Science.gov

Sample records for regulatory site visit

  1. 76 FR 76168 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  2. 75 FR 6404 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participation in its Regulatory Site Visit Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give.... Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  3. 76 FR 4919 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) Center for Biologics... products regulated by CBER. Please specify the physical address(es) of the site(s) you are offering... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center for...

  4. The CACREP Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the CACREP review process is the campus site visit. The visit involves a team, usually from comparable institutions, coming to a campus for a review of the counselor training program(s). The role of the team is to be the CACREP Board's representative on campus to verify the self-study. In this article, the author reviews…

  5. The CACREP Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the CACREP review process is the campus site visit. The visit involves a team, usually from comparable institutions, coming to a campus for a review of the counselor training program(s). The role of the team is to be the CACREP Board's representative on campus to verify the self-study. In this article, the author reviews…

  6. Plan a Site Visit with Your Legislator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Mike

    2005-01-01

    When members of Congress head home for a recess, participants in the grassroots network have an opportunity to use one of their effective education tools: the site visit. A site visit occurs when a legislator actually visits one's business, school, or organization to see one's work firsthand. A local site visit is effective because grassroots…

  7. 42 CFR 455.432 - Site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Site visits. 455.432 Section 455.432 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICAID Provider Screening and Enrollment § 455.432 Site visits....

  8. 48 CFR 52.236-27 - Site Visit (Construction).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Site Visit (Construction....236-27 Site Visit (Construction). As prescribed in 36.523, insert a provision substantially the same as the following: Site Visit (Construction) (FEB 1995) (a) The clauses at 52.236-2, Differing...

  9. 48 CFR 52.236-27 - Site Visit (Construction).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Site Visit (Construction....236-27 Site Visit (Construction). As prescribed in 36.523, insert a provision substantially the same as the following: Site Visit (Construction) (FEB 1995) (a) The clauses at 52.236-2, Differing...

  10. 48 CFR 52.236-27 - Site Visit (Construction).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Site Visit (Construction....236-27 Site Visit (Construction). As prescribed in 36.523, insert a provision substantially the same as the following: Site Visit (Construction) (FEB 1995) (a) The clauses at 52.236-2, Differing...

  11. 48 CFR 52.236-27 - Site Visit (Construction).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Site Visit (Construction....236-27 Site Visit (Construction). As prescribed in 36.523, insert a provision substantially the same as the following: Site Visit (Construction) (FEB 1995) (a) The clauses at 52.236-2, Differing...

  12. Prescribed Fire: The Influence of Site Visits on Citizen Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; Reed, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This research employed a panel design to measure the effect of site visits on public perceptions of prescribed fire. On-site survey questions were devised to compare answers to a mail questionnaire previously completed by the same respondents. Questions were designed to examine how site visits influence public opinion and affect acceptance of…

  13. Prescribed Fire: The Influence of Site Visits on Citizen Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; Reed, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This research employed a panel design to measure the effect of site visits on public perceptions of prescribed fire. On-site survey questions were devised to compare answers to a mail questionnaire previously completed by the same respondents. Questions were designed to examine how site visits influence public opinion and affect acceptance of…

  14. Charter School Site Visit Protocol, 2005-2006 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Site visits are one of the means the Department of Education uses to document each charter school's performance and progress. These visits usually take place during the second and third years of the charter. The Charter School Office, however, reserves the right to conduct visits at other times when deemed necessary. The primary purposes of a site…

  15. Designing a Marketing Course with Field Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doren, Doris; Corrigan, Hope Bober

    2008-01-01

    A key goal of including field site visits in marketing courses is to give business students increased interaction with industry professionals and community leaders. Site visits give students a concrete idea of how different marketing disciplines work in the business world. Business students gain greater insight into a career in marketing from this…

  16. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10... Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.553 Textile and apparel site visits. (a... Textile Agreements (CITA), exclude from the territory of the United States textile or apparel...

  17. Expert Panel Reviews of Research Centers: The Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao; Johnson, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Site visits are used extensively in a variety of settings within the evaluation community. They are especially common in making summative value decisions about the quality and worth of research programs/centers. However, there has been little empirical research and guidance about how to appropriately conduct evaluative site visits of research…

  18. Corrections Education Evaluation System Project. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    Site visits to five correctional institutions in Wisconsin were conducted as part of the development of an evaluation model for the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) project for the Wisconsin Correctional System. The evaluators' perceptions of the CBVE system are presented with recommendations for improvement. Site visits were conducted…

  19. Designing a Marketing Course with Field Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doren, Doris; Corrigan, Hope Bober

    2008-01-01

    A key goal of including field site visits in marketing courses is to give business students increased interaction with industry professionals and community leaders. Site visits give students a concrete idea of how different marketing disciplines work in the business world. Business students gain greater insight into a career in marketing from this…

  20. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  1. Number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive random walker.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Santos Bravo; Klafter, J; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-03-01

    The asymptotic mean number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive continuous-time random walker in two dimensions seems not to have been explicitly calculated anywhere in the literature. This number has been calculated for other dimensions for only one specific asymptotic behavior of the waiting time distribution between steps. We present an explicit derivation for two cases in all integer dimensions so as to formally complete a tableau of results. In this tableau we include the dominant as well as subdominant contributions in all integer dimensions. Other quantities that can be calculated from the mean number of distinct sites visited are also discussed.

  2. How to handle sales demo, reference checks, and site visits.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Although challenging and time consuming, vendor selection, product demonstrations, reference checks, and site visits can be streamlined by following the guidelines and steps presented here. A systematic and uniform approach is the best way to save time and achieve the desired results that are so important to your practice.

  3. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10.553 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications...

  4. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10.553 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications...

  5. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10.553 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications...

  6. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Textile and apparel site visits. 10.553 Section 10.553 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications...

  7. 76 FR 38383 - Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On July 12, 2011, Office of Energy Projects staff will participate in a site...

  8. Perceptions of Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical Preceptors About Usefulness of Onsite Clinical Site Visits.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ragan; O'Brien, Tara; Emerson, Stacy; Reed, Laura

    Clinical site visits are important for evaluating graduate nursing students' clinical success. This descriptive study surveyed family nurse practitioner preceptors' perceptions of modalities for conducting site visits. Results indicated that preceptors believe faculty should make at least 1 face-to-face site visit to observe a student during the semester. No preference for telephone or mobile technology for conducting site visits was identified. The study provides important considerations when designing guidelines for faculty site visits.

  9. Hanford/Tomsk reciprocal site visit: Plutonium agreement compliance talks

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Sorenson, R.; Six, D.; Schiegel, S.C.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the visit to Hanford Site was to: demonstrate equipment, technology, and methods for calculating Pu production, measuring integrated reactor power, and storing and safeguarding PuO{sub 2}; demonstrate the shutdown of Hanford production reactors; and foster openness and transparency of Hanford operations. The first day`s visit was an introduction to Hanford and a review of the history of the reactors. The second day consisted of discussions on the production reactors, reprocessing operations, and PuO{sub 2} storage. The group divided on the third day to tour facilities. Group A toured the N reactor, K-West reactor, K-West Basins, B reactor, and participated in a demonstration and discussion of reactor modeling computer codes. Group B toured the Hanford Pu Storage Facility, 200-East Area, N-cell (oxide loadout station), the Automated Storage Facility, and the Nondestructive Assay Measurement System. Group discussions were held during the last day of the visit, which included scheduling of a US visit to Russia.

  10. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  11. 76 FR 51022 - Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and Soliciting Scoping Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and.... Applicant: Juneau Hydropower, Inc. d. Name of Project: Sweetheart Lake Hydroelectric Project. e. Location.... 791(a)-825(r). g. Applicant Contact: Duff Mitchell, Business Manager, Juneau Hydropower, Inc.,...

  12. Number of distinct sites visited by N random walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernan; Trunfio, Paul; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Weiss, George H.

    1992-05-01

    We study the number of distinct sites visited by N random walkers after t steps SN(t) under the condition that all the walkers are initially at the origin. We derive asymptotic expressions for the mean number of distinct sites in one, two, and three dimensions. We find that passes through several growth regimes; at short times ~td (regime I), for tx<~(t ln[N S1(t)/td/2])d/2 (regime II), and for t>>tx', ~NS1(t) (regime III). The crossover times are tx~ln N for all dimensions, and tx'~∞, exp N, and N2 for one, two, and three dimensions, respectively. We show that in regimes II and III satisfies a scaling relation of the form ~td/2f(x), with x≡N/td/2. We also obtain asymptotic results for the complete probability distribution of SN(t) for the one-dimensional case in the limit of large N and t.

  13. Site Guidelines for a "Making Middle Grades Work" Technical Review Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the Technical Review Visit (TRV) is to follow up on the actions taken to implement the recommendations indicated for each challenge in the most recent Technical Assistance Visit (TAV) report. This document provides the following: (1) Site Guidelines for the Making Middle Grades Work (MMGW) Technical Review Visit; (2) Site Checklist;…

  14. The Impacts of Human Visitation on Mussel Bed Communities Along the California Coast: Are Regulatory Marine Reserves Effective in Protecting These Communities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jayson R.; Fong, Peggy; Ambrose, Richard F.

    2008-04-01

    Rocky intertidal habitats frequently are used by humans for recreational, educational, and subsistence-harvesting purposes, with intertidal populations damaged by visitation activities such as extraction, trampling, and handling. California Marine Managed Areas, particularly regulatory marine reserves (MRs), were established to provide legal protection and enhancement of coastal resources and include prohibitions on harvesting intertidal populations. However, the effectiveness of MRs is unclear as enforcement of no-take laws is weak and no regulations protect intertidal species from other detrimental visitor impacts such as trampling. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine impacts from human visitation on California mussel populations ( Mytilus californianus) and mussel bed community diversity; and (2) to investigate the effectiveness of regulatory MRs in reducing visitor impacts on these populations. Surveys of mussel populations and bed-associated diversity were compared: (1) at sites subjected to either high or low levels of human use, and (2) at sites either unprotected or with regulatory protection banning collecting. At sites subjected to higher levels of human visitation, mussel populations were significantly lower than low-use sites. Comparisons of mussel populations inside and outside of regulatory MRs revealed no consistent pattern suggesting that California no-take regulatory reserves may have limited effectiveness in protecting mussel communities. In areas where many people visit intertidal habitats for purposes other than collecting, many organisms will be affected by trampling, turning of rocks, and handling. In these cases, effective protection of rocky intertidal communities requires an approach that goes beyond the singular focus on collecting to reduce the full suite of impacts.

  15. 48 CFR 1370.102 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. 1370.102 Section 1370.102 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF... Provisions and Clauses 1370.102 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. Insert provision...

  16. Expected number of sites visited by a constrained n-step random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernan; Weiss, George H.

    1995-08-01

    We develop a formalism based on generating functions for calculating the expected number of sites visited by a lattice random walk constrained to visit a fixed point at the nth step. Explicit results are given in the large-n limit when the target point is not too far from the origin.

  17. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  18. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  19. Report: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Site Visit of Wastewater Treatment Plant, Village of Itasca, Illinois

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #12-R-0377, March 30, 2012. We conducted an unannounced site visit of the Recovery Act project to build a new wastewater treatment plant in the Village of Itasca, Illinois, in April and May 2011.

  20. A Pilot Sampling Design for Estimating Outdoor Recreation Site Visits on the National Forests

    Treesearch

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; S.M. Kocis; H. Ken Cordell; D.B.K. English

    2002-01-01

    A pilot sampling design is described for estimating site visits to National Forest System lands. The three-stage sampling design consisted of national forest ranger districts, site days within ranger districts, and last-exiting recreation visitors within site days. Stratification was used at both the primary and secondary stages. Ranger districts were stratified based...

  1. Preceptors' and physician assistant students' views about the value of clinical site visits.

    PubMed

    Aquila, Mitzi Dʼ; Lie, Desiree

    2015-03-01

    To determine preceptor and student views about the value of clinical site visits. An online survey of preceptors and students was conducted after completion of 1-year clerkships, during which each student received 2 visits from program faculty. An 11-question Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree) survey was administered to preceptors and students. Analysis was by descriptive statistics (percentage, mean ± SD) and theme extraction. Response rate was 70% for preceptors and 77% for students. A majority of both groups agreed or strongly agreed that site visits met a need for clarifying the role of the clerkship, addressed expectations, and improved clinical experience; that visits were important, added value to education, and improved communication with the program. Visits increased preceptor self-reported confidence in faculty. Preceptor themes included "face-to-face validation," "personal touch," and "hands-on interaction." Student themes included "value of direct feedback from site visitor," "ability to improve skills between visits," and "connectedness to program." Preceptors and students agreed on the importance and value of site visits for improving communication, clinical skills, and quality of educational experience.

  2. Incorporating Alternative Care Site Characteristics Into Estimates of Substitutable ED Visits.

    PubMed

    Trueger, Nathan Seth; Chua, Kao-Ping; Hussain, Aamir; Liferidge, Aisha T; Pitts, Stephen R; Pines, Jesse M

    2017-07-01

    Several recent efforts to improve health care value have focused on reducing emergency department (ED) visits that potentially could be treated in alternative care sites (ie, primary care offices, retail clinics, and urgent care centers). Estimates of the number of these visits may depend on assumptions regarding the operating hours and functional capabilities of alternative care sites. However, methods to account for the variability in these characteristics have not been developed. To develop methods to incorporate the variability in alternative care site characteristics into estimates of ED visit "substitutability." Our approach uses the range of hours and capabilities among alternative care sites to estimate lower and upper bounds of ED visit substitutability. We constructed "basic" and "extended" criteria that captured the plausible degree of variation in each site's hours and capabilities. To illustrate our approach, we analyzed data from 22,697 ED visits by adults in the 2011 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, defining a visit as substitutable if it was treat-and-release and met both the operating hours and functional capabilities criteria. Use of the combined basic hours/basic capabilities criteria and extended hours/extended capabilities generated lower and upper bounds of estimates. Our criteria classified 5.5%-27.1%, 7.6%-20.4%, and 10.6%-46.0% of visits as substitutable in primary care offices, retail clinics, and urgent care centers, respectively. Alternative care sites vary widely in operating hours and functional capabilities. Methods such as ours may help incorporate this variability into estimates of ED visit substitutability.

  3. School site visits for community-based participatory research on healthy eating.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha I; Bogart, Laura M; Uyeda, Kimberly E; Martinez, Homero; Knizewski, Ritamarie; Ryan, Gery W; Schuster, Mark A

    2009-12-01

    School nutrition policies are gaining support as a means of addressing childhood obesity. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers an approach for academic and community partners to collaborate to translate obesity-related school policies into practice. Site visits, in which trained observers visit settings to collect multilevel data (e.g., observation, qualitative interviews), may complement other methods that inform health promotion efforts. This paper demonstrates the utility of site visits in the development of an intervention to implement obesity-related policies in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) middle schools. In 2006, trained observers visited four LAUSD middle schools. Observers mapped cafeteria layout; observed food/beverage offerings, student consumption, waste patterns, and duration of cafeteria lines; spoke with school staff and students; and collected relevant documents. Data were examined for common themes and patterns. Food and beverages sold in study schools met LAUSD nutritional guidelines, and nearly all observed students had time to eat most or all of their meal. Some LAUSD policies were not implemented, including posting nutritional information for cafeteria food, marketing school meals to improve student participation in the National School Lunch Program, and serving a variety of fruits and vegetables. Cafeteria understaffing and costs were obstacles to policy implementation. Site visits were a valuable methodology for evaluating the implementation of school district obesity-related policies and contributed to the development of a CBPR intervention to translate school food policies into practice. Future CBPR studies may consider site visits in their toolbox of formative research methods.

  4. Visiting the site of death: experiences of the bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Pål; Tønnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief and General Health Questionnaire) in a total of 130 first-degree family members 2 years post-disaster. Results showed that the majority of participants (n = 113; 87%) had visited the site of death. The most important outcome was gaining an increased understanding of what occurred (61%) and a feeling of closeness to the deceased (27%). Those who had visited the site of death reported lower avoidance behavior and higher degree of acceptance of the loss than non-visitors. Although this could be a cause as well as a consequence of the visit, visiting the site of death may be an important part of the support offered to bereaved families after experiencing a disaster loss.

  5. Understanding the Experience of CACREP On-Site Visiting Review Team Chairpersons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the experience of CACREP on-site review team members provides insight into the phenomenon of four counselor educators who have each served as a CACREP on-site visiting review team chairperson a minimum of three times. In total, the participants had been within the counselor education field for approximately 95 years and active within…

  6. Hospice care in nursing homes: is site of care associated with visit volume?

    PubMed

    Miller, Susan C

    2004-08-01

    To determine factors associated with hospice visit volume and to examine whether visit volume differs by nursing home (NH) versus non-NH setting. Retrospective cohort study. Twenty-one hospices across seven states under the ownership of one parent provider. Hospice patients from October 1998 through September 1999 in NH (n=9,460) and non-NH (n=15,484) settings. Data were from the provider's centralized information system. Average daily visit volume was the number of visits divided by the number of hospice routine home care days (days not in hospice inpatient or continuous home care). Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between site of care and an individual's probability of having average daily visits above the sample median. Average daily visits+/-standard deviation were 1.1+/-1.1 for NH and 1.2+/-1.3 for non-NH hospice patients. Site of care was not significantly associated with having an average daily visit volume above the sample median, but patients in NH settings had a lower probability of having a nurse average daily visit volume above the median (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.46-0.74) and a greater probability of having social worker (AOR=2.46, 95% CI=1.87-3.24), aide (AOR=1.97; 95% CI=1.11-3.48), and clergy (AOR=3.23, 95% CI=2.21-4.44) average daily visits above the median than those in non-NH settings. A different mix, not volume, of services appears to be used to address the physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs of hospice patients/families who reside in NH settings than of those in non-NH settings.

  7. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  8. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  9. White-tailed Deer Visitation Rates at Medicated Bait Sites in Southern Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program. Our objective was to assess patterns of deer visitation to medicated bait sites used to treat...

  10. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  11. Number of distinct sites visited by N particles diffusing on a fractal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havlin, Shlomo; Larralde, Hernan; Trunfio, Paul; Kiefer, James E.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Weiss, George H.

    1992-08-01

    We study the mean number of distinct sites, SN(t), visited up to time t by N>>1 noninteracting random walkers all starting from the same origin on a fractal substrate of dimension df. Using analytic arguments and numerical simulations, we find SN(t)~(lnN)df/δtds/2 for fractals with spectral dimension ds==2df/dw<2, where δ==dw/(dw-1) and dw is the fractal dimension of a random walk.

  12. The impact of national cultural distance on the number of foreign Web site visits by U.S. households.

    PubMed

    Beugelsdijk, Sjoerd; Slangen, Arjen

    2010-04-01

    We investigate how national cultural distance, defined as the extent to which the shared values and norms in one country differ from those in another, affect the number of Web site visits. Based on a sample of 2,654 U.S. households visiting Web sites in 38 countries over 25 different Web site categories, we find that cultural distance has a negative and significant effect on the number of taste-related foreign Web site visits. In the case of Web sites containing sexually explicit material, we obtain a significantly positive effect of cultural distance. Our findings suggest that cultural distance can be both a source of attraction and a source of repulsion in explaining the number of Web site visits depending on the nature of the Web site.

  13. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  14. The expected number of distinct sites visited by N biased random walks in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernan; Weiss, George H.; Eugene Stanley, H.

    1994-09-01

    We calculate the asymptotic form of the expected number of distinct sites visited by N random walkers moving independently in one dimension. It is shown that to lowest order and at long times, the leading term in the asymptotic result is that found for the random walk of a single biased particle, which implies that the bias is strong enough a factor to dominate the many-body effects in that regime. The lowest order correction term contains the many-body contribution. This is essentially the result for the unbiased random walk.

  15. The value of redundant measurements - highlights from AmeriFlux site visits using a portable eddy covariance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S.; Billesbach, D. P.; Hanson, C. V.; Dengel, S.; Polonik, P.; Biraud, S.

    2016-12-01

    The AmeriFlux network conducts independent site visits using a portable eddy covariance system (PECS). Short-term (<2 weeks), side-by-side comparisons enable the network to evaluate inter-comparability between sites, improve data quality, and assess measurement uncertainty across the network. The PECS includes commonly used sensors for turbulent flux, radiation, and meteorological measurements which are maintained and calibrated using established best practices at levels at or above the manufacturer's recommendations. The importance of site visits was realized at the inception of the AmeriFlux network with the first site visit in 1997. Since that time, more than 180 site visits at over 120 different sites have been conducted. Site visit reports over the years have led to many key findings and important advances within the flux community which are highlighted in the presentation. Furthermore, we summarize and synthesize results from recent site comparisons that were conducted with the latest generation of the PECS (2013-present). The presentation quantifies observed differences between the PECS and network sites for key flux, radiation, and meteorological metrics. The aggregated comparisons provide insight into comparability amongst network sites as well as areas for improvement. We identify common errors and issues and discuss some best practices.

  16. Report: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Site Visit of the Wastewater Treatment Facility Improvements Project, Perkins, Oklahoma

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-R-0214, May 2, 2011. We conducted an unannounced visit of the construction site of the Perkins Public Works Authority’s wastewater treatment facility improvements project in Perkins, Oklahoma, on April 19–22, 2010.

  17. Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?

    PubMed

    Rands, Sean A

    2017-01-01

    Animals living in complex environments experience differing risks of predation depending upon their location within the landscape. An animal could reduce the risk it experiences by remaining in a refuge site, but it may need to emerge from its refuge and enter more dangerous sites for feeding and other activities. Here, I consider the actions of an animal choosing to travel a short distance between a safe refuge and a dangerous foraging site, such as a bird leaving cover to visit a feeder. Although much work has been conducted examining the choice between a refuge and a foraging site when faced with a trade-off between starvation and predation risk, the work presented here is the first to consider the travel behaviour between these locations. Using state-dependent stochastic dynamic programming, I illustrate that there are several forms of optimal behaviour that can emerge. In some situations, the animal should choose to travel without stopping between sites, but in other cases, it is optimal for the animal to travel hesitantly towards the food, and to stop its travel at a point before it reaches the refuge. I discuss how this hesitant 'dawdling' behaviour may be optimal, and suggest further work to test these predictions.

  18. Leaving safety to visit a feeding site: is it optimal to hesitate while exposed?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Animals living in complex environments experience differing risks of predation depending upon their location within the landscape. An animal could reduce the risk it experiences by remaining in a refuge site, but it may need to emerge from its refuge and enter more dangerous sites for feeding and other activities. Here, I consider the actions of an animal choosing to travel a short distance between a safe refuge and a dangerous foraging site, such as a bird leaving cover to visit a feeder. Although much work has been conducted examining the choice between a refuge and a foraging site when faced with a trade-off between starvation and predation risk, the work presented here is the first to consider the travel behaviour between these locations. Using state-dependent stochastic dynamic programming, I illustrate that there are several forms of optimal behaviour that can emerge. In some situations, the animal should choose to travel without stopping between sites, but in other cases, it is optimal for the animal to travel hesitantly towards the food, and to stop its travel at a point before it reaches the refuge. I discuss how this hesitant ‘dawdling’ behaviour may be optimal, and suggest further work to test these predictions. PMID:28280590

  19. Reaching Site Closure for Groundwater under Multiple Regulatory Agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksberg, N.; Shephard, Gene; Peters, Jay; Couture, B.

    2008-01-15

    Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) requires investigation of both radionuclides and chemical constituents in order to achieve closure. Cleanup criteria for groundwater are regulated both by federal and state agencies. These requirements vary in both numerical values as well as the duration of post remediation monitoring. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. To successfully reach closure under each agency, it is paramount to understand the different requirements during the planning stages of the investigation. Therefore, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater program can then be coordinated to meet each regulatory agency requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. Based on the different criteria, the CTDEP-LR (or RSR criteria) are not only bounding, but also requires the longest duration. As with most decommissioning efforts, regulatory attention is focused on the NRC, however, with the recent industry initiatives based on concern of tritium releases to groundwater at other plants, it is likely that the USEPA and state agencies may continue to drive site investigations. By recognizing these differences, data quality objectives can include all agency requirements, thus minimizing rework or duplicative efforts. CYAPCO intends to complete groundwater monitoring for the NRC and CTDEP-RD by July 2007. However, because shallow remediations are still being conducted, site closure under USEPA and CTDEP-LR is projected to be late 2011.

  20. Standardization of physical measurements in European health examination surveys-experiences from the site visits.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Hanna; Mäki-Opas, Johanna; Mindell, Jennifer S; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Männistö, Satu; Giampaoli, Simona; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Koponen, Päivikki

    2017-01-23

    Health examination surveys (HESs) provide valuable data on health and its determinants at the population level. Comparison of HES results within and between countries and over time requires measurements which are free of bias due to differences in or adherence to measurement procedures and/or measurement devices. In the European HES (EHES) Pilot Project, 12 countries conducted a pilot HES in 2010-11 using standardized measurement protocols and centralized training. External evaluation visits (site visits) were performed by the EHES Reference Centre staff to evaluate the success of standardization and quality of data collection. In general, standardized EHES protocols were followed adequately in all the pilot surveys. Small deviations were observed in the posture of participants during the blood pressure and height measurement; in the use of a tourniquet when drawing blood samples; and in the calibration of measurement devices. Occasionally, problems with disturbing noise from outside or people coming into the room during the measurements were observed. In countries with an ongoing national HES or a long tradition of conducting national HESs at regular intervals, it was more difficult to modify national protocols to fulfil EHES requirements. The EHES protocols to standardize HES measurements and procedures for collection of blood samples are feasible in cross-country settings. The prerequisite for successful standardization is adequate training. External and internal evaluation activities during the survey fieldwork are also needed to monitor compliance to standards. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  1. A delay differential equation model for dengue transmission with regular visits to a mosquito breeding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaacob, Y.; Yeak, S. H.; Lim, R. S.; Soewono, E.

    2015-03-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of widely transmitted vector-borne diseases which potentially affects millions of people throughout the world especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. One of the main factors contributing in the complication of the transmission process is the mobility of people in which people may get infection in the places far from their home. Here we construct a delay differential equation model for dengue transmission in a closed population where regular visits of people to a mosquito breeding site out of their residency such as traditional market take place daily. Basic reproductive ratio of the system is obtained and depends on the ratio between the outgoing rates of susceptible human and infective human. It is shown that the increase of mobility with different variation of mobility rates may contribute to different level of basic reproductive ratio as well as different level of outbreaks.

  2. Go ahead, visit those web sites, you can`t get hurt, can you?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothfuss, J.S.; Parrett, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Browsing (surfing) the World Wide Web (the web) has exploded onto the Internet with an unprecedented popularity. Fueled by massive acceptance, the web client/server technology is leaping forward with a speed that competes with no other software technology. The primary force behind this phenomenon is the simplicity of the web browsing experience. People who have never touched a computer before can now perform sophisticated network tasks with a simple point-and-click. Unfortunately, this simplicity gives many, if not most, web wanderers the impression that the web browser is risk free, nothing more than a high powered television. This misconception is dangerous by creating the myth that a user visiting a web site is immune from subversive or malicious intent. While many want you to believe that surfing the web is as simple as using any other household appliance, it is not like surfing television channels, it is bi-directional. You can learn a lot of useful information from web sites. But, either directly or indirectly, others can also learn quite a bit about you. Of even more concern is a web sites` potential ability to exert control over the local computer. This paper tries to consolidate some of the current concerns that you should consider as you jump into the surf.

  3. Widespread Site-Dependent Buffering of Human Regulatory Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Kutyavin, Tanya; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The average individual is expected to harbor thousands of variants within non-coding genomic regions involved in gene regulation. However, it is currently not possible to interpret reliably the functional consequences of genetic variation within any given transcription factor recognition sequence. To address this, we comprehensively analyzed heritable genome-wide binding patterns of a major sequence-specific regulator (CTCF) in relation to genetic variability in binding site sequences across a multi-generational pedigree. We localized and quantified CTCF occupancy by ChIP-seq in 12 related and unrelated individuals spanning three generations, followed by comprehensive targeted resequencing of the entire CTCF–binding landscape across all individuals. We identified hundreds of variants with reproducible quantitative effects on CTCF occupancy (both positive and negative). While these effects paralleled protein–DNA recognition energetics when averaged, they were extensively buffered by striking local context dependencies. In the significant majority of cases buffering was complete, resulting in silent variants spanning every position within the DNA recognition interface irrespective of level of binding energy or evolutionary constraint. The prevalence of complex partial or complete buffering effects severely constrained the ability to predict reliably the impact of variation within any given binding site instance. Surprisingly, 40% of variants that increased CTCF occupancy occurred at positions of human–chimp divergence, challenging the expectation that the vast majority of functional regulatory variants should be deleterious. Our results suggest that, even in the presence of “perfect” genetic information afforded by resequencing and parallel studies in multiple related individuals, genomic site-specific prediction of the consequences of individual variation in regulatory DNA will require systematic coupling with empirical functional genomic measurements

  4. Widespread site-dependent buffering of human regulatory polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; Kutyavin, Tanya; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-01-01

    The average individual is expected to harbor thousands of variants within non-coding genomic regions involved in gene regulation. However, it is currently not possible to interpret reliably the functional consequences of genetic variation within any given transcription factor recognition sequence. To address this, we comprehensively analyzed heritable genome-wide binding patterns of a major sequence-specific regulator (CTCF) in relation to genetic variability in binding site sequences across a multi-generational pedigree. We localized and quantified CTCF occupancy by ChIP-seq in 12 related and unrelated individuals spanning three generations, followed by comprehensive targeted resequencing of the entire CTCF-binding landscape across all individuals. We identified hundreds of variants with reproducible quantitative effects on CTCF occupancy (both positive and negative). While these effects paralleled protein-DNA recognition energetics when averaged, they were extensively buffered by striking local context dependencies. In the significant majority of cases buffering was complete, resulting in silent variants spanning every position within the DNA recognition interface irrespective of level of binding energy or evolutionary constraint. The prevalence of complex partial or complete buffering effects severely constrained the ability to predict reliably the impact of variation within any given binding site instance. Surprisingly, 40% of variants that increased CTCF occupancy occurred at positions of human-chimp divergence, challenging the expectation that the vast majority of functional regulatory variants should be deleterious. Our results suggest that, even in the presence of "perfect" genetic information afforded by resequencing and parallel studies in multiple related individuals, genomic site-specific prediction of the consequences of individual variation in regulatory DNA will require systematic coupling with empirical functional genomic measurements.

  5. Visiting Holocaust-Related Sites with Medical Students as an Aid in Teaching Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    González-López, Esteban; Ríos-Cortés, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    During the Nazi period numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: "The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine" at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent.

  6. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  7. Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Exposure Assessments: An Analysis of 14 Site Visits

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Matthew M.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Evans, Douglas E.; Birch, M. Eileen; Fernback, Joseph E.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the potential for wide-ranging health effects that could result from exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF). In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) set a recommended exposure limit (REL) for CNT and CNF: 1 µg m−3 as an 8-h time weighted average (TWA) of elemental carbon (EC) for the respirable size fraction. The purpose of this study was to conduct an industrywide exposure assessment among US CNT and CNF manufacturers and users. Fourteen total sites were visited to assess exposures to CNT (13 sites) and CNF (1 site). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area samples were collected for both the inhalable and respirable mass concentration of EC, using NIOSH Method 5040. Inhalable PBZ samples were collected at nine sites while at the remaining five sites both respirable and inhalable PBZ samples were collected side-by-side. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) PBZ and area samples were also collected at the inhalable size fraction and analyzed to quantify and size CNT and CNF agglomerate and fibrous exposures. Respirable EC PBZ concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.94 µg m−3 with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.34 µg m−3 and an 8-h TWA of 0.16 µg m−3. PBZ samples at the inhalable size fraction for EC ranged from 0.01 to 79.57 µg m−3 with a GM of 1.21 µg m−3. PBZ samples analyzed by TEM showed concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 1.613 CNT or CNF-structures per cm3 with a GM of 0.008 and an 8-h TWA concentration of 0.003. The most common CNT structure sizes were found to be larger agglomerates in the 2–5 µm range as well as agglomerates >5 µm. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the inhalable samples for the mass of EC and structure counts by TEM (Spearman ρ = 0.39, P < 0.0001). Overall, EC PBZ and area TWA samples were below the NIOSH REL (96% were <1 μg m−3 at the respirable size fraction), while 30% of the inhalable PBZ EC

  8. A Comparison of the Amount of Art Knowledge and Information Acquired by College Students through Site Visits and General Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Rafael A.

    The purpose of this study was to compare the knowledge about art acquired by students who went on site visits with that of students who experienced only the lecture method of teaching. A study was conducted at Boricua College (New York) with two groups of 25 students each, one participating as a control and one as an experimental group. The…

  9. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard, Ed.; Puma, Michael, Ed.

    Site visits to a sample of 173 colleges, universities, vocational-technical schools, and other postsecondary institutions--conducted to examine the procedures used to manage federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and campus-based student financial assistance programs--are summarized. This report deals only with the conduct of the…

  10. School Site Visits: What Can We Learn from Choice Schools in Milwaukee? SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Thomas; Jacob, Anna M.; Jensen, Laura I.

    2012-01-01

    The School Site Visits study is part of the fifth series of annual reports produced by the School Choice Demonstration Project (SCDP). It describes some of the major challenges experienced and common practices demonstrated by thirteen (13) K-12 schools participating in the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP). During the 2010-11 school year,…

  11. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  12. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Won; Park, Moon Sung

    2015-10-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers.

  13. Reaching site closure for groundwater under multiple regulatory agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksberg, N.; Couture, B.

    2007-07-01

    Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) has been impacted by both radionuclides and chemical constituents. Furthermore, the cleanup standards and closure requirements for HNP are regulated both by federal and state agencies. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. The cleanup criteria to reach site closure for radionuclides is regulated by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiological Division. For license termination under the NRC, the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) for all media can not exceed 25 milli-Rem per year (mRem/yr) plus As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The CTDEP has a similar requirement with the TEDE not to exceed 19 mRem/yr plus ALARA. To reach these criteria, derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) were developed for radiological exposures from three (3) media components; soil, existing groundwater and future groundwater from left-in place foundations or footings. Based on current conditions, the target dose contribution from existing and future groundwater is not to exceed 2 mRem/yr TEDE. After source (soil) remediation is complete, the NRC requires two (2) years of quarterly monitoring to demonstrate that groundwater quality meets the DCGLs and does not show an upward trend. CYAPCO's NRC License Termination Plan (LTP) specifies a minimum 18-month period of groundwater monitoring, as long as samples are collected during two spring/high water seasons, to verify the efficacy of remedial actions at HNP. In addition to the 19 mRem/yr criteria, the CTDEP also requires groundwater to be in compliance with the Remediation Standards Regulation (RSRs). There are no published criteria for radionuclides in the RSRs

  14. Enhancing High School Reform: Lessons from Site Visits to Four Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Betsy

    2005-01-01

    The American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) took groups of national policymakers to visit effective and innovative high schools and to meet with reform-minded leaders as a way to become familiar with the challenges and possibilities of high school redesign. This report summarizes the best practices and policies that were successful in the transformed…

  15. Factors that attract and repel visitation to urban recreation sites: a framework for research

    Treesearch

    David Klenosky; Cherie LeBlanc; Christine Vogt; Herbert Schroeder

    2008-01-01

    The mix of natural features and manmade elements in urban and metropolitan areas presents unique challenges for resource managers and planners. While some elements of the urban landscape (e.g., forested areas, parks, water features, and museums) may attract or encourage visitation, others (e.g., industrial and commercial activity, odors, noises, crime, litter, and...

  16. Some recent variations on the expected number of distinct sites visited by an n-step random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, George H.; Dayan, Ido; Havlin, Shlomo; Kiefer, James E.; Larralde, Hernan; Stanley, H. Eugene; Trunfio, Paul

    1992-12-01

    Asymptotic forms for the expected number of distinct sites visited by an n-step random walk, being calculable for many random walks, have been used in a number of analyses of physical models. We describe three recent extensions of the problem, the first replacing the single random walker by N→∞ random walkers, the second to the study of a random walk in the presence of a trapping site, and the third to a random walk in the presence of a trapping hyperplane.

  17. Expected number of distinct sites visited by N random walks in the presence of an absorbing boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larralde, Hernán; Weiss, George H.

    2003-08-01

    In earlier work we have studied the expected number of distinct sites (ENDS) visited by N random walkers in time t on a translationally invariant lattice. Optical applications suggest the interest in analysing the same problem for a semi-infinite lattice in three dimensions bounded by a plane of absorbing sites. We here study this problem, showing a multiplicity of time regimes, and at the longest times showing that the ENDS is proportional to Nsurdt where t is the time. In the absence of a boundary the comparable result is proportional to Nt. Thus, the boundary effect eliminates approximately surdt random walks.

  18. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids.

  19. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's SITE program was created to meet the demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. The primary mission of the SITe Program is to expedite the cleanup of sites on the NPL. These sites often have multiple contaminants in soil and groundwater, and few...

  20. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's SITE program was created to meet the demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. The primary mission of the SITe Program is to expedite the cleanup of sites on the NPL. These sites often have multiple contaminants in soil and groundwater, and few...

  1. Records for the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk on the fully connected lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turban, Loïc

    2015-11-01

    We consider a random walk on the fully connected lattice with N sites and study the time evolution of the number of distinct sites s visited by the walker on a subset with n sites. A record value v is obtained for s at a record time t when the walker visits a site of the subset for the first time. The record time t is a partial covering time when v\\lt n and a total covering time when v = n. The probability distributions for the number of records s, the record value v and the record (covering) time t, involving r-Stirling numbers, are obtained using generating function techniques. The mean values, variances and skewnesses are deduced from the generating functions. In the scaling limit the probability distributions for s and v lead to the same Gaussian density. The fluctuations of the record time t are also Gaussian at partial covering, when n-v={{O}}(n). They are distributed according to the type-I Gumbel extreme-value distribution at total covering, when v = n. A discrete sequence of generalized Gumbel distributions, indexed by n-v, is obtained at almost total covering, when n-v={{O}}(1). These generalized Gumbel distributions are crossing over to the Gaussian distribution when n - v increases.

