Science.gov

Sample records for regulatory site visit

  1. 76 FR 76168 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  2. 76 FR 4919 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Regulatory Site Visit Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug... Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give CBER regulatory review, compliance, and... INFORMATION CONTACT: Lonnie W. Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center...

  3. 75 FR 6404 - Regulatory Site Visit Training Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Training Program AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... participation in its Regulatory Site Visit Training Program (RSVP). This training program is intended to give.... Henderson, Division of Manufacturers Assistance and Training, Center for Biologics Evaluation and...

  4. The CACREP Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Courtland C.

    2013-01-01

    An important step in the CACREP review process is the campus site visit. The visit involves a team, usually from comparable institutions, coming to a campus for a review of the counselor training program(s). The role of the team is to be the CACREP Board's representative on campus to verify the self-study. In this article, the author reviews…

  5. Co-op Site Visitation and beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Norman R.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 26 faculty cooperative education coordinators, 18 students, and 13 site supervisors found that 80% thought faculty site visits were important; barriers to visits were time and distance; and alternatives included visiting only new sites or those with problems, using telephone or video, and hosting site supervisors on campus. (SK)

  6. Job Candidates' Views of Site Visits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Laurence S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Followed 62 Master of Business Administration students through job search involving 97 site visits to determine whether site visits changed perceptions of visited companies, attitudes toward those firms, and intentions to accept job offers. Findings suggest that organizations can improve recruitment success by paying attention to how site visits…

  7. 76 FR 79675 - Pomperaug Hydro Project Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Pomperaug Hydro Project Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On January 18, 2012, Office of Energy Projects staff will hold a site visit and technical...

  8. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free...) Visits to enterprises of Singapore. U.S. officials may undertake to conduct site visits to enterprises in the territory of Singapore. U.S. officials will conduct such visits together with...

  9. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free...) Visits to enterprises of Singapore. U.S. officials may undertake to conduct site visits to enterprises in the territory of Singapore. U.S. officials will conduct such visits together with...

  10. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free...) Visits to enterprises of Singapore. U.S. officials may undertake to conduct site visits to enterprises in the territory of Singapore. U.S. officials will conduct such visits together with...

  11. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free...) Visits to enterprises of Singapore. U.S. officials may undertake to conduct site visits to enterprises in the territory of Singapore. U.S. officials will conduct such visits together with...

  12. 19 CFR 10.553 - Textile and apparel site visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free...) Visits to enterprises of Singapore. U.S. officials may undertake to conduct site visits to enterprises in the territory of Singapore. U.S. officials will conduct such visits together with...

  13. Prescribed Fire: The Influence of Site Visits on Citizen Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toman, Eric; Shindler, Bruce; Reed, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This research employed a panel design to measure the effect of site visits on public perceptions of prescribed fire. On-site survey questions were devised to compare answers to a mail questionnaire previously completed by the same respondents. Questions were designed to examine how site visits influence public opinion and affect acceptance of…

  14. Changes in AIDS case reporting after hospital site visits.

    PubMed Central

    Fife, D; McAnaney, J; Rahman, M A

    1991-01-01

    In an effort to improve AIDS case reporting, site visits (meetings with hospital staff to encourage reporting) were made to all Philadelphia hospitals. Comparisons of hospitals visited during a 7-week period with hospitals not visited during that period indicated that the site visits were followed by a marked increase in case reports. No similar increase was observed at the comparison hospitals. The increased reporting was accompanied by an increased lag time from diagnosis to report, suggesting that the additional reports at visited hospitals were the result of the identification of previously missed cases rather than a speedup of reporting. Cases reported after the visits were more likely to have white-collar occupations or private medical insurance than were those reported before the visits. PMID:1746665

  15. Corrections Education Evaluation System Project. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Orville; And Others

    Site visits to five correctional institutions in Wisconsin were conducted as part of the development of an evaluation model for the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) project for the Wisconsin Correctional System. The evaluators' perceptions of the CBVE system are presented with recommendations for improvement. Site visits were conducted…

  16. Expert Panel Reviews of Research Centers: The Site Visit Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao; Johnson, Kelli

    2012-01-01

    Site visits are used extensively in a variety of settings within the evaluation community. They are especially common in making summative value decisions about the quality and worth of research programs/centers. However, there has been little empirical research and guidance about how to appropriately conduct evaluative site visits of research…

  17. Designing a Marketing Course with Field Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Doren, Doris; Corrigan, Hope Bober

    2008-01-01

    A key goal of including field site visits in marketing courses is to give business students increased interaction with industry professionals and community leaders. Site visits give students a concrete idea of how different marketing disciplines work in the business world. Business students gain greater insight into a career in marketing from this…

  18. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  19. Number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive random walker.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Santos Bravo; Klafter, J; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-03-01

    The asymptotic mean number of distinct sites visited by a subdiffusive continuous-time random walker in two dimensions seems not to have been explicitly calculated anywhere in the literature. This number has been calculated for other dimensions for only one specific asymptotic behavior of the waiting time distribution between steps. We present an explicit derivation for two cases in all integer dimensions so as to formally complete a tableau of results. In this tableau we include the dominant as well as subdominant contributions in all integer dimensions. Other quantities that can be calculated from the mean number of distinct sites visited are also discussed.

  20. Expert panel reviews of research centers: the site visit process.

    PubMed

    Lawrenz, Frances; Thao, Mao; Johnson, Kelli

    2012-08-01

    Site visits are used extensively in a variety of settings within the evaluation community. They are especially common in making summative value decisions about the quality and worth of research programs/centers. However, there has been little empirical research and guidance about how to appropriately conduct evaluative site visits of research centers. We review the processes of two site visit examples using an expert panel review: (1) a process to evaluate four university research centers and (2) a process to review a federally sponsored research center. A set of 14 categories describing the expert panel review process was obtained through content analysis and participant observation. Most categories were addressed differently through the two processes highlighting the need for more research about the most effective processes to use within different contexts. Decisions about how to structure site visits appear to depend on the research context, practical considerations, the level at which the review is being conducted and the intended impact of the report. Future research pertaining to the selection of site visitors, the autonomy of the visitors in data collection and report writing, and the amount and type of information provided would be particularly valuable.

  1. Middle School Site Visit Report: Five Schools in Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth; And Others

    This study examined schools which had successfully blended gifted education programs into middle school environments in order to provide outstanding services to gifted middle grades students, and sought to determine the factors that made this successful blending possible. Five sites were visited from a variety of settings and schools that used…

  2. How to Plan an Educational Visit on Historic Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutter, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teaching history can be far more than dry lectures and reading long books. Maintains that the "historical staff ride" program in the U.S. Army can serve as an example of how to teach history outside the classroom. Describes the program and provides guidelines for selecting and visiting historic sites with classes. (CFR)

  3. Hanford/Tomsk reciprocal site visit: Plutonium agreement compliance talks

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, R.A.; Sorenson, R.; Six, D.; Schiegel, S.C.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of the visit to Hanford Site was to: demonstrate equipment, technology, and methods for calculating Pu production, measuring integrated reactor power, and storing and safeguarding PuO{sub 2}; demonstrate the shutdown of Hanford production reactors; and foster openness and transparency of Hanford operations. The first day`s visit was an introduction to Hanford and a review of the history of the reactors. The second day consisted of discussions on the production reactors, reprocessing operations, and PuO{sub 2} storage. The group divided on the third day to tour facilities. Group A toured the N reactor, K-West reactor, K-West Basins, B reactor, and participated in a demonstration and discussion of reactor modeling computer codes. Group B toured the Hanford Pu Storage Facility, 200-East Area, N-cell (oxide loadout station), the Automated Storage Facility, and the Nondestructive Assay Measurement System. Group discussions were held during the last day of the visit, which included scheduling of a US visit to Russia.

  4. 76 FR 51022 - Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and Soliciting Scoping Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Juneau Hydropower, Inc.; Notice of Scoping Meeting and Site Visit and.... Applicant: Juneau Hydropower, Inc. d. Name of Project: Sweetheart Lake Hydroelectric Project. e. Location.... 791(a)-825(r). g. Applicant Contact: Duff Mitchell, Business Manager, Juneau Hydropower, Inc.,...

  5. 76 FR 38383 - Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Albany Engineering Corporation, Town of Stuyvesant, NY; Notice of Site Visit and Technical Meeting On July 12, 2011, Office of Energy Projects staff will participate in a...

  6. Remotely operated excavator needs assessment/site visit summary

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, J.; Haller, S.; Worsley, R.; King, M.

    1992-12-02

    The Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration requested an assessment of soil excavation needs relative to soil remediation. The following list identifies the DOE sites assessed: Mound Laboratory, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Nevada Test Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, and Fernald Site. The reviewed sites fall into one or more of the following three categories: production, EPA National Priorities List, or CERCLA (superfund) designation. Only three of the sites appear to have the need for a remotely operated excavator rope. Hanford and Idaho Falls have areas of high-level radioactive contamination either buried or in/under buildings. The Fernald site has a need for remote operated equipment of different types. It is their feeling that remote equipment can be used to remove the health dangers to humans by removing them from the area. Most interviewees stated that characterization technologies needs are more immediate concern over excavation. In addition, the sites do not have similar geographic conditions which would aid in the development of a generic precision excavator. The sites visited were not ready to utilize or provide the required design information necessary to draft a performance specification. This creates a strong case against the development of one type of ROPE for use at these sites. Assuming soil characterization technology/methodology is improved sufficiently to allow accurate and real time field characterization then development of a precision excavator might be pursued based on FEMP needs, since the FEMP`s sole scope of work is remediation. The excavator could then be used/tested and then later modified for other sites as warranted.

  7. The Impacts of Human Visitation on Mussel Bed Communities Along the California Coast: Are Regulatory Marine Reserves Effective in Protecting These Communities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jayson R.; Fong, Peggy; Ambrose, Richard F.

    2008-04-01

    Rocky intertidal habitats frequently are used by humans for recreational, educational, and subsistence-harvesting purposes, with intertidal populations damaged by visitation activities such as extraction, trampling, and handling. California Marine Managed Areas, particularly regulatory marine reserves (MRs), were established to provide legal protection and enhancement of coastal resources and include prohibitions on harvesting intertidal populations. However, the effectiveness of MRs is unclear as enforcement of no-take laws is weak and no regulations protect intertidal species from other detrimental visitor impacts such as trampling. The goal of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine impacts from human visitation on California mussel populations ( Mytilus californianus) and mussel bed community diversity; and (2) to investigate the effectiveness of regulatory MRs in reducing visitor impacts on these populations. Surveys of mussel populations and bed-associated diversity were compared: (1) at sites subjected to either high or low levels of human use, and (2) at sites either unprotected or with regulatory protection banning collecting. At sites subjected to higher levels of human visitation, mussel populations were significantly lower than low-use sites. Comparisons of mussel populations inside and outside of regulatory MRs revealed no consistent pattern suggesting that California no-take regulatory reserves may have limited effectiveness in protecting mussel communities. In areas where many people visit intertidal habitats for purposes other than collecting, many organisms will be affected by trampling, turning of rocks, and handling. In these cases, effective protection of rocky intertidal communities requires an approach that goes beyond the singular focus on collecting to reduce the full suite of impacts.

  8. Study of New Youth Initiatives in Apprenticeship. Interim Report. Volume 2: Site Visit Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This second volume of the interim report provides detailed case study reports on each of the eight Youth Apprenticeship Projects. (Volume 1, an overview of data from the site visits, is available separately as CE 032 791.) Discussion areas covered in each site visit report are local context/operational environment, administrative information,…

  9. 77 FR 44675 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Site Visit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Register on April 20, 2012 (77 FR 23764). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB...: Site Visit Data Collection Request for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funded Grants; Job..., ``Site Visit Data Collection Request for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funded Grants;...

  10. Visiting the Site of Death: Experiences of the Bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Pal; Tonnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale--Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief, and…

  11. Historical Visit to the Site of the Canard River Skirmishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutter, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Reports on a field trip by secondary school history students to Fort Malden National Historic Site in Canada. Describes the use of primary sources and battlefield sites to help students understand historical perspective and interpretation. Includes discussion questions for students and recommendations for implementation. (CFR)

  12. Regulatory Review of Early Site Permit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Michael L.

    2004-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received and is reviewing three applications for early site permits (ESPs). The ESP process allows early resolution of site-related issues affecting possible construction and operation of a new nuclear power plant. The nuclear industry views a successful and predictable ESP process as an important step in assessing whether to seek authorization to construct and operate a new generation of nuclear power reactors in the United States. Because consideration of ESP applications is a first-of-a-kind activity, a number of issues have emerged prior to and during the reviews of the first three applications. Issues have included the need for design information at the ESP stage, accident analyses, quality assurance, and seismic analyses. The NRC has been working to resolve identified issues to support a Commission decision on whether to issue an ESP approximately 33-37 months after receipt of each ESP application. (authors)

  13. Visiting the site of death: experiences of the bereaved after the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Pål; Tønnessen, Arnfinn; Weisaeth, Lars; Heir, Trond

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined how many bereaved relatives of Norwegian tourists who perished in the 2004 Southeast Asian Tsunami had visited the site of death and the most important outcome from the visit. We conducted in-depth interviews (n = 110) and used self-report questionnaires (Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Inventory of Complicated Grief and General Health Questionnaire) in a total of 130 first-degree family members 2 years post-disaster. Results showed that the majority of participants (n = 113; 87%) had visited the site of death. The most important outcome was gaining an increased understanding of what occurred (61%) and a feeling of closeness to the deceased (27%). Those who had visited the site of death reported lower avoidance behavior and higher degree of acceptance of the loss than non-visitors. Although this could be a cause as well as a consequence of the visit, visiting the site of death may be an important part of the support offered to bereaved families after experiencing a disaster loss.

  14. [Alzheimer's disease and the organization of visits to cultural sites].

    PubMed

    Lafont, Valérie; Brinck-Jensen, Signe; Filleau, Christelle; Greenblat, Cathy; David, Renaud; Robert, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of a policy to open up cultural sites within the city to the specific disability of Alzheimer's disease, the Resource and Research Memory Centre at Nice general hospital in partnership with Nice's city hall, has developed a cultural programme. The aim of this project is to assess the therapeutic aspects of this programme and notably the perception of the disease by the family carers.

  15. School Site Visits for Community-Based Participatory Research on Healthy Eating

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anisha I.; Bogart, Laura M.; Uyeda, Kimberly E.; Martinez, Homero; Knizewski, Ritamarie; Ryan, Gery W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Background School nutrition policies are gaining support as a means of addressing childhood obesity. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers an approach for academic and community partners to collaborate to translate obesity-related school policies into practice. Site visits, in which trained observers visit settings to collect multilevel data (e.g., observation, qualitative interviews), may complement other methods that inform health promotion efforts. This paper demonstrates the utility of site visits in the development of an intervention to implement obesity-related policies in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) middle schools. Methods In 2006, trained observers visited four LAUSD middle schools. Observers mapped cafeteria layout; observed food/beverage offerings, student consumption, waste patterns, and duration of cafeteria lines; spoke with school staff and students; and collected relevant documents. Data were examined for common themes and patterns. Results Food and beverages sold in study schools met LAUSD nutritional guidelines, and nearly all observed students had time to eat most or all of their meal. Some LAUSD policies were not implemented, including posting nutritional information for cafeteria food, marketing school meals to improve student participation in the National School Lunch Program, and serving a variety of fruits and vegetables. Cafeteria understaffing and cost were obstacles to policy implementation. Conclusions Site visits were a valuable methodology for evaluating the implementation of school district obesity-related policies and contributed to the development of a CBPR intervention to translate school food policies into practice. Future CBPR studies may consider site visits in their toolbox of formative research methods. PMID:19896033

  16. Preparing for a Successful Psychiatry Residency Review Committee Site Visit: A Guide for New Training Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Shashi K.; Bhatia, Subhash C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: New residency training directors are often faced with multiple competing tasks such as meeting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Psychiatry Program Requirements and achieving successful completion of residency review committee (RRC) site visits. For many years, the authors have presented workshops on this…

  17. 48 CFR 1352.270-71 - Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.270-71 Pre-bid/pre-proposal conference and site visit. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1370.102... understanding of the work required. (b) Offerors are encouraged to submit all questions in writing at least...

  18. White-tailed Deer Visitation Rates at Medicated Bait Sites in Southern Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cattle fever tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, has been found on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) complicating eradication efforts of the USDA’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program. Our objective was to assess patterns of deer visitation to medicated bait sites used to treat...

  19. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  20. Female Faculty Members in University Chemistry Departments: Observations and Conclusions Based on Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Sally; Dixon, Felicia F.; Foster, Natalie; Kuck, Valerie J.; McCarthy, Deborah A.; Tooney, Nancy M.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.

    2011-01-01

    Oral interviews in focus groups and written surveys were conducted with 877 men and women, including administrators, faculty members, postdoctoral associates, and graduate students, during one-day site visits to chemistry and chemical engineering departments at 28 Ph.D.-granting institutions. This report is a preliminary review of the perceptions…

  1. Hot Spots on the Web for Teacher Librarians: A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    Six papers review and recommend sites on the Web as resources for teacher librarians include: "Just Do It: A Guide to Getting Out There and Doing It Yourself" (Catherine Ryan); "A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit" (Karen Bonanno); "A Selection of Recommended Web Sites for TLs To Visit" (Sandra Naude); "Internet Resources for the…

  2. DISSS/PSDB - Personnel Security Database Modernization Project: Compilation of data gathered from DOE Operations Office`s site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, R.; Sweeney, D.

    1995-03-15

    This document is a compilation of the information gathered from visits to the DOE Operations Offices. The purpose of these visits was to gather requirements for the modernization of the personnel security database. The initial phase of visits were to sites which had known local systems to augment CPCI. They were; Rocky Flats, Richland, Las Vegas, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Oakland. The second phase of site visits were to; Headquarters, Schenectady, Pittsburgh, Idaho Falls, Chicago, and Albuquerque. We also visited the NRC. At each site we reviewed the current clearance process in use at the field office. If the site had a local personnel security database (PSDB), we also reviewed the current PSDB processing. Each meeting was began with the a discussion on the purpose of the meeting and the background of the redesign effort.

  3. National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program. October 1986 through September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The report survey visits to the NADP/NTN precipitation collection stations are part of the network's quality assurance program and are coordinated through the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Director's office. Research Triangle Institute, under contract to EPA, has visited approximately two-thirds of the 200 NADP/NTN sites for the purposes of verifying and documenting that pre-established siting criteria are met; assessing the uniformity of sample collection, analysis, and reporting procedures; conducting quality assurance tests of the operators' equipment and procedures, and providing technical assistance and instruction. Of the approximately 120 sites visited from October 1986 through the present, most are operating within specified guidelines.

  4. A delay differential equation model for dengue transmission with regular visits to a mosquito breeding site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaacob, Y.; Yeak, S. H.; Lim, R. S.; Soewono, E.

    2015-03-01

    Dengue disease has been known as one of widely transmitted vector-borne diseases which potentially affects millions of people throughout the world especially in tropical and sub-tropical countries. One of the main factors contributing in the complication of the transmission process is the mobility of people in which people may get infection in the places far from their home. Here we construct a delay differential equation model for dengue transmission in a closed population where regular visits of people to a mosquito breeding site out of their residency such as traditional market take place daily. Basic reproductive ratio of the system is obtained and depends on the ratio between the outgoing rates of susceptible human and infective human. It is shown that the increase of mobility with different variation of mobility rates may contribute to different level of basic reproductive ratio as well as different level of outbreaks.

  5. Go ahead, visit those web sites, you can`t get hurt, can you?

    SciTech Connect

    Rothfuss, J.S.; Parrett, J.W.

    1997-02-01

    Browsing (surfing) the World Wide Web (the web) has exploded onto the Internet with an unprecedented popularity. Fueled by massive acceptance, the web client/server technology is leaping forward with a speed that competes with no other software technology. The primary force behind this phenomenon is the simplicity of the web browsing experience. People who have never touched a computer before can now perform sophisticated network tasks with a simple point-and-click. Unfortunately, this simplicity gives many, if not most, web wanderers the impression that the web browser is risk free, nothing more than a high powered television. This misconception is dangerous by creating the myth that a user visiting a web site is immune from subversive or malicious intent. While many want you to believe that surfing the web is as simple as using any other household appliance, it is not like surfing television channels, it is bi-directional. You can learn a lot of useful information from web sites. But, either directly or indirectly, others can also learn quite a bit about you. Of even more concern is a web sites` potential ability to exert control over the local computer. This paper tries to consolidate some of the current concerns that you should consider as you jump into the surf.

  6. Hazardous waste site remediation and community acceptance: Beyond regulatory compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, M.A.; Moreau, J.P.

    1998-12-31

    Community acceptance is an important criteria in securing regulatory approval of remediation alternatives, and yet the legal requirements for public consultation during the preparation of site investigation and feasibility study reports are minimal. Usually the only provision for formal public input on remedial plans is at the final stages of preparation through the formalistic constraints of a public meeting and limited comment period. This is often too late for meaningful public input and precludes constructive dialogue between responsible parties, local citizens, and regulatory representatives. Often the public opposes proposed remediation alternatives because of insufficient information leading to mistrust and irreconcilable differences. This paper suggests that responsible parties run the risk of community rejection of remediation plans, and costly project delays, if they follow the minimum regulatory requirements for public involvement. Through the use of active and meaningful citizen participation throughout project planning, success in securing community acceptance for preferred remedial alternatives in potentially controversial remediation projects is greatly enhanced.

  7. Visiting Holocaust-Related Sites with Medical Students as an Aid in Teaching Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    González-López, Esteban; Ríos-Cortés, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    During the Nazi period numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: "The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine" at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent.

  8. Visiting Holocaust-Related Sites with Medical Students as an Aid in Teaching Medical Ethics.

    PubMed

    González-López, Esteban; Ríos-Cortés, Rosa

    2016-05-01

    During the Nazi period numerous doctors and nurses played a nefarious role. In Germany they were responsible for the sterilization and killing of disabled persons. Furthermore, the Nazi doctors used concentration camp inmates as guinea pigs in medical experiments for military or racial purposes. A study of the collaboration of doctors with National Socialism exemplifies behavior that must be avoided. Combining medical teaching with lessons from the Holocaust could be a way to transmit Medical Ethics to doctors, nurses and students. The authors describe a study tour with medical students to Poland, to the largest Nazi extermination camp, Auschwitz, and to the city of Krakow. The tour is the final component of a formal course entitled: "The Holocaust, a Reflection from Medicine" at the Autónoma University of Madrid, Spain. Visiting sites related to the Holocaust, the killing centers and the sites where medical experiments were conducted has a singular meaning for medical students. Tolerance, non-discrimination, and the value of human life can be both learnt and taught at the very place where such values were utterly absent. PMID:27430079

  9. Carbon Nanotube and Nanofiber Exposure Assessments: An Analysis of 14 Site Visits

    PubMed Central

    Dahm, Matthew M.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Evans, Douglas E.; Birch, M. Eileen; Fernback, Joseph E.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the potential for wide-ranging health effects that could result from exposure to carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF). In response, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) set a recommended exposure limit (REL) for CNT and CNF: 1 µg m−3 as an 8-h time weighted average (TWA) of elemental carbon (EC) for the respirable size fraction. The purpose of this study was to conduct an industrywide exposure assessment among US CNT and CNF manufacturers and users. Fourteen total sites were visited to assess exposures to CNT (13 sites) and CNF (1 site). Personal breathing zone (PBZ) and area samples were collected for both the inhalable and respirable mass concentration of EC, using NIOSH Method 5040. Inhalable PBZ samples were collected at nine sites while at the remaining five sites both respirable and inhalable PBZ samples were collected side-by-side. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) PBZ and area samples were also collected at the inhalable size fraction and analyzed to quantify and size CNT and CNF agglomerate and fibrous exposures. Respirable EC PBZ concentrations ranged from 0.02 to 2.94 µg m−3 with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.34 µg m−3 and an 8-h TWA of 0.16 µg m−3. PBZ samples at the inhalable size fraction for EC ranged from 0.01 to 79.57 µg m−3 with a GM of 1.21 µg m−3. PBZ samples analyzed by TEM showed concentrations ranging from 0.0001 to 1.613 CNT or CNF-structures per cm3 with a GM of 0.008 and an 8-h TWA concentration of 0.003. The most common CNT structure sizes were found to be larger agglomerates in the 2–5 µm range as well as agglomerates >5 µm. A statistically significant correlation was observed between the inhalable samples for the mass of EC and structure counts by TEM (Spearman ρ = 0.39, P < 0.0001). Overall, EC PBZ and area TWA samples were below the NIOSH REL (96% were <1 μg m−3 at the respirable size fraction), while 30% of the inhalable PBZ EC

  10. A Study of Program Management Procedures in the Campus-Based and Basic Grant Programs. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Richard, Ed.; Puma, Michael, Ed.

    Site visits to a sample of 173 colleges, universities, vocational-technical schools, and other postsecondary institutions--conducted to examine the procedures used to manage federal Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) and campus-based student financial assistance programs--are summarized. This report deals only with the conduct of the…

  11. Data Management and Site-Visit Monitoring of the Multi-Center Registry in the Korean Neonatal Network

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won

    2015-01-01

    The Korean Neonatal Network (KNN), a nationwide prospective registry of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW, < 1,500 g at birth) infants, was launched in April 2013. Data management (DM) and site-visit monitoring (SVM) were crucial in ensuring the quality of the data collected from 55 participating hospitals across the country on 116 clinical variables. We describe the processes and results of DM and SVM performed during the establishment stage of the registry. The DM procedure included automated proof checks, electronic data validation, query creation, query resolution, and revalidation of the corrected data. SVM included SVM team organization, identification of unregistered cases, source document verification, and post-visit report production. By March 31, 2015, 4,063 VLBW infants were registered and 1,693 queries were produced. Of these, 1,629 queries were resolved and 64 queries remain unresolved. By November 28, 2014, 52 participating hospitals were visited, with 136 site-visits completed since April 2013. Each participating hospital was visited biannually. DM and SVM were performed to ensure the quality of the data collected for the KNN registry. Our experience with DM and SVM can be applied for similar multi-center registries with large numbers of participating centers. PMID:26566353

  12. Good clinical practice regulatory inspections: Lessons for Indian investigator sites

    PubMed Central

    Marwah, R.; Van de Voorde, K.; Parchman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory inspections are important to evaluate the integrity of the data submitted to health authorities (HAs), protect patient safety, and assess adequacy of site/sponsor quality systems to achieve the same. Inspections generally occur after submission of data for marketing approval of an investigational drug. In recent years, there has been a significant increase in number of inspections by different HAs, including in India. The assessors/inspectors generally do a thorough review of site data before inspections. All aspects of ICH-GCP, site infrastructure, and quality control systems are assessed during the inspection. Findings are discussed during the close out meeting and a detailed inspection report issued afterward, which has to be responded to within 15–30 days with effective Corrective and Preventive Action Plan (CAPA). Protocol noncompliance, inadequate/inaccurate records, inadequate drug accountability, informed consent issues, and adverse event reporting were some of the most common findings observed during recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) inspections. Drug development is being increasingly globalized and an increased number of patients enrolled in studies submitted as part of applications come from all over the world including India. Because of the steep increase in research activity in the country, inexperienced sites, and more stakeholders, increased efforts will be required to ensure continuous quality and compliance. HAs have also made clear that enforcement will be increased and be swift, aggressive, and effective. PMID:21350732

  13. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids. PMID:24711146

  14. Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Michael J; Phillips, Gregory E; Fischer, Justin W; Burke, Patrick W; Seward, Nathan W; Stahl, Randal S; Nichols, Tracy A; Wunder, Bruce A; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2014-12-01

    Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids.

  15. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the ESPDP is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. The results of the technical and licensing evaluations are presented in this report. The purpose, background, and organization of the ESPDP is delineated in Section 1. Section 11 contains flowcharts defining siting application requirements, environmental report requirements, and emergency planning/preparedness requirements for ALWRS. The licensing and technical review results are presented in Section III.

  16. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Regulatory exemption-multiple site... PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision—determination required. (a) General. (1) The sale of lots contained in multiple sites of fewer than 100...

  17. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Interaction with substrate analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Baikov, A.A.; Pavlov, A.R.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-08-10

    The effect of four PP/sub 1/ analogs with the structure PXP (X = N, C), phosphate, and the complex Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/PP/sub 1/ on the activity of inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was studied over a wide range of substrate (Mg-PP/sub 1/) concentrations (lower limit 0.5 ..mu..M). The enzyme activity decreased in the presence of imidodiphosphate, hydroxymethane diphosphonate (PC(OH)P), and P/sub 1/, and a double reciprocal plot of the rate of hydrolysis of Mg-PP/sub 1/ versus its concentration became linear. Small amounts of methane diphosphonate (PCP), ethane-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate (0.1-1..mu..M), and Cr(H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/PP/sub 1/ (10 ..mu..M) activated the enzyme almost 2-fold by a competitive mechanism. The activation was due to an increase in the affinity of the protein for the activating Mg/sup 2 +/ ion. Ultrafiltration showed that the pyrophosphatase molecule has 2.1 and 3.1 binding sites for PCP and PC(OHP)P, respectively. These results confirm the hypothesis that the enzyme contains a regulatory site whose occupation by PP/sub 1/, P/sub 1/, and substrate analogs increases the affinity of the protein for the activating metal.

  18. Assessing Quality in Digital Reference Services Site Visit Reports: State Library of Florida, Bureau of Library and Network Services and Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Melissa; McClure, Charles R.

    The Assessing Quality on Digital Reference team conducted two site visits at Florida Libraries in August 2001. The objectives of these visits were to: document how digital reference services are currently being planned for, delivered, and evaluated in libraries; understand how "quality" in digital reference is defined in these environments;…

  19. Heavy vehicle industry site visits: comments from companies and conclusions from technical committee

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R.

    1998-02-01

    This report documents the results of several visits with industry as part of the Department of Energy (DOE), office of Transportation Technology, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology, supported Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project. The purpose of the DOE Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamics Project is to use government resources to bring the aerodynamic expertise available in government organizations and academia to bear in assisting the heavy vehicle industry to reduce aerodynamic drag on trucks. The obvious payback from this investment is the reduction in fuel usage and derivative reduction in the US's dependence on foreign oil imports. This report covers 2 projects: (1) The stated purpose of Project 1 was to provide near-term impact through emphasis on existing tools and capabilities and to focus on the trailer drag problem. (2) The stated purpose of Project 2 was to provide the tools necessary to accomplish the longer term goal of a fully-integrated, aerodynamic tractor-trailer combination.

  20. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program. Rept. for Oct 88-Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. One of that program's project, 4A-15, 'Quality Assurance Support for Wet Deposition Monitoring,' is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate the sample collection process and provide technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP/NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1988-1989 (Fiscal Year 1989) site visitation program to 72 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network.

  1. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site visitation program for the period October 1987 through September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1990-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP.NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1987-1988 (Fiscal Year 1988) site visitation program to 57 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network. In its present configuration, the network's research and monitoring programs are supported and operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; State Agricultural Experiment Stations; the Departments of Agriculture, the Interior, Commerce, and Energy; and EPA. Additional support is provided by state agencies, public utilities, and industries.

  2. Reaching site closure for groundwater under multiple regulatory agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Glucksberg, N.; Couture, B.

    2007-07-01

    Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) has been impacted by both radionuclides and chemical constituents. Furthermore, the cleanup standards and closure requirements for HNP are regulated both by federal and state agencies. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. The cleanup criteria to reach site closure for radionuclides is regulated by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (CTDEP) Bureau of Air Management, Radiological Division. For license termination under the NRC, the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) for all media can not exceed 25 milli-Rem per year (mRem/yr) plus As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). The CTDEP has a similar requirement with the TEDE not to exceed 19 mRem/yr plus ALARA. To reach these criteria, derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) were developed for radiological exposures from three (3) media components; soil, existing groundwater and future groundwater from left-in place foundations or footings. Based on current conditions, the target dose contribution from existing and future groundwater is not to exceed 2 mRem/yr TEDE. After source (soil) remediation is complete, the NRC requires two (2) years of quarterly monitoring to demonstrate that groundwater quality meets the DCGLs and does not show an upward trend. CYAPCO's NRC License Termination Plan (LTP) specifies a minimum 18-month period of groundwater monitoring, as long as samples are collected during two spring/high water seasons, to verify the efficacy of remedial actions at HNP. In addition to the 19 mRem/yr criteria, the CTDEP also requires groundwater to be in compliance with the Remediation Standards Regulation (RSRs). There are no published criteria for radionuclides in the RSRs

  3. Protecting the Lunar Heritage Sites from the Effects of Visiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip; Lane, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The Problem: Rocket exhaust blows soil and rocks over vast distances at velocities upwards of 1 to 3 km/s, and this will be highly abrasive and damaging if it impacts the valuable lunar heritage sites.

  4. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program for the period October 1989 through September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. One of that program's projects, 4A-15, 'Quality Assurance Support for Wet Deposition Monitoring,' is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate the sample collection process and provide technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. All NADP/NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1989-1990 (Fiscal Year 1990) site visitation program to 67 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network.

  5. Sites of Predicted Stress-Induced DNA Duplex Destabilization Occur Preferentially at Regulatory Loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, Craig J.

    1993-04-01

    This paper describes a computational method to predict the sites on a DNA molecule where imposed superhelical stresses destabilize the duplex. Several DNA sequences are analyzed in this way, including the pBR322 and ColE1 plasmids, bacteriophage f1, and the polyoma and bovine papilloma virus genomes. Superhelical destabilization in these molecules is predicted to occur at small numbers of discrete sites, most of which are within regulatory regions. The most destabilized sites include the terminator and promoter regions of specific plasmid operons, the LexA binding sites of genes under SOS control, the intergenic control region of bacteriophage f1, and the polyadenylylation sites in eukaryotic viruses. These results demonstrate the existence of close correspondences between sites of predicted superhelical duplex destabilization and specific types of regulatory regions. The use of these correspondences to supplement string-matching techniques in the search for regulatory loci is discussed.

  6. Determinants of First Antenatal Care Visit by Pregnant Women at Community Based Education, Research and Service Sites in Northern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    TURYASIIMA, M.; TUGUME, R.; OPENY, A.; AHAIRWOMUGISHA, E.; OPIO, R.; NTUNGUKA, M.; MAHULO, N.; AKERA, P.; ODONGO-AGINYA, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antenatal care (ANC) aims mainly at prevention, early detection and management of general medical and pregnancy associated disorders. Early booking is recommended for maximum utilisation. Objective To investigate the determinants of first ANC visit and trimesters at which pregnant mothers enrol for ANC at the COBERS sites of Northern Uganda. Design A descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. Setting Five community based education, research and service sites (COBERS) of Atiak, Madi Opei, Mungula, Namukora and Pajule health centre fours (HC IV) in the five respective districts of Amuru, Lamwo, Adjumani, Kitgum and Pader, Northern Uganda, from April to July 2013. Subjects Four hundred and seventeen (417) pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) in five health centers and 10 purposively selected midwives were interviewed using questionnaires. Results Of the 417 respondents, only 11.5% (n = 48) had their first ANC at the recommended period of 0–16 weeks. Prevalence of late entry to ANC was 88.5% (n = 369). Mean gestational age at booking was 22.6±5.7 weeks. Paternal level of education, outcome of previous pregnancy, previous ANC attendance, weeks of amenorrhea, convenience of opening hours at ANC facility, commuting distance from home to health facility, knowing the right time for ANC enrollment, and pregnancy planning remained significant predictors governing early booking. Conclusion Late ANC booking is still a major public health concern that demands public enlightenment, and paternal education coupled with women empowerment will reduce the magnitude of the problem. PMID:26640281

  7. REGULATORY PERSPECTIVE ON MANAGING RISKS AT WOOD TREATING SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over 700 sites in the United States have been identified where wood preserving operations have been conducted. The most common types of wood preservatives found at these sites are creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and copper chromated arsenate (CCA). When properly used and dis...

  8. US Department of Energy wind turbine candidate site program: the regulatory process

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, M.R.; York, K.R.

    1982-06-01

    Sites selected in 1979 as tentative sites for installation of a demonstration MOD-2 turbine are emphasized. Selection as a candidate site in this program meant that the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the site as eligible for a DOE-purchased and installed meteorological tower. The regulatory procedures involved in the siting and installation of these meteorological towers at the majority of the candidate sites are examined. An attempt is also made, in a preliminary fashion, to identify the legal and regulatory procedures that would be required to put up a turbine at each of these candidate sites. The information provided on each of these sites comes primarily from utility representatives, supplemented by conversations with state and local officials. The major findings are summarized on the following: federal requirements, state requirements, local requirements, land ownership, wind rights, and public attitudes.

  9. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. To accomplish this mission, the program seeks to advance the development, implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies for hazardous waste chara...

  10. Visiting 'Voltaire'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of PIA04192 Sitting on 'Voltaire'

    Spirit's panoramic camera took this mosaic on martian day, or sol, 549 (July 20, 2005), as it approached a suite of layered rocks named 'Voltaire.' Seven to eight discrete layers can be seen in the bottom portion of the image, running from upper left to lower right. These rock layers are about 20 to 40 centimeters (8 to 16 inches) wide, and extend several meters in length. Spirit visited 'Haussmann' and several other rocks within the layered suite to perform close-up imaging, and to obtain measurements from its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers.

  11. Key findings from HSC's 2010 site visits: health care markets weather economic downturn, brace for health reform.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Grossman, Joy M; Tu, Ha T

    2011-05-01

    Lingering fallout--loss of jobs and employer coverage--from the great recession slowed demand for health care services but did little to slow aggressive competition by dominant hospital systems for well-insured patients, according to key findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2010 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Hospitals with significant market clout continued to command high payment rate increases from private insurers, and tighter hospital-physician alignment heightened concerns about growing provider market power. High and rising premiums led to increasing employer adoption of consumer-driven health plans and continued increases in patient cost sharing, but the broader movement to educate and engage consumers in care decisions did not keep pace. State and local budget deficits led to some funding cuts for safety net providers, but an influx of federal stimulus funds increased support to community health centers and shored up Medicaid programs, allowing many people who lost private insurance because of job losses to remain covered. Hospitals, physicians and insurers generally viewed health reform coverage expansions favorably, but all worried about protecting revenues as reform requirements phase in. PMID:21614861

  12. Program Strengths and Opportunities for Improvement Identified by Residents During ACGME Site Visits in 5 Surgical Specialties.

    PubMed

    Caniano, Donna A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2016-05-01

    Background There is limited information about how residents in surgical specialties view program strengths and opportunities for improvement (OFIs). Objective This study aggregated surgical residents' perspectives on program strengths and OFIs to determine whether there was agreement in perspectives among residents in 5 surgical specialties. Methods Resident consensus lists of program strengths and areas for improvement were aggregated from site visits reports during 2012 and 2013 for obstetrics and gynecology, orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, plastic surgery, and surgery programs. Four trained individuals coded each strength or OFI in 1 of 3 categories: (1) factors common to all specialties; (2) program or institutional resources; and (3) factors unique to surgical specialties. Themes were classified as most frequent when listed by residents in more than 20% of the programs and less frequent when listed by residents in less than 20% of the programs. Results This study included a total of 359 programs, representing 27% to 49% of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited programs in the 5 specialties. The most frequent strengths were progressive autonomy, collegiality, program leadership, and operative volume. Improving research and didactics, increasing faculty teaching and attendance at educational sessions, and increasing the number of nurse practitioners and physician assistants were common OFIs. Conclusions Factors identified as important by surgical residents related to their learning environment, their educational program, and program and institutional support. Across programs in the study, similar attributes were listed as both program strengths and OFIs. PMID:27168889

  13. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.; Gerrard, Juliet Ann

    2011-06-24

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  14. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  15. Supporting People in the Community: A Case Study of the Residential Support Program, Centennial Developmental Services, Weld County, Colorado. Site Visit Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Pam; Salon, Rebecca

    The site visit report describes the Residential Support Program of the Centennial Developmental Services, a community-centered board providing residential services and support to persons (currently 67) with disabilities in Weld County, Colorado. Residential settings include a group home, supported apartments, foster homes, natural family homes, or…

  16. The ACA Standards Organizer. A Tool for the Preparation of Camps for Visitation for American Camping Association Camp Accreditation and Site Approval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenery, Mary Faeth

    This comprehensive guide helps camp administrators prepare for camp accreditation and site approval visits by the American Camping Association (ACA). The introductory sections outline the purpose and administration of the standards program and provide definitions of camping terms. Standards are organized under one section for camp accreditation…

  17. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P/sub 2/ preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-(/sup 3/H)nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine.

  18. Biological data warehousing system for identifying transcriptional regulatory sites from gene expressions of microarray data.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Ann-Ping; Sun, Yi-Ming; Liu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Hsien-Da; Horng, Jorng-Tzong; Tsai, Meng-Feng; Liu, Baw-Juine

    2006-07-01

    Identification of transcriptional regulatory sites plays an important role in the investigation of gene regulation. For this propose, we designed and implemented a data warehouse to integrate multiple heterogeneous biological data sources with data types such as text-file, XML, image, MySQL database model, and Oracle database model. The utility of the biological data warehouse in predicting transcriptional regulatory sites of coregulated genes was explored using a synexpression group derived from a microarray study. Both of the binding sites of known transcription factors and predicted over-represented (OR) oligonucleotides were demonstrated for the gene group. The potential biological roles of both known nucleotides and one OR nucleotide were demonstrated using bioassays. Therefore, the results from the wet-lab experiments reinforce the power and utility of the data warehouse as an approach to the genome-wide search for important transcription regulatory elements that are the key to many complex biological systems.

  19. ConSite: web-based prediction of regulatory elements using cross-species comparison.

    PubMed

    Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Lenhard, Boris

    2004-07-01

    ConSite is a user-friendly, web-based tool for finding cis-regulatory elements in genomic sequences. Predictions are based on the integration of binding site prediction generated with high-quality transcription factor models and cross-species comparison filtering (phylogenetic footprinting). By incorporating evolutionary constraints, selectivity is increased by an order of magnitude as compared to single-sequence analysis. ConSite offers several unique features, including an interactive expert system for retrieving orthologous regulatory sequences. Programming modules and biological databases that form the foundation of the ConSite service are freely available to the research community. ConSite is available at http:/www.phylofoot.org/consite.

