Science.gov

Sample records for reinforced epoxy composite

  1. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  2. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  3. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  4. Dynamic Mechanical Behavior of Nickel-Aluminum Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Morgana; Hanagud, Sathyanaraya; Thadhani, Naresh

    2005-07-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced with a mixture of micron-sized Ni and micron or nano-sized Al powders were fabricated as bulk materials by cast/curing. The structural/mechanical behavior of these materials was evaluated using elastic and plastic property measurements via static and dynamic compression tests performed on rod shaped samples. Reverse Taylor anvil-on-rod impact tests combined with velocity interferometry gave qualitative and quantitative information about the transient deformation and failure response of the composites. The material containing 20wt% epoxy and nano-sized Al powder showed the most superior mechanical properties in terms of elastic modulus, and static and dynamic compressive strength, and strain before fracture, as compared to the other reinforced cast materials. The results illustrate that nano-sized Al particles provide significant enhancement to strength of epoxy composites by dispersing in the epoxy and generating a nano-Al containing epoxy matrix with embedded Ni particles. Funding for this research was provided by AFOSR/MURI Grant No. F49620-02-1-0382.

  5. Mesoscale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, Harry Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh

    2012-03-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders have complex microstructures that vary greatly from differences in particle size, morphology, loading fractions, etc. The effects of the underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites during dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle sizes of Al and loading fractions of Al and Ni were prepared by casting. Microstructures from the composites were then used in 2D plane strain mesoscale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us-Up and particle deformation response as a function of composite configuration.

  6. Rate dependent response and failure of a ductile epoxy and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Rae, Philip J; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B

    2010-01-01

    An extensive characterization suite has been performed on the response and failure of a ductile epoxy 55A and uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite of IM7 fibers in 55A resin from the quasistatic to shock regime. The quasistatic and intermediate strain rate response, including elastic modulus, yield and failure have are characterized by quasistatic, SHPB, and DMA measurements as a function of fiber orientation and temperature. The high strain rate shock effect of fiber orientation in the composite and response of the pure resin are presented for plate impact experiments. It has previously been shown that at lower impact velocities the shock velocity is strongly dependent on fiber orientation but at higher impact velocity the in-plane and through thickness Hugoniots converge. The current results are compared with previous studies of the shock response of carbon fiber composites with more conventional brittle epoxy matrices. The spall response of the composite is measured and compared with quasistatic fracture toughness measurements.

  7. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  8. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak. PMID:27652137

  9. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  10. Fiber-Reinforced Reactive Nano-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene/ matrix interface based on the fabrication of a reactive nano-epoxy matrix with lower surface energy has been improved. Enhanced mechanical properties versus pure epoxy on a three-point bend test include: strength (25 percent), modulus (20 percent), and toughness (30 percent). Increased thermal properties include higher Tg (glass transition temperature) and stable CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). Improved processability for manufacturing composites includes faster wetting rates on macro-fiber surfaces, lower viscosity, better resin infusion rates, and improved rheological properties. Improved interfacial adhesion properties with Spectra fibers by pullout tests include initial debonding force of 35 percent, a maximum pullout force of 25 percent, and energy to debond at 65 percent. Improved mechanical properties of Spectra fiber composites (tensile) aging resistance properties include hygrothermal effects. With this innovation, high-performance composites have been created, including carbon fibers/nano-epoxy, glass fibers/nano-epoxy, aramid fibers/ nano-epoxy, and ultra-high-molecularweight polyethylene fiber (UHMWPE).

  11. Superior Mechanical Properties of Epoxy Composites Reinforced by 3D Interconnected Graphene Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ya; Chen, Lei; Teng, Kunyue; Shi, Jie; Qian, Xiaoming; Xu, Zhiwei; Tian, Xu; Hu, Chuansheng; Ma, Meijun

    2015-06-01

    Epoxy-based composites reinforced by three-dimensional graphene skeleton (3DGS) were fabricated in resin transfer molding method with respect to the difficulty in good dispersion and arrangement of graphene sheets in composites by directly mixing graphene and epoxy. 3DGS was synthesized in the process of self-assembly and reduction with poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. In the formation of 3DGS, graphene sheets were in good dispersion and ordered state, which resulted in exceptional mechanical properties and thermal stability for epoxy composites. For 3DGS/epoxy composites, the tensile and compressive strengths significantly increased by 120.9% and 148.3%, respectively, as well as the glass transition temperature, which increased by a notable 19 °C, unlike the thermal exfoliation graphene/epoxy composites via direct-mixing route, which increased by only 0.20 wt % content of fillers. Relative to the graphene/epoxy composites in direct-mixing method mentioned in literature, the increase in tensile and compressive strengths of 3DGS/epoxy composites was at least twofold and sevenfold, respectively. It can be expected that 3DGS, which comes from preforming graphene sheets orderly and dispersedly, would replace graphene nanosheets in polymer nanocomposite reinforcement and endow composites with unique structure and some unexpected performance.

  12. Investigations of mechanical and wear properties of alumina/titania/fire-clay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vinay Kumar; Chauhan, Shivani; Sharma, Aarushi

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the effect of various particulates (alumina, titania, fire clay) reinforcements on mechanical and wear properties of epoxy composites have been studied with a prime motive of replacing the costly alumina and titania by much economical fire clay for high mechanical strength and/or wear resistant materials. Fire clay based epoxy composites delivered better mechanical (both tensile and impact) properties than the alumina filled or neat epoxy composites and slightly lower than titania reinforced composites, which qualified the fire clay a very suitable cost effective alternatives of both alumina and titania for high mechanical strength based applications. However, the poor wear behavior of fire clay reinforced composites revealed its poor candidacy for wear and tear applications.

  13. Epoxy/carbon composite resins in dentistry: mechanical properties related to fiber reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Viguie, G; Malquarti, G; Vincent, B; Bourgeois, D

    1994-09-01

    Composite carbon/epoxy resin techniques for restorative dentistry have improved with the development of various composite resins classified according to fiber reinforcement, such as short fibers, woven materials, or long unidirectional fibers. This study of the mechanical properties with three-point flexion enabled comparison of the flexural strengths. The modulus of elasticity of different composite resin materials was determined so that the appropriate reinforced composite resin could be selected for specific clinical conditions.

  14. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity. PMID:17326671

  15. Properties of glass/carbon fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sevkani, V. R.; Patel, B. R.; Patel, V. B.

    2016-05-01

    Composite Materials are well known for their tailor-made properties. For the fabrication of composites different types of reinforcements are used for different applications. Sometimes for a particular application, one type of reinforcement may not fulfill the requirements. Therefore, more than one type of reinforcements may be used. Thus, the idea of hybrid composites arises. Hybrid composites are made by joining two or more different reinforcements with suitable matrix system. It helps to improve the properties of composite materials. In the present work glass/carbon fiber reinforcement have been used with a matrix triglycidyl ether of tris(m-hydroxy phenyl) phosphate epoxy resin using amine curing agent. Different physical and mechanical properties of the glass, carbon and glass/carbon fiber reinforced polymeric systems have been found out.

  16. Epoxy/Fluoroether Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Taylor, M. S.

    1986-01-01

    Composite materials made from unfilled and glass-fiber-reinforced epoxy toughened by copolymerization with elastomeric prepolymers of perfluoroalkyl ether diacyl fluoride (EDAF). Improved properties due to hydrogen bonding between rubber phase and epoxy matrix, plus formation of rubberlike phase domains that molecularly interpenetrate with epoxy matrix. With optimum rubber content, particle size, and particle shape, entire molecular structure reinforced and toughened. Improved composites also show increased failure strength, stiffness, glass-transition temperature, and resistance to water.

  17. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  18. Impact and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of textile silk reinforced epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K.; Guan, J.

    2016-07-01

    Silk fabric reinforced epoxy resin composites (SFRPs) were prepared using simple techniques of hand lay-up, hot-press and vacuum treatment, and a series of volume fractions of silk reinforcements were achieved. The impact properties and dynamic mechanical properties of SFRPs were investigated using a pendulum impact testing method and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The results suggest that silk reinforcement could greatly enhance the mechanical performances of SFRPs. The impact strength reached a maximum of 71 kJ/m2 for 60%-silk SFRP, which demonstrated a potential of silk composites for defence and impact- resistant materials.

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Shape Memory Epoxy (CNFR-SME) Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyang

    Shape memory polymers have a wide range of applications due to their ability to mechanically change shapes upon external stimulus, while their achievable composite counterparts prove even more versatile. An overview of literature on shape memory materials, fillers and composites was provided to pave a foundation for the materials used in the current study and their inherent benefits. This study details carbon nanofiber and composite fabrication and contrasts their material properties. In the first section, the morphology and surface chemistry of electrospun-poly(acrylonitrile)-based carbon nanofiber webs were tailored through various fabrication methods and impregnated with a shape memory epoxy. The morphologies, chemical compositions, thermal stabilities and electrical resistivities of the carbon nanofibers and composites were then characterized. In the second section, an overview of thermal, mechanical and shape memory characterization techniques for shape memory polymers and their composites was provided. Thermal and mechanical properties in addition to the kinetic and dynamic shape memory performances of neat epoxy and carbon nanofiber/epoxy composites were characterized. The various carbon nanofiber web modifications proved to have notable influence on their respective composite performances. The results from these two sections lead to an enhanced understanding of these carbon nanofiber reinforced shape memory epoxy composites and provided insight for future studies to tune these composites at will.

  20. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  1. Hypervelocity Impact Experiments on Epoxy/Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Composite Panels Reinforced with Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatiwada, Suman; Laughman, Jay W.; Armada, Carlos A.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Barrera, Enrique V.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composites with multi-functional capabilities are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Polymer matrix composites (PMCs) reinforced with high strength fibers provide a lightweight and high strength alternative to metals and metal alloys conventionally used in aerospace architectures. Novel reinforcements such as nanofillers offer potential to improve the mechanical properties and add multi-functionality such as radiation resistance and sensing capabilities to the PMCs. This paper reports the hypervelocity impact (HVI) test results on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber composites reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT). Woven UHMWPE fabrics, in addition to providing excellent impact properties and high strength, also offer radiation resistance due to inherent high hydrogen content. SWCNT have exceptional mechanical and electrical properties. BNNT (figure 1) have high neutron cross section and good mechanical properties that add multi-functionality to this system. In this project, epoxy based UHMWPE composites containing SWCNT and BNNT are assessed for their use as bumper shields and as intermediate plates in a Whipple Shield for HVI resistance. Three composite systems are prepared to compare against one another: (I) Epoxy/UHMWPE, (II) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT and (III) Epoxy/UHMWPE/SWCNT/BNNT. Each composite is a 10.0 by 10.0 by 0.11 cm3 panel, consisting of 4 layers of fabrics arranged in cross-ply orientation. Both SWCNT and BNNT are 0.5 weight % of the fabric preform. Hypervelocity impact tests are performed using a two-stage light gas gun at Rice University

  2. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites. [composed of epoxy resins reinforced with carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.; Mullin, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    The fundamental failure mechanisms which result from the interaction of thermal cycling and mechanical loading of carbon-epoxy composites were studied. This work was confined to epoxy resin uniderictionally reinforced with HTS carbon fibers, and consists of first identifying local fiber, matrix and interface failure mechanisms using the model composite specimen containing a small number of fibers so that optical techniques can be used for characterization. After the local fracture process has been established for both mechanical loading and thermal cycling, engineering composite properties and gross fracture modes are then examined to determine how the local events contribute to real composite performance. Flexural strength in high fiber content specimens shows an increase in strength with increased thermal cycling. Similar behavior is noted for 25 v/o material up to 200 cycles; however, there is a drastic reduction after 200 cycles indicating a major loss of integrity probably through the accumulation of local cleavage cracks in the tensile region.

  3. Temperature effect during humid ageing on interfaces of glass and carbon fibers reinforced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Ray, B C

    2006-06-01

    Weight change behavior of fiber-reinforced polymer composites in humid and thermal environments appears to be a complex phenomena. The state of fiber/matrix interface is believed to influence the nature of diffusion modes. A significant weakening often appears at the interface during the hygrothermal ageing. It effects the moisture uptake kinetics and also the reduction of mechanical properties. The importance of temperature at the time of conditioning plays an important role in environmental degradation of such composite materials. An attempt has been made here to evaluate the deleterious effect of temperature on shear strength of carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composites during hygrothermal conditionings. Mechanical tests were conducted at room temperature to assess the effectiveness of the relaxation process in the nullification of environmentally-induced damage in the composites.

  4. Effect of Sodium bicarbonate on Fire behaviour of tilled E- Glass Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girish, S.; Devendra, K.; Bharath, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Composites such as fibre reinforced polymers give us the good mechanical properties, but their fire behaviour is not appreciable and needs to be improved. In this work, E- glass fiber is used as a reinforcement material and Epoxy resin is used as a matrix with particulate sodium bi-carbonate (NaHCO3) is used as additive. The hand lay-up technique is adopted for the development of composites by varying percentage of additive. All the tests were conducted according to ASTM standards to study the Fire behaviour of the developed composites. The different fire properties like Ignition time, mass loss rate and flame propagation rate of Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) with NaHCO3 are compared with neat FRPs. It is found that the ignition time increases as the percentage of additive is increased.

  5. Interlaminar Fracture toughness in Glass-Cellulose Reinforced Epoxy hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppin, Vinayak S.; Ashok; AnanthJoshi; Sridhar, I.; Shivakumar Gouda, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Laminates of fibre reinforced compositesare weak in through thicknessbut strong in fibre direction, this lead to development of hybridizationconcept in polymer composites. In this work a new method of disperssing cellulose micro particleson unidirectional (UD) Glass fibre epoxy composite using semi-automated draw down coating technique was adopted to enhance fracture toughness.Test results show that by adding cellulose increases the load carrying competency by 32% in mode-I as compare to Glass- Epoxy composite samples. Imrovement in interlaminar critical energy release rates (GiC and GnC) up to 55% in Mode -I and 19 %in Mode -II respectively was also observed. This enahancement in fracture toughnees is due to the amount of fiber bridging seen during crack initiation and propagation.

  6. Investigations on Thermal Conductivities of Jute and Banana Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, Satish; Ramakrishna, Avasarala; Balaram Padal, Korabu Tulasi

    2016-01-01

    The Jute and Banana fibers are used as reinforcement in epoxy resin matrix for making partially green biodegradable material composite via hand lay-up technique. The thermal conductivity of the jute fiber epoxy composites and banana fiber epoxy composites at different volume fraction of the fiber is determined experimentally by using guarded heat flow meter method. The experimental results had shown that thermal conductivity of the composites decrease with an increase in the fiber content. Experimental results are compared with theoretical models (Series model, Hashin model and Maxwell model) to describe the variation of the thermal conductivity versus the volume fraction of the fiber. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is observed. Thermal conductivity of Banana fiber composite is less when compared to that of Jute composite which indicates banana is a good insulator and also the developed composites can be used as insulating materials in building, automotive industry and in steam pipes to save energy by reducing rate of heat transfer.

  7. Fiber release from impacted graphite reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, T. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon fibers released from composites by aircraft fires and crashes can cause electrical shorts and consequent equipment damage. This report investigates less vigorous release mechanisms than that previously simulated by explosive burn/blast tests. When AS/3501-6 composites are impacted by various head and weight configurations of a pendulum impactor, less than 0.2 percent by weight of the original sample is released as single fibers. Other fiber release mechanisms studied were air blasts, constant airflow, torsion, flexural, and vibration of composite samples. The full significance of the low single fiber release rates found here is to be evaluated by NASA in their aircraft vulnerability studies.

  8. Dry sliding wear behavior of epoxy composite reinforced with short palmyra fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Somen; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    The present work explores the possibility of using palmyra fiber as a replacement for synthetic fiber in conventional polymer composites for application against wear. An attempt has been made in this work to improve the sliding wear resistance of neat epoxy by reinforcing it with short palmyra fibers (SPF). Epoxy composites with different proportions (0, 4, 8 and 12 wt. %) of SPF are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear tests are performed on the composite samples using a pin-on-disc test rig as per ASTM G 99-05 standards under various operating parameters. Design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's L16 Orthogonal Arrays is used for the analysis of the wear. This parametric analysis reveals that the SPF content is the most significant factor affecting the wear process followed by the sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extensive range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN). A well trained ANN has been used to predict the sliding wear response of epoxy based composites over a wide range.