  2. Sites of Predicted Stress-Induced DNA Duplex Destabilization Occur Preferentially at Regulatory Loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Craig J.

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes a computational method to predict the sites on a DNA molecule where imposed superhelical stresses destabilize the duplex. Several DNA sequences are analyzed in this way, including the pBR322 and ColE1 plasmids, bacteriophage f1, and the polyoma and bovine papilloma virus genomes. Superhelical destabilization in these molecules is predicted to occur at small numbers of discrete sites, most of which are within regulatory regions. The most destabilized sites include the terminator and promoter regions of specific plasmid operons, the LexA binding sites of genes under SOS control, the intergenic control region of bacteriophage f1, and the polyadenylylation sites in eukaryotic viruses. These results demonstrate the existence of close correspondences between sites of predicted superhelical duplex destabilization and specific types of regulatory regions. The use of these correspondences to supplement string-matching techniques in the search for regulatory loci is discussed.

  3. Heavy vehicle industry site visits: comments from companies and conclusions from technical committee

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report documents the results of several visits with industry as part of the Department of Energy (DOE), office of Transportation Technology, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology, supported Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project. The purpose of the DOE Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project is to use government resources to bring the aerodynamic expertise available in government organizations and academia to bear in assisting the heavy vehicle industry to reduce aerodynamic drag on trucks. The obvious payback from this investment is the reduction in fuel usage and derivative reduction in the US's dependence on foreign oil imports. This report covers 2 projects: (1) The stated purpose of Project 1 was to provide near-term impact through emphasis on existing tools and capabilities and to focus on the trailer drag problem. (2) The stated purpose of Project 2 was to provide the tools necessary to accomplish the longer term goal of a fully-integrated, aerodynamic tractor-trailer combination.

  4. The Impact of the Title IV-C, ESEA Innovative-Exemplary Program on Education in Kansas. Results from On-Site Visits. Results from Mailed Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havlicek, Larry L.; Huppee, Barbara A.

    Results are reported from 12 on-site visits and from mailed questionnaire returns regarding the continuing effects of the Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Title IV-C, Innovative Exemplary Program, on education in Kansas. At each district visited, information was obtained, and verified when possible, regarding the changes resulting from…

  5. Assessing Quality in Digital Reference Services Site Visit Reports: State Library of Florida, Bureau of Library and Network Services and Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Melissa; McClure, Charles R.

    The Assessing Quality on Digital Reference team conducted two site visits at Florida Libraries in August 2001. The objectives of these visits were to: document how digital reference services are currently being planned for, delivered, and evaluated in libraries; understand how "quality" in digital reference is defined in these…

  6. REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE ON MANAGING RISKS AT WOOD TREATING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 700 sites in the United States have been identified where wood preserving operations have been conducted. The most common types of wood preservatives found at these sites are creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and copper chromated arsenate (CCA). When properly used and dis...

  7. REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE ON MANAGING RISKS AT WOOD TREATING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 700 sites in the United States have been identified where wood preserving operations have been conducted. The most common types of wood preservatives found at these sites are creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and copper chromated arsenate (CCA). When properly used and dis...

  8. Protecting the Lunar Heritage Sites from the Effects of Visiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Lane, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The Problem: Rocket exhaust blows soil and rocks over vast distances at velocities upwards of 1 to 3 km/s, and this will be highly abrasive and damaging if it impacts the valuable lunar heritage sites.

  9. US Department of Energy wind turbine candidate site program: the regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.R.; York, K.R.

    1982-06-01

    Sites selected in 1979 as tentative sites for installation of a demonstration MOD-2 turbine are emphasized. Selection as a candidate site in this program meant that the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the site as eligible for a DOE-purchased and installed meteorological tower. The regulatory procedures involved in the siting and installation of these meteorological towers at the majority of the candidate sites are examined. An attempt is also made, in a preliminary fashion, to identify the legal and regulatory procedures that would be required to put up a turbine at each of these candidate sites. The information provided on each of these sites comes primarily from utility representatives, supplemented by conversations with state and local officials. The major findings are summarized on the following: federal requirements, state requirements, local requirements, land ownership, wind rights, and public attitudes.

  10. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. To accomplish this mission, the program seeks to advance the development, implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies for hazardous waste chara...

  11. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. To accomplish this mission, the program seeks to advance the development, implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies for hazardous waste chara...

  12. Report: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Site Visit of the Clifton Street Sewer Separation and Water Main Replacement Projects, Portland, Maine

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-R-0248, June 7, 2011. We conducted an unannounced site visit of the Clifton Street Sewer Separation and Water Main Replacement Projects in the City of Portland, Maine, from June 15 through June 17, 2009.

  13. Young Volunteers in Action. Goal Accomplishment and Perceived Outcomes Evaluation. Supplemental Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACTION, Washington, DC.

    This report presents the findings of an evaluation of goal accomplishment at Young Volunteers in Action (YVA) projects at three sites: ALexander City, Alabama; Gainesville, Florida; and New Orleans, Louisiana. First, a brief introduction describes the YVA program and discusses the evaluation approach. The next three sections present case studies…

  14. Re-visiting the tympanic membrane vicinity as core body temperature measurement site

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chee Wee; Liang, Wenyu

    2017-01-01

    Core body temperature (CBT) is an important and commonly used indicator of human health and endurance performance. A rise in baseline CBT can be attributed to an onset of flu, infection or even thermoregulatory failure when it becomes excessive. Sites which have been used for measurement of CBT include the pulmonary artery, the esophagus, the rectum and the tympanic membrane. Among them, the tympanic membrane is an attractive measurement site for CBT due to its unobtrusive nature and ease of measurement facilitated, especially when continuous CBT measurements are needed for monitoring such as during military, occupational and sporting settings. However, to-date, there are still polarizing views on the suitability of tympanic membrane as a CBT site. This paper will revisit a number of key unresolved issues in the literature and also presents, for the first time, a benchmark of the middle ear temperature against temperature measurements from other sites. Results from experiments carried out on human and primate subjects will be presented to draw a fresh set of insights against the backdrop of hypotheses and controversies. PMID:28414722

  15. Re-visiting the tympanic membrane vicinity as core body temperature measurement site.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Wui Keat; Lee, Jason Kai Wei; Lim, Hsueh Yee; Gan, Chee Wee; Liang, Wenyu; Tan, Kok Kiong

    2017-01-01

    Core body temperature (CBT) is an important and commonly used indicator of human health and endurance performance. A rise in baseline CBT can be attributed to an onset of flu, infection or even thermoregulatory failure when it becomes excessive. Sites which have been used for measurement of CBT include the pulmonary artery, the esophagus, the rectum and the tympanic membrane. Among them, the tympanic membrane is an attractive measurement site for CBT due to its unobtrusive nature and ease of measurement facilitated, especially when continuous CBT measurements are needed for monitoring such as during military, occupational and sporting settings. However, to-date, there are still polarizing views on the suitability of tympanic membrane as a CBT site. This paper will revisit a number of key unresolved issues in the literature and also presents, for the first time, a benchmark of the middle ear temperature against temperature measurements from other sites. Results from experiments carried out on human and primate subjects will be presented to draw a fresh set of insights against the backdrop of hypotheses and controversies.

  16. 77 FR 23764 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Site Visit Data Collection; American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... provided and to identify promising best practices and strategies for replication. It is necessary to collect data from the grant sites included in both studies while they are still in operation. Failure to... jobs as a strategy for reducing poverty or increasing employment. Conducting these evaluations...

  17. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme. PMID:21731629

  18. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.; Gerrard, Juliet Ann

    2011-06-24

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  19. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  20. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  1. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  2. Dudley Boulevard Site Visit at Former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-21

    van scan of the former McClellan AFB, Sacramento, CA, a site was found to have Radium -226 contamination. A 2007 characterization survey conducted...by Cabrera Services determined that the site’s asphalt and shallow soils were impacted by Radium -226 and that Radium -226 was the sole contaminant of...Radioanalytical Laboratory using the appropriate in-growth method to determine Radium -226 levels in soil. The values reported for Radium -226 are, in fact

  3. Extracting regulatory sites from the upstream region of yeast genes by computational analysis of oligonucleotide frequencies.

    PubMed

    van Helden, J; André, B; Collado-Vides, J

    1998-09-04

    We present here a simple and fast method allowing the isolation of DNA binding sites for transcription factors from families of coregulated genes, with results illustrated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although conceptually simple, the algorithm proved efficient for extracting, from most of the yeast regulatory families analyzed, the upstream regulatory sequences which had been previously found by experimental analysis. Furthermore, putative new regulatory sites are predicted within upstream regions of several regulons. The method is based on the detection of over-represented oligonucleotides. A specificity of this approach is to define the statistical significance of a site based on tables of oligonucleotide frequencies observed in all non-coding sequences from the yeast genome. In contrast with heuristic methods, this oligonucleotide analysis is rigorous and exhaustive. Its range of detection is however limited to relatively simple patterns: short motifs with a highly conserved core. These features seem to be shared by a good number of regulatory sites in yeast. This, and similar methods, should be increasingly required to identify unknown regulatory elements within the numerous new coregulated families resulting from measurements of gene expression levels at the genomic scale. All tools described here are available on the web at the site http://copan.cifn.unam.mx/Computational_Biology/ yeast-tools Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  4. Regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection in Malaysia-a review.

    PubMed

    Basri, N A; Hashim, S; Ramli, A T; Bradley, D A; Hamzah, K

    2016-12-01

    Malaysia has initiated a range of pre-project activities in preparation for its planned nuclear power programme. Clearly one of the first steps is the selection of sites that are deemed suitable for the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Here we outline the Malaysian regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection, emphasizing details of the selection procedures and site characteristics needed, with a clear focus on radiation safety and radiation protection in respect of the site surroundings. The Malaysia Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) site selection guidelines are in accord with those provided in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents. To enhance the suitability criteria during selection, as well as to assist in the final decision making process, possible assessments using the site selection characteristics and information are proposed.

  5. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory sites in the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Thieffry, D; Salgado, H; Huerta, A M; Collado-Vides, J

    1998-06-01

    As one of the best-characterized free-living organisms, Escherichia coli and its recently completed genomic sequence offer a special opportunity to exploit systematically the variety of regulatory data available in the literature in order to make a comprehensive set of regulatory predictions in the whole genome. The complete genome sequence of E.coli was analyzed for the binding of transcriptional regulators upstream of coding sequences. The biological information contained in RegulonDB (Huerta, A.M. et al., Nucleic Acids Res.,26,55-60, 1998) for 56 different transcriptional proteins was the support to implement a stringent strategy combining string search and weight matrices. We estimate that our search included representatives of 15-25% of the total number of regulatory binding proteins in E.coli. This search was performed on the set of 4288 putative regulatory regions, each 450 bp long. Within the regions with predicted sites, 89% are regulated by one protein and 81% involve only one site. These numbers are reasonably consistent with the distribution of experimental regulatory sites. Regulatory sites are found in 603 regions corresponding to 16% of operon regions and 10% of intra-operonic regions. Additional evidence gives stronger support to some of these predictions, including the position of the site, biological consistency with the function of the downstream gene, as well as genetic evidence for the regulatory interaction. The predictions described here were incorporated into the map presented in the paper describing the complete E.coli genome (Blattner,F.R. et al., Science, 277, 1453-1461, 1997). The complete set of predictions in GenBank format is available at the url: http://www. cifn.unam.mx/Computational_Biology/E.coli-predictions ecoli-reg@cifn.unam.mx, collado@cifn.unam.mx

  6. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  7. Welfare-to-Work Program Coordination in Texas. Report on the Initial Site Visits. First in a Series of Reports on JTPA/Welfare Coordination Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gula, Annette; King, Christopher T.

    The first round of site visits to welfare-to-work programs in Texas examined the nature and degree of program coordination at three sites: El Paso, Houston, and San Antonio. A brief overview of the growing literature on program coordination paid particular attention to welfare-related studies. At the state level, evidence was found of increasing…

  8. Regulatory supervision of sites for spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the Russian northwest.

    PubMed

    Shandala, N K; Sneve, M K; Smith, G M; Kiselev, M F; Kochetkov, O A; Savkin, M N; Simakov, A V; Novikova, N Ya; Titov, A V; Romanov, V V; Seregin, V A; Filonova, A V; Semenova, M P

    2008-12-01

    In the 1960s two technical bases for the Northern Fleet were created in the Russian northwest at Andreeva Bay in the Kola Peninsula and Gremikha village on the coast of the Barents Sea. They maintained nuclear submarines, receiving and storing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. No further waste was received after 1985, and the technical bases have since been re-categorised as temporary storage sites. The handling of these materials to put them into a safe condition is especially hazardous because of their degraded state. This paper describes regulatory activities which have been carried out to support the supervision of radiological protection during recovery of waste and spent fuel, and to support regulatory decisions on overall site remediation. The work described includes: an assessment of the radiation situation on-site; the development of necessary additional regulatory rules and standards for radiation protection assurance for workers and the public during remediation; and the completion of an initial threat assessment to identify regulatory priorities. Detailed consideration of measures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and radiation exposure of the public during and after operations and emergency preparedness and response are complete and provided in sister papers. The continuing requirements for regulatory activities relevant to the development and implementation of on-going and future remediation activities are also outlined. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority supports the work, as part of the Norwegian Government's plan of action to promote improvements in radiation protection and nuclear safety in northwest Russia.

  9. Expected number of distinct sites visited by N Lévy flights on a one-dimensional lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Havlin, S.; Larralde, H.; Weiss, G. H.

    1996-06-01

    We calculate asymptotic forms for the expected number of distinct sites, , visited by N noninteracting n-step symmetric Lévy flights in one dimension. By a Lévy flight we mean one in which the probability of making a step of j sites is proportional to 1/\\|j\\|1+α in the limit j-->∞. All values of α>~0 are considered. In our analysis each Lévy flight is initially at the origin and both N and n are assumed to be large. Different asymptotic results are obtained for different ranges in α. When n is fixed and N-->∞ we find that is proportional to (Nn2)1/(1+α) for α<1 and to N1/(1+α)n1/α for α>~1. When α exceeds 2 the second moment is finite and one expects the results of Larralde et al. [Phys. Rev. A 45, 7128 (1992)] to be valid. We give results for both fixed n and N-->∞ and N fixed and n-->∞. In the second case the analysis leads to the behavior predicted by Larralde et al.

  10. DETERMINANTS OF FIRST ANTENATAL CARE VISIT BY PREGNANT WOMEN AT COMMUNITY BASED EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND SERVICE SITES IN NORTHERN UGANDA.

    PubMed

    Turyasiima, M; Tugume, R; Openy, A; Ahairwomugisha, E; Opio, R; Ntunguka, M; Mahulo, N; Akera, P; Odongo-Aginya, E

    2014-09-01

    Antenatal care (ANC) aims mainly at prevention, early detection and management of general medical and pregnancy associated disorders. Early booking is recommended for maximum utilisation. To investigate the determinants of first ANC visit and trimesters at which pregnant mothers enrol for ANC at the COBERS sites of Northern Uganda. A descriptive cross-sectional study. Five community based Education, Research and Service sites (COBERS) of Atiak, Madi Opei, Mungula, Namukora and Pajule health centre, fours (HC IV) in the five respective districts of Amuru, Lamwo, Adjumani, Kitgum and Pader, Northern Uganda, from April to July 2013. Four hundred and seventeen (417) pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) in five health centres and ten purposively selected midwives were interviewed using questionnaires. Of the 417 respondents, only 11.5% (n = 48) had their first ANC at the recommended period of 0-16 weeks. Prevalence of late entry to ANC was 88.5% (n = 369). Mean gestational age at booking was 22.6 ± 5.7 weeks. Paternal level of education, outcome of previous pregnancy, previous ANC attendance, weeks of amenorrhea, convenience of opening hours at ANC facility, commuting distance from home to health facility, knowing the right time for ANC enrollment and pregnancy planning remained significant predictors governing early booking. Late ANC booking is still a major public health concern that demands public enlightenment and paternal education coupled with women empowerment will reduce the magnitude of the problem.

  11. Extraction of Functional Binding Sites from Unique Regulatory Regions: The Drosophila Early Developmental Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Papatsenko, Dmitri A.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Lifanov, Alex P.; Régnier, Mireille; Nazina, Anna G.; Desplan, Claude

    2002-01-01

    The early developmental enhancers of Drosophila melanogaster comprise one of the most sophisticated regulatory systems in higher eukaryotes. An elaborate code in their DNA sequence translates both maternal and early embryonic regulatory signals into spatial distribution of transcription factors. One of the most striking features of this code is the redundancy of binding sites for these transcription factors (BSTF). Using this redundancy, we explored the possibility of predicting functional binding sites in a single enhancer region without any prior consensus/matrix description or evolutionary sequence comparisons. We developed a conceptually simple algorithm, Scanseq, that employs an original statistical evaluation for identifying the most redundant motifs and locates the position of potential BSTF in a given regulatory region. To estimate the biological relevance of our predictions, we built thorough literature-based annotations for the best-known Drosophila developmental enhancers and we generated detailed distribution maps for the most robust binding sites. The high statistical correlation between the location of BSTF in these experiment-based maps and the location predicted in silico by Scanseq confirmed the relevance of our approach. We also discuss the definition of true binding sites and the possible biological principles that govern patterning of regulatory regions and the distribution of transcriptional signals. PMID:11875036

  12. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent...

  13. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent...

  14. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent...

  15. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent...

  16. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent...

  17. Site-specific parameter values for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's food pathway dose model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M. )

    1992-02-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Western South Carolina result in radionuclide releases to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiation doses to the off-site maximum individual and the off-site population within 80 km of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are currently generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose-model parameters for facilities without resources to develop site-specific values. A survey of land- and water-use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine site-specific values for water recreation, consumption, and agricultural parameters used in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 (1977) dosimetric models. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; recreational and commercial activities on the Savannah River; and meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates. This paper describes how parameter data were obtained at the Savannah River Site and the impacts of such data on off-site dose. Dose estimates using site-specific parameter values are compared to estimates using the NRC default values.

  18. A web site for the computational analysis of yeast regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    van Helden, J; André, B; Collado-Vides, J

    2000-01-30

    A series of computer programs were developed for the analysis of regulatory sequences, with a special focus on yeast. These tools are publicly available on the web (http://copan.cifn.unam. mx/Computational_Biology/yeast-tools or http://www.ucmb.ulb.ac. be/bioinformatics/rsa-tools/). Basically, three classical problems can be addressed: (a) search for known regulatory patterns in the upstream regions of known genes; (b) discovery of unknown regulatory patterns within a set of upstream regions known to be co-regulated; (c) search for unknown genes potentially regulated by a known transcription factor. Each of these tasks can be performed on basis of a simple (string) or more refined (matrix) description of the regulatory patterns. A feature-map program automatically generates visual representations of the positions at which patterns were found. The site also provides a series of general utilities, such as generation of random sequence, automatic drawing of XY graphs, interconversions between sequence formats, etc. Several tools are linked together to allow their sequential utilization (piping), but each one can also be used independently by filling the web form with external data. This widens the scope of the site to the analysis of non-regulatory and/or non-yeast sequences. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Structure-based prediction of DNA target sites by regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Kono, H; Sarai, A

    1999-04-01

    Regulatory proteins play a critical role in controlling complex spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression in higher organism, by recognizing multiple DNA sequences and regulating multiple target genes. Increasing amounts of structural data on the protein-DNA complex provides clues for the mechanism of target recognition by regulatory proteins. The analyses of the propensities of base-amino acid interactions observed in those structural data show that there is no one-to-one correspondence in the interaction, but clear preferences exist. On the other hand, the analysis of spatial distribution of amino acids around bases shows that even those amino acids with strong base preference such as Arg with G are distributed in a wide space around bases. Thus, amino acids with many different geometries can form a similar type of interaction with bases. The redundancy and structural flexibility in the interaction suggest that there are no simple rules in the sequence recognition, and its prediction is not straightforward. However, the spatial distributions of amino acids around bases indicate a possibility that the structural data can be used to derive empirical interaction potentials between amino acids and bases. Such information extracted from structural databases has been successfully used to predict amino acid sequences that fold into particular protein structures. We surmised that the structures of protein-DNA complexes could be used to predict DNA target sites for regulatory proteins, because determining DNA sequences that bind to a particular protein structure should be similar to finding amino acid sequences that fold into a particular structure. Here we demonstrate that the structural data can be used to predict DNA target sequences for regulatory proteins. Pairwise potentials that determine the interaction between bases and amino acids were empirically derived from the structural data. These potentials were then used to examine the compatibility between DNA

  20. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingfeng; Yu, Dong; Jin, Yuan; Dou, Lei; Li, Beiping; Wang, Yuelan; Yue, Junjie; Liang, Long

    2012-06-06

    Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs.

  1. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Results Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. Conclusions In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs. PMID:22672438

  2. Key findings from HSC's 2010 site visits: health care markets weather economic downturn, brace for health reform.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Grossman, Joy M; Tu, Ha T

    2011-05-01

    Lingering fallout--loss of jobs and employer coverage--from the great recession slowed demand for health care services but did little to slow aggressive competition by dominant hospital systems for well-insured patients, according to key findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2010 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Hospitals with significant market clout continued to command high payment rate increases from private insurers, and tighter hospital-physician alignment heightened concerns about growing provider market power. High and rising premiums led to increasing employer adoption of consumer-driven health plans and continued increases in patient cost sharing, but the broader movement to educate and engage consumers in care decisions did not keep pace. State and local budget deficits led to some funding cuts for safety net providers, but an influx of federal stimulus funds increased support to community health centers and shored up Medicaid programs, allowing many people who lost private insurance because of job losses to remain covered. Hospitals, physicians and insurers generally viewed health reform coverage expansions favorably, but all worried about protecting revenues as reform requirements phase in.

  3. The unfolded protein response triggers site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rising, Lisa; Mak, Raymond; Webb, Kristofor; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Zuzow, Nathan; Riviere, Paul; Yang, Bing; Fenech, Emma; Tang, Xin; Lindsay, Scott A.; Christianson, John C.; Hampton, Randolph Y.; Wasserman, Steven A.; Bennett, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insults to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis activate the unfolded protein response (UPR), which elevates protein folding and degradation capacity and attenuates protein synthesis. While a role for ubiquitin in regulating the degradation of misfolded ER-resident proteins is well described, ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translational reprogramming during the UPR remains uncharacterized. Using global quantitative ubiquitin proteomics, we identify evolutionarily conserved, site-specific regulatory ubiquitylation of 40S ribosomal proteins. We demonstrate that these events occur on assembled cytoplasmic ribosomes and are stimulated by both UPR activation and translation inhibition. We further show that ER stress-stimulated regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation occurs on a timescale similar to eIF2α phosphorylation, is dependent upon PERK signaling, and is required for optimal cell survival during chronic UPR activation. In total, these results reveal regulatory 40S ribosomal ubiquitylation as a previously uncharacterized and important facet of eukaryotic translational control. PMID:26051182

  4. Direct evidence for a phenylalanine site in the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Ilangovan, Udayar; Daubner, S Colette; Hinck, Andrew P; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2011-01-15

    The hydroxylation of phenylalanine to tyrosine by the liver enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase is regulated by the level of phenylalanine. Whether there is a distinct allosteric binding site for phenylalanine outside of the active site has been unclear. The enzyme contains an N-terminal regulatory domain that extends through Thr117. The regulatory domain of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein behaves as a dimer on a gel filtration column. In the presence of phenylalanine, the protein elutes earlier from the column, consistent with a conformational change in the presence of the amino acid. No change in elution is seen in the presence of the non-activating amino acid proline. ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC NMR spectra were obtained of the ¹⁵N-labeled protein alone and in the presence of phenylalanine or proline. A subset of the peaks in the spectrum exhibits chemical shift perturbation in the presence of phenylalanine, consistent with binding of phenylalanine at a specific site. No change in the NMR spectrum is seen in the presence of proline. These results establish that the regulatory domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase can bind phenylalanine, consistent with the presence of an allosteric site for the amino acid.

  5. Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan for site: Draft characterization of the Yucca Mountain site:Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the EMMP is to document compliance with the NWPA. To do so, a summary description of site characterization activites is provided, based on the consultation draft of the SCP. Subsequent chpaters identify those technical areas having the potential to be impacted by site characterization activities and the monitoring plans proposed to identify whether those impacts acutally occur. Should monitoring confirm the potential for significant adverse impact, mitigative measures will be developed. In the context of site characterization, mitigation is defined as those changes in site characterization activities that serve to avoid or minimize, to the maximum extent practicle, any significant adverse environmental impacts. Although site characterization activies involve both surface and subsurface activities, it is the surface-based aspect of site characterization that is addressed in detailed by the EMMP. The schedule and duration of these activities is given in the consultation draft of the SCP. A breif summary of all proposed activities is given in the EMMP. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Complementing computationally predicted regulatory sites in Tractor_DB using a pattern matching approach.

    PubMed

    Guía, Marylens Hernández; Pérez, Abel González; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotic genomes annotation has focused on genes location and function. The lack of regulatory information has limited the knowledge on cellular transcriptional regulatory networks. However, as more phylogenetically close genomes are sequenced and annotated, the implementation of phylogenetic footprinting strategies for the recognition of regulators and their regulons becomes more important. In this paper we describe a comparative genomics approach to the prediction of new gamma-proteobacterial regulon members. We take advantage of the phylogenetic proximity of Escherichia coli and other 16 organisms of this subdivision and the intensive search of the space sequence provided by a pattern-matching strategy. Using this approach we complement predictions of regulatory sites made using statistical models currently stored in Tractor_DB, and increase the number of transcriptional regulators with predicted binding sites up to 86. All these computational predictions may be reached at Tractor_DB (www.bioinfo.cu/Tractor_DB, www.tractor.lncc.br, www.ccg.unam.mx/Computational_Genomics/tractorDB/). We also take a first step in this paper towards the assessment of the conservation of the architecture of the regulatory network in the gamma-proteobacteria through evaluating the conservation of the overall connectivity of the network.

  7. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  8. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data.

    PubMed

    Kerns, James R; Followill, David S; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A; Stingo, Francesco C; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student's t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist's acquired values. Acquired values that are well outside the expected distribution should be

  9. Technical Report: Reference photon dosimetry data for Varian accelerators based on IROC-Houston site visit data

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, James R.; Followill, David S.; Kry, Stephen F.; Lowenstein, Jessica; Molineu, Andrea; Alvarez, Paola; Taylor, Paige A.; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate data regarding linear accelerator (Linac) radiation characteristics are important for treatment planning system modeling as well as regular quality assurance of the machine. The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core-Houston (IROC-H) has measured the dosimetric characteristics of numerous machines through their on-site dosimetry review protocols. Photon data are presented and can be used as a secondary check of acquired values, as a means to verify commissioning a new machine, or in preparation for an IROC-H site visit. Methods: Photon data from IROC-H on-site reviews from 2000 to 2014 were compiled and analyzed. Specifically, data from approximately 500 Varian machines were analyzed. Each dataset consisted of point measurements of several dosimetric parameters at various locations in a water phantom to assess the percentage depth dose, jaw output factors, multileaf collimator small field output factors, off-axis factors, and wedge factors. The data were analyzed by energy and parameter, with similarly performing machine models being assimilated into classes. Common statistical metrics are presented for each machine class. Measurement data were compared against other reference data where applicable. Results: Distributions of the parameter data were shown to be robust and derive from a student’s t distribution. Based on statistical and clinical criteria, all machine models were able to be classified into two or three classes for each energy, except for 6 MV for which there were eight classes. Quantitative analysis of the measurements for 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV photon beams is presented for each parameter; supplementary material has also been made available which contains further statistical information. Conclusions: IROC-H has collected numerous data on Varian Linacs and the results of photon measurements from the past 15 years are presented. The data can be used as a comparison check of a physicist’s acquired values. Acquired values that are well

  10. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  11. Site Visitation: Choctaw Language Teaching Program, Mississippi Choctaw Agency Schools, Philadelphia, Mississippi, August 7, 8, 1975. A Report. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 23-C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitka, Eugene

    A site visitation of the Bilingual Program at Choctaw Agency indicated that the program would be implemented during the 1975-76 school year. The program will involve teaching the reading and writing of the Choctaw language combined with teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). A structured approach will be used in teaching ESL to the Choctaw…

  12. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  13. Nevada Test Site Decontamination and Decommissioning Program History, Regulatory Framework, and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic, Bechtel Nevada; Patrick S. Morris, Bechtel Nevada; Jerel G. Nelson, Polestar Applied Technology, Inc.

    2005-08-07

    Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically and/or chemically contaminated facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Facilities identified for D&D are listed in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and closed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act process. This paper discusses the NTS D&D program, including facilities history, D&D regulatory framework, and valuable lessons learned.

  14. Early Regulatory Engagement for Successful Site Remediation: the UK Experience - 13173

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, R.P.; Senior, D.

    2013-07-01

    The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) is an independent safety, security and transport regulator of the UK nuclear industry. ONR regulates all civil nuclear reactor power stations, fuel manufacture, enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing, most defence sites and installations that store and process legacy spent fuel and radioactive waste. The responsibility for funding and strategic direction of decommissioning and radioactive waste management of state owned legacy sites has rested solely with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) since 2005. A key component of NDA's mandate was to encourage new strategic approaches and innovation to dealing with the UK's waste legacy and which deliver value-for-money to the UK taxpayer. ONR, as an agency of the Health and Safety Executive, is entirely independent of NDA and regulates all prescribed activities on NDA's sites. NDA's competition of site management and closure contracts has attracted significant international interest and the formation of consortia comprised of major British, US, French and Swedish organizations bidding for those contracts. The prominence of US organizations in each of those consortia reflects the scale and breadth of existing waste management and D and D projects in the US. This paper will articulate, in broad terms, the challenges faced by international organizations seeking to employ 'off-the-shelf' technology and D and D techniques, successfully employed elsewhere, into the UK regulatory context. The predominantly 'goal-setting' regulatory framework in the UK does not generally prescribe a minimum standard to which a licensee must adhere. The legal onus on licensees in the UK is to demonstrate, whatever technology is selected, that in its applications, risks are reduced 'So Far As Is Reasonably Practicable' or 'SFAIRP'. By the nature of its role, ONR adopts a conservative approach to regulation; however ONR also recognises that in the decommissioning (and ultimately the site closure) domain

  15. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  16. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  17. Using social networking sites (namely Facebook) in health visiting practice--an account of five years experience.

    PubMed

    Dion, Xena

    2015-02-01

    With new developments in electronic and social networking communication methods the way health visitors communicate with clients is rapidly changing. With good governance these technologies can be utilised to enhance the health visiting service and can be an effective way of accessing hard-to-reach families, saving time and resources. This paper presents five years' experience in the use of Facebook between the health visiting team and clients and explains the benefits and potential it offers to health visitors and other community practitioners.

  18. Shared regulatory sites are abundant in the human genome and shed light on genome evolution and disease pleiotropy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Pin; Monahan, Jack; Prendergast, James G D

    2017-03-01

    Large-scale gene expression datasets are providing an increasing understanding of the location of cis-eQTLs in the human genome and their role in disease. However, little is currently known regarding the extent of regulatory site-sharing between genes. This is despite it having potentially wide-ranging implications, from the determination of the way in which genetic variants may shape multiple phenotypes to the understanding of the evolution of human gene order. By first identifying the location of non-redundant cis-eQTLs, we show that regulatory site-sharing is a relatively common phenomenon in the human genome, with over 10% of non-redundant regulatory variants linked to the expression of multiple nearby genes. We show that these shared, local regulatory sites are linked to high levels of chromatin looping between the regulatory sites and their associated genes. In addition, these co-regulated gene modules are found to be strongly conserved across mammalian species, suggesting that shared regulatory sites have played an important role in shaping human gene order. The association of these shared cis-eQTLs with multiple genes means they also appear to be unusually important in understanding the genetics of human phenotypes and pleiotropy, with shared regulatory sites more often linked to multiple human phenotypes than other regulatory variants. This study shows that regulatory site-sharing is likely an underappreciated aspect of gene regulation and has important implications for the understanding of various biological phenomena, including how the two and three dimensional structures of the genome have been shaped and the potential causes of disease pleiotropy outside coding regions.

  19. Shared regulatory sites are abundant in the human genome and shed light on genome evolution and disease pleiotropy

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Pin

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale gene expression datasets are providing an increasing understanding of the location of cis-eQTLs in the human genome and their role in disease. However, little is currently known regarding the extent of regulatory site-sharing between genes. This is despite it having potentially wide-ranging implications, from the determination of the way in which genetic variants may shape multiple phenotypes to the understanding of the evolution of human gene order. By first identifying the location of non-redundant cis-eQTLs, we show that regulatory site-sharing is a relatively common phenomenon in the human genome, with over 10% of non-redundant regulatory variants linked to the expression of multiple nearby genes. We show that these shared, local regulatory sites are linked to high levels of chromatin looping between the regulatory sites and their associated genes. In addition, these co-regulated gene modules are found to be strongly conserved across mammalian species, suggesting that shared regulatory sites have played an important role in shaping human gene order. The association of these shared cis-eQTLs with multiple genes means they also appear to be unusually important in understanding the genetics of human phenotypes and pleiotropy, with shared regulatory sites more often linked to multiple human phenotypes than other regulatory variants. This study shows that regulatory site-sharing is likely an underappreciated aspect of gene regulation and has important implications for the understanding of various biological phenomena, including how the two and three dimensional structures of the genome have been shaped and the potential causes of disease pleiotropy outside coding regions. PMID:28282383

  20. Stennis' granddaughter visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-06

    Jane Kenna of Atlanta, granddaughter of the late Sen. John C. Stennis, visits StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Kenna and her husband, John, visited Stennis on April 6, her first trip to the rocket engine testing facility since the 1988 ceremony to rename the site in honor of her grandfather.

  1. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report. Appendix E

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program (ESPDP) is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. This document provides Appendix E which contains a population density report. In this study the proposed US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) population density and exclusion zone size criteria were evaluated for their potential effectiveness to meet the quantitative public health and safety objectives associated with the NRC Safety Goal Policy. In addition, the individual and societal risks from postulated accidents (based on NUREG-1150 methods) were determined and compared to the quantitative prompt and latent health objective of the safety goal policy.

  2. Environmental regulatory compliance plan, Deaf County site, Texas: Draft revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-14

    The DOE is committed to conduct its operation in an environmentally safe and sound manner and comply with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statues and regulations. These objectives are codified in DOE order N 5400.2, ''Environmental Policy Statement.'' This document, the Deaf Smith County site (Texas) Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plam (ERCP), is one means of implementing that policy. The ERCP describes the environmental regulatory requirements applicable to the Deaf Smith County site (Texas), and presented the framework within which the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) will comply with the requirements. The plan also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental requirements. To achieve this purpose the ERCP will be developed in phases. This version of the ERCP is the first phase in the delopment of the ERCP. It represents the Salt Repository Project Office's understanding of environmental requirements for the site characterization phase of repository development. After consultation with the appropriate federal and state agencies and affected Indian tribes, the ERCP will be updated to reflect the results of consultation with these agencies and affected Indian tribes. 6 refs., 38 figs.

  3. Resident and Faculty Perceptions of Program Strengths and Opportunities for Improvement: Comparison of Site Visit Reports and ACGME Resident Survey Data in 5 Surgical Specialties.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A; Yamazaki, Kenji; Yaghmour, Nicholas; Philibert, Ingrid; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-05-01

    Background Resident and faculty views of program strengths and opportunities for improvement (OFIs) offer insight into how stakeholders assess key elements of the learning environment. Objective This study sought (1) to assess the degree to which residents and faculty in 359 programs in 5 surgical specialties (obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, and surgery) were aligned or divergent in their respective views of program strengths and OFIs; and (2) to evaluate whether responses to selected questions on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Resident Survey correlated with strengths or OFIs identified by the residents during the site visit. Methods Faculty and resident lists of program strengths and OFIs in site visit reports for 2012 and 2013 were aggregated, analyzed, and compared to responses on the Resident Survey. Results While there was considerable alignment in resident and faculty perceptions of program strengths and OFIs, some attributes were more important to one or the other group. Collegiality was valued highly by both stakeholder groups. Responses to 2 questions on the ACGME Resident Survey were associated with resident-identified OFIs in site visit reports pertaining to aspects of the didactic program and responsiveness to resident suggestions for improvement. Conclusions The findings offer program leadership additional insight into how 2 key stakeholder groups view elements of the learning environment as program strengths or OFIs and may serve as useful focal areas for ongoing improvement activities.