  20. Regulatory supervision of sites for spent fuel and radioactive waste storage in the Russian northwest.

    PubMed

    Shandala, N K; Sneve, M K; Smith, G M; Kiselev, M F; Kochetkov, O A; Savkin, M N; Simakov, A V; Novikova, N Ya; Titov, A V; Romanov, V V; Seregin, V A; Filonova, A V; Semenova, M P

    2008-12-01

    In the 1960s two technical bases for the Northern Fleet were created in the Russian northwest at Andreeva Bay in the Kola Peninsula and Gremikha village on the coast of the Barents Sea. They maintained nuclear submarines, receiving and storing radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. No further waste was received after 1985, and the technical bases have since been re-categorised as temporary storage sites. The handling of these materials to put them into a safe condition is especially hazardous because of their degraded state. This paper describes regulatory activities which have been carried out to support the supervision of radiological protection during recovery of waste and spent fuel, and to support regulatory decisions on overall site remediation. The work described includes: an assessment of the radiation situation on-site; the development of necessary additional regulatory rules and standards for radiation protection assurance for workers and the public during remediation; and the completion of an initial threat assessment to identify regulatory priorities. Detailed consideration of measures for the control of radiation exposure of workers and radiation exposure of the public during and after operations and emergency preparedness and response are complete and provided in sister papers. The continuing requirements for regulatory activities relevant to the development and implementation of on-going and future remediation activities are also outlined. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority supports the work, as part of the Norwegian Government's plan of action to promote improvements in radiation protection and nuclear safety in northwest Russia. PMID:19029594

  1. Extraction of Functional Binding Sites from Unique Regulatory Regions: The Drosophila Early Developmental Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Papatsenko, Dmitri A.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Lifanov, Alex P.; Régnier, Mireille; Nazina, Anna G.; Desplan, Claude

    2002-01-01

    The early developmental enhancers of Drosophila melanogaster comprise one of the most sophisticated regulatory systems in higher eukaryotes. An elaborate code in their DNA sequence translates both maternal and early embryonic regulatory signals into spatial distribution of transcription factors. One of the most striking features of this code is the redundancy of binding sites for these transcription factors (BSTF). Using this redundancy, we explored the possibility of predicting functional binding sites in a single enhancer region without any prior consensus/matrix description or evolutionary sequence comparisons. We developed a conceptually simple algorithm, Scanseq, that employs an original statistical evaluation for identifying the most redundant motifs and locates the position of potential BSTF in a given regulatory region. To estimate the biological relevance of our predictions, we built thorough literature-based annotations for the best-known Drosophila developmental enhancers and we generated detailed distribution maps for the most robust binding sites. The high statistical correlation between the location of BSTF in these experiment-based maps and the location predicted in silico by Scanseq confirmed the relevance of our approach. We also discuss the definition of true binding sites and the possible biological principles that govern patterning of regulatory regions and the distribution of transcriptional signals. PMID:11875036

  2. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision... prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Interstate Land Sales Registration Division,...

  3. 24 CFR 1710.15 - Regulatory exemption-multiple site subdivision-determination required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (INTERSTATE LAND SALES REGISTRATION PROGRAM) LAND REGISTRATION General Requirements § 1710.15 Regulatory exemption—multiple site subdivision... prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Interstate Land Sales Registration Division,...

  4. Site-specific parameter values for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's food pathway dose model.

    PubMed

    Hamby, D M

    1992-02-01

    Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Western South Carolina result in radionuclide releases to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiation doses to the off-site maximum individual and the off-site population within 80 km of the SRS are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are currently generated using dose models prescribed for the commercial nuclear power industry by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NRC provides default values for dose-model parameters for facilities without resources to develop site-specific values. A survey of land- and water-use characteristics for the Savannah River area has been conducted to determine site-specific values for water recreation, consumption, and agricultural parameters used in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 (1977) dosimetric models. These site parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk, and vegetable production; recreational and commercial activities on the Savannah River; and meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates. This paper describes how parameter data were obtained at the Savannah River Site and the impacts of such data on off-site dose. Dose estimates using site-specific parameter values are compared to estimates using the NRC default values. PMID:1730555

  5. Using RSAT to scan genome sequences for transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules.

    PubMed

    Turatsinze, Jean-Valery; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Defrance, Matthieu; van Helden, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    This protocol shows how to detect putative cis-regulatory elements and regions enriched in such elements with the regulatory sequence analysis tools (RSAT) web server (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat/). The approach applies to known transcription factors, whose binding specificity is represented by position-specific scoring matrices, using the program matrix-scan. The detection of individual binding sites is known to return many false predictions. However, results can be strongly improved by estimating P value, and by searching for combinations of sites (homotypic and heterotypic models). We illustrate the detection of sites and enriched regions with a study case, the upstream sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster gene even-skipped. This protocol is also tested on random control sequences to evaluate the reliability of the predictions. Each task requires a few minutes of computation time on the server. The complete protocol can be executed in about one hour.

  6. National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site visitation program: summary report for the period December 1984 through September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Tew, E.L.; Moore, C.E.; Ward, D.A.

    1987-11-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1985-1986 Site Visitation Program to the 195 sites that comprise the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network precipitation networks, referred to collectively as the NADP/NTN network.

  7. Complementing computationally predicted regulatory sites in Tractor_DB using a pattern matching approach.

    PubMed

    Guía, Marylens Hernández; Pérez, Abel González; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Prokaryotic genomes annotation has focused on genes location and function. The lack of regulatory information has limited the knowledge on cellular transcriptional regulatory networks. However, as more phylogenetically close genomes are sequenced and annotated, the implementation of phylogenetic footprinting strategies for the recognition of regulators and their regulons becomes more important. In this paper we describe a comparative genomics approach to the prediction of new gamma-proteobacterial regulon members. We take advantage of the phylogenetic proximity of Escherichia coli and other 16 organisms of this subdivision and the intensive search of the space sequence provided by a pattern-matching strategy. Using this approach we complement predictions of regulatory sites made using statistical models currently stored in Tractor_DB, and increase the number of transcriptional regulators with predicted binding sites up to 86. All these computational predictions may be reached at Tractor_DB (www.bioinfo.cu/Tractor_DB, www.tractor.lncc.br, www.ccg.unam.mx/Computational_Genomics/tractorDB/). We also take a first step in this paper towards the assessment of the conservation of the architecture of the regulatory network in the gamma-proteobacteria through evaluating the conservation of the overall connectivity of the network. PMID:15972018

  8. Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan for site: Draft characterization of the Yucca Mountain site:Draft

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the EMMP is to document compliance with the NWPA. To do so, a summary description of site characterization activites is provided, based on the consultation draft of the SCP. Subsequent chpaters identify those technical areas having the potential to be impacted by site characterization activities and the monitoring plans proposed to identify whether those impacts acutally occur. Should monitoring confirm the potential for significant adverse impact, mitigative measures will be developed. In the context of site characterization, mitigation is defined as those changes in site characterization activities that serve to avoid or minimize, to the maximum extent practicle, any significant adverse environmental impacts. Although site characterization activies involve both surface and subsurface activities, it is the surface-based aspect of site characterization that is addressed in detailed by the EMMP. The schedule and duration of these activities is given in the consultation draft of the SCP. A breif summary of all proposed activities is given in the EMMP. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Nevada Test Site Decontamination and Decommissioning Program History, Regulatory Framework, and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Kruzic, Bechtel Nevada; Patrick S. Morris, Bechtel Nevada; Jerel G. Nelson, Polestar Applied Technology, Inc.

    2005-08-07

    Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of radiologically and/or chemically contaminated facilities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are the responsibility of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. Facilities identified for D&D are listed in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and closed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act process. This paper discusses the NTS D&D program, including facilities history, D&D regulatory framework, and valuable lessons learned.

  10. Visiting Professorships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applications are now being accepted for the National Science Foundation (NSF) Visiting Professorships for Women Program. Under this program, women scientists and engineers from industry, government, and academia can be visiting professors at academic institutions in the United States.The program's objectives are to provide opportunities for women to advance their careers in the disciplines of science and engineering that are supported by NSF to provide greater visibility and wider opportunities for women scientists and engineers employed in industry, government, and academic institutions, and to provide encouragement for other women to pursue careers in science and engineering through the awardees' research, lecturing, counseling, and mentoring activities.

  11. SRC liquid spill episode, SRC Pilot Plant, Ft. Lewis, Washington. Intermediate report: site visit observations and findings, January 29-February 20, 1980. [2300 gallon spill

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, A.F. Jr.

    1980-02-27

    This report is intended to provide responsible DOE authorities with the professional observations and recommendations resulting from this firm's technical assistance in evaluating an accidental release of solvent refined coal (SRC) processed liquids at the SRC Pilot Plant, Ft. Lewis, Washington. The spill occurred during the night of December 19-20, 1979 at the facility operated for DOE by the Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company. The site visit on January 29, 1980 was made by DOE's staff member, Mr. John Abrahams, and this firm's representative, Mr. ALvin F. Meyer, Jr., P.E., President. In brief, the spill of approximately 2300 gallons of SRC processed liquids was caused by human failure. Compounding the circumstances was the presence of a bleeder valve which was inexplicably left open. Additional factors contributing to the episode were the fact that the operation was conducted at night, and the presence of steam and noise which obscured, at least partially, the possibility of detecting the spill occurrence. After operating personnel discovered the spill, the plant management of Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company were informed. It was decided that environmental surveys and measurements would be undertaken to detect any possible contamination. Subsequent to the site visit, additional information was provided by Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Company, and by Hqs. ASFE Program officials. Analysis of the available data to date (February 22, 1980) indicates that no off site (SRC Plant boundaries) environmental contamination has occurred. A need exists for close further study and evaluation.

  12. Early Regulatory Engagement for Successful Site Remediation: the UK Experience - 13173

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, R.P.; Senior, D.

    2013-07-01

    The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) is an independent safety, security and transport regulator of the UK nuclear industry. ONR regulates all civil nuclear reactor power stations, fuel manufacture, enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing, most defence sites and installations that store and process legacy spent fuel and radioactive waste. The responsibility for funding and strategic direction of decommissioning and radioactive waste management of state owned legacy sites has rested solely with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) since 2005. A key component of NDA's mandate was to encourage new strategic approaches and innovation to dealing with the UK's waste legacy and which deliver value-for-money to the UK taxpayer. ONR, as an agency of the Health and Safety Executive, is entirely independent of NDA and regulates all prescribed activities on NDA's sites. NDA's competition of site management and closure contracts has attracted significant international interest and the formation of consortia comprised of major British, US, French and Swedish organizations bidding for those contracts. The prominence of US organizations in each of those consortia reflects the scale and breadth of existing waste management and D and D projects in the US. This paper will articulate, in broad terms, the challenges faced by international organizations seeking to employ 'off-the-shelf' technology and D and D techniques, successfully employed elsewhere, into the UK regulatory context. The predominantly 'goal-setting' regulatory framework in the UK does not generally prescribe a minimum standard to which a licensee must adhere. The legal onus on licensees in the UK is to demonstrate, whatever technology is selected, that in its applications, risks are reduced 'So Far As Is Reasonably Practicable' or 'SFAIRP'. By the nature of its role, ONR adopts a conservative approach to regulation; however ONR also recognises that in the decommissioning (and ultimately the site closure) domain

  13. Cryptic variation in vulva development by cis-regulatory evolution of a HAIRY-binding site.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Simone; Sommer, Ralf J

    2013-01-01

    Robustness to mutations is a general principle of biological systems that allows for the accumulation of cryptic variation. However, little is known about robustness and cryptic variation in core developmental pathways. Here we show through gonad-ablation screens in natural isolates of Pristionchus pacificus cryptic variation in nematode vulva development. This variation is mainly caused by cis-regulatory evolution in the conserved Notch ligand apx-1/Delta and involves binding sites for the transcription factor HAIRY. In some isolates, including a Bolivian strain, absence of a HAIRY-binding site results in Ppa-apx-1 expression in the vulva precursor cell P6.p and causes gonad-independent vulva differentiation. In contrast, a Californian strain that gained a HAIRY-binding site lacks Ppa-apx-1 vulval expression and shows gonad-dependence of vulva development. Addition of this HAIRY-binding site to the Bolivian Ppa-apx-1 promoter eliminates expression in the vulva. Our findings indicate significant cis-regulatory evolution in a core developmental pathway leading to intraspecific cryptic variation.

  14. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  15. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Vera B; Taylor, Martin S; Semple, Colin A

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  16. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  17. Regulatory impact analysis of environmental standards for uranium mill tailings at active sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency was directed by Congress, under PL 95-604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, to set standards of general application that provide protection from the hazards associated with uranium mill tailings. Title I of the Act pertains to tailings at inactive sites for which the Agency has developed standards as part of a separate rulemaking. Title II of the Act requires standards covering the processing and disposal of byproduct materials at mills which are currently licensed by the appropriate regulatory authorities. This Regulatory Impact Analysis (RIA) addresses the standards developed under Title II. There are two major parts of the standards for active mills: standards for control of releases from tailings during processing operations and prior to final disposal, and standards for protection of the public after the disposal of tailings. This report presents a detailed analysis of standards for disposal only, since the analysis required for the operations standards is very limited.

  18. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Cody, Tom

    2016-07-12

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  19. Congressman Clyburn Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Congressman James Clyburn visits the new employees of the Savannah River Site. These new jobs the graduates have received are a result of the Recovery Act at work. Lisa Jackson of the Environmental Protection Agency speaks about how the ARRA is in line with President Obama's vision of a better economy and cleaner environment.

  20. Environmental regulatory compliance plan, Deaf County site, Texas: Draft revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-14

    The DOE is committed to conduct its operation in an environmentally safe and sound manner and comply with the letter and spirit of applicable environmental statues and regulations. These objectives are codified in DOE order N 5400.2, ''Environmental Policy Statement.'' This document, the Deaf Smith County site (Texas) Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plam (ERCP), is one means of implementing that policy. The ERCP describes the environmental regulatory requirements applicable to the Deaf Smith County site (Texas), and presented the framework within which the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) will comply with the requirements. The plan also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental requirements. To achieve this purpose the ERCP will be developed in phases. This version of the ERCP is the first phase in the delopment of the ERCP. It represents the Salt Repository Project Office's understanding of environmental requirements for the site characterization phase of repository development. After consultation with the appropriate federal and state agencies and affected Indian tribes, the ERCP will be updated to reflect the results of consultation with these agencies and affected Indian tribes. 6 refs., 38 figs.

  1. A novel SATB1 binding site in the BCL2 promoter region possesses transcriptional regulatory function☆

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Feiran; Sun, Luan; Sun, Yujie

    2010-01-01

    BCL2 is a key regulator of apoptosis. Our previous work has demonstrated that special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1) is positively correlated with BCL2 expression. In the present study, we report a new SATB1 binding site located between P1 and P2 promoters of the BCL2 gene. The candidate SATB1 binding sequence predicted by bioinformatic analysis was investigated in vitro and in vivo by electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). One 25-bp sequence, named SB1, was confirmed to be SATB1 binding site. The regulatory function of SB1 and its relevance to SATB1 were further examed with dual-luciferase reporter assay system in Jurkat cells. We found that SB1 could negatively regulate reporter gene activity. Mutation of SATB1 binding site further repressed the activity. Knockdown of SATB1 also enhanced this negative effect of SB1. Our data indicate that the SB1 sequence possesses negative transcriptional regulatory function and this function can be antagonized by SATB1. PMID:23554662

  2. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Regulatory criteria evaluation report. Appendix E

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The primary objective of the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program (ESPDP) is to demonstrate successfully the use of 10CFR52 to obtain ESPs for one or more US sites for one (or more) ALWR nuclear power plants. It is anticipated that preparation of the ESP application and interaction with NRC during the application review process will result not only in an ESP for the applicant(s) but also in the development of criteria and definition of processes, setting the precedent that facilitates ESPs for subsequent ESP applications. Because siting regulatory processes and acceptance criteria are contained in over 100 separate documents, comprehensive licensing and technical reviews were performed to establish whether the requirements and documentation are self-consistent, whether the acceptance criteria are sufficiently well-defined and clear, and whether the licensing process leading to the issuance of an ESP is unambiguously specified. This document provides Appendix E which contains a population density report. In this study the proposed US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) population density and exclusion zone size criteria were evaluated for their potential effectiveness to meet the quantitative public health and safety objectives associated with the NRC Safety Goal Policy. In addition, the individual and societal risks from postulated accidents (based on NUREG-1150 methods) were determined and compared to the quantitative prompt and latent health objective of the safety goal policy.

  3. Proceedings of the scientific visit on crystalline rock repository development.

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Miksova, Jitka

    2013-02-01

    A scientific visit on Crystalline Rock Repository Development was held in the Czech Republic on September 24-27, 2012. The visit was hosted by the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority (RAWRA), co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and supported by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The purpose of the visit was to promote technical information exchange between participants from countries engaged in the investigation and exploration of crystalline rock for the eventual construction of nuclear waste repositories. The visit was designed especially for participants of countries that have recently commenced (or recommenced) national repository programmes in crystalline host rock formations. Discussion topics included repository programme development, site screening and selection, site characterization, disposal concepts in crystalline host rock, regulatory frameworks, and safety assessment methodology. Interest was surveyed in establishing a %E2%80%9Cclub,%E2%80%9D the mission of which would be to identify and address the various technical challenges that confront the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock environments. The idea of a second scientific visit to be held one year later in another host country received popular support. The visit concluded with a trip to the countryside south of Prague where participants were treated to a tour of the laboratory and underground facilities of the Josef Regional Underground Research Centre.

  4. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Sneve, M K; Kiselev, M; Shandala, N K

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  5. Radio-ecological characterization and radiological assessment in support of regulatory supervision of legacy sites in northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Sneve, M K; Kiselev, M; Shandala, N K

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory cooperation program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective has been the enhancement of safety culture and includes a special focus on regulatory supervision of nuclear legacy sites. The initial project outputs included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous situations and activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision. In turn, this has led to the development of new and updated norms and standards, and related regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at legacy sites. This paper presents the experience gained within the above program with regard to radio-ecological characterization of Sites of Temporary Storage for spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha in the Kola Peninsula in northwest Russia. Such characterization is necessary to support assessments of the current radiological situation and to support prospective assessments of its evolution. Both types of assessments contribute to regulatory supervision of the sites. Accordingly, they include assessments to support development of regulatory standards and guidance concerning: control of radiation exposures to workers during remediation operations; emergency preparedness and response; planned radionuclide releases to the environment; development of site restoration plans, and waste treatment and disposal. Examples of characterization work are presented which relate to terrestrial and marine environments at Andreeva Bay. The use of this data in assessments is illustrated by means of the visualization and assessment tool (DATAMAP) developed as part of the regulatory cooperation program, specifically to help control radiation exposure in operations and to support

  6. Transcription factor abundance controlled by an auto-regulatory mechanism involving a transcription start site switch

    PubMed Central

    Ngondo, Richard Patryk; Carbon, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    A transcriptional feedback loop is the simplest and most direct means for a transcription factor to provide an increased stability of gene expression. In this work performed in human cells, we reveal a new negative auto-regulatory mechanism involving an alternative transcription start site (TSS) usage. Using the activating transcription factor ZNF143 as a model, we show that the ZNF143 low-affinity binding sites, located downstream of its canonical TSS, play the role of protein sensors to induce the up- or down-regulation of ZNF143 gene expression. We uncovered that the TSS switch that mediates this regulation implies the differential expression of two transcripts with an opposite protein production ability due to their different 5′ untranslated regions. Moreover, our analysis of the ENCODE data suggests that this mechanism could be used by other transcription factors to rapidly respond to their own aberrant expression level. PMID:24234445

  7. Russian Experience in the Regulatory Supervision of the Uranium Legacy Sites - 12441

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, M.F.; Romanov, V.V.; Shandala, N.K.; Titov, A.V.; Kiselev, S.M.; Seregin, V.A.; Metlyaev, E.G.; Novikova, N.; Khokhlova, E.A.

    2012-07-01

    Management of the uranium legacy is accompanied with environmental impact intensity of which depends on the amount of the waste generated, the extent of that waste localization and environmental spreading. The question is: how hazardous is such impact on the environment and human health? The criterion for safety assurance is adequate regulation of the uranium legacy. Since the establishment of the uranium industry, the well done regulatory system operates in the FMBA of Russia. Such system covers inter alia, the uranium legacy. This system includes the extent laboratory network of independent control and supervision, scientific researches, regulative practices. The current Russian normative and legal basis of the regulation and its application practice has a number of problems relating to the uranium legacy, connected firstly with the environmental remediation. To improve the regulatory system, the urgent tasks are: -To introduce the existing exposure situation into the national laws and standards in compliance with the ICRP system. - To develop criteria for site remediation and return, by stages, to uncontrolled uses. The similar criteria have been developed within the Russian-Norwegian cooperation for the purpose of remediation of the sites for temporary storage of SNF and RW. - To consider possibilities and methods of optimization for the remediation strategies under development. - To separate the special category - RW resulted from uranium ore mining and dressing. The current Russian RW classification is based on the waste subdivision in terms of the specific activities. Having in mind the new RW-specific law, we receive the opportunity to separate some special category - RW originated from the uranium mining and milling. Introduction of such category can simplify significantly the situation with management of waste of uranium mining and milling processes. Such approach is implemented in many countries and approved by IAEA. The category of 'RW originated from

  8. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  9. Building a dictionary for genomes: Identification of presumptive regulatory sites by statistical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Li, Hao; Siggia, Eric D.

    2000-01-01

    The availability of complete genome sequences and mRNA expression data for all genes creates new opportunities and challenges for identifying DNA sequence motifs that control gene expression. An algorithm, “MobyDick,” is presented that decomposes a set of DNA sequences into the most probable dictionary of motifs or words. This method is applicable to any set of DNA sequences: for example, all upstream regions in a genome or all genes expressed under certain conditions. Identification of words is based on a probabilistic segmentation model in which the significance of longer words is deduced from the frequency of shorter ones of various lengths, eliminating the need for a separate set of reference data to define probabilities. We have built a dictionary with 1,200 words for the 6,000 upstream regulatory regions in the yeast genome; the 500 most significant words (some with as few as 10 copies in all of the upstream regions) match 114 of 443 experimentally determined sites (a significance level of 18 standard deviations). When analyzing all of the genes up-regulated during sporulation as a group, we find many motifs in addition to the few previously identified by analyzing the subclusters individually to the expression subclusters. Applying MobyDick to the genes derepressed when the general repressor Tup1 is deleted, we find known as well as putative binding sites for its regulatory partners. PMID:10944202

  10. Regulatory site of inorganic pyrophosphatase. Nonhyperbolic kinetics of enzymatic reaction at low substrate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, A.R.; Baikov, A.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-08-10

    The initial rate of PP/sub 1/ hydrolysis by inorganic pyrophosphatase from baker's yeast was analyzed as a function of the concentrations of the Mg-PP/sub 1/ complex (substrate) and Mg/sup 2 +/ ions (activator) at substrate concentrations down to 0.1 ..mu..M. Lineweaver-Burk plots for the enzyme in equilibrium with Mg/sup 2 +/ ions were nonlinear at fixed Mg/sup 2 +/ concentrations, which cannot be explained within the framework of previously proposed models of the reaction. The nonlinearity is retained for the monomeric form of the enzyme and indicates that the enzyme has a regulatory site capable of tightly binding free PP/sub 1/ (K/sub d/ approx. 0.02 ..mu..M). A new model of the reaction is proposed in which Mg-PP/sub 1/, PP/sub 1/, and Mg/sup 2 +/ are bound to the enzyme in random order and filling of the regulatory site decreases the dissociation constant of the protein-Mg complex from 4.7 to 0.025 mM. It was concluded that PP/sub 1/ and Mg/sup 2 +/ are regulators of pyrophosphatase activity under physiological conditions.

  11. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  12. Activation of protein phosphatase 1 by a small molecule designed to bind to the enzyme's regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Tappan, Erin; Chamberlin, A Richard

    2008-02-01

    The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a serine-threonine phosphatase that participates ubiquitously in cellular signaling, is controlled by a wide variety of regulatory proteins that interact with PP1 at an allosteric regulatory site that recognizes a "loose" consensus sequence (usually designated as RVXF) found in all such regulatory proteins. Peptides containing the regulatory consensus sequence have been found to recapitulate the binding and PP1 activity modulation of the regulatory proteins, suggesting that it might be possible to design small-molecule surrogates that activate PP1 rather than inhibiting it. This prospect constitutes a largely unexplored way of controlling signaling pathways that could be functionally complementary to the much more extensively explored stratagem of kinase inhibition. Based on these principles, we have designed a microcystin analog that activates PP1. PMID:18291321

  13. Regulatory Closure Options for the Residue in the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.R. Shyr, L.J.

    1998-10-05

    Liquid, mixed, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) has been stored in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTS) located in tank farms on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The DOE is developing technologies to retrieve as much remaining HLW as technically possible prior to physically closing the tank farms. In support of the Hanford Tanks Initiative, Sandia National Laboratories has addressed the requirements for the regulatory closure of the radioactive component of any SST residue that may remain after physical closure. There is significant uncertainty about the end state of each of the 149 SSTS; that is, the nature and amount of wastes remaining in the SSTS after retrieval is uncertain. As a means of proceeding in the face of these uncertainties, this report links possible end-states with associated closure options. Requirements for disposal of HLW and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) are reviewed in detail. Incidental waste, which is radioactive waste produced incidental to the further processing of HLW, is then discussed. If the low activity waste (LAW) fraction from the further processing of HLW is determined to be incidental waste, then DOE can dispose of that incidental waste onsite without a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC). The NRC has proposed three Incidental Waste Criteria for determining if a LAW fraction is incidental waste. One of the three Criteria is that the LAW fraction should not exceed the NRC's Class C limits.

  14. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  15. Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Powers, Charles; Gochfeld, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether

  16. Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: Understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Powers, Charles; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether

  17. Regulatory requirements and tools for environmental assessment of hazardous wastes: understanding tribal and stakeholder concerns using Department of Energy sites.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Powers, Charles; Gochfeld, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Many US governmental and Tribal Nation agencies, as well as state and local entities, deal with hazardous wastes within regulatory frameworks that require specific environmental assessments. In this paper we use Department of Energy (DOE) sites as examples to examine the relationship between regulatory requirements and environmental assessments for hazardous waste sites and give special attention to how assessment tools differ. We consider federal laws associated with environmental protection include the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as well as regulations promulgated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tribal Nations and state agencies. These regulatory regimes require different types of environmental assessments and remedial investigations, dose assessments and contaminant pathways. The DOE case studies illustrate the following points: 1) there is often understandable confusion about what regulatory requirements apply to the site resources, and what environmental assessments are required by each, 2) the messages sent on site safety issued by different regulatory agencies are sometimes contradictory or confusing (e.g. Oak Ridge Reservation), 3) the regulatory frameworks being used to examine the same question can be different, leading to different conclusions (e.g. Brookhaven National Laboratory), 4) computer models used in support of groundwater models or risk assessments are not necessarily successful in convincing Native Americans and others that there is no possibility of risk from contaminants (e.g. Amchitka Island), 5) when given the opportunity to choose between relying on a screening risk assessments or waiting for a full site-specific analysis of contaminants in biota, the screening risk assessment option is rarely selected (e.g. Amchitka, Hanford Site), and finally, 6) there needs to be agreement on whether

  18. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship Between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. (Learn Media Technol. doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660, 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled, controlling for content knowledge and prior visits to the park. Students who were able to navigate the VFT in teams were more likely than their peers who had the system demonstrated by a teacher to want to visit the national park. In addition, students with higher pre-intervention content knowledge were more likely to want to visit the national park than their peers with lower pre-test scores, in both the teacher demonstration and student co-navigation conditions.

  19. Limitations of on-site dairy farm regulatory debits as milk quality predictors.

    PubMed

    Borneman, Darand L; Stiegert, Kyle; Ingham, Steve

    2015-03-01

    In the United States, compliance with grade A raw fluid milk regulatory standards is assessed via laboratory milk quality testing and by on-site inspection of producers (farms). This study evaluated the correlation between on-site survey debits being marked and somatic cell count (SCC) or standard plate count (SPC) laboratory results for 1,301 Wisconsin grade A dairy farms in 2012. Debits recorded on the survey form were tested as predictors of laboratory results utilizing ordinary least squares regression to determine if results of the current method for on-site evaluation of grade A dairy farms accurately predict SCC and SPC test results. Such a correlation may indicate that current methods of on-site inspection serve the primary intended purpose of assuring availability of high-quality milk. A model for predicting SCC was estimated using ordinary least squares regression methods. Step-wise selected regressors of grouped debit items were able to predict SCC levels with some degree of accuracy (adjusted R2=0.1432). Specific debit items, seasonality, and farm size were the best predictors of SCC levels. The SPC data presented an analytical challenge because over 75% of the SPC observations were at or below a 25,000 cfu/mL threshold but were recorded by testing laboratories as at the threshold value. This classic censoring problem necessitated the use of a Tobit regression approach. Even with this approach, prediction of SPC values based on on-site survey criteria was much less successful (adjusted R2=0.034) and provided little support for the on-site survey system as a way to inform farmers about making improvements that would improve SPC. The lower level of correlation with SPC may indicate that factors affecting SPC are more varied and differ from those affecting SCC. Further, unobserved deficiencies in postmilking handling and storage sanitation could enhance bacterial growth and increase SPC, whereas postmilking sanitation will have no effect on SCC because

  20. Regulatory Framework for Salt Waste Disposal and Tank Closure at the Savannah River Site - 13663

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steve; Dickert, Ginger

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high-level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making and to ensure compliance with all regulatory requirements, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its current and past contractors have worked closely with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop and implement a framework for on-site low-level waste disposal and closure of the SRS waste tanks. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, provides DOE the authority to manage defense-related radioactive waste. DOE Order 435.1 and its associated manual and guidance documents detail this radioactive waste management process. The DOE also has a requirement to consult with the NRC in determining that waste that formerly was classified as high-level waste can be safely managed as either low-level waste or transuranic waste. Once DOE makes a determination, NRC then has a responsibility to monitor DOE's actions in coordination with SCDHEC to ensure compliance with the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61 (10CFR61), Subpart C performance objectives. The management of hazardous waste substances or components at SRS is regulated by SCDHEC and the EPA. The foundation for the interactions between DOE, SCDHEC and EPA is the SRS Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). Managing this array of requirements and successfully interacting with regulators, consultants and stakeholders is a challenging task but ensures

  1. Mercury-control technology-assessment study: Troy Chemical Corporation, Newark, New Jersey. Preliminary survey report for the site visit of October 15, 1981. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-21

    An on-site visit was made to the Troy Chemical Corporation, Newark, New Jersey to evaluate control methods in place to reduce hazards to workers involved with mercury (7439976). Products included antiskin agents, bactericides, bodying agents, defoamers, dryers, mildewcides, preservatives, and wetting agents. Process descriptions were offered for raw mercury handling, mercuric/mercurous chloride production, mercuric oxide production, organomercurial production, and mercury reclamation. Control methods described included mercury vapor control through the use of mercury vapor adsorbers, exhaust hoods, and condenser/adsorber systems. The oxide grinding and packaging system, PMA grinding exhaust system, and spill protection pallets were used. Cyclones and filter bags were installed for reducing mercury particulate concentrations in the areas of potential exposure. Personal protective equipment, work practices, biological monitoring, and air-contaminant monitoring programs were described. The use of a sauna for removing mercury from the workers was a new approach that may reduce mercury levels in the body. It is suggested that the company investigate the ventilation of oven doors on the retorts in the mercury-reclamation facility. An in-depth survey is not recommended as adequate information was obtained.

  2. The role of CTCF binding sites in the 3' immunoglobulin heavy chain regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2012-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain locus undergoes a series of DNA rearrangements and modifications to achieve the construction and expression of individual antibody heavy chain genes in B cells. These events affect variable regions, through VDJ joining and subsequent somatic hypermutation, and constant regions through class switch recombination (CSR). Levels of IgH expression are also regulated during B cell development, resulting in high levels of secreted antibodies from fully differentiated plasma cells. Regulation of these events has been attributed primarily to two cis-elements that work from long distances on their target sequences, i.e., an ∼1 kb intronic enhancer, Eμ, located between the V region segments and the most 5' constant region gene, Cμ; and an ∼40 kb 3' regulatory region (3' RR) that is located downstream of the most 3' C(H) gene, Cα. The 3' RR is a candidate for an "end" of B cell-specific regulation of the Igh locus. The 3' RR contains several B cell-specific enhancers associated with DNase I hypersensitive sites (hs1-4), which are essential for CSR and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. Downstream of this enhancer-containing region is a region of high-density CTCF binding sites, which extends through hs5, 6, and 7 and further downstream. CTCF, with its enhancer-blocking activities, has been associated with all mammalian insulators and implicated in multiple chromosomal interactions. Here we address the 3' RR CTCF-binding region as a potential insulator of the Igh locus, an independent regulatory element and a predicted modulator of the activity of 3' RR enhancers. Using chromosome conformation capture technology, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and genetic approaches, we have found that the 3' RR with its CTCF-binding region interacts with target sequences in the V(H), Eμ, and C(H) regions through DNA looping as regulated by protein binding. This region impacts on B cell-specific Igh processes at different stages of B cell

  3. Developing a strategy and closure criteria for radioactive and mixed waste sites in the ORNL remedial action program: Regulatory interface

    SciTech Connect

    Trabalka, J.R.

    1987-09-01

    Some options for stabilization and treatment of contaminated sites can theoretically provide a once-and-for-all solution (e.g., removal or destruction of contaminants). Most realizable options, however, leave contaminants in place (in situ), potentially isolated by physical or chemical, but more typically, by hydrologic measures. As a result of the dynamic nature of the interactions between contaminants, remedial measures, and the environment, in situ stablization measures are likely to have limited life spans, and maintenance and monitoring of performance become an essential part of the scheme. The length of formal institutional control over the site and related questions about future uses of the land and waters are of paramount importance. Unique features of the ORNL site and environs appear to be key ingredients in achieving the very long term institutional control necessary for successful financing and implementation of in situ stabilization. Some formal regulatory interface is necessary to ensure that regulatory limitations and new guidance which can affect planning and implementation of the ORNL Remedial Action Program are communicated to ORNL staff and potential technical and financial limitations which can affect schedules or alternatives for achievement of long-term site stabilization and the capability to meet environmental regulations are provided to regulatory bodies as early as possible. Such an interface should allow decisions on closure criteria to be based primarily on technical merit and protection of human health and the environment. A plan for interfacing with federal and state regulatory authorities is described. 93 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. Determining Virtual Environment "Fit": The Relationship between Navigation Style in a Virtual Field Trip, Student Self-Reported Desire to Visit the Field Trip Site in the Real World, and the Purposes of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, M. Shane; Lin, Ming-Chao; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a follow-up analysis of the data reported in Lin et al. ("Learn Media Technol." doi: 10.1080/17439884.2011.629660 , 2011), we investigated the relationship between student use of a virtual field trip (VFT) system and the probability of students reporting wanting to visit the national park site upon which the VFT was modeled,…

  5. RFI to CMS: An Approach to Regulatory Acceptance of Site Remediation Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowland, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    Lockheed Martin made a smooth transition from RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations'(NASA) Michoud Assembly Facility (MA-F) to its Corrective Measures Study (CMS) phase within the RCRA Corrective Action Process. We located trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination that resulted from the manufacture of the Apollo Program Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle External Tank, began the cleanup, and identified appropriate technologies for final remedies. This was accomplished by establishing a close working relationship with the state environmental regulatory agency through each step of the process, and resulted in receiving approvals for each of those steps. The agency has designated Lockheed Martin's management of the TCE-contamination at the MAF site as a model for other manufacturing sites in a similar situation. In February 1984, the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LDEQ) issued a compliance order to begin the clean up of groundwater contaminated with TCE. In April 1984 Lockheed Martin began operating a groundwater recovery well to capture the TCE plume. The well not only removes contaminants, but also sustains an inward groundwater hydraulic gradient so that the potential offsite migration of the TCE plume is greatly diminished. This effort was successful, and for the agency to give orders and for a regulated industry to follow them is standard procedure, but this is a passive approach to solving environmental problems. The goal of the company thereafter was to take a leadership, proactive role and guide the MAF contamination clean up to its best conclusion at minimum time and lowest cost to NASA. To accomplish this goal, we have established a positive working relationship with LDEQ, involving them interactively in the implementation of advanced remedial activities at MAF as outlined in the following paragraphs.

  6. Field calibrations of a low-cost aerosol sensor at a regulatory monitoring site in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holstius, D. M.; Pillarisetti, A.; Smith, K. R.; Seto, E.

    2014-04-01

    Health effects attributed to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) now rank it among the risk factors with the highest health burdens in the world, but existing monitoring infrastructure cannot adequately characterize spatial and temporal variability in urban PM2.5 concentrations, nor in human population exposures. The development and evaluation of more portable and affordable monitoring instruments based on low-cost sensors may offer a means to supplement and extend existing infrastructure, increasing the density and coverage of empirical measurements and thereby improving exposure science and control. Here, we report on field calibrations of a custom-built, battery-operated aerosol monitoring instrument we developed using low-cost, off-the-shelf optical aerosol sensors. We calibrated our instruments using 1 h and 24 h PM2.5 data from a class III US EPA Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) PM2.5 β-attenuation monitor in continuous operation at a regulatory monitoring site in Oakland, California. We observed negligible associations with ambient humidity and temperature; linear corrections were sufficient to explain 60% of the variance in 1 h reference PM2.5 data and 72% of the variance in 24 h data. Performance at 1 h integration times was comparable to commercially available optical instruments costing considerably more. These findings warrant further exploration of the circumstances under which this class of aerosol sensors may profitably be deployed to generate improved PM2.5 data sets.

  7. Evaluation of inhaler handling-errors, inhaler perception and preference with Spiromax, Easyhaler and Turbuhaler devices among healthy Finnish volunteers: a single site, single visit crossover study (Finhaler)

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Niklas; Holländer, Jenny; Långström, Disa; Santtila, Pekka; Saukkonen, Anni; Torvinen, Saku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Correct inhaler technique and device preference are positively correlated with improved adherence and clinical outcomes. This study was designed to investigate inhaler technique mastery and device preference for three different dry powder inhalers, Spiromax, Easyhaler and Turbuhaler. Methods This was a single site, single visit, crossover study assessing device mastery, handling errors and preference using empty Spiromax, Easyhaler and Turbuhaler devices in healthy adult Finnish volunteers. Inhaler naïve adult participants were observed by healthcare professionals (HCPs) to evaluate the proportion of participants achieving device mastery (defined as an absence of HCP observed errors) using a three-step approach: (1) intuitive use (with no instructions), (2) after reading the patient information leaflet and (3) after HCP instruction. HCPs monitored and recorded errors based on device-specific handling error checklists. At the end of the study, participants completed a device preference questionnaire and rated their satisfaction with the three devices. Results Spiromax was correctly used by 37.5% and 93.3% of participants in steps 1 and 2, respectively, compared with 0% and 58.3% with Easyhaler, and 9.2% and 76.7% with Turbuhaler. All three devices showed high mastery (>95%) in step 3. The most common error reported with Spiromax was related to the orientation of the device. Not shaking the device was the most common error with Easyhaler. Errors in priming the device were the most common with Turbuhaler. Spiromax, Easyhaler and Turbuhaler were rated as the ‘easiest device to use’ by 73.1%, 12.6% and 14.3% of participants, respectively. The HCP instructions clearly improved the use of all devices. Conclusion Higher levels of device mastery, including intuitive/ease of use, were reported by naïve users when using Spiromax compared with Easyhaler and Turbuhaler. PMID:27026804

  8. REGULATORY AUTOPHOSPHORYLATION SITES ON PROTEIN KINASE C-δ AT Thr141 AND Thr295

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Vitalyi O.; Guo, Jianfen; Harleton, Erin; Feinmark, Steven J.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is a Ser/Thr kinase that regulates a wide range of cellular responses. This study identifies novel in vitro PKCδ autophosphorylation sites at Thr141 adjacent to the pseudosubstrate domain, Thr218 in the C1A–C1B interdomain, Ser295, Ser302, and Ser304 in the hinge region, and Ser503 adjacent to Thr505 in the activation loop. Cell-based studies show that Thr141 and Thr295 also are phosphorylated in vivo and that Thr141 phosphorylation regulates the kinetics of PKCδ downregulation in COS7 cells. In vitro studies implicate Thr141 and Thr295 autophosphorylation as modifications that regulate PKCδ activity. A T141D substitution markedly increases basal lipid-independent PKCδ activity; the PKCδ-T141D mutant is only slightly further stimulated in vitro by PMA treatment, suggesting that Thr141 phosphorylation relieves autoinhibitory constraints that limit PKCδ activity. Mutagenesis studies also indicate that a phosphorylation at Thr295 contributes to the control of PKCδ substrate specificity. We previously demonstrated that PKCδ phosphorylates the myofilament protein cardiac troponin I (cTnI) at Ser23/Ser24 when it is allosterically activated by lipid cofactors and that the Thr505/Tyr311-phosphorylated form of PKCδ (that is present in assays with Src) acquires as additional activity toward cTnI-Thr144. Studies reported herein show that a T505A substitution reduces PKCδ-Thr295 autophosphorylation and that a T295A substitution leads to a defect in Src-dependent PKCδ-Tyr311 phosphorylation and PKCδ-dependent cTnI-Thr144 phosphorylation. These results implicate PKCδ-Thr295 autophosphorylation as a lipid-dependent modification that links PKCδ-Thr505 phosphorylation to Src-dependent regulation of PKCδ catalytic function. Collectively, these studies identify novel regulatory autophosphorylations on PKCδ that serve as markers and regulators of PKCδ activity. PMID:19366211

  9. Tritium Dose Assessments with Regulatory and Advanced Computer Models for the Potential European ITER Site Vandellos (Spain)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskob, W.; Velarde, M.; Perlado, J.M

    2005-07-15

    Deterministic and probabilistic dose assessments for releases of tritium have been performed for the potential European ITER Site of Vandellos (Spain). Besides national regulatory models, internationally accepted computer codes such as NORMTRI (for normal conditions) and UFOTRI (for incidental/accidental conditions) were used for the calculations. The paper concentrates on releases of tritium in either HT or HTO form. Source terms from the ITER documentation (GSSR vol. IV and VII) have been used for the HT/HTO releases.The data base of NORMTRI/UFOTRI was adapted to the national regulatory prescriptions. This comprised in particular ingestion habits and dose conversion factors. Important for the calculations was also the selection of meteorological, demographic, nutritional and agricultural data. Meteorological data over a period of one year was used for the probabilistic calculations. Deterministic scenarios were selected to be as close as possible to other studies performed in the frame of ITER. Results of the assessments were early and chronic doses which have been evaluated for the Most Exposed Individual at particular distance bands from the release point.Of particular importance was the comparison between the regulatory and the advanced assessment models. Regulatory models for tritium are sometimes simplistic and are either too conservative or do not consider important processes which might lead to underestimation of the dose. This is for example the case with organically bound tritium which is often not considered in regulatory models but may dominate the dose from ingestion pathways. Therefore, this comparison provided the opportunity to evaluate the appropriateness of a national accepted tool. As the site of ITER was still to be defined, such a comparison was vital and might be also necessary for any other site to assure public confidence in the licensing procedure.