  9. Thermal expansion of selected graphite reinforced polyimide-, epoxy-, and glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of three epoxy-matrix composites, a polyimide-matrix composite and a borosilicate glass-matrix composite, each reinforced with continuous carbon fibers, has been measured and compared. The expansion of a composite with a rubber toughened epoxy-matrix and P75S carbon fibers was very different from the expansion of two different single phase epoxy-matrix composites with P75S fibers although all three had the same stacking sequence. Reasonable agreement was obtained between measured thermal-expansion data and results from classical laminate theory. The thermal expansion of a material may change markedly as a result of thermal cycling. Microdamage, induced by 250 cycles between -156 C and 121 C in the graphite/polyimide laminate, caused a 53 percent decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The thermal expansion of the graphite/glass laminate was not changed by 100 thermal cycles from -129 C to 38 C; however, a residual strain of about 10 x 10 to the minus 6 power was measured for the laminate tested.

  10. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Kathryn Anne

    Carbon fiber is becoming more prevalent in everyday life. As such, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of, not solely general mechanical properties, but of long-term material behavior. Creep rupture testing of carbon fiber is very difficult due to high strength and low strain to rupture properties. Past efforts have included testing upon strands, single tows and overwrapped pressure vessels. In this study, 1 inch wide, [0°/90°]s laminated composite specimens were constructed from fabric supplied by T.D. Williamson Inc. Specimen fabrication methods and gripping techniques were investigated and a method was developed to collect long term creep rupture behavior data. An Instron 1321 servo-hydraulic material testing machine was used to execute static strength and short term creep rupture tests. A hanging dead-weight apparatus was designed to perform long-term creep rupture testing. The testing apparatus, specimens, and specimen grips functioned well. Collected data exhibited a power law distribution and therefore, a linear trend upon a log strength-log time plot. Statistical analysis indicated the material exhibited slow degradation behavior, similar to previous studies, and could maintain a 50 year carrying capacity at 62% of static strength, approximately 45.7 ksi.

  11. Micro/Nanomechanical characterization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy composite.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Wang, Xinnan; Tangpong, X W

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of 1 wt.% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites were characterized using a self-designed micro/nano three point bending tester that was on an atomic force microscope (AFM) to in situ observe MWCNTs movement on the sample surface under loading. The migration of an individual MWCNT at the surface of the nanocomposite was tracked to address the nanomechanical reinforcing mechanism of the nanocomposites. Through morphology analysis of the nanocomposite via scanning electron microscopy, AFM, and digital image correlation technique, it was found that the MWCNTs agglomerate and the bundles were the main factors for limiting the bending strength of the composites. The agglomeration/bundle effect was included in the Halpin-Tsai model to account for the elastic modulus of the nanocomposites.

  12. Designing of epoxy composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes grown carbon fiber fabric for improved electromagnetic interference shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Choudhary, Veena; Saini, Parveen; Mathur, R. B.

    2012-06-01

    In this letter, we report preparation of strongly anchored multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) carbon fiber (CF) fabric preforms. These preforms were reinforced in epoxy resin to make multi scale composites for microwave absorption in the X-band (8.2-12.4GHz). The incorporation of MWCNTs on the carbon fabric produced a significant enhancement in the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI-SE) from -29.4 dB for CF/epoxy-composite to -51.1 dB for CF-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites of 2 mm thickness. In addition to enhanced EMI-SE, interlaminar shear strength improved from 23 MPa for CF/epoxy-composites to 50 MPa for multiscale composites indicating their usefulness for making structurally strong microwave shields.

  13. Meso-scale simulations of particle reinforced epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley W.; Springer, H. Keo; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Spowart, Jonathan E.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2011-06-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with metal powders often exhibit complex microstructure characteristics that can vary greatly due to differences in particle size and distribution, morphology, loading fractions, and composite processing methods. The effects of these differences in underlying microstructure on the mechanical and wave propagation behavior of these composites under dynamic loading conditions are not well understood. To better understand these effects, epoxy (Epon826/DEA) reinforced with different particle loading fractions of aluminum (20 or 40% vol.), nominal particle size of aluminum (5 or 50 microns), and the addition of a stiffer second particle type (Ni, 10% vol., 50 micron nominal diameter) were prepared. Microstructures of the as cast composites were obtained and used in two dimensional meso-scale simulations. The effect of varying velocity loading conditions (>400 m/s) on the wave velocity was then examined to determine the Us--Up response as a function of composite configuration. In this presentation results from the meso-scale simulations will be shown and correlated to microstructure characteristics.

  14. Impact resistance of composite fan blades. [fiber reinforced graphite and boron epoxy blades for STOL operating conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premont, E. J.; Stubenrauch, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    The resistance of current-design Pratt and Whitney Aircraft low aspect ratio advanced fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composite fan blades to foreign object damage (FOD) at STOL operating conditions was investigated. Five graphite/epoxy and five boron/epoxy wide chord fan blades with nickel plated stainless steel leading edge sheath protection were fabricated and impact tested. The fan blades were individually tested in a vacuum whirlpit under FOD environments. The FOD environments were typical of those encountered in service operations. The impact objects were ice balls, gravel, stralings and gelatin simulated birds. Results of the damage sustained from each FOD impact are presented for both the graphite boron reinforced blades. Tests showed that the present design composite fan blades, with wrap around leading edge protection have inadequate FOD impact resistance at 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) tip speed, a possible STOL operating condition.

  15. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  16. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-07-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading to different levels of internal stresses. The mechanical properties, static strength and fatigue life time, are measured in three different directions of the material, i.e. the fiber direction, 0°, the 30° off axis direction, and the 90° direction transverse to the fiber direction. It is experimentally demonstrated that the resulting residual stresses barely influences the quasi-static mechanical properties of reinforced glass-fiber composites. It is found that the fatigue performance in the 0° direction is significantly influenced by the internal stresses, whereas the fatigue performance in the off axes directions so is not significantly influenced of these stresses. This is related to the observations that the damage mechanisms in the off axes directions are mainly related to shear failure in the matrix and in the interface between fiber and matrix and different from the damage mechanisms in the fiber direction, where the damage initiates in the transverse backing fibers and is directly related to fiber fractures in the load-carrying axial fiber bundles.

  17. Enhanced microwave shielding and mechanical properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes anchored carbon fiber felt reinforced epoxy multiscale composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Bharadwaj, Preetam; Choudhary, Veena; Mathur, R. B.

    2014-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were grown on carbon fiber (CF) felt by chemical vapor deposition that resulted into strongly anchored carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the CF surface. These multiscale preforms were used as the reinforcement in epoxy resin to develop multi scale CF felt-MWCNT/epoxy composites. The flexural strength (FS) and the flexural modulus (FM) of the composites were found to increase with increasing amount of CNTs grown on CF felt surface. FS improved by 37 %, i.e. 119 MPa compared to 87 MPa for CF felt/epoxy composites prepared under identical conditions. The FM also improved by 153 %, i.e. 15.7 GPa compared to 6.2 GPa for the CF/epoxy composites. The incorporation of MWCNTs on the CF felt produced a significant change in the electromagnetic interference shielding of these composites which improved from -21 to -27 dB for CF felt-MWCNT/epoxy multiscale composites in the Ku band (12.4-18 GHz) and indicates the usefulness of these strong composites for microwave shielding.

  18. Analysis of the mechanical and thermal properties of jute and glass fiber as reinforcement epoxy hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Braga, R A; Magalhaes, P A A

    2015-11-01

    This work describes the study to investigate and compare the mechanical and thermal properties of raw jute and glass fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid composites. To improve the mechanical properties, jute fiber was hybridized with glass fiber. Epoxy resin, jute and glass fibers were laminated in three weight ratios (69/31/0, 68/25/7 and 64/18/19) respectively to form composites. The tensile, flexural, impact, density, thermal and water absorption tests were carried out using hybrid composite samples. This study shows that the addition of jute fiber and glass fiber in epoxy, increases the density, the impact energy, the tensile strength and the flexural strength, but decreases the loss mass in function of temperature and the water absorption. Morphological analysis was carried out to observe fracture behavior and fiber pull-out of the samples using scanning electron microscope.

  19. Analysis of the mechanical and thermal properties of jute and glass fiber as reinforcement epoxy hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Braga, R A; Magalhaes, P A A

    2015-11-01

    This work describes the study to investigate and compare the mechanical and thermal properties of raw jute and glass fiber reinforced epoxy hybrid composites. To improve the mechanical properties, jute fiber was hybridized with glass fiber. Epoxy resin, jute and glass fibers were laminated in three weight ratios (69/31/0, 68/25/7 and 64/18/19) respectively to form composites. The tensile, flexural, impact, density, thermal and water absorption tests were carried out using hybrid composite samples. This study shows that the addition of jute fiber and glass fiber in epoxy, increases the density, the impact energy, the tensile strength and the flexural strength, but decreases the loss mass in function of temperature and the water absorption. Morphological analysis was carried out to observe fracture behavior and fiber pull-out of the samples using scanning electron microscope. PMID:26249589

  20. Effect of Matrix Modification on Interlaminar Shear Strength of Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhixiong; Li, Jingwen; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    In order to investigate the effect of the matrix variability on the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of glass fiber reinforced composites at 77K, three kinds of modifiers were employed to diethyl toluene diamine (DETD) cured diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) epoxy resin system. The woven glass fiber reinforced composites were fabricated by vacuum pressure impregnation (VPI). The ILSS at 77 K was studied and the results indicated that introduction of modifiers used in this study can enhance the ILSS of composite at 77 K. A maximum of 14.87% increase was obtained by addition of 10 wt% IPBE into the epoxy matrix. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the fracture mechanism and strengthening effect.

  1. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1987-01-01

    Publications and theses generated on composite research are listed. Surface energy changes of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites were investigated after irradiation with 0.5 MeV electrons. Electron spin resonance (ESR) investigations of line shapes and the radical decay behavior were made of an epoxy based on tetraglycidyl diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS), T-300 graphite fiber, and T-300/5208 (graphite fiber/epoxy) composites after irradiation with Co(60) gamma-radiation or 0.5 MeV electrons. The results of the experiments are discussed.

  2. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The epoxy resin system formed by tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) and 4,4'-diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) was characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Dynamic mechanical properties of graphite fiber epoxy composite specimens formulated with two different adhesive systems (NARMCO 5208, NARMCO 5209) were determined. The specimens were exposed to varying dose levels of ionizing radiation (0.5 MeV electrons) with a maximum absorbed dose of 10,000 Mrads. Following irradiation, property measurements were made to assess the influence of radiation on the epoxy and composite specimens. The results established that ionizing radiation has a limited effect on the properties of epoxy and composite specimens.

  3. Thermo-mechanical characterization of siliconized E-glass fiber/hematite particles reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. R., Arun prakash; Rajadurai, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this present work hybrid polymer (epoxy) matrix composite has been strengthened with surface modified E-glass fiber and iron(III) oxide particles with varying size. The particle sizes of 200 nm and <100 nm has been prepared by high energy ball milling and sol-gel methods respectively. To enhance better dispersion of particles and improve adhesion of fibers and fillers with epoxy matrix surface modification process has been done on both fiber and filler by an amino functional silane 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized iron(III) oxide particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Fixed quantity of surface treated 15 vol% E-glass fiber was laid along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of iron(III) oxide particles into the matrix to fabricate hybrid composites. The composites were cured by an aliphatic hardener Triethylenetetramine (TETA). Effectiveness of surface modified particles and fibers addition into the resin matrix were revealed by mechanical testing like tensile testing, flexural testing, impact testing, inter laminar shear strength and hardness. Thermal behavior of composites was evaluated by TGA, DSC and thermal conductivity (Lee's disc). The scanning electron microscopy was employed to found shape and size of iron(III) oxide particles adhesion quality of fiber with epoxy matrix. Good dispersion of fillers in matrix was achieved with surface modifier APTMS. Tensile, flexural, impact and inter laminar shear strength of composites was improved by reinforcing surface modified fiber and filler. Thermal stability of epoxy resin was improved when surface modified fiber was reinforced along with hard hematite particles. Thermal conductivity of epoxy increased with increase of hematite content in epoxy matrix.

  4. Delamination behavior of carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with short fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, M.S.; Hu, X.Z. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Delamination in laminated materials is one major mode of damage and failure encountered in application. Fracture mechanics is often used to characterize the interlaminar fracture behavior. The interlaminar fracture energies, G[sub I], G[sub II] and G[sub I/II] are the major concerns to characterize the interlaminar toughness of the composite laminates. Typical mode-I fracture is caused by normal tension, and typical mode-II fracture by shear in the direction of crack extension. The objective of the present study is to compare and discuss the mode-I and mode-II interlaminar fracture energies, G[sub I] and G[sub II] of carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with and without the reinforcement of short Kevlar fibers (5--7 mm in length) and to identify the microfracture features of the Kevlar fibers under those two delamination modes through SEM observations. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens and end notched flexure (ENF) specimens are used for the mode-I and -II delamination experiments.

  5. Compressive strength of fiber reinforced composite materials. [composed of boron and epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes, and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed, delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  6. Titanium Implant Osseointegration Problems with Alternate Solutions Using Epoxy/Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Composite

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present recent developments in material research with bisphenyl-polymer/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite that have produced highly influential results toward improving upon current titanium bone implant clinical osseointegration success. Titanium is now the standard intra-oral tooth root/bone implant material with biocompatible interface relationships that confer potential osseointegration. Titanium produces a TiO2 oxide surface layer reactively that can provide chemical bonding through various electron interactions as a possible explanation for biocompatibility. Nevertheless, titanium alloy implants produce corrosion particles and fail by mechanisms generally related to surface interaction on bone to promote an inflammation with fibrous aseptic loosening or infection that can require implant removal. Further, lowered oxygen concentrations from poor vasculature at a foreign metal surface interface promote a build-up of host-cell-related electrons as free radicals and proton acid that can encourage infection and inflammation to greatly influence implant failure. To provide improved osseointegration many different coating processes and alternate polymer matrix composite (PMC) solutions have been considered that supply new designing potential to possibly overcome problems with titanium bone implants. Now for important consideration, PMCs have decisive biofunctional fabrication possibilities while maintaining mechanical properties from addition of high-strengthening varied fiber-reinforcement and complex fillers/additives to include hydroxyapatite or antimicrobial incorporation through thermoset polymers that cure at low temperatures. Topics/issues reviewed in this manuscript include titanium corrosion, implant infection, coatings and the new epoxy/carbon-fiber implant results discussing osseointegration with biocompatibility related to nonpolar molecular attractions with secondary bonding, carbon fiber in vivo properties, electrical

  7. Analytical Modeling for Mechanical Strength Prediction with Raman Spectroscopy and Fractured Surface Morphology of Novel Coconut Shell Powder Reinforced: Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Savita; Singh, Alok; Sharma, Sudhir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, an analytical modeling and prediction of tensile and flexural strength of three dimensional micro-scaled novel coconut shell powder (CSP) reinforced epoxy polymer composites have been reported. The novel CSP has a specific mixing ratio of different coconut shell particle size. A comparison is made between obtained experimental strength and modified Guth model. The result shows a strong evidence for non-validation of modified Guth model for strength prediction. Consequently, a constitutive modeled equation named Singh model has been developed to predict the tensile and flexural strength of this novel CSP reinforced epoxy composite. Moreover, high resolution Raman spectrum shows that 40 % CSP reinforced epoxy composite has high dielectric constant to become an alternative material for capacitance whereas fractured surface morphology revealed that a strong bonding between novel CSP and epoxy polymer for the application as light weight composite materials in engineering.