  4. Patient motives behind low-acuity visits to the emergency department in Germany: a qualitative study comparing urban and rural sites

    PubMed Central

    Möckel, Martin; Slagman, Anna; Frick, Johann; Ruhla, Stephan; Searle, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The increasing number of low-acuity visits to emergency departments (ED) is an important issue in Germany, despite the fact that all costs of inpatient and outpatient treatment are covered by mandatory health insurance. We aimed to explore the motives of patients categorised with low-acuity conditions for visiting an ED. Methods We conducted a qualitative study in two urban and one rural ED. We recruited a purposive sample of adults, who were assigned to the lowest two categories in the Manchester triage system. One-to-one interviews took place in the ED during patients' waiting time for treatment. Interview transcripts were analysed using the qualitative data management software MAXQDA. A qualitative content analysis approach was taken to identify motives and to compare the rural with the urban sites. Results A total of 86 patients were asked to participate; of these, n=15 declined participation and n=7 were excluded because they were admitted as inpatients, leaving a final sample of 40 female and 24 male patients. We identified three pathways leading to an ED visit: (1) without primary care contact, (2) after unsuccessful attempts to see a resident specialist or general practitioner (GP) and (3) recommendation to visit the ED by an outpatient provider. The two essential motives were (1) convenience and (2) health anxiety, triggered by time constraints and focused usage of multidisciplinary medical care in a highly equipped setting. All participants from the rural region were connected to a GP, whom they saw more or less regularly, while more interviewees from the urban site did not have a permanent GP. Still, motives to visit the ED were in general the same. Conclusions We conclude that the ED plays a pivotal role in ambulatory acute care which needs to be recognised for adequate resource allocation. Trial registration number DRK S00006053 PMID:27852722

  5. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Sneve, M K; Kiselev, M; Shandala, N K

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  6. Furoates and thenoates inhibit pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 allosterically by binding to its pyruvate regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Masini, Tiziana; Birkaya, Barbara; van Dijk, Simon; Mondal, Milon; Hekelaar, Johan; Jäger, Manuel; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Patel, Mulchand S; Hirsch, Anna K H; Moman, Edelmiro

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed the reawakening of cancer metabolism as a therapeutic target. In particular, inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) holds remarkable promise. Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), currently undergoing clinical trials, is a unique PDK inhibitor in which it binds to the allosteric pyruvate site of the enzyme. However, the safety of DCA as a drug is compromised by its neurotoxicity, whereas its usefulness as an investigative tool is limited by the high concentrations required to exert observable effects in cell culture. Herein, we report the identification - by making use of saturation-transfer difference NMR spectroscopy, enzymatic assays and computational methods - of furoate and thenoate derivatives as allosteric pyruvate-site-binding PDK2 inhibitors. This work substantiates the pyruvate regulatory pocket as a druggable target.

  7. Transcription factor abundance controlled by an auto-regulatory mechanism involving a transcription start site switch.

    PubMed

    Ngondo, Richard Patryk; Carbon, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A transcriptional feedback loop is the simplest and most direct means for a transcription factor to provide an increased stability of gene expression. In this work performed in human cells, we reveal a new negative auto-regulatory mechanism involving an alternative transcription start site (TSS) usage. Using the activating transcription factor ZNF143 as a model, we show that the ZNF143 low-affinity binding sites, located downstream of its canonical TSS, play the role of protein sensors to induce the up- or down-regulation of ZNF143 gene expression. We uncovered that the TSS switch that mediates this regulation implies the differential expression of two transcripts with an opposite protein production ability due to their different 5' untranslated regions. Moreover, our analysis of the ENCODE data suggests that this mechanism could be used by other transcription factors to rapidly respond to their own aberrant expression level.

  8. Russian Experience in the Regulatory Supervision of the Uranium Legacy Sites - 12441

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, M.F.; Romanov, V.V.; Shandala, N.K.; Titov, A.V.; Kiselev, S.M.; Seregin, V.A.; Metlyaev, E.G.; Novikova, N.; Khokhlova, E.A.

    2012-07-01

    Management of the uranium legacy is accompanied with environmental impact intensity of which depends on the amount of the waste generated, the extent of that waste localization and environmental spreading. The question is: how hazardous is such impact on the environment and human health? The criterion for safety assurance is adequate regulation of the uranium legacy. Since the establishment of the uranium industry, the well done regulatory system operates in the FMBA of Russia. Such system covers inter alia, the uranium legacy. This system includes the extent laboratory network of independent control and supervision, scientific researches, regulative practices. The current Russian normative and legal basis of the regulation and its application practice has a number of problems relating to the uranium legacy, connected firstly with the environmental remediation. To improve the regulatory system, the urgent tasks are: -To introduce the existing exposure situation into the national laws and standards in compliance with the ICRP system. - To develop criteria for site remediation and return, by stages, to uncontrolled uses. The similar criteria have been developed within the Russian-Norwegian cooperation for the purpose of remediation of the sites for temporary storage of SNF and RW. - To consider possibilities and methods of optimization for the remediation strategies under development. - To separate the special category - RW resulted from uranium ore mining and dressing. The current Russian RW classification is based on the waste subdivision in terms of the specific activities. Having in mind the new RW-specific law, we receive the opportunity to separate some special category - RW originated from the uranium mining and milling. Introduction of such category can simplify significantly the situation with management of waste of uranium mining and milling processes. Such approach is implemented in many countries and approved by IAEA. The category of 'RW originated from

  9. Building a dictionary for genomes: Identification of presumptive regulatory sites by statistical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Li, Hao; Siggia, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    The availability of complete genome sequences and mRNA expression data for all genes creates new opportunities and challenges for identifying DNA sequence motifs that control gene expression. An algorithm, “MobyDick,” is presented that decomposes a set of DNA sequences into the most probable dictionary of motifs or words. This method is applicable to any set of DNA sequences: for example, all upstream regions in a genome or all genes expressed under certain conditions. Identification of words is based on a probabilistic segmentation model in which the significance of longer words is deduced from the frequency of shorter ones of various lengths, eliminating the need for a separate set of reference data to define probabilities. We have built a dictionary with 1,200 words for the 6,000 upstream regulatory regions in the yeast genome; the 500 most significant words (some with as few as 10 copies in all of the upstream regions) match 114 of 443 experimentally determined sites (a significance level of 18 standard deviations). When analyzing all of the genes up-regulated during sporulation as a group, we find many motifs in addition to the few previously identified by analyzing the subclusters individually to the expression subclusters. Applying MobyDick to the genes derepressed when the general repressor Tup1 is deleted, we find known as well as putative binding sites for its regulatory partners. PMID:10944202

  10. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Nonhyperbolic kinetics of enzymatic reaction at low substrate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, A.R.; Baikov, A.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-08-10

    The initial rate of PP/sub 1/ hydrolysis by inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was analyzed as a function of the concentrations of the Mg-PP/sub 1/ complex (substrate) and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions (activator) at substrate concentrations down to 0.1 ..mu..M. Lineweaver-Burk plots for the enzyme in equilibrium with Mg/sup 2 +/ ions were nonlinear at fixed Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations, which cannot be explained within the framework of previously proposed models of the reaction. The nonlinearity is retained for the monomeric form of the enzyme and indicates that the enzyme has a regulatory site capable of tightly binding free PP/sub 1/ (K/sub d/ approx. 0.02 ..mu..M). A new model of the reaction is proposed in which Mg-PP/sub 1/, PP/sub 1/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ are bound to the enzyme in random order and filling of the regulatory site decreases the dissociation constant of the protein-Mg complex from 4.7 to 0.025 mM. It was concluded that PP/sub 1/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ are regulators of pyrophosphatase activity under physiological conditions.

  11. Characterization of an upstream regulatory element of adenovirus L1 poly (A) site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li

    2005-06-20

    The transition from early to late stage infection by adenovirus involves a change in mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit (AdMLTU). This early to late switch centers around alternative selection of one of five poly (A) sites (L1-L5) that code for the major structural proteins of Adenovirus. During the early stage of infection, steady state mRNA is primarily derived from the L1 poly (A) site. During the late stage of infection, each of the MLTU poly (A) sites is represented in the steady state mRNA pool (Falck-Pedersen, E., Logan, J., 1989. Regulation of poly(A) site selection in adenovirus. J. Virol. 63 (2), 532-541.). Using transient transfection of a plasmid expressing Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase with a tandem poly (A) minigene system (L13) (DeZazzo, J.D., Falck-Pedersen, E., Imperiale, M.J., 1991. Sequences regulating temporal poly(A) site switching in the adenovirus major late transcription unit. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11 (12), 5977-5984; Prescott, J., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1994. Sequence elements upstream of the 3' cleavage site confer substrate strength to the adenovirus L1 and L3 polyadenylation sites. Mol. Cell. Biol. 14 (7), 4682-4693.), it has been demonstrated that the promoter-proximal L1 poly (A) site which is poorly recognized by the 3' end processing machinery, contains an upstream repressor element (URE) that influences steady state levels of mRNA (Prescott, J.C., Liu, L., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1997. Sequence-mediated regulation of adenovirus gene expression by repression of mRNA accumulation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17 (4), 2207-2216.). In this study, we have further characterized the elements that mediate L1URE function. These studies indicate that the L1 upstream regulatory element (L1 URE) contains a complex RNA architecture that serves to repress gene expression through multiple sub-effectors. The L1URE functions when located upstream of a heterologous poly (A) site, and is able to strongly suppress steady state m

  12. Federal consortium visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-10

    Members of the Southeast U.S. Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer gather at the base of the B-1/B-2 Test Stand during a Feb. 10 visit to John C. Stennis Space Center. The group visited Stennis to tour facilities and receive briefings on work at the rocket engine test site. They also visited the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center site and received a briefing on construction of the new science center. The FLC is a nationwide network of federal laboratories to facilitate technology transfers between federal agencies and commercial companies.

  13. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  14. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  15. Evolution of DNA-Binding Sites of a Floral Master Regulatory Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Jose M.; de Bruijn, Suzanne; Pajoro, Alice; Geuten, Koen; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, Gerco C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Flower development is controlled by the action of key regulatory transcription factors of the MADS-domain family. The function of these factors appears to be highly conserved among species based on mutant phenotypes. However, the conservation of their downstream processes is much less well understood, mostly because the evolutionary turnover and variation of their DNA-binding sites (BSs) among plant species have not yet been experimentally determined. Here, we performed comparative ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-seq experiments of the MADS-domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) in two closely related Arabidopsis species: Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata which have very similar floral organ morphology. We found that BS conservation is associated with DNA sequence conservation, the presence of the CArG-box BS motif and on the relative position of the BS to its potential target gene. Differences in genome size and structure can explain that SEP3 BSs in A. lyrata can be located more distantly to their potential target genes than their counterparts in A. thaliana. In A. lyrata, we identified transposition as a mechanism to generate novel SEP3 binding locations in the genome. Comparative gene expression analysis shows that the loss/gain of BSs is associated with a change in gene expression. In summary, this study investigates the evolutionary dynamics of DNA BSs of a floral key-regulatory transcription factor and explores factors affecting this phenomenon. PMID:26429922

  16. Retroviral Scanning: Mapping MLV Integration Sites to Define Cell-specific Regulatory Regions.

    PubMed

    Romano, Oriana; Cifola, Ingrid; Poletti, Valentina; Severgnini, Marco; Peano, Clelia; De Bellis, Gianluca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Miccio, Annarita

    2017-05-28

    Moloney murine leukemia (MLV) virus-based retroviral vectors integrate predominantly in acetylated enhancers and promoters. For this reason, mLV integration sites can be used as functional markers of active regulatory elements. Here, we present a retroviral scanning tool, which allows the genome-wide identification of cell-specific enhancers and promoters. Briefly, the target cell population is transduced with an mLV-derived vector and genomic DNA is digested with a frequently cutting restriction enzyme. After ligation of genomic fragments with a compatible DNA linker, linker-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) allows the amplification of the virus-host genome junctions. Massive sequencing of the amplicons is used to define the mLV integration profile genome-wide. Finally, clusters of recurrent integrations are defined to identify cell-specific regulatory regions, responsible for the activation of cell-type specific transcriptional programs. The retroviral scanning tool allows the genome-wide identification of cell-specific promoters and enhancers in prospectively isolated target cell populations. Notably, retroviral scanning represents an instrumental technique for the retrospective identification of rare populations (e.g. somatic stem cells) that lack robust markers for prospective isolation.

  17. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  18. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  19. Making Child Care Centers SAFER: A Non-Regulatory Approach to Improving Child Care Center Siting

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Tarah S; Harvey, Margaret L.; Rusnak, Sharee Major

    2011-01-01

    Licensed child care centers are generally considered to be safe because they are required to meet state licensing regulations. As part of their licensing requirements, many states inspect child care centers and include an assessment of the health and safety of the facility to look for hazardous conditions or practices that may harm children. However, most states do not require an environmental assessment of the child care center building or land to prevent a center from being placed on, next to, or inside contaminated buildings. Having worked on several sites where child care centers were affected by environmental contaminants, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) endeavor to raise awareness of this issue. One of ATSDR's partner states, Connecticut, took a proactive, non-regulatory approach to the issue with the development its Child Day Care Screening Assessment for Environmental Risk Program. PMID:21563710

  20. Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Powers, Charles; Gochfeld, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether

  1. Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: Understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Powers, Charles; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether

  2. Identification of the fur-binding site in regulatory region of the vulnibactin-receptor gene in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Kyu-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The Vibrio vulnificus vuuA gene, of which expression is repressed by a complex of iron and ferric uptake regulator (Fur), was characterized to localize the Fur-binding site in its upstream regulatory region. In silico analysis suggested the presence of two possible Fur-binding sites; one is a classical Fur-box and the other is a previously reported distinct Fur-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis and DNase I protection assays revealed the binding site for the iron-Fur complex, which includes an extended inverted repeat containing a homologous sequence to the classical Fur-box.

  3. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  4. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  5. Regulatory Framework for Salt Waste Disposal and Tank Closure at the Savannah River Site - 13663

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steve; Dickert, Ginger

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making and to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its current and past contractors have worked closely with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and implement a framework for on-site low-level waste disposal and closure of the SRS waste tanks. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides DOE the authority to manage defense-related radioactive waste. DOE Order 435.1 and its associated manual and guidance documents detail this radioactive waste management process. The DOE also has a requirement to consult with the NRC in determining that waste that formerly was classified as high-level waste can be safely managed as either low-level waste or transuranic waste. Once DOE makes a determination, NRC then has a responsibility to monitor DOE's actions in coordination with SCDHEC to ensure compliance with the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61), Subpart C performance objectives. The management of hazardous waste substances or components at SRS is regulated by SCDHEC and the EPA. The foundation for the interactions between DOE, SCDHEC and EPA is the SRS Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Managing this array of requirements and successfully interacting with regulators, consultants and stakeholders is a challenging task but ensures

  6. Connexin 35/36 is phosphorylated at regulatory sites in the retina

    PubMed Central

    Kothmann, W. Wade; Li, Xiaofan; Burr, Gary S.; O’Brien, John

    2007-01-01

    Connexin 35/36 is the most widespread neuronal gap junction protein in the retina and central nervous system. Electrical and/or tracer coupling in a number of neuronal circuits that express this connexin are regulated by light adaptation. In many cases the regulation of coupling depends on signaling pathways that activate protein kinases such as PKA, and Cx35 has been shown to be regulated by PKA phosphorylation in cell culture systems. To examine whether phosphorylation might regulate Cx35/36 in the retina we developed phospho-specific polyclonal antibodies against the two regulatory phosphorylation sites of Cx35 and examined the phosphorylation state of this connexin in the retina. Western blot analysis with hybrid bass retinal membrane preparations showed Cx35 to be phosphorylated at both the Ser110 and Ser276 sites, and this labeling was eliminated by alkaline phosphatase digestion. The homologous sites of mouse and rabbit Cx36 were also phosphorylated in retinal membrane preparations. Quantitative confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed gap junctions identified with a monoclonal anti-Cx35 antibody to have variable levels of phosphorylation at both the Ser110 and Ser276 sites. Unusual gap junctions that could be identified by their large size (up to 32 μm2) and location in the IPL showed a prominent shift in phosphorylation state from heavily phosphorylated in nighttime, dark-adapted retina to weakly phosphorylated in daytime, light-adapted retina. Both Ser110 and Ser276 sites showed significant changes in this manner. Under both lighting conditions other gap junctions varied from non-phosphorylated to heavily phosphorylated. We predict that changes in the phosphorylation states of these sites correlate with changes in the degree of coupling through Cx35/36 gap junctions. This leads to the conclusion that connexin phosphorylation mediates changes in coupling in some retinal networks. However, these changes are not global and likely occur in a cell type

  7. Integrated genome analysis suggests that most conserved non-coding sequences are regulatory factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Gray, Jesse M.; Cloonan, Nicole; Kuersten, Scott; Grimmond, Sean; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    More than 98% of a typical vertebrate genome does not code for proteins. Although non-coding regions are sprinkled with short (<200 bp) islands of evolutionarily conserved sequences, the function of most of these unannotated conserved islands remains unknown. One possibility is that unannotated conserved islands could encode non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs); alternatively, unannotated conserved islands could serve as promoter-distal regulatory factor binding sites (RFBSs) like enhancers. Here we assess these possibilities by comparing unannotated conserved islands in the human and mouse genomes to transcribed regions and to RFBSs, relying on a detailed case study of one human and one mouse cell type. We define transcribed regions by applying a novel transcript-calling algorithm to RNA-Seq data obtained from total cellular RNA, and we define RFBSs using ChIP-Seq and DNAse-hypersensitivity assays. We find that unannotated conserved islands are four times more likely to coincide with RFBSs than with unannotated ncRNAs. Thousands of conserved RFBSs can be categorized as insulators based on the presence of CTCF or as enhancers based on the presence of p300/CBP and H3K4me1. While many unannotated conserved RFBSs are transcriptionally active to some extent, the transcripts produced tend to be unspliced, non-polyadenylated and expressed at levels 10 to 100-fold lower than annotated coding or ncRNAs. Extending these findings across multiple cell types and tissues, we propose that most conserved non-coding genomic DNA in vertebrate genomes corresponds to promoter-distal regulatory elements. PMID:22684627

  8. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca2+ in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca2+-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca2+ sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I–J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca2+ binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca2+ binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca2+ coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn2+, Mg2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+. Zn2+ blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca2+-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn2+ binds to a different site. Mg2+ does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+ with a rank order of potency of Ca2+ > Ba2+ > Sr2+ = Mn2+ for the human CLC-Ks. Dose–response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba2+ has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca2+ > Sr2+ >> Ba2+), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I–J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca2+-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC-K channel function in the kidney and inner ear. PMID

  9. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Forrest, Lucy R; Pusch, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca(2+) in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca(2+)-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca(2+) sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I-J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca(2+) binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca(2+) binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca(2+) coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+). Zn(2+) blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca(2+)-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn(2+) binds to a different site. Mg(2+) does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+) with a rank order of potency of Ca(2+) > Ba(2+) > Sr(2+) = Mn(2+) for the human CLC-Ks. Dose-response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba(2+) has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca(2+) > Sr(2+) > Ba(2+)), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I-J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC

  10. CTCF binding site sequence differences are associated with unique regulatory and functional trends during embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Plasschaert, Robert N.; Vigneau, Sébastien; Tempera, Italo; Gupta, Ravi; Maksimoska, Jasna; Everett, Logan; Davuluri, Ramana; Mamorstein, Ronen; Lieberman, Paul M.; Schultz, David; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Bartolomei, Marisa S.

    2014-01-01

    CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is a highly conserved multifunctional DNA-binding protein with thousands of binding sites genome-wide. Our previous work suggested that differences in CTCF’s binding site sequence may affect the regulation of CTCF recruitment and its function. To investigate this possibility, we characterized changes in genome-wide CTCF binding and gene expression during differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells. After separating CTCF sites into three classes (LowOc, MedOc and HighOc) based on similarity to the consensus motif, we found that developmentally regulated CTCF binding occurs preferentially at LowOc sites, which have lower similarity to the consensus. By measuring the affinity of CTCF for selected sites, we show that sites lost during differentiation are enriched in motifs associated with weaker CTCF binding in vitro. Specifically, enrichment for T at the 18th position of the CTCF binding site is associated with regulated binding in the LowOc class and can predictably reduce CTCF affinity for binding sites. Finally, by comparing changes in CTCF binding with changes in gene expression during differentiation, we show that LowOc and HighOc sites are associated with distinct regulatory functions. Our results suggest that the regulatory control of CTCF is dependent in part on specific motifs within its binding site. PMID:24121688

  11. Visiting Professorships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications are now being accepted for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Visiting Professorships for Women Program. Under this program, women scientists and engineers from industry, government, and academia can be visiting professors at academic institutions in the United States.The program's objectives are to provide opportunities for women to advance their careers in the disciplines of science and engineering that are supported by NSF to provide greater visibility and wider opportunities for women scientists and engineers employed in industry, government, and academic institutions, and to provide encouragement for other women to pursue careers in science and engineering through the awardees' research, lecturing, counseling, and mentoring activities.

  12. The visit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A pregnant ex-lover returns for a visit with her lesbian ex-lover; she comes alone, without her new husband. Through all their differences there remains a deep awareness of the importance of staying present in each other's lives. The overnight visit offers a unique opportunity for the narrator to connect to her ex-lover and the child she is carrying. What transpires is a unique and loving experience that leaves a feeling of wonder and love tinged with longing.

  13. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Allosteric Coupling between the Intracellular Coupling Helix 4 and Regulatory Sites of the First Nucleotide-binding Domain of CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jennifer E.; Farber, Patrick J.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), leading to folding and processing defects and to chloride channel gating misfunction. CFTR is regulated by ATP binding to its cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains, NBD1 and NBD2, and by phosphorylation of the NBD1 regulatory insert (RI) and the regulatory extension (RE)/R region. These regulatory effects are transmitted to the rest of the channel via NBD interactions with intracellular domain coupling helices (CL), particularly CL4. Using a sensitive method for detecting inter-residue correlations between chemical shift changes in NMR spectra, an allosteric network was revealed within NBD1, with a construct lacking RI. The CL4-binding site couples to the RI-deletion site and the C-terminal residues of NBD1 that precede the R region in full-length CFTR. Titration of CL4 peptide into NBD1 perturbs the conformational ensemble in these sites with similar titration patterns observed in F508del, the major CF-causing mutant, and in suppressor mutants F494N, V510D and Q637R NBD1, as well as in a CL4-NBD1 fusion construct. Reciprocally, the C-terminal mutation, Q637R, perturbs dynamics in these three sites. This allosteric network suggests a mechanism synthesizing diverse regulatory NBD1 interactions and provides biophysical evidence for the allosteric coupling required for CFTR function. PMID:24058550

  15. NRC visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-08-22

    Four members of the National Research Council visited Stennis Space Center on Aug. 22, touring test stands and facilities, and holding roundtable discussions with Stennis leaders. The NRC mission is to improve government decision making and public policy, increase public understanding, and promote the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge in matters involving science, engineering, technology and health.

  16. Role of α-Subunit VISIT-DG Sequence Residues Ser-347 and Gly-351 in the Catalytic Sites of Escherichia coli ATP Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenzong; Brudecki, Laura E.; Senior, Alan E.; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the role of α-subunit VISIT-DG sequence residues αSer-347 and αGly-351 in catalytic sites of Escherichia coli F1Fo ATP synthase. X-ray structures show the very highly conserved α-subunit VISIT-DG sequence in close proximity to the conserved phosphate-binding residues αArg-376, βArg-182, βLys-155, and βArg-246 in the phosphate-binding subdomain. Mutations αS347Q and αG351Q caused loss of oxidative phosphorylation and reduced ATPase activity of F1Fo in membranes by 100- and 150-fold, respectively, whereas αS347A mutation showed only a 13-fold loss of activity and also retained some oxidative phosphorylation activity. The ATPase of αS347Q mutant was not inhibited, and the αS347A mutant was slightly inhibited by MgADP-azide, MgADP-fluoroaluminate, or MgADP-fluoroscandium, in contrast to wild type and αG351Q mutant. Whereas 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole (NBD-Cl) inhibited wild type and αG351Q mutant ATPase essentially completely, ATPase in αS347A or αS347Q mutant was inhibited maximally by ∼80–90%, although reaction still occurred at residue βTyr-297, proximal to the α-subunit VISIT-DG sequence, near the phosphate-binding pocket. Inhibition characteristics supported the conclusion that NBD-Cl reacts inβE (empty) catalytic sites, as shown previously by x-ray structure analysis. Phosphate protected against NBD-Cl inhibition in wild type and αG351Q mutant but not in αS347Q or αS347A mutant. The results demonstrate that αSer-347 is an additional residue involved in phosphate-binding and transition state stabilization in ATP synthase catalytic sites. In contrast, αGly-351, although strongly conserved and clearly important for function, appears not to play a direct role. PMID:19240022

  17. RFI to CMS: An Approach to Regulatory Acceptance of Site Remediation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    Lockheed Martin made a smooth transition from RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations'(NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility (MA-F) to its Corrective Measures Study (CMS) phase within the RCRA Corrective Action Process. We located trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination that resulted from the manufacture of the Apollo Program Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle External Tank, began the cleanup, and identified appropriate technologies for final remedies. This was accomplished by establishing a close working relationship with the state environmental regulatory agency through each step of the process, and resulted in receiving approvals for each of those steps. The agency has designated Lockheed Martin's management of the TCE-contamination at the MAF site as a model for other manufacturing sites in a similar situation. In February 1984, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) issued a compliance order to begin the clean up of groundwater contaminated with TCE. In April 1984 Lockheed Martin began operating a groundwater recovery well to capture the TCE plume. The well not only removes contaminants, but also sustains an inward groundwater hydraulic gradient so that the potential offsite migration of the TCE plume is greatly diminished. This effort was successful, and for the agency to give orders and for a regulated industry to follow them is standard procedure, but this is a passive approach to solving environmental problems. The goal of the company thereafter was to take a leadership, proactive role and guide the MAF contamination clean up to its best conclusion at minimum time and lowest cost to NASA. To accomplish this goal, we have established a positive working relationship with LDEQ, involving them interactively in the implementation of advanced remedial activities at MAF as outlined in the following paragraphs.

  18. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  19. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  20. Regulatory analysis for the use of underground barriers at the Hanford Site tank farms

    SciTech Connect

    Hampsten, K.L.

    1994-08-12

    Sixty-seven of the single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, are assumed to have leaked in the past. Some of the waste retrieval options being considered, such as past-practice sluicing (a process that uses hot water to dislodge waste for subsequent removal by pumping), have the potential for increasing releases of dangerous waste from these tanks. Underground barrier systems are being evaluated as a method to mitigate releases of tank waste to the soil and groundwater that may occur during retrieval activities. The following underground barrier system options are among those being evaluated to determine whether their construction at the Single-Shell Tank Farms is viable. (1) A desiccant barrier would be created by circulating air through the subsurface soil to lower and then maintain the water saturation below the levels required for liquids to flow. (2) An injected materials barrier would be created by injecting materials such as grout or silica into the subsurface soils to form a barrier around and under a given tank or tank farm. (3) A cryogenic barrier would be created by freezing subsurface soils in the vicinity of a tank or tank farm. An analysis is provided of the major regulatory requirements that may impact full scale construction and operation of an underground barrier system and a discussion of factors that should be considered throughout the barrier selection process, irrespective of the type of underground barrier system being considered. However, specific barrier systems will be identified when a given regulation will have significant impact on a particular type of barrier technology. Appendix A provides a matrix of requirements applicable to construction and operation of an underground barrier system.

  1. CLIP-seq analysis of multi-mapped reads discovers novel functional RNA regulatory sites in the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijun; Xing, Yi

    2017-09-19

    Crosslinking or RNA immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (CLIP-seq or RIP-seq) allows transcriptome-wide discovery of RNA regulatory sites. As CLIP-seq/RIP-seq reads are short, existing computational tools focus on uniquely mapped reads, while reads mapped to multiple loci are discarded. We present CLAM (CLIP-seq Analysis of Multi-mapped reads). CLAM uses an expectation-maximization algorithm to assign multi-mapped reads and calls peaks combining uniquely and multi-mapped reads. To demonstrate the utility of CLAM, we applied it to a wide range of public CLIP-seq/RIP-seq datasets involving numerous splicing factors, microRNAs and m6A RNA methylation. CLAM recovered a large number of novel RNA regulatory sites inaccessible by uniquely mapped reads. The functional significance of these sites was demonstrated by consensus motif patterns and association with alternative splicing (splicing factors), transcript abundance (AGO2) and mRNA half-life (m6A). CLAM provides a useful tool to discover novel protein-RNA interactions and RNA modification sites from CLIP-seq and RIP-seq data, and reveals the significant contribution of repetitive elements to the RNA regulatory landscape of the human transcriptome. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Nucleotide sequence conservation of novel and established cis-regulatory sites within the tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Banerjee, Kasturi; Baker, Harriet; Cave, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis and its gene proximal promoter ( < 1 kb upstream from the transcription start site) is essential for regulating transcription in both the developing and adult nervous systems. Several putative regulatory elements within the TH proximal promoter have been reported, but evolutionary conservation of these elements has not been thoroughly investigated. Since many vertebrate species are used to model development, function and disorders of human catecholaminergic neurons, identifying evolutionarily conserved transcription regulatory mechanisms is a high priority. In this study, we align TH proximal promoter nucleotide sequences from several vertebrate species to identify evolutionarily conserved motifs. This analysis identified three elements (a TATA box, cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and a 5′-GGTGG-3′ site) that constitute the core of an ancient vertebrate TH promoter. Focusing on only eutherian mammals, two regions of high conservation within the proximal promoter were identified: a ∼250 bp region adjacent to the transcription start site and a ∼85 bp region located approximately 350 bp further upstream. Within both regions, conservation of previously reported cis-regulatory motifs and human single nucleotide variants was evaluated. Transcription reporter assays in a TH -expressing cell line demonstrated the functionality of highly conserved motifs in the proximal promoter regions and electromobility shift assays showed that brain-region specific complexes assemble on these motifs. These studies also identified a non-canonical CRE binding (CREB) protein recognition element in the proximal promoter. Together, these studies provide a detailed analysis of evolutionary conservation within the TH promoter and identify potential cis-regulatory motifs that underlie a core set of regulatory mechanisms in mammals. PMID:25774193

  3. Goddard visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-21

    A trio of representatives from Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., visited Stennis Space Center on July 21-22 to explore opportunities for collaboration. Visitors and hosts included: (seated, l to r) Shahid Habib, chief of the Goddard Office of Applied Sciences; Stennis Director Patrick Scheuermann; Piers Sellers, deputy director of the Goddard Sciences and Exploration Directorate; (standing, l to r) Duane Armstrong, chief of the Stennis Applied Science & Technology Project Office; Fritz Policelli, representative of the Goddard Office of Applied Sciences; Anne Peek, assistant director of the Stennis Project Directorate; and Keith Brock, director of the Stennis Project Directorate.

  4. EXPERIENCE FROM TWO SMALL QUANTITY RH-TRU WASTE SITES IN NAVIGATING THROUGH AN EVOLVING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Biedscheid, Jennifer; Devarakonda, Murthy; Eide, Jim; Kneff, Dennis

    2003-02-27

    Two small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites have gained considerable experience in navigating through a changing regulatory landscape in their efforts to remove the TRU waste from their sites and proceed with site remediation. The Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) has the objectives of decontaminating nuclear research buildings and associated grounds and remediating to a level of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. As directed by Congress, BCLDP must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006. This schedule requires the containerization of all TRU waste in 2002. BCLDP will generate a total of approximately 27 cubic meters (m3) of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Similarly, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is scheduled to close in 2006 pursuant to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Boeing Canoga Park, the management and operating contractor for ETEC. ETEC had 11.0 m3 of RH-TRU and contact-handled (CH) TRU waste in storage, with the requirement to remove this waste in 2002 in order to meet their site closure schedule. The individual milestones for BCLDP and ETEC necessitated the establishment of site-specific programs to direct packaging and characterization of RH-TRU waste before the regulatory framework for the WIPP disposal of RH-TRU waste is finalized. The lack of large infrastructure for characterization activities, as well as the expedited schedules needed to meet regulatory milestones, provided both challenges and opportunities that are unique to small quantity sites. Both sites have developed unique programs for waste characterization based on the same premise, which directs comprehensive waste data collection efforts such that additional characterization will not be required following the finalization of the WIPP RH-TRU waste program requirements. This paper details the BCLDP program

  5. STS-133 crew visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-20

    Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Rick Gilbrech (far right) welcomes members of the STS-133 shuttle mission crew during an April 20 visit. The mission was the final flight for the space shuttle Discovery, which now becomes the first of the three-orbiter fleet to be retired. During the visit to Stennis, Mission Commander Steven Lindsey ( l to r), Pilot Eric Boe and mission specialists Alvin Drew, Steven Bowen, Michael Barratt and Nicole Stott recapped their historic flight and thanked site employees for providing main engines that performed 'as advertised.'

  6. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory light-chain Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site and its role in hybrid myosins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinach, Fernando C.; Nagai, Kiyoshi; Kendrick-Jones, John

    1986-07-01

    The regulatory light chains, small polypeptides located on the myosin head, regulate the interaction of myosin with actin in response to either Ca2+ or phosphorylation. The demonstration that the regulatory light chains on scallop myosin can be replaced by light chains from other myosins has allowed us to compare the functional capabilities of different light chains1, but has not enabled us to probe the role of features, such as the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site, that are common to all of them. Here, we describe the use of site-directed mutagenesis to study the function of that site. We synthesized the chicken skeletal myosin light chain in Escherichia coli and constructed mutants with substitutions within the Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site. When the aspartate residues at the first and sixth Ca2+ coordination positions are replaced by uncharged alanines, the light chains have a reduced Ca2+ binding capacity but still bind to scallop myosin with high affinity. Unlike the wild-type skeletal light chain which inhibits myosin interaction with actin, the mutants activate it. Thus, an intact Ca2+/Mg2+ binding site in the N-terminal region of the light chain is essential for regulating the interaction of myosin with actin.

  8. Identification of high-confidence RNA regulatory elements by combinatorial classification of RNA-protein binding sites.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang Eric; Xiao, Mu; Shi, Binbin; Yang, Yu-Cheng T; Wang, Dong; Wang, Fei; Marcia, Marco; Lu, Zhi John

    2017-09-08

    Crosslinking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq) technologies have enabled researchers to characterize transcriptome-wide binding sites of RNA-binding protein (RBP) with high resolution. We apply a soft-clustering method, RBPgroup, to various CLIP-seq datasets to group together RBPs that specifically bind the same RNA sites. Such combinatorial clustering of RBPs helps interpret CLIP-seq data and suggests functional RNA regulatory elements. Furthermore, we validate two RBP-RBP interactions in cell lines. Our approach links proteins and RNA motifs known to possess similar biochemical and cellular properties and can, when used in conjunction with additional experimental data, identify high-confidence RBP groups and their associated RNA regulatory elements.

  9. Astronauts' Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-02

    Astronauts Rick Sturckow (right) and Pat Forrester make a presentation Aug. 2 at NASA Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., about their recent space shuttle mission, STS-117. Sturckow and Forrester thanked employees for the reliability and safe performance of the space shuttle's main engines, which are all tested and proved flight-worthy at SSC. The astronauts delivered a video of their mission's highlights, held a question-and-answer session, met one-on-one with employees and presented two Silver Snoopy awards during their visit. The STS-117 mission, which launched June 8, delivered a truss segment and a set of U.S. solar arrays, batteries and associated equipment to the International Space Station. Sturckow commanded the mission; Forrester was a mission specialist who performed two of STS-117's four spacewalks.

  10. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  11. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  12. Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan for Site Characterization; Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    The DOE is committed to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner, and will comply with applicable environmental statutes and regulations. These objectives are described in DOE Order 5400.1 (Environmental Protection Program Requirements). This document -- the Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan (ERCP) -- is one method of implementing the policy set forth in DOE Order 5400.1 and the NWPA. The ERCP describes the plan by which the DOE will comply with applicable Federal environmental statutes and regulations. The ERCP also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental statutes and regulations. 180 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship Between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. (Learn Media Technol. doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660, 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled, controlling for content knowledge and prior visits to the park. Students who were able to navigate the VFT in teams were more likely than their peers who had the system demonstrated by a teacher to want to visit the national park. In addition, students with higher pre-intervention content knowledge were more likely to want to visit the national park than their peers with lower pre-test scores, in both the teacher demonstration and student co-navigation conditions.

  14. Mercury-control technology-assessment study: Ray-O-Vac Corporation, Portage, Wisconsin. Preliminary survey report for the site visit of September 22, 1981. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Telesca, D.R.

    1982-09-01

    An on-site visit was made to the Ray-O-Vac Corporation, located in Portage, Wisconsin for the purpose of investigating the control systems in place at this facility and evaluating their effectiveness in reducing the hazards of mercury exposure to workers. The major exposures at this facility arose during the production of mercury/zinc and silver/zinc button cells used for micro power applications such as in watches and hearing aids. Work areas involving the use of mercury or mercury-containing items were the zinc-amalgamation room, the mercury-mix room, the consolidation room, the hand-assembly room, the vault and the production assembly area. Descriptions were offered of the ventilation systems, baghouse-filter exhaust/supply systems, charcoal filter circulation system, equipment enclosures, tablet deduster, material-transfer containers, zinc amalgamation controls, personal protective equipment, work practices, biological monitoring, and air quality monitoring. The combined baghouse- and charcoal-filter exhaust system with heat recovery was noted due to its energy savings potential and its combined reduction of mercury vapor and mercury particulate concentrations. An in-depth study of the zinc-amalgamation operation and the ventilation system is recommended.

  15. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser.