  10. WarpVisit

    SciTech Connect

    Loring, Burlen; Reubel, Oliver

    2015-06-10

    WarpVisit is an insitu simulation application that integrates the Warp laser plasma accelerator simulation framework with Visit a parallel visualization application. WarpVisit is written in python and supports interactive or live mode where user can connect to Warp with the Visit GUI and batch mode for batch for non-interactive use on high-performance computing resources.

  11. EXPERIENCE FROM TWO SMALL QUANTITY RH-TRU WASTE SITES IN NAVIGATING THROUGH AN EVOLVING REGULATORY LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Biedscheid, Jennifer; Devarakonda, Murthy; Eide, Jim; Kneff, Dennis

    2003-02-27

    Two small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste generator sites have gained considerable experience in navigating through a changing regulatory landscape in their efforts to remove the TRU waste from their sites and proceed with site remediation. The Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project (BCLDP) has the objectives of decontaminating nuclear research buildings and associated grounds and remediating to a level of residual contamination allowing future use without radiological restrictions. As directed by Congress, BCLDP must complete decontamination and decommissioning activities by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2006. This schedule requires the containerization of all TRU waste in 2002. BCLDP will generate a total of approximately 27 cubic meters (m3) of remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. Similarly, the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is scheduled to close in 2006 pursuant to an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Boeing Canoga Park, the management and operating contractor for ETEC. ETEC had 11.0 m3 of RH-TRU and contact-handled (CH) TRU waste in storage, with the requirement to remove this waste in 2002 in order to meet their site closure schedule. The individual milestones for BCLDP and ETEC necessitated the establishment of site-specific programs to direct packaging and characterization of RH-TRU waste before the regulatory framework for the WIPP disposal of RH-TRU waste is finalized. The lack of large infrastructure for characterization activities, as well as the expedited schedules needed to meet regulatory milestones, provided both challenges and opportunities that are unique to small quantity sites. Both sites have developed unique programs for waste characterization based on the same premise, which directs comprehensive waste data collection efforts such that additional characterization will not be required following the finalization of the WIPP RH-TRU waste program requirements. This paper details the BCLDP program

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory domain of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase identifies crucial residues for allosteric regulation and for transduction of the regulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, V; Mora, P; Rochera, L; Ramón-Maiques, S; Rubio, V; Cervera, J

    2000-06-16

    Carbamoyl phosphate (CP), the essential precursor of pyrimidines and arginine, is made in Escherichia coli by a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) consisting of 41.4 and 117.7 kDa subunits, which is feed-back inhibited by UMP and activated by IMP and ornithine. The large subunit catalyzes CP synthesis from ammonia in three steps, and binds the effectors in its 15 kDa C-terminal domain. Fifteen site-directed mutations were introduced in 13 residues of this domain to investigate the mechanism of allosteric modulation by UMP and IMP. Two mutations, K993A and V994A, decreased significantly or abolished enzyme activity, apparently by interfering with the step of carbamate synthesis, and one mutation, T974A, negatively affected ornithine activation. S948A, K954A, T974A, K993A and K993W/H995A abolished or greatly hampered IMP activation and UMP inhibition as well as the binding of both effectors, monitored using photoaffinity labeling and ultracentrifugation binding assays. V994A also decreased significantly IMP and UMP binding. L990A, V991A, H995A, G997A and G1008A had more modest effects or affected more the modulation by and the binding of one than of the other nucleotide. K993W, R1020A, R1021A and K1061A were without substantial effects. The results confirm the independence of the regulatory and catalytic centers, and also confirm functional predictions based on the X-ray structure of an IMP-CPS complex. They prove that the inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP bind in the same site, and exclude that the previously observed binding of ornithine and glutamine in this site were relevant for enzyme activation. K993 and V994 appear to be involved in the transmission of the regulatory signals triggered by UMP and IMP binding. These effectors possibly change the position of K993 and V994, and alter the intermolecular contacts mediated by the regulatory domain. PMID:10843852

  13. Regulatory evolution in proteins by turnover and lineage-specific changes of cyclin-dependent kinase consensus sites

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Alan M.; Liku, Muluye E.; Li, Joachim J.; Durbin, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary change in gene regulation is a key mechanism underlying the genetic component of organismal diversity. Here, we study evolution of regulation at the posttranslational level by examining the evolution of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation sites in the protein subunits of the pre-replicative complex (RC). The pre-RC, an assembly of proteins formed during an early stage of DNA replication, is believed to be regulated by CDKs throughout the animals and fungi. Interestingly, although orthologous pre-RC components often contain clusters of CDK consensus sites, the positions and numbers of sites do not seem conserved. By analyzing protein sequences from both distantly and closely related species, we confirm that consensus sites can turn over rapidly even when the local cluster of sites is preserved, consistent with the notion that precise positioning of phosphorylation events is not required for regulation. We also identify evolutionary changes in the clusters of sites and further examine one replication protein, Mcm3, where a cluster of consensus sites near a nucleocytoplasmic transport signal is confined to a specific lineage. We show that the presence or absence of the cluster of sites in different species is associated with differential regulation of the transport signal. These findings suggest that the CDK regulation of MCM nuclear localization was acquired in the lineage leading to Saccharomyces cerevisiae after the divergence with Candida albicans. Our results begin to explore the dynamics of regulatory evolution at the posttranslational level and show interesting similarities to recent observations of regulatory evolution at the level of transcription. PMID:17978194

  14. Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan for Site Characterization; Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-01

    The DOE is committed to conduct its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner, and will comply with applicable environmental statutes and regulations. These objectives are described in DOE Order 5400.1 (Environmental Protection Program Requirements). This document -- the Environmental Regulatory Compliance Plan (ERCP) -- is one method of implementing the policy set forth in DOE Order 5400.1 and the NWPA. The ERCP describes the plan by which the DOE will comply with applicable Federal environmental statutes and regulations. The ERCP also discusses how DOE will address State and local environmental statutes and regulations. 180 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser. PMID:25324314

  16. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser.

  17. Making Visits Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loar, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Discusses factors in providing safe, supervised setting for visits between parents and children who have been removed from them by child protective services. Presents common overestimations of parental capacity that doom visits, principles for effective visiting, and practical and inexpensive suggestions that are easy to implement and enjoyable…

  18. Interhead fluorescence energy transfer between probes attached to translationally equivalent sites on the regulatory light chains of scallop myosin.

    PubMed

    Chantler, P D; Tao, T

    1986-11-01

    Interhead fluorescence energy transfer studies between probes located at translationally equivalent sites on the two heads of scallop myosin indicates that the distance between such sites is no less than 50 A. Regulatory light chains, possessing either one (Mercenaria, chicken gizzard) or two (Loligo, rabbit skeletal) sulfhydryl groups, were modified either with 1,5-IAEDANS (N'-iodoacetyl-N'-(1-sulfo-5-n-naphthyl)ethylenediamine), as energy transfer donor, or with IAF (5-(iodoacetamido)fluorescein) or DABMI (4-dimethylaminophenylazophenyl-4'-maleimide), as energy transfer acceptor. The sulfhydryl groups on these light chains are located at different positions within the regulatory light-chain primary sequence; this enables one to probe a variety of locations, with respect to regulatory light-chain topology, on each myosin head. These independently modified regulatory light chains were added back to desensitized scallop myosin under a variety of conditions, including biphasic re-addition, the aim being to maximize the number of interhead energy transfer couples present. The efficiency of energy transfer was determined on the same samples by both steady-state and time-decay techniques. Results obtained by these two techniques were in good agreement with each other and indicated that the efficiency of energy transfer did not exceed 20% in any of the hybrids studied. Transfer efficiencies were invariant, irrespective of the presence or absence of MgATP, calcium or actin, either separately or in combination. Results using heavy meromyosin at low ionic strength were identical. It is shown that these results, in conjunction with the results of recent crosslinking studies performed on comparable myosin hybrids, may place certain restrictions on the configurations of the two heads of myosin.

  19. Innovative Regulatory and Technical Approaches for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J. T.; Coutts, P. W.; Franz, J.; Boyle, J. D.; Rogers, B. C.

    2002-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) created the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 to identify, investigate, and cleanup or control radiological contamination at sites used by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) from the 1940s through the 1960s. The USDOE had identified 46 sites in the program and finished remediation at 24 of the smaller ones before the end of 1997. With the passage of the Energy and Water Resources Appropriation Act of 1998 the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) was designated by Congress with responsibility to manage and execute the FUSRAP. The Linde Site located in Tonawanda, New York was operated by the MED from 1942-1946 to extract uranium from several high-grade ores. This natural uranium was subsequently enriched in U-235 elsewhere in the United States and ultimately used to produce energy or weapons. Though in the process of reviewing alternative disposal options by 1995, the USDOE had operated FUSRAP with a strategy requiring virtually all materials remediated be disposed of at only one Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed facility. The change in management of the FUSRAP in 1997 allowed the disposal policy of low levels of radioactively contaminated materials found at the remaining sites to be reexamined. This paper presents some of the innovative regulatory and technical approaches employed at the Linde Site that are resulting in project cost savings while meeting applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements as well as fulfilling commitments made to the local community.

  20. In dialyzed squid axons oxidative stress inhibits the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger by impairing the Cai2+-regulatory site.

    PubMed

    DiPolo, Reinaldo; Beaugé, Luis

    2011-09-01

    The Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, a major mechanism by which cells extrude calcium, is involved in several physiological and physiopathological interactions. In this work we have used the dialyzed squid giant axon to study the effects of two oxidants, SIN-1-buffered peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), on the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the absence and presence of MgATP upregulation. The results show that oxidative stress induced by peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide inhibits the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger by impairing the intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(i)(2+))-regulatory sites, leaving unharmed the intracellular Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-transporting sites. This effect is efficiently counteracted by the presence of MgATP and by intracellular alkalinization, conditions that also protect H(i)(+) and (H(i)(+) + Na(i)(+)) inhibition of Ca(i)(2+)-regulatory sites. In addition, 1 mM intracellular EGTA reduces oxidant inhibition. However, once the effects of oxidants are installed they cannot be reversed by either MgATP or EGTA. These results have significant implications regarding the role of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in response to pathological conditions leading to tissue ischemia-reperfusion and anoxia/reoxygenation; they concur with a marked reduction in ATP concentration, an increase in oxidant production, and a rise in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that seems to be the main factor responsible for cell damage.

  1. Low affinity binding site clusters confer hox specificity and regulatory robustness.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Abe, Namiko; Rinaldi, Lucrezia; McGregor, Alistair P; Frankel, Nicolás; Wang, Shu; Alsawadi, Ahmad; Valenti, Philippe; Plaza, Serge; Payre, François; Mann, Richard S; Stern, David L

    2015-01-15

    In animals, Hox transcription factors define regional identity in distinct anatomical domains. How Hox genes encode this specificity is a paradox, because different Hox proteins bind with high affinity in vitro to similar DNA sequences. Here, we demonstrate that the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in complex with its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) bound specifically to clusters of very low affinity sites in enhancers of the shavenbaby gene of Drosophila. These low affinity sites conferred specificity for Ubx binding in vivo, but multiple clustered sites were required for robust expression when embryos developed in variable environments. Although most individual Ubx binding sites are not evolutionarily conserved, the overall enhancer architecture-clusters of low affinity binding sites-is maintained and required for enhancer function. Natural selection therefore works at the level of the enhancer, requiring a particular density of low affinity Ubx sites to confer both specific and robust expression. PMID:25557079

  2. Regulatory O-GlcNAcylation sites on FoxO1 are yet to be identified

    SciTech Connect

    Fardini, Yann; Perez-Cervera, Yobana; Camoin, Luc; Pagesy, Patrick; Lefebvre, Tony; Issad, Tarik

    2015-06-26

    O-GlcNAcylation is a reversible post-translational modification that regulates cytosolic and nuclear proteins. We and others previously demonstrated that FoxO1 is O-GlcNAcylated in different cell types, resulting in an increase in its transcriptional activity. Four O-GlcNAcylation sites were identified in human FOXO1 but directed mutagenesis of each site individually had modest (T317) or no effect (S550, T648, S654) on its O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity. Moreover, the consequences of mutating all four sites had not been investigated. In the present work, we mutated these sites in the mouse Foxo1 and found that mutation of all four sites did not decrease Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation status and transcriptional activity, and would even tend to increase them. In an attempt to identify other O-GlcNAcylation sites, we immunoprecipitated wild-type O-GlcNAcylated Foxo1 and analysed the tryptic digest peptides by mass spectrometry using High-energy Collisional Dissociation. We identified T646 as a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1. However, site directed mutagenesis of this site individually or together with all four previously identified residues did not impair Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation and transcriptional activity. These results suggest that residues important for the control of Foxo1 activity by O-GlcNAcylation still remain to be identified. - Highlights: • We mutate four previously identified O-GlcNAcylation sites on Foxo1. • Unexpectedly, these mutations do not reduce Foxo1 O-GlcNAcylation. • These mutation do not reduce Foxo1 transcriptional activity. • We identify a new O-GlcNAcylation site on Foxo1 by mass spectrometry. • Mutation of this site increases Foxo1 transcriptional activity.

  3. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W.; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Foxp3 proteins carrying arginine substitutions at the three acetylation sites (3KR) accumulate in T cells to higher levels than wildtype Foxp3 and exert better suppressive activity in co-culture experiments. Acetylation and stability of wildtype, but not mutant, Foxp3 is enhanced when cells are treated with Ex-527, an inhibitor of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. Treatment with Ex-527 promotes Foxp3 expression during induced Treg differentiation, enhances Foxp3 levels in natural Tregs, and prevents loss of Foxp3 expression in adoptively transferred Tregs in mice. Our data identify SIRT1 as a negative regulator of Treg function via deacetylation of three novel target sites in Foxp3. SIRT1 inhibitors strengthen the suppressive activity of Tregs and may be useful in enhancing Treg-based therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases or graft rejections. PMID:22312127

  4. Analysis of yeast endocytic site formation and maturation through a regulatory transition point

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Susheela Y.; Stimpson, Helen E. M.; Weinberg, Jasper; Toret, Christopher P.; Sun, Yidi; Drubin, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The earliest stages of endocytic site formation and the regulation of endocytic site maturation are not well understood. Here we analyzed the order in which the earliest proteins are detectable at endocytic sites in budding yeast and found that an uncharacterized protein, Pal1p/Ydr348cp, is also present at the initial stages of endocytosis. Because Ede1p (homologue of Eps15) and clathrin are the early-arriving proteins most important for cargo uptake, their roles during the early stages of endocytosis were examined more comprehensively. Ede1p is necessary for efficient recruitment of most early-arriving proteins, but not for the recruitment of the adaptor protein Yap1802p, to endocytic sites. The early-arriving proteins, as well as the later-arriving proteins Sla2p and Ent1/2p (homologues of Hip1R and epsins), were found to have longer lifetimes in CLC1-knockout yeast, which indicates that clathrin light chain facilitates the transition from the intermediate to late coat stages. Cargo also arrives during the early stages of endocytosis, and therefore its effect on endocytic machinery dynamics was investigated. Our results are consistent with a role for cargo in regulating the transition of endocytic sites from the early stages of formation to the late stages during which vesicle formation occurs. PMID:22190733

  5. Economic incentives and regulatory framework for shale gas well site reclamation in Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Austin L; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2011-11-15

    Improperly abandoned gas wells threaten human health and safety as well as pollute the air and water. In the next 20 years, tens of thousands of new gas wells will be drilled into the Marcellus, Utica, and Upper Devonian shale formations of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania currently requires production companies to post a bond to ensure environmental reclamation of abandoned well sites, but the size of the bond covers only a small fraction of the site reclamation costs. The economics of shale gas development favor transfer of assets from large entities to smaller ones. With the assets go the liabilities, and without a mechanism to prevent the new owners from assuming reclamation liabilities beyond their means, the economics favor default on well-plugging and site restoration obligations. Policy options and alternatives to bonding are discussed and evaluated. PMID:21985662

  6. Environmental Protection Department Operations and Regulatory Affairs Division Contingency Plan for Site 300 Waste Accumulation Area(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R

    2005-07-14

    -specific information for the WAA(s). Site-specific plans are included in Appendix D. A copy of the Contingency Plan (including the site-specific plans) will be distributed to regulatory agencies and to public service organizations, such as local fire departments and hospitals that may be called on to provide emergency services. A copy of the General Plan with the appropriate site-specific plan will be located at the WAA(s), so it can be used in the case of an emergency.

  7. ABS: a database of Annotated regulatory Binding Sites from orthologous promoters

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Enrique; Farré, Domènec; Albà, M. Mar; Messeguer, Xavier; Guigó, Roderic

    2006-01-01

    Information about the genomic coordinates and the sequence of experimentally identified transcription factor binding sites is found scattered under a variety of diverse formats. The availability of standard collections of such high-quality data is important to design, evaluate and improve novel computational approaches to identify binding motifs on promoter sequences from related genes. ABS () is a public database of known binding sites identified in promoters of orthologous vertebrate genes that have been manually curated from bibliography. We have annotated 650 experimental binding sites from 68 transcription factors and 100 orthologous target genes in human, mouse, rat or chicken genome sequences. Computational predictions and promoter alignment information are also provided for each entry. A simple and easy-to-use web interface facilitates data retrieval allowing different views of the information. In addition, the release 1.0 of ABS includes a customizable generator of artificial datasets based on the known sites contained in the collection and an evaluation tool to aid during the training and the assessment of motif-finding programs. PMID:16381947

  8. Intrasteric control of AMPK via the gamma1 subunit AMP allosteric regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Adams, Julian; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Van Denderen, Bryce J W; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Witters, Lee A; Stapleton, David; Kemp, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a alphabetagamma heterotrimer that is activated in response to both hormones and intracellular metabolic stress signals. AMPK is regulated by phosphorylation on the alpha subunit and by AMP allosteric control previously thought to be mediated by both alpha and gamma subunits. Here we present evidence that adjacent gamma subunit pairs of CBS repeat sequences (after Cystathionine Beta Synthase) form an AMP binding site related to, but distinct from the classical AMP binding site in phosphorylase, that can also bind ATP. The AMP binding site of the gamma(1) CBS1/CBS2 pair, modeled on the structures of the CBS sequences present in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase crystal structure, contains three arginine residues 70, 152, and 171 and His151. The yeast gamma homolog, snf4 contains a His151Gly substitution, and when this is introduced into gamma(1), AMP allosteric control is substantially lost and explains why the yeast snf1p/snf4p complex is insensitive to AMP. Arg70 in gamma(1) corresponds to the site of mutation in human gamma(2) and pig gamma(3) genes previously identified to cause an unusual cardiac phenotype and glycogen storage disease, respectively. Mutation of any of AMP binding site Arg residues to Gln substantially abolishes AMP allosteric control in expressed AMPK holoenzyme. The Arg/Gln mutations also suppress the previously described inhibitory properties of ATP and render the enzyme constitutively active. We propose that ATP acts as an intrasteric inhibitor by bridging the alpha and gamma subunits and that AMP functions to derepress AMPK activity.

  9. Visiting Scholar Exchange Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Kyna, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Provides reports of four United States scholars who visited China as part of the Visiting Scholar Exchange Program. The titles of the reports are (1) "China Journey: A Political Scientist's Look at Yan'an," (2) "The Social Consequences of Land Reclamation in Chinese Coastal Ecosystems," (3) "Anthropology Lectures in South China," and (4) "The Use…

  10. Secondary Emergency Visits

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Bruce; Wiley, Preston

    1991-01-01

    This study surveyed patients seeking emergency care at three Calgary hospitals during a 7-day period in February 1989. Twenty-one percent had seen another physician for the same medical problem within 72 hours. The study suggests that secondary visits at emergency departments affect health care costs. Further study is needed to investigate the extent and appropriateness of such visits. PMID:21229002

  11. Hosting the Presidential Visit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherouse, Mark A.

    This paper describes the visit of President Bush to the campus of Southern Methodist University (SMU) for the May, 1992 commencement and lessons learned from the experience. The paper describes how SMU made use of lead time and suggests how to estimate cost of such a visit. Discussion of strategies for organizing describes the formation and work…

  12. Presidential visit to MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    President George Bush and Alabama Governor Guy Hunt are greeted by Marshall's sixth Center Director Thomas J. Lee (1989-1994) upon their arrival at Redstone Arsenal (RSA) airfield. This was the first sitting president to visit Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since President Kennedy's visit almost 30 years ago.

  13. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    L. Desotell; D. Wieland; V. Yucel; G. Shott; J. Wrapp

    2008-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is planning to close the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is about 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Closure planning for this facility must take into account the regulatory requirements for a diversity of waste streams, disposal and storage configurations, disposal history, and site conditions. This paper provides a brief background of the Area 5 RWMS, identifies key closure issues, and presents the closure strategy. Disposals have been made in 25 shallow excavated pits and trenches and 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes at the 92-Acre Area since 1961. The pits and trenches have been used to dispose unclassified low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform waste, and to store classified low-level and low-level mixed materials. The GCD boreholes are intermediate-depth disposal units about 10 feet (ft) in diameter and 120 ft deep. Classified and unclassified high-specific activity LLW, transuranic (TRU), and mixed TRU are disposed in the GCD boreholes. TRU waste was also disposed inadvertently in trench T-04C. Except for three disposal units that are active, all pits and trenches are operationally covered with 8-ft thick alluvium. The 92-Acre Area also includes a Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) operating under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Interim Status, and an asbestiform waste unit operating under a state of Nevada Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit. A single final closure cover is envisioned over the 92-Acre Area. The cover is the evapotranspirative-type cover that has been successfully employed at the NTS. Closure, post-closure care, and monitoring must meet the requirements of the following regulations: U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Title 40 CFR Part 265, Nevada Administrative

  14. Probing the energetics of proteins through structural perturbation: sites of regulatory energy in human hemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Pettigrew, D W; Romeo, P H; Tsapis, A; Thillet, J; Smith, M L; Turner, B W; Ackers, G K

    1982-01-01

    The sites of energy transduction within the human hemoglobin molecule for the regulation of oxygen affinity have been determined by an extensive study of the molecule's energetic response to structural alteration at individual amino acid residues. For 22 mutant and chemically modified hemoglobins we have determined the total free energy used by the tetrameric molecule for alteration of oxygen affinity at the four binding steps. The results imply that the regulation of oxygen binding affinity is due to energy changes which are mostly localized at the alpha 1 beta 2 interface. They also indicate a high degree of "internal cooperativity" within this contact region--i.e., the structural perturbations at individual residue sites are energetically coupled. Cooperativity in ligand binding is thus a reflection of cooperativity at a deeper level--that of the protein-protein interactions within the alpha 1 beta 2 interfacial domain. Images PMID:6952235

  15. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Laurence; Bataillé, Laetitia; Painset, Anaïs; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Jost, Bernard; Crozatier, Michèle; Vincent, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1) transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col) targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya) is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles. PMID:26204530

  16. Diiron Oxidation State Control of Substrate Access to the Active Site of Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Mediated by the Regulatory Component

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory component (MMOB) of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has a unique N-terminal tail not found in regulatory proteins of other bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases. This N-terminal tail is indispensable for proper function, yet its solution structure and role in catalysis remain elusive. Here, by using double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we show that the oxidation state of the hydroxylase component, MMOH, modulates the conformation of the N-terminal tail in the MMOH–2MMOB complex, which in turn facilitates catalysis. The results reveal that the N-terminal tail switches from a relaxed, flexible conformational state to an ordered state upon MMOH reduction from the diiron(III) to the diiron(II) state. This observation suggests that some of the crystallographically observed allosteric effects that result in the connection of substrate ingress cavities in the MMOH–2MMOB complex may not occur in solution in the diiron(III) state. Thus, O2 may not have easy access to the active site until after reduction of the diiron center. The observed conformational change is also consistent with a higher binding affinity of MMOB to MMOH in the diiron(II) state, which may allow MMOB to displace more readily the reductase component (MMOR) from MMOH following reduction. PMID:24476336

  17. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    D. Wieland, V. Yucel, L. Desotell, G. Shott, J. Wrapp

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators.

  18. (Function of active-site residues of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, Stockholm, Sweden, and visit to Uppsala, Sweden, August 6--12, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1989-08-22

    The traveler participated in the 8th International Congress on Photosynthesis by presenting a paper entitled ''Function of Active-Site Residues of Ribulosebisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase'' and by chairing a discussion session on the same enzyme. Presentation concerning biological CO/sub 2/ fixation, chemical modifications of proteins, 3D structure of proteins, and site-directed mutagenesis were relevant to ongoing investigations of the Protein Engineering Program at ORNL's Biology Division.

  19. Thermodynamics of cooperative DNA recognition at a replication origin and transcription regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Dellarole, Mariano; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo

    2010-12-01

    Binding cooperativity guides the formation of protein-nucleic acid complexes, in particular those that are highly regulated such as replication origins and transcription sites. Using the DNA binding domain of the origin binding and transcriptional regulator protein E2 from human papillomavirus type 16 as model, and through isothermal titration calorimetry analysis, we determined a positive, entropy-driven cooperativity upon binding of the protein to its cognate tandem double E2 site. This cooperativity is associated with a change in DNA structure, where the overall B conformation is maintained. Two homologous E2 domains, those of HPV18 and HPV11, showed that the enthalpic-entropic components of the reaction and DNA deformation can diverge. Because the DNA binding helix is almost identical in the three domains, the differences must lie dispersed throughout this unique dimeric β-barrel fold. This is in surprising agreement with previous results for this domain, which revealed a strong coupling between global dynamics and DNA recognition.

  20. AGU sponsors Argentinean's visit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maria C. Azpiazu, an Argentinean space scientist, has been selected to receive travel support to attend the 1991 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore under AGU's Latin American Visiting Geophysicist Program. In addition to presenting a paper at the meeting on [Analysis of Electron Density and Temperature Profiles in the E-Region on Geomagnetically Quiet Days,] Azpiazu plans to visit several universities and research institutions.Azpiazu is an assistant professor at the University of Buenos Aires and an assistant researcher at the Argentinean National Research Council. While in the United States she plans to visit Boston and Harvard Universities, MIT, Hanscom Air Force Base, and the University of Colorado.

  1. Students Request Supervisory Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Jewell

    1974-01-01

    The author stresses the importance of summer and regular school year visits to vocational agriculture student by the agriculture instructor as opportunities for both project advisement and personal counseling. (EA)

  2. Class Visit Short Cuts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofmann, Alice; Somerville, Mary

    1982-01-01

    Describes methods used by the Louisville Free Public Library's children's department to introduce the library's programs and services to elementary school children. Specific suggestions for one-person visitations are provided including pertinent book titles. (EJS)

  3. [The preoperative anaesthetic visit].

    PubMed

    Harms, Christoph; Kindler, Christoph H

    2009-07-01

    Anaesthetists often visit their patients in exceptional situations characterised by preoperative anxiety or distress. Therefore, even brief contact with the patient can be considered intense and meaningful. The initial preoperative anaesthetic visit is the beginning of the relationship between patient and anaesthetist, and should help to explain the planned anaesthetic technique. Preoperative anaesthetic visits are intense and last for 20 minutes on average. They should assert a professional approach to the patient's emotions, particularly to preoperative anxiety, and a structured and clear collection of information including the past history of the patient. These visits should also provide information about the anaesthesia itself and instructions for the patient with respect to the perioperative period. Communication about the side effects and risks of anaesthetic techniques, and the discussion of potential alternatives are mandatory. Worldwide, courts of law increasingly require a documented discussion between the anaesthetist and patient based on risk-benefit evidence. Today, there is in general a shift away from decisions made solely by physicians, reflecting an increased respect for the autonomy of the patient towards a model of shared decision-making and informed choice. Ideally, the preoperative visit follows the four key habits of highly effective clinicians, i.e., to rapidly establish a rapport with the patient and provide an agenda for the visit, to explore the patient's perspectives and expectations, to demonstrate empathy, and to focus on the end of the visit with providing information and including the patient in the decision-making process. Visits are then concluded upon obtaining informed consent from the patient. PMID:19565444

  4. FoxP2 brainstem neurons project to sodium appetite regulatory sites.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung-Won; Geerling, Joel C; Stein, Matthew K; Miller, Rebecca L; Loewy, Arthur D

    2011-09-01

    The transcription factor Forkhead box protein 2 (FoxP2) is expressed in two cell groups of the brainstem that have been implicated in sodium appetite regulation: the pre-locus coeruleus (pre-LC) and parabrachial nucleus--external lateral-inner subdivision (PBel-inner). Because the connections of these two groups are unknown, neuroanatomical tracing methods were used to define their central projections. The pre-LC outputs were first analyzed using an anterograde axonal tracer--Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) to construct a brain map. Next, we examined whether the FoxP2 immunoreactive (FoxP2+) neurons of the pre-LC contribute to these projections using a retrograde neuronal tracer--cholera toxin β-subunit (CTb). CTb was injected into selected brain regions identified in the anterograde tracing study. One week later the rats were killed, and brainstem sections were processed by a double immunohistochemical procedure to determine whether the FoxP2+ neurons in the pre-LC and/or PBel-inner contained CTb. FoxP2+ pre-LC neurons project to: (1) ventral pallidum; (2) substantia innominata and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; (3) paraventricular, central medial, parafascicular, and subparafascicular parvicellular thalamic nuclei; (4) paraventricular (PVH), lateral, perifornical, dorsomedial (DMH), and parasubthalamic hypothalamic nuclei; and (5) ventral tegmental area (VTA), periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), dorsal and central linear raphe nuclei. FoxP2+ PBel-inner neurons project to the PVH and DMH, with weaker connections to the LHA, VTA, and PAG. Both the pre-LC and PBel-inner project to central sites implicated in sodium appetite, and related issues, including foraging behavior, hedonic responses to salt intake, sodium balance, and cardiovascular regulation, are discussed.

  5. Using quality improvement to promote implementation and increase well child visits in home visiting.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Neera K; Ammerman, Robert T; Massie, Julie A; Clark, Margaret; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2016-03-01

    A key goal of home visiting is to connect children with medical homes through anticipatory guidance regarding recommended well child care (WCC). Substantial barriers to WCC among low socioeconomic families can limit achievement of this outcome. Quality improvement strategies have been widely adopted in healthcare but only recently implemented in home visiting to achieve program outcomes. The objective of this initiative was to increase the percentage of infants enrolled in home visiting who completed at least 3 recommended WCC visits in the first 6 months of life within a large, multi-model program comprised of 11 sites. A series of 33 quality improvement cycles were conducted at 3 sites involving 18 home visitors and 139 families with infants in the target age range. These were deployed sequentially, and changes within and across sites were monitored using trend charts over time. Adopted strategies were then implemented program-wide. Initiatives focused on staff training in WCC recommendations, data collection processes, monthly family tracking reports, and enhanced communication with primary care offices. Data were shared in iterative sessions to identify methods for improving adherence. Wide baseline variability across sites was observed, with the percentage of infants with recommended care ranging from 35% to 83%. Over the project timeline, the percentage of infants receiving at least 3 WCC visits in the first 6 months increased from 58% to 86%. Quality improvement within home visiting can be used to improve WCC adherence and provides an example of maximizing implementation of home visiting interventions. PMID:26699456

  6. Time Allocation in Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Tai-Seale, Ming; McGuire, Thomas G; Zhang, Weimin

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To use an innovative videotape analysis method to examine how clinic time was spent during elderly patients' visits to primary care physicians. Secondary objectives were to identify the factors that influence time allocations. Data Sources A convenience sample of 392 videotapes of routine office visits conducted between 1998 and 2000 from multiple primary care practices in the United States, supplemented by patient and physician surveys. Research Design Videotaped visits were examined for visit length and time devoted to specific topics—a novel approach to study time allocation. A survival analysis model analyzed the effects of patient, physician, and physician practice setting on how clinic time was spent. Principal Findings Very limited amount of time was dedicated to specific topics in office visits. The median visit length was 15.7 minutes covering a median of six topics. About 5 minutes were spent on the longest topic whereas the remaining topics each received 1.1 minutes. While time spent by patient and physician on a topic responded to many factors, length of the visit overall varied little even when contents of visits varied widely. Macro factors associated with each site had more influence on visit and topic length than the nature of the problem patients presented. Conclusions Many topics compete for visit time, resulting in small amount of time being spent on each topic. A highly regimented schedule might interfere with having sufficient time for patients with complex or multiple problems. Efforts to improve the quality of care need to recognize the time pressure on both patients and physicians, the effects of financial incentives, and the time costs of improving patient–physician interactions. PMID:17850524

  7. Predicting Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Sarah; Grannis, Shaun; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    High utilizers of emergency departments account for a disproportionate number of visits, often for nonemergency conditions. This study aims to identify these high users prospectively. Routinely recorded registration data from the Indiana Public Health Emergency Surveillance System was used to predict whether patients would revisit the Emergency Department within one month, three months, and six months of an index visit. Separate models were trained for each outcome period, and several predictive models were tested. Random Forest models had good performance and calibration for all outcome periods, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of at least 0.96. This high performance was found to be due to non-linear interactions among variables in the data. The ability to predict repeat emergency visits may provide an opportunity to establish, prioritize, and target interventions to ensure that patients have access to the care they require outside an emergency department setting. PMID:27570684

  8. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallvé, Santiago; Iglesias-Rozas, José R; Alonso, Ángel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2006-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR) of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs. PMID:16526953

  9. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  10. Home Weatherization Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  11. Malaysian Students Visit Thailand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Understanding at School, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Five students and one coordinator from the Unesco Associated Schools Project undertook a study visit to Bangkok to exchange views and experiences. Future joint projects/activities were discussed, and the students gained some insight into the life of their counterparts in Thailand. (RM)

  12. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  13. Revisiting High School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flagel, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    NACAC's anniversary is a great time to follow up on an article on high school visits, a topic of ongoing discussion in every admission and guidance office. The article highlights a variety of potential good outcomes that can be derived from collaborative interactions. Sadly, however, admission representatives are apt to be described by the…

  14. Pangeghtellghet (Visits to Siberia).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneshiro, Vera, Ed.

    This reader contains eight stories in St. Lawrence Island Yupik about visits by St. Lawrence Island people to their relatives and friends in Siberia over a quarter of a century ago. The book, which is intended for use in advanced levels of reading instruction, is part of a series of Siberian Yupik reading materials. (AMH)

  15. [Visiting the Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of "The Goldfinch: Iowa History for Young People" focuses upon the Amana Colonies, which were home to many German immigrants in the 19th century, and which retain much of their ethnic heritage today. The articles and activities included in this issue are "Amana Today"; "No Black Buggies in Amana"; "Visiting Tante Marie and Onkel…

  16. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

  17. Unusual Properties of Regulatory DNA from the Drosophila Engrailed Gene: Three ``pairing-Sensitive'' Sites within a 1.6-Kb Region

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 2-kb fragment of engrailed DNA can suppress expression of a linked marker gene, white, in the P element vector CaSpeR. This suppression is dependent on the presence of two copies of engrailed DNA-containing P elements (P[en]) in proximity in the Drosophila genome (either in cis or in trans). In this study, the 2-kb fragment was dissected and found to contain three fragments of DNA which could mediate white suppression [called ``pairing-sensitive sites'' (PS)]. A PS site was also identified in regulatory DNA from the Drosophila escargot gene. The eye colors of six different P[en] insertions in the escargot gene suggest an interaction between P[en]-encoded and genome-encoded PS sites. I hypothesize that white gene expression from P[en] is repressed by the formation of a protein complex which is initiated at the engrailed PS sites and also requires interactions with flanking genomic DNA. Genes were sought which influence the function of PS sites. Mutations in some Polycomb and trithorax group genes were found to affect the eye color from some P[en] insertion sites. However, different mutations affected expression from different P[en] insertion sites and no one mutation was found to affect expression from all P[en] insertion sites examined. These results suggest that white expression from P[en] is not directly regulated by members of the Polycomb and trithorax group genes, but in some cases can be influenced by them. I propose that engrailed PS sites normally act to promote interactions between distantly located engrailed regulatory sites and the engrailed promoter. PMID:8005412

  18. A Visit to Three Parisian School Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEB Exchange, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents brief site-visit reports of three Paris (France) public schools to study the planning and use of each school's library. Observations from an elementary, middle, and high school include the overall library design, book classification and access systems, technology use, budgeting, and librarian role. (GR)

  19. Regulatory SNPs and transcriptional factor binding sites in ADRBK1, AKT3, ATF3, DIO2, TBXA2R and VEGFA

    PubMed Central

    Buroker, Norman E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs) which change the transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBS) for transcriptional factors (TFs) to bind DNA were reviewed for the ADRBK1 (GRK2), AKT3, ATF3, DIO2, TBXA2R and VEGFA genes. Changes in the TFBS where TFs attach to regulate these genes may result in human sickness and disease. The highlights of this previous work were reviewed for these genes. PMID:25483406

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in the United States. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  1. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  2. 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  3. Iterative performance assessments as a regulatory tool for evaluating repository safety: How experiences from SKI Project-90 were used in formulating the new performance assessment project SITE-94

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, J.

    1993-12-31

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, regulatory research program has to prepare for the process of licensing a repository for spent nuclear fuel, by building up the necessary knowledge and review capacity. SKIs main strategy for meeting this demand is to develop an independent performance assessment capability. SKIs first own performance assessment project, Project-90, was completed in 1991 and is now followed by a new project, SITE-94. SITE-94 is based on conclusions reached within Project-90. An independent review of Project-90, carried out by a NEA team of experts, has also contributed to the formation of the project. Another important reason for the project is that the implementing organization in Sweden, SKB, has proposed to submit an application to start detailed investigation of a repository candidate site around 1997. SITE-94 is a performance assessment of a hypothetical repository at a real site. The main objective of the project is to determine how site specific data should be assimilated into the performance assessment process, and to evaluate how uncertainties inherent in site characterization will influence performance assessment results. This will be addressed by exploring multiple interpretations, conceptual models, and parameters consistent with the site data. The site evaluation will strive for consistency between geological, hydrological, rock mechanical, and geochemical descriptions. Other important elements of SITE-94 are the development of a practical and defensible methodology for defining, constructing and analyzing scenarios, the development of approaches for treatment of uncertainties, evaluation of canister integrity, and the development and application of an appropriate quality assurance plan for performance assessments.

  4. Emergency department visit volume variability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective One of the most important and basic variables in emergency department (ED) operations is patient visit volumes. This variable is usually predicted on the basis of the average ED patient visit volume over a certain period. However, ED patient visit variability is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated ED patient visit variability in order to determine if the average can be used to operate EDs. Methods Nationwide ED patient visit data were from the standard emergency patient data of the National Emergency Department Information System. The data are transferred automatically by 141 EDs nationwide. The hourly ED visit volumes over 365 days were determined, and the variability was analyzed to evaluate the representativeness of the average. Results A total of 4,672,275 patient visits were collected in 2013. The numbers of daily ED patient visits were widely dispersed and positively skewed rather than symmetric and narrow with a normal distribution. Conclusion The daily variability of ED visit is too large and it did not show normal distribution. The average visit volume does not adequately represent ED operation. PMID:27752589

  5. The NORM technology connection web site : streamlined access to NORM-related service company and regulatory information.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. P.; Richmond, P.; LePoire, D. J.; Arnish, J. J.; Johnson, R.

    2000-11-08

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an Internet web site providing access to critical information needed to support decisions on the management and disposal of wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The NORM Technology Connection web site provides current information on (1) service companies that provide support on NORM issues (e.g., site characterization and remediation, sample analysis, radiation safety training, disposal) and (2) existing applicable NORM regulations and guidelines. A third element of the site is an electronic mail list that allows users to post or respond to questions about the management of NORM. Development of the NORM Technology Connection web site was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. It is hosted and maintained by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The web site is publicly available; access is free, as is participation by any of the service companies.