  8. Research on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of MWCNTs/CF Reinforced Epoxy Resin Matrix Composite Patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, W.; Li, C. Q.; Lin, L.; Chen, Y.

    The mechanical and thermal properties of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite patch were tested, which was prepared by the hand lay-up method. The results indicated that the imagination observed by SEM presented good resin-impregnation for both of the two kinds of composite patches, and the mechanical and thermal properties of composite patch could be effectively increased by improvement of the interface combination after adding MWCNTs. For the mechanical properties of composite patch reinforced with MWCNTs, the interlaminar shear strength, bend strength and impact-tolerance were separately increased by 3.1%, 51.66% and 60.7%; and heat-resistance obtained by DMA were shown better thermal stability.

  9. Modification of epoxy-reinforced glass-cloth composites with a perfluorinated alkyl ether elastomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Chen, T. S.; Taylor, M.

    1984-01-01

    A perfluorinated alkyl ether diacyl fluoride prepolymer (molecular weight about 1500) was coreacted with Epon 828 epoxy resin and diamino diphenyl sulfone to obtain an elastomer-toughened, glass-cloth composite. Improvements in flexural toughness, impact resistance, and water resistance, without loss of strength, modulus of elasticity or a lowering of the glass-transition temperature, were realized over those of the unmodified composite. Factors concerning optimization of the process are discussed. Results suggest that a simultaneously interpenetrating polymer network may be formed which gives rise to a measured improvement in composite mechanical properties.

  10. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Morphological Studies of Rice Husk (Treated/Untreated)-CaCO3 Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepak; Joshi, Garvit; Gupta, Ayush

    2015-10-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites are a very popular area of research because of the easy availability and biodegradability of these fibers. The manufacturing of natural fiber composite is done by reinforcing fibers in the particulate form, fiber form or in woven mat form. Natural fiber composites also utilize industrial wastes as a secondary reinforcements like fly ash, sludge etc. By keeping all these point of views in the present investigation the effect of rice husk flour (chemically treated/untreated) and micro sized calcium carbonate with epoxy resin have been evaluated. The diameter of rice husk flour was maintained at 600 µm through mechanical sieving machine. The husk flour was chemically treated with NaOH (5 % w/v). Mechanical properties like hardness, flexural impact and compression strength were evaluated and found to be superior in modified or chemically treated flour as compared to unmodified or untreated flour reinforced composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study was also undertaken for the developed composites. SEM study shows the distribution of the rice husk flour and calcium carbonate over the matrix.

  11. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy-graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to elucidate the changes in molecular structural and mechanical properties of epoxy/graphite fiber composites upon exposure to ionizing radiation in a simulated space environment, spectroscopic and surface properties of tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diamino diphenyl methane (TGDDM) red with diamino diphenyl sulfone (DDS) and T-300 graphite fiber were investigated following exposure to ionizing radiation. Cobalt-60 gamma radiation and 1/2 MeV electrons were used as radiation sources. The system was studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy, contact angle measurements, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  12. Mechanical, physical and tribological characterization of nano-cellulose fibers reinforced bio-epoxy composites: An attempt to fabricate and scale the 'Green' composite.

    PubMed

    Barari, Bamdad; Omrani, Emad; Dorri Moghadam, Afsaneh; Menezes, Pradeep L; Pillai, Krishna M; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2016-08-20

    The development of bio-based composites is essential in order to protect the environment while enhancing energy efficiencies. In the present investigation, the plant-derived cellulose nano-fibers (CNFs)/bio-based epoxy composites were manufactured using the Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) process. More specifically, the CNFs with and without chemical modification were utilized in the composites. The curing kinetics of the prepared composites was studied using both the isothermal and dynamic Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) methods. The microstructure as well as the mechanical and tribological properties were investigated on the cured composites in order to understand the structure-property correlations of the composites. The results indicated that the manufactured composites showed improved mechanical and tribological properties when compared to the pure epoxy samples. Furthermore, the chemically modified CNFs reinforced composites outperformed the untreated composites. The surface modification of the fibers improved the curing of the resin by reducing the activation energy, and led to an improvement in the mechanical properties. The CNFs/bio-based epoxy composites form uniform tribo-layer during sliding which minimizes the direct contact between surfaces, thus reducing both the friction and wear of the composites.

  13. Mechanical, physical and tribological characterization of nano-cellulose fibers reinforced bio-epoxy composites: An attempt to fabricate and scale the 'Green' composite.

    PubMed

    Barari, Bamdad; Omrani, Emad; Dorri Moghadam, Afsaneh; Menezes, Pradeep L; Pillai, Krishna M; Rohatgi, Pradeep K

    2016-08-20

    The development of bio-based composites is essential in order to protect the environment while enhancing energy efficiencies. In the present investigation, the plant-derived cellulose nano-fibers (CNFs)/bio-based epoxy composites were manufactured using the Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) process. More specifically, the CNFs with and without chemical modification were utilized in the composites. The curing kinetics of the prepared composites was studied using both the isothermal and dynamic Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) methods. The microstructure as well as the mechanical and tribological properties were investigated on the cured composites in order to understand the structure-property correlations of the composites. The results indicated that the manufactured composites showed improved mechanical and tribological properties when compared to the pure epoxy samples. Furthermore, the chemically modified CNFs reinforced composites outperformed the untreated composites. The surface modification of the fibers improved the curing of the resin by reducing the activation energy, and led to an improvement in the mechanical properties. The CNFs/bio-based epoxy composites form uniform tribo-layer during sliding which minimizes the direct contact between surfaces, thus reducing both the friction and wear of the composites. PMID:27178934

  14. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.; Memory, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites are assessed so that durability in space applications can be predicted. A listing of composite systems irradiated along with the maximum radiation dose applied and type of mechanical tests performed is shown. These samples were exposed to 1/2 MeV electrons.

  15. Effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties of epoxy-graphite fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fornes, R. E.; Gilbert, R. D.; Memory, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of high energy radiation on the mechanical properties and on the molecular and structural properties of graphite fiber reinforced composites were assessed so that the durability of such composites in space applications could be predicted. Investigative techniques including ESR and infrared spectroscopy, ESCA, contact angle measurements, and dynamic and static mechanical testing (3-point bending and interlaminar shear) were employed. The results using these different techniques are individually described, and the implications of the data are discussed. The proposed plan of work for the next fiscal year is outlined.

  16. Multiwall carbon nanotubes reinforced epoxy nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei

    The emergence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to myriad possibilities for structural polymer composites with superior specific modulus, strength, and toughness. While the research activities in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer composites (NRPs) have made enormous progress towards fabricating next-generation advanced structural materials with added thermal, optical, and electrical advantages, questions concerning the filler dispersion, interface, and CNT alignment in these composites remain partially addressed. In this dissertation, the key technical challenges related to the synthesis, processing, and reinforcing mechanics governing the effective mechanical properties of NRPs were introduced and reviewed in the first two chapters. Subsequently, issues on the dispersion, interface control, hierarchical structure, and multi-functionality of NRPs were addressed based on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced DGEBA epoxy systems (NREs). In chapter 3, NREs with enhanced flexural properties were discussed in the context of improved dispersion and in-situ formation of covalent bonds at the interface. In chapter 4, NREs with controlled interface and tailored thermomechanical properties were demonstrated through the judicious choice of surface functionality and resin chemistry. In chapter 5, processing-condition-induced CNT organization in hierarchical epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed. In Chapter 6, possibilities were explored for multi-functional NREs for underwater acoustic structural applications. Finally, the findings of this dissertation were concluded and future research was proposed for ordered carbon nanotube array reinforced nanocomposites in the last chapter. Four journal publications resulted from this work are listed in Appendix.

  17. Morphological and electrical properties of epoxy-based composites reinforced with exfoliated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Raimondo, Marialuigia; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to prepare and characterize epoxy/amine-based composites filled with different percentages of partially exfoliated graphite (i.e. pEG) particles having an exfoliation degree of 56% in order to analyze the effect of the filler amounts on the electrical properties of the resulting nanocomposites. Moreover, in order to fully investigate the direct relationship between the physical properties of the employed filler and the results of the electrical characterization, a structural and morphological characterization of the pEG samples is carried out by means of various type of analysis such as X-ray diffraction patterns, micro-Raman and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images. The DC electrical characterization reveals a percolation thresholds (EPT) that falls in the range [2-3] wt% and an electrical conductivity of about 0.66 S/m at the highest filler loading (6.5 wt%). From the analysis of the percolative curve it is possible to derive the percolation law parameters and in particular the critical exponent t, whose value (i.e. 1.2) reflects an effective 2D organization of the percolating structure consistent with the type of filler used (2-dimensional). Finally, an extensive analysis concerning the electrical properties in the frequency domain has been carried out in order to evaluate the effectiveness of pEG-loaded composites in terms of electromagnetic interference compatibility (EMC) and their applicability as radar absorbers materials (RAMs).

  18. Nanofibre distribution in composites manufactured with epoxy reinforced with nanofibrillated cellulose: model prediction and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitomäki, Yvonne; Westin, Mikael; Korpimäki, Jani; Oksman, Kristiina

    2016-07-01

    In this study a model based on simple scattering is developed and used to predict the distribution of nanofibrillated cellulose in composites manufactured by resin transfer moulding (RTM) where the resin contains nanofibres. The model is a Monte Carlo based simulation where nanofibres are randomly chosen from probability density functions for length, diameter and orientation. Their movements are then tracked as they advance through a random arrangement of fibres in defined fibre bundles. The results of the model show that the fabric filters the nanofibres within the first 20 µm unless clear inter-bundle channels are available. The volume fraction of the fabric fibres, flow velocity and size of nanofibre influence this to some extent. To verify the model, an epoxy with 0.5 wt.% Kraft Birch nanofibres was made through a solvent exchange route and stained with a colouring agent. This was infused into a glass fibre fabric using an RTM process. The experimental results confirmed the filtering of the nanofibres by the fibre bundles and their penetration in the fabric via the inter-bundle channels. Hence, the model is a useful tool for visualising the distribution of the nanofibres in composites in this manufacturing process.

  19. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the properties of epoxy based composites reinforced with a semicrystalline thermoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez-Pascual, A.; Shuttleworth, P.; Gónzalez-Castillo, E.; Marco, C.; Gómez-Fatou, M.; Ellis, G.

    2014-08-01

    Novel ternary nanocomposites based on a thermoset (TS) system composed of triglycidyl p-aminophenol (TGAP) epoxy resin and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) curing agent incorporating 5 wt% of a semicrystalline thermoplastic (TP), an ethylene/1-octene copolymer, and 0.5 or 1.0 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been prepared via physical blending and curing. The influence of the TP and the MWCNTs on the curing process, morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the hybrid nanocomposites has been analyzed. Different morphologies evolved depending on the CNT content: the material with 0.5 wt% MWCNTs showed a matrix-dispersed droplet-like morphology with well-dispersed nanofiller that selectively located at the TS/TP interphase, while that with 1.0 wt% MWCNTs exhibited coarse dendritic TP areas containing agglomerated MWCNTs. Although the cure reaction was accelerated in its early stage by the nanofillers, curing occurred at a lower rate since these obstructed chain crosslinking. The nanocomposite with lower nanotube content displayed two crystallization peaks at lower temperature than that of pure TP, while a single peak appearing at similar temperature to that of TP was observed for the blend with higher nanotube loading. The highest thermal stability was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (0.5 wt%), due to a synergistic barrier effect of both TP and the nanofiller. Moreover, this nanocomposite displayed the best mechanical properties, with an optimal combination of stiffness, strength and toughness. However, poorer performance was found for TS/TP (5.0 wt%)/MWCNTs (1.0 wt%) due to the less effective reinforcement of the agglomerated nanotubes and the coalescence of the TP particles into large areas. Therefore, finely tuned morphologies and properties can be obtained by adjusting the nanotube content in the TS/TP blends, leading to high-performance hybrid nanocomposites suitable for structural and high-temperature applications.

  20. Modified Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of a rubber-modified experimental epoxy resin and a standard epoxy as composite matrices were studied. In addition, a brominated epoxy resin was used in varying quantities to improve the fire resistance of the composite. The experimental resin was tris-(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether, known as tris epoxy novolac (TEN). The standard epoxy resin used was tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM). The above resins were modified with carboxyl-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber. It is concluded that: (1) modification of TEN resin with bromine gives better impact resistance than rubber modification alone; (2) 25% rubber addition is necessary to obtain significant improvement in impact resistance; (3) impact resistance increases with bromine content; (4) impact velocity does not significantly affect the energy absorbed by the test sample; (5) Tg did not decline with rubber modification; and (6) TEN resin had better hot/wet properties than TGDDM resin.

  1. Mutual irradiation grafting on indigenous aramid fiber-3 in diethanolamine and epichlorohydrin and its effect on interfacially reinforced epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lixin; Liu, Li; Xie, Fei; Huang, Yudong

    2016-07-01

    The surface of indigenous aramid fiber-3 (IAF3) was decorated via mutual irradiation grafting process in diethanolamine (DEA) and epichlorohydrin (ECH), respectively, with the assist of high energy gamma rays. This modification method with great permeability produced the homogeneous and ameliorative AF3 surfaces, which were observed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atom forced microscopy (AFM). Enhanced surface free energy and reduced contact angles of irradiated AF3 verified the fabulous effectiveness of mutual irradiation without seriously injured tensile strength. The composites based on epoxy resin (ER) polymer as the matrix and irradiated IAF3 grafted DEA and ECH as the reinforcement. By capitalizing on the irradiated IAF3 which has higher wettability and adsorption on resin, the irradiated IAF3-ECH/ER composites exhibit admirable interfacial mechanical performance as compared to the pristine IAF3 contained composites. The interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and flexural strength of composites were remarkable improved to 86.5, 60.13 and 511 MPa respectively, from the pristine IAF3/ER composite with IFSS of 65.9 MPa, ILSS of 48.1 MPa, and flexural strength of 479 MPa.

  2. Effectively Exerting the Reinforcement of Dopamine Reduced Graphene Oxide on Epoxy-Based Composites via Strengthened Interfacial Bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenbin; Shang, Tinghua; Yang, Wengang; Yang, Huichuan; Lin, Song; Jia, Xiaolong; Cai, Qing; Yang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-25

    The effects of dopamine reduced graphene oxide (pDop-rGO) on the curing activity and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites were evaluated. Taking advantage of self-polymerization of mussel-inspired dopamine, pDop-rGO was prepared through simultaneous functionalization and reduction of graphene oxide (GO) via polydopamine coating. Benefiting from the universal binding ability of polydopamine, good dispersion of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix was able to be achieved as the content of pDop-rGO being below 0.2 wt %. Curing kinetics of epoxy composites with pDop-rGO were systematically studied by nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Compared to the systems of neat epoxy or epoxy composites containing GO, epoxy composites loaded with pDop-rGO showed lower activation energy (Eα) over the range of cure (α). It revealed that the amino-bearing pDop-rGO was able to react with epoxy matrix and enhance the curing reactions as an amine-type curing agent. The nature of the interactions at GO-epoxy interface was further evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, confirming the occurrence of chemical bonding. The strengthened interfacial adhesion between pDop-rGO and epoxy matrix thus enhanced the effective stress transfer in the composites. Accordingly, the tensile and flexural properties of EP/pDop-rGO composites were enhanced due to both the well dispersion and strong interfacial bonding of pDop-rGO in epoxy matrix.