  16. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser. PMID:25324314

  17. Deformed protein binding sites and cofactor binding sites are required for the function of a small segment-specific regulatory element in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, C; Pinsonneault, J; Gellon, G; McGinnis, N; McGinnis, W

    1994-01-01

    How each of the homeotic selector proteins can regulate distinct sets of DNA target elements in embryos is not understood. Here we describe a detailed functional dissection of a small element that is specifically regulated by the Deformed homeotic protein. This 120 bp element (module E) is part of a larger 2.7 kb autoregulatory enhancer that maintains Deformed (Dfd) transcription in the epidermis of the maxillary and mandibular segments of Drosophila embryos. In vitro binding assays show that module E contains only one Dfd protein binding site. Mutations in the Dfd binding site that increase or decrease its in vitro affinity for Dfd protein generate parallel changes in the regulatory activity of module E in transgenic embryos, strong evidence that the in vitro-defined binding site is a direct target of Dfd protein in embryos. However, a monomer or multimer of the Dfd binding region alone is not sufficient to supply Dfd-dependent, segment-specific reporter gene expression. An analysis of a systematic series of clustered point mutations in module E revealed that an additional region containing an imperfect inverted repeat sequence is also required for the function of this homeotic protein response element. The Dfd binding site and the putative cofactor binding site(s) in the region of the inverted repeat are both necessary and in combination sufficient for the function of module E. Images PMID:7910795

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cAMP-binding sites of the recombinant type I regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuno, T; Shuntoh, H; Sakaue, M; Saijoh, K; Takeda, T; Fukuda, K; Tanaka, C

    1988-06-30

    The type I regulatory subunit (R-I) of rat brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase was expressed in E. coli and site-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute amino acids in the putative cAMP-binding sites. The wild-type recombinant R-I bound 2 mol of cAMP/mol subunit, while two mutant R-Is with a single amino acid substitution in one of the two intrachain cAMP-binding sites (clone N153:a glutamate for Gly-200, and clone C254:an aspartate for Gly-324) bound 1 mol of cAMP/mol subunit. When these two substitutions were made in one mutant, cAMP did not bind to this mutant, indicating that binding of cAMP to N153 or C254 was to their nonmutated sites. Competition experiments with site-selective analogs and dissociation of bound cAMP from mutant R-Is provided evidence for strong intrachain interactions between the two classes of cAMP-binding sites in R-I.

  19. Innovative Regulatory and Technical Approaches for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J. T.; Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J.; Boyle, J. D.; Rogers, B. C.

    2002-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) created the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 to identify, investigate, and cleanup or control radiological contamination at sites used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the 1940s through the 1960s. The USDOE had identified 46 sites in the program and finished remediation at 24 of the smaller ones before the end of 1997. With the passage of the Energy and Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1998 the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designated by Congress with responsibility to manage and execute the FUSRAP. The Linde Site located in Tonawanda, New York was operated by the MED from 1942-1946 to extract uranium from several high-grade ores. This natural uranium was subsequently enriched in U-235 elsewhere in the United States and ultimately used to produce energy or weapons. Though in the process of reviewing alternative disposal options by 1995, the USDOE had operated FUSRAP with a strategy requiring virtually all materials remediated be disposed of at only one Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facility. The change in management of the FUSRAP in 1997 allowed the disposal policy of low levels of radioactively contaminated materials found at the remaining sites to be reexamined. This paper presents some of the innovative regulatory and technical approaches employed at the Linde Site that are resulting in project cost savings while meeting applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements as well as fulfilling commitments made to the local community.

  20. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  1. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  2. In dialyzed squid axons oxidative stress inhibits the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger by impairing the Cai2+-regulatory site.

    PubMed

    DiPolo, Reinaldo; Beaugé, Luis

    2011-09-01

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, a major mechanism by which cells extrude calcium, is involved in several physiological and physiopathological interactions. In this work we have used the dialyzed squid giant axon to study the effects of two oxidants, SIN-1-buffered peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), on the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the absence and presence of MgATP upregulation. The results show that oxidative stress induced by peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide inhibits the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger by impairing the intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+))-regulatory sites, leaving unharmed the intracellular Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-transporting sites. This effect is efficiently counteracted by the presence of MgATP and by intracellular alkalinization, conditions that also protect H(i)(+) and (H(i)(+) + Na(i)(+)) inhibition of Ca(i)(2+)-regulatory sites. In addition, 1 mM intracellular EGTA reduces oxidant inhibition. However, once the effects of oxidants are installed they cannot be reversed by either MgATP or EGTA. These results have significant implications regarding the role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in response to pathological conditions leading to tissue ischemia-reperfusion and anoxia/reoxygenation; they concur with a marked reduction in ATP concentration, an increase in oxidant production, and a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that seems to be the main factor responsible for cell damage.

  3. The Federal Government should Encourage Early Public, Regulatory, and Industry Cooperation in Siting Energy Facilities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-13

    Agriculture Depart- ment’s Rural Electrification Administration, the Departments of the Interior and Energy, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (an...most complete and consistently satisfactory examples of open site planning we found. In this case, the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) and...the Rural Electrification Administration, and subjected to detailed environmental analysis. The sixth candidate site--the site added after the regula

  4. Regulatory O-GlcNAcylation sites on FoxO1 are yet to be identified

    SciTech Connect

    Fardini, Yann; Perez-Cervera, Yobana; Camoin, Luc; Pagesy, Patrick; Lefebvre, Tony; Issad, Tarik

    2015-06-26

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification that regulates cytosolic and nuclear proteins. We and others previously demonstrated that FoxO1 is O-GlcNAcylated in different cell types, resulting in an increase in its transcriptional activity. Four O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified in human FOXO1 but directed mutagenesis of each site individually had modest (T317) or no effect (S550, T648, S654) on its O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the consequences of mutating all four sites had not been investigated. In the present work, we mutated these sites in the mouse Foxo1 and found that mutation of all four sites did not decrease Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity, and would even tend to increase them. In an attempt to identify other O-GlcNAcylation sites, we immunoprecipitated wild-type O-GlcNAcylated Foxo1 and analysed the tryptic digest peptides by mass spectrometry using High-energy Collisional Dissociation. We identified T646 as a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1. However, site directed mutagenesis of this site individually or together with all four previously identified residues did not impair Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation and transcriptional activity. These results suggest that residues important for the control of Foxo1 activity by O-GlcNAcylation still remain to be identified. - Highlights: • We mutate four previously identified O-GlcNAcylation sites on Foxo1. • Unexpectedly, these mutations do not reduce Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation. • These mutation do not reduce Foxo1 transcriptional activity. • We identify a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1 by mass spectrometry. • Mutation of this site increases Foxo1 transcriptional activity.

  5. Gene regulatory network analysis reveals differences in site-specific cell fate determination in mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Ertaylan, Gökhan; Okawa, Satoshi; Schwamborn, Jens C.; del Sol, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis—the generation of new neurons—is an ongoing process that persists in the adult mammalian brain of several species, including humans. In this work we analyze two discrete brain regions: the subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles; and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in mice and shed light on the SVZ and SGZ specific neurogenesis. We propose a computational model that relies on the construction and analysis of region specific gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from the publicly available data on these two regions. Using this model a number of putative factors involved in neuronal stem cell (NSC) identity and maintenance were identified. We also demonstrate potential gender and niche-derived differences based on cell surface and nuclear receptors via Ar, Hif1a, and Nr3c1. We have also conducted cell fate determinant analysis for SVZ NSC populations to Olfactory Bulb interneurons and SGZ NSC populations to the granule cells of the Granular Cell Layer. We report 31 candidate cell fate determinant gene pairs, ready to be validated. We focus on Ar—Pax6 in SVZ and Sox2—Ncor1 in SGZ. Both pairs are expressed and localized in the suggested anatomical structures as shown by in situ hybridization and found to physically interact. Finally, we conclude that there are fundamental differences between SGZ and SVZ neurogenesis. We argue that these regulatory mechanisms are linked to the observed differential neurogenic potential of these regions. The presence of nuclear and cell surface receptors in the region specific regulatory circuits indicate the significance of niche derived extracellular factors, hormones and region specific factors such as the oxygen sensitivity, dictating SGZ and SVZ specific neurogenesis. PMID:25565969

  6. Relative activities of the transcriptional regulatory sites in the rplKAJLrpoBC gene cluster of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ralling, G; Linn, T

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of transcription of the rplKAJLrpoBC gene cluster of Escherichia coli appears to be complex. At least four different promoters and a transcriptional attenuator have been identified. To compare the relative effect of each of the putative promoters and the attenuator on transcription of these genes, we fused these regulatory sites to lacZ. These transcriptional fusions were constructed on lambda transducing phages so a single copy of each could be stably integrated into the chromosome. The level of beta-galactosidase in a lysogen of each phage reflects the activity of the transcriptional regulatory site. We find that the promoters preceding rplK (rplKp) and rplJ (rplJp) are indeed the major promoters of this gene cluster. The minor promoter before rplL (rplLp) is much weaker and contributes little to the transcription of the downstream genes. Under these conditions, we find no evidence of a promoter (rpoBp) in the rplL-rpoB intercistronic region. The attenuator (atn) terminates ca. 70% of the transcripts initiated at the promoters preceding it. Although we cannot rule out that some transcripts from rplKp may read through into rplJLrpoBC, we find that rplJp alone is sufficient for high-level expression of these genes. PMID:6325390

  7. Geologic uncertainty in a regulatory environment: An example from the potential Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautman, C. A.; Treadway, A. H.

    1991-11-01

    Regulatory geologists are concerned with predicting the performance of sites proposed for waste disposal or for remediation of existing pollution problems. Geologic modeling of these sites requires large-scale expansion of knowledge obtained from very limited sampling. This expansion induces considerable uncertainty into the geologic models of rock properties that are required for modeling the predicted performance of the site. One method for assessing this uncertainty is through nonparametric geostatistical simulation. Simulation can produce a series of equiprobable models of a rock property of interest. Each model honors measured values at sampled locations, and each can be constructed to emulate both the univariate histogram and the spatial covariance structure of the measured data. Computing a performance model for a number of geologic simulations allows evaluation of the effects of geologic uncertainty. A site may be judged acceptable if the number of failures to meet a particular performance criterion produced by these computations is sufficiently low. A site that produces too many failures may be either unacceptable or simply inadequately described. The simulation approach to addressing geologic uncertainty is being applied to the potential high-level nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, U.S.A. Preliminary geologic models of unsaturated permeability have been created that reproduce observed statistical properties reasonably well. A spread of unsaturated groundwater travel times has been computed that reflects the variability of those geologic models. Regions within the simulated models exhibiting the greatest variability among multiple runs are candidates for obtaining the greatest reduction in uncertainty through additional site characterization.

  8. Economic incentives and regulatory framework for shale gas well site reclamation in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Austin L; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2011-11-15

    Improperly abandoned gas wells threaten human health and safety as well as pollute the air and water. In the next 20 years, tens of thousands of new gas wells will be drilled into the Marcellus, Utica, and Upper Devonian shale formations of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania currently requires production companies to post a bond to ensure environmental reclamation of abandoned well sites, but the size of the bond covers only a small fraction of the site reclamation costs. The economics of shale gas development favor transfer of assets from large entities to smaller ones. With the assets go the liabilities, and without a mechanism to prevent the new owners from assuming reclamation liabilities beyond their means, the economics favor default on well-plugging and site restoration obligations. Policy options and alternatives to bonding are discussed and evaluated.

  9. Environmental Protection Department Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division Contingency Plan for Site 300 Waste Accumulation Area(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R

    2005-07-14

    -specific information for the WAA(s). Site-specific plans are included in Appendix D. A copy of the Contingency Plan (including the site-specific plans) will be distributed to regulatory agencies and to public service organizations, such as local fire departments and hospitals that may be called on to provide emergency services. A copy of the General Plan with the appropriate site-specific plan will be located at the WAA(s), so it can be used in the case of an emergency.

  10. Dynamic evolution of precise regulatory encodings creates the clustered site signature of enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Justin; Potter, Nathan; Erives, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Concentration gradients of morphogenic proteins pattern the embryonic axes of Drosophila by activating different genes at different concentrations. The neurogenic ectoderm enhancers (NEEs) activate different genes at different threshold levels of the Dorsal (Dl) morphogen, which patterns the dorsal/ventral axis. NEEs share a unique arrangement of highly constrained DNA-binding sites for Dl, Twist (Twi), Snail (Sna) and Suppressor of Hairless (Su(H)), and encode the threshold variable in the precise length of DNA that separates one well-defined Dl element from a Twi element. However, NEEs also possess dense clusters of variant Dl sites. Here, we show that these increasingly variant sites are eclipsed relic elements, which were superseded by more recently evolved threshold encodings. Given the divergence in egg size during Drosophila lineage evolution, the observed characteristic clusters of divergent sites indicate a history of frequent selection for changes in threshold responses to the Dl morphogen gradient and confirm the NEE structure/function model. PMID:20981027

  11. 12 CFR 1010.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-determination required. 1010.15 Section 1010.15 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION LAND..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent to acquire contiguous land which, when taken cumulatively, would or could result in one site of 100 or...

  12. 12 CFR 1010.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-determination required. 1010.15 Section 1010.15 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION LAND..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent to acquire contiguous land which, when taken cumulatively, would or could result in one site of 100 or...

  13. 12 CFR 1010.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-determination required. 1010.15 Section 1010.15 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION LAND..., where the developer either owns contiguous land or holds an option or other evidence of intent to acquire contiguous land which, when taken cumulatively, would or could result in one site of 100 or...

  14. Comparative Analysis of Regulatory Elements between Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by Genome-Wide Transcription Start Site Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yu; Nagarajan, Harish; Seo, Joo-Hyun; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription start site (TSS) profiles of the enterobacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were experimentally determined through modified 5′ RACE followed by deep sequencing of intact primary mRNA. This identified 3,746 and 3,143 TSSs for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Experimentally determined TSSs were then used to define promoter regions and 5′ UTRs upstream of coding genes. Comparative analysis of these regulatory elements revealed the use of multiple TSSs, identical sequence motifs of promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, reflecting conserved gene expression apparatuses between the two species. In both species, over 70% of primary transcripts were expressed from operons having orthologous genes during exponential growth. However, expressed orthologous genes in E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed a strikingly different organization of upstream regulatory regions with only 20% identical promoters with TSSs in both species. Over 40% of promoters had TSSs identified in only one species, despite conserved promoter sequences existing in the other species. 662 conserved promoters having TSSs in both species resulted in the same number of comparable 5′ UTR pairs, and that regulatory element was found to be the most variant region in sequence among promoter, 5′ UTR, and ORF. In K. pneumoniae, 48 sRNAs were predicted and 36 of them were expressed during exponential growth. Among them, 34 orthologous sRNAs between two species were analyzed in depth, and the analysis showed that many sRNAs of K. pneumoniae, including pleiotropic sRNAs such as rprA, arcZ, and sgrS, may work in the same way as in E. coli. These results reveal a new dimension of comparative genomics such that a comparison of two genomes needs to be comprehensive over all levels of genome organization. PMID:22912590

  15. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    L. Desotell; D. Wieland; V. Yucel; G. Shott; J. Wrapp

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is planning to close the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Closure planning for this facility must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. This paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues, and presents the closure strategy. Disposals have been made in 25 shallow excavated pits and trenches and 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes at the 92-Acre Area since 1961. The pits and trenches have been used to dispose unclassified low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform waste, and to store classified low-level and low-level mixed materials. The GCD boreholes are intermediate-depth disposal units about 10 feet (ft) in diameter and 120 ft deep. Classified and unclassified high-specific activity LLW, transuranic (TRU), and mixed TRU are disposed in the GCD boreholes. TRU waste was also disposed inadvertently in trench T-04C. Except for three disposal units that are active, all pits and trenches are operationally covered with 8-ft thick alluvium. The 92-Acre Area also includes a Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) operating under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status, and an asbestiform waste unit operating under a state of Nevada Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit. A single final closure cover is envisioned over the 92-Acre Area. The cover is the evapotranspirative-type cover that has been successfully employed at the NTS. Closure, post-closure care, and monitoring must meet the requirements of the following regulations: U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Title 40 CFR Part 265, Nevada Administrative

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Laurence; Bataillé, Laetitia; Painset, Anaïs; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Jost, Bernard; Crozatier, Michèle; Vincent, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1) transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col) targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya) is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles. PMID:26204530

  17. A competitive regulatory mechanism discriminates between juxtaposed splice sites and pri-miRNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; Pagani, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We have explored the functional relationships between spliceosome and Microprocessor complex activities in a novel class of microRNAs (miRNAs), named Splice site Overlapping (SO) miRNAs, whose pri-miRNA hairpins overlap splice sites. We focused on the evolutionarily conserved SO miR-34b, and we identified two indispensable elements for recognition of its 3′ splice site: a branch point located in the hairpin and a downstream purine-rich exonic splicing enhancer. In minigene systems, splicing inhibition owing to exonic splicing enhancer deletion or AG 3′ss mutation increases miR-34b levels. Moreover, small interfering-mediated silencing of Drosha and/or DGCR8 improves splicing efficiency and abolishes miR-34b production. Thus, the processing of this 3′ SO miRNA is regulated in an antagonistic manner by the Microprocessor and the spliceosome owing to competition between these two machineries for the nascent transcript. We propose that this novel mechanism is commonly used to regulate the relative amount of SO miRNA and messenger RNA produced from primary transcripts. PMID:23863840

  18. Optimizing Characterization of Site Hydrology in Support of New Reactor Licensing at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, T. J.; Raione, R.; Ahn, H.; Barnhurst, D.; Giacinto, J.; McBride, M.; Tiruneh, N. D.

    2009-12-01

    The NRC regulates the civilian use of radioactive materials and facilities in an open and transparent manner. The NRC regulatory criteria are designed to protect human health and safety, and the environment by regulating nuclear facilities. During review of new reactor licensing applications, NRC staff reviews and independently verifies hydrogeologic information submitted by the applicant in several topical areas such as development and testing of Conceptual Site Models (CSM) which may involve perched aquifers; engineered water level fluctuations of surface-water reservoirs; ground-water collector wells and local ground-water uses; design-basis ground-water levels for structural analysis; analysis of scenarios for potential release of radionuclides to the subsurface; deep well injection of effluents; and monitoring to detect radionuclide releases. This information is reviewed in a systematic manner in accordance with NRC requirements and guidance to evaluate safety and environmental impacts and reduce the uncertainties for these impacts. NRC licensing staff is reviewing 14 applications for siting new reactors. Experience gained through these licensing activities has shown the value of using site-specific data to evaluate the CSM and its use to assess design and operational issues. Optimizing the information flow process through a systemically and thorough review process creates efficiencies. Through an iterative process of evaluating various geographical settings and associated ground-water conditions, NRC staff has developed methods to minimize prediction uncertainty through the use of confirmatory analyses performed under conservative, hierarchal approaches.

  19. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. Wieland, V. Yucel, L. Desotell, G. Shott, J. Wrapp

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators.

  20. Thermodynamics of Cooperative DNA Recognition at a Replication Origin and Transcription Regulatory Site

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Binding cooperativity guides the formation of protein−nucleic acid complexes, in particular those that are highly regulated such as replication origins and transcription sites. Using the DNA binding domain of the origin binding and transcriptional regulator protein E2 from human papillomavirus type 16 as model, and through isothermal titration calorimetry analysis, we determined a positive, entropy-driven cooperativity upon binding of the protein to its cognate tandem double E2 site. This cooperativity is associated with a change in DNA structure, where the overall B conformation is maintained. Two homologous E2 domains, those of HPV18 and HPV11, showed that the enthalpic−entropic components of the reaction and DNA deformation can diverge. Because the DNA binding helix is almost identical in the three domains, the differences must lie dispersed throughout this unique dimeric β-barrel fold. This is in surprising agreement with previous results for this domain, which revealed a strong coupling between global dynamics and DNA recognition. PMID:21047141

  1. Direct observation of proteolytic cleavage at the S2 site upon forced unfolding of the Notch negative regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Natalie L; Avis, Johanna M

    2012-10-09

    The conserved Notch signaling pathway plays crucial roles in developing and self-renewing tissues. Notch is activated upon ligand-induced conformation change of the Notch negative regulatory region (NRR) unmasking a key proteolytic site (S2) and facilitating downstream events. Thus far, the molecular mechanism of this signal activation is not defined. However, strong indirect evidence favors a model whereby transendocytosis of the Notch extracellular domain, in tight association with ligand into the ligand-bearing cell, exerts a force on the NRR to drive the required structure change. Here, we demonstrate that force applied to the human Notch2 NRR can indeed expose the S2 site and, crucially, allow cleavage by the metalloprotease TACE (TNF-alpha-converting enzyme). Molecular insight into this process is achieved using atomic force microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations on the human Notch2 NRR. The data show near-sequential unfolding of its constituent LNR (Lin12-Notch repeat) and HD (heterodimerization) domains, at forces similar to those observed for other protein domains with a load-bearing role. Exposure of the S2 site is the first force "barrier" on the unfolding pathway, occurring prior to unfolding of any domain, and achieved via removal of the LNRAB linker region from the HD domain. Metal ions increase the resistance of the Notch2 NRR to forced unfolding, their removal clearly facilitating unfolding at lower forces. The results provide direct demonstration of force-mediated exposure and cleavage of the Notch S2 site and thus firmly establish the feasibility of a mechanotransduction mechanism for ligand-induced Notch activation.

  2. Effect of daily cod liver oil and a multivitamin-mineral supplement with selenium on upper respiratory tract pediatric visits by young, inner-city, Latino children: randomized pediatric sites.

    PubMed

    Linday, Linda A; Shindledecker, Richard D; Tapia-Mendoza, Juan; Dolitsky, Jay N

    2004-11-01

    We studied the effect of daily supplementation with lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a children's multivitamin-mineral supplement containing selenium on the number of pediatric visits by young, inner-city, Latino children from late autumn of 2002 through early spring of 2003. Two private pediatric offices with similar demographics, located 1.1 miles apart in upper Manhattan, New York City, were randomized to a supplementation site and a medical records control site. Ninety-four children (47 at each site), 6 months to 5 years of age, were enrolled. The mean age of the supplementation group was 2.03 years (SD, +/- 1.04 years); that of the control group was 2.08 years (SD, +/- 1.10 years). Children > or = 1 year of age in the supplementation group received 1 teaspoon of lemon-flavored cod liver oil per day and one half-tablet of a children's multivitamin-mineral; the starting dose was halved for children < 1 year of age. The supplements were given from enrollment through May 1, 2003. The primary outcome measure was the number of upper respiratory tract pediatric visits during the follow-up/supplementation period. The supplementation group had a statistically significant decrease in the mean number of upper respiratory tract visits over time (p = .042; r = 0.893; y = 0.602 - 0.002x); the medical records control group had no change in this parameter (p = .999; r = 0.0006; y = 0.259 + 1.43 x 10(-6)x). The supplements were well tolerated; per parental report, 70% of children completed the 5- to 6-month course of cod liver oil. Use of these nutritional supplements was acceptable to the inner-city Latino families and their young children, and was associated with a decrease in upper respiratory tract pediatric visits over time; this approach therefore deserves further research and attention.

  3. Mercury control technology assessment study: General Electric Ccompany, Circleville Lamp Plant, Circleville, Ohio. Preliminary survey report for the site visit of October 6, 1981. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Telesca, D.R.

    1982-02-19

    A visit was made to the General Electric Company's Circleville Lamp Facility, Circleville, Ohio for the purpose of evaluating control methods designed to protect the workers from exposure to hazardous levels of mercury. The visit included a review of the fluorescent-lamp manufacturing process, a tour of the production facility, and an investigation of engineering controls, work practices and monitoring programs. Existing control strategies appeared effective in maintaining mercury vapor levels below the OSHA standard of 0.10mg/m/sup 3/. This was achieved through a combined effort in providing extensive dilution ventilation, modifying process equipment for mercury control, and developing the proper work practices for handling mercury. Areas suggested for further research as a result of this visit include the development of a small portable vacuum cleaner which would be effective in safely cleaning mercury spills, developing a procedure to reprocess mercury laden oil, and developing a comfortable and lightweight powered air-purifying helmet for respiratory protection against exposure to mercury vapor.

  4. Multiple muscle-specific regulatory elements are associated with a DNase I hypersensitive site of the cardiac beta-myosin heavy-chain gene.

    PubMed

    Huang, W Y; Chen, J J; Shih, N; Liew, C C

    1997-10-15

    Using nuclei isolated from neonatal cardiomyocytes, we have mapped the DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) residing within the 5'-upstream regions of the hamster cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) gene. Two cardiac-specific DHSs within the 5 kb upstream region of the cardiac MyHC gene were identified. One of the DHSs was mapped to the -2.3 kb (beta-2.3 kb) region and the other to the proximal promoter region. We further localized the beta-2.3 kb site to a range of 250 bp. Multiple, conserved, muscle regulatory motifs were found within the beta-2.3 kb site, consisting of three E-boxes, one AP-2 site, one CArG motif, one CT/ACCC box and one myocyte-specific enhancer factor-2 site. This cluster of regulatory elements is strikingly similar to a cluster found in the enhancer of the mouse muscle creatine kinase gene (-1256 to -1050). The specific interaction of the motifs within the beta-2.3 kb site and the cardiac nuclear proteins was demonstrated using gel mobility-shift assays and footprinting analysis. In addition, transfection analysis revealed a significant increase in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity when the beta-2.3 kb site was linked to a heterologous promoter. These results suggest that previously undefined regulatory elements of the beta-MyHC gene may be associated with the beta-2.3 kb site.

  5. WarpVisit

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, Burlen; Reubel, Oliver

    2015-06-10

    WarpVisit is an insitu simulation application that integrates the Warp laser plasma accelerator simulation framework with Visit a parallel visualization application. WarpVisit is written in python and supports interactive or live mode where user can connect to Warp with the Visit GUI and batch mode for batch for non-interactive use on high-performance computing resources.

  6. Does Positive Selection Drive Transcription Factor Binding Site Turnover? A Test with Drosophila Cis-Regulatory Modules

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Kreitman, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor binding site(s) (TFBS) gain and loss (i.e., turnover) is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM) evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s) driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time. PMID:21572512

  7. Covalent modification of a volatile anesthetic regulatory site activates TASK-3 (KCNK9) tandem-pore potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Conway, Kevin E; Cotten, Joseph F

    2012-03-01

    TASK-3 (KCNK9) tandem-pore potassium channels provide a volatile anesthetic-activated and Gα(q) protein- and acidic pH-inhibited potassium conductance important in neuronal excitability. Met-159 of TASK-3 is essential for anesthetic activation and may contribute to the TASK-3 anesthetic binding site(s). We hypothesized that covalent occupancy of an anesthetic binding site would irreversibly activate TASK-3. We introduced a cysteine at residue 159 (M159C) and studied the rate and effect of Cys-159 modification by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), a cysteine-selective alkylating agent. TASK-3 channels were transiently expressed in Fischer rat thyroid cells, and their function was studied in an Ussing chamber. NEM irreversibly activated M159C TASK-3, with minimal effects on wild-type TASK-3. NEM-modified M159C channels were resistant to inhibition by both acidic pH and active Gα(q) protein. M159C channels that were first inhibited by Gα(q) protein were more-slowly activated by NEM, which suggests protection of Cys-159, and similar results were observed with isoflurane activation of wild-type TASK-3. M159W and M159F TASK-3 mutants behaved like NEM-modified M159C channels, with increased basal currents and resistance to inhibition by active Gα(q) protein or acidic pH. TASK-3 wild-type/M159C dimers expressed as a single polypeptide demonstrated that modification of a single Cys-159 was sufficient for TASK-3 activation, and M159F/M159C and M159W/M159C dimers provided evidence for cross-talk between subunits. The data are consistent with residue 159 contributing to an anesthetic regulatory site or sites, and they suggest that volatile anesthetics, through perturbations at a single site, increase TASK-3 channel activity and disrupt its regulation by active Gα(q) protein, a determinant of central nervous system arousal and consciousness.

  8. Expedition 50 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-26

    Expedition 50 NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, left, Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos, center, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet visit Red Square to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Randy Bresnik of NASA visit Red Square to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineers Paolo Nespoli of ESA, left, Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos, center, and Randy Bresnik of NASA visit Red Square prepare to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. President Kennedy Visit - Apollo Model

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-09-12

    S62-05628 (November 1962) --- President John F. Kennedy speaks to a gathering of media and employees at Site 3 during a 1962 visit. Others seen are Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth; and James E. Webb, NASA Administrator.

  12. A transcriptional regulatory element is associated with a nuclease-hypersensitive site in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lint, C; Ghysdael, J; Paras, P; Burny, A; Verdin, E

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the chromatin organization of the integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome has previously revealed a major constitutive DNase I-hypersensitive site associated with the pol gene (E. Verdin, J. Virol. 65:6790-6799, 1991). In the present report, high-resolution mapping of this site with DNase I and micrococcal nuclease identified a nucleosome-free region centered around nucleotides (nt) 4490 to 4766. A 500-bp fragment encompassing this hypersensitive site (nt 4481 to 4982) exhibited transcription-enhancing activity (two- to threefold) when it was cloned in its natural position with respect to the HIV-1 promoter after transient transfection in U937 and CEM cells. Using in vitro footprinting and gel shift assays, we have identified four distinct binding sites for nuclear proteins within this positive regulatory element. Site B (nt 4519 to 4545) specifically bound four distinct nuclear protein complexes: a ubiquitous factor, a T-cell-specific factor, a B-cell-specific factor, and the monocyte/macrophage- and B-cell-specific transcription factor PU.1/Spi-1. In most HIV-1 isolates in which this PU box was not conserved, it was replaced by a binding site for the related factor Ets1. Factors binding to site C (nt 4681 to 4701) had a DNA-binding specificity similar to that of factors binding to site B, except for PU.1/Spi-1. A GC box containing a binding site for Sp1 was identified (nt 4623 to 4631). Site D (nt 4816 to 4851) specifically bound a ubiquitously expressed factor. These results identify a transcriptional regulatory element associated with a nuclease-hypersensitive site in the pol gene of HIV-1 and suggest that its activity may be controlled by a complex interplay of cis-regulatory elements. Images PMID:8139041

  13. The C-Terminal Heme Regulatory Motifs of Heme Oxygenase-2 Are Redox-Regulated Heme Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, Angela S.; Sharma, Ajay; Choi, Michelle; Spencer, Andrea M.; Bagai, Ireena; Hoffman, Brian M.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-2 (HO2), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, contains three heme regulatory motifs (HRMs) centered at Cys127, Cys265, and Cys282. Previous studies using the soluble form of human HO2 spanning residues 1–288 (HO2sol) have shown that a disulfide bond forms between Cys265 and Cys282 and that, in this oxidized state, heme binds to the catalytic site of HO2sol via His45. However, various mutational and spectroscopic studies have confirmed the involvement of cysteine in Fe3+-heme binding upon reduction of the disulfide bond. In an effort to understand how the HRMs are involved in binding of heme to disulfide-reduced HO2sol, in the work described here, we further investigated the properties of Fe3+-heme bound to HO2. Specifically, we investigated binding of Fe3+-heme to a truncated form of soluble HO2 (residues 213–288; HO2tail) that spans the C-terminal HRMs of HO2 but lacks the catalytic core. We found that HO2tail in the disulfide-reduced state binds Fe3+-heme and accounts for the spectral features observed upon binding of heme to the disulfide-reduced form of HO2sol that cannot be attributed to heme binding at the catalytic site. Further analysis revealed that while HO2sol binds one Fe3+-heme per monomer of protein under oxidizing conditions, disulfide-reduced HO2sol binds slightly more than two. Both Cys265 and Cys282 were identified as Fe3+-heme ligands, and His256 also acts as a ligand to the Cys265-ligated heme. Additionally, Fe3+-heme binds with a much weaker affinity to Cys282 than to Cys265, which has an affinity much weaker than that of the His45 binding site in the catalytic core. In summary, disulfide-reduced HO2 has multiple binding sites with varying affinities for Fe3+-heme. PMID:25853617

  14. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallvé, Santiago; Iglesias-Rozas, José R; Alonso, Ángel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2006-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR) of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs. PMID:16526953

  15. Your First Chiropractic Visit

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Living Patient Information from the American Chiropractic Association Your First Chiropractic Visit You’ve decided to visit a chiropractor, but you’re not quite sure what to expect on your ...

  16. (Function of active-site residues of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, Stockholm, Sweden, and visit to Uppsala, Sweden, August 6--12, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1989-08-22

    The traveler participated in the 8th International Congress on Photosynthesis by presenting a paper entitled ''Function of Active-Site Residues of Ribulosebisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase'' and by chairing a discussion session on the same enzyme. Presentation concerning biological CO/sub 2/ fixation, chemical modifications of proteins, 3D structure of proteins, and site-directed mutagenesis were relevant to ongoing investigations of the Protein Engineering Program at ORNL's Biology Division.

  17. Preliminary site visit report, UOP (Universal Oil Products) engineering offices: control-technology assessment of petroleum-refinery operations, Des Plains, Illinois, June 2, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    A visit was made to Universal Oil Products, Inc. (UOP), Des Plaines, Illinois to assess the control methods used at this facility to protect workers from harmful exposures to chemical and physical agents. Specific attention was given to control methods for hydrogen fluoride (HF) alkylation units. Engineering controls included curbs around equipment to prevent acid spills from contaminating surrounding areas, the drainage of surface liquids into a neutralization pit, the scrubbing of all vent streams leaving the HF units with a potassium hydroxide scrubber to neutralize any HF present, the provision of emergency shower booths, and the installation of a sieve dryer to remove water in entering feed. A point was developed for joints, flanges, and valves of the alkylation unit; originally the paint was orange, but on exposure to HF it turned bright yellow. Protective clothing offered included face shields, gauntlets, rubbers, booths, acid-resistant jackets, overalls, acid hoods, or complete pressurized suits. Work practices were carefully rehearsed so as to avoid accidental exposures. Workers were trained in safety measures, spill cleanups and washdowns, how to neutralize, and proper equipment-tagging procedures. Additional information was provided concerning emergency booths, the use of protective clothing, alkylation change houses, and safety procedures.

  18. Forecasting emergency department visits using internet data.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Andreas; Kurland, Lisa; Farrokhnia, Nasim; Castrén, Maaret; Nordberg, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Using Internet data to forecast emergency department (ED) visits might enable a model that reflects behavioral trends and thereby be a valid tool for health care providers with which to allocate resources and prevent crowding. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Web site visits to a regional medical Web site, the Stockholm Health Care Guide, a proxy for the general public's concern of their health, could be used to predict the ED attendance for the coming day. In a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study, a model for forecasting the daily number of ED visits was derived and validated. The model was derived through regression analysis, using visits to the Stockholm Health Care Guide Web site between 6 pm and midnight and day of the week as independent variables. Web site visits were measured with Google Analytics. The number of visits to the ED within the region was retrieved from the Stockholm County Council administrative database. All types of ED visits (including adult, pediatric, and gynecologic) were included. The period of August 13, 2011, to August 12, 2012, was used as a training set for the model. The hourly variation of visits was analyzed for both Web site and the ED visits to determine the interval of hours to be used for the prediction. The model was validated with mean absolute percentage error for August 13, 2012, to October 31, 2012. The correlation between the number of Web site visits between 6 pm and midnight and ED visits the coming day was significant (r=0.77; P<.001). The best forecasting results for ED visits were achieved for the entire county, with a mean absolute percentage error of 4.8%. The result for the individual hospitals ranged between mean absolute percentage error 5.2% and 13.1%. Web site visits may be used in this fashion to predict attendance to the ED. The model works both for the entire region and for individual hospitals. The possibility of using Internet data to predict ED visits is promising

  19. Use of enhancer trapping to identify pathogen-induced regulatory events spatially restricted to plant-microbe interaction sites.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Mercedes; Tsuchiya, Tokuji; He, Shuilin; Eulgem, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Plant genes differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions can be important for host immunity or can contribute to pathogen virulence. Large-scale transcript profiling studies, such as microarray- or mRNA-seq-based analyses, have revealed hundreds of genes that are differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions. However, transcriptional responses limited to a small number of cells at infection sites can be difficult to detect using these approaches, as they are under-represented in the whole-tissue datasets typically generated by such methods. This study examines the interactions between Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and the pathogenic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) by enhancer trapping to uncover novel plant genes involved in local infection responses. We screened a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter-based enhancer-trap population for expression patterns related to Hpa infection. Several independent lines exhibited GUS expression in leaf mesophyll cells surrounding Hpa structures, indicating a regulatory response to pathogen infection. One of these lines contained a single enhancer-trap insertion in an exon of At1g08800 (MyoB1, Myosin Binding Protein 1) and was subsequently found to exhibit reduced susceptibility to Hpa. Two additional Arabidopsis lines with T-DNA insertions in exons of MyoB1 also exhibited approximately 30% fewer spores than wild-type plants. This study demonstrates that our enhancer-trapping strategy can result in the identification of functionally relevant pathogen-responsive genes. Our results further suggest that MyoB1 either positively contributes to Hpa virulence or negatively affects host immunity against this pathogen.