  6. Groundwater contamination from waste management sites: The interaction between risk-based engineering design and regulatory policy: 1. Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, Joel; Freeze, R. Allan

    1987-02-01

    This paper puts in place a risk-cost-benefit analysis for waste management facilities that explicitly recognizes the adversarial relationship that exists in a regulated market economy between the owner/operator of a waste management facility and the government regulatory agency under whose terms the facility must be licensed. The risk-cost-benefit analysis is set up from the perspective of the owner/operator. It can be used directly by the owner/operator to assess alternative design strategies. It can also be used by the regulatory agency to assess alternative regulatory policy, but only in an indirect manner, by examining the response of an owner/operator to the stimuli of various policies. The objective function is couched in terms of a discounted stream of benefits, costs, and risks over an engineering time horizon. Benefits are in the form of revenues for services provided; costs are those of construction and operation of the facility. Risk is defined as the cost associated with the probability of failure, with failure defined as the occurrence of a groundwater contamination event that violates the licensing requirements established for the facility. Failure requires a breach of the containment structure and contaminant migration through the hydrogeological environment to a compliance surface. The probability of failure can be estimated on the basis of reliability theory for the breach of containment and with a Monte-Carlo finite-element simulation for the advective contaminant transport. In the hydrogeological environment the hydraulic conductivity values are defined stochastically. The probability of failure is reduced by the presence of a monitoring network operated by the owner/operator and located between the source and the regulatory compliance surface. The level of reduction in the probability of failure depends on the probability of detection of the monitoring network, which can be calculated from the stochastic contaminant transport simulations. While

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  8. Scheduling the Remediation of Port Hope: Logistical and Regulatory Challenges of a Multiple Site Urban Remediation Project - 13119

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson Jones, Andrea; Lee, Angela; Palmeter, Tim

    2013-07-01

    The Port Hope Project is part of the larger CAN$1.28 billion Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), a community-based program for the development and implementation of a safe, local, long-term management solution for historic Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) in the Municipalities of Port Hope and Clarington, Ontario, Canada. Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is the Project Proponent, Public Works and Government Services (PWGSC) is managing the procurement of services and the MMM Group Limited - Conestoga Rovers and Associates Joint Venture (MMM-CRA Joint Venture) is providing detailed design and construction oversight and administration services for the Project. The Port Hope Project includes the construction of a long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) in the Municipality of Port Hope and the remediation of 18 (eighteen) large-scale LLRW, numerous small-scale sites still being identified and industrial sites within the Municipality. The total volume to be remediated is over one million cubic metres and will come from sites that include temporary storage sites, ravines, beaches, parks, private commercial and residential properties and vacant industrial sites all within the urban area of Port Hope. Challenges that will need to be overcome during this 10 year project include: - Requirements stipulated by the Environmental Assessment (EA) that affect Project logistics and schedule. - Coordination of site remediation with the construction schedule at the LTWMF. - Physical constraints on transport routes and at sites affecting production rates. - Despite being an urban undertaking, seasonal constrains for birds and fish (i.e., nesting and spawning seasons). - Municipal considerations. - Site-specific constraints. - Site interdependencies exist requiring consideration in the schedule. Several sites require the use of an adjacent site for staging. (authors)

  9. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Wastes at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lach, Denise

    2005-06-01

    We have spent this first part of the project preparing background material for conference participants and making arrangements for the conference itself. Material regarding state regulatory constraints to the use of bioremediation in the cleanup of radionuclides and heavy metals at DOE sites around the country has been added to the Bioremediation Briefing paper for participants. The Steering Committee has been formulated and will hold their first meeting via phone conference on Monday, September 13, 2005. On the agenda is identification of conference participants, experts, and initial issues likely to be addressed. Human Subjects approval has been secured from the University. The ''pre-test'' has been developed and is ready to implement. The Consensus Conference will be held in Phoenix, AZ during January and February 2005; we are working with the Chamber of Commerce to find an appropriate site.

  10. Visit a Farm? Surely Not!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Popular myth has it that visiting a farm can be dangerous, but there are only a few occasions when children have become ill during a school visit to a farm. Simple, sensible precautions, including wearing appropriate clothing, such as trousers and wellington boots (if wet) or sensible shoes, and careful hand-washing, are all that is required. The…

  11. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  12. Free Energy Landscape of Lipid Interactions with Regulatory Binding Sites on the Transmembrane Domain of the EGF Receptor.

    PubMed

    Hedger, George; Shorthouse, David; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-25

    Lipid molecules can bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins, modulating their structure and function. We have undertaken coarse-grained simulations to calculate free energy profiles for glycolipids and phospholipids interacting with modulatory sites on the transmembrane helix dimer of the EGF receptor within a lipid bilayer environment. We identify lipid interaction sites at each end of the transmembrane domain and compute interaction free energy profiles for lipids with these sites. Interaction free energies ranged from ca. -40 to -4 kJ/mol for different lipid species. Those lipids (glycolipid GM3 and phosphoinositide PIP2) known to modulate EGFR function exhibit the strongest binding to interaction sites on the EGFR, and we are able to reproduce the preference for interaction with GM3 over other glycolipids suggested by experiment. Mutation of amino acid residues essential for EGFR function reduce the binding free energy of these key lipid species. The residues interacting with the lipids in the simulations are in agreement with those suggested by experimental (mutational) studies. This approach provides a generalizable tool for characterizing the interactions of lipids that bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins.

  13. Free Energy Landscape of Lipid Interactions with Regulatory Binding Sites on the Transmembrane Domain of the EGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid molecules can bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins, modulating their structure and function. We have undertaken coarse-grained simulations to calculate free energy profiles for glycolipids and phospholipids interacting with modulatory sites on the transmembrane helix dimer of the EGF receptor within a lipid bilayer environment. We identify lipid interaction sites at each end of the transmembrane domain and compute interaction free energy profiles for lipids with these sites. Interaction free energies ranged from ca. −40 to −4 kJ/mol for different lipid species. Those lipids (glycolipid GM3 and phosphoinositide PIP2) known to modulate EGFR function exhibit the strongest binding to interaction sites on the EGFR, and we are able to reproduce the preference for interaction with GM3 over other glycolipids suggested by experiment. Mutation of amino acid residues essential for EGFR function reduce the binding free energy of these key lipid species. The residues interacting with the lipids in the simulations are in agreement with those suggested by experimental (mutational) studies. This approach provides a generalizable tool for characterizing the interactions of lipids that bind to specific sites on integral membrane proteins. PMID:27109430

  14. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  15. Manual of Procedures for Evaluation Visits under Standards for Accreditation, 1972. Revised 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL. Committee on Accreditation.

    This fully revised manual of procedures for evaluation visits presents guidelines for site visits to library schools seeking accreditation for their programs of study. Visits to such schools provide the Committee on Accreditation with data to assist in reaching a judgment whether to grant accredited status. The area of responsibility for the…

  16. Functional analysis of the BRI1 receptor kinase by Thr-for-Ser substitution in a regulatory autophosphorylation site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BRI1 becomes highly phosphorylated in vivo upon perception of the ligand, brassinolide, as a result of autophosphorylation and transphosphorylation by its co-receptor kinase, BAK1. Important autophosphorylation sites include those involved in activation of kinase activity and those that are inhibito...

  17. CONREAL: conserved regulatory elements anchored alignment algorithm for identification of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic footprinting.

    PubMed

    Berezikov, Eugene; Guryev, Victor; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Cuppen, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of transcription-factor target sites in promoters remains difficult due to the short length and degeneracy of the target sequences. Although the use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches may help in the recognition of conserved and potentially functional sequences, correct alignment of the short transcription-factor binding sites can be problematic for established algorithms, especially when aligning more divergent species. Here, we report a novel phylogenetic footprinting approach, CONREAL, that uses biologically relevant information, that is, potential transcription-factor binding sites as represented by positional weight matrices, to establish anchors between orthologous sequences and to guide promoter sequence alignment. Comparison of the performance of CONREAL with the global alignment programs LAGAN and AVID using a reference data set, shows that CONREAL performs equally well for closely related species like rodents and human, and has a clear added value for aligning promoter elements of more divergent species like human and fish, as it identifies conserved transcription-factor binding sites that are not found by other methods. CONREAL is accessible via a Web interface at http://conreal.niob.knaw.nl/.

  18. Visit to Shikhany, 1987. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-29

    In August 1987, the Soviet Union invited participants in the chemical weapons negotiations at the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva to visit the Soviet military chemical facility at Shikhany. The presentation at Shikhany of chemical weapons and of weapon destruction took place on 3 and 4 October 1987. Six members of the US delegation attended. The presentation provided unclassified information on seven chemical agents or agent composites and nineteen weapons for delivery of chemical agents. This report provides a ready reference to the information obtained from the Shikhany visit. Information is included on principal agent types and weapons types. Shikhany is the site of a Soviet military facility and is located in the Volsk district nine hundred kilometers southeast of Moscow, and lies northwest of and adjacent to the Volga river. This report provides descriptions of the chemical munitions displayed for the visitors, the chemical agents for use in the munitions, and Soviet chemical agent demilitarization.

  19. United States-Russia exchange visits

    SciTech Connect

    Desmond, W.J.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Zack, N.R.; Martin, H.R.; Gardner, B.; Schlegel, S.; Von Hippel, F.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy, under a government-to-government program, hosted the first visit with the Russian Federation to exchange information and technologies for special nuclear material control, accounting, and physical protection at a plutonium storage facility. The Russian specialists toured a storage facility at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, and were shown the physical protection and materials control systems that DOE employs to protect excess nuclear materials. Technical discussions included topics associated with protective forces and their operation, perimeter and interior intrusion detection and assessment equipment/systems, vulnerability assessment demonstrations, and the vault monitoring and materials control systems. In October, the Russian Federation hosted a reciprocal visit to the Mayak Enterprise civil plutonium storage facility, previously known as Chelyabinsk-65. The US specialists participated in technical discussions on the protection and control of plutonium and supported an evaluation of safeguards and security at the Mayak storage facility.

  20. 28 CFR 540.46 - Attorney visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney visits. 540.46 Section 540.46... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.46 Attorney visits. Requirements for attorney visits... chapter). Provisions pertinent to attorney visits for pretrial inmates are contained in § 551.117 of...

  1. Regulatory acceptance of the proposed well abandonment program for the present landfill, Operable Unit 7, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    The regulatory agencies approved a well abandonment program for the Present Landfill, Operable Unit (OU) 7 at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, only three months after preparation. The proposed well abandonment program consists of abandoning 26 of the 54 existing monitoring wells in OU 7 that are currently sampled quarterly as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) compliance wells or sitewide groundwater protection wells. Well abandonment was proposed on the basis that the purpose of each well has been fulfilled, the wells fall under the footprint of the landfill cap, the presence of the wells would compromise the integrity of the cap because holes would have to be cut in the synthetic liner, and unequal compaction of the fill material around the wells would potentially cause differential settlement of the cap. The proposal provided the technical justification to abandon the wells in place. The timely approval of the proposal by the regulatory agencies will allow the abandonment of the wells during fiscal year 1995 under the sitewide Well Abandonment and Replacement Program (WARP). Cost savings resulting from a decrease in the number of wells to be sampled under the groundwater monitoring program are estimated at $416,000 per year. This paper presents a summary of the well abandonment program, discusses the timely approvals required for implementation, and present the potential cost savings that can be achieved through implementation of the program.

  2. HIV-1 splicing is controlled by local RNA structure and binding of splicing regulatory proteins at the major 5' splice site.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2015-07-01

    The 5' leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome contains the major 5' splice site (ss) that is used in the production of the many spliced viral RNAs. This splice-donor (SD) region can fold into a stable stem-loop structure and the thermodynamic stability of this RNA hairpin influences splicing efficiency. In addition, splicing may be modulated by binding of splicing regulatory (SR) proteins, in particular SF2/ASF (SRSF1), SC35 (SRSF2), SRp40 (SRSF5) and SRp55 (SRSF6), to sequence elements in the SD region. The role of RNA structure and SR protein binding in splicing control was previously studied by functional analysis of mutant SD sequences. The interpretation of these studies was complicated by the fact that most mutations simultaneously affect both structure and sequence elements. We therefore tried to disentangle the contribution of these two variables by designing more precise SD region mutants with a single effect on either the sequence or the structure. The current analysis indicates that HIV-1 splicing at the major 5'ss is modulated by both the stability of the local RNA structure and the binding of splicing regulatory proteins. PMID:25779589

  3. Mapping the ribosomal protein S7 regulatory binding site on mRNA of the E. coli streptomycin operon.

    PubMed

    Surdina, A V; Rassokhin, T I; Golovin, A V; Spiridonova, V A; Kopylov, A M

    2010-07-01

    In this work it is shown by deletion analysis that an intercistronic region (ICR) approximately 80 nucleotides in length is necessary for interaction with recombinant E. coli S7 protein (r6hEcoS7). A model is proposed for the interaction of S7 with two ICR sites-region of hairpin bifurcations and Shine-Dalgarno sequence of cistron S7. A de novo RNA binding site for heterologous S7 protein of Thermus thermophilus (r6hTthS7) was constructed by selection of a combinatorial RNA library based on E. coli ICR: it has only a single supposed protein recognition site in the region of bifurcation. The SERW technique was used for selection of two intercistronic RNA libraries in which five nucleotides of a double-stranded region, adjacent to the bifurcation, had the randomized sequence. One library contained an authentic AG (-82/-20) pair, while in the other this pair was replaced by AU. A serwamer capable of specific binding to r6hTthS7 was selected; it appeared to be the RNA68 mutant with eight nucleotide mutations. The serwamer binds to r6hTthS7 with the same affinity as homologous authentic ICR of str mRNA binds to r6hEcoS7; apparent dissociation constants are 89 +/- 43 and 50 +/- 24 nM, respectively.

  4. Skylab mission report, third visit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of the operational and engineering aspects of the third Skylab visit, including information on the performance of the command and service module and the experiment hardware, the crew's evaluation of the visit, and other visit-related areas of interest such as biomedical observations. The specific areas discussed are contained in the following: (1) solar physics and astrophysics investigations; (2) Comet Kohoutek experiments; (3) medical experiments; (4) earth observations, including data for the multispectral photographic facility, the earth terrain camera, and the microwave radiometer/scattermometer and altimeter; (5) engineering and technology experiments; (6) food and medical operational equipment; (7) hardware and experiment anomalies; and (8) mission support, mission objectives, flight planning, and launch phase summary. Conclusions discussed as a result of the third visit to Skylab involve the advancement of the sciences, practical applications, the durability of man and systems in space, and spaceflight effectiveness and economy.

  5. Astronaut Steve Swanson Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Tuesday, 3 March 2015, a special guest visited NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during his time back on Earth. Steven Swanson, NASA astronaut, intrigued the audience by highlighting his adventur...

  6. Tests and visits before surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Before surgery - tests; Before surgery - doctor visits ... Pre-op is the time before your surgery. It means "before operation." During this time, you will meet with one of your doctors. This may be your surgeon or primary care ...

  7. Preparing for an Office Visit

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Neurologist Preparing for an Office Visit Your Rights as a Patient Family & Friends Communities Research Matters Donate Clinical Trials Animal Research Resources Neurology Now Magazine Patient Education Brochures ...

  8. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  9. Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamm, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicle Group needed a targeting tool for vehicles that rendezvous with the ISS. The Visiting Vehicle Ground Trajectory targeting tool provides the ability to perform both realtime and planning operations for the Visiting Vehicle Group. This tool provides a highly reconfigurable base, which allows the Visiting Vehicle Group to perform their work. The application is composed of a telemetry processing function, a relative motion function, a targeting function, a vector view, and 2D/3D world map type graphics. The software tool provides the ability to plan a rendezvous trajectory for vehicles that visit the ISS. It models these relative trajectories using planned and realtime data from the vehicle. The tool monitors ongoing rendezvous trajectory relative motion, and ensures visiting vehicles stay within agreed corridors. The software provides the ability to update or re-plan a rendezvous to support contingency operations. Adding new parameters and incorporating them into the system was previously not available on-the-fly. If an unanticipated capability wasn't discovered until the vehicle was flying, there was no way to update things.

  10. Lessons Learned from WIPP Site Characteriztion, Performance Assessment, and Regulatory Review Related to Radionuclide Migration through Water-Conducting Features

    SciTech Connect

    Beauheim, R.L.: Larson. K.W.

    1998-11-11

    Many lessons have been learned over the past 24 years as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project has progressed from initial site characterization to final licensing that may be of relevance to other nuclear-waste-disposal projects. These lessons pertain to the manner in which field and laboratory investigations are planned, how experiments are interpreted, how conceptual and numerical models are developed and simplified~ and how defensibility and credibility are achieved and maintained. These lessons include 1) Site characterization and performance assessment (PA) should evolve together through an iterative process, with neither activity completely dominating the other. 2) Defensibility and credibility require a much greater depth of understanding than can be represented in PA models. 3) Experimentalists should be directly involved in model and parameter abstraction and simplification for PA. 4) External expert review should be incorporated at all stages of a project~ not just after an experiment or modeling activity is completed. 5) Key individuals should be retained for the life of a project or a process must be established to transfer their working knowledge to new individuals. 6) An effective QA program needs to be stable and consistent for the duration of a project and rests on best scientific practices. All of these lessons relate to the key point that consideration must be given from the earliest planning stages to maximizing the defensibility and credibility of all work.

  11. Interactions between Copper-binding Sites Determine the Redox Status and Conformation of the Regulatory N-terminal Domain of ATP7B*

    PubMed Central

    LeShane, Erik S.; Shinde, Ujwal; Walker, Joel M.; Barry, Amanda N.; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Ralle, Martina; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Copper-transporting ATPase ATP7B is essential for human copper homeostasis and normal liver function. ATP7B has six N-terminal metal-binding domains (MBDs) that sense cytosolic copper levels and regulate ATP7B. The mechanism of copper sensing and signal integration from multiple MBDs is poorly understood. We show that MBDs communicate and that this communication determines the oxidation state and conformation of the entire N-terminal domain of ATP7B (N-ATP7B). Mutations of copper-coordinating Cys to Ala in any MBD (2, 3, 4, or 6) change the N-ATP7B conformation and have distinct functional consequences. Mutating MBD2 or MBD3 causes Cys oxidation in other MBDs and loss of copper binding. In contrast, mutation of MBD4 and MBD6 does not alter the redox status and function of other sites. Our results suggest that MBD2 and MBD3 work together to regulate access to other metal-binding sites, whereas MBD4 and MBD6 receive copper independently, downstream of MBD2 and MBD3. Unlike Ala substitutions, the Cys-to-Ser mutation in MBD2 preserves the conformation and reduced state of N-ATP7B, suggesting that hydrogen bonds contribute to interdomain communications. Tight coupling between MBDs suggests a mechanism by which small changes in individual sites (induced by copper binding or mutation) result in stabilization of distinct conformations of the entire N-ATP7B and altered exposure of sites for interactions with regulatory proteins. PMID:20032459

  12. Using a Consensus Conference to Characterize Regulatory Concerns Regarding Bioremediation of Radionuclides and Heavy Metals in Mixed Waste at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Denise Lach; Stephanie Sanford

    2006-09-01

    A consensus workshop was developed and convened with ten state regulators to characterize concerns regarding emerging bioremediation technology to be used to clean-up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at US DOE sites. Two questions were explored: integrated questions: (1) What impact does participation in a consensus workshop have on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of state regulators regarding bioremediation technology? (2) How effective is a consensus workshop as a strategy for eliciting and articulating regulators’ concerns regarding the use of bioremediation to clean up radionuclides and heavy metals in mixed wastes at U.S. Department of Energy Sites around the county? State regulators met together for five days over two months to learn about bioremediation technology and develop a consensus report of their recommendations regarding state regulatory concerns. In summary we found that panel members: - quickly grasped the science related to bioremediation and were able to effectively interact with scientists working on complicated issues related to the development and implementation of the technology; - are generally accepting of in situ bioremediation, but concerned about costs, implementation (e.g., institutional controls), and long-term effectiveness of the technology; - are concerned equally about technological and implementation issues; and - believed that the consensus workshop approach to learning about bioremediation was appropriate and useful. Finally, regulators wanted decision makers at US DOE to know they are willing to work with DOE regarding innovative approaches to clean-up at their sites, and consider a strong relationship between states and the DOE as critical to any effective clean-up. They do not want perceive themselves to be and do not want others to perceive them as barriers to successful clean-up at their sites.

  13. HMGN proteins modulate chromatin regulatory sites and gene expression during activation of naïve B cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaofei; Zhu, Iris; Deng, Tao; Furusawa, Takashi; Rochman, Mark; Vacchio, Melanie S.; Bosselut, Remy; Yamane, Arito; Casellas, Rafael; Landsman, David; Bustin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The activation of naïve B lymphocyte involves rapid and major changes in chromatin organization and gene expression; however, the complete repertoire of nuclear factors affecting these genomic changes is not known. We report that HMGN proteins, which bind to nucleosomes and affect chromatin structure and function, co-localize with, and maintain the intensity of DNase I hypersensitive sites genome wide, in resting but not in activated B cells. Transcription analyses of resting and activated B cells from wild-type and Hmgn−/− mice, show that loss of HMGNs dampens the magnitude of the transcriptional response and alters the pattern of gene expression during the course of B-cell activation; defense response genes are most affected at the onset of activation. Our study provides insights into the biological function of the ubiquitous HMGN chromatin binding proteins and into epigenetic processes that affect the fidelity of the transcriptional response during the activation of B cell lymphocytes. PMID:27112571

  14. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Chandler, Madison R.; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R.; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A.; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl− transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  15. Regulatory domain or CpG site variation in SLC12A5, encoding the chloride transporter KCC2, in human autism and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Chandler, Madison R; Bourassa, Cynthia; Liang, Bo; Khanna, Arjun R; Dion, Patrick; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2015-01-01

    Many encoded gene products responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs) like autism spectrum disorders (ASD), schizophrenia (SCZ), intellectual disability (ID), and idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) converge on networks controlling synaptic function. An increase in KCC2 (SLC12A5) Cl(-) transporter activity drives the developmental GABA excitatory-inhibitory sequence, but the role of KCC2 in human NDs is essentially unknown. Here, we report two rare, non-synonymous (NS), functionally-impairing variants in the KCC2 C-terminal regulatory domain (CTRD) in human ASD (R952H and R1049C) and SCZ (R952H) previously linked with IGE and familial febrile seizures, and another novel NS KCC2 variant in ASD (R1048W) with highly-predicted pathogenicity. Exome data from 2517 simplex families in the ASD Simon Simplex Collection (SSC) revealed significantly more KCC2 CTRD variants in ASD cases than controls, and interestingly, these were more often synonymous and predicted to disrupt or introduce a CpG site. Furthermore, full gene analysis showed ASD cases are more likely to contain rare KCC2 variants affecting CpG sites than controls. These data suggest genetically-encoded dysregulation of KCC2-dependent GABA signaling may contribute to multiple human NDs. PMID:26528127

  16. Savannah River Site Public and Regulatory Involvement in the Cercla Low-Level Waste (LLW) Program and Their Effect on Decisions to Dispose of LLW Generated by Cercla

    SciTech Connect

    Belencan, H.

    2008-07-01

    The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public, federal and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of LLW generated from CERCLA Removal and Remedial Actions. At SRS the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) project has generated large amounts of LLW from the removal of buildings and processing facilities. The D and D project is expected to generate even larger amounts of LLW in the future. The most cost effective disposal alternated is to use the onsite LLW disposal facility in E-Area. The E-Area LLW Facility is owned and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its authority granted by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Since the disposal of CERCLA generated waste is also governed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CERCLA regulations, it is important that EPA, DOE, and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) work together to resolve any conflicts in implementation of the D and D project so that all regulations are followed and the project can be continued successfully. An issue of particular significance will be described in this paper that, were it not resolved successfully, would have jeopardized the completion of one project and resulted in higher overall project costs. The EPA determined in review of

  17. Insights into structural and regulatory roles of Sec16 in COPII vesicle formation at ER exit sites

    PubMed Central

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken

    2012-01-01

    COPII-coated buds are formed at endoplasmic reticulum exit sites (ERES) to mediate ER-to-Golgi transport. Sec16 is an essential factor in ERES formation, as well as in COPII-mediated traffic in vivo. Sec16 interacts with multiple COPII proteins, although the functional significance of these interactions remains unknown. Here we present evidence that full-length Sec16 plays an important role in regulating Sar1 GTPase activity at the late steps of COPII vesicle formation. We show that Sec16 interacts with Sec23 and Sar1 through its C-terminal conserved region and hinders the ability of Sec31 to stimulate Sec23 GAP activity toward Sar1. We also find that purified Sec16 alone can self-assemble into homo-oligomeric complexes on a planar lipid membrane. These features ensure prolonged COPII coat association within a preformed Sec16 cluster, which may lead to the formation of ERES. Our results indicate a mechanistic relationship between COPII coat assembly and ERES formation. PMID:22675024

  18. Overlapping protein-binding sites within a negative regulatory element modulate the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon-Limas, D.E.; Amaya-Manzanares, E.; Nino-Rosales, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene, whose deficiency in humans causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain, the significance and mechanism of which is unknown. Towards dissecting this molecular mechanism, we have previously identified a 182 bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human HPRT gene which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and RNAase protection assays. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60 bp region which, when tested by transient transfections in cultured fibroblasts, functioned as a repressor element. Methylation interference footprinting revealed a minimal unique DNA motif as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and non-neuronal sources. Moreover, UV-crosslinking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several distinct proteins. Strikingly, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the association of these two complexes. These data suggest that differential formation of DNA-protein complexes at this regulatory domain could be a major determinant in the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene.

  19. Visitation arrangements for impaired parents.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen A; Street, David F

    2011-07-01

    Forensic mental health professionals are frequently asked to evaluate the parenting skills of divorcing parents because the court seeks help in determining the custody, visitation, and parenting time arrangements for the children. When one of the parents is impaired, the court wants to know the way to help the children have a good relationship with that parent and keep the children safe. There is little empirical research to answer such questions. In this article, the authors describe their methodology for providing useful clinical information to the court to help guide their decisions regarding visitation with impaired parents.

  20. Stennis visits Lake Cormorant school

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Alexis Harry, assistant director of Astro Camp at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, talks with students at Lake Cormorant (Miss.) Elementary School during a 'Living and Working in Space' presentation March 30. Stennis hosted the school presentation during a visit to the Oxford area. Harry, who also is a high school biology teacher in Slidell, La., spent time discussing space travel with students and answering questions they had about the experience, including queries about how astronauts eat, sleep and drink in space. The presentation was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis. For more information about NASA education initiatives, visit: http://education.ssc.nasa.gov/.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Arizona. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is one of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United States and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. This report describes laws and regulatory programs in Arizona. The Arizona state constitution establishes the Arizona Corporation Commission to regulate public service corporations. Within the area of its jurisdiction, the Commission has exclusive power and may not be interfered with by the legislature except in one narrow instance as described in the case Corporation Commission v. Pacific Greyhound Lines.

  2. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  3. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  4. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  5. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  6. 28 CFR 540.47 - Media visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Media visits. 540.47 Section 540.47... PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.47 Media visits. Requirements for media visits are governed by the provisions on contact with news media (see subpart E of this part). A media...

  7. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains original…

  8. Visiting School Campuses: Reporter Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Spending time in schools and classrooms can be one of the best ways for novice reporters to dive into the education beat, and for veteran journalists to find fresh inspiration. While it is certainly not necessary for every story, education journalists should try their best to make time to visit schools. Classroom observations and campus tours help…

  9. A Modern Visit to Galileo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the author's visit to the Italian cities where Galileo lived. Discusses the legendary swinging Cathedral lamp and the Leaning Tower of Pisa. Describes the science apparatus used by Galileo and other men of science which appear in the Museum of the History of Science in Florence. Presents six pictures of items viewed within the museum.…

  10. Regulatory Requirements and Technical Analysis for Department of Energy Regulated Performance Assessments of Shallow-Trench Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B.; Black, P.; Tauxe, J.; Yucel, V.; Rawlinson, S.; Colarusso, A.; DiSanza, F.

    2001-12-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) operates and maintains two active facilities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that dispose Department of Energy (DOE) defense-generated low-level radioactive (LLW), mixed radioactive, and classified waste in shallow trenches, pits and large-diameter boreholes. The operation and maintenance of the LLW disposal sites are self-regulated under DOE Order 435.1, which requires review of a Performance Assessment for four performance objectives: 1) all pathways 25 mrem/yr limit; 2) atmospheric pathways 10 mrem/yr limit; 3) radon flux density of 20 pCi/m2/s; and 4) groundwater resource protection (Safe Drinking Water Act; 4 mrem/yr limit). The inadvertent human intruder is protected under a dual 500- and 100-mrem limit (acute and chronic exposure). In response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 92 2, a composite analysis is required that must examine all interacting sources for compliance against both 30 and 100 mrem/yr limits. A small component of classified transuranic waste is buried at intermediate depths in 3-meter diameter boreholes at the Area 5 LLW disposal facility and is assessed through DOE-agreement against the requirements of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s 40 CFR 191. The hazardous components of mixed LLW are assessed against RCRA requirements. The NTS LLW sites fall directly under three sets of federal regulations and the regulatory differences result not only in organizational challenges, but also in different decision objectives and technical paths to completion. The DOE regulations require deterministic analysis for a 1,000-year compliance assessment supplemented by probabilistic analysis under a long-term maintenance program. The EPA regulations for TRU waste are probabilistically based for a compliance interval of 10,000 years. Multiple steps in the assessments are strongly dependent on assumptions for long-term land use policies

  11. A site-specific, single-copy transgenesis strategy to identify 5' regulatory sequences of the mouse testis-determining gene Sry.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Alexander; Kashimada, Kenichi; Davidson, Tara-Lynne; Ng, Ee Ting; Chawengsaksophak, Kallayanee; Bowles, Josephine; Koopman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Y-chromosomal gene SRY acts as the primary trigger for male sex determination in mammalian embryos. Correct regulation of SRY is critical: aberrant timing or level of Sry expression is known to disrupt testis development in mice and we hypothesize that mutations that affect regulation of human SRY may account for some of the many cases of XY gonadal dysgenesis that currently remain unexplained. However, the cis-sequences involved in regulation of Sry have not been identified, precluding a test of this hypothesis. Here, we used a transgenic mouse approach aimed at identifying mouse Sry 5' flanking regulatory sequences within 8 kb of the Sry transcription start site (TSS). To avoid problems associated with conventional pronuclear injection of transgenes, we used a published strategy designed to yield single-copy transgene integration at a defined, transcriptionally open, autosomal locus, Col1a1. None of the Sry transgenes tested was expressed at levels compatible with activation of Sox9 or XX sex reversal. Our findings indicate either that the Col1a1 locus does not provide an appropriate context for the correct expression of Sry transgenes, or that the cis-sequences required for Sry expression in the developing gonads lie beyond 8 kb 5' of the TSS.

  12. CArG boxes in the human cardiac. cap alpha. -actin gene are core binding sites for positive trans-acting regulatory factors

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, T.; Boxer, L.M.; Kedes, L.

    1987-10-01

    Positively acting, rate-limiting regulatory factors that influence tissue-specific expression of the human cardiac ..cap alpha..-actin gene in a mouse muscle cell line are shown by in vivo competition and gel mobility-shift assays to bind to upstream regions of its promoter but to neither vector DNA not a ..beta..-globin promoter. Although the two binding regions are distinctly separated, each corresponds to a cis region required for muscle-specific transcriptional stimulation, and each contains a core CC(A+T-rich)/sub 6/GC sequence (designated CArG box), which is found in the promoter regions of several muscle-associated genes. Each site has an apparently different binding affinity for trans-acting factors, which may explain the different transcriptional stimulation activities of the two cis regions. Therefore, the authors conclude that the two CArG box regions are responsible for muscle-specific transcriptional activity of the cardiac ..cap alpha..-actin gene through a mechanism that involves their binding of a positive trans-acting factor in muscle cells.

  13. Regulatory and institutional issues impending cleanup at US Department of Energy sites: Perspectives gained from an office of environmental restoration workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, W E; Gephart, J M; Gephart, R E; Quinn, R D; Stevenson, L A

    1991-05-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) nuclear weapons and energy operations are conducted across a nation-wide industrial complex engaged in a variety of manufacturing, processing, testing, and research and development activities. The overall mission of DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is to protect workers, the public, and the environment from waste materials generated by past, current, and future DOE activities and to bring the DOE complex into compliance with all applicable laws, regulations, and agreements related to health, safety, and the environment. EM addresses this broad mandate through related and interdependent programs that include corrective actions, waste operations, environmental restoration, and technology development. The EM Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) recognizes the importance of implementing a complex-wide process to identify and resolve those issues that may impede progress towards site cleanup. As a first step in this process, FM-40 sponsored an exercise to identify and characterize major regulatory and institutional issues and to formulate integrated action steps towards their resolution. This report is the first product of that exercise. It is intended that the exercise described here will mark the beginning of an ongoing process of issue identification, tracking, and resolution that will benefit cleanup activities across the DOE complex.

  14. Characterizing Primary Care Visit Activities at Veterans Health Administration Clinics.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jennifer C; Terwiesch, Christian; Pelak, Mary; Pettit, Amy R; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Medical home models seek to increase efficiency and maximize the use of resources by ensuring that all care team members work at the top of their licenses. We sought to break down primary care office visits into measurable activities to better under stand how primary care providers (PCPs) currently spend visit time and to provide insight into potential opportunities for revision or redistribution of healthcare tasks. We videotaped 27 PCPs during office visits with 121 patients at four Veterans Health Administration medical centers. Based on patterns emerging from the data, we identified a taxonomy of 12 provider activity categories that enabled us to quantify the frequency and duration of activities occurring during routine primary care visits. We conducted descriptive and multivariate analyses to examine associations between visit characteristics and provider and clinic characteristics. We found that PCPs spent the greatest percentage of their visit time discussing existing conditions (20%), discussing new conditions (18%), record keeping (13%), and examining patients (13%). Providers spent the smallest percentage of time on preventive care and coordination of care. Mean visit length was 22.9 minutes (range 7.9-58.0 minutes). Site-level ratings of medical home implementation were not associated with differences in how visit time was spent. These data provide a window into how PCPs are spending face-to-face time with patients. The methodology and taxonomy presented here may prove useful for future quality improvement and research endeavors, particularly those focused on opportunities to increase nonappointment care and to ensure that team members work at the top of their skill level.

  15. Florivory and pollinator visitation: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kaoru; Dhami, Manpreet K.; Cross, David J.R.; Rice, Carolyn P.; Romano, Nic H.; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Florivory, or damage to flowers by herbivores, can make flowers less attractive to pollinators, potentially resulting in reduced plant fitness. However, not many studies have combined observations with experiments to assess the causal link between florivory and pollination. We conducted field observations at eight sites in northern California, combined with field experiments that involved artificial floral damage, to study the effect of florivory on pollination in the hummingbird-pollinated sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus aurantiacus. We used two indicators of pollinator visitation, stigma closure and the presence of microorganisms in floral nectar. The field observations revealed that stigma closure was less frequent in damaged flowers than in intact flowers. In the experiments, however, floral damage did not decrease stigma closure or microbial detection in nectar. Instead, neighbouring flowers were similar for both indicators. These results suggest that the observed negative association between florivory and pollination is not causal and that the location of flowers is more important to pollinator visitation than florivory in these populations of M. aurantiacus. PMID:27178063

  16. Florivory and pollinator visitation: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kaoru; Dhami, Manpreet K; Cross, David J R; Rice, Carolyn P; Romano, Nic H; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Florivory, or damage to flowers by herbivores, can make flowers less attractive to pollinators, potentially resulting in reduced plant fitness. However, not many studies have combined observations with experiments to assess the causal link between florivory and pollination. We conducted field observations at eight sites in northern California, combined with field experiments that involved artificial floral damage, to study the effect of florivory on pollination in the hummingbird-pollinated sticky monkeyflower, Mimulus aurantiacus We used two indicators of pollinator visitation, stigma closure and the presence of microorganisms in floral nectar. The field observations revealed that stigma closure was less frequent in damaged flowers than in intact flowers. In the experiments, however, floral damage did not decrease stigma closure or microbial detection in nectar. Instead, neighbouring flowers were similar for both indicators. These results suggest that the observed negative association between florivory and pollination is not causal and that the location of flowers is more important to pollinator visitation than florivory in these populations of M. aurantiacus. PMID:27178063

  17. Regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    The web resource Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat) offers a collection of software tools dedicated to the prediction of regulatory sites in non-coding DNA sequences. These tools include sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, pattern matching, genome-scale pattern matching, feature-map drawing, random sequence generation and other utilities. Alternative formats are supported for the representation of regulatory motifs (strings or position-specific scoring matrices) and several algorithms are proposed for pattern discovery. RSAT currently holds >100 fully sequenced genomes and these data are regularly updated from GenBank.

  18. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  19. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  20. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  1. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  2. 28 CFR 540.42 - Visiting times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting times. 540.42 Section 540.42 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.42 Visiting times. (a) Each Warden shall establish...

  3. Home Visits in Geropsychiatry Fellowship Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roane, David M.; Teusink, J. Paul; Wortham, Jennifer A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The psychiatric home visit is an effective intervention for elderly patients who otherwise would not receive mental health services. Home visits also have potential to be useful for training. Here, the current practice of home visits in geropsychiatry fellowship programs is examined. Design and Methods: The directors of 55 current…

  4. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-03-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains original books and manuscripts from the library's own collections. The sheer magnitude of human achievement represented here and the amount of effort and money that must have been required to amass these books boggles the mind.

  5. The Arctic Visiting Speakers Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Fahnestock, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Visiting Speakers Program (AVS) is a program of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) and funded by the National Science Foundation. AVS provides small grants to researchers and other Arctic experts to travel and share their knowledge in communities where they might not otherwise connect. The program aims to: initiate and encourage arctic science education in communities with little exposure to arctic research; increase collaboration among the arctic research community; nurture communication between arctic researchers and community residents; and foster arctic science education at the local level. Individuals, community organizations, and academic organizations can apply to host a speaker. Speakers cover a wide range of arctic topics and can address a variety of audiences including K-12 students, graduate and undergraduate students, and the general public. Preference is given to tours that reach broad and varied audiences, especially those targeted to underserved populations. Between October 2000 and July 2013, AVS supported 114 tours spanning 9 different countries, including tours in 23 U.S. states. Tours over the past three and a half years have connected Arctic experts with over 6,600 audience members. Post-tour evaluations show that AVS consistently rates high for broadening interest and understanding of arctic issues. AVS provides a case study for how face-to-face interactions between arctic scientists and general audiences can produce high-impact results. Further information can be found at: http://www.arcus.org/arctic-visiting-speakers.

  6. A Visit With a Curandero

    PubMed Central

    Mull, J. Dennis; Mull, Dorothy S.

    1983-01-01

    One author visited a Mexican-American folk healer in the Los Angeles area, not as a patient but as a fellow health professional. Information was obtained from this healer, a curandero, regarding his background, his clientele, the illnesses he treats, the therapeutic techniques he uses and his relationship with the official health care system. This information was generally consistent with statements about curanderismo that have appeared in the social sciences literature. It also provided additional insight into practices that have been alluded to in that literature but not described in detail. With few exceptions, curanderos would seem to be talented healers whose efforts often benefit their patients and whose continued popularity has important implications for physicians, especially those serving large numbers of people of Mexican descent. PMID:6659503

  7. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  8. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes. PMID:24187127

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Idaho. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Idaho state legislature has created the Idaho Public Utilities Commission and has given the Commission the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate every public utility in the state. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. Commissioners serve full time and are appointed for six year terms. No more than two of the members may be from the same political party. Title 61 of the Idaho Code, which establishes the Commission and delineates its powers, vests all regulatory responsibility in the Commission to the exclusion of local government. However, as an incident to their franchising power, municipalities may impose reasonable regulations on the use of their streets. The Idaho Supreme Court holds that the transfer of regulatory power over public utilities to the Commission did not diminish the powers and duties of municipalities to control and maintain their streets and alleys. Limited statutory authority also exists giving municipalities the power to regulate the fares, rates, rentals, or charges made for the service rendered under any franchise granted in such city, except such as are subject to regulation by the Public Utilities Commission. With the exception of this limited power, the Commission is the sole agency having regulatory power over Idaho public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. Final Report - Summer Visit 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, R

    2011-09-12

    During my visit to LLNL during the summer of 2010, I worked on algebraic multilevel solvers for large sparse systems of linear equations arising from discretizations of partial differential equations. The particular solver of interest is based on ILU decomposition. The setup phase for this AMG solve is just the single ILU decomposition, and its corresponding error matrix. Because the ILU uses a minimum degree or similar sparse matrix ordering, most of the fill-in, and hence most of the error, is concentrated in the lower right corner of the factored matrix. All of the major multigrid components - the smoother, the coarse level correction matrices, and the fine-to-coarse and coarse-to-fine rectangular transfer matrices, are defined in terms of various blocks of the ILU factorization. Although such a strategy is not likely to be optimal in terms of convergence properties, it has a relatively low setup cost, and therefore is useful in situations where setup costs for more traditional AMG approaches cannot be amortized over the solution of many linear systems using the same matrix. Such a situation arises in adaptive methods, where often just one linear system is solved at each step of an adaptive feedback loop, or in solving nonlinear equations by approximate Newton methods, where the approximate Jacobian might change substantially from iteration to iteration. In general terms, coarse levels are defined in terms of successively smaller lower right blocks of the matrix, typically decreasing geometrically in order. The most difficult issue was the coarse grid correction matrix. The preconditioner/smoother for a given level is just the corresponding lower right blocks of the ILU factorization. The coarse level matrix itself is just the Schur complement; this matrix is not known exactly using just the ILU decomposition in the setup phase. Thus we approximate this matrix using various combinations of the preconditioning matrix and the error matrix. During my visit, several

  11. MEETING IN TUCSON: 3MRA: A MULTI-MEDIA HUMAN AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING SYSTEM FOR SITE-SPECIFIC TO NATIONAL SCALE REGULATORY APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    3MRA provides a technology that fully integrates the full dimensionality of human and ecological exposure and risk assessment, thus allowing regulatory decisions a more complete expression of potential adverse health effects related to the disposal and reuse of contaminated waste...

  12. A CRE/ATF-like site in the upstream regulatory sequence of the human interleukin 1 beta gene is necessary for induction in U937 and THP-1 monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J G; Chandra, G; Clay, W C; Stinnett, S W; Haneline, S A; Lorenz, J J; Patel, I R; Wisely, G B; Furdon, P J; Taylor, J D

    1993-01-01

    Transfection of U937 and THP-1 cells with a recombinant plasmid, pIL1(4.0kb)-CAT, containing 4 kb of the interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) gene upstream regulatory sequence resulted in inducer-dependent expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity. Treatment of the transfected cells with various combinations of the inducers lipopolysaccharide, phorbol myristate acetate, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP upregulated the IL-1 beta promoter. In U937 and THP-1 cells, maximum stimulation of both the endogenous IL-1 beta gene and pIL1(4.0kb)-CAT transfectants was observed following treatment with the combination of inducing agents lipopolysaccharide-phorbol myristate acetate-dibutyryl cyclic AMP. This combination of inducing agents was used to identify and study, at the molecular level, some of the regulatory elements necessary for induction of the IL-1 beta gene. A series of 5' deletion derivatives of the upstream regulatory sequence were used in transient transfection assays to identify an 80-bp fragment located between -2720 and -2800 bp upstream of the mRNA start site that was required for induction. Exonuclease III mapping, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), and DNA sequence analysis of this region were used to identify a transcription factor binding sequence which contained a potential cyclic AMP response element (CRE/ATF)- and NF-kappa B-like binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CRE/ATF-like site resulted in the loss of binding of a specific factor or factors as determined by EMSA. The loss of binding activity directly correlated with a loss of approximately 75% of promoter activity as determined in transient transfection assays. As determined by EMSA, the factor binding to the CRE/ATF-like site was present in nuclear extracts prepared from both uninduced and induced THP-1 and U937 cells. However, the intensity of the band appeared to be increased when nuclear extracts from induced cells were used. In contrast to the CRE/ATF mutation, which

  13. [Time analysis of pharmacists' home visit duties].

