subsets of RNPs include mRNA and protein products from the same gene, indicating the widespread existence of auto-regulatory RNPs. Lastly, from the simultaneous acquisition and integrative analysis of protein and RNA constituents of RNPs, we identify extensive cross-regulatory and hierarchical interactions in post-transcriptional control.

  4. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-11-30

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator.

  5. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator. PMID:26633362

  6. Thyroid transcription factor FOXE1 interacts with ETS factor ELK1 to co-regulate TERT

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Martyn; Lim, Grace; Li, Cheng; Choi, In Ho; Kochhar, Shivansh; Liddle, Chris; Zhang, Lei; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although FOXE1 was initially recognized for its role in thyroid organogenesis, more recently a strong association has been identified between the FOXE1 locus and thyroid cancer. The role of FOXE1 in adult thyroid, and in particular regarding cancer risk, has not been well established. We hypothesised that discovering key FOXE1 transcriptional partners would in turn identify regulatory pathways relevant to its role in oncogenesis. Results In a transcription factor-binding array, ELK1 was identified to bind FOXE1. We confirmed this physical association in heterologously transfected cells by IP and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In thyroid tissue, endogenous FOXE1 was shown to bind ELK1, and using ChIP assays these factors bound thyroid-relevant gene promoters TPO and TERT in close proximity to each other. Using a combination of electromobility shift assays, TERT promoter assays and siRNA-silencing, we found that FOXE1 positively regulated TERT expression in a manner dependent upon its association with ELK1. Treating heterologously transfected thyroid cells with MEK inhibitor U0126 inhibited FOXE1-ELK1 interaction, and reduced TERT and TPO promoter activity. Methodology We investigated FOXE1 interactions within in vitro thyroid cell models and human thyroid tissue using a combination of immunoprecipitation (IP), chromatin IP (ChIP) and gene reporter assays. Conclusions FOXE1 interacts with ELK1 on thyroid relevant gene promoters, establishing a new regulatory pathway for its role in adult thyroid function. Co-regulation of TERT suggests a mechanism by which allelic variants in/near FOXE1 are associated with thyroid cancer risk. PMID:27852061

  7. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  8. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  9. Mitochondrial fusion and ERK activity regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein localization in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR.

  10. Iron-independent phosphorylation of iron regulatory protein 2 regulates ferritin during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallander, Michelle L; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Rodansky, Eva S; Romney, S Joshua; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2008-08-29

    Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) is a key iron sensor that post-transcriptionally regulates mammalian iron homeostasis by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in mRNAs that encode proteins involved in iron metabolism (e.g. ferritin and transferrin receptor 1). During iron deficiency, IRP2 binds IREs to regulate mRNA translation or stability, whereas during iron sufficiency IRP2 is degraded by the proteasome. Here, we identify an iron-independent IRP2 phosphorylation site that is regulated by the cell cycle. IRP2 Ser-157 is phosphorylated by Cdk1/cyclin B1 during G(2)/M and is dephosphorylated during mitotic exit by the phosphatase Cdc14A. Ser-157 phosphorylation during G(2)/M reduces IRP2 RNA-binding activity and increases ferritin synthesis, whereas Ser-157 dephosphorylation during mitotic exit restores IRP2 RNA-binding activity and represses ferritin synthesis. These data show that reversible phosphorylation of IRP2 during G(2)/M has a role in modulating the iron-independent expression of ferritin and other IRE-containing mRNAs during the cell cycle.

  11. The kinase DYRK1A reciprocally regulates the differentiation of Th17 and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Bernard; Gagnon, John D; Goel, Gautam; Roche, Marly I; Conway, Kara L; Tran, Khoa; Aldrich, Leslie N; Sundberg, Thomas B; Paterson, Alison M; Mordecai, Scott; Dombkowski, David; Schirmer, Melanie; Tan, Pauline H; Bhan, Atul K; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; O'Shea, John J; Medoff, Benjamin D; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L; Sharpe, Arlene H; Shaw, Stanley Y; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2015-01-01

    The balance between Th17 and T regulatory (Treg) cells critically modulates immune homeostasis, with an inadequate Treg response contributing to inflammatory disease. Using an unbiased chemical biology approach, we identified a novel role for the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase DYRK1A in regulating this balance. Inhibition of DYRK1A enhances Treg differentiation and impairs Th17 differentiation without affecting known pathways of Treg/Th17 differentiation. Thus, DYRK1A represents a novel mechanistic node at the branch point between commitment to either Treg or Th17 lineages. Importantly, both Treg cells generated using the DYRK1A inhibitor harmine and direct administration of harmine itself potently attenuate inflammation in multiple experimental models of systemic autoimmunity and mucosal inflammation. Our results identify DYRK1A as a physiologically relevant regulator of Treg cell differentiation and suggest a broader role for other DYRK family members in immune homeostasis. These results are discussed in the context of human diseases associated with dysregulated DYRK activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05920.001 PMID:25998054

  12. T-bet Regulates Natural Regulatory T Cell Afferent Lymphatic Migration and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Iwami, Daiki; Brinkman, C Colin; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2016-03-15

    T-bet is essential for natural regulatory T cells (nTreg) to regulate Th1 inflammation, but whether T-bet controls other Treg functions after entering the inflammatory site is unknown. In an islet allograft model, T-bet(-/-) nTreg, but not induced Treg, failed to prolong graft survival as effectively as wild-type Treg. T-bet(-/-) nTreg had no functional deficiency in vitro but failed to home from the graft to draining lymph nodes (dLN) as efficiently as wild type. T-bet regulated expression of adhesion- and migration-related molecules, influencing nTreg distribution in tissues, so that T-bet(-/-) nTreg remained in the grafts rather than migrating to lymphatics and dLN. In contrast, both wild-type and T-bet(-/-) CD4(+) conventional T cells and induced Treg migrated normally toward afferent lymphatics. T-bet(-/-) nTreg displayed instability in the graft, failing to suppress Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells and prevent their infiltration into the graft and dLN. Thus, T-bet regulates nTreg migration into afferent lymphatics and dLN and consequently their suppressive stability in vivo. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. AMPK Regulates Mitotic Spindle Orientation through Phosphorylation of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Thaiparambil, Jose T.; Eggers, Carrie M.

    2012-01-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine172 phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine19 phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLCser19) and spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLCser19 spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLCser19 to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments. PMID:22688514

  14. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica) miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important gene regulators in plants. MiRNAs and their targets have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis and rice. However, relatively little is known about the characterization of miRNAs and their target genes in peach (Prunus persica), which is a complex crop with unique developmental programs. Results We performed small RNA deep sequencing and identified 47 peach-specific and 47 known miRNAs or families with distinct expression patterns. Together, the identified miRNAs targeted 80 genes, many of which have not been reported previously. Like the model plant systems, peach has two of the three conserved trans-acting siRNA biogenesis pathways with similar mechanistic features and target specificity. Unique to peach, three of the miRNAs collectively target 49 MYBs, 19 of which are known to regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism, a key pathway associated with stone hardening and fruit color development, highlighting a critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening. We also found that the majority of the miRNAs were differentially regulated in different tissues, in part due to differential processing of miRNA precursors. Up to 16% of the peach-specific miRNAs were differentially processed from their precursors in a tissue specific fashion, which has been rarely observed in plant cells. The miRNA precursor processing activity appeared not to be coupled with its transcriptional activity but rather acted independently in peach. Conclusions Collectively, the data characterizes the unique expression pattern and processing regulation of peach miRNAs and demonstrates the presence of a complex, multi-level miRNA regulatory network capable of targeting a wide variety of biological functions, including phenylpropanoid pathways which play a multifaceted spatial-temporal role in peach fruit development. PMID:22909020

  15. Unique expression, processing regulation, and regulatory network of peach (Prunus persica) miRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Xia, Rui; Zhao, Bingyu; An, Yong-qiang; Dardick, Chris D; Callahan, Ann M; Liu, Zongrang