  20. ReLA, a local alignment search tool for the identification of distal and proximal gene regulatory regions and their conserved transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    González, Santi; Montserrat-Sentís, Bàrbara; Sánchez, Friman; Puiggròs, Montserrat; Blanco, Enrique; Ramirez, Alex; Torrents, David

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The prediction and annotation of the genomic regions involved in gene expression has been largely explored. Most of the energy has been devoted to the development of approaches that detect transcription start sites, leaving the identification of regulatory regions and their functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) largely unexplored and with important quantitative and qualitative methodological gaps. Results: We have developed ReLA (for REgulatory region Local Alignment tool), a unique tool optimized with the Smith–Waterman algorithm that allows local searches of conserved TFBS clusters and the detection of regulatory regions proximal to genes and enhancer regions. ReLA's performance shows specificities of 81 and 50% when tested on experimentally validated proximal regulatory regions and enhancers, respectively. Availability: The source code of ReLA's is freely available and can be remotely used through our web server under http://www.bsc.es/cg/rela. Contact: david.torrents@bsc.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22253291

  1. Philippe Busquin Visits Paranal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    The European Commissioner for Research, Mr. Philippe Busquin, who is currently visiting the Republic of Chile, arrived at the ESO Paranal Observatory on Tuesday afternoon, July 29, 2003. The Commissioner was accompanied, among others, by the EU Ambassador to Chile, Mr. Wolfgang Plasa, and Ms. Christina Lazo, Executive Director of the Chilean Science and Technology Agency (CONICYT). The distinguished visitors were able to acquaint themselves with one of the foremost European research facilities, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), during an overnight stay at this remote site. Arriving after the long flight from Europe in Antofagasta, capital of the II Chilean region, the Commissioner continued along the desert road to Paranal, some 130 km south of Antofasta and site of the world's largest and most efficient optical/infrared astronomical telescope facility. The high guests were welcomed by the ESO Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, and the ESO Representative in Chile, Mr. Daniel Hofstadt, as well as ESO staff members of many nationalities. The visitors were shown the various high-tech installations at the observatory, including many of the large, front-line VLT astronomical instruments that have been built in collaboration between ESO and European research institutes. Explanations were given by ESO astronomers and engineers and the Commissioner gained a good impression of the wide range of exciting research programmes that are carried out with the VLT. Having enjoyed the spectacular sunset over the Pacific Ocean from the KUEYEN telescope, one of the four 8.2-m telescopes that form the VLT array, the Commissioner visited the VLT Control Room from where the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes and the VLT Interferometer (VLTI) are operated. Here, the Commissioner was invited to follow an observing sequence at the console of the KUEYEN telescope. " This is a tribute to the human genius ", commented the Commissioner. " It is an extraordinary contribution to the development

  2. Mississippi lieutenant governor visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (left) stands with Mississippi Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant at the A-3 Test Stand construction site during an Oct. 1 visit by the state official. During his tour, Bryant was updated on construction of the first large test stand at Stennis since the 1960s. The A-3 stand will be used to conduct simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines that will take humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. In addition to touring Stennis facilities, Bryant visited the INFINITY Science Center construction site, where he was updated on work under way to construct a 72,000-square-foot facility that will showcase the science underpinning the missions of NASA and resident agencies at Stennis.

  3. Mississippi lieutenant governor visits Stennis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (left) stands with Mississippi Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant at the A-3 Test Stand construction site during an Oct. 1 visit by the state official. During his tour, Bryant was updated on construction of the first large test stand at Stennis since the 1960s. The A-3 stand will be used to conduct simulated high-altitude testing on the next generation of rocket engines that will take humans back to the moon and possibly beyond. In addition to touring Stennis facilities, Bryant visited the INFINITY Science Center construction site, where he was updated on work under way to construct a 72,000-square-foot facility that will showcase the science underpinning the missions of NASA and resident agencies at Stennis.

  4. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 backup crew members Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), left, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, center, and Mark Vande Hei of NASA pose for a photograph in front of Saint Basil's Cathedral as they visited Red Square to lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Stennis' granddaughter visits Mississippi Facility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-04-06

    Jane Kenna of Atlanta, granddaughter of the late Sen. John C. Stennis, stands with her husband, John, near a bust of her grandfather displayed in StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Kenna visited Stennis on April 6, her first trip to the rocket engine testing facility since the 1988 ceremony to rename the site in honor of Stennis.

  6. Children enjoy visit to Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-27

    About 200 children of employees at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center visited the facility for annual Take Our Children to Work activities July 27. Participants enjoyed a windshield tour of the rocket engine test site and various demonstrations and presentations on such topics as cryogenics, the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, computer safety and robotics. They also had an opportunity to take photos at the astronaut suit exhibit and participate in StenniSphere activities.

  7. Stennis' granddaughter visits Mississippi Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Jane Kenna of Atlanta, granddaughter of the late Sen. John C. Stennis, stands with her husband, John, near a bust of her grandfather displayed in StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center. Kenna visited Stennis on April 6, her first trip to the rocket engine testing facility since the 1988 ceremony to rename the site in honor of Stennis.

  8. Supriya Jindal visits school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal fields a question from a student at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. Jindal was joined on her visit by retired astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space.

  9. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  10. Goddard Queen Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-05-07

    Queen Elizabeth II and NASA Administrator Michael Griffin plant a commemorative tree on the grounds of the visitor's center during a visit to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, in Greenbelt, Md. The Royal couple's appearance was one of the last stops on a six-day visit to the United States. Photo Credit (NASA/Debbie McCallum)

  11. Presidential visit to MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    President George Bush and Alabama Governor Guy Hunt are greeted by Marshall's sixth Center Director Thomas J. Lee (1989-1994) upon their arrival at Redstone Arsenal (RSA) airfield. This was the first sitting president to visit Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since President Kennedy's visit almost 30 years ago.

  12. Hosting the Presidential Visit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherouse, Mark A.

    This paper describes the visit of President Bush to the campus of Southern Methodist University (SMU) for the May, 1992 commencement and lessons learned from the experience. The paper describes how SMU made use of lead time and suggests how to estimate cost of such a visit. Discussion of strategies for organizing describes the formation and work…

  13. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South…

  14. Supriya Jindal visits school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal fields a question from a student at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. Jindal was joined on her visit by retired astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space.

  15. 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  16. 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  17. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  18. Early Childhood Home Visiting.

    PubMed

    Duffee, James H; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Kuo, Alice A; Legano, Lori A; Earls, Marian F

    2017-09-01

    High-quality home-visiting services for infants and young children can improve family relationships, advance school readiness, reduce child maltreatment, improve maternal-infant health outcomes, and increase family economic self-sufficiency. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports unwavering federal funding of state home-visiting initiatives, the expansion of evidence-based programs, and a robust, coordinated national evaluation designed to confirm best practices and cost-efficiency. Community home visiting is most effective as a component of a comprehensive early childhood system that actively includes and enhances a family-centered medical home. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. The prenatal visit.

    PubMed

    Cohen, George J

    2009-10-01

    As advocates for children and their families, pediatricians can support and guide expectant parents in the prenatal period. Prenatal visits allow the pediatrician to gather basic information from expectant parents, offer them information and advice, and identify high-risk conditions that may require special care. In addition, a prenatal visit is the first step in establishing a relationship between the family and the pediatrician (the infant's medical home) and in helping the parents develop parenting skills and confidence. There are several possible formats for this first visit. The one used depends on the experience and preference of the parents, the style of the pediatrician's practice, and pragmatic issues of reimbursement.

  20. Visiting bags: a labile thermal environment.

    PubMed Central

    Rudland, S. V.; Jacobs, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define usual colour and site of storage of visiting bags in general practitioners' cars and to investigate effect of these variables on temperature inside bag. DESIGN--Questionnaire to general practitioners; serial temperature measurements from paired black visiting bags at different storage sites and from bags of different colour. SETTING--South Devon coastal town during May and June. SUBJECTS--200 general practitioners, of whom 145 returned legible questionnaires. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Bag colour, duration and site of storage, temperature inside black bags at defined storage sites, and effects of bag colour on internal temperature. RESULTS--111 (77%) of the general practitioners carried a black visiting bag, and 76 kept their bag in their car all day. The bag was coolest in the car boot, but irrespective of storage site, maximum internal temperature of the bag was always over 25 degrees C and reached up to 80 degrees C. Spraying a black bag silver significantly reduced the bag's internal temperature (mean difference 8.37 degrees C (95% confidence interval 6.68 to 9.86 degrees C) df = 59, t = 10.29, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS--General practitioners should use a silver coloured visiting bag; when visiting, they should store it in their car boot; at other times they should remove it to a cooler site. PMID:8173404

  1. Iterative performance assessments as a regulatory tool for evaluating repository safety: How experiences from SKI Project-90 were used in formulating the new performance assessment project SITE-94

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.

    1993-12-31

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, regulatory research program has to prepare for the process of licensing a repository for spent nuclear fuel, by building up the necessary knowledge and review capacity. SKIs main strategy for meeting this demand is to develop an independent performance assessment capability. SKIs first own performance assessment project, Project-90, was completed in 1991 and is now followed by a new project, SITE-94. SITE-94 is based on conclusions reached within Project-90. An independent review of Project-90, carried out by a NEA team of experts, has also contributed to the formation of the project. Another important reason for the project is that the implementing organization in Sweden, SKB, has proposed to submit an application to start detailed investigation of a repository candidate site around 1997. SITE-94 is a performance assessment of a hypothetical repository at a real site. The main objective of the project is to determine how site specific data should be assimilated into the performance assessment process, and to evaluate how uncertainties inherent in site characterization will influence performance assessment results. This will be addressed by exploring multiple interpretations, conceptual models, and parameters consistent with the site data. The site evaluation will strive for consistency between geological, hydrological, rock mechanical, and geochemical descriptions. Other important elements of SITE-94 are the development of a practical and defensible methodology for defining, constructing and analyzing scenarios, the development of approaches for treatment of uncertainties, evaluation of canister integrity, and the development and application of an appropriate quality assurance plan for performance assessments.

  2. Role of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s On-Site Representatives in pre-licensing activities for a high-level radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, P.S.; Gilray, J.

    1994-12-31

    Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission are required to consult with each other prior to DOE`s submittal of a license application to construct a high-level radioactive waste repository. DOE entered into an agreement which, in part, enabled NRC On-Site Representatives to be stationed at a high-level waste candidate site {open_quotes}principally to serve as a point of prompt informational exchange and consultation and to preliminary identify concerns about such investigations relating to potential licensing issues.{close_quotes} On-Site Representatives` direct observation of site characterization activities including construction of an underground studies facility (at Yucca Mountain, NV candidate site) provides NRC staff opportunities to help ensure that DOE will develop data which are appropriate to determine if the site will safely isolate waste and which will be defensible in a License Application. The On-Site Representatives, through supervision and input from the Division of High-Level Waste Management, may consult with the DOE site project office and its contractor staff on items pertaining to management and program controls necessary to satisfy NRC licensing needs, such as demonstrated application of procedural controls and technical data that will support a License Application. The On-Site Representatives interact with DOE through consultations with project staff, quality assurance workshops, observations of reviews of computer software and Q-List considerations, responses to audit and surveillance observations and day-to-day contact with DOE site management, QA staff, and technical investigators.

  3. Analysis of a DNase I-hypersensitive site in transgenic Drosophila reveals a key regulatory element of Sgs3.

    PubMed Central

    Ramain, P; Giangrande, A; Richards, G; Bellard, M

    1988-01-01

    We have undertaken chromatin studies on transformed Drosophila strains carrying DNA sequences modified in the region of the DNase I (EC 3.1.4.5)-hypersensitive sites -750 and -600 base pairs upstream from the Sgs3 start site. Although both sites are developmentally specific, modifications in the -750 site have little or no effect on Sgs3-encoded transcript levels, whereas either deletion or replacement of sequences at the -600 site causes an important reduction in transcript levels. The element associated with the -600 site enhances Sgs3 transcription when displaced with respect to the start site. This combined approach has defined sequence elements necessary both for normal transcript levels as well as the chromatin structure characteristic of Sgs3 activity in vivo. Images PMID:3128796

  4. Well-child visits

    MedlinePlus

    ... listening to heart, breath, and stomach sounds) Heart sounds Infantile reflexes and deep tendon reflexes as the child gets older Neonatal jaundice -- first few visits only Palpation Percussion Standard ophthalmic exam Temperature measurement (see also normal body temperature ) Immunization information: ...

  5. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-13

    Media members interview Commander Christopher Ferguson (right) during his Jan. 13 visit to StenniSphere. He was joined by Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (on stage, left), both members of the STS-126 shuttle mission.

  6. Class Visit Short Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Alice; Somerville, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes methods used by the Louisville Free Public Library's children's department to introduce the library's programs and services to elementary school children. Specific suggestions for one-person visitations are provided including pertinent book titles. (EJS)

  7. Class Visit Short Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Alice; Somerville, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes methods used by the Louisville Free Public Library's children's department to introduce the library's programs and services to elementary school children. Specific suggestions for one-person visitations are provided including pertinent book titles. (EJS)

  8. Visiting Scholars Program | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    The Visiting Scholars Program (VSP) provides a unique opportunity for scientists to collaborate with the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR), the only federal national laboratory in the United States devoted exclusively to b

  9. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Commander Christopher Ferguson (left) and Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, both members of the STS-126 shuttle mission, sign autographs for Stennis employees Jan. 13 during a visit to StenniSphere.

  10. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Media members interview Commander Christopher Ferguson (right) during his Jan. 13 visit to StenniSphere. He was joined by Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper (on stage, left), both members of the STS-126 shuttle mission.

  11. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Commander Christopher Ferguson (right) and Mission Specialist Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, both members of the STS-126 shuttle mission, share highlights of their trip to the International Space Station during their Jan. 13 visit to StenniSphere.

  12. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-13

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands with astronauts Christopher Ferguson (right) and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper in front of the A-2 Test Stand during the space shuttle crew members' visit to NASA's rocket engine testing facility Jan. 13. During their visit, Ferguson and Stefanyshyn-Piper reported on the STS-126 space shuttle delivery and servicing mission to the International Space Station. Ferguson served as commander of the mission. Stefanyshyn-Piper served as a mission specialist.

  13. STS-126 crew visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (center) stands with astronauts Christopher Ferguson (right) and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper in front of the A-2 Test Stand during the space shuttle crew members' visit to NASA's rocket engine testing facility Jan. 13. During their visit, Ferguson and Stefanyshyn-Piper reported on the STS-126 space shuttle delivery and servicing mission to the International Space Station. Ferguson served as commander of the mission. Stefanyshyn-Piper served as a mission specialist.

  14. Definition of a consensus DNA-binding site for the Escherichia coli pleiotropic regulatory protein, FruR.

    PubMed

    Nègre, D; Bonod-Bidaud, C; Geourjon, C; Deléage, G; Cozzone, A J; Cortay, J C

    1996-07-01

    The FruR regulator of Escherichia coli controls the initiation of transcription of several operons encoding a variety of proteins involved in carbon and energy metabolism. The sequence determinants of the FruR-binding site were analysed by using 6x His-tagged FruR and a series of double-stranded randomized oligonucleotides. FruR consensus binding sites were selected and characterized by several consecutive rounds of the polymerase chain reaction-assisted binding-site selection method (BSS) using nitrocellulose-immobilized DNA-binding protein. FruR was demonstrated to require, for binding, an 8 bp left half-site motif and a 3 bp conserved right half-site with the following sequence: 5'-GNNGAATC/GNT-3'. In this sequence, the left half-site AATC/ consensus tetranucleotide is a typical motif of the DNA-binding site of the regulators of the GalR-Lacl family. On the other hand, the high degree of degeneracy found in the right half-site of this palindrome-like structure indicated that FruR, which is a tetramer in solution, interacts asymmetrically with the two half-sites of its operator. However, potentially FruR-target sites showing a high degree of symmetry were detected in 13 genes/operons. Among these, we have focused our interest on the pfkA gene, encoding phosphofructo-kinase-1, which is negatively regulated by FruR.

  15. Interleukin-10 expressed at early tumour sites induces subsequent generation of CD4+ T-regulatory cells and systemic collapse of antitumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Naohiro; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masahiro; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-secreting T-regulatory (Tr) cells and anti-B16 melanoma immunity, and studied the association of early cytokines expressed at tumour sites with the generation of Tr cells. A large number of CD4+ Tr cells producing interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10 and TGF-β accumulated with functionally depressed CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) at tumour sites on day 20 after subcutaneous (s.c.) inoculation of B16 tumour cells. Tr cells consisted of two populations, which were termed T helper 3 (Th3) and Tr1 cells. B16-infiltrating Tr cells strongly inhibited the generation of B16-specific T helper 1 (Th1) cells in a TGF-β-dependent manner and were assumed to suppress effective generation of CTLs. In addition, B16 cells markedly progressed in mice transferred adoptively by the cultured B16-infiltrating Tr cells compared with untreated mice. The capacity of these Tr cells to produce TGF-β was hampered by neutralizing anti-IL-10 and partly anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) injected intralesionally during the early development of B16 tumours, and this treatment markedly attenuated B16 growth. Furthermore, a lesional injection of recombinant mouse IL-10 at an early tumour site resulted in the vigorous progression of B16 tumours. These results provide evidence that Tr cells, belonging to the T helper 3/T-regulatory 1 (Th3/Tr1) type, are activated in B16-bearing hosts under the influence of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines, mainly IL-10 (produced at early tumour lesions), and that this regulatory T-cell population functions as a suppressor of anti-B16 immunity. PMID:11529935

  16. The Role and Specificity of the Catalytic and Regulatory Cation-binding Sites of the Na+-pumping NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Oscar; Shea, Michael E.; Makhatadze, George I.; Barquera, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    The Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase is the entry site for electrons into the respiratory chain and the main sodium pump in Vibrio cholerae and many other pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we have employed steady-state and transient kinetics, together with equilibrium binding measurements to define the number of cation-binding sites and characterize their roles in the enzyme. Our results show that sodium and lithium ions stimulate enzyme activity, and that Na+-NQR enables pumping of Li+, as well as Na+ across the membrane. We also confirm that the enzyme is not able to translocate other monovalent cations, such as potassium or rubidium. Although potassium is not used as a substrate, Na+-NQR contains a regulatory site for this ion, which acts as a nonessential activator, increasing the activity and affinity for sodium. Rubidium can bind to the same site as potassium, but instead of being activated, enzyme turnover is inhibited. Activity measurements in the presence of both sodium and lithium indicate that the enzyme contains at least two functional sodium-binding sites. We also show that the binding sites are not exclusively responsible for ion selectivity, and other steps downstream in the mechanism also play a role. Finally, equilibrium-binding measurements with 22Na+ show that, in both its oxidized and reduced states, Na+-NQR binds three sodium ions, and that the affinity for sodium is the same for both of these states. PMID:21652714

  17. Groundwater contamination from waste management sites: The interaction between risk-based engineering design and regulatory policy: 1. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, Joel; Freeze, R. Allan

    1987-02-01

    This paper puts in place a risk-cost-benefit analysis for waste management facilities that explicitly recognizes the adversarial relationship that exists in a regulated market economy between the owner/operator of a waste management facility and the government regulatory agency under whose terms the facility must be licensed. The risk-cost-benefit analysis is set up from the perspective of the owner/operator. It can be used directly by the owner/operator to assess alternative design strategies. It can also be used by the regulatory agency to assess alternative regulatory policy, but only in an indirect manner, by examining the response of an owner/operator to the stimuli of various policies. The objective function is couched in terms of a discounted stream of benefits, costs, and risks over an engineering time horizon. Benefits are in the form of revenues for services provided; costs are those of construction and operation of the facility. Risk is defined as the cost associated with the probability of failure, with failure defined as the occurrence of a groundwater contamination event that violates the licensing requirements established for the facility. Failure requires a breach of the containment structure and contaminant migration through the hydrogeological environment to a compliance surface. The probability of failure can be estimated on the basis of reliability theory for the breach of containment and with a Monte-Carlo finite-element simulation for the advective contaminant transport. In the hydrogeological environment the hydraulic conductivity values are defined stochastically. The probability of failure is reduced by the presence of a monitoring network operated by the owner/operator and located between the source and the regulatory compliance surface. The level of reduction in the probability of failure depends on the probability of detection of the monitoring network, which can be calculated from the stochastic contaminant transport simulations. While

  18. Father attendance in nurse home visitation.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, John R; Olds, David L

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to examine the rates and predictors of father attendance at nurse home visits in replication sites of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP). Early childhood programs can facilitate father involvement in the lives of their children, but program improvements require an understanding of factors that predict father involvement. The sample consisted of 29,109 low-income, first-time mothers who received services from 694 nurses from 80 sites. We conducted mixed-model multiple regression analyses to identify population, implementation, site, and nurse influences on father attendance. Predictors of father attendance included a count of maternal visits (B = 0.12, SE = 0.01, F = 3101.77), frequent contact between parents (B = 0.61, SE = 0.02, F = 708.02), cohabitation (B = 1.41, SE = 0.07, F = 631.51), White maternal race (B = 0.77, SE = 0.06, F = 190.12), and marriage (B = 0.42, SE = 0.08, F = 30.08). Random effects for sites and nurses predicted father-visit participation (2.7 & 6.7% of the variance, respectively), even after controlling for population sociodemographic characteristics. These findings suggest that factors operating at the levels of sites and nurses influence father attendance at home visits, even after controlling for differences in populations served. Further inquiry about these influences on father visit attendance is likely to inform program-improvement efforts.

  19. The NORM technology connection web site : streamlined access to NORM-related service company and regulatory information.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. P.; Richmond, P.; LePoire, D. J.; Arnish, J. J.; Johnson, R.

    2000-11-08

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an Internet web site providing access to critical information needed to support decisions on the management and disposal of wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The NORM Technology Connection web site provides current information on (1) service companies that provide support on NORM issues (e.g., site characterization and remediation, sample analysis, radiation safety training, disposal) and (2) existing applicable NORM regulations and guidelines. A third element of the site is an electronic mail list that allows users to post or respond to questions about the management of NORM. Development of the NORM Technology Connection web site was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. It is hosted and maintained by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The web site is publicly available; access is free, as is participation by any of the service companies.

  20. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  1. Using quality improvement to promote implementation and increase well child visits in home visiting.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neera K; Ammerman, Robert T; Massie, Julie A; Clark, Margaret; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-03-01

    A key goal of home visiting is to connect children with medical homes through anticipatory guidance regarding recommended well child care (WCC). Substantial barriers to WCC among low socioeconomic families can limit achievement of this outcome. Quality improvement strategies have been widely adopted in healthcare but only recently implemented in home visiting to achieve program outcomes. The objective of this initiative was to increase the percentage of infants enrolled in home visiting who completed at least 3 recommended WCC visits in the first 6 months of life within a large, multi-model program comprised of 11 sites. A series of 33 quality improvement cycles were conducted at 3 sites involving 18 home visitors and 139 families with infants in the target age range. These were deployed sequentially, and changes within and across sites were monitored using trend charts over time. Adopted strategies were then implemented program-wide. Initiatives focused on staff training in WCC recommendations, data collection processes, monthly family tracking reports, and enhanced communication with primary care offices. Data were shared in iterative sessions to identify methods for improving adherence. Wide baseline variability across sites was observed, with the percentage of infants with recommended care ranging from 35% to 83%. Over the project timeline, the percentage of infants receiving at least 3 WCC visits in the first 6 months increased from 58% to 86%. Quality improvement within home visiting can be used to improve WCC adherence and provides an example of maximizing implementation of home visiting interventions.

  2. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Denise

    2005-06-01

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site.

  3. The Site Specific Demethylation in the 5′-Regulatory Area of NMDA Receptor 2B Subunit Gene Associated with CIE-Induced Up-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Chen, Jiguo; Ticku, Maharaj K.; Yan, Bo; Henderson, George

    2010-01-01

    Background The NMDA receptor represents a particularly important site of ethanol action in the CNS. We recently reported that NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene expression was persistently up-regulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment. Increasing evidence that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in dynamic and long-lasting regulation of gene expression in multiple neuroadaptive processes prompted us to investigate the role of DNA methylation in mediating CIE-induced up-regulation of NR2B gene transcription. To dissect the changes of DNA methylation in the NR2B gene, we have screened a large number of CpG sites within its 5′-regulatory area following CIE treatment. Methods Primary cortical cultured neurons were subjected to ethanol treatment in a CIE paradigm. Bisulfite conversion followed by pyrosequencing was used for quantitative measurement and analysis of CpG methylation status within the 5′-regulatory area of the NR2B gene; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to examine DNA levels associated with methylation and transcription factor binding. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and in vitro DNA methylation assays were performed to determine the direct impact of DNA methylation on the interaction between DNA and transcription factor and promoter activity. Results Analysis of individual CpG methylation sites within the NR2B 5′regulatory area revealed three regions with clusters of site-specific CpG demethylation following CIE treatment and withdrawal. This was confirmed by ChIP showing similar decreases of methylated DNA in the same regions. The CIE-induced demethylation is characterized by being located near certain transcription factor binding sequences, AP-1 and CRE, and occurred during treatment as well as after ethanol withdrawal. Furthermore, the increase in vitro of methylated DNA decreased transcription factor binding activity and promoter activity. An additional ChIP assay indicated that the CIE-induced DNA

  4. The site specific demethylation in the 5'-regulatory area of NMDA receptor 2B subunit gene associated with CIE-induced up-regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley; Chen, Jiguo; Ticku, Maharaj K; Yan, Bo; Henderson, George

    2010-01-20

    The NMDA receptor represents a particularly important site of ethanol action in the CNS. We recently reported that NMDA receptor 2B (NR2B) gene expression was persistently up-regulated following chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment. Increasing evidence that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in dynamic and long-lasting regulation of gene expression in multiple neuroadaptive processes prompted us to investigate the role of DNA methylation in mediating CIE-induced up-regulation of NR2B gene transcription. To dissect the changes of DNA methylation in the NR2B gene, we have screened a large number of CpG sites within its 5'-regulatory area following CIE treatment. Primary cortical cultured neurons were subjected to ethanol treatment in a CIE paradigm. Bisulfite conversion followed by pyrosequencing was used for quantitative measurement and analysis of CpG methylation status within the 5'-regulatory area of the NR2B gene; chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay was used to examine DNA levels associated with methylation and transcription factor binding. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and in vitro DNA methylation assays were performed to determine the direct impact of DNA methylation on the interaction between DNA and transcription factor and promoter activity. Analysis of individual CpG methylation sites within the NR2B 5'regulatory area revealed three regions with clusters of site-specific CpG demethylation following CIE treatment and withdrawal. This was confirmed by ChIP showing similar decreases of methylated DNA in the same regions. The CIE-induced demethylation is characterized by being located near certain transcription factor binding sequences, AP-1 and CRE, and occurred during treatment as well as after ethanol withdrawal. Furthermore, the increase in vitro of methylated DNA decreased transcription factor binding activity and promoter activity. An additional ChIP assay indicated that the CIE-induced DNA demethylation is accompanied by

  5. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael K.; de Velde, Jan Van; O'Shea, Charlotte; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Workman, Christopher T.; Vandepoele, Klaas; Skriver, Karen; Masi, Federico De

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together with the workflow associated with functional modules offer a strong resource to unravel the regulatory potential of NAC genes and that this workflow could be used to study other families of transcription factors. PMID:24914054

  6. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuan-Yue; Hinkley, Sarah J.; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, L.; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R.; O'Neill, Colleen M.; Song, Alex H.; Mich, Andrea; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E.; Holmes, Michael C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe a facile approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function. PMID:26322838

  7. Functional redundancy of the DE-1 and alpha A-CRYBP1 regulatory sites of the mouse alpha A-crystallin promoter.

    PubMed

    Sax, C M; Ilagan, J G; Piatigorsky, J

    1993-06-11

    Previous studies have implicated the DE-1 (-111/-106) and alpha A-CRYBP1 (-66/-57) sites for activity of the mouse alpha A-crystallin promoter in transiently transfected lens cells. Here we have used the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene to test the functional importance of the putative DE-1 and alpha A-CRYBP1 regulatory elements by site-specific and deletion mutagenesis in stably transformed alpha TN4-1 lens cells and in transgenic mice. FVB/N and C57BL/6 x SJL F2 hybrid transgenic mice were assayed for CAT activity in the lens, heart, lung, kidney, spleen, liver, cerebrum, and muscle. F0, F1, and F2 mice from multiple lines carrying single mutations of the DE-1 or alpha A-CRYBP1 sites showed high levels of CAT activity in the lens, but not in any of the non-lens tissues. By contrast, despite activity of the wild-type promoter, none of the mutant promoter/CAT constructs were active in the transiently transfected and stably transformed lens cells. The mice carrying transgenes with either site-specific mutations in both the DE-1 and alpha A-CRYBP1 sites or a deletion of the entire DE-1 and part of the alpha A-CRYBP1 site (-60/+46) fused to the CAT gene did not exhibit CAT activity above background in any of the tissues examined, including the lens. Our results thus indicate that the DE-1 and alpha A-CRYBP1 sites are functionally redundant in transgenic mice. Moreover, the present data coupled with previous transfection and transgenic mouse experiments suggest that this functional redundancy is confined to lens expression within the mouse and is not evident in transiently transfected and stably transformed lens cells, making the cultured lens cells sensitive indicators of functional elements of crystallin genes.

  8. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  9. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  10. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication.

  11. Pangeghtellghet (Visits to Siberia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneshiro, Vera, Ed.

    This reader contains eight stories in St. Lawrence Island Yupik about visits by St. Lawrence Island people to their relatives and friends in Siberia over a quarter of a century ago. The book, which is intended for use in advanced levels of reading instruction, is part of a series of Siberian Yupik reading materials. (AMH)

  12. Antiques Roadshow visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-07-23

    Associate producer Adam Monahan (right) looks on as Antiques Roadshow Host Mark Walberg (left) discusses space toys with expert toy appraiser Noel Barrett in the StenniSphere visitor center and museum at Stennis Space Center. The Antiques Roadshow program shown on Public Broadcasting System stations across the nation visited Stennis to film a space toy segment on July 23.

  13. Malaysian Students Visit Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Understanding at School, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Five students and one coordinator from the Unesco Associated Schools Project undertook a study visit to Bangkok to exchange views and experiences. Future joint projects/activities were discussed, and the students gained some insight into the life of their counterparts in Thailand. (RM)

  14. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  15. Revisiting High School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagel, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    NACAC's anniversary is a great time to follow up on an article on high school visits, a topic of ongoing discussion in every admission and guidance office. The article highlights a variety of potential good outcomes that can be derived from collaborative interactions. Sadly, however, admission representatives are apt to be described by the…

  16. Obama Visit to KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Lori Garver visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver (right) and Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Rick Gilbrech address NASA employees during a Feb. 23, 2012, all hands meeting onsite. Garver visited Stennis Space Center to meet with senior managers, members of the media and NASA employees to discuss the space agency's proposed budget for fiscal year 2013.

  18. STS-119 crew visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-05

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman (r to l) presents a commemorative photo of a space shuttle main engine test firing to STS-119 Mission Commander Lee Archambault, Pilot Tony Antonelli and Mission Specialists Steve Swanson and Richard Arnold during the crew's May 5 visit to the facility.

  19. Embassy of Spain visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-29

    Delegates from the Embassy of Spain visited Goddard on Sept 29, 2016. Center Director Chris Scolese gave a brief overview of the Center and the guests then toured B29 James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in clean room, and B28 Hyperwall.

  20. Bolden Visit Davis Elementary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-10

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden speaks to students during a visit to Davis Elementary School, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009, in Washington. Bolden spent time with approximately 120 students in third, fourth and fifth grade talking about science, technology, mathematics and engineering as part of the National Day of Service and Remembrance. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  1. The Visiting Corporate Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Melanie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a visiting information consultant program in a corporate library that was developed to provide library services to more clients, increase library visibility, and to provide new and convenient outreach library services and information to users. The initial pilot program is discussed as are observations that were incorporated into the…

  2. Your First Gynecologic Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... future visits and get information about how to stay healthy. You also may have certain exams. Your doctor may ... ups and downs What can I do to stay healthy? Making good lifestyle choices can help you to be strong and healthy for years to ...

  3. Savannah River Site Public and regulatory involvement in the transuranic (TRU) program and their effect on decisions to dispose of Pu-238 heat source tru waste onsite

    SciTech Connect

    Bert Crapse, H.M.; Sonny, W.T.

    2007-07-01

    The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of heat source Pu-238 TRU waste. As can be imagined, a decision to dispose of TRU waste onsite versus shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal is of considerable interest to the stakeholders in South Carolina. The interaction between the stakeholders not only include the general public, but also the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and Region IV of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The discussions, educational sessions, and negotiations include resolution of equity issues as well and moved forward to an understanding of the difficulties including risk management faced by the Ship-to- WIPP program. Once the program was better understood, the real negotiations concerning equity, safety, and risk to workers from handling Pu-238 waste could begin. This paper will also discuss the technical, regulatory, and public involvement aspects of disposal onsite that must be properly communicated if the program is to be successful. The Risk Based End State Vision Report for the Savannah River Site includes a variance that proposes on-site near surface disposal of waste from the program to produce Pu-238 heat sources

  4. A Functional Screen Provides Evidence for a Conserved, Regulatory, Juxtamembrane Phosphorylation Site in Guanylyl Cyclase A and B

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Andersland, Joshua; Rose, Beth A.; Stone, Matthew D.; Griffin, Timothy J.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2012-01-01

    Kinase homology domain (KHD) phosphorylation is required for activation of guanylyl cyclase (GC)-A and -B. Phosphopeptide mapping identified multiple phosphorylation sites in GC-A and GC-B, but these approaches have difficulty identifying sites in poorly detected peptides. Here, a functional screen was conducted to identify novel sites. Conserved serines or threonines in the KHDs of phosphorylated receptor GCs were mutated to alanine and tested for reduced hormone to detergent activity ratios. Mutation of Ser-489 in GC-B to alanine but not glutamate reduced the activity ratio to 60% of wild type (WT) levels. Similar results were observed with Ser-473, the homologous site in GC-A. Receptors containing glutamates for previously identified phosphorylation sites (GC-A-6E and GC-B-6E) were activated to ∼20% of WT levels but the additional glutamate substitution for S473 or S489 increased activity to near WT levels. Substrate-velocity assays indicated that GC-B-WT-S489E and GC-B-6E-S489E had lower Km values and that WT-GC-B-S489A, GC-B-6E and GC-B-6E-S489A had higher Km values than WT-GC-B. Homologous desensitization was enhanced when GC-A contained the S473E substitution, and GC-B-6E-S489E was resistant to inhibition by a calcium elevating treatment or protein kinase C activation – processes that dephosphorylate GC-B. Mass spectrometric detection of a synthetic phospho-Ser-473 containing peptide was 200–1300-fold less sensitive than other phosphorylated peptides and neither mass spectrometric nor 32PO4 co-migration studies detected phospho-Ser-473 or phospho-Ser-489 in cells. We conclude that Ser-473 and Ser-489 are Km-regulating phosphorylation sites that are difficult to detect using current methods. PMID:22590601

  5. Functional homology between the yeast regulatory proteins GAL4 and LAC9: LAC9-mediated transcriptional activation in Kluyveromyces lactis involves protein binding to a regulatory sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Breunig, K D; Kuger, P

    1987-01-01

    As shown previously, the beta-galactosidase gene of Kluyveromyces lactis is transcriptionally regulated via an upstream activation site (UASL) which contains a sequence homologous to the GAL4 protein-binding site in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M. Ruzzi, K.D. Breunig, A.G. Ficca, and C.P. Hollenberg, Mol. Cell. Biol. 7:991-997, 1987). Here we demonstrate that the region of homology specifically binds a K. lactis regulatory protein. The binding activity was detectable in protein extracts from wild-type cells enriched for DNA-binding proteins by heparin affinity chromatography. These extracts could be used directly for DNase I and exonuclease III protection experiments. A lac9 deletion strain, which fails to induce the beta-galactosidase gene, did not contain the binding factor. The homology of LAC9 protein with GAL4 (J.M. Salmeron and S. A. Johnston, Nucleic Acids Res. 14:7767-7781, 1986) strongly suggests that LAC9 protein binds directly to UASL and plays a role similar to that of GAL4 in regulating transcription. Images PMID:2830492

  6. Functional analysis of the BRI1 receptor kinase by Thr-for-Ser substitution in a regulatory autophosphorylation site

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BRI1 becomes highly phosphorylated in vivo upon perception of the ligand, brassinolide, as a result of autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by its co-receptor kinase, BAK1. Important autophosphorylation sites include those involved in activation of kinase activity and those that are inhibito...

  7. Crystal structure of YegS, a homologue to the mammalian diacylglycerol kinases, reveals a novel regulatory metal binding site.

    PubMed

    Bakali, H M Amin; Herman, Maria Dolores; Johnson, Kenneth A; Kelly, Amélie A; Wieslander, Ake; Hallberg, B Martin; Nordlund, Pär

    2007-07-06

    The human lipid kinase family controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and tumorigenesis and includes diacylglycerol kinases, sphingosine kinases, and ceramide kinases. YegS is an Escherichia coli protein with significant sequence homology to the catalytic domain of the human lipid kinases. We have solved the crystal structure of YegS and shown that it is a lipid kinase with phosphatidylglycerol kinase activity. The crystal structure reveals a two-domain protein with significant structural similarity to a family of NAD kinases. The active site is located in the interdomain cleft formed by four conserved sequence motifs. Surprisingly, the structure reveals a novel metal binding site composed of residues conserved in most lipid kinases.

  8. Floral visitation by the Argentine ant reduces bee visitation and plant seed set.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Cause; Naughton, Ida; Boser, Christina; Alarcón, Ruben; Hung, Keng-Lou James; Holway, David

    2015-01-01

    Ants often visit flowers, but have only seldom been documented to provide effective pollination services. Floral visitation by ants can also compromise plant reproduction in situations where ants interfere with more effective pollinators. Introduced ants may be especially likely to reduce plant reproductive success through floral visitation, but existing experimental studies have found little support for this hypothesis. Here, we combine experimental and observational approaches to examine the importance of floral visitation by the nonnative Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) on plant species native to Santa Cruz Island, California, USA. First, we determine how L. humile affects floral visitor diversity, bee visitation rates, and levels of pollen limitation for the common, focal plant species island morning glory (Calystegia macrostegia ssp. macrostegia). Second, we assess the broader ecological consequences of floral visitation by L. humile by comparing floral visitation networks between invaded and uninvaded sites. The Argentine ant and native ants both visited island morning glory flowers, but L. humile was much more likely to behave aggressively towards other floral visitors and to be the sole floral occupant. The presence of L. humile in morning glory flowers reduced floral visitor diversity, decreased rates of bee visitation, and increased levels of pollen limitation. Network comparisons between invaded and uninvaded. sites revealed differences in both network structure and species-level attributes. In. invaded sites, floral visitors were observed on fewer plant species, ants had a higher per-plant interaction strength relative to that of other visitors, and interaction strengths between bees and plants were weaker. These results illustrate that introduced ants can negatively affect plant reproduction and potentially disrupt pollination services at an ecosystem scale.