    PubMed

    Horii, Kota; Hirasawa, Shinichiro; Toshima, Chiaki; Morimoto, Masao; Shiraishi, Takeya; Maeda, Keigo; Hirohara, Masayoshi; Kushida, Kazuki

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacists' home visit duties include accepting prescriptions, making inquiries with the attending physician, preparing medication, giving guidance on medication, going on home visits(round trips), and handling insurance claims. In the present study, we measured the time required for each duty and determined work duration per visit. The study took place during September 2013; the sample included 116 subjects and 211 home visits were conducted. Pharmacists' mean work duration per visit was 73 min and 15 s; they spent an average of 36 min and 13 s of this period on round trips involving home visits and providing guidance on medication. Pharmacists are responsible for preparing medication for outpatients; therefore, it can be assumed that they can visit patients at their homes only during the estimated 2-h period after lunch and before the commencement of outpatient service in the evening. Therefore, it is difficult for one pharmacist to visit more than five patients a day. The number of patients that each pharmacist can visit in one week(6 working days)is estimated at 25-30.

  14. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Amy WY; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. PMID:24855389

  15. A systematic review of nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Wong, Amy Wy; Zhang, Chengfei; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Conventional endodontic treatment used to require multiple visits, but some clinicians have suggested that single-visit treatment is superior. Single-visit endodontic treatment and multiple-visit endodontic treatment both have their advantages and disadvantages. This paper is a literature review of the research on nonsurgical single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment. The PubMed database was searched using the keywords (endodontic treatment OR endodontic therapy OR root canal treatment OR root canal therapy) AND (single-visit OR one-visit OR 1-visit). Review papers, case reports, data studies, and irrelevant reports were excluded, and 47 papers on clinical trials were reviewed. The studies generally had small sample sizes, and the endodontic procedures varied among the studies. Meta-analysis on the selected studies was performed, and the results showed that the postoperative complications of the single-visit and multiple-visit endodontic treatment were similar. Furthermore, neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment had superior results over the other in terms of healing or success rate. Results of limited studies on disinfection of the root canals using low-energy laser photodynamic therapy is inconclusive, and further studies are necessary to show whether laser should be used in endodontic treatment. This review also found that that neither single-visit endodontic treatment nor multiple-visit treatment could guarantee the absence of postoperative pain. Since the study design of many studies displayed significant limitation and the materials and equipment used in endodontic treatment have dramatically changed in recent years, prospective randomized clinical trials are needed to further verify the postoperative pain and success rates of single-visit versus multiple-visit endodontic treatment.

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.; Massaro, Lawrence M.; Jensen, Philip J.

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel (UNF) from 12 shutdown nuclear power plant sites. At these shutdown sites the nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down and the sites have been decommissioned or are undergoing decommissioning. The shutdown sites are Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. The evaluation was divided into four components: characterization of the UNF and greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC waste) inventory; a description of the on-site infrastructure and conditions relevant to transportation of UNF and GTCC waste; an evaluation of the near-site transportation infrastructure and experience relevant to shipping transportation casks containing UNF and GTCC waste, including identification of gaps in information; and, an evaluation of the actions necessary to prepare for and remove UNF and GTCC waste. The primary sources for the inventory of UNF and GTCC waste are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) RW-859 used nuclear fuel inventory database, industry sources such as StoreFUEL and SpentFUEL, and government sources such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The primary sources for information on the conditions of site and near-site transportation infrastructure and experience included observations and information collected during visits to the Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, and Zion sites; information provided by managers at the shutdown sites; Facility Interface Data Sheets compiled for DOE in 2005; Services Planning Documents prepared for DOE in 1993 and 1994; industry publications such as Radwaste Solutions; and Google Earth. State and Regional Group representatives, a Tribal representative, and a Federal Railroad Administration representative participated in six of the shutdown site

  17. AthaMap web tools for database-assisted identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements and the display of highly conserved transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-07-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap contains more than 7.4 x 10(6) putative binding sites for 36 transcription factors (TFs) from 16 different TF families. A newly implemented functionality allows the display of subsets of higher conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Furthermore, a web tool was developed that permits a user-defined search for co-localizing cis-regulatory elements. The user can specify individually the level of conservation for each TFBS and a spacer range between them. This web tool was employed for the identification of co-localizing sites of known interacting TFs and TFs containing two DNA-binding domains. More than 1.8 x 10(5) combinatorial elements were annotated in the AthaMap database. These elements can also be used to identify more complex co-localizing elements consisting of up to four TFBSs. The AthaMap database and the connected web tools are a valuable resource for the analysis and the prediction of gene expression regulation at http://www.athamap.de. PMID:15980498

  18. Microgravity sciences application visiting scientist program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Contract NAS8-38785, Microgravity Experimental and Theoretical Research, is a project involving a large number of individual research programs related to: determination of the structure of human serum albumin and other biomedically important proteins; analysis of thermodynamic properties of various proteins and models of protein nucleation; development of experimental techniques for the growth of protein crystals in space; study of the physics of electrical double layers in the mechanics of liquid interfaces; computational analysis of vapor crystal growth processes in microgravity; analysis of the influence of magnetic fields in damping residual flows in directional solidification processes; crystal growth and characterization of II-VI semiconductor alloys; and production of thin films for nonlinear optics. It is not intended that the programs will be necessarily limited to this set at any one time. The visiting scientists accomplishing these programs shall serve on-site at MSFC to take advantage of existing laboratory facilities and the daily opportunities for technical communications with various senior scientists.

  19. How to Host a School Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eboch, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Bringing a "real live" author into the school can be a great fun for both kids and staff. However, it can also be a disaster. In this article, the author offers ideas on how to host a school visit. Library media specialists can help ensure a successful visit by preparing in advance: define the goals, communicate the expectations, provide…

  20. Should Supervisors Intervene during Classroom Visits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Real-time coaching has become the go-to supervisory model in some schools (especially charters), with supervisors routinely jumping in during teacher observations and sometimes taking over the class to model a more effective approach. The author sets out goals and guidelines for impromptu classroom visits that include visiting each classroom at…

  1. Home Visitation--A Chance for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosen, Roger L.

    1976-01-01

    Some ideas for improving the effectiveness of home visitation of students by vocational agriculture instructors include: planning for the visit, getting to know the student, assessing the home situation for influencing factors, using home responsibilities for plant and animal care as learning experiences, and considering life goals. (MS)

  2. 42 CFR 409.48 - Visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... covered each time an HHA employee or someone providing home health services under arrangements enters the... INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.48 Visits. (a) Number of allowable... home health visits. All Medicare home health services are covered under hospital insurance unless...

  3. 28 CFR 551.120 - Visiting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visiting. 551.120 Section 551.120 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS... special visits to protect the inmate's business interests or to help prepare for trial....

  4. Home visits in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovicz, Difat; Srivastava, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There has been a decline in family physicians providing home visits to housebound patients. Objective of program To increase family medicine residents’ exposure to home visits; their comfort and skills in providing home visits; and their willingness to provide home visits after graduation. Program description Between 2000 and 2010, each family practice resident at St Joseph’s Health Centre Family Medicine Teaching Unit in Toronto, Ont, was assigned at least 1 housebound patient to care for longitudinally over 2 years; the rationale for this was to increase the sense of “ownership” and responsibility among residents for their assigned homebound patients. Starting in 2003, until the program’s conclusion in 2010, residents were asked to fill out surveys before and after the program to assess their comfort with and confidence in providing home visits, as well as their satisfaction with the program. Survey responses were analyzed for changes over the course of residency training. A total of 85 residents completed the home visit teaching program between 2003 and 2010 inclusive. Conclusion While residents’ willingness to provide home visits did not increase over the course of residency, their confidence in making housecalls did increase. There was also a trend toward increased confidence among residents in working with community agencies. Thus, having home visit patients be a part of resident practices might play an important role in increasing the likelihood that future family physicians will continue to care for their patients when those patients are no longer ambulatory. PMID:26052599

  5. 28 CFR 548.19 - Pastoral visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pastoral visits. 548.19 Section 548.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS... clergyperson's or faith group representative's credentials. (b) Pastoral visits may not be counted as...

  6. 28 CFR 548.19 - Pastoral visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pastoral visits. 548.19 Section 548.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS... clergyperson's or faith group representative's credentials. (b) Pastoral visits may not be counted as...

  7. 28 CFR 548.19 - Pastoral visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pastoral visits. 548.19 Section 548.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS... clergyperson's or faith group representative's credentials. (b) Pastoral visits may not be counted as...

  8. 28 CFR 548.19 - Pastoral visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pastoral visits. 548.19 Section 548.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS... clergyperson's or faith group representative's credentials. (b) Pastoral visits may not be counted as...

  9. 28 CFR 548.19 - Pastoral visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pastoral visits. 548.19 Section 548.19 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT RELIGIOUS... clergyperson's or faith group representative's credentials. (b) Pastoral visits may not be counted as...

  10. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  11. Home Visiting: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boller, Kimberly; Strong, Debra A.; Daro, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Recent large federal investments in services for pregnant women and young children will fuel the expansion of home visiting services across the U.S. The authors summarize the history of home visiting and describe trends toward evidence-based and national program models. Moving to an integrated system requires supports for implementation with…

  12. Assessing Quality in Home Visiting Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korfmacher, Jon; Laszewski, Audrey; Sparr, Mariel; Hammel, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Defining quality and designing a quality assessment measure for home visitation programs is a complex and multifaceted undertaking. This article summarizes the process used to create the Home Visitation Program Quality Rating Tool (HVPQRT) and identifies next steps for its development. The HVPQRT measures both structural and dynamic features of…

  13. Implementing and Preparing for Home Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The most common setting for early intervention services for infants and toddlers with disabilities and their families is the home. This article discusses home- and community-based early intervention and how the routines-based interview (RBI) can set the stage for successful home visits. It also addresses what has been learned about home visiting,…

  14. 28 CFR 540.62 - Institutional visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Institutional visits. 540.62 Section 540.62 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.62 Institutional visits. (a) A...

  15. Evaluation in the Field: The Need for Site Visit Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of programs is enhanced when trained, skilled, and observant evaluators go "into the field"--the real world where programs are conducted--paying attention to what's going on, systematically documenting what they see, and reporting what they learn. The article opens by presenting and illustrating twelve reasons for…

  16. Effective Delivery of Therapeutic Interventions: Findings from Four Site Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Cathy; Squires, Garry; Bragg, Joanna; Wasilewski, David; Muscutt, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This project follows a survey into the role of UK educational psychologists (EPs) in delivering therapeutic interventions to children and young people. Four educational psychology services (EPSs) that identified themselves as providing effective therapeutic practice were selected on the basis of their qualitative responses to the survey. Site…

  17. Material Interface Reconstruction in VisIt

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, J S

    2005-01-27

    In this paper, we first survey a variety of approaches to material interface reconstruction and their applicability to visualization, and we investigate the details of the current reconstruction algorithm in the VisIt scientific analysis and visualization tool. We then provide a novel implementation of the original VisIt algorithm that makes use of a wide range of the finite element zoo during reconstruction. This approach results in dramatic improvements in quality and performance without sacrificing the strengths of the VisIt algorithm as it relates to visualization.

  18. Role of the Chemical Environment beyond the Coordination Site: Structural Insight into Fe(III) Protoporphyrin Binding to Cysteine-Based Heme-Regulatory Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Hans Henning; Kühl, Toni; Goradia, Nishit; Galler, Kerstin; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2015-10-12

    The importance of heme as a transient regulatory molecule has become a major focus in biochemical research. However, detailed information about the molecular basis of transient heme-protein interactions is still missing. We report an in-depth structural analysis of Fe(III) heme-peptide complexes by a combination of UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The experiments reveal insights both into the coordination to the central iron ion and into the spatial arrangement of the amino acid sequences interacting with protoporphyrin IX. Cysteine-based peptides display different heme-binding behavior as a result of the existence of ordered, partially ordered, and disordered conformations in the heme-unbound state. Thus, the heme-binding mode is clearly the consequence of the nature and flexibility of the residues surrounding the iron ion coordinating cysteine. Our analysis reveals scenarios for transient binding of heme to heme-regulatory motifs in proteins and demonstrates that a thorough structural analysis is required to unravel how heme alters the structure and function of a particular protein. PMID:26260099

  19. Role of the Chemical Environment beyond the Coordination Site: Structural Insight into Fe(III) Protoporphyrin Binding to Cysteine-Based Heme-Regulatory Protein Motifs.

    PubMed

    Brewitz, Hans Henning; Kühl, Toni; Goradia, Nishit; Galler, Kerstin; Popp, Jürgen; Neugebauer, Ute; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2015-10-12

    The importance of heme as a transient regulatory molecule has become a major focus in biochemical research. However, detailed information about the molecular basis of transient heme-protein interactions is still missing. We report an in-depth structural analysis of Fe(III) heme-peptide complexes by a combination of UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The experiments reveal insights both into the coordination to the central iron ion and into the spatial arrangement of the amino acid sequences interacting with protoporphyrin IX. Cysteine-based peptides display different heme-binding behavior as a result of the existence of ordered, partially ordered, and disordered conformations in the heme-unbound state. Thus, the heme-binding mode is clearly the consequence of the nature and flexibility of the residues surrounding the iron ion coordinating cysteine. Our analysis reveals scenarios for transient binding of heme to heme-regulatory motifs in proteins and demonstrates that a thorough structural analysis is required to unravel how heme alters the structure and function of a particular protein.

  20. Binding Sites in the EFG1 Promoter for Transcription Factors in a Proposed Regulatory Network: A Functional Analysis in the White and Opaque Phases of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Claude; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Park, Yang-Nim; Daniels, Karla J.; Soll, David R.

    2016-01-01

    In Candida albicans the transcription factor Efg1, which is differentially expressed in the white phase of the white-opaque transition, is essential for expression of the white phenotype. It is one of six transcription factors included in a proposed interactive transcription network regulating white-opaque switching and maintenance of the alternative phenotypes. Ten sites were identified in the EFG1 promoter that differentially bind one or more of the network transcription factors in the white and/or opaque phase. To explore the functionality of these binding sites in the differential expression of EFG1, we generated targeted deletions of each of the 10 binding sites, combinatorial deletions, and regional deletions using a Renilla reniformis luciferase reporter system. Individually targeted deletion of only four of the 10 sites had minor effects consistent with differential expression of EFG1, and only in the opaque phase. Alternative explanations are considered. PMID:27172219

  1. Identification and characterization of two nuclear factor-kappaB sites in the regulatory region of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Sandra; Fiorentini, Chiara; Busi, Chiara; Guerra, Nicoletta; Spano, PierFranco; Missale, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Regulation of D2 receptor (D2R) expression is crucial in the function of dopaminergic systems. Because alterations of D2R expression may contribute to the development of different disorders, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms regulating D2R gene transcription. We report the characterization of two putative nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) motifs, referred to as D2-kappaB sites, in the human D2R promoter, and demonstrate that they bind NF-kappaB subunits and stimulate D2R promoter activity. D2-kappaB sites show different degrees of conservation and specificity, when compared with canonical kB sites. The D2-kappaB1 site (from -407 to -398) is highly conserved and binds p50/p65 and p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas D2-kappaB2 (from -513 to -504) is more degenerated and only binds p50/p65 heterodimers. Activation of D2-kappaB sites in COS-7 cells expressing a luciferase reporter vector containing the D2R promoter resulted in increased transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of each D2-kappaB site differentially modified D2R promoter activity. In particular, mutation of the D2-kappaB1 motif did not affect D2R promoter response to p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas inactivation of the D2-kappaB2 site decreased it. Mutations of either D2-kappaB1 or D2-kappaB2 sites attenuated the D2R promoter transcriptional efficiency induced by p50/p65 complexes. Thus, D2R transcription mediated by p50/c-Rel is supported mainly by the D2-kappaB2 site, whereas both sites are necessary to support the full transcriptional activity mediated by p50/p65 complexes. A correlation was found between NF-kappaB activity and D2R expression in the pituitary and pituitary-derived cells but not in the striatum, suggesting that NF-kappaB regulation of D2R expression could be a pituitary-specific mechanism.

  2. Annual Checkups Are Becoming Wellness Visits

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history and lifestyle, medication reviews, checks of vital signs and scheduling preventive screenings and vaccinations. "When you ... another important element of wellness visits. "Electronic medical records have the potential to be powerful tools to ...

  3. Smokey Visits Station Flight Control Room

    NASA Video Gallery

    Smokey Bear celebrated his 68th birthday with a special visit to the International Space Station Flight Control Room at Johnson Space Center in Houston. On May 14, Smokey went where no bear had gon...

  4. Indiana School for the Blind Visits Goddard

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows highlights of the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and the Indian Creek Public High School visit to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in June 2011. Both blind a...

  5. 28 CFR 540.41 - Visiting facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... required by the type of institution. The Warden shall ensure that the visiting area is as comfortable and... perimeter, but always under supervision of staff. (b) Institutions of medium and high security levels,...

  6. 28 CFR 540.41 - Visiting facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... required by the type of institution. The Warden shall ensure that the visiting area is as comfortable and... perimeter, but always under supervision of staff. (b) Institutions of medium and high security levels,...

  7. Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits

    MedlinePlus

    ... supplements. Highlights from the 2009 Drug Abuse Warning Network In 2009, there were nearly 4.6 million ... Report: Highlights of the 2009 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) Findings on Drug-Related Emergency Department Visits . ...

  8. President Obama and Family Visit KSC

    NASA Video Gallery

    President Obama, accompanied by First Lady Michelle Obama and their two daughters, visited NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on Friday, Apr. 29. The First Family then boarded the Marine One helicopter ...

  9. Regulatory band gap of vacancy at the B sites in CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, D. H.; Xiao, X. J.; Zhang, C. M.; Li, X. L.; Hu, M. Z.; Yin, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The structure, electronic structure, states density and optics properties of the orthorhombic CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite with vacancy at the B sites are calculated by the CASTEP program. The calculated results indicate that the cell volume shrinks with the content of vacancy at the B sites increasing, and the structure has the large degree of distortion from the cubic structure. The band gaps are 1.656, 1.750, 3.077, 3.256 and 4.76 eV, corresponding to x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00, respectively. As an application, the additional absorption peak can be obtained by CH3NH3Pb1-xI3 perovskite doped vacancy at the B sites.

  10. Stepping Off the Sidewalk: An Examination of the Data Collection Techniques of Websites Visited by Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Judith L.

    2003-01-01

    Used data collected by a trend analysis company on 111 Web sites commonly visited by children to identify specific privacy issues faced by children when exploring child-oriented and adult-oriented Web sites. Discusses the complexity of issues raised by the expansion of information technology. (SLD)

  11. A palindromic regulatory site within vertebrate GATA-1 promoters requires both zinc fingers of the GATA-1 DNA-binding domain for high-affinity interaction.

    PubMed

    Trainor, C D; Omichinski, J G; Vandergon, T L; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-05-01

    GATA-1, a transcription factor essential for the development of the erythroid lineage, contains two adjacent highly conserved zinc finger motifs. The carboxy-terminal finger is necessary and sufficient for specific binding to the consensus GATA recognition sequence: mutant proteins containing only the amino-terminal finger do not bind. Here we identify a DNA sequence (GATApal) for which the GATA-1 amino-terminal finger makes a critical contribution to the strength of binding. The site occurs in the GATA-1 gene promoters of chickens, mice, and humans but occurs very infrequently in other vertebrate genes known to be regulated by GATA proteins. GATApal is a palindromic site composed of one complete [(A/T)GATA(A/G)] and one partial (GAT) canonical motif. Deletion of the partial motif changes the site to a normal GATA site and also reduces by as much as eightfold the activity of the GATA-1 promoter in an erythroid precursor cell. We propose that GATApal is important for positive regulation of GATA-1 expression in erythroid cells. PMID:8628290

  12. Racial/ethnic differences in healthcare visits made prior to suicide attempt across the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ahmedani, Brian K.; Stewart, Christine; Simon, Gregory E.; Lynch, Frances; Lu, Christine Y.; Waitzfelder, Beth E.; Solberg, Leif I.; Owen-Smith, Ashli A.; Beck, Arne; Copeland, Laurel A.; Hunkeler, Enid M.; Rossom, Rebecca C.; Williams, L. Keoki

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide is a public health concern, but little is known about the patterns of healthcare visits made before a suicide attempt, and whether those patterns differ by race/ethnicity. Objectives To examine racial/ethnic variation in the types of healthcare visits made before a suicide attempt, when those visits occur, and whether mental health or substance use diagnoses were documented. Research Design Retrospective, longitudinal study, 2009–2011. Participants 22,387 individuals who attempted suicide and were enrolled in the health plan across 10 health systems in the Mental Health Research Network. Measures Cumulative percentage of different types of healthcare visits made in the 52-weeks before a suicide attempt, by self-reported racial/ethnicity and diagnosis. Data were from the Virtual Data Warehouse at each site. Results Over 38% of individuals made any healthcare visit within the week before their suicide attempt and ~95% within the preceding year; these percentages varied across racial/ethnic groups (p<0.001). White individuals had the highest percentage of visits (>41%) within 1-week of suicide attempt. Asian Americans were the least likely to make visits within 52 weeks. Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders had proportionally the most inpatient and emergency visits before an attempt, but were least likely to have a recorded mental health or substance use diagnosis. Overall, visits were most common in primary care and outpatient general medical settings. Conclusions This study provides temporal evidence of racial/ethnic differences in healthcare visits made prior to suicide attempt. Healthcare systems can use this information to help focus the design and implementation of their suicide prevention initiatives. PMID:25872151

  13. Engaging and Retaining Abused Women in Perinatal Home Visitation Programs

    PubMed Central

    Alhusen, Jeanne L.; Bullock, Linda; Bhandari, Shreya; Ghazarian, Sharon; Udo, Ifeyinwa E.; Campbell, Jacquelyn

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy affects 0.9% to 17% of women and affects maternal health significantly. The impact of IPV extends to the health of children, including an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and the neonatal period, mental health problems, and cognitive delays. Despite substantial sequelae, there is limited research substantiating best practices for engaging and retaining high-risk families in perinatal home visiting (HV) programs, which have been shown to improve infant development and reduce maltreatment. METHODS: The Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program (DOVE) is a multistate longitudinal study testing the effectiveness of a structured IPV intervention integrated into health department perinatal HV programs. The DOVE intervention, based on an empowerment model, combined 2 evidence-based interventions: a 10-minute brochure-based IPV intervention and nurse home visitation. RESULTS: Across all sites, 689 referrals were received from participating health departments. A total of 339 abused pregnant women were eligible for randomization; 42 women refused, and 239 women were randomly assigned (124 DOVE; 115 usual care), resulting in a 71% recruitment rate. Retention rates from baseline included 93% at delivery, 80% at 3 months, 76% at 6 months, and 72% at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: Challenges for HV programs include identifying and retaining abused pregnant women in their programs. DOVE strategies for engaging and retaining abused pregnant women should be integrated into HV programs’ federal government mandates for the appropriate identification and intervention of women and children exposed to IPV. PMID:24187115

  14. Response to Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ten questions pertaining to site-specific models for use in the license termination rule: Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.; McDonald, J.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Pelton, M.A.; Gelston, G.M.; Taira, R.Y.

    1998-05-01

    This paper is in response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ten questions posed at the Modeling Workshop held November 13 and 14, 1997. The ten questions were developed in advance of the workshop to allow model developers to prepare a presentation at the Workshop. This paper is an expanded version of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) presentation given at the Modeling Workshop by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. This paper is organized by the ten questions asked by the NRC, each section devoted to a single question. The current version of methodology is MEPAS 3.2 (NRC 1997) and the discussion in this paper will pertain to that version. In some cases, MEPAS 4.0, which is currently being developed under the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) (Whelan et al. 1997), will be referenced to inform the reader of potential capabilities in the near future. A separate paper is included in the document that discusses the FRAMES concept.

  15. Phylogenetic divergence of CD47 interactions with human signal regulatory protein alpha reveals locus of species specificity. Implications for the binding site.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2007-01-19

    Cell-cell interactions between ubiquitously expressed integrin-associated protein (CD47) and its counterreceptor signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha) on phagocytes regulate a wide range of adhesive signaling processes, including the inhibition of phagocytosis as documented in mice. We show that CD47-SIRPalpha binding interactions are different between mice and humans, and we exploit phylogenetic divergence to identify the species-specific binding locus on the immunoglobulin domain of human CD47. All of the studies are conducted in the physiological context of membrane protein display on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Novel quantitative flow cytometry analyses with CD47-green fluorescent protein and soluble human SIRPalpha as a probe show that neither human CD47 nor SIRPalpha requires glycosylation for interaction. Human CD47-expressing CHO cells spread rapidly on SIRPalpha-coated glass surfaces, correlating well with the spreading of primary human T cells. In contrast, CHO cells expressing mouse CD47 spread minimally and show equally weak binding to soluble human SIRPalpha. Further phylogenetic analyses and multisite substitutions of the CD47 Ig domain show that human to cow mutation of a cluster of seven residues on adjacent strands near the middle of the domain decreases the association constant for human SIRPalpha to about one-third that of human CD47. Direct tests of cell-cell adhesion between human monocytes and CD47-displaying CHO cells affirm the species specificity as well as the importance of the newly identified binding locus in cell-cell interactions.

  16. Baseline Predictors of Missed Visits in the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Jeffery, Robert; Johnson, Karen C.; Roche, Cathy C.; Van Dorsten, Brent; Gee, Molly; Johnson, Ruby Ann; Charleston, Jeanne; Dotson, Kathy; Walkup, Michael P.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Brancati, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify baseline attributes associated with consecutively missed data collection visits during the first 48 months of Look AHEAD—a randomized, controlled trial in 5145 overweight/obese adults with type 2 diabetes designed to determine the long-term health benefits of weight loss achieved by lifestyle change. Design and Methods The analyzed sample consisted of 5016 participants who were alive at month 48 and enrolled at Look AHEAD sites. Demographic, baseline behavior, psychosocial factors, and treatment randomization were included as predictors of missed consecutive visits in proportional hazard models. Results In multivariate Cox proportional hazard models, baseline attributes of participants who missed consecutive visits (n=222) included: younger age ( Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.18 per 5 years younger; 95% Confidence Interval 1.05, 1.30), higher depression score (HR 1.04; 1.01, 1.06), non-married status (HR 1.37; 1.04, 1.82), never self-weighing prior to enrollment (HR 2.01; 1.25, 3.23), and randomization to minimal vs. intensive lifestyle intervention (HR 1.46; 1.11, 1.91). Conclusions Younger age, symptoms of depression, non-married status, never self-weighing, and randomization to minimal intervention were associated with a higher likelihood of missing consecutive data collection visits, even in a high-retention trial like Look AHEAD. Whether modifications to screening or retention efforts targeted to these attributes might enhance long-term retention in behavioral trials requires further investigation. PMID:23996977

  17. Selection of DNA binding sites by regulatory proteins: the LexA protein and the arginine repressor use different strategies for functional specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, O G

    1988-01-01

    The DNA sequences in the operator sites of the arginine regulon and of the SOS regulon have been subject to a statistical analysis. A quantitative correlation is found between the statistics of sequence choice and the activity at individual operator sites in both systems, as expected from theoretical considerations [Berg & von Hippel, J.Mol.Biol. (1987) 193, 723-750]. Based on these correlations it is possible to predict the effect of various sequence mutations. There is a significant difference in the slopes of the correlation lines between sequence and activity for the two systems. From this difference it can be expected that individual point mutations in the ARG boxes will have a much smaller effect on activity than similar changes in the SOS boxes. This difference may be related to a strong cooperative activity at tandem ARG boxes while the binding at SOS boxes appears to be mostly noncooperative. PMID:3290847

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Wisconsin. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Wisconsin state legislature has designated the Public Service Commission (PSC) as the agency responsible for regulating public utilities, and has prescribed the manner in which such utilities are to be regulated. The PSC consists of three commissioners appointed to staggered six-year terms by the governor and confirmed by the senate. Municipalities are given certain limited regulatory powers over public utilities. They are allowed to determine the quality and character of each kind of product or service to be rendered by any public utility within the municipality; to determine all other terms and conditions upon which a public utility may be permitted to occupy the streets, highways or other public places within the municipality; and may require such additions and extensions to (a public utility's) physical plant within said municipality as shall be reasonable and necessary in the interest of the public, and to designate the location and nature of all such additions and extensions subject to review by the PSC. However, the PSC has original and concurrent jurisdiction with municipalities to require extensions of service and to regulate service. Municipalities may purchase and own public utilities; however, such utilities are subject to regulation by the PSC. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. The U.S. Department of Energy's Regulatory and Evaluation Framework for Demonstrating Radiation Protection of the Environment: Implementation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, Ernest J.; Tiller, Brett L.; Domotor, S. L.; Higley, Kathryn A.

    2005-08-01

    Abstract. In 2001, a multi-agency study was conducted to characterize potential environmental effects from radiological and chemical contaminants on the near-shore environment of the Columbia River at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. Historically, the 300 Area was the location of nuclear fuel fabrication and was the main location for research and development activities from the 1940s until the late 1980s. During past waste handling practices uranium, copper, and other heavy metals were routed to liquid waste streams and ponds near the Columbia River shoreline. The Washington State Department of Health and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project sampled various environmental components including river water, riverbank spring water, sediment, fishes, crustaceans, bivalve mollusks, aquatic insects, riparian vegetation, small mammals, and terrestrial invertebrates for analyses of radiological and chemical constituents. The radiological analysis results for water and sediment were used as initial input into the RESRAD BIOTA. The RESRAD BIOTA code showed that maximum radionuclide concentrations measured in water and sediment were lower than the initial screening criteria for concentrations to produce dose rates at existing or proposed limits. Radionuclide concentrations measured in biota samples were used to calculate site-specific bioaccumulation coefficients (Biv) to test the utility of the RESRAD BIOTA’s site-specific screening phase. To further evaluate site-specific effects, the default Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for internal alpha particle emissions was reduced by half and the program’s kinetic/allometric calculation approach was initiated. The subsequent calculations showed the initial RESRAD BIOTA results to be conservative, which is appropriate for screening purposes.

  20. Illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Berkanovic, E; Hurwicz, M L

    1992-08-01

    Although there is a large literature examining the effects of distress on the demand for medical care, the data on which this literature is based are equivocal. Nonetheless, this literature is cited frequently by those who advocate a national mental health policy designed to produce a cost-effective "medical offset effect." In this study, longitudinal data on illness episodes, physician visits, and depressive symptoms were collected from 940 Medicare recipients enrolled in a health maintenance organization (HMO) under a Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) contract. Seven waves of interviews were conducted over a period of 1 year. This article presents two sets of analyses. In the first, controlling for chronic conditions and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between depressive symptoms reported at baseline, and all illness episodes and physician visits that occurred over the subsequent year are examined. In the second, controlling for depressive symptoms and demographics reported at baseline, the relationships between illness episodes and physician visits over the study year, and depressive symptoms recorded at the final interview are examined. The data indicate that, whereas depressive symptoms at baseline are virtually unrelated to subsequent illness episodes and physician visits, illness episodes and physician visits are related to subsequent depressive symptoms. These data indicate, therefore, that policies aimed at diverting the distressed from seeking medical care may result in further inequities in the receipt of needed care. PMID:10120227

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Missouri. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Missouri is vested in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for a term of six years. Commissioners must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the general supervision of public utilities. The Public Service Commission Law passed in 1913, makes no provision for the regulation of public utilities by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  3. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  4. Managing ecotourism visitation in protected areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Farrell, T.A.; Lindberg, Kreg; Wood, Megan Epler; Engeldrum, David

    1998-01-01

    Ecotourism management seeks to integrate and balance several potentially conflicting objectives: protection of natural and cultural resources, provision of recreation opportunities and generation of economic benefits. In the absence of effective planning and management, ecotourism can lead to significant negative impacts on vegetation, soil, water, wildlife, historic resources, cultures, and visitor experiences. This chapter reviews visitor-related natural resource and experience impacts associated with ecotourism within protected areas. The influence of factors that control the nature and extent of impacts are also reviewed, including type and amount of use, the variable resistance and resilience of environmental attributes such as vegetation and soil types, and the role of management in shaping visitation, resources and facilities to support visitation while minimizing associated impacts. Implications for managing the effects of protected area visitation are highlighted, including carrying capacity decision frameworks and selecting management strategies and tactics.

  5. Induction and repression of DAN1 and the family of anaerobic mannoprotein genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs through a complex array of regulatory sites

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Brian D.; Sertil, Odeniel; Abramova, Natalia E.; Davies, Kelvin J. A.; Lowry, Charles V.

    2001-01-01

    The DAN/TIR mannoprotein genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DAN1, DAN2, DAN3, DAN4, TIR1, TIR2, TIR3 and TIR4) are expressed in anaerobic cells while the predominant cell wall proteins Cwp1 and Cwp2 are down-regulated. Elements involved in activation and repression of the DAN/TIR genes were defined in this study, using the DAN1 promoter as a model. Nested deletions in a DAN1/lacZ reporter pinpointed regions carrying activation and repression elements. Inspection revealed two consensus sequences subsequently shown to be independent anaerobic response elements (AR1, consensus TCGTTYAG; AR2, consensus AAAAATTGTTGA). AR1 is found in all of the DAN/TIR promoters; AR2 is found in DAN1, DAN2 and DAN3. A 120 bp segment carrying two copies of AR1 preferentially activated transcription of lacZ under anaerobic conditions. A fusion of three synthetic copies of AR1 to MEL1 was also expressed anaerobically. Mutations in either AR1 site within the 120 bp segment caused a drastic loss of expression, indicating that both are necessary for activation and implying cooperativity between adjacent transcriptional activation complexes. A single AR2 site carried on a 46 bp fragment from the DAN1 promoter activated lacZ transcription under anaerobic conditions, as did a 26 bp synthetic AR2 fragment fused to MEL1. Nucleotide substitutions within the AR2 sequence eliminated the activity of the 46 bp segment. Ablation of the AR2 sequences in the full promoter caused a partial reduction of expression. The presence of the ATTGTT core (recognized by HMG proteins) in the AR2 sequence suggests that an HMG protein may activate through AR2. One region was implicated in aerobic repression of DAN1. It contains sites for the heme-induced Mot3 and Rox1 repressors. PMID:11160904

  6. "When Are You Coming to Visit?" Home Visits and Seeing Our Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlessman, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The process that led the author to home visits was a gradual one. She sensed that on the other side of the bus ride home, students' lives were much richer and more varied than could be taken into account by classroom conversations, curriculum, and conferences. Home visits made her even more aware of the need to provide opportunities for students…

  7. Overview of the federal home visiting program.

    PubMed

    Adirim, Terry; Supplee, Lauren

    2013-11-01

    On March 23, 2010, the President signed into law the Affordable Care Act (Public Law 111-148), which included an amendment of Title V of the Social Security Act authorizing the creation of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program. Authorized and funded at $1.5 billion for 5 years, the MIECHV represents a large investment in health and development outcomes for at-risk children through evidence-based home visiting programs. The MIECHV presents unprecedented opportunities to integrate early childhood services systems, not only on the federal level but also within states and local communities. The MIECHV is funded in escalating amounts over 5-year period authorized, as follows: $100 million in fiscal year (FY) 2010, $250 million in FY 2011, $350 million in FY 2012, $400 million in FY 2013, and $400 million in FY 2014. Most of the funding is being provided to states and territories to provide home visiting services in their at-risk communities. In addition, the legislation included a 3% set-aside for tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations and a 3% set-aside for research and evaluation. This investment has spurred the creation of more comprehensive and coordinated early childhood service systems across the United States. This article provides an overview of the MIECHV program, including descriptions of the various requirements under the Affordable Care Act. These include partnering with states to provide evidence-based home visiting services to at-risk families, working with tribal communities to implement culturally competent home visiting programs, and developing a mechanism to systematically review the evidence of effectiveness for home visiting program models and to conduct a national evaluation of the MIECHV program. PMID:24187124

  8. The AAS Visiting Professor Programs: Three Anniversaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2003-05-01

    The AAS Program of Visiting Professors was started in 1958 with three astronomers as lecturers. They were Paul Merrill (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories), Seth Nicholson (Mt. Wilson and Palomar Observatories) and Harlow Shapley (Harvard College Observatory). The program was run by a Committee on Visiting Professors from 1958 through 1963. The program was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation. The Executive Officer of the AAS, Paul Routley headed the program from the 1963 - 64 academic year through the 1968 - 69 academic year. Larry Fredrick headed the program for 1969 - 70 and then Hank Gurin headed it through 1973 -74, the last year of the program. At the end of this summer meeting, the combined Visiting Professors Program and the Shapley Program will be starting their 47th year. The Shapley Visiting Lectureships in Astronomy Program was started in the 1974 - 75 academic year under the leadership of Hank Gurin. The original funding came from the Perkin Fund and a three year grant from the Research Corporation. In 1975 the Shapley Endowment fund was set up to help pay the expenses of the program. In 1976 there was support from the Slipher fund which lasted through the 1978 - 79 academic year. From 1979 to the present the program is financed by the Shapley Endowment Fund and by the contributions made by institutions which host the visits. In the fall of 1998 the fee that Institutions pay to the AAS in support of their Shapley visits was reduced from 300 to 250 to make it easier for them to apply for visits. Members of the AAS have made contributions to the program over the years and we are very appreciative of this support. In 1974 there were 42 lecturers in the program, of whom four are still active giving lectures (George Carruthers, Larry Fredrick, Arlo Landolt and Davis Philip). After the summer meeting, the Shapley Program will be embarking on its 30th year. Now there are 82 astronomers in the program and we get from 40 to 60 requests a year

  9. METAvivor Reps Visit NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Three representatives of METAvivor visited NCI at Frederick on April 13 to meet and tour with Balamurugan Kuppusamy, Ph.D., staff scientist in the laboratory of Esta Sterneck, Ph.D., senior investigator, Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Signaling, Center for Cancer Research.  The purpose of the visit was to learn more about Kuppusamy’s research. Kuppusamy is a recipient of a $50,000, two-year grant awarded by METAvivor to study the role of the CEBPD-FBXW7 signaling pathway in inflammatory breast cancer.

  10. Chilean Teachers Begin Exchange Program Visit in Magdalena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    Two teachers from the town of San Pedro de Atacama, in the northern desert of the South American nation of Chile, arrive in Magdalena, New Mexico, Sunday, January 28, for a two-week visit that is part of a Sister Cities program sponsored by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), the nonprofit research corporation that operates the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). They will be accompanied by their town's mayor. Myriam Nancy Rivera Mercado, Head of the high school in San Pedro, Gabriela Fernanda Rodriguez Moraleda, a tourism teacher there, and San Pedro Mayor Sandra Berna Martinez will begin a visit that includes classroom observations in the Magdalena schools, a reception hosted by the Magdalena Village Council, and a Mayor's Breakfast with Magdalena Mayor Jim Wolfe. They also will meet local residents, tour the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge with a second-grade class, visit an area ranch, tour the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope, and see Socorro's Community Arts Party. "These teachers will learn much about New Mexico, the United States, and our educational system, and will take this new knowledge back to their students and their community," said NRAO Education Officer Robyn Harrison. The visit is part of a Sister Cities program initiated and funded by AUI, which operates the NRAO for the U.S. National Science Foundation. Radio astronomy is a common link between San Pedro de Atacama and Magdalena. San Pedro is near the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international telescope project now under construction with funding by major partners in North America, Europe, and Japan. Magdalena is near the site of NRAO's VLA radio telescope. In Magdalena, the Village Council and Mayor Wolfe formalized their participation in the Sister Cities program last September, and San Pedro ratified the program in December. In San Pedro, the ceremony ratifying the agreement was attended by U.S. Ambassador to Chile Craig K

  11. 29 CFR 1908.6 - Conduct of a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONSULTATION AGREEMENTS § 1908.6 Conduct of a visit. (a) Preparation. (1) An onsite consultative visit shall be made only after appropriate preparation by the consultant. Prior to the visit, the consultant shall... conference. An initial visit may include training and education for employers and employees, if the need...

  12. 29 CFR 1908.6 - Conduct of a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONSULTATION AGREEMENTS § 1908.6 Conduct of a visit. (a) Preparation. (1) An onsite consultative visit shall be made only after appropriate preparation by the consultant. Prior to the visit, the consultant shall... conference. An initial visit may include training and education for employers and employees, if the need...

  13. 22 CFR 125.5 - Exemptions for plant visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemptions for plant visits. 125.5 Section 125... EXPORT OF TECHNICAL DATA AND CLASSIFIED DEFENSE ARTICLES § 125.5 Exemptions for plant visits. (a) A... course of a classified plant visit by a foreign person, provided: The classified visit has itself...

  14. 22 CFR 125.5 - Exemptions for plant visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemptions for plant visits. 125.5 Section 125... EXPORT OF TECHNICAL DATA AND CLASSIFIED DEFENSE ARTICLES § 125.5 Exemptions for plant visits. (a) A... course of a classified plant visit by a foreign person, provided: The classified visit has itself...