  3. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy, as Applied to Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composite Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Timothy Marvin

    1996-08-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) can be an elegantly simple nondestructive evaluation tool. The resonance spectrum of any specimen is dependent on, and sensitive at ppm levels to, its density, geometry, elastic and thermal properties, and boundary conditions. The measurement of spectrum is fast, taking between 15 and 90 seconds with state-of-the-art instrumentation, making it appropriate for following properties as a function of temperature. Parts per million changes in specimen density, geometry, elastic moduli, temperature, and boundary conditions are detected with RUS. A novel apparatus is presented for driving and detecting the mechanical resonance of objects with major dimensions ranging from 0.1 cm to 33 cm. The noise floor of the apparatus is characterized using a high Q titanium alloy and a low Q graphite/epoxy composite. The apparatus is used to measure the amplitude/frequency resonance spectra of right rectangular parallelepiped (RRP) specimens of four different lay-ups of AS4/3501-6 carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CFRE) composite material at room temperature and at one degree C intervals between -177^circC and 25 ^circC. It is important to know the mechanical properties of this material at low temperatures for underwater, polar, and space applications. The temperature dependence of the second order elastic moduli are calculated from the resonance spectra of the AS4/3501-6 RRPs. High power ultrasound is used to enhance the cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite. Composite panels are insonified through the caul plate, by a high power ultrasonic horn, while curing. Stiffness enhancements of five percent are observed. The resonance spectrum of a steel caul plate is used to monitor the degree of cure of AS4/3501-6 CFRE composite panels in real time. Because the curing composite acts to change the boundary conditions, the resonance spectrum changes as the composite cures. RUS is used to screen a variety of high precision engineered parts for mechanical defects

  4. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  5. Steady-shear rheological properties of graphene-reinforced epoxy resin for manufacturing of aerospace composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausi, Marialaura; Santonicola, M. Gabriella; Laurenzi, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the steady-shear rheological behavior and the absolute viscosity of epoxy matrix reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (xGnP) before cure. Three different grades of xGnP (grades C, M and H) were dispersed homogenously at different weight percentages (wt%) into the epoxy matrix, ranging from 0.5 to 5 wt%. It is found that nanocomposite fluids with xGnP-C exhibit a Newtonian behavior at shear rate in the range 0.1-100 s-1, conversely, nanocomposite fluids with xGnP of grade M and H exhibit a shear-thinning behavior with the increase of nanoplatelet loading. Results from this analysis indicate how the steady shear rheological properties of the nano-reinforced polymer fluids depend on the geometrical characteristics of the graphene nanoplatelets.

  6. Radio frequency shielding behaviour of silane treated Fe2O3/E-glass fibre reinforced epoxy hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun prakash, V. R.; Rajadurai, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, radio frequency shielding behaviour of polymer (epoxy) matrixes composed of E-glass fibres and Fe2O3 fillers have been studied. The principal aim of this project is to prepare suitable shielding material for RFID application. When RFID unit is pasted on a metal plate without shielding material, the sensing distance is reduced, resulting in a less than useful RFID system. To improve RF shielding of epoxy, fibres and fillers were utilized. Magnetic behaviour of epoxy polymer composites was measured by hysteresis graphs (B-H) followed by radio frequency identifier setup. Fe2O3 particles of sizes 800, 200 and 100 nm and E-glass fibre woven mat of 600 g/m2 were used to make composites. Particle sizes of 800 nm and 200 nm were prepared by high-energy ball milling, whereas particles of 100 nm were prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance better dispersion of particles within the epoxy matrix, a surface modification process was carried out on fillers by an amino functional coupling agent called 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized Fe2O3 particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Variable quantity of E-glass fibre (25, 35, and 45 vol%) was laid down along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of 800, 200, and 100 nm size Fe2O3 particles into the matrix, to fabricate the hybrid composites. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images reveal the shape and size of Fe2O3 particles for different milling times and particle dispersion in the epoxy matrix. The maximum improved sensing distance of 45.2, 39.4 and 43.5 % was observed for low-, high-, and ultra-high radio frequency identifier setup along with shielding composite consist of epoxy, 1 vol% 200 nm Fe2O3 particles and 45 vol% of E-glass fibre.

  7. Polyaniline stabilized magnetite nanoparticle reinforced epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbo; Tadakamalla, Sruthi; Huang, Yudong; Colorado, Henry A; Luo, Zhiping; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2012-10-24

    Magnetic epoxy polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) reinforced with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared at different particle loading levels. The particle surface functionality tuned by conductive polyaniline (PANI) is achieved via a surface initiated polymerization (SIP) approach. The effects of nanoparticle loading, surface functionality, and temperature on both the viscosity and storage/loss modulus of liquid epoxy resin suspensions and the physicochemical properties of the cured solid PNCs are systematically investigated. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the cured epoxy filled with the functionalized NPs has shifted to the higher temperature in the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) compared with that of the cured pure epoxy. Enhanced mechanical properties of the cured epoxy PNCs filled with the functionalized NPs are observed in the tensile test compared with that of the cured pure epoxy and cured epoxy PNCs filled with as-received NPs. The uniform NP distribution in the cured epoxy PNCs filled with functionalized NPs is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). These magnetic epoxy PNCs show the good magnetic properties and can be attached by a permanent magnet. Enhanced interfacial interaction between NPs and epoxy is revealed in the fracture surface analysis. The PNCs formation mechanism is also interpreted from the comprehensive analysis based on the TGA, DSC, and FTIR in this work.

  8. Non destructive FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy studies on carbon fiber reinforced polyimide composite and water diffusion in epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravikumar

    order of the kinetic rates agreed to a good extent with literature reports implying the mechanistic aspect is retained in composite. The second part of the work focused on the diffusion studies. With the capability of depth profiling using PAS, we were able to demonstrate the sorption trend as a function of depth in epoxies. The samples used were physically aged and the apparent diffusion constant was found to be of the order of 10 -10cm2/s. The lower value of the diffusion constant was attributed to poor relaxation capability due to ageing. The initial sorption trend was modeled on the basis of Fickian diffusion and the trend correlated well with the gravimetry analysis. Time evolution of water sorption in PAS correlated well with gravimetry technique. The third aspect of the work involved curing studies in nanocomposites. With the recent trend being controlling active nano-domains for better applicability and processing of materials. We were able to employ PAS to study the curing trend in carbon nanotube dispersed thermosets. DSC studies showed the existence of two glass transition temperatures, which we believe might be due to relaxation in homopolymers and relaxation of polymeric segment close to the nanotube surface. We were able to study the curing aspect of the filler reinforced thermoset and found that the surface curing displayed a higher crosslinking compared to the bulk.

  9. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  10. MoS2 nanolayers grown on carbon nanotubes: an advanced reinforcement for epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Keqing; Liu, Jiajia; Shi, Yongqian; Jiang, Saihua; Wang, Dong; Hu, Yuan; Gui, Zhou

    2015-03-25

    In the present study, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) wrapped with MoS2 nanolayers (MoS2-CNTs) were facilely synthesized to obtain advanced hybrids. The structure of the MoS2-CNT hybrids was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. Subsequently, the MoS2-CNT hybrids were incorporated into EP for reducing fire hazards. Compared with pristine CNTs, MoS2-CNT hybrids showed good dispersion in EP matrix and no obvious aggregation of CNTs was observed. The obtained nanocomposites exhibited significant improvements in thermal properties, flame retardancy and mechanical properties, compared with those of neat EP and composites with a single CNT or MoS2. With the incorporation of 2.0 wt % of MoS2-CNT hybrids, the char residues and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the EP composite was significantly increased. Also, the addition of MoS2-CNT hybrids awarded excellent fire resistance to the EP matrix, which was evidenced by the significantly reduced peak heat release rate and total heat release. Moreover, the amount of organic volatiles from EP decomposition was obviously decreased, and the formation of toxic CO was effectively suppressed, implying the toxicity of the volatiles was reduced and smoke production was obviously suppressed. The dramatically reduced fire hazards were generally ascribed to the synergistic effect of MoS2 and CNTs, containing good dispersion of MoS2-CNT hybrids, catalytic char function of MoS2 nanolayers, and physical barrier effects of MoS2 nanolayers and CNT network structure. PMID:25742464

  11. Epoxy coated reinforcement in bridge decks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, J.

    A review was conducted of methods relating to the use of epoxy coated reinforcing bars for bridge decks and their potential for use in the United Kingdom. A survey of work carried out in the USA was carried out and the analysis used in a preliminary cost study. The options of having either a hot rolled asphalt surfacing or a permanently exposed concrete wearing surface were considered. It was concluded that epoxy coating of the top steel in addition to current waterproofing practice would provide, at relatively little extra cost, additional assurance that the reinforcement would be adequately protected throughout the life of a bridge. Current design rules do not permit decks with permanently exposed concrete wearing surface without waterproofing. Epoxy coating may afford a means of introducing such decks but before a positive recommendation to delete waterproofing can be made further studies would have to be undertaken.

  12. Post-failure Analysis and Fractography of In-plane Tension-Tested Tufted Carbon Fabric-Reinforced Epoxy Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masa, Suresh Kumar; Mallya, Ambresha Basappa; Dhanapal, Karuppanan; Ramachandra, Ranganath Vemulapad; Kishore

    2015-04-01

    Tufted and plain unidirectional carbon fabric-reinforced epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by vacuum-enhanced resin infusion technology and subjected to in-plane tensile tests with a view to study the changes in mechanical properties and failure responses. Owing to the presence of tufts in the laminates, both the tensile strength and modulus decrease by ~38 and ~20%, respectively, vis- à- vis the values recorded for plain composites. The fracture features point to the fact that though both the composites fail in brittle manner, they, however, exhibit differing fiber pull out lengths. Further, it was noticed that for the tufted ones, crack originates in the vicinity of tuft thread, spreads through the composite in a brittle manner, and results in a display of shorter fiber pull out lengths. These observations and other results are discussed in this paper.

  13. The fabrication and tribological behavior of epoxy composites modified by the three-dimensional polyurethane sponge reinforced with dopamine functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Huaiyuan; Sun, Liyuan; Wang, Enqun; Zhu, Yixing; Zhu, Yanji

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interpenetrating network structure epoxy composites were fabricated based on the modified carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced flexible polyurethane (PU) sponge. CNTs were first functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) as revealed by TEM imaging, which is formed via the oxidative self-polymerization of dopamine. Then the functionalized CNTs (CNT-PDA) were successfully anchored on the skeleton surfaces of sponge, forming a continuous 3D carbon network. The interfacial interaction between modified PU sponge and epoxy (EP) matrix was significantly enhanced due to the covalent linkage of PDA. Improvement in the thermal stability of CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites was observed by TG analysis and related to the CNTs anchored on the skeleton of sponge. The tribological properties of pure EP, PU3D/EP and CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites were comparatively investigated in terms of different loads and velocities. Results demonstrated that CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites exhibited the best tribological performance owing to the strong interfacial interaction and the 3D carbon network structure. In particular, the wear resistance of CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites was 6.2 times and 3 times higher than those of pure EP and PU3D/EP composites under the applied load of 1.6 MPa, respectively.

  14. Atmospheric corrosion and epoxy-coated reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, H.G.

    1998-12-31

    Atmospheric corrosion can have a tremendous effect on the ability of epoxy-coated reinforcement to maintain its effectiveness. Corrosive conditions can result in the coating becoming brittle and more susceptible to damage from handling. Atmospheric conditions can also enhance localized corrosion at holidays on the bars. Efforts to minimize these effects will be discussed.

  15. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  16. Process for Preparing Epoxy-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    One-pot reaction process for preparing epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogels comprising the reaction of at least one silicon compound selected from the group consisting of alkoxysilanes, orthosilicates and combination thereof in any ratio with effective amounts of an epoxy monomer and an aminoalkoxy silane to obtain an epoxy monomer-silica sol in solution, subsequently preparing an epoxy-monomer silica gel from said silica sol solution followed by initiating polymerization of the epoxy monomer to obtain the epoxy-reinforced monolithic silica aerogel.

  17. Reinforcement of Epoxies Using Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Sharma, Jitendra; Chatterjee, Tirtha

    2008-03-01

    The reinforcement of bisphenol-A and bisphenol-F epoxies using single walled carbon nanotubes has been approached experimentally by understanding the nature of interactions between the matrices and nanotubes. Unassisted dispersions of single walled carbon nanotubes in epoxies were studied by a combination of radiation scattering (elastic small angle scattering and inelastic scattering), DSC based glass transition determination, melt rheology and solid-state mechanical testing in order to understand and correlate changes in local and global dynamics to the tailoring of composite mechanical properties. Significant changes in the glass transition temperature of the matrix can successfully account for changes in the viscoelastic properties of the epoxy dispersions for concentrations below the percolation threshold, while above the percolation threshold the network superstructure formed by the nanotubes controls the viscoelastic properties.

  18. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Kanimozhi, K.; Sethuraman, K.; Selvaraj, V.; Alagar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix. PMID:25279372

  19. Development of ricehusk ash reinforced bismaleimide toughened epoxy nanocomposites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K, Kanimozhi; Sethuraman, K.; V, Selvaraj; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Recent past decades have witnessed remarkable advances in composites with potential applications in biomedical devices, aerospace, textiles, civil engineering, energy, electronic engineering, and household products. Thermoset polymer composites have further enhanced and broadened the area of applications of composites. In the present work epoxy-BMI toughened-silica hybrid (RHA/DGEBA-BMI) was prepared using bismaleimide as toughener, bisphenol-A as matrix and a silica precursor derived from rice husk ash as reinforcement with glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane as coupling agent. Differential scanning calorimetry, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and goniometry were used to characterize RHA/DGEBA-BMI composites developed in the present work. Tensile, impact and flexural strength, tensile and flexural modulus, hardness, dielectric properties were also studied and discussed. The hybrid nanocomposites possess the higher values of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and mechanical properties than those of neat epoxy matrix.

  20. Effect of Geopolymer filler in Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) Pipe for Piping Application: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus Abu Hashim, Mohammad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Mohd Ruzaidi Ghazali, Che; Hussin, Kamarudin; Binhussain, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The present work is aimed to carry out the effect of geopolymer material which is fly ash as filler in the glass reinforced epoxy pipe on the micro structure of fly ash geopolymer, compression properties, and bulk density using the filament winding method. Conventional glass reinforced epoxy pipes has its own disadvantages such as high corrosion resistance at acidic environment and low strength which can be replaced by the composite pipes. Geopolymer is a type of amorphous alumino-silicate and can be synthesized by geopolymerization process. A series of glass reinforced epoxy pipe and glass reinforced epoxy pipe filled with 10 - 40 weight percentage geopolymer filler which is fly ash with 4 Molarity were prepared. Morphology of the raw material fly ash and fly ash based-geopolymer surface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the additions of fly ash at the beginning with 10 wt% are showing higher compressive strength than glass reinforced epoxy pipe without fly ash geopolymer filler. The compressive test of these series of samples was determined using Instron Universal Testing under compression mode. It was found that compressive strength for samples fly ash based-geopolymer filler are higher as compared to glass reinforced epoxy pipe without geopolymer filler. However, the compressive strength of glass reinforced epoxy pipe with fly ash geopolymer filler continues to decline when added to 20 wt% - 40 wt% of geopolymer filler loading. The results showed that the mixing of geopolymer materials in epoxy system can be obtained in this study.

  1. Evaluation of long-duration exposure to the natural space environment on the mechanical properties of carbon-reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyhnal, Richard F.; Welch, Douglas W.; Powell, J. Howard

    1992-01-01

    Experiment AO175 involved passive exposure of carbon-fiber reinforced laminates of epoxy, bismaleimide, and polyimide resins. The post-flight evaluation includes the following: optical examination of exposed surfaces and polished cross-sections; panel weight and distortion measurements; ultrasonic c-scan inspection; and conventional mechanical testing of coupons machined from the panels.

  2. Multifunctional epoxy composites with natural Moroccan clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsif, M.; Zerouale, A.; Kandri, N. Idrissi; Allali, F.; Sgarbossa, P.; Bartolozzi, A.; Tamburini, S.; Bertani, R.

    2016-05-01

    Two natural Moroccan clays, here firstly completely characterized, have been used as fillers without modification in epoxy composites. Mechanical properties resulted to be improved and a significant antibacterial activity is exhibited by the epoxy composite containing the C2 clay.