  9. Characterisation of multiple regulatory domains spanning the major transcriptional start site of the FUS gene, a candidate gene for motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Kejhal; Wilm, Thomas P; Cashman, Christine; Quinn, John P; Bubb, Vivien J; Moss, Diana J

    2015-01-21

    Fused-In-Sarcoma (FUS) is a candidate gene for neurological disorders including motor neurone disease and Parkinson׳s disease in addition to various types of cancer. Recently it has been reported that over expression of FUS causes motor neurone disease in mouse models hence mutations leading to changes in gene expression may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative disease. Genome evolutionary conservation was used to predict important cis-acting DNA regulators of the FUS gene promoter that direct transcription. The putative regulators identified were analysed in reporter gene assays in cells and in chick embryos. Our analysis indicated in addition to regulatory domains 5' of the transcriptional start site an important regulatory domain resides in intron 1 of the gene itself. This intronic domain functioned both in cell lines and in vivo in the neural tube of the chick embryo including developing motor neurones. Our data suggest the interaction of multiple domains including intronic domains are involved in expression of FUS. A better understanding of the regulation of expression of FUS may give insight into how its stimulus inducible expression may be associated with neurological disorders.

  10. HIV-1 splicing is controlled by local RNA structure and binding of splicing regulatory proteins at the major 5' splice site.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2015-07-01

    The 5' leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome contains the major 5' splice site (ss) that is used in the production of the many spliced viral RNAs. This splice-donor (SD) region can fold into a stable stem-loop structure and the thermodynamic stability of this RNA hairpin influences splicing efficiency. In addition, splicing may be modulated by binding of splicing regulatory (SR) proteins, in particular SF2/ASF (SRSF1), SC35 (SRSF2), SRp40 (SRSF5) and SRp55 (SRSF6), to sequence elements in the SD region. The role of RNA structure and SR protein binding in splicing control was previously studied by functional analysis of mutant SD sequences. The interpretation of these studies was complicated by the fact that most mutations simultaneously affect both structure and sequence elements. We therefore tried to disentangle the contribution of these two variables by designing more precise SD region mutants with a single effect on either the sequence or the structure. The current analysis indicates that HIV-1 splicing at the major 5'ss is modulated by both the stability of the local RNA structure and the binding of splicing regulatory proteins.

  11. CpG site DNA methylation patterns reveal a novel regulatory element in the mouse prion protein gene

    PubMed Central

    DALAI, Wuyun; MATSUO, Eiko; TAKEYAMA, Natsumi; KAWANO, Junichi; SAEKI, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The cellular isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) plays critical roles in the development of prion disorders. Although PrP mRNA is ubiquitously present in a tissue-specific manner, the DNA methylation of PrP gene (Prnp) is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that the CpG island (CGI, positioned at −218 to +152 bp from the transcriptional start site) including the Prnp core promoter region was completely unmethylated in all tested tissues. On the other hand, CpG methylation in the CGI shore region (positioned at −599 to −238 bp) occurred in various tissue- and site-specific proportions. Interestingly, the correlation analysis between CpG methylation status and PrP mRNA levels showed that one CpG site methylation at −576 was negatively correlated with the PrP mRNA level (Pearson’s r = −0.374, P=0.035). Taken together, our results suggest that Prnp is a typical housekeeping gene and various methylation frequencies of the CGI shore region are likely to affect Prnp expression in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:27666463

  12. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

  13. Supriya Jindal visits school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal (left) speaks to teachers and students at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. At the school, Jindal was joined by retired NASA astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride was a crew member on space shuttle Challenger during its STS-7 mission in 1983. She also was a crew member of space shuttle discovery on the STS-41 mission in 1984.

  14. Supriya Jindal visits school

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-19

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal (left) speaks to teachers and students at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. At the school, Jindal was joined by retired NASA astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride was a crew member on space shuttle Challenger during its STS-7 mission in 1983. She also was a crew member of space shuttle discovery on the STS-41 mission in 1984.

  15. NASA chief scientist visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-19

    NASA Chief Scientist Dr. Waleed Abdalati visited Stennis Space Center on July 19, to learn about the extensive science capabilities onsite. Shown at right are: (seated, l to r), Stennis Center Director Patrick Scheuermann; Dr. Abdalati; U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Jonathan White; NOAA National Data Buoy Center Program Manager Shannon McArthur; (standing, l to r) Stennis Project Directorate Assistant Director Anne Peek; Stennis Applied Science & Technology Project Office Chief Duane Armstrong; and Stennis Project Directorate Director Keith Brock.

  16. Bolden Visit Davis Elementary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-10

    NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden reads a passage from the book "Can You Fly High Wright Brothers?" while visiting with students at Davis Elementary School, Friday, Sept. 11, 2009, in Washington. Bolden spent time with approximately 120 students in third, fourth and fifth grade talking about science, technology, mathematics and engineering as part of the National Day of Service and Remembrance. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. Supriya Jindal visits school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Louisiana First Lady Supriya Jindal (left) speaks to teachers and students at A.P. Tureaud Elementary School in New Orleans during a March 19 visit. At the school, Jindal was joined by retired NASA astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman in space. Ride was a crew member on space shuttle Challenger during its STS-7 mission in 1983. She also was a crew member of space shuttle discovery on the STS-41 mission in 1984.

  18. Predicting distinct organization of transcription factor binding sites on the promoter regions: a new genome-based approach to expand human embryonic stem cell regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour, Batool; Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Khosravi, Pegah; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2013-12-01

    Self-proliferation and differentiation into distinct cell types have been made stem cell as a promising target for regenerative medicine. Several key genes can regulate self-renewal and pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (hESCs). They work together and build a transcriptional hierarchy. Coexpression and coregulation of genes control by common regulatory elements on the promoter regions. Consequently, distinct organization and combination of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs modules) on promoter regions, in view of order and distance, lead to a common specific expression pattern within a set of genes. To gain insights into transcriptional regulation of hESCs, we selected promoter regions of eleven common expressed hESC genes including SOX2, LIN28, STAT3, NANOG, LEFTB, TDGF1, POU5F1, FOXD3, TERF1, REX1 and GDF3 to predict activating regulatory modules on promoters and discover key corresponding transcription factors. Then, promoter regions in human genome were explored for modules and 328 genes containing the same modules were detected. Using microarray data, we verified that 102 of 328 genes commonly upregulate in hESCs. Also, using output data of DNA-protein interaction assays, we found that 42 of all predicted genes are targets of SOX2, NANOG and POU5F1. Additionally, a protein interaction network of hESC genes was constructed based on biological processes, and interestingly, 126 downregulated genes along with upregulated ones identified by promoter analysis were predicted in the network. Based on the results, we suggest that the identified genes, coregulating with common hESC genes, represent a novel approach for gene discovery based on whole genome promoter analysis irrespective of gene expression. Altogether, promoter profiling can be used to expand hESC transcriptional regulatory circuitry by analysis of shared functional sequences between genes. This approach provides a clear image on underlying regulatory mechanism of gene expression profile and

  19. Barriers to Garden Visitation in Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Samira

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify barriers to use of outdoor spaces in Texas pediatric healthcare facilities. Available research on hospital healing gardens and outdoor spaces has indicated that despite several health benefits of garden visitation for staff, patients, and family members, these amenities are not being used to their fullest capacity. Previous researchers have recommended design features such as comfortable seats and adequate shade to increase garden visitation in healthcare setting. However no quantitative data have demonstrated significance of correlation between presence of these design features and garden use. The present study served to statistically support design guidelines suggested by previous researchers and introduce new guidelines. Site visits and surveys were conducted in five green outdoor spaces in three pediatric hospitals in east Texas. Hospital visitors, family members, and staff responded to questions concerning barriers to garden visitation, their visitation habits, and satisfaction with the garden features. The study was reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards of the relevant hospitals and academic institutions. A negative significant correlation was found between staff garden use and dissatisfaction with quality of seats and poor shade. While quality of seats didn't impact visitor and family member garden visitation, a significant negative correlation was found between poor shade and their garden use. The study served to statistically support previous design suggestions for hospital gardens, and introduced new design guidelines. Design recommendations include functionality, visibility, accessibility, exclusivity, and availability of shade and seats. Design process, evidence-based design, healing environments, hospital.

  20. Lessons Learned from WIPP Site Characteriztion, Performance Assessment, and Regulatory Review Related to Radionuclide Migration through Water-Conducting Features

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.: Larson. K.W.

    1998-11-11

    Many lessons have been learned over the past 24 years as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project has progressed from initial site characterization to final licensing that may be of relevance to other nuclear-waste-disposal projects. These lessons pertain to the manner in which field and laboratory investigations are planned, how experiments are interpreted, how conceptual and numerical models are developed and simplified~ and how defensibility and credibility are achieved and maintained. These lessons include 1) Site characterization and performance assessment (PA) should evolve together through an iterative process, with neither activity completely dominating the other. 2) Defensibility and credibility require a much greater depth of understanding than can be represented in PA models. 3) Experimentalists should be directly involved in model and parameter abstraction and simplification for PA. 4) External expert review should be incorporated at all stages of a project~ not just after an experiment or modeling activity is completed. 5) Key individuals should be retained for the life of a project or a process must be established to transfer their working knowledge to new individuals. 6) An effective QA program needs to be stable and consistent for the duration of a project and rests on best scientific practices. All of these lessons relate to the key point that consideration must be given from the earliest planning stages to maximizing the defensibility and credibility of all work.

  1. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  2. Identification of two regulatory binding sites which confer myotube specific expression of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase ART1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Maik; Böhlig, Levin; Kirschner, Ralf D; Engeland, Kurt; Hauschildt, Sunna

    2008-01-01

    Background Mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) 1 belongs to a family of mammalian ectoenzymes that catalyze the transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD+ to a target protein. ART1 is predominantly expressed in skeletal and cardiac muscle. It ADP-ribosylates α7-integrin which together with β1-integrin forms a dimer and binds to laminin, a protein of the extracellular matrix involved in cell adhesion. This posttranslational modification leads to an increased laminin binding affinity. Results Using C2C12 and C3H-10T 1/2 cells as models of myogenesis, we found that ART1 expression was restricted to myotube formation. We identified a fragment spanning the gene 1.3 kb upstream of the transcriptional start site as the functional promoter of the ART1 gene. This region contains an E box and an A/T-rich element, two conserved binding sites for transcription factors found in the promoters of most skeletal muscle specific genes. Mutating the DNA consensus sequence of either the E box or the A/T-rich element resulted in a nearly complete loss of ART1 promoter inducibility, indicating a cooperative role of the transcription factors binding to those sites. Gel mobility shift analyses carried out with nuclear extracts from C2C12 and C3H-10T 1/2 cells revealed binding of myogenin to the E box and MEF-2 to the A/T-rich element, the binding being restricted to C2C12 and C3H-10T 1/2 myotubes. Conclusion Here we describe the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the ART1 gene expression in skeletal muscle cells. The differentiation-dependent upregulation of ART1 mRNA is induced by the binding of myogenin to an E box and of MEF-2 to an A/T-rich element in the proximal promoter region of the ART1 gene. Thus the transcriptional regulation involves molecular mechanisms similar to those used to activate muscle-specific genes. PMID:18939989

  3. Replication and segregation of plasmids containing cis-acting regulatory sites of silent mating-type genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled by the SIR genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerly, W J; Rine, J

    1987-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two cis-acting regulatory sites called E and I flank the silent mating-type gene, HMRa, and mediate SIR-dependent transcriptional repression of the a1-a2 promoters. It has been shown previously that the E and I sites have plasmid replicator (ARS) activity. We show in this report that the ARS activity of the E and I sites is governed by the SIR genotype of the cell. In wild-type cells, a plasmid carrying the E site from HMRa (HMR E) in the vector YIp5 exhibited very high mitotic stability at a copy number of approximately 25 per cell. However, in sir2, sir3, or sir4 mutants, plasmids with HMR E had the low mitotic stability characteristic of plasmids containing ARS1, a SIR-independent replicator. Elevated mitotic stability of plasmids that carry HMR E is due to a segregation mechanism provided by SIR and HMR E. In sir2 and sir4 mutants, the plasmid copy number was significantly lowered, suggesting that these gene products also participate in the replication of plasmids carrying HMR E. The phenotype of point mutations introduced at an 11-base-pair ARS consensus sequence present at HMR E indicated that this sequence is functional but not absolutely required for autonomous replication of the plasmid and that it is not required for SIR-dependent mitotic stabilization. A plasmid carrying both a centromere and HMR E exhibited reduced mitotic stability in wild-type cells. This destabilization appeared to be due to antagonism between the segregation functions provided by the centromere and by HMR E. Images PMID:3325822

  4. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  5. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells.

  6. The effectiveness of visitation proxy variables in improving recreation use estimates for the USDA Forest Service

    Treesearch

    Donald B.K. English; Susan M. Kocis; J. Ross Arnold; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Larry Warren

    2003-01-01

    In estimating recreation visitation at the National Forest level in the US, annual counts of a number of types of visitation proxy measures were used. The intent was to improve the overall precision of the visitation estimate by employing the proxy counts. The precision of visitation estimates at sites that had proxy information versus those that did not is examined....

  7. Rethinking emergency department visits.

    PubMed

    Resar, Roger K; Griffin, Frances A

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to date have been unable to reverse the trend of increased emergency department utilization. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement has developed a framework for reducing avoidable emergency department visits on the basis of the formation of local coalitions. These coalitions include interested partners approaching improvement by integrating community resources and nonmedical solutions. Targeted patient populations are identified via homogeneous characteristics. Open-ended interview questions are used to identify possible community and nonmedical solutions to complement medical strategies. This article describes the framework and process of testing. If validated, this approach will have significant policy implications.

  8. Expression of a myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation site mutant complements the cytokinesis and developmental defects of Dictyostelium RMLC null cells.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, B D; Chen, P; Chisholm, R L

    1994-12-01

    In a number of systems phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RMLC) of myosin regulates the activity of myosin. In smooth muscle and vertebrate nonmuscle systems RMLC phosphorylation is required for contractile activity. In Dictyostelium discoideum phosphorylation of the RMLC regulates both ATPase activity and motor function. We have determined the site of phosphorylation on the Dictyostelium RMLC and used site-directed mutagenesis to replace the phosphorylated serine with an alanine. The mutant light chain was then expressed in RMLC null Dictyostelium cells (mLCR-) from an actin promoter on an integrating vector. The mutant RMLC was expressed at high levels and associated with the myosin heavy chain. RMLC bearing a ser13ala substitution was not phosphorylated in vitro by purified myosin light chain kinase, nor could phosphate be detected on the mutant RMLC in vivo. The mutant myosin had reduced actin-activated ATPase activity, comparable to fully dephosphorylated myosin. Unexpectedly, expression of the mutant RMLC rescued the primary phenotypic defects of the mlcR- cells to the same extent as did expression of wild-type RMLC. These results suggest that while phosphorylation of the Dictyostelium RMLC appears to be tightly regulated in vivo, it is not essential for myosin-dependent cellular functions.

  9. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Chandler, Madison R.; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R.; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl− transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  10. A regulatory calcium-binding site at the subunit interface of CLC-K kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Gradogna, Antonella; Babini, Elena; Picollo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    The two human CLC Cl− channels, ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb, are almost exclusively expressed in kidney and inner ear epithelia. Mutations in the genes coding for ClC-Kb and barttin, an essential CLC-K channel β subunit, lead to Bartter syndrome. We performed a biophysical analysis of the modulatory effect of extracellular Ca2+ and H+ on ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb in Xenopus oocytes. Currents increased with increasing [Ca2+]ext without full saturation up to 50 mM. However, in the absence of Ca2+, ClC-Ka currents were still 20% of currents in 10 mM [Ca2+]ext, demonstrating that Ca2+ is not strictly essential for opening. Vice versa, ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb were blocked by increasing [H+]ext with a practically complete block at pH 6. Ca2+ and H+ act as gating modifiers without changing the single-channel conductance. Dose–response analysis suggested that two protons are necessary to induce block with an apparent pK of ∼7.1. A simple four-state allosteric model described the modulation by Ca2+ assuming a 13-fold higher Ca2+ affinity of the open state compared with the closed state. The quantitative analysis suggested separate binding sites for Ca2+ and H+. A mutagenic screen of a large number of extracellularly accessible amino acids identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278 on the loop connecting helices I and J), which are close to each other but positioned on different subunits of the channel, as a likely candidate for forming an intersubunit Ca2+-binding site. Single mutants E261Q and D278N greatly diminished and the double mutant E261Q/D278N completely abolished modulation by Ca2+. Several mutations of a histidine residue (H497) that is homologous to a histidine that is responsible for H+ block in ClC-2 did not yield functional channels. However, the triple mutant E261Q/D278N/H497M completely eliminated H+ -induced current block. We have thus identified a protein region that is involved in binding these physiologically important ligands and that is likely undergoing

  11. Preparing for an Office Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you are referred to other medical specialists. Pre-visit Planning Activities Write down the questions you ... doctor the questions you wrote out during your pre-visit planning activities, even if you may feel ...

  12. Savannah River Site Public and Regulatory Involvement in the Cercla Low-Level Waste (LLW) Program and Their Effect on Decisions to Dispose of LLW Generated by Cercla

    SciTech Connect

    Belencan, H.

    2008-07-01

    The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public, federal and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of LLW generated from CERCLA Removal and Remedial Actions. At SRS the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) project has generated large amounts of LLW from the removal of buildings and processing facilities. The D and D project is expected to generate even larger amounts of LLW in the future. The most cost effective disposal alternated is to use the onsite LLW disposal facility in E-Area. The E-Area LLW Facility is owned and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its authority granted by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Since the disposal of CERCLA generated waste is also governed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CERCLA regulations, it is important that EPA, DOE, and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) work together to resolve any conflicts in implementation of the D and D project so that all regulations are followed and the project can be continued successfully. An issue of particular significance will be described in this paper that, were it not resolved successfully, would have jeopardized the completion of one project and resulted in higher overall project costs. The EPA determined in review of

  13. The usage of visual indicators in regulatory monitoring at hard-bottom finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland (Canada).

    PubMed

    Hamoutene, Dounia; Salvo, Flora; Donnet, Sebastien; Dufour, Suzanne C

    2016-07-15

    Finfish aquaculture can be installed over hard and patchy substrates where grab sampling is challenging and use of video can be an appropriate tool to document benthic changes. Video monitoring can show visual indicators of enrichment, namely flocculent matter, Beggiatoa-like mats, and opportunistic polychaete complexes (OPC). We examined factors influencing presence of indicators using 52 video monitoring reports collected in Newfoundland, Canada. The main driving factor was distance to cage, with indicators showing a higher probability of occurrence within 10m from cages due to low current velocities. Indicators were less prevalent on sites dominated by hard substrates while OPC in particular were restricted to depths >35m. Beggiatoa-like bacteria covered a larger surface than the two other indicators; however, our results suggest the necessity of amalgamating information related to all the indicators (including bare stations that could indicate anoxia) to establish a more accurate evaluation of aquaculture impact. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reasons young adults visit (and do not visit) impaired grandparents.

    PubMed

    Boon, Susan D; Shaw, Megan J

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the value undergraduate students ( N = 138) attach to relationships with impaired grandparents by examining some of the reasons they visit (and do not visit) grandparents who live with conditions limiting their cognitive, physical, or psychological well-being. As part of a larger study, participants completed two checklists to indicate their reasons for visiting and not visiting their affected grandparents. Reward-based reasons were endorsed more frequently as motives for visiting than were reasons based on external constraints, family difficulties, guilt, or wanting to take advantage of the time left with their grandparents. Barriers that restricted opportunities to visit were endorsed more frequently as explanations for participants' failure to visit than were problems in the relationship itself, guilt, or severity of impairment.

  15. Virtual screening of gene expression regulatory sites in non-coding regions of the infectious salmon anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, which contains an important fish pathogen called the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), have a genome consisting of eight segments of single-stranded RNA that encode different viral proteins. Each of these segments is flanked by non-coding regions (NCRs). In other Orthomyxoviruses, sequences have been shown within these NCRs that regulate gene expression and virulence; however, only the sequences of these regions are known in ISAV, and a biological role has not yet been attributed to these regions. This study aims to determine possible functions of the NCRs of ISAV. Results The results suggested an association between the molecular architecture of NCR regions and their role in the viral life cycle. The available NCR sequences from ISAV isolates were compiled, alignments were performed to obtain a consensus sequence, and conserved regions were identified in this consensus sequence. To determine the molecular structure adopted by these NCRs, various bioinformatics tools, including RNAfold, RNAstructure, Sfold, and Mfold, were used. This hypothetical structure, together with a comparison with influenza, yielded reliable secondary structure models that lead to the identification of conserved nucleotide positions on an intergenus level. These models determined which nucleotide positions are involved in the recognition of the vRNA/cRNA by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) or mRNA by the ribosome. Conclusions The information obtained in this work allowed the proposal of previously unknown sites that are involved in the regulation of different stages of the viral cycle, leading to the identification of new viral targets that may assist future antiviral strategies. PMID:25069483

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Arizona. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in Arizona. The Arizona state constitution establishes the Arizona Corporation Commission to regulate public service corporations. Within the area of its jurisdiction, the Commission has exclusive power and may not be interfered with by the legislature except in one narrow instance as described in the case Corporation Commission v. Pacific Greyhound Lines.

  17. Sensing kuuki among visiting nurses.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Atsuko; Suwa, Sayuri; Tsujimura, Mayuko

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to explore how visiting nurses in Japan sense Kuuki (mood or atmosphere) in the homes of patients and families. Participants were 15 Japanese visiting nurses with experience sensing kuuki in homes of patients and families. Data were collected through two 90 min focus group interviews with experienced visiting nurses, and a qualitative content analysis was performed. The qualitative analysis showed that experienced visiting nurses sensed kuuki in eight ways. Kuuki differs based on type of illness, state of health and number of visits. Sensitivity to kuuki is thought to be linked to understanding of patient and family feelings, changes in the physical condition of patients and evaluation of nursing care delivery. Perception of kuuki also contributes to care planning especially on the very first home visit and when visiting terminally ill patients.

  18. Regulatory Requirements and Technical Analysis for Department of Energy Regulated Performance Assessments of Shallow-Trench Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B.; Black, P.; Tauxe, J.; Yucel, V.; Rawlinson, S.; Colarusso, A.; DiSanza, F.

    2001-12-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) operates and maintains two active facilities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that dispose Department of Energy (DOE) defense-generated low-level radioactive (LLW), mixed radioactive, and classified waste in shallow trenches, pits and large-diameter boreholes. The operation and maintenance of the LLW disposal sites are self-regulated under DOE Order 435.1, which requires review of a Performance Assessment for four performance objectives: 1) all pathways 25 mrem/yr limit; 2) atmospheric pathways 10 mrem/yr limit; 3) radon flux density of 20 pCi/m2/s; and 4) groundwater resource protection (Safe Drinking Water Act; 4 mrem/yr limit). The inadvertent human intruder is protected under a dual 500- and 100-mrem limit (acute and chronic exposure). In response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 92 2, a composite analysis is required that must examine all interacting sources for compliance against both 30 and 100 mrem/yr limits. A small component of classified transuranic waste is buried at intermediate depths in 3-meter diameter boreholes at the Area 5 LLW disposal facility and is assessed through DOE-agreement against the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s 40 CFR 191. The hazardous components of mixed LLW are assessed against RCRA requirements. The NTS LLW sites fall directly under three sets of federal regulations and the regulatory differences result not only in organizational challenges, but also in different decision objectives and technical paths to completion. The DOE regulations require deterministic analysis for a 1,000-year compliance assessment supplemented by probabilistic analysis under a long-term maintenance program. The EPA regulations for TRU waste are probabilistically based for a compliance interval of 10,000 years. Multiple steps in the assessments are strongly dependent on assumptions for long-term land use policies

  19. Lysine residues involved in the hysteresis and in the regulatory sites of spinach ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase.

    PubMed

    Yokota, A; Tokai, H

    1993-11-01

    Lysine residues have been suggested to be involved in the hysteretic decrease of the activity of spinach ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and the binding of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate to its regulatory sites [Yokota, A. & Tsujimoto, N. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 204, 901-909]. This work identifies the lysine residues and investigates the effects of their chemical modification on the course of RuBisCO reaction. The carbamylated form of RuBisCO reacted with trinitrobenzene sulfonate in three phases; an initial rapid, second slow, and final non-specific reaction. Lys-334 in loop 6, Lys-21, and Lys-128, all from the large subunits, were trinitrophenylated in the first 60-min reaction. Lys-305 of the large subunits was labeled in the next step. The modification of these residues was strongly suppressed in the enzyme form that had undergone hysteretic conformational change after binding 2-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate at its catalytic sites. Instead, Lys-450 of the large subunits and Lys-71 from the small subunits were newly modified in the quaternary complex. A higher concentration of 2-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate reduced the trinitrophenylation of the two residues to half. The modification of the carbamylated form of the enzyme for 30 min was expected to arylate Lys-21, Lys-128, and Lys-334 at random, and the course of the reaction of the partially modified enzyme was expected to deviate from that of the unmodified enzyme. Experimental results showed that this was the case.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A site-specific, single-copy transgenesis strategy to identify 5' regulatory sequences of the mouse testis-determining gene Sry.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Alexander; Kashimada, Kenichi; Davidson, Tara-Lynne; Ng, Ee Ting; Chawengsaksophak, Kallayanee; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Y-chromosomal gene SRY acts as the primary trigger for male sex determination in mammalian embryos. Correct regulation of SRY is critical: aberrant timing or level of Sry expression is known to disrupt testis development in mice and we hypothesize that mutations that affect regulation of human SRY may account for some of the many cases of XY gonadal dysgenesis that currently remain unexplained. However, the cis-sequences involved in regulation of Sry have not been identified, precluding a test of this hypothesis. Here, we used a transgenic mouse approach aimed at identifying mouse Sry 5' flanking regulatory sequences within 8 kb of the Sry transcription start site (TSS). To avoid problems associated with conventional pronuclear injection of transgenes, we used a published strategy designed to yield single-copy transgene integration at a defined, transcriptionally open, autosomal locus, Col1a1. None of the Sry transgenes tested was expressed at levels compatible with activation of Sox9 or XX sex reversal. Our findings indicate either that the Col1a1 locus does not provide an appropriate context for the correct expression of Sry transgenes, or that the cis-sequences required for Sry expression in the developing gonads lie beyond 8 kb 5' of the TSS.

  1. Regulatory and institutional issues impending cleanup at US Department of Energy sites: Perspectives gained from an office of environmental restoration workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, W E; Gephart, J M; Gephart, R E; Quinn, R D; Stevenson, L A

    1991-05-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons and energy operations are conducted across a nation-wide industrial complex engaged in a variety of manufacturing, processing, testing, and research and development activities. The overall mission of DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is to protect workers, the public, and the environment from waste materials generated by past, current, and future DOE activities and to bring the DOE complex into compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and agreements related to health, safety, and the environment. EM addresses this broad mandate through related and interdependent programs that include corrective actions, waste operations, environmental restoration, and technology development. The EM Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) recognizes the importance of implementing a complex-wide process to identify and resolve those issues that may impede progress towards site cleanup. As a first step in this process, FM-40 sponsored an exercise to identify and characterize major regulatory and institutional issues and to formulate integrated action steps towards their resolution. This report is the first product of that exercise. It is intended that the exercise described here will mark the beginning of an ongoing process of issue identification, tracking, and resolution that will benefit cleanup activities across the DOE complex.

  2. Pre-steady-state kinetics of Bacillus licheniformis 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase: evidence for a regulatory binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Mireia; Iversen, Karin; Planas, Antoni; Christensen, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported the first stopped-flow experiments on a Bacillus licheniformis 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase [Abel, Planas and Christensen (2001) Biochem. J. 357, 195-202]. It was shown that the pre-steady-state kinetics of the 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase using the substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl 3-O-beta-cellobiosyl-beta-D-glucoside may be explained by a reaction scheme involving an induced fit and the binding of two substrates as well as a second enzymic conformational change, whereas the results definitely could not be explained in terms of the simple double-displacement scheme. In the present study, we report further stopped-flow kinetic results on the glucanase using a series of low-molecular-mass substrates with various leaving groups and varying chain length. The analysis of the resulting data leads to the conclusion that the free enzyme exists in two conformations, one of which binds the substrates rather strongly in a regulatory site, before any productive interactions can take place. This corresponds to an allosteric activation mechanism. With these substrates, however, the productive enzyme-substrate species are also able to change into less active or inactive forms. This may be seen as a feedback inhibitory mechanism. PMID:12568655

  3. Network Science Center Research Teams Visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    overseeing the program that includes approximately 20 kids ranging from age 4 to 12. We were able to visit the project site with him and this will be...companies or people to create video and multimedia productions. During filming, Samson has a crew of seven employees. Samson took his firm to the next...these two days driving to, and visiting a “One Laptop per Child” study site located near Lake Wenchi. This visit is discussed in a blog post authored by

  4. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  5. STS-124 crew visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-07-23

    NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Gene Goldman (center) welcomed members of the STS-124 Discovery space shuttle crew during their July 23 visit to the center. Crew members who visited Stennis were (l to r) Pilot Ken Ham, Mission Specialist Karen Nyberg, Kelly, and Mission Specialists Ron Garan and Mike Fossum.

  6. Home Visiting in Two Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamorey, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The home visiting component of early childhood education programs provides an important portal through which to observe family interactions as well as gain insights about the ethnotheories of the home visitor. Home visits were videotaped in the United States and in Turkey to analyze training and program effectiveness. One striking feature of this…

  7. Visit a Farm? Surely Not!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular myth has it that visiting a farm can be dangerous, but there are only a few occasions when children have become ill during a school visit to a farm. Simple, sensible precautions, including wearing appropriate clothing, such as trousers and wellington boots (if wet) or sensible shoes, and careful hand-washing, are all that is required. The…

  8. Home Visiting in Two Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamorey, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The home visiting component of early childhood education programs provides an important portal through which to observe family interactions as well as gain insights about the ethnotheories of the home visitor. Home visits were videotaped in the United States and in Turkey to analyze training and program effectiveness. One striking feature of this…

  9. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  10. Visit a Farm? Surely Not!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular myth has it that visiting a farm can be dangerous, but there are only a few occasions when children have become ill during a school visit to a farm. Simple, sensible precautions, including wearing appropriate clothing, such as trousers and wellington boots (if wet) or sensible shoes, and careful hand-washing, are all that is required. The…

  11. T-->A transversion 11 bp from a splice acceptor site in the human gene for steroidogenic acute regulatory protein causes congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tee, M K; Lin, D; Sugawara, T; Holt, J A; Guiguen, Y; Buckingham, B; Strauss, J F; Miller, W L

    1995-12-01

    Congenial lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is the most severe form of CAH. Affected individuals can make no adrenal or gonadal steroids. All affected individuals are phenotypic females irrespective of gonadal sex, and frequently die in infancy if mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid replacements are not instituted. Recent data implicate the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in this disorder. We now describe a 46,XY patient of Vietnamese ancestry with lipoid CAH who had a somewhat milder form of the disease. Diagnosis was at 10 weeks of age, and low levels of plasma progesterone, corticosterone, 180H-corticosterone and androstenedione were detectable. Testicular RNA for StAR was reverse transcribed, amplified, cloned and sequenced, revealing a 185 bp deletion corresponding to all of exon 5. The corresponding mRNA did not encode active protein in transfected cells. Cloned genomic DNA from the patient revealed only a T-->A transversion in intron 4,11 bp from the splice acceptor site of exon 5. This transversion destroys an NcoI site; digestion of PCR-amplified genomic DNA from the patient and both parents confirmed that the patient was homozygous and the parents were heterozygous. Expression vectors for StAR minigenes were constructed containing all StAR exons plus introns 4, 5 and 6 either with or without the T-->A mutation in intron 4. RNase protection assays showed that expression of the vector with normal intron 4 yielded correctly spliced StAR mRNA in transfected COS-1 cells, while most, but not all StAR mRNA from the vector with the T-->A transversion in intron 4 was abnormally spliced. RNase protection of the patient's testicular RNA confirmed that most, but not all StAR mRNA was similarly spliced abnormally. Splicing errors appear to be a rare cause of genetic diseases, but subtle intronic mutations may be missed when genomic DNA is the only material available for study. The low level of normal StAR mRNA produced may account for the later

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Texas. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Texas is generally vested in the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor, with the advice of at least two-thirds of the senate, for a six-year term. Prior to the passage of the Texas Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) in 1975, the power to regulate public utilities was vested almost exclusively in municipalities. Under PURA, municipalities retain exclusive original jurisdiction over all electric, water, and sewer utilities within the municipality. PURA provides that all regulations pertaining to public utilities promulgated by local regulatory agencies remain in effect unless they are superceded by Commission rules. The municipality's governing body is required to exercise its regulatory authority under rules and standards consistent with those promulgated by the Commission. The Commission has exclusive appellate jurisdiction to review orders and ordinances of regulatory municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. QL-10NEURO-ONCOLOGY TELEMEDICINE FOLLOW-UP VISITS

    PubMed Central

    Green, Richard; Woyshner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    We report our 18 month experience with the use of a videoconferencing system to perform neuro-oncology follow-up visits. The Neuro-oncology Program at the Kaiser Permanente-Los Angeles Medical center serves the majority of Kaiser HMO patients in the Southern California region. We installed a videoconferencing system (Cisco TelePresence EX90, Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA) in our office in Los Angeles and in a medical office building in Anaheim, CA at a distance of 35 miles. Established neuro-oncology patients from Orange County chose between in-person and remote visits. Patients were seated in an examination room and the neuro-oncology provider alerted by text page. A focused history and physical examination was performed, followed by desktop sharing of clinical and laboratory data using an electronic medical record (Epic Systems Corporation, Verona, WI) and of neuroimages (Phillips iSite PACS, Andover, MA). Patients were asked, but not required, to complete an anonymous online 16 question satisfaction survey after each visit. Visits were performed by either a neuro-oncologist (179) or a Physician's Assistant (12). Of the 191 visits, 174 included evaluation of neuroimaging and 77 included evaluation of response to ongoing chemotherapy. During 12 visits chemotherapy was initiated, and during 15 visits the chemotherapy regimen was changed based on imaging findings. One-hundred and eleven surveys (58% of visits) were completed. Patients reported a high level of satisfaction with the visits (average 9.6, on a 1-10 scale). The average estimated travel time saved was 118 minutes per visit. Four surveys reported technical problems and 1 indicated a preference for an in-person visit. No adverse events could be attributed to use of the telemedicine system. These data suggest that neuro-oncology follow-up visits can be practiced safely and effectively using a telemedicine system, with high levels of patient satisfaction.

  14. Instructions for Using Traffic Counters to Estimate Recreation Visits and Use

    Treesearch

    George A. James; Thomas H. Ripley

    1963-01-01

    Every manager of a recreation site needs three essential statistics: man-hours of use, number of visits, and peak loads. Man-hours of use are a good gauge of site wear and tear and service reaquirements. Visits reflect the number of impressions gained by people and hence provide an index to public approval or dissatisfaction, depending upon site condition. Peak load...

  15. Crohn's Disease: The First Visit

    PubMed Central

    Farraye, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    A Crohn's disease patient's first visit to a new practice is the optimal time to collect important clinical data and identify appropriate therapies. A methodologic approach to this visit is crucial. The focus of this visit should be on preparing the patient for the initiation of treatment, with particular attention to the necessary steps prior to the use of immunosuppressive and biologic agents. This paper is intended to provide recommendations and a checklist for the initial assessment and evaluation of patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:21528042

  16. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  17. Preparing for your Doctor Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Visiting Your Doctor Evaluation + Tests Autonomic Testing Nerve/Skin/Muscle Biopsy Computerized Axial Tomography Scan (CAT) Electrodiagnostic Testing Lumbar Puncture Imaging Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Peripheral Neuropathy ...

  18. Medicare Update: Annual Wellness Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... about your health. This is called a Health Risk Assessment (HRA). The answers may provide important information to ... the visit? You should bring your completed health risk assessment, a complete list of your medications (including vitamins ...

  19. Visiting Scholars Program Selection | FNLCR

    Cancer.gov

    The Expression of Interest will provide us with the applicant’s: Personal and professional information Targeted start and end dates Purpose of the visit in the context of his/her overall research activities Research approach to ad

  20. Visiting Scholars Program | FNLCR Staging

    Cancer.gov

    The Visiting Scholars Program (VSP) is a scientific partnership program that offers extramural scientists access to the intellectual capital and state-of-the-art facilities of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR), the only na

  1. Astronaut Steve Swanson Visits Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On Tuesday, 3 March 2015, a special guest visited NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during his time back on Earth. Steven Swanson, NASA astronaut, intrigued the audience by highlighting his adventur...

  2. Skylab mission report, third visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the operational and engineering aspects of the third Skylab visit, including information on the performance of the command and service module and the experiment hardware, the crew's evaluation of the visit, and other visit-related areas of interest such as biomedical observations. The specific areas discussed are contained in the following: (1) solar physics and astrophysics investigations; (2) Comet Kohoutek experiments; (3) medical experiments; (4) earth observations, including data for the multispectral photographic facility, the earth terrain camera, and the microwave radiometer/scattermometer and altimeter; (5) engineering and technology experiments; (6) food and medical operational equipment; (7) hardware and experiment anomalies; and (8) mission support, mission objectives, flight planning, and launch phase summary. Conclusions discussed as a result of the third visit to Skylab involve the advancement of the sciences, practical applications, the durability of man and systems in space, and spaceflight effectiveness and economy.