  15. A Visitation/Training Program for Institutionalized Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila; Tayloe, Bryan

    Research on the use of paraprofessionals and trained volunteers for visitation programs with elders is limited. To determine the effects of a visitation program on nursing home residents and their college student and elder visitors, and to explore the effectiveness of special training for such visitation, nursing home residents (N=25) visited with…

  16. 22 CFR 125.5 - Exemptions for plant visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exemptions for plant visits. 125.5 Section 125... EXPORT OF TECHNICAL DATA AND CLASSIFIED DEFENSE ARTICLES § 125.5 Exemptions for plant visits. (a) A... course of a classified plant visit by a foreign person, provided: The classified visit has itself...

  17. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... visit. (3) Visit—Mental health. A mental health visit is a face-to-face encounter between a RHC or FQHC... or FQHC practitioner, in accordance with paragraph (b)(1) of this section, for mental health services... diagnosis or treatment on the same day; (ii) Has a medical visit and a mental health visit on the same...

  18. PTSD in Depressed Mothers in Home Visitation

    PubMed Central

    Ammerman, Robert T.; Putnam, Frank W.; Chard, Kathleen M.; Stevens, Jack; Van Ginkel, Judith B.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has suggested that mothers participating in home visitation programs have a high incidence of mental health problems, particularly depression. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common comorbidity with depression, yet its prevalence among home visiting populations and implications for parenting and maternal functioning have not been examined. This study contrasted depressed mothers with (n = 35) and without PTSD (n = 55) who were enrolled in a home visitation program. Results indicated that depressed mothers with comorbid PTSD were more likely to have experienced childhood sexual abuse, had greater severity of depressive symptoms, increased social isolation, and lower overall functioning than their counterparts without PTSD. Among PTSD mothers, greater severity of PTSD symptoms, in particular avoidance and emotional numbness, were associated with increased maternal psychopathology and parenting deficits even after controlling for depression severity. These findings add to the literature documenting the negative impacts of PTSD on maternal functioning and parenting. Implications for screening and treatment in the context of home visitation are discussed. PMID:24307928

  19. CoSN Delegation Visits Scandinavia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In November 2007, a delegation from the Consortium for School Networking visited three Scandinavian countries to examine best practices. The delegates were motivated by their desire to understand the high achievement levels of students in Finland, Sweden, and Denmark. For several years, students in these countries have been outperforming their…

  20. Innovative technology offers virtual visitation for families.

    PubMed

    Thibeau, Shelley; Ricouard, Dawn; Gilcrease, Carolyn

    2012-10-01

    Parents of preterm infants and infants with congenital anomalies requiring treatment must begin their relationship with their infant in the unfamiliar and often stressful neonatal intensive care unit, full of strange sights and sounds. Innovative technology such as webcams offers virtual visitation, which holds potential to improve parent-infant bonding and reduce parents' self-perceived stress.

  1. Toward Population Impact from Home Visiting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kenneth A.; Goodman, W. Benjamin; Murphy, Robert; O'Donnell, Karen J.; Sato, Jeannine M.

    2013-01-01

    Although some home visiting programs have proven effective with the families they serve, no program has yet demonstrated broader impact on an entire county or state population. This article describes the Durham Connects program, which aims to achieve broad county-level effects by coalescing community agencies to serve early-intervention goals…

  2. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  3. Parent Involvement in Early Childhood Home Visiting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korfmacher, Jon; Green, Beth; Staerkel, Fredi; Peterson, Carla; Cook, Gina; Roggman, Lori; Faldowski, Richard A.; Schiffman, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    This review provides an overview of an important aspect of early childhood home visiting research: understanding how parents are involved in program services and activities. Involvement is defined as the process of the parent connecting with and using the services of a program to the best of the client's and the program's ability. The term…

  4. Home Visitation Assessing Progress, Managing Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daro, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Early intervention efforts to promote healthy child development have long been a central feature of social service and public health reforms. Today, prenatal care, well-baby visits, and assessments to detect possible developmental delays are commonplace in most communities. Recently, child abuse prevention advocates have applied a developmental…

  5. 76 FR 81959 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention Study Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Homelessness Prevention... following information: Title of Proposal: Homelessness Prevention Study Site Visits. OMB Control Number, if... requirements associated with HUD's Homelessness Prevention Study Site Visits. This information...

  6. Fire Promotes Pollinator Visitation: Implications for Ameliorating Declines of Pollination Services

    PubMed Central

    Van Nuland, Michael E.; Haag, Elliot N.; Bryant, Jessica A. M.; Read, Quentin D.; Klein, Robert N.; Douglas, Morgan J.; Gorman, Courtney E.; Greenwell, Trey D.; Busby, Mark W.; Collins, Jonathan; LeRoy, Joseph T.; Schuchmann, George; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2013-01-01

    Pollinators serve critical roles for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and have an estimated annual value of over $150 billion for global agriculture. Mounting evidence from agricultural systems reveals that pollinators are declining in many regions of the world, and with a lack of information on whether pollinator communities in natural systems are following similar trends, identifying factors which support pollinator visitation and services are important for ameliorating the effects of the current global pollinator crisis. We investigated how fire affects resource structure and how that variation influences floral pollinator communities by comparing burn versus control treatments in a southeastern USA old-field system. We hypothesized and found a positive relationship between fire and plant density of a native forb, Verbesina alternifolia, as well as a significant difference in floral visitation of V. alternifolia between burn and control treatments. V. alternifolia density was 44% greater and floral visitation was 54% greater in burned treatments relative to control sites. When the density of V. alternifolia was experimentally reduced in the burn sites to equivalent densities observed in control sites, floral visitation in burned sites declined to rates found in control sites. Our results indicate that plant density is a proximal mechanism by which an imposed fire regime can indirectly impact floral visitation, suggesting its usefulness as a tool for management of pollination services. Although concerns surround the negative impacts of management, indirect positive effects may provide an important direction to explore for managing future ecological and conservation issues. Studies examining the interaction among resource concentration, plant apparency, and how fire affects the evolutionary consequences of altered patterns of floral visitation are overdue. PMID:24265787

  7. Fire promotes pollinator visitation: implications for ameliorating declines of pollination services.

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Michael E; Haag, Elliot N; Bryant, Jessica A M; Read, Quentin D; Klein, Robert N; Douglas, Morgan J; Gorman, Courtney E; Greenwell, Trey D; Busby, Mark W; Collins, Jonathan; Leroy, Joseph T; Schuchmann, George; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Bailey, Joseph K

    2013-01-01

    Pollinators serve critical roles for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and have an estimated annual value of over $150 billion for global agriculture. Mounting evidence from agricultural systems reveals that pollinators are declining in many regions of the world, and with a lack of information on whether pollinator communities in natural systems are following similar trends, identifying factors which support pollinator visitation and services are important for ameliorating the effects of the current global pollinator crisis. We investigated how fire affects resource structure and how that variation influences floral pollinator communities by comparing burn versus control treatments in a southeastern USA old-field system. We hypothesized and found a positive relationship between fire and plant density of a native forb, Verbesina alternifolia, as well as a significant difference in floral visitation of V. alternifolia between burn and control treatments. V. alternifolia density was 44% greater and floral visitation was 54% greater in burned treatments relative to control sites. When the density of V. alternifolia was experimentally reduced in the burn sites to equivalent densities observed in control sites, floral visitation in burned sites declined to rates found in control sites. Our results indicate that plant density is a proximal mechanism by which an imposed fire regime can indirectly impact floral visitation, suggesting its usefulness as a tool for management of pollination services. Although concerns surround the negative impacts of management, indirect positive effects may provide an important direction to explore for managing future ecological and conservation issues. Studies examining the interaction among resource concentration, plant apparency, and how fire affects the evolutionary consequences of altered patterns of floral visitation are overdue. PMID:24265787

  8. Life Satisfaction and Frequency of Doctor Visits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Park, Nansook; Sun, Jennifer K.; Smith, Jacqui; Peterson, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Identifying positive psychological factors that reduce health care use may lead to innovative efforts that help build a more sustainable and high quality health care system. Prospective studies indicate that life satisfaction is associated with good health behaviors, enhanced health, and longer life, but little information is available about the association between life satisfaction and health care use. We tested whether higher life satisfaction was prospectively associated with fewer doctor visits. We also examined potential interactions between life satisfaction and health behaviors. Methods Participants were 6,379 adults from the Health and Retirement Study, a prospective and nationally representative panel study of American adults over the age of 50. Participants were tracked for four years. We analyzed the data using a generalized linear model with a gamma distribution and log link. Results Higher life satisfaction was associated with fewer doctor visits. On a six-point life satisfaction scale, each unit increase in life satisfaction was associated with an 11% decrease in doctor visits—after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (RR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.86 to 0.93). The most satisfied respondents (N=1,121; 17.58%) made 44% fewer doctor visits than the least satisfied (N=182; 2.85%). The association between higher life satisfaction and reduced doctor visits remained even after adjusting for baseline health and a wide range of sociodemographic, psychosocial, and health-related covariates (RR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99). Conclusions Higher life satisfaction is associated with fewer doctor visits, which may have important implications for reducing health care costs. PMID:24336427

  9. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis.

  10. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  11. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  12. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  13. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  14. Finding regulatory elements and regulatory motifs: a general probabilistic framework

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Over the last two decades a large number of algorithms has been developed for regulatory motif finding. Here we show how many of these algorithms, especially those that model binding specificities of regulatory factors with position specific weight matrices (WMs), naturally arise within a general Bayesian probabilistic framework. We discuss how WMs are constructed from sets of regulatory sites, how sites for a given WM can be discovered by scanning of large sequences, how to cluster WMs, and more generally how to cluster large sets of sites from different WMs into clusters. We discuss how 'regulatory modules', clusters of sites for subsets of WMs, can be found in large intergenic sequences, and we discuss different methods for ab initio motif finding, including expectation maximization (EM) algorithms, and motif sampling algorithms. Finally, we extensively discuss how module finding methods and ab initio motif finding methods can be extended to take phylogenetic relations between the input sequences into account, i.e. we show how motif finding and phylogenetic footprinting can be integrated in a rigorous probabilistic framework. The article is intended for readers with a solid background in applied mathematics, and preferably with some knowledge of general Bayesian probabilistic methods. The main purpose of the article is to elucidate that all these methods are not a disconnected set of individual algorithmic recipes, but that they are just different facets of a single integrated probabilistic theory. PMID:17903285

  15. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Identification of a regulatory autophosphorylation site adjacent to the inhibitory and calmodulin-binding domains.

    PubMed

    Schworer, C M; Colbran, R J; Keefer, J R; Soderling, T R

    1988-09-25

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) autophosphorylated under limiting conditions (7 microM [gamma-32P]ATP, 500 microM magnesium acetate, 4 degrees C) was analyzed by CNBr cleavage and peptide mapping to determine the site of autophosphorylation that brings about transition of the kinase to the Ca2+-independent form. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (C3) revealed one major CN-Br 32P-peptide (CB1) that eluted at about 6% propanol. This peptide contained [32P]threonine, but almost no [32P]serine, and migrated as a single band (Mr = 3000-3500) in polyacrylamide gels run in the presence of urea and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The properties of CB1 were compared to the properties of a 26-residue synthetic peptide containing the CaM-binding and inhibitory domains as well as a consensus phosphorylation sequence (-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr-) of rat brain CaM-kinase II (residues 282-307 and 283-308 of the alpha and beta subunits, respectively). CB1 and the synthetic peptide comigrated in urea/sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, co-eluted from reverse phase HPLC (C3 and C18) and from Sephadex G-50, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent calmodulin-binding properties. When the two peptides were subjected to automated Edman sequence analysis, both exhibited a burst of 32P release at cycle 5, which is consistent with the expected amino-terminal sequence of the two peptides, i.e. His-Arg-Gln-Glu-Thr(PO4)-. These findings indicate that autophosphorylation of Thr286 (alpha subunit) and Thr287 (beta subunit) is responsible for transition of CaM-kinase II to the Ca2+-independent form. PMID:3417668

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Binding Sites and Structural Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 Reveal that It Is a DNA-Binding Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haidai; Dong, Jiazhen; Liang, Deguang; Gao, Zengqiang; Bai, Lei; Sun, Rui; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to encode four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4) to subvert the host antiviral immune response, but their detailed DNA-binding profiles as transcription factors in the host remain uncharacterized. Here, we first performed genome-wide vIRF2-binding site mapping in the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). vIRF2 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of 100 putative target genes. Importantly, we confirmed that vIRF2 can specifically interact with the promoters of the genes encoding PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL, which are associated with autophagosome formation or tumor progression and metastasis, and regulate their transcription in vivo. The crystal structure of the vIRF2 DNA-binding domain (DBD) (referred to here as vIRF2DBD) showed variable loop conformations and positive-charge distributions different from those of vIRF1 and cellular IRFs that are associated with DNA-binding specificities. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that Arg82 and Arg85 are required for the in vitro DNA-binding activity of vIRF2DBD and can abolish the transcription regulation function of vIRF2 on the promoter reporter activity of PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL. Collectively, our study provided unique insights into the DNA-binding potency of vIRF2 and suggested that vIRF2 could act as a transcription factor of its target genes in the host antiviral immune response. IMPORTANCE The oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to subvert the host antiviral immune responses by encoding four homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4). However, none of their DNA-binding profiles in the human genome have been characterized until now, and the structural basis for their diverse

  17. A practical three visit complete denture system.

    PubMed

    Ling, B C

    2000-10-01

    Standard prosthodontic procedures require five visits to construct a set of complete maxillary and mandibular dentures. Various attempts have been made to reduce these procedures to four or three appointments. However, most of these techniques require the use of visible light polymerized resin as the final denture base materials. Visible light-cured resin materials have inferior physical properties and biocompatibility problems as compared with heat cured polymethylmethacrylate. This paper describes a system of complete denture construction which requires three clinical appointments instead of the usual five visits. This system is made possible by using the VLC base/tray material as the preliminary impression material as well as the application of a new biometric wax occlusion rim. It retains the use of polymethylmethacrylate as the denture base material. This system also utilizes all the procedures used in the conventional five appointment system of complete denture construction. PMID:11709981

  18. National Ice Center Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Meg

    2002-01-01

    The long-term goal of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Visiting Scientist Program at the National Ice Center (NIC) is to recruit the highest quality visiting scientists in the ice research community for the broad purpose of strengthening the relationship between the operational and research communities in the atmospheric and oceanic sciences. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research supports the scientific community by creating, conducting, and coordinating projects that strengthen education and research in the atmospheric, oceanic and earth sciences. UCAR accomplishes this mission by building partnerships that are national or global in scope. The goal of UCAR is to enable researchers and educators to take on issues and activities that require the combined and collaborative capabilities of a broadly engaged scientific community.

  19. Neuroscientists’ Classroom Visits Positively Impact Student Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Fitzakerley, Janet L.; Michlin, Michael L.; Paton, John; Dubinsky, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    The primary recommendation of the 2010 President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists’ visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners’ perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4th-6th grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students’ interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change). Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to primary school

  20. Building Relationships by Revisiting Home Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Carol B.

    2011-01-01

    The author can't think of any better way to begin a relationship with a young school-bound child than to make a home visit. Home is where the heart is. Home is where the child feels most comfortable, where a child feels safe. When he is at home, a child can more easily welcome a new adult into his world and take the lead in establishing this…

  1. Neuroscientists' classroom visits positively impact student attitudes.

    PubMed

    Fitzakerley, Janet L; Michlin, Michael L; Paton, John; Dubinsky, Janet M

    2013-01-01

    The primary recommendation of the 2010 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report on K-12 education was to inspire more students so that they are motivated to study science. Scientists' visits to classrooms are intended to inspire learners and increase their interest in science, but verifications of this impact are largely qualitative. Our primary goal was to evaluate the impact of a longstanding Brain Awareness classroom visit program focused on increasing learners understanding of their own brains. Educational psychologists have established that neuroscience training sessions can improve academic performance and shift attitudes of students from a fixed mindset to a growth mindset. Our secondary goal was to determine whether short interactive Brain Awareness scientist-in-the-classroom sessions could similarly alter learners' perceptions of their own potential to learn. Teacher and student surveys were administered in 4(th)-6(th) grade classrooms throughout Minnesota either before or after one-hour Brain Awareness sessions that engaged students in activities related to brain function. Teachers rated the Brain Awareness program as very valuable and said that the visits stimulated students' interest in the brain and in science. Student surveys probed general attitudes towards science and their knowledge of neuroscience concepts (particularly the ability of the brain to change). Significant favorable improvements were found on 10 of 18 survey statements. Factor analyses of 4805 responses demonstrated that Brain Awareness presentations increased positive attitudes toward science and improved agreement with statements related to growth mindset. Overall effect sizes were small, consistent with the short length of the presentations. Thus, the impact of Brain Awareness presentations was positive and proportional to the efforts expended, demonstrating that short, scientist-in-the-classroom visits can make a positive contribution to primary school

  2. John Dewey's Visits to Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    John Dewey visited Hawai'i on three separate occasions. Of all three trips, by far the most important, as far as Dewey's influence on education in Hawai'i is concerned, was in 1899 when he came with his wife, Alice Chipman Dewey, to help launch the University Extension program in Honolulu. The Deweys' second trip was a very brief one--twenty years…

  3. Visit of the Federal President of Germany

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-05

    Le D.G. H.Schopper a le plaisir de souhaiter la bienvenue au président de la République fédérale allemande, Richard von Weizsäcker (président féderale de 1984-1994). C'est la première visite d'un président allemand dans l'histoire du Cern.

  4. Visit of the Federal President of Germany

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le D.G. H.Schopper a le plaisir de souhaiter la bienvenue au président de la République fédérale allemande, Richard von Weizsäcker (président féderale de 1984-1994). C'est la première visite d'un président allemand dans l'histoire du Cern.

  5. Environmental Field Trips - Some Places to Visit in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meetre, Jeff

    This publication lists 40 places in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area that could be visited on an environmental field trip. The sites are placed into five categories: (1) Air Monitoring; (2) Ecology and Nature Study; (3) Solid Waste Management; (4) Wastewater Treatment; and (5) Water Supply. Each entry includes name, address, and phone number…

  6. The Unequal Effect of Adequate Yearly Progress: Evidence from School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abigail B.; Clift, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report insights, based on annual site visits to elementary and middle schools in three states from 2004 to 2006, into the incentive effect of the No Child Left Behind Act's requirement that increasing percentages of students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in every public school. They develop a framework, drawing on the physics…

  7. Randomized Trial of a Statewide Home Visiting Program: Impact in Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Anne; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Burrell, Lori; Higman, Susan M.; Windham, Amy; Sia, Calvin

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of home visiting in preventing child abuse and neglect in the first 3 years of life in families identified as at-risk of child abuse through population-based screening at the child's birth. Methods: This experimental study focused on Hawaii Healthy Start Program (HSP) sites operated by three community-based…

  8. Parental Engagement in Home Visiting Programs--Findings from the Parents as Teachers Multisite Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Mary; Spiker, Donna; Gerlach-Downie, Suzanne; Hernandez, Frances

    This report presents the findings of a reassessment of an ongoing, multi-site evaluation of the Parents as Teachers (PAT) home visiting program. The evaluation had, from its inception, included data collection and analyses regarding engagement; however, a reassessment of research questions driving the evaluation shifted engagement from a secondary…

  9. Factors relating to patient visit time with a physician.

    PubMed

    Migongo, Alice W; Charnigo, Richard; Love, Margaret M; Kryscio, Richard; Fleming, Steven T; Pearce, Kevin A

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to identify factors that increase or decrease patient time with a physician, determine which combinations of factors are associated with the shortest and longest visits to physicians, quantify how much physicians contribute to variation in the time they spend with patients, and assess how well patient time with a physician can be predicted. Data were acquired from a modified replication of the 1997-1998 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, administered by the Kentucky Ambulatory Network to 56 primary care clinicians at 24 practice sites in 2001 and 2002. A regression tree and a linear mixed model (LMM) were used to discover multivariate associations between patient time with a physician and 22 potentially predictive factors. Patient time with a physician was related to the number of diagnoses, whether non-illness care was received, and whether the patient had been seen before by the physician or someone at the practice. Approximately 38% of the variation in patient time with a physician was accounted for by predictive factors in the tree; roughly 33% was explained by predictive factors in the LMM, with another 12% linked to physicians. Knowledge of patient characteristics and needs could be used to schedule office visits, potentially improving patient flow through a clinic and reducing waiting times. PMID:21393556

  10. Practice visits as a tool in quality improvement: mutual visits and feedback by peers compared with visits and feedback by non-physician observers

    PubMed Central

    Van den Hombergh, P.; Grol, R.; van den Hoogen, H.; van den Bosch, W.

    1999-01-01

    Objective - To evaluate and compare the effects of two programmes of assessment of practice management in a practice visit: mutual visits and feedback by peers compared with visits and feedback by non- physician observers. Design - Prospective, randomised intervention study, with follow up after one year. Setting - General practices in the Netherlands in 1993 and 1994. Subjects - A total of 90 general practitioners (GPs) in 68 practices; follow up after one year comprised 81 GPs in 62 practices. Main measures - Scores on indicators and dimensions of practice management in the visit instrument to assess practice management and organisation (a validated Dutch method to assess practice management in a practice visit). Change was defined as the difference in score between the first visit and the visit after one year on 208 indicators and on 33 dimensions of practice management. Results - Data of 44 mutual visits by peers were compared with data of 46 visits by non-physician observers. After a year both programmes showed improvements on many aspects of practice management, but different aspects changed in each of the two programmes. After mutual practice visits, GPs scored significantly higher on content of the doctor's bag, on collaboration with colleagues, on collaboration with other care providers, and on accessibility of patient information than after a visit by a non-physician observer. The visits by non-physician observers resulted in a higher score on extent of use of records and on assessment on outcome and year report. Conclusion - Change after mutual practice visits and feedback by peers is more marked than after a visit and feedback by a non-physician observer. PMID:10847872

  11. Historic Sites and Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Academics debate the veracity of historic sites and what they represent, but no one that has visited historic places as a student, or traveled with students to historic places, can deny their power to teach. Every community has historic sites. Historic sites are, by definition, primary sources. They are artifacts of the past that often contain a…

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Rhode Island. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Rhode Island statutes vest in the Public Utility Commission and the Division of Public Utilities the exclusive power and authority to regulate public utility companies in that state. Both bodies have been established within the Department of Business Regulation but are independent of the Department's director and are not under his jurisdiction. The jurisdiction to regulate utilities is shared by the Commission and the Division. The Commission serves as a quasi-judicial tribunal with jurisdiction, powers, and duties to hold investigations and hearings involving rates, sufficiency and resonableness of facilities, gas, electric, water, and pipeline public utilities. The administrator, who is chief executive officer of the Division, is responsible for exercising the jurisdiction, supervision, powers, and duties not specifically assigned to the Commission. By virtue of his office, the chairman of the Commission serves also as the administrator and he supervises and directs the execution of all laws relating to public utilities and carriers and all regulations and orders of the Commission governing the conduct and charges of public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Genes co-regulated with LBD16 in nematode feeding sites inferred from in silico analysis show similarities to regulatory circuits mediated by the auxin/cytokinin balance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Javier; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Plant endoparasitic nematodes, root-knot and cyst nematodes (RKNs and CNs) induce within the root vascular cylinder transfer cells used for nourishing, termed giant cells (GCs) and syncytia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this process is essential to develop tools for nematode control. Based on the crucial role in gall development of LBD16, also a key component of the auxin pathway leading to the divisions in the xylem pole pericycle during lateral root (LR) formation, we investigated genes co-regulated with LBD16 in different transcriptomes and analyzed their similarities and differences with those of RKNs and CNs feeding sites (FS). This analysis confirmed LBD16 and its co-regulated genes, integrated in signaling cascades mediated by auxins during LR and callus formation, as a particular feature of RKN-FS distinct to CNs. However, LBD16, and its positively co-regulated genes, were repressed in syncytia, suggesting a selective down- regulation of the LBD16 auxin mediated pathways in CNs-FS. Interestingly, cytokinin-induced genes are enriched in syncytia and we encountered similarities between the transcriptome of shoot regeneration from callus, modulated by cytokinins, and that of syncytia. These findings establish differences in the regulatory networks leading to both FS formation, probably modulated by the auxin/cytokinin balance. PMID:25664644

  14. Genes co-regulated with LBD16 in nematode feeding sites inferred from in silico analysis show similarities to regulatory circuits mediated by the auxin/cytokinin balance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Plant endoparasitic nematodes, root-knot and cyst nematodes (RKNs and CNs) induce within the root vascular cylinder transfer cells used for nourishing, termed giant cells (GCs) and syncytia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this process is essential to develop tools for nematode control. Based on the crucial role in gall development of LBD16, also a key component of the auxin pathway leading to the divisions in the xylem pole pericycle during lateral root (LR) formation, we investigated genes co-regulated with LBD16 in different transcriptomes and analyzed their similarities and differences with those of RKNs and CNs feeding sites (FS). This analysis confirmed LBD16 and its co-regulated genes, integrated in signaling cascades mediated by auxins during LR and callus formation, as a particular feature of RKN-FS distinct to CNs. However, LBD16, and its positively co-regulated genes, were repressed in syncytia, suggesting a selective down- regulation of the LBD16 auxin mediated pathways in CNs-FS. Interestingly, cytokinin-induced genes are enriched in syncytia and we encountered similarities between the transcriptome of shoot regeneration from callus, modulated by cytokinins, and that of syncytia. These findings establish differences in the regulatory networks leading to both FS formation, probably modulated by the auxin/cytokinin balance.

  15. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Mississippi. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Mississippi is vested generally in the Public Service Commission, composed of three members elected for four year terms from separate districts of the state. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. It is empowered to amend municipal franchises that contain provisions conflicting with its exclusive jurisdiction over the rates and standards of service of public utilities. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. They may also operate their own utilities which are totally exempt from Commission control, unless they provide services more than one mile beyond their corporate boundaries. Other than a procedure in which certain provisions in municipal franchises may be subject to modification by the Commission, there is no process by which the decisions of local government respecting utilities are reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Pennsylvania. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is generally vested in the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The Commission is comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of two-thirds of the senate. Commission members are appointed for 10 year terms. They must be free from any employment which is incompatible with the duties of the Commission, and are subject to a statutory code of ethics. The Commission is charged with responsibility for enforcing the Public Utility Law. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. The Commission, for example, may grant exemptions from local zoning requirements, and has approving authority over privileges or franchises granted by municipalities to public utilities. The Commission, however, has no authority over municipally owned utilities operating within municipal boundaries. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Michigan. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Michigan Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commission members are appointed for six-year terms. They must be free from pecuniary and employment interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is vested with complete power and jurisdiction to regulate all public utilities in the state except any municipally-owned utility. The Commission may not change any rates fixed in or regulated by a franchise granted by a municipality. Upon submission to the Commission by the municipality and the public utility operating in the municipality, the Commission may investigate and fix rates and establish rules and conditions of service. The jurisdiction of the Commission extends to all public utilities except municipally-owned utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Genetic flexibility of regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Alexander; Tuboly, Csaba; Horváth, Péter; Krishna, Sandeep; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2010-07-20

    Gene regulatory networks are based on simple building blocks such as promoters, transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites on DNA. But how diverse are the functions that can be obtained by different arrangements of promoters and TF binding sites? In this work we constructed synthetic regulatory regions using promoter elements and binding sites of two noninteracting TFs, each sensing a single environmental input signal. We show that simply by combining these three kinds of elements, we can obtain 11 of the 16 Boolean logic gates that integrate two environmental signals in vivo. Further, we demonstrate how combination of logic gates can result in new logic functions. Our results suggest that simple elements of transcription regulation form a highly flexible toolbox that can generate diverse functions under natural selection.

  19. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... services as defined in part 410, subpart G of this chapter; or a qualified provider of outpatient diabetes... visit also includes a separately billable medical nutrition therapy visit or a diabetes outpatient...

  20. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... services as defined in part 410, subpart G of this chapter; or a qualified provider of outpatient diabetes... visit also includes a separately billable medical nutrition therapy visit or a diabetes outpatient...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... services as defined in part 410, subpart G of this chapter; or a qualified provider of outpatient diabetes... visit also includes a separately billable medical nutrition therapy visit or a diabetes outpatient...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2463 - What constitutes a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... services as defined in part 410, subpart G of this chapter; or a qualified provider of outpatient diabetes... visit also includes a separately billable medical nutrition therapy visit or a diabetes outpatient...

  3. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoungjip; Kang, Seungwoo; Ha, Jin-Young; Song, Junehwa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user's place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit patterns in shopping malls. To achieve the goal, VisitSense employs accurate visit detection and prediction methods. For accurate visit detection, we develop a change-based detection method to take into consideration the stability change of ambient radio and the mobility change of users. It performs well in large shopping malls where ambient radio is quite noisy and causes existing algorithms to easily fail. In addition, we proposed a causality-based visit prediction model to capture the causality in the sequential visit patterns for effective prediction. We have developed a VisitSense prototype system, and a visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising application that is based on it. Furthermore, we deploy the system in the COEX Mall, one of the largest shopping malls in Korea, and conduct diverse experiments to show the effectiveness of VisitSense. PMID:26193275

  4. VisitSense: Sensing Place Visit Patterns from Ambient Radio on Smartphones for Targeted Mobile Ads in Shopping Malls

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byoungjip; Kang, Seungwoo; Ha, Jin-Young; Song, Junehwa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel smartphone framework called VisitSense that automatically detects and predicts a smartphone user’s place visits from ambient radio to enable behavioral targeting for mobile ads in large shopping malls. VisitSense enables mobile app developers to adopt visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising for shopping mall visitors in their apps. It also benefits mobile users by allowing them to receive highly relevant mobile ads that are aware of their place visit patterns in shopping malls. To achieve the goal, VisitSense employs accurate visit detection and prediction methods. For accurate visit detection, we develop a change-based detection method to take into consideration the stability change of ambient radio and the mobility change of users. It performs well in large shopping malls where ambient radio is quite noisy and causes existing algorithms to easily fail. In addition, we proposed a causality-based visit prediction model to capture the causality in the sequential visit patterns for effective prediction. We have developed a VisitSense prototype system, and a visit-pattern-aware mobile advertising application that is based on it. Furthermore, we deploy the system in the COEX Mall, one of the largest shopping malls in Korea, and conduct diverse experiments to show the effectiveness of VisitSense. PMID:26193275

  5. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  6. Clinic Visit Data as a Tool to Improve Student Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamping, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Typically, the number of student visits to a school clinic is interesting only to the health services department as a metric for setting levels for clinic staffing and medical supply stocking. However, the number of visits and the reasons for those visits can gauge a school's indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and can motivate the facility…

  7. Visiting Professorships Take on New Uses in Changing Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Sydni

    2013-01-01

    In a tight job market, visiting professorships can be appealing way stations for new Ph.D.'s while they search for permanent posts. Unlike adjunct positions, which are often renewed semester by semester, visiting professorships are set by annual or even multiyear contracts, with most capped at three years. The visiting jobs often come with health…

  8. Grandparent Visitation Rights: An Inappropriate Intrusion or Appropriate Protection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Pat M.; Wacker, Robbyn R.

    2002-01-01

    Increased divorce rates, longevity in multi-generational families, and activism by older persons are a part of the context in which the role of grandparents in the family, an overview of grandparent visitation statutes, and controversy about visitation rights are discussed. The history and characteristics of grandparent visitation statutes, the…

  9. Hillary Clinton visits Pathfinder projects in Brazil.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In October 1995, US First Lady Hillary Clinton visited a maternity hospital in Salvador, Brazil, in which a family planning (FP)/reproductive health program has been administered by Pathfinder International since 1981 with funding from USAID. During her tour of the facility, Clinton learned about the high degree of unmet need for FP in the region which results from a lack of sufficient resources to meet demand. Clinton, in turn, praised the state of Bahia for its emphasis on FP in low-income areas.

  10. A Home Visit Checklist to Reduce Rehospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Wood, Sharon L

    2015-09-01

    Hospital readmission rates have become the subject of national attention among healthcare providers. Home healthcare agencies work to bridge the gap between hospital and home/community, and share a vested interest in reducing hospital readmissions. Evidence supports the use of checklists to improve safety and decrease risk by reducing errors of omission, facilitating communication and improving clinician accountability. This article proposes that the use of checklists in home healthcare agencies may reduce rehospitalizations, and presents the experience of a large home healthcare agency's creation and implementation of a pilot study to introduce a home visit checklist. PMID:26323007

  11. [The visit prior to returning home].

    PubMed

    Blond, Héléne

    2015-01-01

    Towards the end of a hospital stay, the question of the elderly person's future is raised. Depending on the situation, a return home, follow-up and rehabilitation care or admission to a nursing home may be envisaged. When a return home is considered, the preparatory home visit is important, both for the nursing team as well as for the patient and their family, as it enables the feasibility and suitability of the project to be assessed. Often coming down to an assessment regarding accessibility, it also makes the patient and their family think about the capacities of the hospitalised person and their future day-to-day reality.

  12. Hillary Clinton visits Pathfinder projects in Brazil.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In October 1995, US First Lady Hillary Clinton visited a maternity hospital in Salvador, Brazil, in which a family planning (FP)/reproductive health program has been administered by Pathfinder International since 1981 with funding from USAID. During her tour of the facility, Clinton learned about the high degree of unmet need for FP in the region which results from a lack of sufficient resources to meet demand. Clinton, in turn, praised the state of Bahia for its emphasis on FP in low-income areas. PMID:12179683

  13. The preteen visit: an opportunity for prevention.

    PubMed

    Campos-Outcalt, Doug

    2006-12-01

    All early adolescents should visit a physician at age 11 or 12 years to receive a set of recommended vaccines. Two vaccines are recommended for boys in this age group-quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap). Three vaccines are recommended for girls--MCV4, Tdap, and human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. In addition, 2 doses of varicella vaccine are now recommended before age 5 years; both boys and girls at age 11 or 12 who have received only 1 dose should be given a second. PMID:17137541

  14. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site. [R

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  15. Quasi-Experimental Pilot Study of Intervention to Increase Participant Retention and Completed Home Visits in the Nurse-Family Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Ingoldsby, Erin M.; Baca, Pilar; McClatchey, Maureen W.; Luckey, Dennis W.; Ramsey, Mildred O.; Loch, Joan M.; Lewis, Jan; Blackaby, Terrie S.; Petrini, Mary B.; Smith, Bobbie J.; McHale, Mollie; Perhacs, Marianne; Olds, David L.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated an intervention to increase participant retention and engagement in community practice settings of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), an evidence-based program of nurse home visiting for low-income, first-time parents. Using a quasi-experimental design (six intervention and 11 controls sites that delivered the NFP), we compared intervention and control sites on retention and number of completed home visits during a 10-month period after the intervention was initiated. Nurses at the 5 intervention sites were guided in tailoring the frequency, duration, and content of the visits to participants’ needs. NFP nurses at the control sites delivered the program as usual. At intervention sites, participant retention and completed home visits increased from the pre-intervention to intervention periods, while at control sites these outcomes decreased from the pre-intervention to intervention periods, leading to a significant intervention-control difference in change in participant retention (Hazard Ratio: 0.42, p = .015) and a 1.4 visit difference in change in completed home visits (p<.001, ES = 0.36). We conclude that training nurse home visitors to promote adaptation of program dosage and content to meet families’ needs shows promise as a way to improve participant retention and completed home visits. PMID:23832657

  16. National Ice Center Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Meg

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the work done by Dr. Kim Partington were to manage NASA's polar research program, including its strategic direction, research funding and interagency and international collaborations. The objectives of the UCAR Visiting Scientist Program at the National Ice Center (NIC) are to: (1) Manage a visiting scientist program for the NIC Science Center in support of the mission of the NIC; (2) Provide a pool of researchers who will share expertise with the NIC and the science community; (3) Facilitate communications between the research and operational communities for the purpose of identifying work ready for validation and transition to an operational environment; and (4) Act as a focus for interagency cooperation. The NIC mission is to provide worldwide operational sea ice analyses and forecasts for the armed forces of the US and allied nations, the Departments of Commerce and Transportation, and other US Government and international agencies, and the civil sector. The NIC produces these analyses and forecasts of Arctic, Antarctic, Great Lakes, and Chesapeake Bay ice conditions to support customers with global, regional, and tactical scale interests. The NIC regularly deploys Naval Ice Center NAVICECEN Ice Reconnaissance personnel to the Arctic and Antarctica in order to perform aerial ice observation and analysis in support of NIC customers. NIC ice data are a key part of the US contribution to international global climate and ocean observing systems.

  17. First Visiting Astronomers at VLT KUEYEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    A Deep Look into the Universal Hall of Mirrors Starting in the evening of April 1, 2000, Ghislain Golse and Francisco Castander from the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (Toulouse, France) [1] were the first "visiting astronomers" at Paranal to carry out science observations with the second 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescope, KUEYEN . Using the FORS2 multi-mode instrument as a spectrograph, they measured the distances to a number of very remote galaxies, located far out in space behind two clusters of galaxies. Such observations may help to determine the values of cosmological parameters that define the geometry and fate of the Universe. After two nights of observations, the astronomers came away from Paranal with a rich harvest of data and a good feeling. "We are delighted that the telescope performed so well. It is really impressive how far out one can reach with the VLT, compared to the `smaller' 4-meter telescopes with which we previously observed. It opens a new window towards the distant, early Universe. Now we are eager to start reducing and analysing these data!" , Francisco Castander said. Measuring the Geometry of the Universe with Multiple Images in Cluster Lenses The present programme is typical of the fundamental cosmological studies that are now being undertaken with the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). Clusters of galaxies are very massive objects. Their gravitational fields intensify ("magnify") and distort the images of galaxies behind them. The magnification factor for the faint background galaxy population seen within a few arcminutes of the centre of a massive cluster at intermediate distance (redshift z ~ 0.2 - 0.4, i.e., corresponding to a look-back time of approx. 2 - 4 billion years) is typically larger than 2, and occasionally much larger. The clusters thus function as gravitational lenses . They may be regarded as "natural telescopes" that help us to see fainter objects further out into space than would otherwise be possible with our own telescopes. In a

  18. New Research Strengthens Home Visiting Field: The Pew Home Visiting Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doggett, Libby

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that home visiting parental education programs improve child and family outcomes, and they save money for states and taxpayers. Now, the next generation of research is deepening understanding of those program elements that are essential to success, ways to improve existing models, and factors to consider in tailoring…

  19. Visiting People on a Dairy Farm [and] Visiting People on a Dairy Farm: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    These booklets are designed to present an elementary-level unit that describes a visit to a dairy farm. In a narrative format with many black and white photographs, the student booklet explains some typical activities, such as milking and haying, on the Schwartzbeck dairy farm in Maryland. The booklet is divided into seven parts, each of which can…

  20. Weather and Prey Predict Mammals' Visitation to Water.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant; Sanderson, James G; Erz, Jon; Lehnen, Sarah E; Butler, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Throughout many arid lands of Africa, Australia and the United States, wildlife agencies provide water year-round for increasing game populations and enhancing biodiversity, despite concerns that water provisioning may favor species more dependent on water, increase predation, and reduce biodiversity. In part, understanding the effects of water provisioning requires identifying why and when animals visit water. Employing this information, by matching water provisioning with use by target species, could assist wildlife management objectives while mitigating unintended consequences of year-round watering regimes. Therefore, we examined if weather variables (maximum temperature, relative humidity [RH], vapor pressure deficit [VPD], long and short-term precipitation) and predator-prey relationships (i.e., prey presence) predicted water visitation by 9 mammals. We modeled visitation as recorded by trail cameras at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA (June 2009 to September 2014) using generalized linear modeling. For 3 native ungulates, elk (Cervus Canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), less long-term precipitation and higher maximum temperatures increased visitation, including RH for mule deer. Less long-term precipitation and higher VPD increased oryx (Oryx gazella) and desert cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus audubonii) visitation. Long-term precipitation, with RH or VPD, predicted visitation for black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus). Standardized model coefficients demonstrated that the amount of long-term precipitation influenced herbivore visitation most. Weather (especially maximum temperature) and prey (cottontails and jackrabbits) predicted bobcat (Lynx rufus) visitation. Mule deer visitation had the largest influence on coyote (Canis latrans) visitation. Puma (Puma concolor) visitation was solely predicted by prey visitation (elk, mule deer, oryx). Most ungulate visitation peaked during May and

  1. Microgravity sciences application visiting scientist program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin; Vanalstine, James

    1995-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center pursues scientific research in the area of low-gravity effects on materials and processes. To facilitate these Government performed research responsibilities, a number of supplementary research tasks were accomplished by a group of specialized visiting scientists. They participated in work on contemporary research problems with specific objectives related to current or future space flight experiments and defined and established independent programs of research which were based on scientific peer review and the relevance of the defined research to NASA microgravity for implementing a portion of the national program. The programs included research in the following areas: protein crystal growth, X-ray crystallography and computer analysis of protein crystal structure, optimization and analysis of protein crystal growth techniques, and design and testing of flight hardware.

  2. Re-visiting the electrophysiology of language.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    This editorial accompanies a special issue of Brain and Language re-visiting old themes and new leads in the electrophysiology of language. The event-related potential (ERP) as a series of characteristic deflections ("components") over time and their distribution on the scalp has been exploited by speech and language researchers over decades to find support for diverse psycholinguistic models. Fortunately, methodological and statistical advances have allowed human neuroscience to move beyond some of the limitations imposed when looking at the ERP only. Most importantly, we currently witness a refined and refreshed look at "event-related" (in the literal sense) brain activity that relates itself more closely to the actual neurobiology of speech and language processes. It is this imminent change in handling and interpreting electrophysiological data of speech and language experiments that this special issue intends to capture.

  3. Trip report for field visit to Fayetteville Shale gas wells.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-09-30

    This report describes a visit to several gas well sites in the Fayetteville Shale on August 9, 2007. I met with George Sheffer, Desoto Field Manager for SEECO, Inc. (a large gas producer in Arkansas). We talked in his Conway, Arkansas, office for an hour and a half about the processes and technologies that SEECO uses. We then drove into the field to some of SEECO's properties to see first-hand what the well sites looked like. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) made several funding awards under a program called Low Impact Natural Gas and Oil (LINGO). One of the projects that received an award is 'Probabilistic Risk-Based Decision Support for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Facilities in Sensitive Ecosystems'. The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville has the lead on the project, and Argonne National Laboratory is a partner. The goal of the project is to develop a Web-based decision support tool that will be used by mid- and small-sized oil and gas companies as well as environmental regulators and other stakeholders to proactively minimize adverse ecosystem impacts associated with the recovery of gas reserves in sensitive areas. The project focuses on a large new natural gas field called the Fayetteville Shale. Part of the project involves learning how the natural gas operators do business in the area and the technologies they employ. The field trip on August 9 provided an opportunity to do that.