    2012-08-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important gene regulators in plants. MiRNAs and their targets have been extensively studied in Arabidopsis and rice. However, relatively little is known about the characterization of miRNAs and their target genes in peach (Prunus persica), which is a complex crop with unique developmental programs. We performed small RNA deep sequencing and identified 47 peach-specific and 47 known miRNAs or families with distinct expression patterns. Together, the identified miRNAs targeted 80 genes, many of which have not been reported previously. Like the model plant systems, peach has two of the three conserved trans-acting siRNA biogenesis pathways with similar mechanistic features and target specificity. Unique to peach, three of the miRNAs collectively target 49 MYBs, 19 of which are known to regulate phenylpropanoid metabolism, a key pathway associated with stone hardening and fruit color development, highlighting a critical role of miRNAs in the regulation of peach fruit development and ripening. We also found that the majority of the miRNAs were differentially regulated in different tissues, in part due to differential processing of miRNA precursors. Up to 16% of the peach-specific miRNAs were differentially processed from their precursors in a tissue specific fashion, which has been rarely observed in plant cells. The miRNA precursor processing activity appeared not to be coupled with its transcriptional activity but rather acted independently in peach. Collectively, the data characterizes the unique expression pattern and processing regulation of peach miRNAs and demonstrates the presence of a complex, multi-level miRNA regulatory network capable of targeting a wide variety of biological functions, including phenylpropanoid pathways which play a multifaceted spatial-temporal role in peach fruit development.

  16. Follicular regulatory T cells control humoral autoimmunity via NFAT2-regulated CXCR5 expression.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Müller, Gerd; Stauss, Dennis; Dietz, Lena; Klein-Hessling, Stefan; Serfling, Edgar; Lipp, Martin; Berberich, Ingolf; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2014-03-10

    Maturation of high-affinity B lymphocytes is precisely controlled during the germinal center reaction. This is dependent on CD4(+)CXCR5(+) follicular helper T cells (TFH) and inhibited by CD4(+)CXCR5(+)Foxp3(+) follicular regulatory T cells (TFR). Because NFAT2 was found to be highly expressed and activated in follicular T cells, we addressed its function herein. Unexpectedly, ablation of NFAT2 in T cells caused an augmented GC reaction upon immunization. Consistently, however, TFR cells were clearly reduced in the follicular T cell population due to impaired homing to B cell follicles. This was TFR-intrinsic because only in these cells NFAT2 was essential to up-regulate CXCR5. The physiological relevance for humoral (auto-)immunity was corroborated by exacerbated lupuslike disease in the presence of NFAT2-deficient TFR cells.

  17. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fabiana M; Fuda, Nicholas J; Mahat, Dig B; Core, Leighton J; Guertin, Michael J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes.

  18. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sucrose-induced anthocyanin accumulation in vegetative tissue of Petunia plants requires anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ai, Trinh Ngoc; Naing, Aung Htay; Arun, Muthukrishnan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Chang Kil

    2016-11-01

    The effects of three different sucrose concentrations on plant growth and anthocyanin accumulation were examined in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic (T2) specimens of the Petunia hybrida cultivar 'Mirage rose' that carried the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1. Anthocyanin accumulation was not observed in NT plants in any treatments, whereas a range of anthocyanin accumulation was observed in transgenic plants. The anthocyanin content detected in transgenic plants expressing the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors (B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1) was higher than that in NT plants. In addition, increasing sucrose concentration strongly enhanced anthocyanin content as shown by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, wherein increased concentrations of sucrose enhanced transcript levels of the transcription factors that are responsible for the induction of biosynthetic genes involved in anthocyanin synthesis; this pattern was not observed in NT plants. In addition, sucrose affected plant growth, although the effects were different between NT and transgenic plants. Taken together, the application of sucrose could enhance anthocyanin production in vegetative tissue of transgenic Petunia carrying anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors, and this study provides insights about interactive effects of sucrose and transcription factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis in the transgenic plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of antimicrobial resistance by extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors.

    PubMed

    Woods, Emily C; McBride, Shonna M

    2017-01-30

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors are a subfamily of σ(70) sigma factors that activate genes involved in stress-response functions. In many bacteria, ECF sigma factors regulate resistance to antimicrobial compounds. This review will summarize the ECF sigma factors that regulate antimicrobial resistance in model organisms and clinically relevant pathogens.

  1. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced regulatory T cells referee inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Sharon M; Chen, Wanjun

    2005-01-01

    Naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells mediate immune suppression to limit immunopathogenesis associated with chronic inflammation, persistent infections and autoimmune diseases. Their mode of suppression is contact-dependent, antigen-nonspecific and involves a nonredundant contribution from the cytokine transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. Not only can TGF-beta mediate cell-cell suppression between the regulatory T cells and CD4+CD25- or CD8+ T cells, but new evidence also reveals its role in the conversion of CD4+CD25- T cells, together with TCR antigen stimulation, into the regulatory phenotype. Elemental to this conversion process is induction of expression of the forkhead transcription factor, Foxp3. This context-dependent coercion of naive CD4+ T cells into a powerful subset of regulatory cells provides a window into potential manipulation of these cells to orchestrate therapeutic intervention in diseases characterized by inadequate suppression, as well as a promising means of controlling pathologic situations in which excessive suppression dominates.

  2. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03346.001 PMID:25163748

  3. Sustained activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 during infection by paramyxoviruses requires MDA5.

    PubMed

    Grandvaux, Nathalie; Guan, Xiaochun; Yoboua, Fabrice; Zucchini, Nicolas; Fink, Karin; Doyon, Priscilla; Martin, Lydie; Servant, Marc J; Chartier, Stéfany

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) are the main cytosolic sensors of single-stranded RNA viruses, including paramyxoviruses, and are required to initiate a quick and robust innate antiviral response. Despite different ligand-binding properties, the consensus view is that RIG-I and MDA5 trigger common signal(s) to activate interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and NF-κB, and downstream antiviral and proinflammatory cytokine expression. Here, we performed a thorough analysis of the temporal involvement of RIG-I and MDA5 in the regulation of IRF-3 during respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Based on specific RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RIG-I and MDA5 in A549 cells, we confirmed that RIG-I is critical for the initiation of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization and downstream gene expression. On the other hand, our experiments yielded the first evidence that knockdown of MDA5 leads to early ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of active IRF-3. Conversely, ectopic expression of MDA5 prolonged RIG-I-induced IRF-3 activation. Altogether, we provide novel mechanistic insight into the temporal involvement of RIG-I and MDA5 in the innate antiviral response. While RIG-I is essential for initial IRF-3 activation, engagement of induced MDA5 is essential to prevent early degradation of IRF-3, thereby sustaining IRF-3-dependent antiviral gene expression. MDA5 plays a similar role during Sendai virus infection suggesting that this model is not restricted to RSV amongst paramyxoviruses.

  4. A murrel interferon regulatory factor-1: molecular characterization, gene expression and cell protection activity.

    PubMed

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Palanisamy, Rajesh; Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Bhatt, Prasanth; Gnanam, Annie J; Pasupuleti, Mukesh; Arasu, Abirami

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have reported a first murrel interferon regulatory factor-1 (designated as Murrel IRF-1) which is identified from a constructed cDNA library of striped murrel Channa striatus. The identified sequence was obtained by internal sequencing method from the library. The Murrel IRF-1 varies in size of the polypeptide from the earlier reported fish IRF-1. It contains a DNA binding domain along with a tryptophan pentad repeats, a nuclear localization signal and a transactivation domain. The homologous analysis showed that the Murrel IRF-1 had a significant sequence similarity with other known fish IRF-1 groups. The phylogenetic analysis exhibited that the Murrel IRF-1 clustered together with IRF-1 members, but the other members including IRF-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 were clustered individually. The secondary structure of Murrel IRF-1 contains 27% α-helices (85 aa residues), 5.7% β-sheets (19 aa residues) and 67.19% random coils (210 aa residues). Furthermore, we predicted a tertiary structure of Murrel IRF-1 using I-Tasser program and analyzed the structure on PyMol surface view. The RNA structure of the Murrel IRF-1 along with its minimum free energy (-284.43 kcal/mol) was also predicted. The highest gene expression was observed in spleen and its expression was inducted with pathogenic microbes which cause epizootic ulcerative syndrome in murrels such as fungus, Aphanomyces invadans and bacteria, Aeromonas hydrophila, and poly I:C, a viral RNA analog. The results of cell protection assay suggested that the Murrel IRF-1 regulates the early defense response in C. striatus. Moreover, it showed Murrel IRF-1 as a potential candidate which can be developed as a therapeutic agent to control microbial infections in striped murrel. Overall, these results indicate the immune importance of IRF-1, however, the interferon signaling mechanism in murrels upon infection is yet to be studied at proteomic level.