  3. Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicle Group needed a targeting tool for vehicles that rendezvous with the ISS. The Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory targeting tool provides the ability to perform both realtime and planning operations for the Visiting Vehicle Group. This tool provides a highly reconfigurable base, which allows the Visiting Vehicle Group to perform their work. The application is composed of a telemetry processing function, a relative motion function, a targeting function, a vector view, and 2D/3D world map type graphics. The software tool provides the ability to plan a rendezvous trajectory for vehicles that visit the ISS. It models these relative trajectories using planned and realtime data from the vehicle. The tool monitors ongoing rendezvous trajectory relative motion, and ensures visiting vehicles stay within agreed corridors. The software provides the ability to update or re-plan a rendezvous to support contingency operations. Adding new parameters and incorporating them into the system was previously not available on-the-fly. If an unanticipated capability wasn't discovered until the vehicle was flying, there was no way to update things.

  4. Issues in intensive care visiting.

    PubMed

    Biley, F C; Millar, B J; Wilson, A M

    1993-06-01

    In order to obtain a contemporary view of the visiting hour regimes in intensive care units (ICUs) in the UK, a national telephone survey was performed. 122 geographically representative units were contacted, representing 42% of the total number of units in the UK. 107 units gave consent to participate in the study, of which 66 units allowed visiting at any time of the day. Many of these units however restricted the number or kind of visitors and only 19% could be regarded as having 'true' open visiting, that is, visiting at any time of the day for any age of child, any member of the family, or friends. Several of the topics arising from the study are discussed in more detail, for example the childhood risk of infection and/or psychological trauma and the needs of the family. Based on the available research evidence, a more liberated view of hospital visiting is necessary, with relaxation of what often amount to restricted visiting regimes. Several recommendations for further research are made.

  5. 28 CFR 540.46 - Attorney visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney visits. 540.46 Section 540.46... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.46 Attorney visits. Requirements for attorney visits... chapter). Provisions pertinent to attorney visits for pretrial inmates are contained in § 551.117 of...

  6. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Idaho. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Idaho state legislature has created the Idaho Public Utilities Commission and has given the Commission the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate every public utility in the state. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. Commissioners serve full time and are appointed for six year terms. No more than two of the members may be from the same political party. Title 61 of the Idaho Code, which establishes the Commission and delineates its powers, vests all regulatory responsibility in the Commission to the exclusion of local government. However, as an incident to their franchising power, municipalities may impose reasonable regulations on the use of their streets. The Idaho Supreme Court holds that the transfer of regulatory power over public utilities to the Commission did not diminish the powers and duties of municipalities to control and maintain their streets and alleys. Limited statutory authority also exists giving municipalities the power to regulate the fares, rates, rentals, or charges made for the service rendered under any franchise granted in such city, except such as are subject to regulation by the Public Utilities Commission. With the exception of this limited power, the Commission is the sole agency having regulatory power over Idaho public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Louisiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Louisiana Public Service Commission, composed of five members elected by the general electorate and elected for six-year terms. The Commission is charged with regulating all public utilities and has such other regulatory authority as provided by law. The Commission, however, has no power to regulate a public utility owned, operated, or regulated on the effective data of this constitution (1921) by the governing authority of one or more political subdivisions unless the Commission is authorized to regulate these utilities by the electorate of the political subdivision involved. An additional statutory provision excludes all municipally-owned public utilities from Commission regulation. New Orleans has retained the regulatory authority which it held as of the effective date of the Louisiana Constitution. Therefore, the Commission exercises no regulatory powers over investor or municipally-owned utilities in New Orleans. A municipality is empowered to own and operate a revenue-producing public utility within or without its boundaries and it may sell and distribute the commodity or service of the public utility within or without its corporate limits and may establish rates, rules, and regulations with respect to the sale and distribution. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Illinois. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Illinois Commerce Commission, comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate and appointed for five year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any business subject to regulation by the Commission. Local governments may exercise a large degree of regulatory authority over public utilities providing services within a municipality. The question of whether a municipality will exercise regulatory control over local public utilities must be put to the voters of the city. If the proposition is approved by a majority of the voters, the municipality may regulate services and rates and exercise most of the regulatory functions otherwise assigned to the Commission. If any public utility is dissatisfied with any action of a municipality, the utility is entitled to apply to the Commission for review of the action. On review, the Commission may take any determination which it deems just and reasonable. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are excluded specifically from the definition of public utility. These utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission and are regulated locally. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Kentucky. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Until April 1, 1979, the Public Service Commission had been vested with exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of rates and service of utilities. As of that date two new agencies, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) and the Utility Regulatory Commission (URC), have replaced the Public Service Commission. The ERC consists of three full-time members appointed by the governor for four year terms and is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Kentucky statutes relating to electric and gas utilities. The three-member URC is responsible for enforcing the provisions relating to non-energy utilities such as telephone, sewer, and water utilities. The statutes vest all regulatory authority over public utilities in either the ERC or the URC. Local governments retain only the power to grant local franchises. However, it should be noted, that any utility owned or operated by a political subdivision of the state is exempt from regulation. Thus, local government has complete authority over utilities which are self-owned. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. MEETING IN TUCSON: 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  11. MEETING IN TUCSON: 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  12. 77 FR 41417 - Regulatory Science Considerations for Medical Countermeasure Radiation Biodosimetry Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Science Considerations for Medical Countermeasure... entitled ``Regulatory Science Considerations for Medical Countermeasure (MCM) Radiation Biodosimetry... the public meeting, please visit FDA's Medical Devices News & Events--Workshops & Conferences calendar...

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Hawaii. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Hawaii is vested in the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the Governor. Commissioners serve for six year terms, must be independent of the companies they regulate and must not possess or acquire an interest in any public utility. The regulatory authority of the Commission preempts that of any other state agency. Local governments have no authority over public utilities. Chapter 196 of the Hawaii statutes establishes the position of the Energy Resources Coordinator; the role of the coordinator, however, is merely to develop, review, and recommend programs for the optimum development of Hawaii's energy resources. The Commission has jurisdiction over all public utilities located in the state. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Utah. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Utah Public Service Commission comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the consent of the State Senate. Commission members are appointed for six-year terms and must be free from employment and pecuniary interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the general supervision of public utilities, but its authority does not extend to municipally-owned utilities. Local governments are forbidden from exercising any regulatory powers over public utilities unless the utility is municipally-owned. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in West Virginia. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the West Virginia Public Service Commission, comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the state senate. Commissioners are appointed for six year terms. They must be free from any pecuniary or employment interest in public utilities. The Commission possesses the exclusive authority to regulate public utilities. While local governments retain the power to control the use of their streets and to grant franchises to public utilities, they cannot use this power to infringe on the exercise of regulatory power by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Indiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Service Commission of Indiana. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor. Commissioners are appointed for four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interest in any public utility. Indiana courts have stated that the Commission was created and vested with regulatory authority over public utilities in order to relieve these utilities from local regulation. Local governments do, however, have specific statutory authority to determine, by contract or ordinance, the quality and character of service to be provided by public utilities within the municipality. Local governments may also regulate the use of streets and other public property by public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Wyoming. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested in the Wyoming Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the state senate. Each member of the Commission serves a six-year term and no more than two members may be from the same political party. The Commission has exclusive regulatory authority over public utilities. The statutory definition of public utility, however, does not include municipally-owned and operated utility systems to the extent they provide services within the municipality. Such utilities are regulated locally. The Commission reviews no documentation of rates or services of municipallyy-owned systems. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Stennis visits Lake Cormorant school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Alexis Harry, assistant director of Astro Camp at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, talks with students at Lake Cormorant (Miss.) Elementary School during a 'Living and Working in Space' presentation March 30. Stennis hosted the school presentation during a visit to the Oxford area. Harry, who also is a high school biology teacher in Slidell, La., spent time discussing space travel with students and answering questions they had about the experience, including queries about how astronauts eat, sleep and drink in space. The presentation was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis. For more information about NASA education initiatives, visit: http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/.

  19. Visitation arrangements for impaired parents.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen A; Street, David F

    2011-07-01

    Forensic mental health professionals are frequently asked to evaluate the parenting skills of divorcing parents because the court seeks help in determining the custody, visitation, and parenting time arrangements for the children. When one of the parents is impaired, the court wants to know the way to help the children have a good relationship with that parent and keep the children safe. There is little empirical research to answer such questions. In this article, the authors describe their methodology for providing useful clinical information to the court to help guide their decisions regarding visitation with impaired parents.

  20. Stennis visits Lake Cormorant school

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-30

    Alexis Harry, assistant director of Astro Camp at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, talks with students at Lake Cormorant (Miss.) Elementary School during a 'Living and Working in Space' presentation March 30. Stennis hosted the school presentation during a visit to the Oxford area. Harry, who also is a high school biology teacher in Slidell, La., spent time discussing space travel with students and answering questions they had about the experience, including queries about how astronauts eat, sleep and drink in space. The presentation was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis. For more information about NASA education initiatives, visit: http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/.

  1. Stennis visits Lake Cormorant school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Alexis Harry, assistant director of Astro Camp at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, talks with students at Lake Cormorant (Miss.) Elementary School during a 'Living and Working in Space' presentation March 30. Stennis hosted the school presentation during a visit to the Oxford area. Harry, who also is a high school biology teacher in Slidell, La., spent time discussing space travel with students and answering questions they had about the experience, including queries about how astronauts eat, sleep and drink in space. The presentation was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis. For more information about NASA education initiatives, visit: http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/.

  2. Current Regulations and Regulatory Actions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site will provide basic information on clean air permitting under the title V operating permits program, provide access to state and regional permitting programs, and maintain access to proposed and final regulatory requirements.

  3. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains…

  4. Providing Individually Responsive Home Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgley, Robyn; O'Kelley, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Home visiting is a common method of providing early intervention services to families. The reason home visitors in early intervention programs begin working with a young child and his or her family is usually because the child has a developmental delay, diagnosed disability, or is at risk for developing a delay. It seems reasonable for a home…

  5. A Modern Visit to Galileo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the author's visit to the Italian cities where Galileo lived. Discusses the legendary swinging Cathedral lamp and the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Describes the science apparatus used by Galileo and other men of science which appear in the Museum of the History of Science in Florence. Presents six pictures of items viewed within the museum.…

  6. A Modern Visit to Galileo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the author's visit to the Italian cities where Galileo lived. Discusses the legendary swinging Cathedral lamp and the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Describes the science apparatus used by Galileo and other men of science which appear in the Museum of the History of Science in Florence. Presents six pictures of items viewed within the museum.…

  7. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains…

  8. A Visit to Reggio Emilia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rody, MaryAnn

    1995-01-01

    Describes two child care administrators' visit to the model preschools in Reggio Emilia, Italy. Discusses the Reggio view of childhood and the structure and environment in a typical Reggio classroom. Notes how the larger cultural elements of Italy--community, history, and pride--are deeply rooted in the Reggio concept. (HTH)

  9. NASA chief technologist visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-26

    NASA Chief Technologist Bobby Braun visited John C. Stennis Space Center on Aug. 26. While at Stennis, he spoke to employees and the media about innovation and technology in NASA's future and the important role Stennis will play in space exploration programs. Braun also toured facilities and received briefings on work under way at the nation's premier rocket engine test facility.

  10. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama waves farewell after speaking at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. Visiting School Campuses: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Spending time in schools and classrooms can be one of the best ways for novice reporters to dive into the education beat, and for veteran journalists to find fresh inspiration. While it is certainly not necessary for every story, education journalists should try their best to make time to visit schools. Classroom observations and campus tours help…

  14. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media representative...

  15. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media representative...

  16. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media representative...

  17. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media representative...

  18. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media representative...

  19. 28 CFR 540.41 - Visiting facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting facilities. 540.41 Section 540... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.41 Visiting facilities. The Warden shall have... have a portion of the visiting room equipped and set up to provide facilities for the children...

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New York. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the New York Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. Commissioners may not have any pecuniary or financial interest in any public utility. Local governing bodies are authorized to exercise such power, jurisdiction and authority in enforcing the laws of the state and the orders, rules, and regulations of the commission as may be prescribed by statute or by the commission with respect to public utilities. A Commission spokesman confirmed that no statutes have been passed pursuant to this provision and the Commission has not ceded any of its regulatory powers to local governments. With the exception of the granting of franchises and permits to use public ways, local governments exercise no regulatory powers over public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Georgia. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members elected to six-year terms by the general electorate. Commissioners must be free of employment or pecuniary interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is the only agency that may exert regulatory control over public utilities. The legislature has delegated no regulatory authority to local government. Except for the powers incident to granting a franchise and its normal police powers, municipal corporations do not have any role in the supervision of public utilities. The Commission's general supervisory authority does not extend to public utilities owned or operated by municipal corporations. The jurisdiction of the Commission extends to several specific public utilities, including gas or electric light and power companies. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Nebraska. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The state agency with principal authority to regulate electric public utilities is the Power Review Board (Board). However, the Board in fact, exercised little regulatory authority over heat and power utilities because all electrical power in Nebraska is currently supplied by public authorities and is not subject to regulation by the Board. Gas and water utilities are also subject to general supervision by municipalities. The Board is compised of five members - an attorney, an engineer, one accountant, two lay - persons appointed by the governor and confirmed by the legislature. All members are appointed to overlapping four-year terms, and none may serve more than two consecutive terms. Decisions by the Board require the approval of a majority of its members. The Public Service Commission of Nebraska is a constitutionally created body. Its powers and duties include the regulation of rates, service, and general control of common carriers as the legislature may provide by law. Other state agencies also possess limited regulatory jurisdiction which may be relevant to an energy facility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  3. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  4. Piloting a Statewide Home Visiting Quality Improvement Learning Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neera K; Rome, Martha G; Massie, Julie A; Mangeot, Colleen; Ammerman, Robert T; Breckenridge, Jye; Lannon, Carole M

    2017-02-01

    Objective To pilot test a statewide quality improvement (QI) collaborative learning network of home visiting agencies. Methods Project timeline was June 2014-May 2015. Overall objectives of this 8-month initiative were to assess the use of collaborative QI to engage local home visiting agencies and to test the use of statewide home visiting data for QI. Outcome measures were mean time from referral to first home visit, percentage of families with at least three home visits per month, mean duration of participation, and exit rate among infants <6 months. Of 110 agencies, eight sites were selected based on volume, geography, and agency leadership. Our adapted Breakthrough Series model included monthly calls with performance feedback and cross-agency learning. A statewide data system was used to generate monthly run charts. Results Mean time from referral to first home visit was 16.7 days, and 9.4% of families received ≥3 visits per month. Mean participation was 11.7 months, and the exit rate among infants <6 months old was 6.1%. Agencies tested several strategies, including parent commitment agreements, expedited contact after referral, and Facebook forums. No shift in outcome measures was observed, but agencies tracked intermediate process changes using internal site-specific data. Agencies reported positive experiences from participation including more frequent and structured staff meetings. Conclusions for Practice Within a pilot QI learning network, agencies tested and measured changes using statewide and internal data. Potential next steps are to develop and test new metrics with current pilot sites and a larger collaborative.

  5. Internet-Based Medical Visit and Diagnosis for Common Medical Problems: Experience of First User Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Shevchik, Grant J.; Paone, Suzanne; Martich, G. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective Internet-based medical visits, or “structured e-Visits,” allow patients to report symptoms and seek diagnosis and treatment from their doctor over a secure Web site, without calling or visiting the physician's office. While acceptability of e-Visits has been investigated, outcomes associated with e-Visits, that is, whether patients receiving diagnoses receive appropriate care or need to return to the doctor, remain unexplored. Materials and Methods: The first 156 e-Visit users from a large family medicine practice were surveyed regarding their experience with the e-Visit and e-Visit outcomes. In addition, medical records for patients making e-Visits were reviewed to examine need for follow-up care within 7 days. Results: Interviews were completed with 121 patients (77.6% participation). The most common type of e-Visit was for “other” symptoms or concerns (37%), followed by sinus/cold symptoms (35%). Back pain, urinary symptoms, cough, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and vaginal irritation were each less frequent (<10%). A majority, 61% completed e-Visits with their own physician. The majority of patients (57.0%) reported receipt of a diagnosis without need for follow-up beyond a prescription; 75% of patients thought the e-Visit was as good as or better than an in-person visit, and only 11.6% felt that their concerns or questions were incompletely addressed. In a review of medical records, 16.9% had a follow-up visit within 7 days, mostly for the same condition. Four of these were on the same day as the e-Visit, including one emergency department visit. Conclusions: Outcomes for the e-Visit suggest that it is an appropriate and potentially cost-saving addition to in-person delivery of primary care. PMID:21457013

  6. STS-128 crew visits Stennis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Astronauts C.J. Sturckow (seated, left) and Pat Forrester (seated, right) sign autographs during their Oct. 7 visit to Stennis Space Center. The astronauts visited the rocket engine testing facility to thank Stennis employees for contributions to their recent STS-128 space shuttle mission. All three of the main engines used on the mission were tested at Stennis. Sturckow served as commander for the STS-128 flight; Forrester was a mission specialist. During a 14-day mission aboard space shuttle discovery, the STS-128 crew delivered equipment and supplies to the International Space Station, including science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and an exercise treadmill. The mission featured three spacewalks to replace experiments and install new equipment at the space station.

  7. Steering UNICORE applications with VISIT.

    PubMed

    Eickermann, Thomas; Frings, Wolfgang; Gibbon, Paul; Kirtchakova, Lidia; Mallmann, Daniel; Visser, Anke

    2005-08-15

    The UNICORE (UNiform Interface to COmputing REsources) software provides a Grid infrastructure together with a computing portal for engineers and scientists to access supercomputer centres from anywhere on the Internet. While UNICORE is primarily designed for the submission and control of batch jobs, it is also feasible to establish an on-line connection between an application and the UNICORE user-client. This opens up the possibility of performing on-line visualization and computational steering of applications under UNICORE control while maintaining the security provided by this system. This contribution describes the design of a steering extension to UNICORE based on the steering toolkit VISIT (VISualization Interface Toolkit). VISIT is a lightweight library that supports bidirectional data exchange between visualizations and parallel applications. As an example application, a parallel simulation of a laser-plasma interaction that can be steered by an AVS/Express application is presented.

  8. STS-128 crew visits Stennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-07

    Astronauts C.J. Sturckow (seated, left) and Pat Forrester (seated, right) sign autographs during their Oct. 7 visit to Stennis Space Center. The astronauts visited the rocket engine testing facility to thank Stennis employees for contributions to their recent STS-128 space shuttle mission. All three of the main engines used on the mission were tested at Stennis. Sturckow served as commander for the STS-128 flight; Forrester was a mission specialist. During a 14-day mission aboard space shuttle discovery, the STS-128 crew delivered equipment and supplies to the International Space Station, including science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and an exercise treadmill. The mission featured three spacewalks to replace experiments and install new equipment at the space station.

  9. NSF visiting professorships for women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The deadline date for the National Science Foundation's Visiting Professorships for Women (VPW) program is November 15. The program enables experienced women scientists and engineers to undertake advanced research and teaching at host institutions where they can also provide guidance and encouragement to other women who want to pursue research careers. NSF is particularly interested in increasing participation in research of minority women and women with disabilities.

  10. President Bill Clinton visits JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-14

    S98-05023 (14 April 1998) --- A large crowd of JSC employees listen to President Bill Clinton during an April 14 visit to the Johnson Space Center. NASA, Houston and JSC officials, as well as the STS-95 Discovery crew members scheduled to fly in space later this year, are on the dais with the President. He earlier had gone inside several of the Shuttle and ISS crew training facilities and mockups. Photo Credit: Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA

  11. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama waves hello as he exits of Air Force One along with Senator Bill Nelson after landing at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama tours the commercial rocket processing facility of Space Exploration Technologies, known as SpaceX, along with Elon Musk, SpaceX CEO at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama also visited the NASA Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director bob Cabana shakes hands with President Barack Obama as he and Gen. C. Robert Kehler, Commander, Air Force Space Command, left, welcome the President to Kennedy in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    Air Force One is seen as it prepares to depart from the NASA SHuttle Landing Facility (SLF) after President Barack Obama delivered a speech at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    Members of the press watch on monitors as President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the Administration is charting for NASA and the future of U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver shakes hands with President Barack Obama as she and NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, left, welcome the President to Kennedy in Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama visited Kennedy to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. NASA Advisory Council visits Stennis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA Advisory Council members visited Stennis Space Center April 15 and 16, touring facilities and participating in various presentations. They also viewed a space shuttle main engine test on the A-2 Test Stand. The council of accomplished citizens advises NASA on major policy and program issues. The council includes former Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Hagan Schmitt as chair, as well as former astronaut Eileen Collins, the first woman to command a space shuttle mission.

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli chromosome near oriC: identification and characterization of asnC, a regulatory element in E. coli asparagine metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    de Wind, N; de Jong, M; Meijer, M; Stuitje, A R

    1985-01-01

    We developed a new method for the specific mutagenization of the E. coli chromosome. This method takes advantage of the fact that a pBR322 plasmid containing chromosomal sequences is mobilizable during an Hfr-mediated conjugational transfer, due to an homologous recombination between the E. coli Hfr chromosome and the pBR322 derivative. Transconjugants are screened with a simple selection procedure for integration of mutant sequences in the chromosome and loss of pBR322 sequences. Using this method we specifically inactivated several genes near the E. coli replication origin oriC. We found that a gene coding for asparagine synthetase A. This regulatory mechanism was investigated in detail by determining in vivo regulation of asnA promoter activity by the 17kD protein under different growth conditions. Results obtained also suggest a general regulatory role of the 17kD protein in E. coli asparagine metabolism. Therefore the 17kD gene is proposed to be renamed asnC. Images PMID:3909107

  19. Team Visitation Guidelines for Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Programs. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Dorothy; Klitzke, Elizabeth

    These guidelines outline the role of the visiting team members and the team leader and familiarize the team with details necessary to conduct a comprehensive external evaluation of Wisconsin secondary vocational programs. First, the three goals of the on-site evaluation are outlined. A discussion of the team selection and team members' functions…

  20. Binding Sites in the EFG1 Promoter for Transcription Factors in a Proposed Regulatory Network: A Functional Analysis in the White and Opaque Phases of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Claude; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Park, Yang-Nim; Daniels, Karla J; Soll, David R

    2016-06-01

    In Candida albicans the transcription factor Efg1, which is differentially expressed in the white phase of the white-opaque transition, is essential for expression of the white phenotype. It is one of six transcription factors included in a proposed interactive transcription network regulating white-opaque switching and maintenance of the alternative phenotypes. Ten sites were identified in the EFG1 promoter that differentially bind one or more of the network transcription factors in the white and/or opaque phase. To explore the functionality of these binding sites in the differential expression of EFG1, we generated targeted deletions of each of the 10 binding sites, combinatorial deletions, and regional deletions using a Renilla reniformis luciferase reporter system. Individually targeted deletion of only four of the 10 sites had minor effects consistent with differential expression of EFG1, and only in the opaque phase. Alternative explanations are considered. Copyright © 2016 Pujol et al.

  1. Binding Sites in the EFG1 Promoter for Transcription Factors in a Proposed Regulatory Network: A Functional Analysis in the White and Opaque Phases of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claude; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Park, Yang-Nim; Daniels, Karla J.; Soll, David R.

    2016-01-01

    In Candida albicans the transcription factor Efg1, which is differentially expressed in the white phase of the white-opaque transition, is essential for expression of the white phenotype. It is one of six transcription factors included in a proposed interactive transcription network regulating white-opaque switching and maintenance of the alternative phenotypes. Ten sites were identified in the EFG1 promoter that differentially bind one or more of the network transcription factors in the white and/or opaque phase. To explore the functionality of these binding sites in the differential expression of EFG1, we generated targeted deletions of each of the 10 binding sites, combinatorial deletions, and regional deletions using a Renilla reniformis luciferase reporter system. Individually targeted deletion of only four of the 10 sites had minor effects consistent with differential expression of EFG1, and only in the opaque phase. Alternative explanations are considered. PMID:27172219

  2. Identification and characterization of two nuclear factor-kappaB sites in the regulatory region of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Sandra; Fiorentini, Chiara; Busi, Chiara; Guerra, Nicoletta; Spano, PierFranco; Missale, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Regulation of D2 receptor (D2R) expression is crucial in the function of dopaminergic systems. Because alterations of D2R expression may contribute to the development of different disorders, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms regulating D2R gene transcription. We report the characterization of two putative nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) motifs, referred to as D2-kappaB sites, in the human D2R promoter, and demonstrate that they bind NF-kappaB subunits and stimulate D2R promoter activity. D2-kappaB sites show different degrees of conservation and specificity, when compared with canonical kB sites. The D2-kappaB1 site (from -407 to -398) is highly conserved and binds p50/p65 and p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas D2-kappaB2 (from -513 to -504) is more degenerated and only binds p50/p65 heterodimers. Activation of D2-kappaB sites in COS-7 cells expressing a luciferase reporter vector containing the D2R promoter resulted in increased transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of each D2-kappaB site differentially modified D2R promoter activity. In particular, mutation of the D2-kappaB1 motif did not affect D2R promoter response to p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas inactivation of the D2-kappaB2 site decreased it. Mutations of either D2-kappaB1 or D2-kappaB2 sites attenuated the D2R promoter transcriptional efficiency induced by p50/p65 complexes. Thus, D2R transcription mediated by p50/c-Rel is supported mainly by the D2-kappaB2 site, whereas both sites are necessary to support the full transcriptional activity mediated by p50/p65 complexes. A correlation was found between NF-kappaB activity and D2R expression in the pituitary and pituitary-derived cells but not in the striatum, suggesting that NF-kappaB regulation of D2R expression could be a pituitary-specific mechanism.

  3. Florivory and pollinator visitation: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kaoru; Dhami, Manpreet K.; Cross, David J.R.; Rice, Carolyn P.; Romano, Nic H.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Florivory, or damage to flowers by herbivores, can make flowers less attractive to pollinators, potentially resulting in reduced plant fitness. However, not many studies have combined observations with experiments to assess the causal link between florivory and pollination. We conducted field observations at eight sites in northern California, combined with field experiments that involved artificial floral damage, to study the effect of florivory on pollination in the hummingbird-pollinated sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus aurantiacus. We used two indicators of pollinator visitation, stigma closure and the presence of microorganisms in floral nectar. The field observations revealed that stigma closure was less frequent in damaged flowers than in intact flowers. In the experiments, however, floral damage did not decrease stigma closure or microbial detection in nectar. Instead, neighbouring flowers were similar for both indicators. These results suggest that the observed negative association between florivory and pollination is not causal and that the location of flowers is more important to pollinator visitation than florivory in these populations of M. aurantiacus. PMID:27178063

  4. Arctic Visiting Speakers Series (AVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, S. E.; Griswold, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Visiting Speakers (AVS) Series funds researchers and other arctic experts to travel and share their knowledge in communities where they might not otherwise connect. Speakers cover a wide range of arctic research topics and can address a variety of audiences including K-12 students, graduate and undergraduate students, and the general public. Host applications are accepted on an on-going basis, depending on funding availability. Applications need to be submitted at least 1 month prior to the expected tour dates. Interested hosts can choose speakers from an online Speakers Bureau or invite a speaker of their choice. Preference is given to individuals and organizations to host speakers that reach a broad audience and the general public. AVS tours are encouraged to span several days, allowing ample time for interactions with faculty, students, local media, and community members. Applications for both domestic and international visits will be considered. Applications for international visits should involve participation of more than one host organization and must include either a US-based speaker or a US-based organization. This is a small but important program that educates the public about Arctic issues. There have been 27 tours since 2007 that have impacted communities across the globe including: Gatineau, Quebec Canada; St. Petersburg, Russia; Piscataway, New Jersey; Cordova, Alaska; Nuuk, Greenland; Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania; Oslo, Norway; Inari, Finland; Borgarnes, Iceland; San Francisco, California and Wolcott, Vermont to name a few. Tours have included lectures to K-12 schools, college and university students, tribal organizations, Boy Scout troops, science center and museum patrons, and the general public. There are approximately 300 attendees enjoying each AVS tour, roughly 4100 people have been reached since 2007. The expectations for each tour are extremely manageable. Hosts must submit a schedule of events and a tour summary to be posted online

  5. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  6. Process, cost, and clinical quality: the initial oral contraceptive visit.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael J; Woolford, Samuel W; Moore, Charles L; Berger, Barry M

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate how the analysis of clinical process, cost, and outcomes can identify healthcare improvements that reduce cost without sacrificing quality, using the example of the initial visit associated with oral contraceptive pill use. Cross-sectional study using data collected by HealthMETRICS between 1996 and 2009. Using data collected from 106 sites in 24 states, the unintended pregnancy (UIP) rate, effectiveness of patient education, and unit visit cost were calculated. Staff type providing education and placement of education were recorded. Two-way analysis of variance models were created and tested for significance to identify differences between groups. Sites using nonclinical staff to provide education outside the exam were associated with lower cost, higher education scores, and a UIP rate no different from that of sites using clinical staff. Sites also providing patient education during the physical examination were associated with higher cost, lower education scores, and a UIP rate no lower than that of sites providing education outside of the exam. Through analyzing process, cost, and quality, lower-cost processes that did not reduce clinical quality were identified. This methodology is applicable to other clinical services for identifying low-cost processes that do not result in lower clinical quality. By using nonclinical staff educators to provide education outside of the physical examination, sites could save an average of 32% of the total cost of the visit.

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory; a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste; an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information; and, an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site

  8. Regulatory band gap of vacancy at the B sites in CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, D. H.; Xiao, X. J.; Zhang, C. M.; Li, X. L.; Hu, M. Z.; Yin, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The structure, electronic structure, states density and optics properties of the orthorhombic CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite with vacancy at the B sites are calculated by the CASTEP program. The calculated results indicate that the cell volume shrinks with the content of vacancy at the B sites increasing, and the structure has the large degree of distortion from the cubic structure. The band gaps are 1.656, 1.750, 3.077, 3.256 and 4.76 eV, corresponding to x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00, respectively. As an application, the additional absorption peak can be obtained by CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite doped vacancy at the B sites.

  9. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-03-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains original books and manuscripts from the library's own collections. The sheer magnitude of human achievement represented here and the amount of effort and money that must have been required to amass these books boggles the mind.

  10. President Bill Clinton visits JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-14

    S98-05017 (14 April 1998) --- President Bill Clinton prepares to use a fork to sample some space food while visiting NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Holding the food packet is U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr. (D.-Ohio), currently in training at JSC as a payload specialist for a flight scheduled later this year aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. Looking on is astronaut Curtis L. Brown Jr., STS-95 commander. The picture was taken in the full fuselage trainer (FFT). Photo Credit: Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA

  11. Obama Kennedy Space Center Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-14

    President Barack Obama, left, Air Force Col. Lee Rosen, Commander, 45th Launch Group, center, and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk talk with Dr. John P. Holdren is Assistant to the President for Science and Technology during a tour of the commercial rocket processing facility of Space Exploration Technologies, known as SpaceX, at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Cape Canaveral, Fla. on Thursday, April 15, 2010. Obama also visited the NASA Kennedy Space Center to deliver remarks on the bold new course the administration is charting to maintain U.S. leadership in human space flight. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. STS-116 crew visits SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The astronauts of NASA's STS-116 space shuttle mission visited NASA Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi to share highlights of their 13-day mission and to thank SSC employees for the reliability of the space shuttle's main engines, which helped propel Space Shuttle Discovery into orbit during its Dec. 9, 2006, launch. Pictured (from left) are STS-116 crewmembers Commander Mark Polansky, Pilot Bill Oefelein, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, SSC Center Director, Richard Gilbrech, Mission Specialists Joan Higginbotham, Nicholas Patrick and Christer Fuglesang. During the mission, which began with the first evening launch since 2002, the astronauts installed the P5 spacer truss segment and rewired the International Space Station's power system.

  13. STS-115 crew visits SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Commander Brent Jett (center) talks with employees and visitors at NASA Stennis Space Center. The astronauts of NASA's STS-115 space shuttle mission visited SSC in south Mississippi to share highlights of their 12-day mission and to thank SSC employees for the reliability of the space shuttle's main engines, which helped propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into orbit. STS-115's other crewmembers are (from left) Mission Specialists Joe Tanner, Dan Burbank, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper and Steve MacLean of the Canadian Space Agency. The mission launched Sept. 9, 2006, resuming construction of the International Space Station.

  14. The Arctic Visiting Speakers Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Fahnestock, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Visiting Speakers Program (AVS) is a program of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) and funded by the National Science Foundation. AVS provides small grants to researchers and other Arctic experts to travel and share their knowledge in communities where they might not otherwise connect. The program aims to: initiate and encourage arctic science education in communities with little exposure to arctic research; increase collaboration among the arctic research community; nurture communication between arctic researchers and community residents; and foster arctic science education at the local level. Individuals, community organizations, and academic organizations can apply to host a speaker. Speakers cover a wide range of arctic topics and can address a variety of audiences including K-12 students, graduate and undergraduate students, and the general public. Preference is given to tours that reach broad and varied audiences, especially those targeted to underserved populations. Between October 2000 and July 2013, AVS supported 114 tours spanning 9 different countries, including tours in 23 U.S. states. Tours over the past three and a half years have connected Arctic experts with over 6,600 audience members. Post-tour evaluations show that AVS consistently rates high for broadening interest and understanding of arctic issues. AVS provides a case study for how face-to-face interactions between arctic scientists and general audiences can produce high-impact results. Further information can be found at: http://www.arcus.org/arctic-visiting-speakers.

  15. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 – Goddard Center Director Chris Scolese greets His Majesty Carl XVI Gustaf, King of Sweden outside the entrance to Building 28 at GSFC. The king’s visit came as part his participation in a large delegation that also included the Swedish Ambassador to the United States, both the chairman and president of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, as well as distinguished members of Sweden’s industrial, academia and professional organizations. For the arrival, approximately 60 children from the Goddard Child Development Center were on hand to greet the Swedish delegation. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  16. Home Visits in Geropsychiatry Fellowship Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roane, David M.; Teusink, J. Paul; Wortham, Jennifer A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The psychiatric home visit is an effective intervention for elderly patients who otherwise would not receive mental health services. Home visits also have potential to be useful for training. Here, the current practice of home visits in geropsychiatry fellowship programs is examined. Design and Methods: The directors of 55 current…

  17. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish a...

  18. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish a...

  19. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish a...

  20. 42 CFR 409.48 - Visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... care, only one visit may be covered. (4) A visit is initiated with the delivery of covered home health services and ends at the conclusion of delivery of covered home health services. In those circumstances in... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Visits. 409.48 Section 409.48 Public Health CENTERS...

  1. 42 CFR 409.48 - Visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... care, only one visit may be covered. (4) A visit is initiated with the delivery of covered home health services and ends at the conclusion of delivery of covered home health services. In those circumstances in... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Visits. 409.48 Section 409.48 Public Health CENTERS...

  2. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  3. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  4. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus): cDNA cloning, sites of expression and transcript abundance in corticosteroidogenic tissue after an acute stressor.

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Makoto; Zuccarelli, Micah D; Nakamura, Ikumi; Young, Graham

    2009-06-01

    The white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus, is a primitive bony fish that is recognized as an important emerging species for aquaculture. However, many aspects of its stress and reproductive physiology remain unclear. These processes are controlled by various steroid hormones. In order to investigate the regulation of steroidogenesis associated with acute stress in sturgeon, a cDNA-encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) was isolated from white sturgeon. The putative amino acid sequence of sturgeon StAR shares high homology (over 60%) with other vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis grouped sturgeon StAR within Actinopterygii, but it was clearly segregated from teleost StARs. RT-PCR analysis revealed that transcripts were most abundant in yellow corpuscles found throughout the kidney and weaker signals were detected in gonad and kidney. Very weak signals were also detected in brain and spleen by quantitative real-time PCR. In situ hybridization revealed that StAR is expressed in the cells of yellow corpuscles. No significant changes in StAR gene expression were detected in response to an acute handling stress. These results suggest that StAR is highly conserved throughout vertebrates, but the expression of the functional protein during the stress response may be partially regulated post-transcriptionally.

  5. Response to Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ten questions pertaining to site-specific models for use in the license termination rule: Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.; McDonald, J.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Pelton, M.A.; Gelston, G.M.; Taira, R.Y.

    1998-05-01

    This paper is in response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ten questions posed at the Modeling Workshop held November 13 and 14, 1997. The ten questions were developed in advance of the workshop to allow model developers to prepare a presentation at the Workshop. This paper is an expanded version of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) presentation given at the Modeling Workshop by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. This paper is organized by the ten questions asked by the NRC, each section devoted to a single question. The current version of methodology is MEPAS 3.2 (NRC 1997) and the discussion in this paper will pertain to that version. In some cases, MEPAS 4.0, which is currently being developed under the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) (Whelan et al. 1997), will be referenced to inform the reader of potential capabilities in the near future. A separate paper is included in the document that discusses the FRAMES concept.