  4. Maternal Psychological Distress and Visitation to the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Michelle M; Rossman, Beverly; Patra, Kousiki; Kratovil, Amanda; Khan, Samah; Meier, Paula P

    2016-01-01

    Aim To examine associations between maternal NICU visitation rates, maternal psychological distress (“distress”), and preterm infant outcome post-NICU discharge in a contemporary cohort of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Methods This was a prospective study of 69 mothers and their VLBW infants. Distress was assessed 1 month post-birth, 2 weeks prior to NICU discharge and after NICU discharge at 4 months corrected age [CA]. Maternal NICU visitation rates were calculated for the first 2 weeks and 1 month post-birth as well as for the entire NICU hospitalization. Regression analyses adjusted for the impact of 1. maternal and infant characteristics and distress on maternal visitation rates and 2. the impact of visitation on long-term maternal distress, and rates of infant clinic attendance and rehospitalization. Results Greater number of children in the home, maternal exposure to a greater number of potentially traumatic events prior to childbirth, and lower maternal anxiety consistently predicted lower visitation rate. Lower maternal visitation rate predicted higher maternal depression scores at infants’ 4 month CA visit. Maternal NICU visitation rate did not predict post-NICU discharge infant clinic attendance or rehospitalization. Conclusion Distress is an important predictor of visitation. In turn, visitation is associated with long-term maternal distress. PMID:25684177

  5. Regulatory Autonomy and Performance: The Reform of Higher Education Re-Visited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Jurgen; de Boer, Harry; Weyer, Elke

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to contribute to the understanding of organizational autonomy and control in higher education reform and related expectations as regards the performance of universities. Our analyses draws on principal-agent models as a normative theory of policy reform, and institutionalist approaches in public policy and…

  6. UTOPIA: a consultation system for visit-by-visit diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, T; Roudsari, A V; Leicester, H J; Theodorou, T; Carson, E R; Sönksen, P H

    1996-01-01

    UTOPIA (UTilities for OPtimizing Insulin Adjustment) is a prototype computer system proposed to support home data analysis and therapy recommendations for the individual patient. The paper describes methods of analysis and their incorporation into an overall system design that matches the iterative practices at the physician-patient consultation from visit to visit. Four modules support home data display and comparison with clinical measurements; extraction of blood glucose trends and daily cycles using time series analysis, learning relationships between insulin adjustments and changes in time series patterns via a parametric, linear systems model; and advice generation by solving the linear equation for candidate insulin adjustments. Concepts and methods are placed in context, with a discussion of comparable and related research.

  7. Low correlation between visit-to-visit variability and 24-hour variability of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi; Diaz, Keith M.; Newman, Jonathan; Sloan, Richard P.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the need for obtaining blood pressure (BP) at multiple visits to calculate VVV, substituting BP variability from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) may be a practical alternative. We assessed the correlation between VVV of BP and BP variability from ABPM using data from 146 untreated, mostly normotensive participants (mean age 47.9 years) in a substudy of the ongoing Masked Hypertension Study. VVV of SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was estimated by the standard deviation (SDvvv) and average real variability (ARVvvv) from 6 study visits over a median of 216 days. ABPM data were used to calculate the day-night SD (SDdn) and the ARV of SBP and DBP over 24 hours (ARV24). For SBP, the mean SDvvv and SDdn were 6.3 (SD=2.5) and 8.8 (SD=1.8) mmHg, respectively, and mean ARVvvv and ARV24 were 7.2 (SD=3.2) and 8.4 (SD=2.1) mmHg, respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficient between SDvvv and SDdn of SBP was rs=0.25 and between ARVvvv and ARV24 was rs=0.17. Participants in the highest quartile of SDdn of SBP were 1.66 (95% CI: 0.93 – 2.75) times more likely to be in the highest quartile of SDvvv of SBP. The observed-to-expected ratio between the highest quartiles of ARVvvv and ARV24 of SBP was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.41 – 1.69). The correlations for SDvvv and SDdn and ARVvvv and ARV24 of DBP were minimal. These data suggest VVV and 24-hour variability are weakly correlated and not interchangeable. PMID:23784506

  8. Flowers visited by hummingbirds in the open habitats of the southeastern Brazilian mountaintops: species composition and seasonality.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Rodrigues, M

    2014-08-01

    The hummingbird-visited plant community located on the open-habitat mountaintop of the Espinhaço Range was studied for two years (from August 2007 to July 2009) in Serra do Cipó National Park, Southeastern Brazil (19° 15' S and 43° 31' W). The floral characteristics and flowering period of the hummingbird-visited plants was monthly recorded along trails located in three vegetation types: (1) typical campos rupestres (TCR), (2) open fields (OPF), and (3) capões de mata (CAM). Hummingbird visitation was observed in 51 plant species, 22 ornithophilous and 29 non-ornithophilous species. The TCR showed the greatest number of species visited (N = 38), followed by the OPF (N = 18) and CAM (N = 17). Six species of hummingbirds were recorded visiting flowers: Augastes scutatus, Campylopterus largipennis, Colibri serrirostris, Chlorostilbon lucidus, Eupetomena macroura and Phaethornis pretrei. This study demonstrates that the species richness and the number of ornithophilous species visited by the hummingbirds at the study site are more similar to hummingbird-plant communities of the Atlantic Forest than to those of the Cerrado communities and other Brazilian highland open-habitat communities. The plant families most visited by hummingbirds were Bromeliaceae and Asteraceae. Although the Asteraceae family is rarely used as a food resource for hummingbirds in other high and lowland communities, in the study site this family is used mainly by the endemic hummingbird Augastes scutatus. We found a large overlap of flowering throughout the year among the species visited by the hummingbirds. Thus, the nectar availability supports these resident hummingbirds. The present study also showed that the studied hummingbird-plant community is composed of many species endemic to the campos rupestres of the Espinhaço Range, some of which are considered to be in danger of extinction, thus constituting a unique and threatened community. Thus, understanding hummingbird-plant pollination

  9. Flowers visited by hummingbirds in the open habitats of the southeastern Brazilian mountaintops: species composition and seasonality.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Rodrigues, M

    2014-08-01

    The hummingbird-visited plant community located on the open-habitat mountaintop of the Espinhaço Range was studied for two years (from August 2007 to July 2009) in Serra do Cipó National Park, Southeastern Brazil (19° 15' S and 43° 31' W). The floral characteristics and flowering period of the hummingbird-visited plants was monthly recorded along trails located in three vegetation types: (1) typical campos rupestres (TCR), (2) open fields (OPF), and (3) capões de mata (CAM). Hummingbird visitation was observed in 51 plant species, 22 ornithophilous and 29 non-ornithophilous species. The TCR showed the greatest number of species visited (N = 38), followed by the OPF (N = 18) and CAM (N = 17). Six species of hummingbirds were recorded visiting flowers: Augastes scutatus, Campylopterus largipennis, Colibri serrirostris, Chlorostilbon lucidus, Eupetomena macroura and Phaethornis pretrei. This study demonstrates that the species richness and the number of ornithophilous species visited by the hummingbirds at the study site are more similar to hummingbird-plant communities of the Atlantic Forest than to those of the Cerrado communities and other Brazilian highland open-habitat communities. The plant families most visited by hummingbirds were Bromeliaceae and Asteraceae. Although the Asteraceae family is rarely used as a food resource for hummingbirds in other high and lowland communities, in the study site this family is used mainly by the endemic hummingbird Augastes scutatus. We found a large overlap of flowering throughout the year among the species visited by the hummingbirds. Thus, the nectar availability supports these resident hummingbirds. The present study also showed that the studied hummingbird-plant community is composed of many species endemic to the campos rupestres of the Espinhaço Range, some of which are considered to be in danger of extinction, thus constituting a unique and threatened community. Thus, understanding hummingbird-plant pollination

  10. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED). This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R). Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes) between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes). Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes) when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes) or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes). The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics. PMID:23126473

  11. Grandparent visitation rights: an inappropriate intrusion or appropriate protection?

    PubMed

    Keith, Pat M; Wacker, Robbyn R

    2002-01-01

    Increased divorce rates, longevity in multi-generational families, and activism by older persons are a part of the context in which the role of grandparents in the family, an overview of grandparent visitation statutes, and controversy about visitation rights are discussed. The history and characteristics of grandparent visitation statutes, the process of filing, and criteria used to grant visitation provide insight into the complexities of the request for, and determination of, these rights. Family dynamics interact with a myriad of state statutes to suggest implications for research and policy.

  12. Does the invasive Lupinus polyphyllus increase pollinator visitation to a native herb through effects on pollinator population sizes?

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Anna; Padrón, Benigno

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants may compete with native species for abiotic factors as light, space and nutrients, and have also been shown to affect native pollination interactions. Studies have mainly focused on how invasive plants affect pollinator behaviour, i.e. attraction of pollinators to or away from native flowers. However, when an invasive plant provides resources utilized by native pollinators this could increase pollinator population sizes and thereby pollination success in natives. Effects mediated through changes in pollinator population sizes have been largely ignored in previous studies, and the dominance of negative interactions suggested by meta-analyses may therefore be biased. We investigated the impact of the invasive Lupinus polyphyllus on pollination in the native Lotus corniculatus using a study design comparing invaded and uninvaded sites before and after the flowering period of the invasive. We monitored wild bee abundance in transects, and visit rate and seed production of potted Lotus plants. Bumblebee abundance increased 3.9 times in invaded sites during the study period, whereas it was unaltered in uninvaded sites. Total visit rate per Lotus plant increased 2.1 times in invaded sites and decreased 4.4 times in uninvaded sites. No corresponding change in seed production of Lotus was found. The increase in visit rate to Lotus was driven by an increase in solitary bee visitation, whereas mainly bumblebees were observed to visit the invasive Lupinus. The mechanism by which the invasive increases pollinator visit rates to Lotus could be increased availability of other flower resources for solitary bees when bumblebees forage on Lupinus.

  13. The Visiting Nurse Association of Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    1987-10-01

    In short, the VNA of Los Angeles has a proud tradition. For almost 50 years, it has been providing needed health care and supportive services to the chronically ill and disabled in their own homes. Thanks to the efforts of all who made these traditions, the VNA also has a bright future. The VNA is a source of pride in California not only because of what it has accomplished but also because of what the good people of the VNA will be able to accomplish in the future. The VNA of Los Angeles is a valuable community resource whose services will be needed now more than ever before. The combination of demographics, consequences of the greying of America, the effects of the expected AIDS epidemic, and the evolution of new technology all point in the direction of home care. The VNA is already in the vanguard of what surely will become a national trend. Because of these contributions--past, present, and future--CARING is proud to salute the Visiting Nurse Association of Los Angeles.

  14. A visit to the village of Saye.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    This brief article describes the changes in the village of Saye, Burkina Faso which were recognizable after 20 years absence. Rainfall was plentiful and it was the best season for agriculture in 20 years; the sorghum swayed in the breezes ready for harvest. There are 28 women and village elders who still recognized their visitor, Ramata. The changes in family planning attitudes and sexuality were evident in the way men and women freely joke and laugh about sexual issues in a good humored but not superficial way. The respected El Hadj (meaning that he had visited Mecca) Sawadogo, president of the local Naam group, was the one who cracked jokes which brought laughter to the audience. The taboos are still there, but everyone agrees that family planning is a good idea because it reduces suffering and the people do not still have enough food to eat. Birth spacing is generally accepted, but there is resistance to stopping births. There is growing tolerance toward premarital pregnancies, and polygamy among younger women, which leads to fractious polygamous wives. 20 years ago it was a radical act to show a film on sex education, where pen and ink outlines gave shape to a naked teenaged boy and girl next to each other on the screen. The audience response was a roar of disbelief and the author feared that the local prefet would put him in jail for disturbing public order and violating a taboo.

  15. Former Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong Visits MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Among several other NASA dignitaries, former astronaut Neil A. Armstrong visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in attendance of the annual NASA Advisory Council Meeting. While here, Mr. Armstrong was gracious enough to allow the casting of his footprint. This casting will join those of other astronauts on display at the center. Armstrong was first assigned to astronaut status in 1962. He served as command pilot for the Gemini 8 mission, launched March 16, 1966, and performed the first successful docking of two vehicles in space. In 1969, Armstrong was commander of Apollo 11, the first manned lunar landing mission, and gained the distinction of being the first man to land a craft on the Moon and the first man to step on its surface. Armstrong subsequently held the position of Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics, NASA Headquarters Office of Advanced Research and Technology, from 1970 to 1971. He resigned from NASA in 1971. Pictured with Armstrong is MSFC employee Daniel McFall, who assisted with the casting procedure.

  16. Incorporating OASIS into the Visiting Nurses Association.

    PubMed

    Clark, L L

    1998-01-01

    Beginning in 1994, the Visiting Nurses Association, Western Pennsylvania, began to investigate incorporating an outcome measurement system within its organization for the purposes of marketing quality results, benchmarking achievements, and defining quality of care for both internal and external review groups. In the fall of 1995, this agency was accepted into the Outcome Based Quality Improvement (OBQI) Demonstration Project, also known as the Medicare Quality Assurance Project, which the Health Care Financing Administration has funded for the purpose of measuring clinical and utilization outcomes in the home care arena. This article reviews the processes the agency used to develop and incorporate the entire OBQI process into its systems, including the incorporation of the Outcome Assessment Information Set (OASIS). The OASIS is a set of outcome measurement questions developed by Dr. Peter Shaughnessy at the Center for Health Policy Research in Denver. The process also includes training of staff and development of forms, point-of-care software with a vendor, and plans of action for improving outcomes that have been quantified through OBQI efforts.

  17. Diversity and pollination value of insects visiting the flowers of a rare buckwheat (Eriogonum pelinophilum: Polygonaceae) in disturbed and "natural" areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared flower-visitors of the endangered plant Eriogonum pelinophilum, at a largely undistributed (UN) and a smaller, highly disturbed and fragmented site (DI). We found no difference between the DI site and the UN site in: 1) flower visitation rate, or 2) species richness of E. pelinophilum f...

  18. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Saueressig

    2010-07-14

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  19. Blue Ribbon Commission Tour of Hanford Site

    ScienceCinema

    Paul Saueressig

    2016-07-12

    The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future toured the Department of Energy's Hanford Site on July 14, 2010. Commission members, invited guests, and members of the public visited facilities that store high-level, radioactive waste.

  20. Formation of Regulatory Modules by Local Sequence Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Turnover of regulatory sequence and function is an important part of molecular evolution. But what are the modes of sequence evolution leading to rapid formation and loss of regulatory sites? Here we show that a large fraction of neighboring transcription factor binding sites in the fly genome have formed from a common sequence origin by local duplications. This mode of evolution is found to produce regulatory information: duplications can seed new sites in the neighborhood of existing sites. Duplicate seeds evolve subsequently by point mutations, often towards binding a different factor than their ancestral neighbor sites. These results are based on a statistical analysis of 346 cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, and a comparison set of intergenic regulatory sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fly regulatory modules, pairs of binding sites show significantly enhanced sequence similarity up to distances of about 50 bp. We analyze these data in terms of an evolutionary model with two distinct modes of site formation: (i) evolution from independent sequence origin and (ii) divergent evolution following duplication of a common ancestor sequence. Our results suggest that pervasive formation of binding sites by local sequence duplications distinguishes the complex regulatory architecture of higher eukaryotes from the simpler architecture of unicellular organisms. PMID:21998564

  1. Formation of regulatory modules by local sequence duplication.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Turnover of regulatory sequence and function is an important part of molecular evolution. But what are the modes of sequence evolution leading to rapid formation and loss of regulatory sites? Here we show that a large fraction of neighboring transcription factor binding sites in the fly genome have formed from a common sequence origin by local duplications. This mode of evolution is found to produce regulatory information: duplications can seed new sites in the neighborhood of existing sites. Duplicate seeds evolve subsequently by point mutations, often towards binding a different factor than their ancestral neighbor sites. These results are based on a statistical analysis of 346 cis-regulatory modules in the Drosophila melanogaster genome, and a comparison set of intergenic regulatory sequence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In fly regulatory modules, pairs of binding sites show significantly enhanced sequence similarity up to distances of about 50 bp. We analyze these data in terms of an evolutionary model with two distinct modes of site formation: (i) evolution from independent sequence origin and (ii) divergent evolution following duplication of a common ancestor sequence. Our results suggest that pervasive formation of binding sites by local sequence duplications distinguishes the complex regulatory architecture of higher eukaryotes from the simpler architecture of unicellular organisms.

  2. Wetlands: The changing regulatory landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, R.M. )

    1993-05-01

    Protection of wetlands became a national issue in 1988 when President George Bush pledged no net loss of wetlands in the US under his [open quotes]environmental presidency.[close quotes] As wetlands became a national issue, the job of protecting them became an obligation for many groups, including hydro-power developers. Now, when a site selected for development includes an area that may be classified as a wetland, the developer quickly discovers the importance of recognizing and protecting these natural habitats. Federal legislation severely limits development of wetland, and most states increase the restrictions with their own wetlands regulations. The difficulty of defining wetlands complicates federal and state enforcement. Land that appears to be dry may in fact be classified as a wetland. So, even if a site appears dry, potential hydro developers must confirm whether or not any jurisdictional wetlands are present. Regulated lands include much more than marshes and swamps. Further complicating the definition of wetlands, a recent court decision found that even artificially created wetlands, such as man-made ponds, may be subject to regulation. Hydro developers must be aware of current regulatory requirements before they consider development of any site that may contain wetlands. To be certain that a site is [open quotes]buildable[close quotes] from the standpoint of wetlands regulation, a developer must verify (with the help of state agencies) that the property does not contain any jurisdictional wetlands. If it does, the regulatory process before development becomes much more complicated. For the short term, uncertainty abounds and extreme caution is in order. Because the regulatory process has become so complex and an agreeable definition of wetlands so elusive, the trend among the Corps and collaborating agencies is to constrict nationwide permits in favor of narrowing the jurisdictional definition of wetlands.

  3. Home Visiting Processes: Relations with Family Characteristics and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Carla A.; Roggman, Lori A.; Green, Beth; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel; Korfmacher, Jon; McKelvey, Lorraine; Zhang, Dong; Atwater, Jane B.

    2013-01-01

    Variations in dosage, content, and family engagement with Early Head Start (EHS) home visiting services were examined for families participating in the EHS Research and Evaluation Project. Families were grouped by characteristics of maternal age, maternal ethnicity, and level of family risk. All home visiting variables were related differentially…

  4. Facilitating Visitation for Infants with Prenatal Substance Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burry, Caroline Long; Wright, Lois

    2006-01-01

    Permanency planning for infants with prenatal substance exposure is challenging due to characteristics of the infants and the ongoing substance use or relapse of the parents. Visitation is a primary mechanism through which child welfare workers determine and support permanency planning. Productive use of visitation for permanency planning for…

  5. Home Visitation Programs: Critical Issues and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzi-Lessing, Lenette

    2011-01-01

    As support for intervening early in the lives of vulnerable children has risen in the United States in recent years, so has interest in home-visitation programs. Home visitation is increasingly recognized for its potential to foster early child development and competent parenting, as well as to reduce risk for child abuse and neglect and other…

  6. 26 CFR 521.114 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visiting professors or teachers. 521.114... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.114 Visiting professors or teachers. Under Article XIV of... States for the purpose of teaching, lecturing, or instructing at any university, college, school,...

  7. The Shapley Visiting Lectureships Program - 2002 and On

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2001-12-01

    The Shapley Visiting Lectureships Program Web page [www.union.edu/orgs/shapley] is attached to the AAS Web homepage and now is in its fourth year of operation. The complete Shapley brochure is presented here as well as an application form that can be filled out on line and sent back to Union College in Schenectady. On a number of occasions an electronic form is received in the morning and the Shapley visit is set up by the afternoon of the same day. Instead of mailing out the hardcopy multi-paged brochures we now mail over 2000 postcards to institutions with instructions on how to go to the AAS Shapley Web page. We have built up a larger body of institutions that know about the Shapley Program and they can apply whenever they decide they would like to have a visit. The Shapley Program has been expanded to include Mexico. At present three Mexican visits have been made and one Mexican astronomer has made a visit to the the United States. Canada has been part of the Shapley Program since 1977 and a total of 52 Shapley visits have been made. Although the majority of US visits are still made by car we have increased the number of visits made by air travel to satisfy the requests of some institutions for specific speakers or topics.

  8. The National Home Visiting Coalition: A History of Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jane; Gavaghan, Bridget; Howard, Karen; Kelley, Melissa L.; Schwartz, Marvin; Walzer, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Home Visiting Coalition represents more than 75 organizations working together to articulate the effectiveness of home visiting to a range of policymakers and stakeholders in the early childhood field. Despite varying program goals and service delivery strategies, the Coalition participants share a commitment to expanding access to…

  9. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  10. 33 CFR 6.04-7 - Visitation, search, and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visitation, search, and removal. 6.04-7 Section 6.04-7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Visitation, search, and removal. The Captain of the Port may cause to be inspected and searched at any...

  11. 33 CFR 6.04-7 - Visitation, search, and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visitation, search, and removal. 6.04-7 Section 6.04-7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Visitation, search, and removal. The Captain of the Port may cause to be inspected and searched at any...

  12. 33 CFR 6.04-7 - Visitation, search, and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Visitation, search, and removal. 6.04-7 Section 6.04-7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Visitation, search, and removal. The Captain of the Port may cause to be inspected and searched at any...

  13. 33 CFR 6.04-7 - Visitation, search, and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visitation, search, and removal. 6.04-7 Section 6.04-7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Visitation, search, and removal. The Captain of the Port may cause to be inspected and searched at any...

  14. 33 CFR 6.04-7 - Visitation, search, and removal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visitation, search, and removal. 6.04-7 Section 6.04-7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Visitation, search, and removal. The Captain of the Port may cause to be inspected and searched at any...

  15. Aftercare, Emergency Department Visits, and Readmission in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Corine E.; Mamdani, Muhammad; Schachar, Russell; To, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: U.S. and Canadian data demonstrate decreasing inpatient days, increasing nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits, and short supply of child psychiatrists. Our study aims to determine whether aftercare reduces ED visits and/or readmission in adolescents with first psychiatric hospitalization. Method: We conducted a population-based…

  16. 32 CFR 536.20 - Claims assistance visits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims assistance visits. 536.20 Section 536.20 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.20 Claims assistance visits. Members of USARCS...

  17. 29 CFR 1954.11 - Visits to State agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF APPROVED STATE PLANS State Monitoring Reports and Visits to State Agencies § 1954.11 Visits to State agencies. As a part of the continuing monitoring...

  18. Custody and Visitation: An Explication of Prevalent Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Nancy V.; Davenport, Caroline V.

    A review of the literature on custody and visitation reveals many contradictory opinions, little empirical evidence and lack of a conceptual framework for assessing issues. An exploratory study is reported in which 99 custodial parents, 71 noncustodial parents and 70 children of divorce expressed their opinions on custody and visitation. The data…

  19. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  20. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  1. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  2. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  3. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a... resident of Switzerland, who temporarily visits the United States for the purpose of teaching for a period... States or who is not a resident of Switzerland. (d) Nonresidence presumed. An individual who...

  4. The Visiting Women Scientists Program, 1978-79: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Place, Carol; And Others

    This is the final report of a program in which 51 women scientists visited 12 junior high and high schools in North Carolina and a total of 128 schools in four large American metropolitan areas. The purpose of these visits was to provide students with a chance to meet women scientists as role models. The report is divided into 9 chapters and 8…

  5. 29 CFR 1908.6 - Conduct of a visit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... health. (e) Onsite activity. (1) Activity during the onsite consultative visit will focus primarily on... the visit is reduced, the consultant remains obligated to work with the employer to ensure correction... report to the extent required by 29 CFR 1910.1020 or other applicable OSHA standards or regulations....

  6. Federal Home Visiting under the Affordable Care Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strader, Kathleen; Counts, Jacqueline; Filene, Jill

    2013-01-01

    The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program is part of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and provides $1.5 billion over 5 years to states, territories, and tribes with the goal of delivering evidence-based home visiting services as part of a high-quality, comprehensive early childhood system that promotes…

  7. Daytime School Guided Visits to an Astronomical Observatory in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo, Pedro Donizete, Jr.; Silva, Cibelle Celestino; Aroca, Silvia Calbo

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the activity "Daytime School Guided Visits" at an astronomical observatory in Brazil with pupils from primary school. The adopted research methodology relied on questionnaire applications and semistructured interviews. The objectives were to identify the influences of the visits on learning of astronomical concepts and on…

  8. Computerized recording of visits to an outpatient sports clinic.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Aho, H; Järvinen, M; Niittymäki, S

    1987-01-01

    At the Tampere Research Station of Sports Medicine (TRSSM) a continuous coding system of patient visits was started on March 1, 1985. The registration form contained 25 variables including all essential information about the patient's identification, sports, time of and reason for the visit, physician, examinations, diagnosis, treatment, and possible further measures. To classify and number the diagnosis, a specific classification of sports injuries and diseases was drawn up. The data were stored and analyzed using a DEC-2060 computer at the University of Tampere. During 6 months a total of 814 visits were recorded. The three most common sports were soccer, long-distance running, and orienteering. Competitive athletes totalled 337 (62%); 43 of these were top-ranking athletes. The most common reasons for visits were problems of the knee (266 visits, 33%), ankle (80, 10%), and low back (71, 9%). Knee sprains accounted for 10% of all visits. Problems related to the musculoskeletal system were the reason for 751 (92%) of all visits. Operative treatment was needed by 49 patients (6%). The continuous coding system of patient visits at an outpatient sports clinic showed great advantages as a basic data bank for scientific research, annual statistics, and patient identification and filing. The system described has been adopted as part of the daily routine at the TRSSM. PMID:3812865

  9. 50 CFR 216.81 - Visits to fur seal rookeries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Visits to fur seal rookeries. 216.81... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.81 Visits to fur seal rookeries. From June 1 to October 15... any fur seal rookery or hauling grounds nor pass beyond any posted sign forbidding passage....

  10. 50 CFR 216.81 - Visits to fur seal rookeries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Visits to fur seal rookeries. 216.81... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.81 Visits to fur seal rookeries. From June 1 to October 15... any fur seal rookery or hauling grounds nor pass beyond any posted sign forbidding passage....

  11. 50 CFR 216.81 - Visits to fur seal rookeries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Visits to fur seal rookeries. 216.81... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.81 Visits to fur seal rookeries. From June 1 to October 15... any fur seal rookery or hauling grounds nor pass beyond any posted sign forbidding passage....

  12. 50 CFR 216.81 - Visits to fur seal rookeries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Visits to fur seal rookeries. 216.81... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.81 Visits to fur seal rookeries. From June 1 to October 15... any fur seal rookery or hauling grounds nor pass beyond any posted sign forbidding passage....

  13. 50 CFR 216.81 - Visits to fur seal rookeries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Visits to fur seal rookeries. 216.81... MAMMALS Pribilof Islands Administration § 216.81 Visits to fur seal rookeries. From June 1 to October 15... any fur seal rookery or hauling grounds nor pass beyond any posted sign forbidding passage....

  14. Behavioral Correlates of Parental Visiting during Family Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantos, Arthur L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explored effects of parental visiting on emotional and behavioral adjustment of 49 children in care, using Child Behavior Checklist and Wide Range Achievement Test. Found that children who were visited more frequently exhibited fewer externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. Also found that these behavioral correlates depended on type of…

  15. 75 FR 10806 - Training Program for Regulatory Project Managers; Information Available to Industry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... continuation of the Regulatory Project Management Site Tours and Regulatory Interaction Program (the Site Tours... performance in its regulatory project management staff. CDER seeks to significantly enhance review efficiency... about project management procedures (but not drug-specific information) with industry...

  16. Weather and Prey Predict Mammals’ Visitation to Water

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Grant; Sanderson, James G.; Erz, Jon; Lehnen, Sarah E.; Butler, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout many arid lands of Africa, Australia and the United States, wildlife agencies provide water year-round for increasing game populations and enhancing biodiversity, despite concerns that water provisioning may favor species more dependent on water, increase predation, and reduce biodiversity. In part, understanding the effects of water provisioning requires identifying why and when animals visit water. Employing this information, by matching water provisioning with use by target species, could assist wildlife management objectives while mitigating unintended consequences of year-round watering regimes. Therefore, we examined if weather variables (maximum temperature, relative humidity [RH], vapor pressure deficit [VPD], long and short-term precipitation) and predator-prey relationships (i.e., prey presence) predicted water visitation by 9 mammals. We modeled visitation as recorded by trail cameras at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA (June 2009 to September 2014) using generalized linear modeling. For 3 native ungulates, elk (Cervus Canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), less long-term precipitation and higher maximum temperatures increased visitation, including RH for mule deer. Less long-term precipitation and higher VPD increased oryx (Oryx gazella) and desert cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus audubonii) visitation. Long-term precipitation, with RH or VPD, predicted visitation for black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus). Standardized model coefficients demonstrated that the amount of long-term precipitation influenced herbivore visitation most. Weather (especially maximum temperature) and prey (cottontails and jackrabbits) predicted bobcat (Lynx rufus) visitation. Mule deer visitation had the largest influence on coyote (Canis latrans) visitation. Puma (Puma concolor) visitation was solely predicted by prey visitation (elk, mule deer, oryx). Most ungulate visitation peaked during May and

  17. Weather and Prey Predict Mammals' Visitation to Water.

    PubMed

    Harris, Grant; Sanderson, James G; Erz, Jon; Lehnen, Sarah E; Butler, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Throughout many arid lands of Africa, Australia and the United States, wildlife agencies provide water year-round for increasing game populations and enhancing biodiversity, despite concerns that water provisioning may favor species more dependent on water, increase predation, and reduce biodiversity. In part, understanding the effects of water provisioning requires identifying why and when animals visit water. Employing this information, by matching water provisioning with use by target species, could assist wildlife management objectives while mitigating unintended consequences of year-round watering regimes. Therefore, we examined if weather variables (maximum temperature, relative humidity [RH], vapor pressure deficit [VPD], long and short-term precipitation) and predator-prey relationships (i.e., prey presence) predicted water visitation by 9 mammals. We modeled visitation as recorded by trail cameras at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA (June 2009 to September 2014) using generalized linear modeling. For 3 native ungulates, elk (Cervus Canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana), less long-term precipitation and higher maximum temperatures increased visitation, including RH for mule deer. Less long-term precipitation and higher VPD increased oryx (Oryx gazella) and desert cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus audubonii) visitation. Long-term precipitation, with RH or VPD, predicted visitation for black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus). Standardized model coefficients demonstrated that the amount of long-term precipitation influenced herbivore visitation most. Weather (especially maximum temperature) and prey (cottontails and jackrabbits) predicted bobcat (Lynx rufus) visitation. Mule deer visitation had the largest influence on coyote (Canis latrans) visitation. Puma (Puma concolor) visitation was solely predicted by prey visitation (elk, mule deer, oryx). Most ungulate visitation peaked during May and

  18. BR 06-1 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS OF VISIT TO VISIT BLOOD PRESSURE VARIABILITY.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jinho

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of visit to visit blood pressure variability (VVBPV) for cardiovascular outcome, it has long been awaited for prospective intervention trial to reduce VVBPV for evidence based medicine. But because of several hurdles, most importantly, pending measure to reduce VVBPV, such trial may not be available in the near future. It means that current understanding on the VVBPV is not casual but related to the cardiovascular outcome.Waiting for more sound evidence, which can be remained in a clinician's mind struggling not to be indifferent for potential benefit? Firstly, the most important potential confounder in spite of the strict statistical analyses to be published may be the mean blood pressure. Secondly, the population candidate for monitoring VVBPV needs to be understood. In general, the higher the risk, the more the value of considering the VVBPV. Thirdly, understanding the biological confounders for VVBPV such as arterial stiffness, low grade systemic inflammation, and sympathetic over-reactivity may inspire the clinician and/or patient the importance of the well-known lifestyle modification such as physical activity. Lastly, therapeutic aspects previously drawing less attention such as the class of drug with less inter-individual blood pressure variability, the relationship between the class of a drug and the volume status, adherence in general, the clinic protocol for the timing of drug intake with or without exercise and office visit, and the general conditions which can affect the volume status and thereby blood pressure level.Even without evidence of direct intervention on VVBPV, by monitoring and understanding VVPBV, a clinician can be developed to a new level of blood pressure management which is not only simply prescribing antihypertensive drugs but also more comprehensive understanding of the patient factors closely related to the blood pressure. PMID:27643152

  19. Group visits for chronic illness management: implementation challenges and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Katherine R; Kaewluang, Napatsawan; Lekhak, Nirmala

    2014-01-01

    The group visit approach to improve chronic illness self-management appears promising in terms of selected outcomes, but little information is available about best ways to organize and implement group visits. This literature review of 84 articles identified group visit implementation challenges, including lack of a group visit billing code, inadequate administrative support and resources, difficult participant recruitment and retention, and logistical issues such as space and scheduling. Recommendations for future implementation initiatives were also abstracted from the literature. Patients and providers can benefit from well-planned and well-conducted group visits. These benefits include greater patient and provider satisfaction, reduced overall utilization, improved clinical outcomes, and greater provider efficiency and productivity.

  20. Ambulatory Care Visits to Pediatricians in Taiwan: A Nationwide Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling-Yu; Lynn, An-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatricians play a key role in the healthy development of children. Nevertheless, the practice patterns of pediatricians have seldom been investigated. The current study analyzed the nationwide profiles of ambulatory visits to pediatricians in Taiwan, using the National Health Insurance Research Database. From a dataset that was randomly sampled one out of every 500 records among a total of 309,880,000 visits in 2012 in the country, 9.8% (n = 60,717) of the visits were found paid to pediatricians. Children and adolescents accounted for only 69.3% of the visits to pediatricians. Male pediatricians provided 80.5% of the services and the main workforces were those aged 40–49 years. The most frequent diagnoses were respiratory tract diseases (64.7%) and anti-histamine agents were prescribed in 48.8% of the visits to pediatricians. Our detailed results could contribute to evidence-based discussions on health policymaking. PMID:26540064

  1. Optimizing robot placement for visit-point tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y.K.; Watterberg, P.A.

    1996-06-01

    We present a manipulator placement algorithm for minimizing the length of the manipulator motion performing a visit-point task such as spot welding. Given a set of points for the tool of a manipulator to visit, our algorithm finds the shortest robot motion required to visit the points from each possible base configuration. The base configurations resulting in the shortest motion is selected as the optimal robot placement. The shortest robot motion required for visiting multiple points from a given base configuration is computed using a variant of the traveling salesman algorithm in the robot joint space and a point-to-point path planner that plans collision free robot paths between two configurations. Our robot placement algorithm is expected to reduce the robot cycle time during visit- point tasks, as well as speeding up the robot set-up process when building a manufacturing line.

  2. Home visiting programs for HIV-affected families: a comparison of service quality between volunteer-driven and paraprofessional models

    PubMed Central

    Kidman, Rachel; Nice, Johanna; Taylor, Tory; Thurman, Tonya R.

    2014-01-01

    Home visiting is a popular component of programs for HIV-affected children in sub-Saharan Africa, but its implementation varies widely. While some home visitors are lay volunteers, other programs invest in more highly trained paraprofessional staff. This paper describes a study investigating whether additional investment in paraprofessional staffing translated into higher quality service delivery in one program context. Beneficiary children and caregivers at sites in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa were interviewed after 2 years of program enrollment and asked to report about their experiences with home visiting. Analysis focused on intervention exposure, including visit intensity, duration and the kinds of emotional, informational and tangible support provided. Few beneficiaries reported receiving home visits in program models primarily driven by lay volunteers; when visits did occur, they were shorter and more infrequent. Paraprofessional-driven programs not only provided significantly more home visits, but also provided greater interaction with the child, communication on a larger variety of topics, and more tangible support to caregivers. These results suggest that programs that invest in compensation and extensive training for home visitors are better able to serve and retain beneficiaries, and they support a move toward establishing a professional workforce of home visitors to support vulnerable children and families in South Africa. PMID:25379052

  3. Regulatory compliance in solid-organ transplantation: what you don't know can hurt your program.

    PubMed

    Benjey, Jane; Cunanan, Mary; Thomson, Art

    2007-06-01

    The risk of noncompliance with rules and regulations in solid-organ transplantation is significant and may lead to probation, suspension, or program closure. Transplant program leadership is responsible for ensuring that programs and centers are in compliance with regulations and data reporting requirements. As the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services prepare to implement new rules and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations positions itself to join the certification process for transplant programs, heightened awareness and vigilance by all members of the transplant community are warranted. This article aims to inform transplant team members, particularly transplant program leaders, of the various regulatory bodies that oversee solid-organ transplantation, as well as these bodies' responsibilities and current agendas. Information is also included to help leaders continuously prepare their programs for site visits and audits by these oversight bodies.

  4. Evolution of splicing regulatory networks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McManus, C. Joel; Coolon, Joseph D.; Eipper-Mains, Jodi; Wittkopp, Patricia J.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The proteome expanding effects of alternative pre-mRNA splicing have had a profound impact on eukaryotic evolution. The events that create this diversity can be placed into four major classes: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splice sites, and alternative 3′ splice sites. Although the regulatory mechanisms and evolutionary pressures among alternative splicing classes clearly differ, how these differences affect the evolution of splicing regulation remains poorly characterized. We used RNA-seq to investigate splicing differences in D. simulans, D. sechellia, and three strains of D. melanogaster. Regulation of exon skipping and tandem alternative 3′ splice sites (NAGNAGs) were more divergent than other splicing classes. Splicing regulation was most divergent in frame-preserving events and events in noncoding regions. We further determined the contributions of cis- and trans-acting changes in splicing regulatory networks by comparing allele-specific splicing in F1 interspecific hybrids, because differences in allele-specific splicing reflect changes in cis-regulatory element activity. We find that species-specific differences in intron retention and alternative splice site usage are primarily attributable to changes in cis-regulatory elements (median ∼80% cis), whereas species-specific exon skipping differences are driven by both cis- and trans-regulatory divergence (median ∼50% cis). These results help define the mechanisms and constraints that influence splicing regulatory evolution and show that networks regulating the four major classes of alternative splicing diverge through different genetic mechanisms. We propose a model in which differences in regulatory network architecture among classes of alternative splicing affect the evolution of splicing regulation. PMID:24515119

  5. Home Visiting Family Support Programs: Benefits of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Home Visiting Campaign, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The federally funded, locally administered Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program sponsors family support programs that are often called "home visiting" because they take place in the homes of at-risk families. These families often lack support, experience, and knowledge of basic parenting skills. Because children…

  6. Visiting Again? Subjective Well-Being of Children in Elementary School and Repeated Visits to School Health Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaver, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Children with vague complaints are without chronic illness, and who repeatedly visit the school nurse may be at risk for limited academic success. This study compares student reports of subjective well-being between children who do and do not repeatedly visit the school nurse with vague complaints. Methods: Children in grades 4 through…

  7. Randomized Trial of a Statewide Home Visiting Program to Prevent Child Abuse: Impact in Reducing Parental Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Anne; Fuddy, Loretta; Burrell, Lori; Higman, Susan M.; McFarlane, Elizabeth; Windham, Amy; Sia, Calvin

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the impact of a home visiting program in reducing malleable parental risk factors for child abuse in families of newborns identified, through population-based screening, as at-risk of child abuse. Methods: This randomized trial focused on Healthy Start Program (HSP) sites operated by three community-based organizations on…

  8. Ceres: Dawn visits a Warm Wet Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Combe, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Ceres likely contains considerable water, has differentiated, and formed a hydrated silicate core and water mantle. There were major dimensional, thermal and chemical changes over its history, making it more a planet than an asteroid. These factors created the present day body, which the Dawn misson will visit next March. I will summarize our current understanding of Ceres and suggest what Dawn will find. A major uncertainty is how processes, such as aqueous mineralization, impact and cratering, infall of external material, mixing, and viscous relaxation of surface features have altered the formation materials and surface, hiding Ceres' secrets. Ceres' bulk density of 2100 kg/m3, suggest major water content. Modeling of Ceres' thermodynamic evolution for different times of accretion, assuming several radioactive heating scenarios, produces results ranging from a dry Vestal-like object (earlier, hotter formation) to retention and melting of the ice and differentiation of silicates from liquid water. Mixing of liquid water and silicates leads to exothermic hydration reactions, formation of a core and a liquid mantle. Large dimensional changes are associated. A crust stays frozen but founders at times due to gravitational instability, dimensional changes and impacts. The liquid mantle freezes from top, down, but a layer of salty liquid water probably exists today near the core. Hydrated silicates from the initial differentiation would likely dehydrate near the core center due to temperature and pressure. From observations, only subdued spatial albedo and color variations are observed at UV and IR wavelengths on Ceres' surface at the scale possible from Earth (~50-100 km) and an oblate spheroid shape is found, consistent with a differentiated body. Compositional evidence includes the long known similarity of Ceres' albedo and visual-IR reflectance spectrum to those for carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Thus, the surface is likely made of carbon-bearing, hydroxolated

  9. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Langston, M.E.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  10. Incidence of Postoperative Pain after Single Visit and Two Visit Root Canal Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonal B.; Bhagwat, S.V; Patil, Sanjana A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root Canal Treatment (RCT) has become a mainstream procedure in dentistry. A successful RCT is presented by absence of clinical signs and symptoms in teeth without any radiographic evidence of periodontal involvement. Completing this procedure in one visit or multiple visits has long been a topic of discussion. Aim To evaluate the incidence of postoperative pain after root canal therapy performed in single visit and two visits. Material and Methods An unblinded/ open label randomized controlled trial was carried out in the endodontic department of the Dental Institute, where 78 patients were recruited from the regular pool of patients. A total of 66 maxillary central incisors requiring root canal therapy fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Using simple randomization by biased coin randomization method, the selected patients were assigned into two groups: group A (n=33) and group B (n=33). Single visit root canal treatment was performed for group A and two visit root canal treatment for group B. Independent sample t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results Thirty three patients were allotted to group A where endodontic treatment was completed in single visit while 33 patients were allotted to group B where endodontic treatment was completed in two visits. One patient dropped-out from Group A. Hence in Group A, 32 patients were analysed while in Group B, 33 patients were analysed. After 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours of obturation, pain was significantly higher in Group B as compared to Group A. However, there was no significant difference in the pain experienced by the patients 48 hours after treatment in both the groups. Conclusion Incidence of pain after endodontic treatment being performed in one-visit or two-visits is not significantly different. PMID:27437339

  11. President of Czech Republic visits ESO's Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-04-01

    On 6 April 2011, the ESO Paranal Observatory was honoured with a visit from the President of the Czech Republic, Václav Klaus, and his wife Livia Klausová, who also took the opportunity to admire Cerro Armazones, the future site of the planned E-ELT. The distinguished visitor was shown the technical installations at the observatory, and was present when the dome of one of the four 8.2-metre Unit Telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope opened for a night's observing at Cerro Paranal, the world's most advanced visible-light observatory. "I'm delighted to welcome President Klaus to the Paranal Observatory and to show him first-hand the world-leading astronomical facility that ESO has designed, has built, and operates for European astronomy," said ESO's Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. President Klaus replied, "I am very impressed by the remarkable technology that ESO has built here in the heart of the desert. Czech astronomers are already making good use of these facilities and we look forward to having Czech industry and its scientific community contribute to the future E-ELT." From the VLT platform, the President had the opportunity to admire Cerro Armazones as well as other spectacular views of Chile's Atacama Desert surrounding Paranal. Adjacent to Cerro Paranal, Armazones has been chosen as the site for the future E-ELT (see eso1018). ESO is seeking approval from its governing bodies by the end of 2011 for the go-ahead for the 1-billion euro E-ELT. Construction is expected to begin in 2012 and the start of operations is planned for early in the next decade. President Klaus was accompanied by the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic, Karel Schwarzenberg, the Czech Ambassador in Chile, Zdenek Kubánek, dignitaries of the government, and a Czech industrial delegation. The group was hosted at Paranal by the ESO Director General, Tim de Zeeuw, the ESO Representative in Chile, Massimo Tarenghi, the Director of Operations, Andreas Kaufer, and Jan Palous

  12. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  13. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments.