  5. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon regulatory factor 7 in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Mao, Mingguang; Huo, Yuan; Han, Yuzhe; Zhang, Saisai

    2016-02-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) plays an important role in regulating the response of type I interferon (IFN) to viral infection. To understand the mechanisms underlying immune reactions in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, the gene encoding G. macrocephalus IRF7 was cloned and characterized. The cDNA of G. macrocephalus IRF7 was also cloned and sequenced. A cDNA sequence of 2032 bp was assembled using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. It contains an open reading frame of 1323 bp in length, which encoded a 440-amino acid polypeptide that comprised a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF association domain (IAD), and a serine-rich domain (SRD). In the DBD, the tryptophan cluster consisted of only four tryptophans, which is a unique characteristic in fish IRF7. The mRNA of IRF7 was detected in various tissues, including in the spleen, thymus, kidney, intestine, and gills, using relative quantification PCR (R-qPCR). Dynamic expression of IRF7 was observed in larvae throughout post-hatching (ph) development, with the highest level detected at day of ph (dph) 25. Response to immune stimulation was examined by challenging larvae with polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) to mimic viral infection and elicit an immune reaction. R-qPCR revealed that the expression of IRF7 significantly increased in pIC-treated groups relative to that in the control groups, in a time-dependent manner, with peak responses at 48 and 72 h after pIC-treatment. These results show that IRF7 is expressed in various tissues of adult fish and larvae and is sensitive to viral infection, suggesting that it plays a role in antiviral immune defense in G. macrocephalus.

  6. Glucitol induction in Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a regulatory factor, GutR.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, R; Rehemtulla, S N; Wong, S L

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the glucitol dehydrogenase gene (gutB) is suggested to be regulated both positively and negatively in Bacillus subtilis. A mutation in the gutR locus results in the constitutive expression of gutB. The exact nature of this mutation and the function of gutR are still unknown. Cloning and characterization of gutR indicated that this gene is located immediately upstream of gutB and is transcribed in the opposite direction relative to gutB. GutR is suggested to be a 95-kDa protein with a putative helix-turn-helix motif and a nucleotide binding domain at the N-terminal region. At the C-terminal region, a short sequence of GutR shows homology with two proteins, Cyc8 (glucose repression mediator protein) and GsiA (glucose starvation-inducible protein), known to be directly or indirectly involved in catabolite repression. Part of the C-terminal conserved sequence from these proteins shows all the features observed in the tetratricopeptide motif found in many eucaryotic proteins. To study the functional role of gutR, chromosomal gutR was insertionally inactivated. A total loss of glucitol inducibility was observed. Reintroduction of a functional gutR to the GutR-deficient strain through integration at the amyE locus restores the inducibility. Therefore, GutR serves as a regulatory factor to modulate glucitol induction. The nature of the gutR1 mutation was also determined. A single amino acid change (serine-289 to arginine-289) near the putative nucleotide binding motif B in GutR is responsible for the observed phenotype. Possible models for the action of GutR are discussed. Images PMID:8195087

  7. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  8. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  10. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 is Expressed inOsteoblasts and Regulated by PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sonali; Mahalingam, Chandrika D.; Das, Varsha; Levi, Edi; Rishi, Arun K.; Datta, Nabanita S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •CARP-1 is identified for the first time in bone cells. •PTH downregulates CARP-1 expression in differentiated osteoblasts. •PTH displaces CARP-1 from nucleus to the cytoplasm in differentiated osteoblasts. •Downregulation of CARP-1 by PTH involves PKA, PKC and P-p38 MAPK pathways. -- Abstract: Bone mass is dependent on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and life-span of osteoblasts. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) controls osteoblast cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppresses mature osteoblasts apoptosis. Intermittent administration of PTH increases bone mass but the mechanism of action are complex and incompletely understood. Cell Cycle and Apoptosis Regulatory Protein (CARP)-1 (aka CCAR1) is a novel transducer of signaling by diverse agents including cell growth and differentiation factors. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanism, we investigated involvement of CARP-1 in PTH signaling in osteoblasts. Immunostaining studies revealed presence of CARP-1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes, while a minimal to absent levels were noted in the chondrocytes of femora from 10 to 12-week old mice. Treatment of 7-day differentiated MC3T3-E1 clone-4 (MC-4) mouse osteoblastic cells and primary calvarial osteoblasts with PTH for 30 min to 5 h followed by Western blot analysis showed 2- to 3-fold down-regulation of CARP-1 protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner compared to the respective vehicle treated control cells. H-89, a Protein Kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, suppressed PTH action on CARP-1 protein expression indicating PKA-dependent mechanism. PMA, a Protein Kinase C (PKC) agonist, mimicked PTH action, and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, partially blocked PTH-dependent downregulation of CARP-1, implying involvement of PKC. U0126, a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Kinase (MEK) inhibitor, failed to interfere with CARP-1 suppression by PTH. In contrast, SB203580, p38 inhibitor, attenuated PTH down-regulation of CARP-1

  11. The MYB98 subcircuit of the synergid gene regulatory network includes genes directly and indirectly regulated by MYB98.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Lloyd, Alan; Drews, Gary N

    2008-08-01

    The female gametophyte contains two synergid cells that play a role in many steps of the angiosperm reproductive process, including pollen tube guidance. At their micropylar poles, the synergid cells have a thickened and elaborated cell wall: the filiform apparatus that is thought to play a role in the secretion of the pollen tube attractant(s). MYB98 regulates an important subcircuit of the synergid gene regulatory network (GRN) that functions to activate the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation. The MYB98 subcircuit comprises at least 83 downstream genes, including 48 genes within four gene families (CRP810, CRP3700, CRP3730 and CRP3740) that encode Cys-rich proteins. We show that the 11 CRP3700 genes, which include DD11 and DD18, are regulated by a common cis-element, GTAACNT, and that a multimer of this sequence confers MYB98-dependent synergid expression. The GTAACNT element contains the MYB98-binding site identified in vitro, suggesting that the 11 CRP3700 genes are direct targets of MYB98. We also show that five of the CRP810 genes, which include DD2, lack a functional GTAACNT element, suggesting that they are not directly regulated by MYB98. In addition, we show that the five CRP810 genes are regulated by the cis-element AACGT, and that a multimer of this sequence confers synergid expression. Together, these results suggest that the MYB98 branch of the synergid GRN is multi-tiered and, therefore, contains at least one additional downstream transcription factor.

  12. iTAK: A program for genome-wide prediction and classification of plant transcription factors, transcriptional regulators and protein kinases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate the expression of target genes by binding to specific elements in their regulatory regions. Transcriptional regulators (TRs) also regulate the expression of target genes; however, they operate indirectly via interaction with the basal transcript...