  6. Quantal release, incremental detection, and long-period Ca2+ oscillations in a model based on regulatory Ca2+-binding sites along the permeation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, G; Swillens, S

    1996-01-01

    Quantal release, incremental detection, and oscillations are three types of Ca2+ responses that can be obtained in different conditions, after stimulation of the intracellular Ca2+ stores by submaximum concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3). All three phenomena are thought to occur through the regulatory properties of the InsP3 receptor/Ca2+ channel. In the present study, we perform further analysis of the model (Swillens et al., 1994, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:10074-10078) previously proposed for transient InsP3-induced Ca2+ release, based on the bell-shaped dependence of the InsP3 receptor activity on the Ca2+ level and on the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain located around the mouth of the channel. We show that Ca2+ oscillations also arise in the latter model. Conditions for the occurrence of the various behaviors are investigated. Numerical simulations also show that the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain can markedly increase the period of oscillations. Periods on the order of 1 min can indeed be accounted for by the model when one assigns realistic values to the kinetic constants of the InsP3 receptor, which, in the absence of a domain, lead to oscillations with periods of a few seconds. Finally, theoretical support in favor of a positive cooperativity in the regulation of the InsP3 receptor by Ca2+ is presented. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8889149

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maine. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Maine Supreme Court holds that the regulation of the operations of public utilities is an exercise of the police powers of the state. The legislature has delegated such regulatory authority to the Maine Public Utilities Commission (PUC). The statutes provide no role for local government in the regulation of public utilities. The PUC consists of three full time members, appointed by the Governor subject to review by the Joint Standing Committee on Public Utilities and to confirmation by the Legislature. They each serve seven year terms. One member is designated by the Governor as chairman. The Commission appoints a secretary, assistant secretary, director of transportation, and, with the approval of the Attorney General, a general counsel. A member of the PUC cannot have any official or professional connection or relation with or hold any stock or securities in any public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Iowa. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Iowa State Commerce Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of two-thirds of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from employment or pecuniary interests in any public utility. Although the right to grant franchises is specifically reserved for municipalities, local governments exercise no regulatory authority over the provision of utility services by public utilities. Municipally-owned utilities, however, are specifically excepted from rate regulation by the Commission. The regulation of rates charged by municipally-owned utilities is the responsibility of local governments. The Commission is given no authority to review decisions of local governments with respect to rates. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Carolina. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Pursuant to constitutional South Carolina mandate the General Assembly has created the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of seven members elected to four year terms by the General Assembly. One commissioner is elected from each of seven districts corresponding to the congressional districts as they existed as of January 1, 1930. The commissioners elect one of their members as chairman. The South Carolina statutes contain separate chapters dealing with the regulation of public utilities and electric utilities. Public utility includes the furnishing of gas or heat (other than by means of electricity) to the public. While the Commission is granted general supervisory and regulatory powers over public utilities and electric utilities, total governments retain some control over electrical utilities. All municipality's have the power to grant exclusive franchises to such utilities for the furnishing of light to the municipality and its inhabitants. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Maryland. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Maryland is vested in the Public Service Commission under the authority of the Public Service Commission Law. The Commission consists of five commissioners who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate. Commissioners must be or become citizens of Maryland, at least three are to serve full time, and one of the commissioners is to be nominated as chairman. The tenure of each commissioner is six years and their terms are on a staggered schedule. Commissioners are eligible for reappointment. The Public Service Commission Law provides that the Commission's powers an jurisdiction shall extend to the full extent permitted by the Constitution and laws of the United States. Local governments in Maryland are not given regulatory power over public service companies. The only power that local governments have over the operations of utilities is the power to grant franchises. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  12. The U.S. Department of Energy's Regulatory and Evaluation Framework for Demonstrating Radiation Protection of the Environment: Implementation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Tiller, Brett L.; Domotor, S. L.; Higley, Kathryn A.

    2005-08-01

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RESRAD BIOTA. The RESRAD BIOTA code showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RESRAD BIOTA’s site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the program’s kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RESRAD BIOTA results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  13. Assessment of the interaction of human complement regulatory proteins with group A Streptococcus. Identification of a high-affinity group A Streptococcus binding site in FHL-1.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Caballero, D; Albertí, S; Vivanco, F; Sánchez-Corral, P; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    2000-04-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS), the most frequent bacterial cause of suppurative infections in humans, expresses on the cell surface M proteins with capacity to bind factor H, FHL-1 and C4b binding protein (C4BP). This has been interpreted as a mechanism developed by this pathogen to decrease phagocytosis by macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells. We report the analysis of the capacity to bind factor H, FHL-1 and C4BP of 69 clinical isolates from 19 different serotypes. We show that strains binding complement regulators (30/69) belong to specific M serotypes. Of these, M18 strains are relatively frequent and interact with all three complement regulators simultaneously. However, the most virulent M1 and M3 strains did not bind complement regulators in our assays. The relevance of the interaction between complement regulators and S. pyogenes was analyzed using different approaches with the conclusion that under physiological conditions only FHL-1 and C4BP bind to streptococci. We show that FHL-1 presents a higher binding affinity for S. pyogenes than factor H because it carries a hydrophobic, high-affinity, GAS binding site in addition to the heparin binding site in SCR7. Using synthetic peptides we provide evidence that the high-affinity GAS binding site in FHL-1 involves the hydrophobic tail (Ser-Phe-Thr-Leu) that distinguishes FHL-1 from factor H.

  14. Mapping of a Myosin-binding Domain and a Regulatory Phosphorylation Site in M-Protein, a Structural Protein of the Sarcomeric M Band

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Wolfgang M.J.; van der Ven, Peter F.M.; Steiner, Frank; Weber, Klaus; Fürst, Dieter O.

    1998-01-01

    The myofibrils of cross-striated muscle fibers contain in their M bands cytoskeletal proteins whose main function seems to be the stabilization of the three-dimensional arrangement of thick filaments. We identified two immunoglobin domains (Mp2–Mp3) of M-protein as a site binding to the central region of light meromyosin. This binding is regulated in vitro by phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser76) in the immediately adjacent amino-terminal domain Mp1. M-protein phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent kinase A inhibits binding to myosin LMM. Transient transfection studies of cultured cells revealed that the myosin-binding site seems involved in the targeting of M-protein to its location in the myofibril. Using the same method, a second myofibril-binding site was uncovered in domains Mp9–Mp13. These results support the view that specific phosphorylation events could be also important for the control of sarcomeric M band formation and remodeling. PMID:9529381

  15. Site-specific in vivo cleavages by DNA topoisomerase I in the regulatory regions of the 35 S rRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are transcription independent.

    PubMed

    Vogelauer, M; Camilloni, G

    1999-10-15

    Eukaryotic type I DNA topoisomerase controls DNA topology by transiently breaking and resealing one strand of DNA at a time. During transcription and replication its action reduces the torsional stress derived from these activities. The association of DNA topoisomerase I with the nucleolus has been reported and this enzyme was shown to be involved in yeast rDNA metabolism. Here, we have investigated the in vivo presence of DNA topoisomerase I cleavage sites in the non-transcribed spacer of the rDNA cluster. We show a specific profile of highly localized cleavage in relevant areas of this region. The sites are detected in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the 35 S gene. The analysis of mutants in which transcription is prevented and/or reduced, namely a strain lacking the 43 kDa subunit of RNA polymerase I, a second one that does note transcribe, lacking a subunit of the core factor and another member of the RNA polymerase I transcription factors lacking one of the UAF component which transcribes at very low level, show that DNA topoisomerase I cleavage sites are not related to transcription by RNA polymerase I. These findings point to a role for DNA topoisomerase I that is additional to the commonly recognized function in removing the transcription-induced topological stress. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Florida. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Florida Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. The governor must choose his appointees from a list of persons recommended by the nine-person Florida Public Service Commission Nominating Council. Commissioners serve either three- or four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any utility subject to the jurisdiction of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Connecticut. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Connecticut statutes expressly provide for the regulation of public utilities. As of January 1, 1979, responsibility for the regulation of utilities is vested in the Public Utilities Control Authority (PUCA). Formerly such authority was exercised by the Public Utilities Commission which has been abolished and replaced by the PUCA. The Public Utilities Act provides that the PUCA is to consist of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of both houses of the general assembly. It should be noted that statutory references to the Public Utilities Commission are deemed to mean the Public Utilities Control Authority. The statute gives only a minor role to local government in regulating public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Virginia. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilties is vested generally in the State Corporation Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by a joint vote of the two houses of the general assembly. Commissioners serve six-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any company subject to the supervision and regulation of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the primary responsibility of supervising and regulating public utilities. However, local governments retain the power to grant franchises and otherwise regulate the use of streets and other public property. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission to the extent that they operate within corporate limits. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Tennessee. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Tennessee Public Service Commission has been designated by the legislature as the agency primarily responsible for the regulation of public utilities and carriers. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by the voters of the state. Each member of the Commission serves a six-year term. The Commission is given broad supervisory control over public utilities in the public utilities statute. Included under its authority is the power to determine whether a privilege or franchise granted to a public utility by a municipality is necessary and proper for the public convenience. No privilege or franchise is valid until it has been approved by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Missouri. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Missouri is vested in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for a term of six years. Commissioners must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the general supervision of public utilities. The Public Service Commission Law passed in 1913, makes no provision for the regulation of public utilities by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Mini-Visit Guidelines and Rating Scale in Wisconsin Secondary Vocational Programs. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Dorothy; Klitzke, Elizabeth

    These guidelines outline the role of the visiting team members and familiarize them with those details necessary to conduct a condensed external evaluation of Wisconsin secondary vocational programs. (Such condensed evaluations are conducted when a full team visitation is not appropriate.) First, the three goals of the on-site evaluation are…

  2. The Finishing Touch: Preparing the Report, the Staff and the Campus for the Visiting Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Frank; Fitzmorris, Carolyn

    In preparation for an accreditation visit, Hutchinson Community College (HCC), in Kansas, conducted a self-study to determine if their institutional practices were consistent with their mission and undertook other activities to ensure a smooth site visit. A steering committee first prepared a self-study manual which identified the purpose, goals,…

  3. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  4. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to James Pontius, Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigator (GEDI) Project Manager and Bryan Blair, GEDI Deputy Principal Investigator talk about mission and science of GEDI and the collaborative work being done with Sweden. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Visit to an Ocean Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    "Visit to an Ocean Planet" is an interactive, educational CD-ROM that reveals the importance of our oceans to global climate and life. It is designed to complement middle and high school science curricula, as well as to be enjoyed by the general public. The CD-ROM allows users to explore the Gulf of Mexico with satellite data, investigate the 1997-1998 El Nino, discover "what's up" with Earth-orbiting satellites, and learn about the real life oceanographers. The curriculum background material are arranged in the context of widely accepted teaching themes. The CD-ROM also highlights results from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite launched by NASA and the Centre National Etudes Spatiales (CNES). It has been measuring our oceans since 1992. This product is a result of NASA's commitment to involve the educational community in endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, and enlighten inquisitive minds.

  6. Visit to an Ocean Planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    "Visit to an Ocean Planet" is an interactive, educational CD-ROM that reveals the importance of our oceans to global climate and life. It is designed to complement middle and high school science curricula, as well as to be enjoyed by the general public. The CD-ROM allows users to explore the Gulf of Mexico with satellite data, investigate the 1997-1998 El Nino, discover "what's up" with Earth-orbiting satellites, and learn about the real life oceanographers. The curriculum background material are arranged in the context of widely accepted teaching themes. The CD-ROM also highlights results from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite launched by NASA and the Centre National Etudes Spatiales (CNES). It has been measuring our oceans since 1992. This product is a result of NASA's commitment to involve the educational community in endeavors to inspire America's students, create learning opportunities, and enlighten inquisitive minds.

  7. A Visit With a Curandero

    PubMed Central

    Mull, J. Dennis; Mull, Dorothy S.

    1983-01-01

    One author visited a Mexican-American folk healer in the Los Angeles area, not as a patient but as a fellow health professional. Information was obtained from this healer, a curandero, regarding his background, his clientele, the illnesses he treats, the therapeutic techniques he uses and his relationship with the official health care system. This information was generally consistent with statements about curanderismo that have appeared in the social sciences literature. It also provided additional insight into practices that have been alluded to in that literature but not described in detail. With few exceptions, curanderos would seem to be talented healers whose efforts often benefit their patients and whose continued popularity has important implications for physicians, especially those serving large numbers of people of Mexican descent. PMID:6659503

  8. President Bill Clinton visits JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-14

    S98-05024 (14 April 1998) --- A large crowd of JSC employees listen to President Bill Clinton during an April 14 visit to the Johnson Space Center. On the dais with the President (seated, from the left) are JSC Director George W.S. Abbey, U.S. Rep. Nick Lampson (D.-TX), and Houston Mayor Lee Brown. Standing behind them are members of the STS-95 crew: (from the left) Pedro Duque of ESA, Chiaki Mukai of NASDA, U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr. (D.-Ohio), Stephen K. Robinson, Scott E. Parazynski, Steven W. Lindsey (behind Clinton) and Curtis L. Brown Jr. Out of the frame is NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin who also addressed the crowd. The Chief Executive earlier had gone inside several of the shuttle and ISS crew training facilities and mockups. Photo Credit: Joe McNally, National Geographic, for NASA

  9. President Clinton's visit to JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-14

    98-E-03312 (14 April 1998) --- President Bill Clinton (at lectern) addresses employees at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) during an April 14 visit to the Houston facility. Seated behind him (from the left) are JSC Director George W.S. Abbey, U.S. Rep. Nick Lampson (D.-TX), NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin and Houston Mayor Lee Brown. Standing are members of the STS-95 crew: (from the left) Pedro Duque, Chiaki Mukai, U.S. Sen. John H. Glenn Jr. (D.-Ohio), Stephen K. Robinson, Scott E. Parazynski, Steven W. Lindsey and Curtis L. Brown Jr. Brown is commander of the scheduled flight aboard Discovery. Mukai represents Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA) and Duque is with the European Space Agency (ESA). Photo Credit: NASA or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  10. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 –Goddard Space Flight Center senior management and members of the Royal Swedish Academy walk towards Building 29 as part of the Swedish delegation’s tour of the center. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to Jim Jeletic, Deputy Project Manager of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) talk about telescope operations just outside the HST control center at Goddard. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  12. Swedish Delegation Visits NASA Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Swedish Delegation Visits GSFC – May 3, 2017 - Members of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences listen to Catherine Peddie, Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Deputy Project Manager use a full-scale model of WFIRST to describe the features of the observatory. Photo Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth Read more: go.nasa.gov/2p1rP0h NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  13. Growth-regulatory human galectin-1: crystallographic characterisation of the structural changes induced by single-site mutations and their impact on the thermodynamics of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    López-Lucendo, María F; Solís, Dolores; André, Sabine; Hirabayashi, Jun; Kasai, Ken-ichi; Kaltner, Herbert; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Romero, Antonio

    2004-10-29

    Human galectin-1 is a potent multifunctional effector that participates in specific protein-carbohydrate and protein-protein (lipid) interactions. By determining its X-ray structure, we provide the basis to define the structure of its ligand-binding pocket and to perform rational drug design. We have also analysed whether single-site mutations introduced at some distance from the carbohydrate recognition domain can affect the lectin fold and influence sugar binding. Both the substitutions introduced in the C2S and R111H mutants altered the presentation of the loop, harbouring Asp123 in the common "jelly-roll" fold. The orientation of the side-chain was inverted 180 degrees and the positions of two key residues in the sugar-binding site of the R111H mutant were notably shifted, i.e. His52 and Trp68. Titration calorimetry was used to define the decrease in ligand affinity in both mutants and a significant increase in the entropic penalty was found to outweigh a slight enhancement of the enthalpic contribution. The position of the SH-groups in the galectin appeared to considerably restrict the potential to form intramolecular disulphide bridges and was assumed to be the reason for the unstable lectin activity in the absence of reducing agent. However, this offers no obvious explanation for the improved stability of the C2S mutant under oxidative conditions. The noted long-range effects in single-site mutants are relevant for the functional divergence of closely related galectins and in more general terms, the functionality definition of distinct amino acids.

  14. Evaluating Short-Term Vocational Guidance Programs Through Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeltzel, Kenneth E.

    1971-01-01

    This study has shown that counselors state that they want to make changes. If these changes will make positive differences in the quality of the program, an effort is needed by counselors, with the help of teachers, educators, and administrators, to facilitate innovation implementation. (Author)

  15. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  16. Postfire communications: the influence of site visits on local support.

    Treesearch

    Eric L. Toman; Bruce Shindler; Jim Absher; Sarah McCaffrey

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of large wildfires has increased in recent years. In many cases, agency personnel have little prior experience to draw from to organize their postfire response to uncharacteristically large events. However, local residents look to resource managers to provide the necessary leadership to work through these difficult decisions. In particular, methods to...

  17. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  18. ARO/ARL Site Visit Project Review Presentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    hemodynamic activity. 7/11/2012 Challenges 10 complicated equipment gradient artifact BCG artifact How to combine the data? bias field auditory...noise 7/11/2012 11 A B C + + – – Our Solutions EEG+ BCG BCG 7/11/2012 12 (Goldman et al., Neuroimage 2009) Observing latent...Discrimination Results model human subjects Neurometric curve NOT optimized to match psychometric curve! human subjects model ( matrix word

  19. Shifting Patterns of Physician Home Visits.

    PubMed

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Jetty, Anuradha; Peterson, Lars E

    2016-04-01

    Home visits have been shown to improve quality of care and lower medical costs for complex elderly patients. We investigated trends in physician home visits and domiciliary care visits as well as physician characteristics associated with providing these services. Longitudinal analysis of Medicare Part B claims data for a national sample of direct patient care physicians in 2006 and 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the physician sample and to determine numbers of home visits and domiciliary visits in total and by physician specialty. Patient homes, nursing homes, and domiciliary care facilities. Direct patient care physicians (n = 22,186). Physician demographics, specialty, practice characteristics (practice type, geographic location), number of home visits, and domiciliary visits in 2006 and 2011. We found a small increase (n = 63,501) in total number of home visits made to Medicare beneficiaries between 2006 and 2011 performed by a decreasing percentage of physicians (5.1%, n = 18,165 in 2006; 4.5%, n = 15,296 in 2011). There was substantial growth in domiciliary care visit numbers (n = 218,514) and a small increase in percentage of physicians delivering these services (2.0% in 2006, 2.3% in 2011). Physicians who performed home visits were more likely to be older, in rural locations, specialists in primary care, and more likely to provide nursing home and domiciliary care compared with physicians who did not make any home visits (P < .05). Home visits and domiciliary visits to Medicare beneficiaries are increasing. General internal medicine physicians provided the highest number of home and domiciliary care visits in 2006, and family physicians did so in 2011. Such delivery models show promise in lowering medical costs while providing high-quality patient care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The costs of visits to emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Williams, R M

    1996-03-07

    Many visits to emergency departments are for minor medical problems, and these visits are criticized as being expensive and economically inefficient. This study examines the marginal costs (the extra costs for an additional visit) of emergency department visits. Monthly data on the costs of hospital and physicians' services from 1991 through 1993 were obtained from a sample of six community hospitals in Michigan. The data were analyzed with ordinary least-squares regression techniques to determine the ratio of marginal to average costs. Average and marginal costs were then determined for 24,010 visits during 12 randomly selected weeks in 1993. A visit by an individual patient was the unit analysis, and visits were classified as nonurgent, semiurgent, or urgent according to explicit criteria. Costs and charges were determined for all visits and were classified according to the degree of urgency. For all emergency department visits, the average charge was $383, the average cost was $209, and the marginal cost was $88 (42 percent of the average cost). Thirty-two percent of the visits were classified as nonurgent, 26 percent as semiurgent, and 42 percent as urgent. For nonurgent visits, the average charge was $124, the average cost was $62, and the marginal cost was only $24. For semiurgent visits, the average charge was $312, the average cost was $159, and the marginal cost was $67. For urgent visits, the average charge was $621, the average cost was $351, and the marginal cost was $148. The true costs of nonurgent care in the emergency department are relatively low. The potential savings from a diversion of nonurgent visits to private physicians' offices may therefore be much less than is widely believed.

  1. In brain, Axl recruits Grb2 and the p85 regulatory subunit of Pl3 kinase; in vitro mutagenesis defines th requisite binding sites for downstream Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Gohari, Pouyan; Yan, Ying; Backer, Jonathan M.; Varnum, Brian; Shafit-Zagardo, Bridget

    2010-01-01

    Axl is a receptor tyrosine kinase implicated in cell survival following growth factor withdrawal and other stressors. The binding of Axl's ligand, growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6), results in Axl autophosphorylation, recruitment of signaling molecules, and activation of downstream survival pathways. Pull-down assays and immunoprecipitations using wildtype and mutant Axl transfected cells determined that Axl directly binds growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) at pYVN and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3 kinase) at two pYXXM sites (pY779 and pY821). Also, p85 can indirectly bind to Axl via an interaction between p85's second proline-rich region and the N-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2. Further, Grb2 and p85 can compete for binding at the pY821VNM site. Gas6-stimulation of Axl-transfected COS7 cells recruited activated PI3 kinase and phosphorylated Akt. An interaction between Axl, p85 and Grb2 was confirmed in brain homogenates, enriched populations of O4+ oligodendrocytes, and O4– flow-through prepared from day 10 mouse brain, indicating that cells with active Gas6/Axl signal through Grb2 and the PI3 kinase/Akt pathways. PMID:18346204

  2. Despite regulatory changes, hospitals cautious in helping physicians purchase electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joy M; Cohen, Genna

    2008-09-01

    While hospitals are evaluating strategies to help physicians purchase electronic medical records (EMRs) following recent federal regulatory changes, they are proceeding cautiously, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Hospital strategies to aid physician EMR adoption include offering direct financial subsidies, extending the hospital's ambulatory EMR vendor discounts and providing technical support. Two key factors driving hospital interest in supporting physician EMR adoption are improving the quality and efficiency of care and aligning physicians more closely with the hospital. A few hospitals have begun small-scale, phased rollouts of subsidized EMRs, but the burden of other hospital information technology projects, budget limitations and lack of physician interest are among the factors impeding hospital action. While it is too early to assess whether the regulatory changes will spur greater physician EMR adoption, the outcome will depend both on hospitals' willingness to provide support and physicians' acceptance of hospital assistance.

  3. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Paolo Nespoli of ESA lays roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Doctor, Clinic, and Dental Visits

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media Virtual Office Hours ... case managers, social workers, psychiatrists/psychologists, pharmacists and medical specialists. This may mean juggling multiple appointments, but ...

  5. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  6. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  7. Final Report - Summer Visit 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R

    2011-09-12

    During my visit to LLNL during the summer of 2010, I worked on algebraic multilevel solvers for large sparse systems of linear equations arising from discretizations of partial differential equations. The particular solver of interest is based on ILU decomposition. The setup phase for this AMG solve is just the single ILU decomposition, and its corresponding error matrix. Because the ILU uses a minimum degree or similar sparse matrix ordering, most of the fill-in, and hence most of the error, is concentrated in the lower right corner of the factored matrix. All of the major multigrid components - the smoother, the coarse level correction matrices, and the fine-to-coarse and coarse-to-fine rectangular transfer matrices, are defined in terms of various blocks of the ILU factorization. Although such a strategy is not likely to be optimal in terms of convergence properties, it has a relatively low setup cost, and therefore is useful in situations where setup costs for more traditional AMG approaches cannot be amortized over the solution of many linear systems using the same matrix. Such a situation arises in adaptive methods, where often just one linear system is solved at each step of an adaptive feedback loop, or in solving nonlinear equations by approximate Newton methods, where the approximate Jacobian might change substantially from iteration to iteration. In general terms, coarse levels are defined in terms of successively smaller lower right blocks of the matrix, typically decreasing geometrically in order. The most difficult issue was the coarse grid correction matrix. The preconditioner/smoother for a given level is just the corresponding lower right blocks of the ILU factorization. The coarse level matrix itself is just the Schur complement; this matrix is not known exactly using just the ILU decomposition in the setup phase. Thus we approximate this matrix using various combinations of the preconditioning matrix and the error matrix. During my visit, several

  8. Identification of binding sites on the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A for the catalytic C subunit and for tumor antigens of simian virus 40 and polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Ruediger, R; Roeckel, D; Fait, J; Bergqvist, A; Magnusson, G; Walter, G

    1992-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 2A is composed of three subunits: the catalytic subunit C and two regulatory subunits, A and B. The A subunit consists of 15 nonidentical repeats and has a rodlike shape. It is associated with the B and C subunits as well as with the simian virus 40 small T, polyomavirus small T, and polyomavirus medium T tumor antigens. We determined the binding sites on subunit A for subunit C and tumor antigens by site-directed mutagenesis of A. Twenty-four N- and C-terminal truncations and internal deletions of A were assayed by coimmunoprecipitation for their ability to bind C and tumor antigens. It was found that C binds to repeats 11 to 15 at the C terminus of A, whereas T antigens bind to overlapping but distinct regions of the N terminus. Simian virus 40 small T binds to repeats 3 to 6, and polyomavirus small T and medium T bind to repeats 2 to 8. The data suggest cooperativity between C and T antigens in binding to A. This is most apparent for medium T antigen, which can only bind to those A subunit molecules that provide the entire binding region for the C subunit. We infer from our results that B also binds to N-terminal repeats. A model of the small T/medium T/B-A-C complexes is presented. Images PMID:1328865

  9. Identification of the regulatory autophosphorylation site of autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase). Evidence that auto-kinase belongs to a member of the p21-activated kinase family.

    PubMed

    Yu, J S; Chen, W J; Ni, M H; Chan, W H; Yang, S D

    1998-08-15

    Autophosphorylation-dependent protein kinase (auto-kinase) was identified from pig brain and liver on the basis of its unique autophosphorylation/activation property [Yang, Fong, Yu and Liu (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 7034-7040; Yang, Chang and Soderling (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9421-9427]. Its substrate consensus sequence motif was determined as being -R-X-(X)-S*/T*-X3-S/T-. To characterize auto-kinase further, we partly sequenced the kinase purified from pig liver. The N-terminal sequence (VDGGAKTSDKQKKKAXMTDE) and two internal peptide sequences (EKLRTIV and LQNPEK/ILTP/FI) of auto-kinase were obtained. These sequences identify auto-kinase as a C-terminal catalytic fragment of p21-activated protein kinase 2 (PAK2 or gamma-PAK) lacking its N-terminal regulatory region. Auto-kinase can be recognized by an antibody raised against the C-terminal peptide of human PAK2 by immunoblotting. Furthermore the autophosphorylation site sequence of auto-kinase was successfully predicted on the basis of its substrate consensus sequence motif and the known PAK2 sequence, and was further demonstrated to be RST(P)MVGTPYWMAPEVVTR by phosphoamino acid analysis, manual Edman degradation and phosphopeptide mapping via the help of phosphorylation site analysis of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the sequence of PAK2 from residues 396 to 418. During the activation process, auto-kinase autophosphorylates mainly on a single threonine residue Thr402 (according to the sequence numbering of human PAK2). In addition, a phospho-specific antibody against a synthetic phosphopeptide containing this identified sequence was generated and shown to be able to differentially recognize the activated auto-kinase autophosphorylated at Thr402 but not the non-phosphorylated/inactive auto-kinase. Immunoblot analysis with this phospho-specific antibody further revealed that the change in phosphorylation level of Thr402 of auto-kinase was well correlated with the activity change of the kinase during both

  10. Regulatory Forum.

    PubMed

    Peden, W Michael

    2016-12-01

    Revision of the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) S1 guidance for rat carcinogenicity studies to be more selective of compounds requiring a 2-year rat carcinogenicity study has been proposed following extensive evaluation of rat carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity studies by industry and drug regulatory authorities. To inform the ICH S1 expert working group in their potential revision of ICH S1, a prospective evaluation study was initiated in 2013, in which sponsors would assess the pharmacologic and toxicologic findings present in the chronic toxicity studies and predict a positive or negative carcinogenicity outcome using a weight of evidence argument (a carcinogenicity assessment document [CAD]). The Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee was asked by the Society of Toxicology Pathology (STP) executive committee to track these changes with ICH S1 and inform the STP membership of status changes. This commentary is intended to provide a brief summary of recent changes to the CAD guidance and highlight the importance of STP membership participation in the process of CAD submissions.

  11. GENERAL HOSPITAL PSYCHIATRY : COST OF ONE VISIT

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Gopala P.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of patients attending general hospital psychiatry out-patient (OP) showed that cost of one visit was Rs. 201/- Management's contribution of the total expenditure was 68% and patients' 32%. Salaries accounted for the maximum-48%. This was followea by loss of earnings- 17%. Drugs accounted for less than 10%. If MCI norms are followed, cost of a visit would increase by 61%, drug supply and number of patient's visits remaining the same. PMID:21407953

  12. Bouncing Back Elsewhere: Multilevel Analysis of Return Visits to the Same or a Different Hospital After Initial Emergency Department Presentation.

    PubMed

    Shy, Bradley D; Loo, George T; Lowry, Tina; Kim, Eugene Y; Hwang, Ula; Richardson, Lynne D; Shapiro, Jason S

    2017-09-27

    Analyses of 72-hour emergency department (ED) return visits are frequently used for quality assurance purposes and have been proposed as a means of measuring provider performance. These analyses have traditionally examined only patients returning to the same hospital as the initial visit. We use a health information exchange network to describe differences between ED visits resulting in 72-hour revisits to the same hospital and those resulting in revisits to a different site. We examined data from a 31-hospital health information exchange of all ED visits during a 5-year period to identify 72-hour return visits and collected available encounter, patient, and hospital variables. Next, we used multilevel analysis of encounter-level, patient-level, and hospital-level data to describe differences between initial ED visits resulting in different-site and same-site return visits. We identified 12,621,159 patient visits to the 31 study EDs, including 841,259 same-site and 107,713 different-site return visits within 72 hours of initial ED presentation. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the initial-visit characteristics' predictive relationship that any return visit would be at a different site: daytime visit (OR 1.10; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.12), patient-hospital county concordance (OR 1.40; 95% CI 1.36 to 1.44), male sex (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.24 to 1.30), aged 65 years or older (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.57), sites with an ED residency (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.40 to 0.43), sites at an academic hospital (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.08 to 1.15), sites with high density of surrounding EDs (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.68 to 1.77), and sites with a high frequency of same-site return visits (OR 0.10; 95% CI 0.10 to 0.11). This analysis describes how ED encounters with early revisits to the same hospital differ from those with revisits to a second hospital. These findings challenge the use of single-site return-visit frequency as a quality measure, and, more constructively

  13. Home health visits using a cable television network: user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Allen, A; Roman, L; Cox, R; Cardwell, B

    1996-01-01

    There are about 1.5 million home patients who receive home health care (nurses visiting patients in their homes) in the US each year. In a significant proportion of these visits, hands-on care is not needed. Rather, the nurse needs to verify compliance with medication regimes, assess mental or emotional status, or check blood sugar levels, blood pressure and the like. Many of these activities might be handled by a nursing visit using interactive video to the patient's home, saving the nurse's time wasted in driving, finding parking, etc. A system for delivering home health care using interactive video has been piloted in the state of Kansas. Using the local cable television infrastructure for audio and video transmission, this system permits a nurse to see patients in their homes for a fraction of the cost of an on-site visit. This new method of delivering home health care is being evaluated with an ongoing study of utilization and user satisfaction. We conducted a prospective survey administered to home health nurses (n = 2) and homebound patients (n = 3) using a cable TV-mediated interactive video system, to assess utilization and user satisfaction with televideo-mediated home health care visits. One hundred and eighty-one patient questionnaires and 193 nurses questionnaires were completed. The average length of a visit was 15 minutes (range 1-91). All mean scores tabulated for the questions indicated strong nurse and patient satisfaction with the system. Participating nurses and clients were satisfied with the televideo encounters. The mean score for all questions was better than neutral. Recognizing that this was a pilot study, hampered by small numbers and subject to the inherent biases of a single institution study, the results support further investigation and implementation of this modality for home health care.

  14. Refinement and cross-validation of nickel bioavailability in PNEC-pro, a regulatory tool for site-specific risk assessment of metals in surface water.

    PubMed

    Verschoor, Anja J; Vijver, Martina G; Vink, Jos P M

    2017-02-22

    The European Water Framework Directive prescribes that the environmental quality standards for nickel in surface waters should be based on bioavailable concentrations. Biotic ligand models (BLMs) are powerful tools to account for site-specific bioavailability within risk assessments. Several BLMs and simplified tools are available. For nickel, most of them are based on the same toxicity dataset and chemical speciation methodology as laid down in the 2008 European Union Environmental-Risk Assessment Report (RAR). Since then, insights on toxic effects of nickel on aquatic species have progressed and new data and methodologies were generated and implemented in PNEC-pro tool. The aim of this study is to provide maximum transparency on data revisions and how this affects the derived environmental quality standards. A case study with seven different ecoregions was used to determine differences in species sensitivity distributions and in HC5-values between the original Ni-RAR BLMs and the PNEC-pro BLMs. The BLM parameters used were pH dependent, which extended the applicability domain of PNEC-pro up to a pH of 8.7 for surface waters. After inclusion of additional species, adjustment of cross-species extrapolation and the HC5s are well within the prediction range of the RAR. Based on the latest data and scientific insights, transfer functions in the user-friendly PNEC-pro tool have been updated accordingly without compromising the original considerations of the Ni-RAR. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of the functional role of allosteric site residue Asp102 in the regulatory mechanism of human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (malic enzyme).

    PubMed

    Hung, Hui-Chih; Kuo, Meng-Wei; Chang, Gu-Gang; Liu, Guang-Yaw

    2005-11-15

    Human mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malate dehydrogenase (decarboxylating) (malic enzyme) can be specifically and allosterically activated by fumarate. X-ray crystal structures have revealed conformational changes in the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of fumarate. Previous studies have indicated that fumarate is bound to the allosteric pocket via Arg67 and Arg91. Mutation of these residues almost abolishes the activating effect of fumarate. However, these amino acid residues are conserved in some enzymes that are not activated by fumarate, suggesting that there may be additional factors controlling the activation mechanism. In the present study, we tried to delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of activation of the enzyme by fumarate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Asp102, which is one of the charged amino acids in the fumarate binding pocket and is not conserved in other decarboxylating malate dehydrogenases. In order to explore the charge effect of this residue, Asp102 was replaced by alanine, glutamate or lysine. Our experimental data clearly indicate the importance of Asp102 for activation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 to Ala or Lys significantly attenuated the activating effect of fumarate on the enzyme. Kinetic parameters indicate that the effect of fumarate was mainly to decrease the K(m) values for malate, Mg2+ and NAD+, but it did not notably elevate kcat. The apparent substrate K(m) values were reduced by increasing concentrations of fumarate. Furthermore, the greatest effect of fumarate activation was apparent at low malate, Mg2+ or NAD+ concentrations. The K(act) values were reduced with increasing concentrations of malate, Mg2+ and NAD+. The Asp102 mutants, however, are much less sensitive to regulation by fumarate. Mutation of Asp102 leads to the desensitization of the co-operative effect between fumarate and substrates of the enzyme.

  16. T-Loop Phosphorylated Cdk9 Localizes to Nuclear Speckle Domains Which May Serve as Sites of Active P-TEFb Function and Exchange Between the Brd4 and 7SK/HEXIM1 Regulatory Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Eugene C.; Liu, Hongbing; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    P-TEFb functions to induce the elongation step of RNA polymerase II transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Core P-TEFb is comprised of Cdk9 and a cyclin regulatory subunit, with Cyclin T1 being the predominant Cdk9-associated cyclin. The kinase activity of P-TEFb is dependent on phosphorylation of the Thr186 residue located within the T-loop domain of the Cdk9 subunit. Here, we used immunofluorescence deconvolution microscopy to examine the subcellular distribution of phospho-Thr186 Cdk9/Cyclin T1 P-TEFb heterodimers. We found that phospho-Thr186 Cdk9 displays a punctate distribution throughout the non-nucleolar nucleoplasm and it co-localizes with Cyclin T1 almost exclusively within nuclear speckle domains. Phospho-Thr186 Cdk9 predominantly co-localized with the hyperphosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II. Transient expression of kinase-defective Cdk9 mutants revealed that neither is Thr186 phosphorylation or kinase activity required for Cdk9 speckle localization. Lastly, both the Brd4 and HEXIM1 proteins interact with P-TEFb at or very near speckle domains and treatment of cells with the Cdk9 inhibitor flavopiridol alters this distribution. These results indicate that the active form of P-TEFb resides in nuclear speckles and raises the possibility that speckles are sites of P-TEFb function and exchange between negative and positive P-TEFb regulatory complexes. PMID:20201073

  17. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 backup crew member Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) lays roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 backup crew members Norishige Kanai of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), left, Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos, center, and Mark Vande Hei of NASA lay roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Expedition 52 Red Square Visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-10

    Expedition 52 flight engineer Randy Bresnik of NASA salutes after laying roses at the site where Russian space icons are interred as part of traditional pre-launch ceremonies, Monday, July 10, 2017 in Moscow. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Hospitalizations and return visits after chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ED visits.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Steven J; Yeatts, Karin B; Waller, Anna E; Hassmiller Lich, Kristen; Travers, Debbie; Weinberger, Morris; Donohue, James F

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe population-based patterns of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related emergency department (ED) visits. We analyzed all COPD-related ED visits made by North Carolina residents 45 years or older in 2008 to 2009 using statewide surveillance system data. Return visits were identified when patients returned to the same ED within 3 or 14 days of a prior COPD-related visit. We quantify the prevalence of hospitalization and return visits by age, sex, and payment method and describe ED disposition patterns. Nearly half (46.3%) of the 97 511 COPD-related ED visits resulted in hospital admission. The percent of visits preceded by another COPD-related visit within 3 and 14 days was 1.6% and 6.2%, respectively. Emergency department-related hospitalizations increased with age; there were no differences by sex. Hospitalizations were less likely for uninsured, Medicare, and Medicaid visits than for privately insured visits. In contrast, 3- and 14-day return visits were more likely to be uninsured, Medicare, and Medicaid visits than privately insured visits. Fourteen-day returns were more likely to be made by men. Return visits initially increased with age compared with the 45- to 49-year age group, then decreased steadily after age 65 years. When return visits were made, discharge at both visits was the most common disposition pattern. However, 33.7% of 3-day returns and 22.7% of 14-day returns were discharged at the first visit and hospitalized upon returning to the ED. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related hospital admissions and short-term return ED visits were common and varied by age and insurance status. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management remains a critical area for intervention and quality improvement. © 2013.