  3. Design synthesis of a boron/epoxy reinforced metal shear web.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept has been developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad, boron/epoxy plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced stiffeners. Baseline composite and titanium shear resistant designs are compared; the composite concept is 28% lighter than the titanium web. Element test results show the metal cladding effectively reinforces critical composite load transfer and fastener hole areas making the composite web concept practical for other shear structure applications.-

  4. Effect of carbon nanotube addition on the wear behavior of basalt/epoxy woven composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, M T; Rhee, K Y; Lee, B H; Kim, C J

    2013-08-01

    The effect of acid-treated carbon nanotube (CNT) addition on the wear and dynamic mechanical thermal properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites was investigated in this study. Basalt/CNT/epoxy composites were fabricated by impregnating woven basalt fibers into epoxy resin mixed with 1 wt% CNTs which were acid-treated. Wear and DMA (dynamic mechanical analyzer) tests were performed on basalt/epoxy composites and basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The results showed that the addition of the acid-treated CNTs improved the wear properties of basalt/epoxy woven composites. Specifically, the friction coefficient of the basalt/epoxy composite was stabilized in the range of 0.5-0.6 while it fell in the range of 0.3-0.4 for basalt/CNT/epoxy composites. The wear volume loss of the basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was approximately 68% lower than that of the basalt/epoxy composites. The results also showed that the glass transition temperature of basalt/CNT/epoxy composites was higher than that of basalt/epoxy composites. The improvement of wear properties of basalt/epoxy composites by the addition of acid-treated CNTs was caused by the homogeneous load transfer between basalt fibers and epoxy matrix due to the reinforcement of CNTs.

  5. Physical aging and its influence on the reliability of network epoxies and epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K.

    1983-01-01

    The matrix-dominated physical and mechanical properties of a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite and a neat epoxy resin were found to be affected by sub-Tg annealing in nitrogen and dark atmosphere. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 carbon-fiber/Fiberite 934 epoxy as well as Fiberite 934 epoxy resin were quenched from above Tg and given annealing at 140 C, 110 C, or 80 C, for time up to one-hundred thousand minutes. No weight loss was observed during annealing at these temperatures. Significant variations were found in density, modulus, hardness, damping, moisture absorption ability, thermal expansivity. Moisture-epoxy interactious were also studied. The kinetics of aging as well as the molecular aggregation during this densification process were monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis, density gradient column, microhardness tester, Instron, and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  6. Synthesis of polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Benjamin J

    2014-10-07

    The synthesis of a polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy uses a one-step cure by applying an external stimulus to release the acid from the polyoxometalate and thereby catalyze the cure reaction of the epoxy resin. Such polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites afford the cured epoxy unique properties imparted by the intrinsic properties of the polyoxometalate. For example, polyoxometalate-loaded epoxy composites can be used as corrosion resistant epoxy coatings, for encapsulation of electronics with improved dielectric properties, and for structural applications with improved mechanical properties.

  7. Crack propagation in aluminum sheets reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roderick, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis was developed to predict both the crack growth and debond growth in a reinforced system. The analysis was based on the use of complex variable Green's functions for cracked, isotropic sheets and uncracked, orthotropic sheets to calculate inplane and interlaminar stresses, stress intensities, and strain-energy-release rates. An iterative solution was developed that used the stress intensities and strain-energy-release rates to predict crack and debond growths, respectively, on a cycle-by-cycle basis. A parametric study was made of the effects of boron-epoxy composite reinforcement on crack propagation in aluminum sheets. Results show that the size of the debond area has a significant effect on the crack propagation in the aluminum. For small debond areas, the crack propagation rate is reduced significantly, but these small debonds have a strong tendency to enlarge. Debond growth is most likely to occur in reinforced systems that have a cracked metal sheet reinforced with a relatively thin composite sheet.

  8. Experimental Analysis and Numerical Simulation of Tensile Behaviour of TiNi Shape Memory Alloy Fibres Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composite at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sahli, M. L.; Necib, B.

    2011-05-04

    The shape memory alloys (SMA) possess both sensing and actuating functions due to their shape memory effect, pseudo-elasticity, high damping capability and other remarkable properties. Combining the SMA with other materials can create intelligent or smart composites. The epoxy resin composites filled with TiNi alloys fibres were fabricated and their mechanical properties have been investigated. In this study, stress/strain relationships for a composite with embedded shape memory materials (SMA) fibres are presented. The paper illustrates influence of the SMA fibres upon changes in mechanical behaviour of a composite plate with the SMA components, firstly and secondly, the actuating ability and reliability of shape memory alloy hybrid composites.

  9. Effects of temperature and humidity cycling on the strengths of textile reinforced carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Furrow, Keith W.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of the combined effects of temperature and humidity cycling on AS4/3501-6 composites (unstitched, Kevlar 29 stitched, and S-2 glass stitched uniweave fabric) and AS4/E905L composites (2-D, S-2 glass stitched 2-D, and 3-D braided fabric). The AS4/3501-6 uniweave material had a quasi-isotropic layup, whereas the AS4/E905L materials were braided in a (+/-30 deg/0 deg)(sub s) orientation. Data presented include compression strengths and compression-compression fatigue results for uncycled composites and cycled composites (160, 480, 720, and 1280 cycles from 140 deg F at 95 percent relative humidity to -67 deg F). To observe the presence of microcracking within the laminates, photomicrographs were taken of each material type at the end of each cycling period. Microcracks were found to be more prevalent within stitched laminates, predominantly around individual stitches. The glass stitched laminates showed significant microcracking even before cycling. Less microcracking was evident in the Kevlar stitched materials, whereas the unstitched uniweave material developed microcracks only after cycling. The 3-D braid did not develop microcracks. The static compression strengths of the unstitched and Kevlar stitched uniweave materials were degraded by about 10 percent after 1280 temperature/humidity cycles, whereas the reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched uniweave was less than 3 percent. The reduction in compression strength for the glass stitched 2-D braid was less than 8 percent. The unstitched 2-D and 3-D braids did not lose strength from temperature/humidity cycling. The compression-compression fatigue properties of all six material types were not affected by temperature/humidity cycling.

  10. Carbon fibre reinforced epoxy implants for bridging large osteoperiosteal gaps.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Marwah, S; Goel, S C; Tuli, S M

    1988-03-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability or otherwise of carbon fibre reinforced epoxy (CFRE) implants for bridging large osteoperiosteal gaps, devoid of periosteum. Using the basic principles of composite mechanics and simple design criteria, CFRE implants were designed and developed. These implants were put in simulated osteoperiosteal gaps in the ulna of healthy mature rabbits. Ten wk postoperative results clearly demonstrated that implants made of CFRE induced callus bone formation (in the form of woven bone) which totally encapsulated the implant thereby providing reunion of the two bone segments. Further follow-up showed formation of lamellar bones and formation in the pores of the implant. Radiological and scanning electron microscopical evidence is presented.

  11. Post-impact fatigue of cross-plied, through-the-thickness reinforced carbon/epoxy composites. M.S. Thesis - Clemson Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serdinak, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the post-impact fatigue response of integrally woven carbon/epoxy composites was conducted. Five different through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcing fibers were used in an experimental textile process that produced an integrally woven (0/90/0/90/0/90/0/90/0)(sub T) ply layup with 21K AS4 carbon tow fiber. The resin was Hercules 3501-6, and the five TTT reinforcing fibers were Kevlar, Toray carbon, AS4 carbon, glass, and IM6 carbon. The purpose of this investigation was to study the post-impact fatigue response of these material systems and to identify the optimum TTT fiber. Samples were impacted with one half inch diameter aluminum balls with an average velocity of 543 ft/sec. Post-impact static compression and constant amplitude tension-compression fatigue tests were conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted with a loading ratio of R=-5, and frequency of 4 Hz. Damage growth was monitored using x-radiographic and sectioning techniques and by examining the stress-strain response (across the impact site) throughout the fatigue tests. The static compressive stress versus far-field strain response was nearly linear for all material groups. All the samples had a transverse shear failure mode. The average compressive modulus (from far-field strain) was about 10 Msi. The average post-impact static compressive strength was about 35.5 Ksi. The IM6 carbon sample had a strength of over 40 Ksi, more than 16 percent stronger than average. There was considerable scatter in the S-N data. However, the IM6 carbon samples clearly had the best fatigue response. The response of the other materials, while worse than IM6 carbon, could not be ranked definitively. The initial damage zones caused by the impact loading and damage growth from fatigue loading were similar for all five TTT reinforcing materials. The initial damage zones were circular and consisted of delaminations, matrix cracks and ply cracks. Post-impact fatigue loading caused delamination growth

  12. Radiation effects on epoxy/carbon-fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, E. N.; Skidmore, T. E.

    2009-07-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 MGy. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and spectroscopy results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results quantify the changes in the epoxy within the composite as a result of exposure to gamma radiation at doses relevant to service.

  13. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  14. Acoustic emission from composite-reinforced metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Herakovich, C. T.; Jones, G. L.; Renieri, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic-emission (AE) count rates are presented for tensile loading of unidirectional boron-epoxy and for aluminum sheets reinforced with unidirectional boron-epoxy. It is shown that different prepreg materials have different characteristic AE patterns. Results from composite-reinforced metal specimens show that early failures are accompanied by a sharp increase in AE count rate at the knee of the bilinear stress-strain diagram. It is further shown that the count rates are a function of specimen fabrication and that higher total counts do not necessarily correspond to early failures.

  15. Multiple welding of long fiber epoxy vitrimer composites.

    PubMed

    Chabert, Erwan; Vial, Jérôme; Cauchois, Jean-Pierre; Mihaluta, Marius; Tournilhac, François

    2016-05-25

    Vitrimers appear as a new class of polymers that exhibit mechanical strength and are insoluble even at high temperatures, like thermosets, and yet, like thermoplastics, they are heat processable, recyclable and weldable. The question arises whether this welding property is maintained in composite materials made of more than 50 vol% of reinforcing fibers. In this paper, we quantitatively analyze the bond strength of epoxy vitrimer-based composite plates made by resin transfer molding and compare them to their non-vitrimer counterparts made of a standard thermoset epoxy. It is demonstrated that only epoxy vitrimer samples show substantial bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly welded thanks to the exchange reactions, which promote improved surface conformity and chemical bonding between the adherands at the joint interface. This opens the way towards joining composite parts without adhesives nor mechanical fasteners. PMID:27140663

  16. Multiple welding of long fiber epoxy vitrimer composites.

    PubMed

    Chabert, Erwan; Vial, Jérôme; Cauchois, Jean-Pierre; Mihaluta, Marius; Tournilhac, François

    2016-05-25

    Vitrimers appear as a new class of polymers that exhibit mechanical strength and are insoluble even at high temperatures, like thermosets, and yet, like thermoplastics, they are heat processable, recyclable and weldable. The question arises whether this welding property is maintained in composite materials made of more than 50 vol% of reinforcing fibers. In this paper, we quantitatively analyze the bond strength of epoxy vitrimer-based composite plates made by resin transfer molding and compare them to their non-vitrimer counterparts made of a standard thermoset epoxy. It is demonstrated that only epoxy vitrimer samples show substantial bond strength and the ability to be repeatedly welded thanks to the exchange reactions, which promote improved surface conformity and chemical bonding between the adherands at the joint interface. This opens the way towards joining composite parts without adhesives nor mechanical fasteners.

  17. Fracto-emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Fracto-emission (FE) is the emission of particles and photons during and following crack propagation. Electrons (EE), positive ions (PIE), and excited and ground state neutrals (NE) were observed. Results of a number of experiments involving principally graphite/epoxy composites and Kevlar single fibers are presented. The physical processes responsible for EE and PIE are discussed as well as FE from fiber- and particulate-reinforced composites.

  18. Advanced resin systems for graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Jayarajan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The value of resin/carbon fiber composites as lightweight structures for aircraft and other vehicle applications is dependent on many properties: environmental stability, strength, toughness, resistance to burning, smoke produced when burning, raw material costs, and complexity of processing. A number of woven carbon fiber and epoxy resin composites were made. The epoxy resin was commercially available tetraglycidylmethylene dianiline. In addition, composites were made using epoxy resin modified with amine and carboxyl terminated butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer. Strength and toughness in flexure as well as oxygen index flammability and NBS smoke chamber tests of the composites are reported.

  19. Composite Intersection Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  20. Composite intersection reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  1. Development of lightweight aluminum compression panels reinforced by boron-epoxy infiltrated extrusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, P. A.; Mcelman, J. A.; Henshaw, J.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to evaluate the structural efficiencies afforded by the selective reinforcement of conventional aluminum compression panels with unidirectional boron epoxy composite materials. A unique approach for selective reinforcement was utilized called boron/epoxy infiltration. This technique uses extruded metal sections with preformed hollow voids into which unidirectional boron filaments are drawn and subsequently infiltrated with resin to form an integral part. Simplified analytical models were developed to investigate the behavior of stiffener webs with reinforced flanges. Theoretical results are presented demonstrating the effects of transverse shear, of the reinforcement, flange eccentricity and torsional stiffness in such construction. A series of 55 tests were conducted on boron-infiltrated rods and extruded structural sections.

  2. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E; Eric Skidmore, E

    2008-12-12

    The Department of Energy Savannah River Site vitrifies nuclear waste incident to defense programs through its Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The piping in the DWPF seal pot jumper configuration must withstand the stresses during an unlikely but potential deflagration event, and maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. Carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites (CFR) were proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event. The proposed CFR materials have been ASME-approved (Section XI, Code Case N-589-1) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. The proposed carbon fiber/epoxy composite reinforcement system was originally developed for pipeline rehabilitation and post-construction maintenance in petrochemical, refineries, DOT applications and other industries. The effects of ionizing radiation on polymers and organic materials have been studied for many years. The majority of available data are based on traditional exposures to gamma irradiation at high dose rates ({approx}10,000 Gy/hr) allowing high total dose within reasonable test periods and general comparison of different materials exposed at such conditions. However, studies in recent years have shown that degradation of many polymers are sensitive to dose rate, with more severe degradation often observed at similar or even lower total doses when exposed to lower dose rates. This behavior has been primarily attributed to diffusion-limited oxidation which is minimized during very high dose rate exposures. Most test standards for accelerated aging and nuclear qualification of components acknowledge these limitations. The results of testing to determine the radiation resistance and microstructural effects of gamma irradiation exposure on a bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix composite reinforced with carbon fibers are presented. This work provides a foundation for a more extensive evaluation of dose rate effects on advanced epoxy

  3. Pristine and γ-irradiated halloysite reinforced epoxy nanocomposites - Insight study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, Muhammad Jawwad; Naveed, Muhammad; Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Asif, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    The present study focuses on development of epoxy system reinforced with naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). A comparative study is presented describing the performance of pristine and γ-irradiated HNTs in an epoxy matrix. The γ-irradiation treatment was used for structural modification of natural pristine HNTs under air sealed environment at different absorbed doses and subsequently these irradiated HNTs were incorporated in epoxy resin with various wt% loadings. The consequences of γ-irradiation on HNTs were studied by FTIR and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) in terms of changes in functional groups and crystalline characteristics. An improvement is observed in mechanical properties and crack resistance of composites reinforced with γ-irradiated HNTs. The irradiated HNTs imparted an improved flexural and tensile strength/modulus along with better thermal performance.

  4. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  5. Transverse thermal expansion of carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmer, J. F.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal expansion coefficients and moduli of elasticity have been determined experimentally for a series of epoxy-matrix composites reinforced with carbon and Kevlar fibers. It is found that in the transverse direction the difference between the properties of the fiber and the matrix is not as pronounced as in the longitudinal direction, where the composite properties are fiber-dominated. Therefore, the pattern of fiber packing tends to affect transverse composite properties. The transverse properties of the composites tested are examined from the standpoint of the concept of homogeneity defined as the variation of packing (or lack thereof) throughout a sample.