  13. Unveiling combinatorial regulation through the combination of ChIP information and in silico cis-regulatory module detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Guns, Tias; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Thorrez, Lieven; Nijssen, Siegfried; Marchal, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Computationally retrieving biologically relevant cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is not straightforward. Because of the large number of candidates and the imperfection of the screening methods, many spurious CRMs are detected that are as high scoring as the biologically true ones. Using ChIP-information allows not only to reduce the regions in which the binding sites of the assayed transcription factor (TF) should be located, but also allows restricting the valid CRMs to those that contain the assayed TF (here referred to as applying CRM detection in a query-based mode). In this study, we show that exploiting ChIP-information in a query-based way makes in silico CRM detection a much more feasible endeavor. To be able to handle the large datasets, the query-based setting and other specificities proper to CRM detection on ChIP-Seq based data, we developed a novel powerful CRM detection method ‘CPModule’. By applying it on a well-studied ChIP-Seq data set involved in self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells, we demonstrate how our tool can recover combinatorial regulation of five known TFs that are key in the self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells. Additionally, we make a number of new predictions on combinatorial regulation of these five key TFs with other TFs documented in TRANSFAC. PMID:22422841

  14. Glutamine-dependent α-ketoglutarate production regulates the balance between T helper 1 cell and regulatory T cell generation.

    PubMed

    Klysz, Dorota; Tai, Xuguang; Robert, Philippe A; Craveiro, Marco; Cretenet, Gaspard; Oburoglu, Leal; Mongellaz, Cédric; Floess, Stefan; Fritz, Vanessa; Matias, Maria I; Yong, Carmen; Surh, Natalie; Marie, Julien C; Huehn, Jochen; Zimmermann, Valérie; Kinet, Sandrina; Dardalhon, Valérie; Taylor, Naomi

    2015-09-29

    T cell activation requires that the cell meet increased energetic and biosynthetic demands. We showed that exogenous nutrient availability regulated the differentiation of naïve CD4(+) T cells into distinct subsets. Activation of naïve CD4(+) T cells under conditions of glutamine deprivation resulted in their differentiation into Foxp3(+) (forkhead box P3-positive) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which had suppressor function in vivo. Moreover, glutamine-deprived CD4(+) T cells that were activated in the presence of cytokines that normally induce the generation of T helper 1 (TH1) cells instead differentiated into Foxp3(+) Treg cells. We found that α-ketoglutarate (αKG), the glutamine-derived metabolite that enters into the mitochondrial citric acid cycle, acted as a metabolic regulator of CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Activation of glutamine-deprived naïve CD4(+) T cells in the presence of a cell-permeable αKG analog increased the expression of the gene encoding the TH1 cell-associated transcription factor Tbet and resulted in their differentiation into TH1 cells, concomitant with stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. Together, these data suggest that a decrease in the intracellular amount of αKG, caused by the limited availability of extracellular glutamine, shifts the balance between the generation of TH1 and Treg cells toward that of a Treg phenotype. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Methionine enkephalin (MENK) inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Control of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy by Transcriptional Corepressor IRF2BP2 (Interferon Regulatory Factor-2 Binding Protein 2).

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Li, Tianyu; Zhu, Xuehai; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Ji, Yan-Xiao; Fang, Chun; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Peng; Li, Hongliang; Wei, Xiang

    2017-09-01

    The transcription factor NFAT1 (nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1), with the aid of transcriptional coactivators, has been recognized for its necessity and sufficiency to drive pathological cardiac hypertrophy. However, how the transcriptional activity of NFAT1 in terms of cardiac hypertrophy is controlled at the transcriptional level has not been well defined. Herein, we showed that a cardiac-enriched protein IRF2BP2 (interferon regulatory factor-2 binding protein 2) was further upregulated in both human and mouse hypertrophied myocardium and negatively regulated cardiomyocyte hypertrophic response in vitro. By generating cardiomyocyte-specific Irf2bp2 knockout and Irf2bp2-transgenic mouse strains, our in vivo experiments showed that, whereas IRF2BP2 loss-of-function exacerbated both aortic banding- and angiotensin II infusion-induced cardiac hypertrophic response, IRF2BP2 overexpression exerted a strong protective effect against these maladaptive processes. Particularly, IRF2BP2 directly interacted with the C-terminal transactivation domain of NFAT1 by competing with myocyte enhancer factor-2C and disturbing their transcriptional synergism, thereby impeding NFAT1-transactivated hypertrophic transcriptome. As a result, the devastating effect of Irf2bp2 deficiency on cardiac hypertrophy was largely rescued by NFAT1 blockage. Our study, thus, defined IRF2BP2 as a novel negative regulator in controlling pathological cardiac hypertrophy at the transcriptional level. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Genomic analysis of host - Peste des petits ruminants vaccine viral transcriptome uncovers transcription factors modulating immune regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Siddappa; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Mishra, Bina; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-02-24

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is an acute transboundary viral disease of economic importance, affecting goats and sheep. Mass vaccination programs around the world resulted in the decline of PPR outbreaks. Sungri 96 is a live attenuated vaccine, widely used in Northern India against PPR. This vaccine virus, isolated from goat works efficiently both in sheep and goat. Global gene expression changes under PPR vaccine virus infection are not yet well defined. Therefore, in this study we investigated the host-vaccine virus interactions by infecting the peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from goat with PPRV (Sungri 96 vaccine virus), to quantify the global changes in the transcriptomic signature by RNA-sequencing. Viral genome of Sungri 96 vaccine virus was assembled from the PPRV infected transcriptome confirming the infection and demonstrating the feasibility of building a complete non-host genome from the blood transcriptome. Comparison of infected transcriptome with control transcriptome revealed 985 differentially expressed genes. Functional analysis showed enrichment of immune regulatory pathways under PPRV infection. Key genes involved in immune system regulation, spliceosomal and apoptotic pathways were identified to be dysregulated. Network analysis revealed that the protein - protein interaction network among differentially expressed genes is significantly disrupted in infected state. Several genes encoding TFs that govern immune regulatory pathways were identified to co-regulate the differentially expressed genes. These data provide insights into the host - PPRV vaccine virus interactome for the first time. Our findings suggested dysregulation of immune regulatory pathways and genes encoding Transcription Factors (TFs) that govern these pathways in response to viral infection.

  18. A PP2A regulatory subunit PPTR-1 regulates the C. elegans Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway by modulating AKT-1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Srivatsan; Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Narasimhan, Sri Devi; Tesz, Gregory; Czech, Michael P.; Tissenbaum, Heidi A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The C. elegans insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) cascade plays a central role in the regulation of lifespan, dauer diapause, metabolism and stress response. The major regulatory control of IIS is through phosphorylation of its components by serine/threonine-specific protein kinases. In a RNAi screen for serine/threonine protein phosphatases that counter-balance the effect of the kinases in the IIS pathway, we identified pptr-1, a B56 regulatory subunit of the PP2A holoenzyme. Modulation of pptr-1 affects phenotypes associated with the IIS pathway including lifespan, dauer, stress resistance and fat storage. We show that PPTR-1 functions by regulating worm AKT-1 phosphorylation at Thr 350. With striking conservation, mammalian B56β regulates Akt phosphorylation at Thr 308 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In C. elegans, this modulation ultimately leads to changes in subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of the forkhead transcription factor DAF-16. This study reveals a conserved role for the B56 regulatory subunit in modulating insulin signaling through AKT dephosphorylation and thereby has widespread implications in cancer and diabetes research. PMID:19249087

  19. Mathematical methods for inferring regulatory networks interactions: application to genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Aracena, J; Demongeot, J

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of reconstruction of the intergenic interaction graph from the raw data of genetic co-expression coming with new technologies of bio-arrays (DMA-arrays, protein-arrays, etc.). These new imaging devices in general only give information about the asymptotical part (fixed configurations of co-expression or limit cycles of such configurations) of the dynamical evolution of the regulatory networks (genetic and/or proteic) underlying the functioning of living systems. Extracting the casual structure and interaction coefficients of a gene interaction network from the observed configurations is a complex problem. But if all the fixed configurations are supposedly observed and if they are factorizable into two or more subsets of values, then the interaction graph possesses as many connected components as the number of factors and the solution is obtained in polynomial time. This new result allows us for example to partly solve the topology of the genetic regulatory network ruling the flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana .

  20. Differential regulation of TGA transcription factors by post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Dominique; Privat, Isabelle; Trifa, Youssef; Zhou, Jun-Ma; Klessig, Daniel F; Lam, Eric

    2002-12-01

    Transcription factors often belong to multigene families and their individual contribution in a particular regulatory network remains difficult to assess. We show here that specific members from a family of conserved Arabidopsis bZIP transcription factors, the TGA proteins, are regulated in their protein stability by developmental stage-specific proteolysis. Using GFP fusions of three different Arabidopsis TGA factors that represent members of distinct subclasses of the TGA factor family, we demonstrate that two of these TGA proteins are specifically targeted for proteolysis in mature leaf cells. Using a supershift gel mobility assay, we found evidence for similar regulation of the cognate proteins as compared to the GFP fusion proteins expressed under the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Using various inhibitors, we showed that the expression of at least one of these three TGA factors could be stabilized by inhibition of proteasome-mediated proteolysis. This study indicates that TGA transcription factors may be regulated by distinct pathways of targeted proteolysis that can serve to modulate the contribution of specific members of a multigene family in complex regulatory pathways.

  1. Use of in vitro translation extract depleted in specific initiation factors for the investigation of translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallie, Daniel R

    2007-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression often involves the control of translation mediated through one or more initiation factors that are required for the translation of eukaryotic mRNAs. Genetic and molecular biological approaches can be highly useful in the initial identification of translational regulation, but the use of in vitro translation lysates can be essential in elucidating the details of translational regulatory mechanisms. Wheat germ lysate has long been used for in vitro translation studies. The noncompetitive conditions that prevail in this lysate as it is normally produced, however, preclude the translational regulatory analysis of many mRNAs involving the preferential recruitment of initiation factors. The development of lysate depleted in specific translation initiation factors converts wheat germ lysate from a noncompetitive system to one that is competitive in a fast and simple procedure that enables it to be used in the analysis of many more translational regulatory mechanisms than is currently possible with unfractionated lysate.

  2. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-09-03

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins.

  3. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins. PMID:24058359

  4. Protein-protein interactions in the regulation of WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yingjun; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2013-03-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor, SPF1, from sweet potato. Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the functional diversity, almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TTGACC/T W-box sequences and, therefore, mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors. Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors. It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes. In this review, we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute, at different levels, to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  5. Acetylation of interferon regulatory factor-7 by p300/CREB-binding protein (CBP)-associated factor (PCAF) impairs its DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, Alexandre; Prakash, Arun; Smith, Eric; Masumi, Atsuko; Hovanessian, Ara G; Levy, David E; Marié, Isabelle

    2002-12-20

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon-inducible transcription factor required for induction of delayed early interferon alpha genes and the onset of a potent antiviral state. After induction of IRF7 by autocrine interferon, latent IRF7 is activated by virus-induced phosphorylation on serine residues within the C-terminal regulatory domain. Although it is likely that IRF7 is subjected to a cascade of events responsible for regulating its biological activity, to date no mechanism other than phosphorylation has been reported to modulate IRF7 activity. Here, we report that IRF7 is acetylated in vivo by the histone acetyltransferases p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) and GCN5. The single lysine residue target for acetylation, lysine 92, is located in the DNA-binding domain and is conserved throughout the entire IRF family. Mutation of lysine 92 resulted in complete abolition of DNA binding ability. However, a mutant that cannot be acetylated by PCAF due to a change in the surrounding amino acid context of lysine 92 showed increased DNA binding and activity compared with wild type IRF7. Conversely, we showed that acetylated IRF7 displayed impaired DNA binding capability and that over-expression of PCAF led to decreased IRF7 activity. Together, our results strongly suggest that acetylation of lysine 92 negatively modulates IRF7 DNA binding.

  6. Evolution of Osteocrin as an activity-regulated factor in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Ataman, Bulent; Boulting, Gabriella L; Harmin, David A; Yang, Marty G; Baker-Salisbury, Mollie; Yap, Ee-Lynn; Malik, Athar N; Mei, Kevin; Rubin, Alex A; Spiegel, Ivo; Durresi, Ershela; Sharma, Nikhil; Hu, Linda S; Pletikos, Mihovil; Griffith, Eric C; Partlow, Jennifer N; Stevens, Christine R; Adli, Mazhar; Chahrour, Maria; Sestan, Nenad; Walsh, Christopher A; Berezovskii, Vladimir K; Livingstone, Margaret S; Greenberg, Michael E

    2016-11-10

    Sensory stimuli drive the maturation and function of the mammalian nervous system in part through the activation of gene expression networks that regulate synapse development and plasticity. These networks have primarily been studied in mice, and it is not known whether there are species- or clade-specific activity-regulated genes that control features of brain development and function. Here we use transcriptional profiling of human fetal brain cultures to identify an activity-dependent secreted factor, Osteocrin (OSTN), that is induced by membrane depolarization of human but not mouse neurons. We find that OSTN has been repurposed in primates through the evolutionary acquisition of DNA regulatory elements that bind the activity-regulated transcription factor MEF2. In addition, we demonstrate that OSTN is expressed in primate neocortex and restricts activity-dependent dendritic growth in human neurons. These findings suggest that, in response to sensory input, OSTN regulates features of neuronal structure and function that are unique to primates.

  7. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor 2 enhances regulatory T-cell functions and suppresses food allergy in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Song, Jiang-Ping; Wu, Yingying; Yan, Hao; Zhan, Zhengke; Yang, Litao; He, Weiyi; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Qiu, Shuqi; Liu, Zhigang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2014-06-01

    The functions of regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in immunity, and the regulatory mechanisms of Treg cell activities are not fully understood yet. We sought to investigate the role of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 2 in the upregulation of Treg cell function. The expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor (IGF2R) on T cells was assessed by using flow cytometry. Treg cell functions were evaluated by assessing the suppressor effect on proliferation of other effector T (Teff) cells. The effect of IGF2 on regulating Treg cell functions were evaluated with a cell-culture model and a food allergy mouse model. Expression of IGF2R was observed in more than 90% of murine and human Treg cells but in less than 10% of effector CD4(+) T cells. Activation of IGF2R and T-cell receptor induced marked Treg cell proliferation and release of TGF-β from Treg cells, which enhanced Treg cell immune suppressor effects on other Teff cell activities and allergic inflammation in the intestine. Activation of IGF2R enhances Treg cell functions in suppressing other Teff cell activities and inhibiting allergic inflammation in the intestine. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A local regulatory network around three NAC transcription factors in stress responses and senescence in Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Richard; Hill, Claire; Penfold, Christopher A; Breeze, Emily; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan D; Zhang, Peijun; Jackson, Alison; Cooke, Emma; Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mead, Andrew; Beynon, Jim; Wild, David L; Denby, Katherine J; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky

    2013-01-01

    Summary A model is presented describing the gene regulatory network surrounding three similar NAC transcription factors that have roles in Arabidopsis leaf senescence and stress responses. ANAC019, ANAC055 and ANAC072 belong to the same clade of NAC domain genes and have overlapping expression patterns. A combination of promoter DNA/protein interactions identified using yeast 1-hybrid analysis and modelling using gene expression time course data has been applied to predict the regulatory network upstream of these genes. Similarities and divergence in regulation during a variety of stress responses are predicted by different combinations of upstream transcription factors binding and also by the modelling. Mutant analysis with potential upstream genes was used to test and confirm some of the predicted interactions. Gene expression analysis in mutants of ANAC019 and ANAC055 at different times during leaf senescence has revealed a distinctly different role for each of these genes. Yeast 1-hybrid analysis is shown to be a valuable tool that can distinguish clades of binding proteins and be used to test and quantify protein binding to predicted promoter motifs. PMID:23578292

  10. Fatty Acid–Regulated Transcription Factors in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Depner, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid regulation of hepatic gene transcription was first reported in the early 1990s. Several transcription factors have been identified as targets of fatty acid regulation. This regulation is achieved by direct fatty acid binding to the transcription factor or by indirect mechanisms where fatty acids regulate signaling pathways controlling the expression of transcription factors or the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, or proteolytic cleavage of the transcription factor. Although dietary fatty acids are well-established regulators of hepatic transcription factors, emerging evidence indicates that endogenously generated fatty acids are equally important in controlling transcription factors in the context of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our first goal in this review is to provide an up-to-date examination of the molecular and metabolic bases of fatty acid regulation of key transcription factors controlling hepatic metabolism. Our second goal is to link these mechanisms to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a growing health concern in the obese population. PMID:23528177