  14. Hydrocarbon footprints as a record of bumblebee flower visitation.

    PubMed

    Witjes, Sebastian; Eltz, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Bumblebees leave traces of cuticular hydrocarbons on flowers they visit, with the amount deposited being positively related to the number of visits. We asked whether such footprint hydrocarbons are retained on flowers for sufficiently long periods of time so as to reflect bee visitation in pollination studies. In laboratory experiments, flower corollae (Primula veris, Digitalis grandiflora) visited by Bombus terrestris workers retained bee-derived nonacosenes (C(29)H(58)) in near-unchanged quantities for 24 hours, both at 15 and 25 degrees C. Additionally, synthetic (Z)-9-tricosene applied to flower corollae of the deadnettle Lamium maculatum was retained for 48 hours in an unchanged quantity. In a field survey, the amount of footprint alkenes on flowers of comfrey (Symphytum officinale) plants was positively correlated with the number of bumblebee visits that those plants had received during the day. Together, these data suggest that flowers retain a long-term quantitative record of bumblebee visitation. The analysis of petal extracts by gas chromatography could provide a cheap and reliable way of quantifying bumblebee visits in landscape scale studies of pollination. PMID:20013038

  15. Effects of Early Dental Office Visits on Dental Caries Experience

    PubMed Central

    Rozier, R. Gary; Preisser, John S.; Stearns, Sally C.; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the association between timing of a first dentist office visit before age 5 years and dental disease in kindergarten. Methods. We used North Carolina Medicaid claims (1999–2006) linked to state oral health surveillance data to compare caries experience for kindergarten students (2005–2006) who had a visit before age 60 months (n = 11 394) to derive overall exposure effects from a zero-inflated negative binomial regression model. We repeated the analysis separately for children who had preventive and tertiary visits. Results. Children who had a visit at age 37 to 48 and 49 to 60 months had significantly less disease than children with a visit by age 24 months (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81, 0.95; IRR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.69, 0.82, respectively). Disease status did not differ between children who had a tertiary visit by age 24 months and other children. Conclusions. Medicaid-enrolled children in our study followed an urgent care type of utilization, and access to dental care was limited. Children at high risk for dental disease should be given priority for a preventive dental visit before age 3 years. PMID:24134364

  16. Energy expenditure on recreational visits to different natural environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Lewis R; White, Mathew P; Taylor, Adrian H; Herbert, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity poses a significant challenge to physical and mental health. Environmental approaches to tackle physical inactivity have identified natural environments as potentially important public health resources. Despite this, little is known about characteristics of the activity involved when individuals visit different types of natural environment. Using Natural England's Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment Survey, we examined 71,603 English respondents' recreational visits to natural environments in the past week. Specifically, we examined the intensity of the activities they undertook on the visits (METs), the duration of their visit, and the associated total energy expenditure (MET minutes). Visits to countryside and urban greenspace environments were associated with more intense activities than visits to coastal environments. However, visits to coastal environments were associated with the most energy expenditure overall due to their relatively long duration. Results differed by the urbanity or rurality of the respondent's residence and also how far respondents travelled to their destination. Knowledge of what types of natural environment afford the highest volumes and intensities of physical activity could inform landscape architecture and exercise prescriptions. Isolating activity-supporting characteristics of natural environments that can be translated into urban design is important in providing physical activity opportunities for those less able to access expansive environments. PMID:26151390

  17. A dog and a "happy person" visit nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lana; Spence, Linda J; McGavin, Lily; Struble, Laura; Keilman, Linda

    2002-10-01

    Recent recognition of the importance of the human-animal bond has led to the proliferation of programs designed to improve the lives of nursing home residents through the use of animals. Because human-human interaction in the nursing home setting is often of an obligatory nature, we wondered if a visit from a nonjudgmental, outgoing, enthusiastic young adult ("a happy person") could elicit the same positive influence as a visit from a nonjudgmental dog. The purpose of this study was to determine if elderly residents of a midwestern nursing home had a preference for the type of visitor (dog vs. person) when both visits were nonobligatory and nonjudgmental. Behaviors were evaluated to determine if one visitor was more likely to influence prosocial behaviors (moving closer, patting, smiling). Six residents were visited by both the dog and the happy person: 5 of 6 completed the final interview. Residents were equally likely to smile at and move closer to both visitors. Residents were more likely to pat the dog. Three residents liked both visits equally: 1 preferred the dog, and 1 preferred the happy person. These data suggest that nonobligatory visits to nursing home residents from a happy person may be as beneficial to the resident as visits from a dog. PMID:12365767

  18. A dog and a "happy person" visit nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lana; Spence, Linda J; McGavin, Lily; Struble, Laura; Keilman, Linda

    2002-10-01

    Recent recognition of the importance of the human-animal bond has led to the proliferation of programs designed to improve the lives of nursing home residents through the use of animals. Because human-human interaction in the nursing home setting is often of an obligatory nature, we wondered if a visit from a nonjudgmental, outgoing, enthusiastic young adult ("a happy person") could elicit the same positive influence as a visit from a nonjudgmental dog. The purpose of this study was to determine if elderly residents of a midwestern nursing home had a preference for the type of visitor (dog vs. person) when both visits were nonobligatory and nonjudgmental. Behaviors were evaluated to determine if one visitor was more likely to influence prosocial behaviors (moving closer, patting, smiling). Six residents were visited by both the dog and the happy person: 5 of 6 completed the final interview. Residents were equally likely to smile at and move closer to both visitors. Residents were more likely to pat the dog. Three residents liked both visits equally: 1 preferred the dog, and 1 preferred the happy person. These data suggest that nonobligatory visits to nursing home residents from a happy person may be as beneficial to the resident as visits from a dog.

  19. Within-population spatial variation in pollinator visitation rates, pollen limitation on seed set, and flower longevity in an alpine species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundemo, Sverre; Totland, Ørjan

    2007-11-01

    Pollen limitation through insufficient pollen deposition on stigmas caused by too infrequent pollinator visitation may influence the reproductive outcome of plants. In this study we investigated how pollinator visitation rate, the degree of pollen limitation, and flower longevity varied spatially among three sites at different altitudes within a population of the dwarf shrub Dryas octopetala L. in alpine southern Norway. Significant pollen limitation on seed set only occurred at the mid-elevation site, while seed set at the other sites appeared to be mainly resource limited, thus indicating a spatial variation in pollen limitation. There was no association between the spatial variation in the extent of pollen limitation and pollinator visitation rate to flowers. However, pollinator visitation rates were related to flower longevity of Dryas; sites with low visitation rates had long-lived flowers and vice versa. Thus, our results suggest within-population spatial co-variation between pollinator visitation rates, pollen limitation, and a developmental response to these factors, flower longevity.

  20. Random Walks with Preferential Relocations to Places Visited in the Past and their Application to Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Denis; Solis-Salas, Citlali

    2014-06-01

    Strongly non-Markovian random walks offer a promising modeling framework for understanding animal and human mobility, yet, few analytical results are available for these processes. Here we solve exactly a model with long range memory where a random walker intermittently revisits previously visited sites according to a reinforced rule. The emergence of frequently visited locations generates very slow diffusion, logarithmic in time, whereas the walker probability density tends to a Gaussian. This scaling form does not emerge from the central limit theorem but from an unusual balance between random and long-range memory steps. In single trajectories, occupation patterns are heterogeneous and have a scale-free structure. The model exhibits good agreement with data of free-ranging capuchin monkeys.

  1. Recommended Radiation Protection Practices for Low-Level Waste Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hadlock, D. E.; Hooker, C. D.; Herrington, W. N.; Gilchrist, R. L.

    1983-12-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to provide technical assistance in estsblishing operational guidelines, with respect to radiation control programs and methods of minimizing occupational radiation exposure, at Low-Level Waste (LLW) dis- posal sites. The PNL, through site visits, evaluated operations at LLW dis- posal sites to determine the adequacy of current practices in maintaining occupational exposures as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). The data sought included the specifics of: ALARA programs, training programs, external exposure control , internal exposure control , respiratory protection, survei 1 - lance, radioactive waste management, facilities and equipment, and external dose analysis. The results of the study indicated the following: The Radiation Protection and ALARA programs at the three commercial LLW disposal sites were observed to be adequate in scope and content compared to similar programs at other types of nuclear facilities. However, it should be noted that there were many areas that could be improved upon to help ensure the health and safety of the occupa- tionally exposed individuals. As a result, radiation protection practices were recommended with related rationales in order to reduce occupational exposures as far below specified radiation limits as is reasonably achievable. In addition, recommendations were developed for achieving occupational exposure ALARA under the Regulatory Requirements issued in 10 CFR Part 61.

  2. [History and testimonies of visiting nurses (1905-1938)].

    PubMed

    Henry, Stéphane

    2012-06-01

    Although short-lived, the history of visiting nurses is rich in political, social and health consequences it has generated. It involves the establishment of a new know-how in the first part of the twentieth century, mostly social, by the fact that the nurse comes out of the hospital to go and visit families in need. How this profession has been built and what is the impact of its social intervention on the population before the Second World War? Based on contemporary studies, institutional archives and biographical works, this study considers an immersion in the heart of the visiting nurse profession, through unwavering dedication, female emancipation and unexpected misery.

  3. Trail impacts and trail impact management related to ecotourism visitation at Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ecotourism and protected area visitation in Central and South America are largely dependent upon a relatively undisturbed quality of natural resources. However, visitation may impact vegetation, soil, water and wildlife resources, and degrade visitor facilities such as recreation sites and trails. Findings are reported from trail impact research conducted at Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonia, Chile. The frequency and magnitude of selected trail impacts and the relative effect of the amount of use, vegetation type, trail position and trail grade are investigated. Findings differed from previous studies in that amount of use was significantly related to both trail width increases and trail erosion. Management actions to minimize trail impacts are offered.

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the rules... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  5. 28 CFR 540.43 - Frequency of visits and number of visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.43 Frequency of visits..., to prevent overcrowding in the visiting room or unusual difficulty in supervising a visit. Exceptions... visitor must travel, frequency of the inmate's visits, or health problems of the inmate or visitor....

  6. 49 CFR 389.5 - Regulatory docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS General § 389.5 Regulatory docket. (a) Information and data... the Web site regulations.gov, at any time, by using the uniform resources locator (URL) http://www.regulations.gov. Copies may be downloaded or printed....

  7. 77 FR 48992 - Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facility Visits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Tobacco Product Manufacturing Facility Visits AGENCY: Food... for Tobacco Products (CTP) is announcing an invitation for participation in its Tobacco Product... involved in the manufacturing of tobacco products, including any related laboratory testing, and...

  8. Listening to parents to improve health visiting practice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Alison; Hargreaves, Sharon; Taylor, Liz

    2015-05-01

    Listening to the "voice" of the service user is now widely accepted as central to the delivery of high quality healthcare. This paper presents an overview of the importance of service user engagement and personalised care in health visiting with a brief review of recent policy and research. A personalised approach to health visiting practice is recommended to improve service user experience and uptake of the health visiting service offer and this is considered most significant when engaging "hard to reach" groups. A project report on a service user experience strategy within the 0-19 service of a NHS Trust in England is presented which describes initiatives to develop a health visiting and school nursing service that listens to service users. A cyclical service user engagement model which incorporates continuous reviews and service reconfiguration is described with examples of service changes in response to expressed local needs. PMID:26364334

  9. 76 FR 82201 - General Site Suitability Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Power Stations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide; request for... regulatory guide DG-4021, ``General Site Suitability Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations.'' This guide... for nuclear power stations. DATES: Submit comments by February 25, 2012. Comments received after...

  10. Returning to health visiting practice: completing the circle.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Stephen; Anto-Awuakye, Sandra; Bryar, Rosamund; Trivedi, Seema G

    2012-09-01

    One strategic health authority, NHS London, initiated a pilot return to health visiting/nursing practice scheme in London in 2010. This paper reports on the experiences of the first three cohorts of returnees on the City University London programme, one of the London programmes, and the adaptations that have been made to the programme to help provide returnees with the theory base and practice experience to equip them to work in today's health visiting. Written evaluation forms were completed by the returnees and information gathered from their application forms. This information was supplemented for Cohort 1 with some interviews with practice teachers and lecturers and a mid-stage questionnaire to the returnees. Of the 54 students in the three cohorts over half were still on one or both Nursing and Midwifery Council registers, which had not been anticipated at the start of the programme and led to modifications to the programme after Cohort 1 with an increase in the health visiting specific content. The returnees had a wide range of experience to bring back to health visiting reflecting the fact that a large number had been out of health visiting for more than 11 years. The evaluation shows that providing support by the university to the practice placement areas; ensuring that the taught element is current and useful to health visiting practice and having a relevant but not too onerous assessment process are critical.

  11. Returning to health visiting practice: completing the circle.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Stephen; Anto-Awuakye, Sandra; Bryar, Rosamund; Trivedi, Seema G

    2012-09-01

    One strategic health authority, NHS London, initiated a pilot return to health visiting/nursing practice scheme in London in 2010. This paper reports on the experiences of the first three cohorts of returnees on the City University London programme, one of the London programmes, and the adaptations that have been made to the programme to help provide returnees with the theory base and practice experience to equip them to work in today's health visiting. Written evaluation forms were completed by the returnees and information gathered from their application forms. This information was supplemented for Cohort 1 with some interviews with practice teachers and lecturers and a mid-stage questionnaire to the returnees. Of the 54 students in the three cohorts over half were still on one or both Nursing and Midwifery Council registers, which had not been anticipated at the start of the programme and led to modifications to the programme after Cohort 1 with an increase in the health visiting specific content. The returnees had a wide range of experience to bring back to health visiting reflecting the fact that a large number had been out of health visiting for more than 11 years. The evaluation shows that providing support by the university to the practice placement areas; ensuring that the taught element is current and useful to health visiting practice and having a relevant but not too onerous assessment process are critical. PMID:23029774

  12. 76 FR 59066 - Notice of Regulatory Review Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... posted without change on the FHFA Internet Web site, http://www.fhfa.gov , and will include any personal... Title 12 of the Code of Federal Regulations and are also posted on the FHFA Internet Web site at http... regulatory review plan in the Federal Register and post it on the FHFA Web site, http://www.fhfa.gov ....

  13. Regulatory advice and drug development--a case study in negotiating with regulators.

    PubMed

    Seldrup, Jørgen

    2011-06-15

    Regulatory guidance on the development of drugs has existed for well over half a century in some territories. As drug development grew to become global so was born the need for harmonization. Beginning in the 1990 s, the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) developed guidelines which were adopted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the U.S.A., the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in the European Union and the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) in Japan. These guidelines are generally not disease specific. A visit to the web sites of any of the aforementioned Agencies or, for that matter other regulatory agencies outside of these, will witness a plethora of additional/separate guidances, some of which are disease specific. In addition to such written guidances, more specific advice (for example, on a drug development program at the end of Phase II) may be requested from the Regulator. Despite the harmonization efforts expressed through ICH, the actual advice given by different regulatory authorities in practical situations, however, may be inconsistent. This paper will describe a case of seeking advice on a Phase III programme from the FDA and the EMA, obtaining different opinions and developing an innovative solution to satisfy both Authorities without necessarily extending development time significantly. The case is chronic kidney disease; the issues concern study design (non-inferiority, margin, etc.); the solution required a non-traditional design and associated sample size considerations. We conclude with some general advice on 'talking to the regulator'. This work was originally presented as a Poster at the Statistical Methods in Biopharmacy, 6th International Meeting, Paris, 21-22 September 2009. PMID:21365671

  14. 77 FR 41417 - Regulatory Science Considerations for Medical Countermeasure Radiation Biodosimetry Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... other stakeholders on the clinical application and scientific and technological challenges for performance validation of radiation biodosimetry devices. Date and Time: The public meeting will be held on..., please visit the following Web site:...

  15. ORegAnno 3.0: a community-driven resource for curated regulatory annotation.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Cotto, Kelsy C; Wang, Grace; Griffith, Malachi; Kasaian, Katayoon; Jones, Steven J M; Montgomery, Stephen B; Griffith, Obi L

    2016-01-01

    The Open Regulatory Annotation database (ORegAnno) is a resource for curated regulatory annotation. It contains information about regulatory regions, transcription factor binding sites, RNA binding sites, regulatory variants, haplotypes, and other regulatory elements. ORegAnno differentiates itself from other regulatory resources by facilitating crowd-sourced interpretation and annotation of regulatory observations from the literature and highly curated resources. It contains a comprehensive annotation scheme that aims to describe both the elements and outcomes of regulatory events. Moreover, ORegAnno assembles these disparate data sources and annotations into a single, high quality catalogue of curated regulatory information. The current release is an update of the database previously featured in the NAR Database Issue, and now contains 1 948 307 records, across 18 species, with a combined coverage of 334 215 080 bp. Complete records, annotation, and other associated data are available for browsing and download at http://www.oreganno.org/.

  16. Visit the MedlinePlus Search Cloud | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Visit the MedlinePlus Search Cloud Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents ... information Visit the new MedlinePlus Visit the MedlinePlus search cloud, featuring the top 100 search terms of ...

  17. Assessing short and long-term educational impact of visits to hospice via a combination of qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Goh, E C L; Hsu, C-Y S

    2014-05-01

    While qualitative methods have gained considerable recognition in medical education research, employing multiple qualitative data sources in assessing long-term educational impact is rare. Utilising in-depth data analysis method to six cross-sectional cohorts (2004-2009) of students' reflection papers (n = 213), this article demonstrates how students experienced subtle but important shifts in their attitudes (including personal, professional and spiritual domains) after making field visits to a hospice centre as part of the Special Needs Dentistry module. For retrospective assessment of learning retention, a pilot focus group was conducted with three junior faculty members who participated in the field visits to a hospice during their own undergraduate training. A subsequent focus group was conducted with graduates of the 2008 (n = 8) cohort using a refined discussion guide arising from the analysis of pilot group results. Graduates were unanimous in stating that the visits had sown 'seeds' in their minds and hearts, seeds which started to grow after they completed dental school and began to practice. This is demonstrative of the long-term positive educational impact of the pedagogical design that entailed a special site visit coupled with post-visit debrief and written reflection. PMID:24521143

  18. Assessing short and long-term educational impact of visits to hospice via a combination of qualitative methods.

    PubMed

    Goh, E C L; Hsu, C-Y S

    2014-05-01

    While qualitative methods have gained considerable recognition in medical education research, employing multiple qualitative data sources in assessing long-term educational impact is rare. Utilising in-depth data analysis method to six cross-sectional cohorts (2004-2009) of students' reflection papers (n = 213), this article demonstrates how students experienced subtle but important shifts in their attitudes (including personal, professional and spiritual domains) after making field visits to a hospice centre as part of the Special Needs Dentistry module. For retrospective assessment of learning retention, a pilot focus group was conducted with three junior faculty members who participated in the field visits to a hospice during their own undergraduate training. A subsequent focus group was conducted with graduates of the 2008 (n = 8) cohort using a refined discussion guide arising from the analysis of pilot group results. Graduates were unanimous in stating that the visits had sown 'seeds' in their minds and hearts, seeds which started to grow after they completed dental school and began to practice. This is demonstrative of the long-term positive educational impact of the pedagogical design that entailed a special site visit coupled with post-visit debrief and written reflection.

  19. Completely Digital Two-Visit Immediately Loaded Implants: Proof of Concept.

    PubMed

    Schnitman, Paul A; Han, Rita K

    2015-08-01

    Implant dentistry has become a common treatment alternative, yet only a small percentage of patients missing teeth are receiving its benefits. Significant limitations are the small percent of practitioners placing implants due to the long learning curve, as well as the time commitment on the part of the patient. This proof of concept demonstrates clinical implant treatment requiring years of manual skill development on the part of the surgeon, restorative dentist, and technician can be accomplished in 2 visits, completely digitally, without the need for conventional impressions, laboratory procedures, and advanced manual skills. This technique results in reduced learning curve and treatment time. The first visit consists of consultation, diagnosis, CT and optical surface scans of the implant site to include: soft tissue, adjacent teeth, and opposing arch. This digital information is imported and interactively reconstructed in a 3-D open format implant planning software. The implant and restoration are now precisely planned into the optimal bone position with the ideal emergence profile for biologically and esthetically designed restoration. This information is then electronically forwarded to a production facility, where all necessary models are digitally printed and the immediate crown is digitally milled. On the second visit, the patient returns for guided implant insertion and immediate restoration. As digital procedures are refined, many more dental professionals will become involved in providing implant therapy earlier in their careers. This promises to result in reduced costs, making implants available to millions more patients who could benefit from them. PMID:25985057

  20. 'Getting to Know Your Baby': delivering a universal antenatal home visit.

    PubMed

    Monaghan, Nicola; Owen, Julia

    2012-12-01

    Ashton, Leigh and Wigan Division, part of Bridgewater Community Healthcare NHS Trust was identified as a 'quasi' Early Implementer site. The organisation chose to focus on strengthening the health visitor parenting work in pregnancy and early months by providing health visitors with the current evidence base best practice in relation to skills and methods of working with families, and by way of doing this to develop clinical leadership in order to enable health visitors to lead service change. The health visitors involved developed, implemented and evaluated a piloted universal antenatal home visit. The aim of the visit was to build a supportive relationship between clients and the health visitor, using a motivational interviewing approach, to prepare them for parenthood and to promote bonding and attachment. It was anticipated that this would also create an opportunity for the early identification of any concerns or issues and the provision of support and referral if appropriate. The project was evaluated by parents and health visitors alike. Fourteen women and three men were seen during the pilot and although this was a relatively small number, due to the issues discussed, key themes were identified and positive feedback received from all involved. Health visitors stated this way of working empowered the parents as the visit was more parent-centred and less didactic. Following on from the original pilot further work was completed and it is now envisaged that a universal high quality antenatal contact will be delivered to all clients within our Trust in the very near future. PMID:23304893

  1. Pediatric emergency room visits: a risk factor for acquiring measles.

    PubMed

    Farizo, K M; Stehr-Green, P A; Simpson, D M; Markowitz, L E

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, measles outbreaks have occurred among unimmunized children in inner cities in the United States. From May 1988 through June 1989, 1214 measles cases were reported in Los Angeles, and from October 1988 through June 1989, 1730 cases were reported in Houston. More than half of cases were in children younger than 5 years of age, most of whom were unvaccinated. Of cases of measles in preschool-aged children, nearly one fourth in Los Angeles and more than one third in Houston were reported by one inner-city emergency room. To evaluate whether emergency room visits were a risk factor for acquiring measles, in Los Angeles, 35 measles patients and 109 control patients with illnesses other than measles, and in Houston, 49 measles patients and 128 control patients, who visited these emergency rooms, were enrolled in case-control studies. Control patients were matched to case patients for ethnicity, age, and week of visit. Records were reviewed to determine whether case patients had visited the emergency room during the period of potential measles exposure, which was defined as 10 to 18 days before rash onset, and whether control patients had visited 10 to 18 days before their enrollment visit. In Los Angeles, 23% of case patients and 5% of control patients (odds ratio = 5.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.7, 15.9; P less than .01), and in Houston, 41% of case patients and 6% of control patients (odds ratio = 8.4, 95% confidence interval = 3.3, 21.2; P less than .01), visited the emergency room during these periods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Inbreeding in Mimulus guttatus Reduces Visitation by Bumble Bee Pollinators

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David E.; Roulston, T’ai H.; Hart, Haley

    2014-01-01

    Inbreeding in plants typically reduces individual fitness but may also alter ecological interactions. This study examined the effect of inbreeding in the mixed-mating annual Mimulus guttatus on visitation by pollinators (Bombus impatiens) in greenhouse experiments. Previous studies of M. guttatus have shown that inbreeding reduced corolla size, flower number, and pollen quantity and quality. Using controlled crosses, we produced inbred and outbred families from three different M. guttatus populations. We recorded the plant genotypes that bees visited and the number of flowers probed per visit. In our first experiment, bees were 31% more likely to visit outbred plants than those selfed for one generation and 43% more likely to visit outbred plants than those selfed for two generations. Inbreeding had only a small effect on the number of flowers probed once bees arrived at a genotype. These differences were explained partially by differences in mean floral display and mean flower size, but even when these variables were controlled statistically, the effect of inbreeding remained large and significant. In a second experiment we quantified pollen viability from inbred and self plants. Bees were 37–54% more likely to visit outbred plants, depending on the population, even when controlling for floral display size. Pollen viability proved to be as important as floral display in predicting pollinator visitation in one population, but the overall explanatory power of a multiple regression model was weak. Our data suggested that bees use cues in addition to display size, flower size, and pollen reward quality in their discrimination of inbred plants. Discrimination against inbred plants could have effects on plant fitness and thereby reinforce selection for outcrossing. Inbreeding in plant populations could also reduce resource quality for pollinators, potentially resulting in negative effects on pollinator populations. PMID:25036035

  3. Where is the UK's pollinator biodiversity? The importance of urban areas for flower-visiting insects.

    PubMed

    Baldock, Katherine C R; Goddard, Mark A; Hicks, Damien M; Kunin, William E; Mitschunas, Nadine; Osgathorpe, Lynne M; Potts, Simon G; Robertson, Kirsty M; Scott, Anna V; Stone, Graham N; Vaughan, Ian P; Memmott, Jane

    2015-03-22

    Insect pollinators provide a crucial ecosystem service, but are under threat. Urban areas could be important for pollinators, though their value relative to other habitats is poorly known. We compared pollinator communities using quantified flower-visitation networks in 36 sites (each 1 km(2)) in three landscapes: urban, farmland and nature reserves. Overall, flower-visitor abundance and species richness did not differ significantly between the three landscape types. Bee abundance did not differ between landscapes, but bee species richness was higher in urban areas than farmland. Hoverfly abundance was higher in farmland and nature reserves than urban sites, but species richness did not differ significantly. While urban pollinator assemblages were more homogeneous across space than those in farmland or nature reserves, there was no significant difference in the numbers of rarer species between the three landscapes. Network-level specialization was higher in farmland than urban sites. Relative to other habitats, urban visitors foraged from a greater number of plant species (higher generality) but also visited a lower proportion of available plant species (higher specialization), both possibly driven by higher urban plant richness. Urban areas are growing, and improving their value for pollinators should be part of any national strategy to conserve and restore pollinators.

  4. Where is the UK's pollinator biodiversity? The importance of urban areas for flower-visiting insects

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, Katherine C. R.; Goddard, Mark A.; Hicks, Damien M.; Kunin, William E.; Mitschunas, Nadine; Osgathorpe, Lynne M.; Potts, Simon G.; Robertson, Kirsty M.; Scott, Anna V.; Stone, Graham N.; Vaughan, Ian P.; Memmott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Insect pollinators provide a crucial ecosystem service, but are under threat. Urban areas could be important for pollinators, though their value relative to other habitats is poorly known. We compared pollinator communities using quantified flower-visitation networks in 36 sites (each 1 km2) in three landscapes: urban, farmland and nature reserves. Overall, flower-visitor abundance and species richness did not differ significantly between the three landscape types. Bee abundance did not differ between landscapes, but bee species richness was higher in urban areas than farmland. Hoverfly abundance was higher in farmland and nature reserves than urban sites, but species richness did not differ significantly. While urban pollinator assemblages were more homogeneous across space than those in farmland or nature reserves, there was no significant difference in the numbers of rarer species between the three landscapes. Network-level specialization was higher in farmland than urban sites. Relative to other habitats, urban visitors foraged from a greater number of plant species (higher generality) but also visited a lower proportion of available plant species (higher specialization), both possibly driven by higher urban plant richness. Urban areas are growing, and improving their value for pollinators should be part of any national strategy to conserve and restore pollinators. PMID:25673686

  5. Volunteers' experiences visiting the cognitively impaired in nursing homes: a friendly visiting program.

    PubMed

    Damianakis, Thecla

    2007-01-01

    Two challenges facing nursing-home care today are understanding the concept of quality of life as it relates to cognitively impaired residents and finding effective ways to ensure that it is achieved. Canadian director Allan King's documentary, Memory for Max, Claire, Ida and Company , filmed at Baycrest, captures a method for enhancing the quality of life of six cognitively impaired residents. While the film suggests an intervention model implemented by volunteers, there are challenges unique to institution-based programs (i.e., the recruitment and retention of volunteers). One of the challenges is the fear that volunteers may experience when interacting with the cognitively impaired. We conducted a pilot study of a model for training volunteers to provide friendly visiting and evaluated the impact on the participating residents. Observational accounts of volunteer-resident interactions and seven volunteer interviews were analysed and yielded several themes-(a) relationship building, (b) contribution of the environment, (c) preserving personhood, (d) resident-centred presence and the quality of the moment-and several themes related to the volunteers' role and their perceived impact on the residents. Discussed are the implications for volunteer programs in long-term health care settings.

  6. Highlights of NASA/DOE photovoltaics market assessment visit to Colombia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A NASA/DOE sponsored photovoltaic market assessment team composed of representatives of NASA-Lewis Research Center, DHR, Inc., and Associates in Rural Development, Inc. recently conducted a month-long study in Colombia (June 28 - July 23). The team contacted government officials and private sector representatives in Bogota and Cali, and visited rural development and agricultural sites in the departments of Cundinamarca, Caldas, Valle, and chada to determine the potential market for American photovoltaic products in the Colombia agricultural and rural sectors.

  7. Using practitioners' feedback to contribute to organisational development in health visiting.

    PubMed

    Drea, Clare; Lumsden, Virginia; Bourne, James

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the findings of a survey of practitioners within a health visiting service. This service was an Early Implementer site for the Health Visitor Implementation Plan. The survey was administered in the context of training all practitioners in the Solihull Approach. It aimed to gather information from practitioners about factors they thought could help them do their work with families more effectively. Practitioners' responses were analysed using thematic analysis. The principal needs identified were: more knowledge, skills and training; increased time to support families; increased supervision and support; and improved communication and partnership working. Practitioners' needs identified through the analysis were subsequently taken into account during development of the service.

  8. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... been learned since that time. Far more is now known about regulation—not only about when it is... interests of future generations; identify methods of ensuring that regulatory review does not produce...

  9. Fine particulate matter components and emergency department visits among a privately insured population in Greater Houston.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suyang; Ganduglia, Cecilia M; Li, Xiao; Delclos, George L; Franzini, Luisa; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Although adverse health effects of PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5μm) mass have been extensively studied, it remains unclear regarding which PM2.5 components are most harmful. No studies have reported the associations between PM2.5 components and adverse health effects among a privately insured population. In our study, we estimated the short-term associations between exposure to PM2.5 components and emergency department (ED) visits for all-cause and cause-specific diseases in Greater Houston, Texas, during 2008-2013 using ED visit data extracted from a private insurance company (Blue Cross Blue Shield Texas [BCBSTX]). A total of 526,453 ED visits were included in our assessment, with an average of 236 (±63) visits per day. We selected 20 PM2.5 components from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Chemical Speciation Network site located in Houston, and then applied Poisson regression models to assess the previously mentioned associations. Interquartile range increases in bromine (0.003μg/m(3)), potassium (0.048μg/m(3)), sodium ion (0.306μg/m(3)), and sulfate (1.648μg/m(3)) were statistically significantly associated with the increased risks in total ED of 0.71% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06, 1.37%), 0.71% (95% CI: 0.21, 1.22%), 1.28% (95% CI: 0.34, 2.24%), and 1.22% (95% CI: 0.23, 2.23%), respectively. Seasonal analysis suggested strongest associations occurred during the warm season. Our findings suggest that a privately insured population, presumably healthier than the general population, may be still at risk of adverse health effects due to exposure to ambient PM2.5 components. PMID:27235902

  10. Assessing the regulatory picture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses the safety of the nation's drinking water supply and discusses compliance of the Clean Water Act. Right now, the shape of the regulatory future is uncertain. The results of the D-DBP regulatory negotiation are imminent. Congress is ready to begin debating reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and utilities are trying to comply with the regulations while trying not to price water out of the reach of some of their customers.

  11. NRC regulatory initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.C.

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is addressing several low-level waste disposal issues that will be important to waste generators and to States and Compacts developing new disposal capacity. These issues include Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed waste, below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, and the low-level waste data base. This paper discusses these issues and their current status.

  12. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients’ conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours’ policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords “visiting policy”, “visiting hours” and “intensive care unit” with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses’ perspectives, patients’ preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  13. A Review of Visiting Policies in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Maleki, Majid; Peyrovi, Hamid; Bahrani, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Admission to intensive care units is potentially stressful and usually goes together with disruption in physiological and emotional function of the patient. The role of the families in improving ill patients' conditions is important. So this study investigates the strategies, potential challenges and also the different dimensions of visiting hours' policies with a narrative review. The search was carried out in scientific information databases using keywords "visiting policy", "visiting hours" and "intensive care unit" with no time limitation on accessing the published studies in English or Farsi. Of a total of 42 articles, 22 conformed to our study objectives from 1997 to 2013. The trajectory of current research shows that visiting in intensive care units has, since their inception in the 1960s, always considered the nurses' perspectives, patients' preferences and physiological responses, and the outlook for families. However, little research has been carried out and most of that originates from the United States, Europe and since 2010, a few from Iran. It seems that the need to use the research findings and emerging theories and practices is necessary to discover and challenge the beliefs and views of nurses about family-oriented care and visiting in intensive care units. PMID:26755480

  14. Air pollution and ED visits for chest pain.

    PubMed

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczyslaw

    2009-02-01

    This was a study of 157,028 emergency department (ED)-diagnosed visits for chest pain (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9]: 786) in 6 cities in Canada. The generalized linear mixed methods technique was applied to analyze the relations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain on the levels of ambient air pollutants after adjusting for meteorological variables. The daily counts of visits were analyzed separately for the whole period (January-December), warm (April-September), and cold (October-March). The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the mean values of the pollutant concentrations. The highest increase was obtained for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) exposure in the warm period as follows: 5.9% (95% confidence interval, 3.3-5.8) for mean value equals to 20.1 ppb. The associations of ED visits for chest pain with air pollution are very similar to the associations of ED visits related to cardiac problems. PMID:19371523

  15. Coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits in California.

    PubMed

    Malig, Brian J; Green, Shelley; Basu, Rupa; Broadwin, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Although respiratory disease has been strongly connected to fine particulate air pollution (particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5)), evidence has been mixed regarding the effects of coarse particles (particulate matter from 2.5 to 10 μm in diameter), possibly because of the greater spatial heterogeneity of coarse particles. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits, including common subdiagnoses, from 2005 to 2008 in 35 California counties. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to help control for time-invariant confounders and seasonal influences, and the study population was limited to those residing within 20 km of pollution monitors to mitigate the influence of spatial heterogeneity. Significant associations between respiratory emergency department visits and coarse particle levels were observed. Asthma visits showed associations (for 2-day lag, excess risk per 10 μg/m³ = 3.3%, 95% confidence interval: 2.0, 4.6) that were robust to adjustment by other common air pollutants (particles <2.5 μm in diameter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide). Pneumonia and acute respiratory infection visits were not associated, although some suggestion of a relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visits was present. Our results indicate that coarse particle exposure may trigger asthma exacerbations requiring emergency care, and reducing exposures among asthmatic persons may provide benefits.

  16. Retention Strategies and Factors Associated with Missed Visits Among Low Income Women at Increased Risk of HIV Acquisition in the US (HPTN 064)

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jonathan; Golin, Carol E.; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James P.; Emel, Lynda; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Frew, Paula M.; Justman, Jessica; Adimora, Adaora A.; Watson, Christopher Chauncey; Mannheimer, Sharon; Rompalo, Anne; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Tims-Cook, Zandraetta; Carter, Yvonne; Hodder, Sally L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Women at high-risk for HIV acquisition often face challenges that hinder their retention in HIV prevention trials. These same challenges may contribute to missed clinical care visits among HIV-infected women. This article, informed by the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, identifies factors associated with missed study visits and describes the multifaceted retention strategies used by study sites. HPTN 064 was a multisite, longitudinal HIV seroincidence study in 10 US communities. Eligible women were aged 18–44 years, resided in a census tract/zipcode with high poverty and HIV prevalence, and self-reported ≥1 personal or sex partner behavior related to HIV acquisition. Multivariate analyses of predisposing (e.g., substance use) and enabling (e.g., unmet health care needs) characteristics, and study attributes (i.e., recruitment venue, time of enrollment) identified factors associated with missed study visits. Retention strategies included: community engagement; interpersonal relationship building; reduction of external barriers; staff capacity building; and external tracing. Visit completion was 93% and 94% at 6 and 12 months. Unstable housing and later date of enrollment were associated with increased likelihood of missed study visits. Black race, recruitment from an outdoor venue, and financial responsibility for children were associated with greater likelihood of attendance. Multifaceted retention strategies may reduce missed study visits. Knowledge of factors associated with missed visits may help to focus efforts. PMID:24697160

  17. Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This teacher's guide contains activities to use in conjunction with a site visit to the Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site (Elverson, Pennsylvania). The guide provides diagrams of the furnace, a cold-blast smelting operation, and the furnace operation. It presents a timeline of iron production from ancient times through contemporary times.…

  18. Visiting with an Old and Active Friend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    When Comet Hale-Bopp passed through the inner solar system in early 1997, it was admired in the sky by a substantial fraction of the world's population. It was the true image of a "classical" comet, with a bright head and an enormous, multi-coloured tail. Due to its fortuitous orbit, it remained visible in the evening sky during several months, with all the associated positive effects. Professional observers at large telescopes around the world gathered the richest data ever obtained from a single comet, amateurs at star parties in different countries made large numbers of beautiful images and hardly a day passed without media reports about the latest developments of this spectacular celestial phenomenon. It is no wonder that, as an extra bonus, the general interest in astronomy received a major boost on this occasion. ESO has maintained a special Hale-Bopp webpage during the past years; from here there are also links to other Hale-Bopp sites; note, however, that some of them may not be active anymore. The new ESO image Since the passage four years ago, the comet has been moving away from the Sun and is now located at a distance that corresponds to nearly midway between the orbits of Saturn and Uranus. However, as the comet's orbit is highly inclined to the main plane in which the major planets move, Hale-Bopp is now far below that plane. It is seen deep in the southern sky, south of the Large Magellanic Cloud in the constellation Dorado (The Goldfish). It can therefore only be observed with telescopes located in the southern hemisphere. As it moves away, observations are made from time to time to document the comet's behaviour. The large 'dirty snowball' nucleus of ice and dust (probably about 50 km diameter) continues to be active, despite the very low temperature where it is now. This is quite unusual for a comet and is clearly confirmed on the present photo ( PR Photo 07a/01 ) from the WFI camera on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope at La Silla, obtained a few days

  19. VisIt Version 2.0.1

    2010-06-01

    VisIt is an interactive parallel visualization and graphical analysis tool for viewing scientific data on UNIX and PC platforms, Users can quickly generate visualizations from their data, animate them through time, manipulate them, and save the resulting images for presentations, VisIt contains a rich set of visualization features so that you can view your data in a variety of ways. It can be used to visualize scalar and vector fields defined on two and threemore » dimensional (2D and 3D) structured and unstructured meshes. VisIt was designed to handle very large data set sizes in the terascale range and yet can also handle small data sets in kilobyte range.« less

  20. Coyote visits at scent stations in relation to home range

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, C.E.; Knowlton, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    Response of free-franging coyotes (Canis latrans) to scent stations was studied in southeastern Idaho and southern Texas to examine relationships between the scent-station survey technique and coyote home range. Coyotes with radio transmitters were intensively monitored to determine movement and spatial use patterns for comparison with coyote visitations to artificial scent stations. Coyotes more frequently visited scent stations on the periphery or outside their home ranges than within them, probably because resident coyotes avoided scent stations (novel stimuli) in the very familiar core areas of their home ranges and were more likely to investigate them when encountered on the periphery or outside of them. Hence, scent stations may receive more visits from transient or dispersing individuals than from residents. 55 refs., 4 tabs.