  6. Physical aging in graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1983-01-01

    Sub-Tg annealing has been found to affect the properties of graphite/epoxy composites. The network epoxy studied was based on the chemistry of tetraglycidyl 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl methane (TGDDM) crosslinked by 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DDS). Differential scanning calorimetry, thermal mechanical analysis, and solid-state cross-polarized magic-angle-spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been utilized in order to characterize this process of recovery towards thermodynamic equilibrium. The volume and enthalpy recovery as well as the 'thermoreversibility' aspects of the physical aging are discussed. This nonequilibrium and time-dependent behavior of network epoxies are considered in view of the increasingly wide applications of TGDDM-DDS epoxies as matrix materials of structural composites in the aerospace industry.

  7. Dielectric properties of epoxy resin fly ash composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, A.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Samal, S. K.; Behera, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy resin is widely used as an insulating material in high voltage applications. Ceramic fillers are always added to the polymer matrix to enhance its mechanical properties. But at the same time, filler materials decreases the electrical properties. So while making the fly ash epoxy composite, it is obvious to detect the effect of fly ash reinforcement on the dielectric nature of the material. In the present research work, fly ash is added to four different weight percentages compositions and post-curing has been done in the atmospheric condition, normal oven and micro oven. Tests were carried out on the developed polymer composite to measure its dielectric permittivity and tan delta value in a frequency range of 1 Hz - 1 MHz. The space charge behaviours were also observed by using the pulse electroacoustic (PEA) technique. The dielectric strength and losses are compared for different conditions.

  8. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  9. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY/CARBON-FIBER COMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E

    2008-01-11

    Piping in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) must withstand the stresses involved during an unlikely but potential deflagration event. One method proposed for protection and reinforcement of piping during such an event is the use of a carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composite (Diamond-Wrap{reg_sign}). In the DWPF, this reinforcement composite product would be required to maintain its safety function for a 20-year service life. This product has been ASME-approved (nuclear code case 589) for post-construction maintenance and is DOT-compliant per 49CFR 192 and 195. However, its radiation resistance properties have not been evaluated. This report documents initial radiation resistance testing of the product and microstructural effects. Additional testing is recommended to evaluate radiation effects on specific properties such as burst strength, chemical resistance/weeping and for service life prediction in critical applications.

  10. Physical aging in graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The matrix dominated mechanical behavior of a graphite epoxy composite was found to be affected by sub Tg annealing. Postcured + or - 45 deg 4S specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were quenched from above Tg and given a sub Tg annealing at 140 C for times up to 10 to the 5th power min. The ultimate tensile strength, strain to break, and toughness of the composite material were found to decrease as functions of sub Tg annealing time. No weight loss was observed during the sub Tg annealing. The time dependent change in mechanical behavior is explained on the basis of free volume changes that are related to the physical aging of the nonequilibrium glassy network epoxy. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  11. Interlocked fabric and laminated fabric Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a novel interlocked fabric reinforced Kevlar 49/epoxy composite has been measured and compared to those of a laminated Kevlar 49 fabric composite (which served as a reference material). Both composites were 5.0 mm thick, contained the same 50% in-plane fiber volume fraction and were fabricated in a similar manner using the same Dow DER 332 epoxy, Jeffamine T403-hardened resin system. The reference material (Material 1) was reinforced with seven plies of Dupont style 1033 Kevlar 49 fabric. A photomicrograph of a section polished parallel to one of the fiber directions is shown. The interlocked fabric was designed and woven for Sandia National Laboratories by Albany International Research Co., Dedham, MA. The main design criterion was to duplicate a sewn through-the-thickness fabric used in preliminary studies. The interlocked fabric composite (Material 2) contains roughly 4% by volume of through-the-thickness fiber reinforcement for the purpose of improving interlaminar strength. A photomicrograph of a section showing the warp-aligned binder yarns interlocking the six fabric plies together is shown. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Interphase tailoring in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. V.; Sanadi, A. R.; Crasto, A. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fiber-matrix interphase in graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites is presently modified through the electrodeposition of a coating of the polymer poly(styrene-comaleic anhydride), or 'SMA' on the graphite fibers; optimum conditions have been established for the achievement of the requisite thin, uniform coatings, as verified by SEM. A single-fiber composite test has shown the SMA coating to result in an interfacial shear strength to improve by 50 percent over commercially treated fibers without sacrifice in impact strength. It is suggested that the epoxy resin's superior penetration into the SMA interphase results in a tougher fiber/matrix interface which possesses intrinsic energy-absorbing mechanisms.

  13. Thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Amelkovich, Yu A.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2015-04-01

    The thermal properties of epoxy composites filled with boric acid fine powder at different percentage were studied. Epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, boric acid as flame-retardant filler, hexamethylenediamine as a curing agent. The prepared samples and starting materials were examined using methods of thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. It was found that the incorporation of boric acid fine powder enhances the thermal stability of epoxy composites.

  14. Preparation, characterization, and enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites.

    PubMed

    Rubab, Zakya; Afzal, Adeel; Siddiqi, Humaira M; Saeed, Shaukat

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. First, submicron titania particles are prepared via surfactant-free sol-gel method using TiCl₄ as precursor. These particles are subsequently used as inorganic fillers (or reinforcement) for thermally cured epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites are prepared via mechanical mixing of titania particles with liquid epoxy resin and subsequently curing the mixture with an aliphatic diamine. The amount of titania particles integrated into epoxy matrix is varied between 2.5 and 10.0 wt.% to investigate the effect of sub-micron titania particles on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. These composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric (TG), and mechanical analyses. It is found that sub-micron titania particles significantly enhance the glass transition temperature (>6.7%), thermal oxidative stability (>12.0%), tensile strength (>21.8%), and Young's modulus (>16.8%) of epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites with 5.0 wt.% sub-micron titania particles perform best at elevated temperatures as well as under high stress.

  15. Carbon nanotube networks in epoxy composites and aerogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryning, Mateusz B.

    This thesis describes the properties of carbon nanotube networks in epoxy composites and in novel carbon nanotube aerogels. SWNT Epoxy composites were created using a new procedure that enabled us to control SWNT concentration and dispersion quality in the composite. The composites exhibited percolation-like electrical conductivity with threshold volume fractions in the semi-dilute nanotube concentration regime. The observed electrical conductivites are described in terms of nanotube length, degree of aggregation, and sample homogeneity. By modifying the procedure to allow for nanotube chaining, conductive composites were created at SWNT volume fractions as low as 5.2 (+1.9/-0.5) x 10-5, the lowest reported to date. The thermal conductivity of SWNT-epoxy composites is also investigated. Composites were prepared using suspensions of SWNTs in N-N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) or surfactant stabilized aqueous SWNT suspensions. Thermal conductivity enhancement was observed in both types of composites, but DMF-processed composites showed an advantage at SWNT volume fractions between φ ˜ 0.001 to 0.005. Surfactant processed samples, however, allowed greater SWNT loading at which a larger overall enhancement (64 +/- 9) % at φ ˜ 0.1 was observed. The enhancement differences are attributed to a tenfold higher SWNT/solid-composite interfacial thermal resistance in the surfactant-processed composites over DMF-processed composites. The interfacial resistance was extracted from the data using effective medium theory. Carbon nanotube aerogels were created by freeze drying and critical point drying aqueous carbon nanotube gels. The resulting aerogels have densities of approximately 0.01 to 0.06 g/cm3 and maintain the dimensions of the wet gel. Critical point dried aerogels also preserve the microscopic three-dimensional network of debundled carbon nanotubes of the original gel. Pure SWNT aerogels are self-supporting. Reinforcement with small amounts of added polyvinyl alcohol (PVA

  16. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  18. Quasicrystalline particulate reinforced aluminum composite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.E.; Biner, S.B.; Sordelet, D.J.; Unal, O.

    1997-07-01

    Particulate reinforced aluminum and aluminum alloy composites are rapidly emerging as new commercial materials for aerospace, automotive, electronic packaging and other high performance applications. However, their low processing ductility and difficulty in recyclability have been the key concern. In this study, two composite systems having the same aluminum alloy matrix, one reinforced with quasicrystals and the other reinforced with the conventional SiC reinforcements were produced with identical processing routes. Their processing characteristics and tensile mechanical properties were compared.

  19. Hygrothermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of graphite fibre-reinforced epoxy laminates beyond initial failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishai, O.; Garg, A.; Nelson, H. G.

    1986-01-01

    The critical load levels and associated cracking beyond which a multidirectional laminate can be considered as structurally failed has been determined by loading graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy laminates to different strain levels up to ultimate failure. Transverse matrix cracking was monitored by acoustic and optical methods. The residual stiffness and strength parallel and perpendicular to the cracks were determined and related to the environmental/loading history. Within the range of experimental conditions studied, it is concluded that the transverse cracking process does not have a crucial effect on the structural performance of multidirectional composite laminates.

  20. Rubber-toughened polyfunctional epoxies - Brominated vs nonbrominated formulated for graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new, commercially available, trifunctional epoxy resin (tris-(hydroxyphenyl)-methane triglycidyl ether) was modified with synthetic rubber to increase the impact resistance of epoxy/graphite composites. These composites were reinforced with commercially available satin-weave carbon cloth using two formulations of epoxies (brominated and nonbrominated) containing various amounts of carboxy-terminated butadience acrylonitrile (CTBN) rubber that had been prereacted with epoxy resin. The impact resistance was determined by measuring the interlaminar shear strength of the composites after impact. The mechanical properties, such as flexural strength and modulus at room temperature and at 93 C, were also determined. Measurements were taken of the flammability and glass transition temperature (Tg); and a thermal-gravimetric analysis was made.

  1. Epoxy composite processing in a microwave part-shaped cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Shidaker, T.A.; Hawley, M.C.

    1997-12-31

    A microwave part-shaped applicator was designed to be competitive with conventional liquid composite molding processes. Three glass-reinforced diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A epoxy composites with a diaminodiphenyl sulfone curative are processed in the part-shaped cavity by microwave heating, conventional heating, and hybrid heating where both microwave and conduction heating are employed. Hybrid heating provided superior heating uniformity due to complementary heat transfer mechanisms: an outward flux of thermal energy from microwave heating combined with an inward flux of energy associated with conventional heating. Because of the penetrating nature of microwave energy, the time required to attain the cure temperature in the composite center was reduced by more than 85% using microwave and hybrid heating methods.

  2. Examining graphite reinforcement in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, R. E.; Yates, C. I.

    1980-01-01

    Structure of graphite layers in composite parts can be checked by pyrolizing epoxy portion of composite samples. After 2-3 hours in nitrogen atmosphere at 540 C, only graphite fibers remain. These can be separated and checked for proper number, thickness, and orientation.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Triaxial Braided Carbon/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, C. L.; Roberts, G. D.; Braley, M. S.; Xie, M.; Booker, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    In an on-going effort to increase the safety and efficiency of turbine engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is exploring lightweight alternatives to the metal containment structures that currently encase commercial jet engines. Epoxy reinforced with braided carbon fibers is a candidate structural material which may be suitable for an engine case. This paper reports flat-coupon mechanical-property experiments performed to compliment previously reported subcomponent impact testing and analytical simulation of containment structures. Triaxial-braid T700/5208 epoxy and triaxial-braid T700/M36 toughened epoxy composites were evaluated. Also, two triaxial-braid architectures (0 +/- 60 deg., 0 +/- 45 deg.) with the M36 resin were evaluated through tension, compression, and shear testing. Tensile behavior was compared between standard straight-sided specimens (ASTM D3039) and bowtie specimens. Both double-notch shear (ASTM D3846) and Iosepescu (ASTM D5379) tests were performed as well. The M36/0 +/- 45 deg. configuration yield the best response when measurements were made parallel to the axial tows. Conversely, the M36/0 +/- 60 deg. configuration was best when measurements were made perpendicular to the axial tows. The results were used to identify critical properties and to augment the analysis of impact experiments.

  4. Mechanical Properties of Triaxial Braided Carbon/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, C. L.; Roberts, G. D.; Braley, M. S.; Xie, M.; Booker, M. J.

    2003-01-01

    In an on-going effort to increase the safety and efficiency of turbine engines, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is exploring lightweight alternatives to the metal containment structures that currently encase commercial jet engines. Epoxy reinforced with braided carbon fibers is a candidate structural material which may be suitable for an engine case. This paper reports flat-coupon mechanical-property experiments performed to compliment previously reported subcomponent impact testing and analytical simulation of containment structures. Triaxial-braid T700/5208 epoxy and triaxial-braid T700h436 toughened epoxy composites were evaluated. Also, two triaxial-braid architectures (0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees, and 0 degrees plus or minus 45 degrees) with the M36 resin were evaluated through tension, compression, and shear testing. Tensile behavior was compared between standard straight-sided specimens (ASTM D3039) and bow-tie specimens. Both double-notch shear (ASTM D3846) and Iosepescu (ASTM D5379) tests were performed as well. The M36/O degrees plus or minus 45 degrees configuration yield the best response when measurements were made parallel to the axial tows. Conversely, the M36/0 degrees plus or minus 60 degrees configuration was best when measurements were made perpendicular to the axial tows. The results were used to identify critical properties and to augment the analysis of impact experiments.

  5. Characterization of carbon fiber reinforced resin composites by the nanoindentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuli; Zuo, Dunwen; Cao, Lianjing; Lu, Wenzhuang; Zhu, Yongwei; Li, Jun

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of carbon fiber reinforced resin composites (CFRP) including the epoxy matrix, the carbon fiber and the interface of the carbon fiber/epoxy composites were investigated by means of nanoindentation technique. The hardness, Young's modulus of the components in CFRP were obtained. The results show that the hardness and Young's modulus have a gradient variation from the epoxy matrix to carbon fiber.

  6. Vibrations of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formica, Giovanni; Lacarbonara, Walter; Alessi, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    This work deals with a study of the vibrational properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced composites by employing an equivalent continuum model based on the Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka approach. The theory allows the calculation of the effective constitutive law of the elastic isotropic medium (matrix) with dispersed elastic inhomogeneities (carbon nanotubes). The devised computational approach is shown to yield predictions in good agreement with the experimentally obtained elastic moduli of composites reinforced with uniformly aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The primary contribution of the present work deals with the global elastic modal properties of nano-structured composite plates. The investigated composite plates are made of a purely isotropic elastic hosting matrix of three different types (epoxy, rubber, and concrete) with embedded single-walled CNTs. The computations are carried out via a finite element (FE) discretization of the composite plates. The effects of the CNT alignment and volume fraction are studied in depth to assess how the modal properties are influenced both globally and locally. As a major outcome, the lowest natural frequencies of CNT-reinforced rubber composites are shown to increase up to 500 percent.

  7. Ultrasonic characterization of the nonlinear elastic properties of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical treatment of linear and nonlinear elasticity in a unidirectionally fiber reinforced composite as well as measurements for a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite (T300/5208) are presented. Linear elastic properties were measured by both ultrasonic and strain gage measurements. The nonlinear properties were determined by measuring changes in ultrasonic natural phase velocity with a pulsed phase locked loop interferometer as a function of stress and temperature. These measurements provide the basis for further investigations into the relationship between nonlinear elastic properties and other important properties such as strength and fiber-matrix interfacial stength in graphite/epoxy composites.