  11. Notch and TGFβ form a positive regulatory loop and regulate EMT in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiesi; Jain, Saket; Azad, Abul K; Xu, Xia; Yu, Hai Chuan; Xu, Zhihua; Godbout, Roseline; Fu, YangXin

    2016-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, the mechanisms that regulate EMT in EOC are not fully understood. Here, we report that activation of Notch1 induces EMT in EOC cells as evidenced by downregulation of E-cadherin and cytokeratins, upregulation of Slug and Snail, as well as morphological changes. Interestingly, activation of Notch1 increases TGFβ/Smad signaling by upregulating the expression of TGFβ and TGFβ type 1 receptor. Time course experiments demonstrate that inhibition of Notch by DAPT (a γ-secretase inhibitor) decreases TGFβ-induced phosphorylation of receptor Smads at late, but not at early, timepoints. These results suggest that Notch activation plays a role in sustaining TGFβ/Smad signaling in EOC cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch by DAPT decreases TGFβ induction of Slug and repression of E-cadherin and knockdown of Notch1 decreases TGFβ-induced repression of E-cadherin, indicating that Notch is required, at least in part, for TGFβ-induced EMT in EOC cells. On the other hand, TGFβ treatment increases the expression of Notch ligand Jagged1 and Notch target gene HES1 in EOC cells. Functionally, the combination of Notch1 activation and TGFβ treatment is more potent in promoting motility and migration of EOC cells than either stimulation alone. Taken together, our results indicate that Notch and TGFβ form a reciprocal positive regulatory loop and cooperatively regulate EMT and promote EOC cell motility and migration.

  12. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  13. Redox regulation and overreduction control in the photosynthesizing cell: complexity in redox regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Marie-Luise; Kandlbinder, Andrea; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2008-11-01

    Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus between efficient energy conversion at low light and avoidance of overreduction and damage development at excess light resembles dangerous navigating between Scylla and Charybdis. Photosynthesis is a high rate redox metabolic pathway that generates redox intermediates with extreme redox potentials and eventually reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Therefore it is not surprising that the states of defined redox reactions in the chloroplast provide the predominant information and thus directly or indirectly the decisive signals for the multilevel control of cell activities in the chloroplast, cytoplasm, mitochondrion and nucleus. This review elaborates on the diversity of photosynthesis-derived redox signals such as the plastoquinone and thiol redox state that regulate and coordinate light use efficiency, electron transport activity, metabolic reactions, gene transcription and translation not only in the chloroplast but through retrograde signaling also essentially in all other cell compartments. The synergistic and antagonistic interrelations between the redox-dependent signaling pathways and their interactions with other signals such as abscisic acid and tetrapyrol intermediates constitute a redundant and probably buffered regulatory network to optimize performance of photosynthesis on the cellular and whole leaf level.

  14. The Regulatory Easy Street: Self-Regulation Below the Self-Control Threshold Does not Consume Regulatory Resources.

    PubMed

    Vandellen, Michelle R; Hoyle, Rick H; Miller, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    We present and test a theory in which self-control is distinguished from broader acts of self-regulation when it is both effortful and conscious. In two studies, we examined whether acts of behavioral management that do not require effort are exempt from resource depletion. In Study 1, we found that a self-regulation task only reduced subsequent self-control for participants who had previously indicated that completing the task would require effort. In Study 2, we found that participants who completed a self-regulation task for two minutes did not evidence the subsequent impairment in self-control evident for participants who had completed the task for four or more minutes. Our results support the notion that self-regulation without effort falls below the self-control threshold and has different downstream consequences than self-control.

  15. The Regulatory Easy Street: Self-Regulation Below the Self-Control Threshold Does not Consume Regulatory Resources

    PubMed Central

    vanDellen, Michelle R.; Hoyle, Rick H.; Miller, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    We present and test a theory in which self-control is distinguished from broader acts of self-regulation when it is both effortful and conscious. In two studies, we examined whether acts of behavioral management that do not require effort are exempt from resource depletion. In Study 1, we found that a self-regulation task only reduced subsequent self-control for participants who had previously indicated that completing the task would require effort. In Study 2, we found that participants who completed a self-regulation task for two minutes did not evidence the subsequent impairment in self-control evident for participants who had completed the task for four or more minutes. Our results support the notion that self-regulation without effort falls below the self-control threshold and has different downstream consequences than self-control. PMID:22711963

  16. Establishing a Framework for the Ad/Abaxial Regulatory Network of Arabidopsis: Ascertaining Targets of Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER and KANADI Regulation[W

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Brenda J.; Liu, Tie; Newell, Nicole R.; Magnani, Enrico; Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall; Michaels, Scott; Barton, M. Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    The broadly conserved Class III HOMEODOMAIN LEUCINE ZIPPER (HD-ZIPIII) and KANADI transcription factors have opposing and transformational effects on polarity and growth in all tissues and stages of the plant's life. To obtain a comprehensive understanding of how these factors work, we have identified transcripts that change in response to induced HD-ZIPIII or KANADI function. Additional criteria used to identify high-confidence targets among this set were presence of an adjacent HD-ZIPIII binding site, expression enriched within a subdomain of the shoot apical meristem, mutant phenotype showing defect in polar leaf and/or meristem development, physical interaction between target gene product and HD-ZIPIII protein, opposite regulation by HD-ZIPIII and KANADI, and evolutionary conservation of the regulator–target relationship. We find that HD-ZIPIII and KANADI regulate tissue-specific transcription factors involved in subsidiary developmental decisions, nearly all major hormone pathways, and new actors (such as INDETERMINATE DOMAIN4) in the ad/abaxial regulatory network. Multiple feedback loops regulating HD-ZIPIII and KANADI are identified, as are mechanisms through which HD-ZIPIII and KANADI oppose each other. This work lays the foundation needed to understand the components, structure, and workings of the ad/abaxial regulatory network directing basic plant growth and development. PMID:24076978

  17. Huangqin-Tang Ameliorates TNBS-Induced Colitis by Regulating Effector and Regulatory CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Li, Wen-Yang; Wan, Zheng; Zhao, Bing; He, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhu-Guo; Huang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Li, Bin-Bin; Lu, Yang-Jia; Ding, Cong-Cong; Chi, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Huangqin-Tang decoction (HQT) is a classic traditional Chinese herbal formulation that is widely used to ameliorate the symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential and immunological regulatory activity of HQT in experimental colitis in rats. Using an animal model of colitis by intrarectally administering 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS), we found that administration of HQT significantly inhibited the severity of TNBS-induced colitis in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with HQT produced better results than that with mesalazine, as shown by improvedweight loss bleeding and diarrhoea scores, colon length, and intestinal inflammation. As for potential immunological regulation of HQT action, the percentages of Th1 and Th17 cells were reduced, but those Th2 and Treg cells were enhanced in LPMCs after HQT treatment. Additionally, HQT lowered the levels of Th1/Th17-associated cytokines but increased production of Th2/Treg-associated cytokines in the colon and MLNs. Furthermore, we observed a remarkable suppression of the Th1/Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and ROR-γt. However, expression levels of the Th2/Treg-associated transcription factors GATA-3 and Foxp3 were enhanced during treatment with HQT. Our results suggest that HQT has the therapeutic potential to ameliorate TNBS-induced colitis symptoms. This protective effect is possibly mediated by its effects on CD4(+) T cells subsets.

  18. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  19. Regulatory development of the interim and revised regulations for radioactivity in drinking water--past and present issues and problems.

    PubMed

    Lappenbusch, W L; Cothern, C R

    1985-05-01

    Developing the Revised Regulations for Radioactivity in Drinking Water under the Safe Drinking Water Act requires information from all related areas and disciplines. As one step in the regulatory process, the background and history of that process as it applies to radioactivity in drinking water is described. The issues involved in developing the revised regulations are as follows: monitoring and sources of exposure, dose evaluation, health effects, engineering, economics and general policy development.

  20. Regulatory Teaching and Self-Regulated Learning in College Students: Confirmatory Validation Study of the IATLP Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucia; Martinez-Vicente, J. M.; Cardelle-Elawar, Maria; Sander, Paul; Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. C.; Garcia-Belen, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to empirically confirm two conceptual interactions proposed by the IATLP Scales: (1) the combination of the teacher's regulatory teaching and the student's self-regulated learning, in order to produce satisfaction with learning; (2) the relationship of this interaction with students' prior…

  1. Regulatory Teaching and Self-Regulated Learning in College Students: Confirmatory Validation Study of the IATLP Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucia; Martinez-Vicente, J. M.; Cardelle-Elawar, Maria; Sander, Paul; Justicia, Fernando; Pichardo, M. C.; Garcia-Belen, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to empirically confirm two conceptual interactions proposed by the IATLP Scales: (1) the combination of the teacher's regulatory teaching and the student's self-regulated learning, in order to produce satisfaction with learning; (2) the relationship of this interaction with students' prior…

  2. Immune Regulation of Intrahepatic Regulatory T Cells in Fibrotic Livers of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Lou, Jinli; Bai, Li; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Sujun; Duan, Zhongping

    2017-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is the result of chronic inflammation and repair, and many immune cells contribute to the process. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediate immune tolerance and are highly expressed in liver fibrosis. However, few reports have studied the specific effects of Tregs on regulating immune cells in liver fibrosis. The present study aimed to investigate the regulation of Tregs on intrahepatic immune cells in liver fibrosis by depleting Tregs in mice. Material/Methods Liver fibrosis was induced by carbon tetrachloride, and an anti-CD25 mAb (PC61) was used to deplete Tregs. Liver fibrosis and injury were reflected by immunofluorescence staining and alanine aminotransferase level. The expressions of immune cell Tregs and cytokines were detected by flow cytometry and/or real-time PCR. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) concentration was measured by ELISA. Results Tregs were rich in fibrotic livers; after Tregs depletion, the intrahepatic CD4+ T cell and Kupffer cells (KC) populations did not change compared with liver fibrosis, but CD8+ T cells were slightly elevated. However, natural killer (NK) cells and IFN-γ levels were significantly decreased in fibrosis and increased after Tregs depletion. Interesting, we found Tregs promoted KC M1/M2 balance to M2, because inducible nitric oxide synthase (M1) was increased but arginase-1 (M2) was reduced after depleting Tregs. Furthermore, in isolated KCs from livers, IL-12 (M1) was increased, but TGF-β (M2) was reduced after depleting Tregs, compared with fibrotic livers. Conclusions Tregs are involved in the immune regulation of liver fibrosis, primarily by suppressing NK cells and M1 KCs, and mildly suppressing CD8+ T cells. PMID:28235976

  3. Fatigue risk management: Organizational factors at the regulatory and industry/company level.

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Hartley, Laurence; Powell, David; Cabon, Philippe; Hitchcock, Edward; Mills, Ann; Popkin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on the development of fatigue risk management systems (FRMS) in the transport sector. The evolution of regulatory frameworks is traced, from uni-dimensional hours of service regulations through to frameworks that enable multi-dimensional FRMS. These regulatory changes reflect advances in understanding of human error in the aetiology of accidents, and in fatigue and safety science. Implementation of FRMS shifts the locus of responsibility for safety away from the regulator towards companies and individuals, and requires changes in traditional roles. Organizational, ethnic, and national culture need to be considered. Recent trends in the work environment have potential to adversely affect FRMS, including precarious employment and shortages of skilled labour. Essential components of an FRMS, and examples of FRMS in different transport modes, are described. It is vital that regulators, employer, and employees have an understanding of the causes and consequences of fatigue that is sufficient for them to meet their responsibilities in relation to FRMS. While there is a strong evidence base supporting the principles of FRMS, experience with implementation is more limited. The evidence base for effective implementation will expand, since FRMS is data-driven, and ongoing evaluation is integral. We strongly advocate that experience be shared wherever possible.

  4. Regulation of the endogenous VEGF-A gene by exogenous designed regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tachikawa, Kiyoshi; Schröder, Oliver; Frey, Gerhard; Briggs, Steven P.; Sera, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    We describe a facile method to activate or repress transcription of endogenous genes in a quantitative and specific manner by treatment with designed regulatory proteins (DRPs), in which artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are fused to cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Penetration of DRPs into cells is mediated by an N-terminal CPP fused to a nuclear localization signal; a DNA-binding domain and a transactivation domain follow. The DNA-binding domain was targeted to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A gene. An agonist DRP was rapidly taken up by cells and transported to the nucleus; soon after, the cells began transcribing the gene and secreting VEGF-A protein in a dose-dependent manner. Multiple copies of a short oligopeptide derived from a minimal transactivation domain of human β-catenin was stronger than VP-16. The SRDX domain from the plant transcription factor, SUPERMAN, changed the DRP to a hypoxia-induced antagonist of VEGF-A. DRPs combine many of the potential benefits of transgenes with those of recombinant proteins. PMID:15475575

  5. Expression and subcellular localization of myogenic regulatory factors during the differentiation of skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Paola; Barbieri, Elena; Burattini, Sabrina; Guescini, Michele; D'Emilio, Alessandra; Biagiotti, Laura; Del Grande, Paolo; De Luca, Antonio; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2009-12-15

    It is known that the MyoD family members (MyoD, Myf5, myogenin, and MRF4) play a pivotal role in the complex mechanism of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. However, fragmentary information on transcription factor-specific regulation is available and data on their post-transcriptional and post-translational behavior are still missing. In this work, we combined mRNA and protein expression analysis with their subcellular localization. Each myogenic regulator factor (MRF) revealed a specific mRNA trend and a protein quantitative analysis not overlapping, suggesting the presence of post-transcriptional mechanisms. In addition, each MRF showed a specific behavior in situ, characterized by a differentiation stage-dependent localization suggestive of a post-translational regulation also. Consistently with their transcriptional activity, immunogold electron microscopy data revealed MRFs distribution in interchromatin domains. Our results showed a MyoD and Myf5 contrasting expression profile in proliferating myoblasts, as well as myogenin and MRF4 opposite distribution in the terminally differentiated myotubes. Interestingly, MRFs expression and subcellular localization analysis during C2C12 cell differentiation stages showed two main MRFs regulation mechanisms: (i) the protein half-life regulation to modulate the differentiation stage-dependent transcriptional activity and (ii) the cytoplasmic retention, as a translocation process, to inhibit the transcriptional activity. Therefore, our results exhibit that MRFs nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking is involved in muscle differentiation and suggest that, besides the MRFs expression level, also MRFs subcellular localization, related to their functional activity, plays a key role as a regulatory step in transcriptional control mechanisms.