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotube incorporated novel three phase carbon/epoxy composite with enhanced properties.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sohel; Alagirusamy, Ramasamy; Joshi, Mangala

    2011-08-01

    In the present work, single-walled carbon nanotubes were dispersed within the matrix of carbon fabric reinforced epoxy composites in order to develop novel three phase carbon/epoxy/single-walled carbon nanotube composites. A combination of ultrasonication and high speed mechanical stirring at 2000 rpm was used to uniformly disperse carbon nanotubes in the epoxy resin. The state of carbon nanotube dispersion in the epoxy resin and within the nanocomposites was characterized with the help of optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Pure carbon/epoxy and three phase composites were characterized for mechanical properties (tensile and compressive) as well as for thermal and electrical conductivity. Fracture surfaces of composites after tensile test were also studied in order to investigate the effect of dispersed carbon nanotubes on the failure behavior of composites. Dispersion of only 0.1 wt% nanotubes in the matrix led to improvements of 95% in Young's modulus, 31% in tensile strength, 76% in compressive modulus and 41% in compressive strength of carbon/epoxy composites. In addition to that, electrical and thermal conductivity also improved significantly with addition of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Strain sensing capabilities of iron/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulos, Angelos; Hristoforou, Evangelos; Tsamasphyros, George

    2012-08-01

    Particulate composite materials are very common in industrial applications due to the fact that particulate fillers can provide improved materials, as compared with the unfilled matrix. They can also be synergistic with fiber reinforcement to further improve the system performance. On the other hand, a new approach in structural health monitoring is to exploit the intrinsic properties of the material, such as electrical conductivity, optical properties etc, as sensing parameters. In this paper we present results concerning the strain sensing capabilities of iron/epoxy particulate composites at different percentages varying from 30% to 60% by weight. In particular, we investigate the strain induced alteration of the magnetic resistance (reluctance) of such polymers. The magnetic properties of the iron/epoxy composites have been investigated using a vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature. For the strain-reluctance measurements, a non-contact sensing probe has been employed. The strain-reluctance relation is found to be linear and strongly dependent on the concentration of iron particles.

  10. The influence of different dispersion methods on the size of the aggregate of CNTs in epoxy resin for the manufacturing of carbon fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Giuseppina; Guadagno, Liberata; Simonet, Bartolome; Santos, Bricio

    2016-05-01

    Different industrial mixing methods and some of their combinations (1) ultrasound; (2) stirring; (3) (4) by roller machine, (5) by gears machine (6) Ultrasound radiation + high stirring were investigated for incorporating Multi walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into a resin based on an aeronautical epoxy precursor, cured with 4,4' diamine-dibenzylsulfone (DDS). The effect of different parameters, ultrasound intensity, number of cycles, type of blade, gears speed on the nanofiller dispersion were analyzed. The inclusion of the nanofiller in the resin causes a drastic increase in the viscosity, preventing the homogenization of the resin and a drastic increase in temperature in the zones closest to the ultrasound probe. To overcome these challenges, the application of high speed agitation simultaneously with the application of ultrasonic radiation was used. This allows on the one hand a homogeneous dispersion, on the other hand an improvement of the dissipation of heat generated by ultrasonic radiation. A comprehensive study with parameters like viscosity and temperature was performed. It is necessary a balance between viscosity and temperature. Viscosity must be low enough to facilitate the dispersion and homogenization of the nanofillers, whereas the temperature cannot be too high because of re-agglomerations

  11. Fabrication of sisal fibers/epoxy composites with liquid crystals polymer grafted on sisal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Q. Y.; Lu, S. R.; Song, L. F.; Li, Y. Q.

    2016-07-01

    In this word, microcrystalline cellulose fibers (MCFs), extracted from sisal fibers, were treated with function end-group hyperbranched liquid crystals (HLP). This work brought some insights into the successful surface modification in epoxy composite with HLP. The HLP-MCFs/epoxy composites are studied systematically. The HLP - MCFs/epoxy composites were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), polarizing microscope (POM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and mechanical properties analysis. The results reveal that the reinforcement of EP composites was carried out by adding HLP-MCFs. In particular, with 1.0 wt% filler loading, the flexural strength, tensile strength, impact strength and flexural modulus of the HLP-MCFs/EP composites were increased by 60%, 69%, 130%, and 192%, respectively. It anticipates that our current work exploits more efficient methods to overcome the few nature fiber/polymer (NPC) adhesion in the interface region and provides implications for the engineering applications of the development of NPC.

  12. Impact properties of rubber-modified epoxy resin-graphite-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Nir, Z.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the impact resistance of graphite-fiber composites, a commercial and an experimental epoxy resin were modified with liquid reactive rubber and a brominated epoxy resin. The commercial epoxy was a tetrafunctional resin, and the experimental epoxy was a trifunctional resin. The reactive rubber was a carboxyl-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer. The rubber content was varied from 0 to 25 percent (wt). The brominated epoxy resin was used at Br levels of 4, 19, and 35 percent of the resin. Composites were prepared with woven graphite cloth reinforcement. The composites were evaluated by using flexural strength in the dry state and an elevated temperature after saturation with water. The impact properties were determined by measuring shear strength after falling-ball impact and instrumented impact. The rubber-modified, trifunctional resin exhibited better properties, when tested in hot-wet conditions in a heated oven at 366 K (after boiling the material for 2 h in demineralized water), than the tetrafunctional resin. Improved impact resistance was observed with the addition of the reactive rubber to the epoxy resin. Further improvement was observed with the addition of the brominated epoxy resin.

  13. Compressive response of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, J.R.; Teply, J.L.

    1988-03-01

    A mathematical model is developed from the principle of minimum potential energy to determine the longitudinal compressive response of unidirectional fiber composites. A theoretical study based on this model is conducted to assess the influence of local fiber misalignment and the nonlinear shear deformation of the matrix. Numerical results are compared with experiments to verify this study; it appears that the predicted compressive response coincides well with experimental results. It is also shown that the compressive strength of Kevlar/epoxy is dominated by local shear failure. 12 references.

  14. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  15. Design and evaluation of a bolted joint for a discrete carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prefabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0% strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166% of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7% strain and at 110% of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7% in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  16. Design and Evaluation of a Bolted Joint for a Discrete Carbon-Epoxy Rod-Reinforced Hat Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    The use of pre-fabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0 percent strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166 percent of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7 percent strain and at 110 percent of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7 percent in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  17. Flexure fatigue testing of 90 deg graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, A.N.W.

    1995-12-01

    A great deal of research has been performed characterizing the in-plane fiber-dominated properties, under both static and fatigue loading, of advanced composite materials. To the author`s knowledge, no study has been performed to date investigating fatigue characteristics in the transverse direction. This information is important in the design of bonded composite airframe structure where repeated, cyclic out-of-plane bending may occur. Recent tests characterizing skin/stringer debond failures in reinforced composite panels where the dominant loading in the skin is flexure along the edge of the frame indicate failure initiated either in the skin or else the flange, near the flange tip. When failure initiated in the skin, transverse matrix cracks formed in the surface skin ply closest to the flange and either initiated delaminations or created matrix cracks in the next lower ply, which in turn initiated delaminations. When failure initiated in the flanges, transverse cracks formed in the flange angle ply closest to the skin and initiated delamination. In no configuration did failure propagate through the adhesive bond layer. For the examined skin/flange configurations, the maximum transverse tension stress at failure correlates very well with the transverse tension strength of the composites. Transverse tension strength (static) data of graphite epoxy composites have been shown to vary with the volume of material stressed. As the volume of material stressed increased, the strength decreased. A volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics can be used to predict the transverse strength measurements. The volume dependence reflects the presence of inherent flaws in the microstructure of the lamina. A similar approach may be taken to determine a volume scale effect on the transverse tension fatigue behavior of graphite/epoxy composites.

  18. Modelling of the impact response of fibre-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.L.; Harding, J.; Ruiz, C.

    1990-01-01

    The work carried out over the course of a three year period in three different areas is summarized. Experimental techniques for determining the impact mechanical properties of fiber reinforced epoxy laminates are studied. The experimental results obtained from the tensile, compressive and interlaminar shear properties of woven reinforced carbon/epoxy, glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and hybrid carbon-glass/epoxy laminates are analyzed. Attempts at modeling the experimentally observed behavior are described.

  19. Natural Curaua Fiber-Reinforced Composites in Multilayered Ballistic Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Louro, Luis Henrique Leme; Trindade, Willian; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Eduardo; Weber, Ricardo Pondé; Miguez Suarez, João Carlos; da Silva Figueiredo, André Ben-Hur; Pinheiro, Wagner Anacleto; da Silva, Luis Carlos; Lima, Édio Pereira

    2015-10-01

    The performance of a novel multilayered armor in which the commonly used plies of aramid fabric layer were replaced by an equal thickness layer of distinct curaua fiber-reinforced composites with epoxy or polyester matrices was assessed. The investigated armor, in addition to its polymeric layer (aramid fabric or curaua composite), was also composed of a front Al2O3 ceramic tile and backed by an aluminum alloy sheet. Ballistic impact tests were performed with actual 7.62 caliber ammunitions. Indentation in a clay witness, simulating human body behind the back layer, attested the efficacy of the curaua-reinforced composite as an armor component. The conventional aramid fabric display a similar indentation as the curaua/polyester composite but was less efficient (deeper indentation) than the curaua/epoxy composite. This advantage is shown to be significant, especially in favor of the lighter and cheaper epoxy composite reinforced with 30 vol pct of curaua fiber, as possible substitute for aramid fabric in multilayered ballistic armor for individual protection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the mechanism associated with the curaua composite ballistic performance.

  20. Aging and quality assurance of Kevlar 49-epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.

    1981-05-15

    The aging of Kevlar 49-epoxy composites under the service environment conditions expected by ESA will be insignificant to the best of our knowledge at this time. However, certain precautions in materials acceptance criteria and composite fabrication should be followed.

  1. Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials Used for Tankage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Christy

    2005-01-01

    The Nonmetallic Materials and Processes Group is presently working on several projects to optimize cost while providing effect materials for the space program. One factor that must be considered is that these materials must meet certain weight requirements. Composites contribute greatly to this effort. Through the use of composites the cost of launching payloads into orbit will be reduced to one-tenth of the current cost. This research project involved composites used for aluminum pressure vessels. These tanks are used to store cryogenic liquids during flight. The tanks need some type of reinforcement. Steel was considered, but added too much weight. As a result, fiber was chosen. Presently, only carbon fibers with epoxy resin are wrapped around the vessels as a primary source of reinforcement. Carbon fibers are lightweight, yet high strength. The carbon fibers are wet wound onto the pressure vessels. This was done using the ENTEC Filament Winding Machine. It was thought that an additional layer of fiber would aid in reinforcement as well as containment and impact reduction. Kevlar was selected because it is light weight, but five times stronger that steel. This is the same fiber that is used to make bullet-proof vests trampolines, and tennis rackets.

  2. Flexure fatigue testing of 90 deg graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, Ann Nancy W.

    1995-01-01

    A great deal of research has been performed characterizing the in-plane fiber-dominated properties, under both static and fatigue loading, of advanced composite materials. To the author's knowledge, no study has been performed to date investigating fatigue characteristics in the transverse direction. This information is important in the design of bonded composite airframe structure where repeated, cyclic out-of-plane bending may occur. Recent tests characterizing skin/stringer debond failures in reinforced composite panels where the dominant loading in the skin is flexure along the edge of the frame indicate failure initiated either in the skin or else the flange, near the flange tip. When failure initiated in the skin, transverse matrix cracks formed in the surface skin ply closest to the flange and either initiated delaminations or created matrix cracks in the next lower ply, which in turn initiated delaminations. When failure initiated in the flanges, transverse cracks formed in the flange angle ply closest to the skin and initiated delamination. In no configuration did failure propagate through the adhesive bond layer. For the examined skin/flange configurations, the maximum transverse tension stress at failure correlates very well with the transverse tension strength of the composites. Transverse tension strength (static) data of graphite epoxy composites have been shown to vary with the volume of material stressed. As the volume of material stressed increased, the strength decreased. A volumetric scaling law based on Weibull statistics can be used to predict the transverse strength measurements. The volume dependence reflects the presence of inherent flaws in the microstructure of the lamina. A similar approach may be taken to determine a volume scale effect on the transverse tension fatigue behavior of graphite/epoxy composites. The objective of this work is to generate transverse tension strength and fatigue S-N characteristics for composite materials using

  3. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2011-11-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  4. Damping properties of fiber reinforced composite suitable for stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Sun, Baochen; Du, Yanliang

    2012-04-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) cables were initially most investigated to replace steel cables. To further explore the advantages of FRP cables, the potential ability of vibration control is studied in this paper emphasizing the designable characteristic of hybrid FRP cables. Fiber reinforced vinyl ester composites and fiber reinforced epoxy composites were prepared by the pultrusion method. Due to the extensive application of fiber reinforced composites, the temperature spectrum and frequency spectrum of loss factor for the composite were tested using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) equipment. The damping properties and damping mechanism of the composite were investigated and discussed at different temperatures and frequencies. The result indicates that the loss factor of the composites is increasing with the increase of the frequency from 0.1Hz to 2 Hz and decreasing with the decrease of the temperature from -20°C to 60°C. The loss factor of the carbon fiber composite is higher than that of the glass fiber for the same matrix. The loss factor of the vinyl ester composite is higher than that of the epoxy composite for the same fiber.

  5. Assessment of particulate cellulose epoxy composites manufactured by JMFIL under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasababu, Nadendla

    2015-08-01

    Increase in environmental concern towards sustainable development invites the development of new materials which are eco-friendly to satisfy various engineering needs. The present work introduces a new manufacturing method i.e. "Just Mold Fill and Immediate Loading" to prepare epoxy composites reinforced at different contents of particulate cellulose. The fabricated composites specimens are post processed and machined, tested as per ASTM procedures under impact load.

  6. Accelerated viscoelastic characterization of E-Glass/Epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, an accelerated viscoelastic characterization was applied to E-Glass/Epoxy materials. The approach is based on the TTSP (Time Temperature Superposition Principle) and the widely used lamination theory for composite materials. The final goal is the life prediction for fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) piping systems used in oil industries. Creep tests at different temperatures were conducted with a servo-hydraulic test system to determine compliance master curves. The viscoelastic response of unidirectional specimens was modeled by a generalized Kelvin model. Direct iteration methods were developed to solve the differential equations. The viscoelastic response of E-Glass/Epoxy laminates at different temperatures to transverse normal and in-plane shear stresses is determined using 90{degree} and 10{degree} off-axis tensile specimens, respectively. Based on short-term creep tests, (2.5 hours), 40-year predictions were achieved. Creep-rupture tests at different temperatures were conducted. The rupture stresses were determined for 0{degree}, 90{degree}, 10{degree}, and ({plus minus}55{degrees})s specimens.

  7. Thermoplastic impact property improvement in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite bumper beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, M. M.; Sapuan, S. M.; Ali, Aidy; Ahmad, D.; Khalina, A.

    2010-05-01

    Utilization of thermoset resin as a bumper beam composite matrix is currently more dominated in car manufacturer suppliers, because of availability, easy processing, low material cost and production equipment investment. Moreover, low viscosity, shrinkage and excellent flow facilitate better fibre impregnation and proper surface resin wetting. Three-dimensional cross linking curing increase impact, creep and environmental stress cracking resistance properties. Low impact properties of natural fibre epoxy composite, are main issues in its employment for automotive structural components. Impact properties in epoxy composite bumper beam could be increased by modifying the resin, reinforcement and manufacturing process as well as geometry parameters such as cross section, thickness, added ribs and fixing method optimizations could strengthen impact resistance. There are two main methods, flexibilisation and toughening, as modifying the resin in order to improve the impact properties of epoxy composite, which form single phase or two-phase morphology to make modifier as epoxy or from separate phase to keep the thermo-mechanical properties. Liquid rubber, thermoplastic, core shell particle and rigid particle are different methods of toughening improvements. In this research, thermoplastic toughening has used to improve impact properties in hybrid natural fibre epoxy composite for automotive bumper beam and has achieved reasonable impact improvements.

  8. Hygrothermal expansion of Kevlar 49/epoxy and S2-glass/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.Y.; Hahn, H.T.