  6. The complexities of air pollution regulation: the need for an integrated research and regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Nadadur, Srikanth S; Miller, C Andrew; Hopke, Philip K; Gordon, Terry; Vedal, Sverre; Vandenberg, John J; Costa, Daniel L

    2007-12-01

    The Clean Air Act mandates the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to periodically reassess existing and new science that underlie the regulation of major ambient pollutants -- particulate matter (PM) and tropospheric ozone being most notable. While toxic effects have been ascribed individually to these and other pollutants in the air, it is clear that mixtures of these contaminants have the potential to interact and thereby influence their overall toxic outcomes. It follows that a more comprehensive assessment of the potential health effects of the air pollution complex might better protect human health; however, traditional regulatory drivers and funding constraints have impeded progress to such a goal. Despite difficulties in empirically conducting studies of complex mixtures of air pollutants and acquiring relevant exposure data, there remains a need to develop integrated, interdisciplinary research and analytical strategies to provide more comprehensive (and relevant) assessments of associated health outcomes and risks. The research and assessment communities are endeavoring to dissect this complexity using varied approaches Here we present five interdisciplinary perspectives of this evolving line of thought among researchers and those who use such data in assessment: (1) analyses that coordinate air quality-health analyses utilizing representative polluted U.S. air sheds to apportion source and component-specific health risks; (2) novel approaches to characterize air quality in terms of emission sources and how emission reduction strategies might effectively impact pollutant levels; (3) insights from present-day studies of effects of single ambient pollutants in animal and controlled clinical toxicology studies and how these are evolving to address air pollution; (4) refinements in epidemiologic health assessments that take advantage of the complexities of existent air quality conditions; and (5) new approaches to integrative analyses to establish the

  7. Down-regulation of Cdc6, a cell cycle regulatory gene, in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Liza D; Frost, Andra R; Davila, Monica; Hutson, Alan D; Grizzle, William E; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2002-07-12

    CDC6 plays a critical role in regulation of the onset of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. We have found that Cdc6 expression is down-regulated in prostate cancer as detected by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR of prostate cell lines and laser-captured microdissected prostate tissues. This result was substantiated by immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue sections and immunoblot analysis of benign (BPH-1) and adenocarcinomatous prostatic cells. Furthermore, a 100-fold reduction in the transcription efficiency of the Cdc6 promoter-luciferase construct was noted in the metastatic PC3 cells compared with that in BPH-1 cells. Concentration of the E2F and Oct1 transcription factors that have putative binding sites in the Cdc6 promoter was substantially low in PC3 cells compared with BPH cells. Mutagenesis of the two E2F binding sites on the Cdc6 promoter resulted in increased promoter activity in PC3 cells owing to elimination of the negative regulation by pRb.E2F complex but not to the level of that obtained in BPH cells. We conclude that an altered interaction of transcription factors may be responsible for the down-regulation of Cdc6 transcription in PC3 cells. Our study suggests a potential use of the lack of CDC6 expression as an index of prostate cancer development.

  8. Regulatory switch enforced by basic helix-loop-helix and ACT-domain mediated dimerizations of the maize transcription factor R.

    PubMed

    Kong, Que; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Feller, Antje; Werkman, Joshua R; Chai, Chenglin; Wang, Yongqin; Grotewold, Erich; Yuan, Ling

    2012-07-24

    The maize R2R3-MYB regulator C1 cooperates with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor R to activate the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes coordinately. As is the case for other bHLH factors, R harbors several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we show that not the classical but rather a briefly extended R bHLH region forms homodimers that bind canonical G-box DNA motifs. This bHLH DNA-binding activity is abolished if the C-terminal ACT (aspartokinase, chorismate, and TyrA) domain is licensed to homodimerize. Then the bHLH remains in the monomeric form, allowing it to interact with R-interacting factor 1 (RIF1). In this configuration, the R-RIF1 complex is recruited to the promoters of a subset of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, such as A1, through the interaction with its MYB partner C1. If, however, the ACT domain remains monomeric, the bHLH region dimerizes and binds to G-boxes present in several anthocyanin genes, such as Bz1. Our results provide a mechanism by which a dimerization domain in a bHLH factor behaves as a switch that permits distinct configurations of a regulatory complex to be tethered to different promoters. Such a combinatorial gene regulatory framework provides one mechanism by which genes lacking obviously conserved cis-regulatory elements are regulated coordinately.

  9. Differential regulation of Bvg-activated virulence factors plays a role in Bordetella pertussis pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kinnear, S M; Marques, R R; Carbonetti, N H

    2001-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, regulates expression of many virulence factors via a two-component signal transduction system encoded by the bvgAS regulatory locus. It has been shown by transcription activation kinetics that several of the virulence factors are differentially regulated. fha is transcribed within 10 min following a bvgAS-inducing signal, while prn is transcribed after 1 h and ptx is not transcribed until 2 to 4 h after induction. These genes therefore represent early, intermediate, and late classes of bvg-activated promoters, respectively. Although there have been many insightful studies into the mechanisms of BvgAS-mediated regulation, the role that differential regulation of virulence genes plays in B. pertussis pathogenicity has not been characterized. We provide evidence that alterations to the promoter regions of bvg-activated genes can alter the kinetic pattern of expression of these genes without changing steady-state transcription levels. In addition, B. pertussis strains containing these promoter alterations that express either ptx at an early time or fha at a late time demonstrate a significant reduction in their ability to colonize respiratory tracts in an intranasal mouse model of infection. These data suggest a role for differential regulation of bvg-activated genes, and therefore for the BvgAS regulatory system, in the pathogenicity of B. pertussis.

  10. Regulation of the transforming growth factor β pathway by reversible ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salihi, Mazin A.; Herhaus, Lina; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signalling pathway plays a central role during embryonic development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It regulates gene transcription through a signalling cascade from cell surface receptors to intracellular SMAD transcription factors and their nuclear cofactors. The extent, duration and potency of signalling in response to TGFβ cytokines are intricately regulated by complex biochemical processes. The corruption of these regulatory processes results in aberrant TGFβ signalling and leads to numerous human diseases, including cancer. Reversible ubiquitylation of pathway components is a key regulatory process that plays a critical role in ensuring a balanced response to TGFβ signals. Many studies have investigated the mechanisms by which various E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate the turnover and activity of TGFβ pathway components by ubiquitylation. Moreover, recent studies have shed new light into their regulation by deubiquitylating enzymes. In this report, we provide an overview of current understanding of the regulation of TGFβ signalling by E3 ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitylases. PMID:22724073

  11. Evolution of DNA-Binding Sites of a Floral Master Regulatory Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Jose M.; de Bruijn, Suzanne; Pajoro, Alice; Geuten, Koen; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, Gerco C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Flower development is controlled by the action of key regulatory transcription factors of the MADS-domain family. The function of these factors appears to be highly conserved among species based on mutant phenotypes. However, the conservation of their downstream processes is much less well understood, mostly because the evolutionary turnover and variation of their DNA-binding sites (BSs) among plant species have not yet been experimentally determined. Here, we performed comparative ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-seq experiments of the MADS-domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) in two closely related Arabidopsis species: Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata which have very similar floral organ morphology. We found that BS conservation is associated with DNA sequence conservation, the presence of the CArG-box BS motif and on the relative position of the BS to its potential target gene. Differences in genome size and structure can explain that SEP3 BSs in A. lyrata can be located more distantly to their potential target genes than their counterparts in A. thaliana. In A. lyrata, we identified transposition as a mechanism to generate novel SEP3 binding locations in the genome. Comparative gene expression analysis shows that the loss/gain of BSs is associated with a change in gene expression. In summary, this study investigates the evolutionary dynamics of DNA BSs of a floral key-regulatory transcription factor and explores factors affecting this phenomenon. PMID:26429922

  12. Probing the Informational and Regulatory Plasticity of a Transcription Factor DNA–Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Kirsch, Jack F.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors have two functional constraints on their evolution: (1) their binding sites must have enough information to be distinguishable from all other sequences in the genome, and (2) they must bind these sites with an affinity that appropriately modulates the rate of transcription. Since both are determined by the biophysical properties of the DNA–binding domain, selection on one will ultimately affect the other. We were interested in understanding how plastic the informational and regulatory properties of a transcription factor are and how transcription factors evolve to balance these constraints. To study this, we developed an in vivo selection system in Escherichia coli to identify variants of the helix-turn-helix transcription factor MarA that bind different sets of binding sites with varying degrees of degeneracy. Unlike previous in vitro methods used to identify novel DNA binders and to probe the plasticity of the binding domain, our selections were done within the context of the initiation complex, selecting for both specific binding within the genome and for a physiologically significant strength of interaction to maintain function of the factor. Using MITOMI, quantitative PCR, and a binding site fitness assay, we characterized the binding, function, and fitness of some of these variants. We observed that a large range of binding preferences, information contents, and activities could be accessed with a few mutations, suggesting that transcriptional regulatory networks are highly adaptable and expandable. PMID:22496663