    1982-11-01

    Ply failure occurred during preconditioning at 75/sup 0/C of (0/90)/sub 2S/ S2-glass/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy laminates. Wet specimens showed different thermal expansion beavior near and above the glass transition temperature. Various available theories can be used to predict the thermal expansion coefficients. Stress analysis showed that the compressive normal stress at the interface in Kevlar 49/epoxy after cure is very small compared with those in other composites. Significant and rapid changes in the transverse coefficient of thermal expansion occurs in the T/sub g/ region. The two-phase diffusion model is a good representation of the diffusion behavior. Desorption process reveals a higher diffusion coefficient than absorption. S2-glass/epoxy was found to be unstable under the conditions applied, with cracking and losses during desorption. Maximum moisture contents were approx. 0.31% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 0.412% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to about 0.11 and 0.16%. Kevlar 49/epoxy was more stable than S2-glass/epoxy; max moisture contents were approx. 2.47% at 75/sup 0/C/75% RH and approx. 5.5% at 75/sup 0/C/water. The composite swelled transversely up to 1.0 and 2.23%. Results indicate that Kevlar 49 fibers swell radially. Relation between swelling strain and moisture content undergoes hysteresis during moisture cycling. Relation between swelling strain and moisture concentration is fairly linear for S2-glass/epoxy, Kevlar 49/epoxy and AS 3501/5 graphite/epoxy and only weakly depends on the material system. The equilibrium moisture content in (+-45)/sub 2S/ laminate is higher than in unidirectional lamina. The equilibrium thickness swelling strain can be predicted by laminated plate theory.

  9. Effect of modified aminosilane interfaces in glass/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C.E.; Blum, F.D.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of the interfacial modification of glass/epoxy composites have been studied using 3-point bending tests. Hydrolyzed {gamma}-aminopropyltriethyoxysilane APS and {gamma}-aminobutyltriethoxysilane (ABS) were separately adsorbed onto E-glass and the treated fibers were then used in composites that used both a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and a diglycidyl ether of polypropylene epoxy matrix. Mechanical tests were used to characterize the flexural strength of the composite as a function of the silane coupling agent and the flexibility of the epoxy used.

  10. Effect of Liquid-Crystalline Epoxy Backbone Structure on Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy-Alumina Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Thanhkieu; Kim, Jinhwan

    2016-06-01

    In a series of papers published recently, we clearly demonstrated that the most important factor governing the thermal conductivity of epoxy-Al2O3 composites is the backbone structure of the epoxy. In this study, three more epoxies based on diglycidyl ester-terminated liquid-crystalline epoxy (LCE) have been synthesized to draw conclusions regarding the effect of the epoxy backbone structure on the thermal conductivity of epoxy-alumina composites. The synthesized structures were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and optical microscopy were also employed to examine the thermal and optical properties of the synthesized LCEs and the cured composites. All three LCE resins exhibited typical liquid-crystalline behaviors: clear solid crystalline state below the melting temperature (T m), sharp crystalline melting at T m, and transition to nematic phase above T m with consequent isotropic phase above the isotropic temperature (T i). The LCE resins displayed distinct nematic liquid-crystalline phase over a wide temperature range and retained liquid-crystalline phase after curing, with high thermal conductivity of the resulting composite. The thermal conductivity values ranged from 3.09 W/m-K to 3.89 W/m-K for LCE-Al2O3 composites with 50 vol.% filler loading. The steric effect played a governing role in the difference. The neat epoxy resin thermal conductivity was obtained as 0.35 W/m-K to 0.49 W/m-K based on analysis using the Agari-Uno model. The results clearly support the objective of this study in that the thermal conductivity of the LCE-containing networks strongly depended on the epoxy backbone structure and the degree of ordering in the cured network.

  11. Mechanical properties and environmental effects of epoxy resins in the neat state and in composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.M.P.

    1984-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties of graphite fiber reinforced, epoxy matrix composite laminates subjected to loading perpendicular to the plane of lamination and of neat epoxy resin are reported. The centrosymmetric deformation (CSD) test geometry provides an accurate and convenient test mode for the study of the viscoelastic behavior of very stiff graphite-epoxy laminates. It is found that the in-phase and out-of-phase stiffness superpose to form master curves covering a frequency range of 12 decades. By a suitable scaling procedure of the master curves, it is found that the in-phase stiffness has the same shape and the out-of-phase has the same dispersion for all laminates irrespective of the stacking sequence. The dispersion characteristics of in-situ and neat resin epoxy were nearly identical, but with the neat resin having a lower glass-transition temperature. The graphite/epoxy composites and neat resin epoxy have been shown to be sensitive to hygrothermal environment. For postcured specimens the plasticization and inhomogeneous swelling effects due to the moisture absorbed are found to be reversible, in the sense that the initially dry properties of the laminate are recovered after redrying the wet specimen. On the other hand, for as cured specimens, the plasticization and inhomogeneous swelling effects are found to be irreversible under the same hygrothermal environment.

  12. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  14. Microstructural Characterisation of Jute/Epoxy Quasi-Unidirectional Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Amandeep Singh; Hall, Wayne; Summerscales, John

    2014-12-01

    The elastic properties of a composite can be predicted by micromechanical models based on the properties of the individual constituent materials of the composite and their geometrical characteristics. This paper presents a novel methodology using image analysis to determine (a) the fibre volume fraction and (b) the fibre orientation distribution factor of quasi-unidirectional jute fibre reinforced epoxy resin composites. For fibre volume fraction, digital micrographs were smoothed to reduce noise in the image, an intensity histogram informed selection of the threshold intensity for conversion to a binary image, the image was morphologically closed and opened to remove internal voids and small features respectively and the fibre volume fraction was calculated as the ratio of the detected fibre area to the total image area. For fibre orientation, the image was sharpened with Contrast-Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalisation, a threshold was set for conversion to binary and then a masking image was rotated at a number of seed points over the image to find the angles with the minimum sum of intensity at each point. The data generated was then used to validate new rules-of-mixture equations for natural fibre composites.

  15. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. II. Performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor, as previously proposed, depends on the optical properties and the reaction kinetics of the epoxy. The reaction kinetics of a typical epoxy system are presented. It is a third-order autocatalytic reaction with a peak observed in each isothermal reaction-rate curve. A model is derived to describe the performance characteristics of the epoxy cure sensor. If a composite coupon is cured at an isothermal temperature, the sensor signal can be used to predict the time when the gel point occurs and to monitor the cure process. The sensor is also shown to perform well in nonstoichiometric epoxy matrices. In addition the sensor can detect the end of the cure without calibration.

  16. Study to determine and analyze the strength of high modulus glass in epoxy-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Glass composition research was conducted to produce a high modulus, high strength beryllium-free glass fiber. This program was built on the previous research for developing high modulus, high strength glass fibers which had a 5 weight percent beryllia content. The fibers resulting from the composition program were then used to produce fiber reinforced-epoxy resin composites which were compared with composites reinforced by commercial high modulus glass fibers, Thornel S graphite fiber, and hybrids where the external quarters were reinforced with Thornel S graphite fiber and the interior half with glass fiber as well as the reverse hybrid. The composites were given tensile strength, compressive strength, short-beam shear strength, creep and fatigue tests. Comments are included on the significance of the test data.

  17. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  18. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  19. Polyfunctional epoxies - Different molecular weights of brominated polymeric additives as flame retardants in graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The imparting of flame retardancy to graphite-reinforced composites without incurring mechanical property deterioration is investigated for the case of an experimental, trifunctional epoxy resin incorporating brominated polymeric additives (BPAs) of the diglycidyl type. Such mechanical properties as flexural strength and modulus, and short beam shear strength, were measured in dry and in hot/wet conditions, and the glass transition temperature, flammability, and water absorption were measured and compared with nonbromilated systems. Another comparison was made with a tetrafunctional epoxy system. The results obtained are explained in terms of differences in the polymeric backbone length of the bromine carrier polymer. BPAs are found to be a reliable bromine source for fire inhibition in carbon-reinforced composites without compromise of mechanical properties.

  20. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  1. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  2. Progress toward Making Epoxy/Carbon-Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, Thomas; Roylance, Margaret; Gassner, John; Kyle, William

    2008-01-01

    A modicum of progress has been made in an effort to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes as fibers in epoxy-matrix/fiber composite materials. Two main obstacles to such use of carbon nanotubes are the following: (1) bare nanotubes are not soluble in epoxy resins and so they tend to agglomerate instead of becoming dispersed as desired; and (2) because of lack of affinity between nanotubes and epoxy matrices, there is insufficient transfer of mechanical loads between the nanotubes and the matrices. Part of the effort reported here was oriented toward (1) functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with methyl methacrylate (MMA) to increase their dispersability in epoxy resins and increase transfer of mechanical loads and (2) ultrasonic dispersion of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran, which was used as an auxiliary solvent to aid in dispersing the functionalized nanotubes into a epoxy resin. In another part of this effort, poly(styrene sulfonic acid) was used as the dispersant and water as the auxiliary solvent. In one experiment, the strength of composite of epoxy with MMA-functionalized-nanotubes was found to be 29 percent greater than that of a similar composite of epoxy with the same proportion of untreated nanotubes.

  3. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  4. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit; Saunders, Chris B.; Barnard, John W.; Lopata, Vince J.; Kremers, Walter; McDougall, Tom E.; Chung, Minda; Tateishi, Miyoko

    1996-08-01

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres, and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL's 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties.

  5. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  6. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  7. Thermo-mechanical properties of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber filled epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liyun

    The optimization of thermo-mechanical properties of polymer composites at low filler loadings is of great interest in both engineering and scientific fields. There have been several studies on high aspect ratio fillers as novel reinforcement phase for polymeric materials. However, facile synthesis method of high aspect ratio nanofillers is limited. In this study, a scalable synthesis method of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers is going to be presented. I will also demonstrate that the inclusion of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers in epoxy results in a significant improvement of epoxy thermo-mechanical properties at low filler loadings. With silica nanofiber concentration of 2.8% by volume, the Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength and fracture toughness of epoxy increased ~23, ~28 and ~50%, respectively, compared to unfilled epoxy. At silica nanofiber volume concentration of 8.77%, the thermal expansion coefficient decreased by ˜40% and the thermal conductivity was improved by ˜95% at room temperature. In the current study, the influence of nano-sized silica filler aspect ratio on mechanical and thermal behavior of epoxy nanocomposites were studied by comparing silica nanofibers to spherical silica nanoparticles (with aspect ratio of one) at various filler loadings. The significant reinforcement of composite stiffness is attributed to the variation of the local stress state in epoxy due to the high aspect ratio of the silica nanofiber and the introduction of a tremendous amount of interfacial area between the nanofillers and the epoxy matrix. The fracture mechanisms of silica nanofiber filled epoxy were also investigated. The existence of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber promotes fracture energy dissipation by crack deflection, crack pinning as well as debonding with fiber pull-out leading to enhanced fracture toughness. High aspect ratio fillers also provide significant reduction of photon scattering due to formation of a continuous fiber network

  8. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  9. Analysis of Glass-Reinforced Epoxy Material for Radio Frequency Resonator

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. T.; Misran, N.; Yatim, Baharudin

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) resonator using glass-reinforced epoxy material for C and X band is proposed in this paper. Microstrip line technology for RF over glass-reinforced epoxy material is analyzed. Coupling mechanism over RF material and parasitic coupling performance is explained utilizing even and odd mode impedance with relevant equivalent circuit. Babinet's principle is deployed to explicate the circular slot ground plane of the proposed resonator. The resonator is designed over four materials from different backgrounds which are glass-reinforced epoxy, polyester, gallium arsenide (GaAs), and rogers RO 4350B. Parametric studies and optimization algorithm are applied over the geometry of the microstrip resonator to achieve dual band response for C and X band. Resonator behaviors for different materials are concluded and compared for the same structure. The final design is fabricated over glass-reinforced epoxy material. The fabricated resonator shows a maximum directivity of 5.65 dBi and 6.62 dBi at 5.84 GHz and 8.16 GHz, respectively. The lowest resonance response is less than −20 dB for C band and −34 dB for X band. The resonator is prototyped using LPKF (S63) drilling machine to study the material behavior. PMID:24977230

  10. Modified glass fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumei

    traditional and modern techniques at the same time, the newly developed modified glass fibre reinforced epoxy matrix composites (MGFRECs) have much improved comprehensive properties. The flexural strength, the flexural modulus, the shear modulus and the impact energy (Izod impact test) of the composites were improved up to 87%, 74%, 30% and 89% respectively when modified samples were compared to the samples made by the traditional methods.

  11. Effect of loading rate on tensile properties and failure behavior of glass fibre/epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, K. K.; Biswal, M.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Dutta, K.; Ray, B. C.

    2016-02-01

    Fibre reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are subjected to different range of loading rates during their service life. Present investigation is focused on to study the effects of variation of loading rates on mechanical behavior and various dominating failure modes of these potential materials when subjected to tensile loading. The results revealed that on the variation of loading rates the ultimate tensile strength varies but the tensile modulus is mostly unaffected. Furthermore, the strain to failure is also increasing with increase in loading rates. Different failure patterns of glass/epoxy composite tested at 1, 10,100, 500 and 1000 mm/min loading rates are identified. Scanning electron micrographs shows various dominating failures modes in the glass/epoxy composite.

  12. Electron emission and acoustic emission from the fracture of graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jahan-Latibari, A.; Jensen, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    In past studies it has been shown that the fracture of materials leads to the emission of a variety of species, including electrons, ions, neutral molecules, and photons, all encompassed by the term 'fractoemission' (FE). In this paper, electron emission (EE) from the fracture of single graphite fibers and neat epoxy resin is examined. Measurements of EE are also combined with the detection of acoustic emission (AE) during the testing of graphite-epoxy composite specimens with various fiber orientation. The characteristics of these signals are related to known failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced plastics. This study suggests that by comparing data from AE and FE measurements, one can detect and distinguish the onset of internal and external failure in composites. EE measurements are also shown to be sensitive to the locus of fracture in a composite material.

  13. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, B.G.; Daniels, J.G.; White, W.T.; Thompson, L.M.; Clemons, L.M.

    1985-04-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi). 1 reference, 2 tables.

  14. Thermal Expansion and Swelling of Cured Epoxy Resin Used in Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal expansion and swelling of resin material as influenced by variations in temperature during moisture absorption is discussed. Comparison measurements using composites constructed of graphite fibers and each of two epoxy resin matrices are included. Polymer theory relative to these findings is discussed and modifications are proposed.

  15. Optical Absorption of Epoxy Resin and its Role in the Laser Ultrasonic Generation Mechanism in Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratoudaki, T.; Edwards, C.; Dixon, S.; Palmer, S. B.

    2003-03-01

    Epoxy resins are used in various applications and are essential to the fabrication of carbon fibre reinforced composite materials (CFRCs). This paper investigates laser generated ultrasound in epoxy resins using three different lasers, a TEA CO2, a Nd:YAG and a XeCl excimer. In these partially transparent materials the ultrasonic generation mechanism is directly related to the optical absorption depth which can therefore be measured directly from the ultrasonic waveforms using for example a Michelson interferometer as detector. The present work aims firstly to relate the observed amplitude of the longitudinal wave to the optical absorption depth of the epoxy and secondly to evaluate the role of the epoxy resin to the generation of the ultrasound in CFRCs. For the latter, comparative results of generation efficiency between the three wavelengths are presented and an attempt is made to understand the way that the resin matrix influences the generation mechanism of ultrasound in composite materials.

  16. Service tough composite structures using the Z-direction reinforcement process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freitas, Glenn; Magee, Constance; Boyce, Joseph; Bott, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Foster-Miller has developed a new process to provide through thickness reinforcement of composite structures. The process reinforces laminates locally or globally on-tool during standard autoclave processing cycles. Initial test results indicate that the method has the potential to significantly reduce delamination in carbon-epoxy. Laminates reinforced with the z-fiber process have demonstrated significant improvements in mode 1 fracture toughness and compression strength after impact. Unlike alternative methods, in-plane properties are not adversely affected.

  17. Microstructure and strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of particle reinforced epoxy-based reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Bradley William

    The effects of reactive metal particles on the microstructure and mechanical properties of epoxy-based composites is investigated in this work. Particle reinforced polymer composites show promise as structural energetic materials that can provide structural strength while simultaneously being capable of releasing large amounts of chemical energy through highly exothermic reactions occurring between the particles and with the matrix. This advanced class of materials is advantageous due to the decreased amount of high density inert casings needed for typical energetic materials and for their ability to increase payload expectancy and decrease collateral damage. Structural energetic materials can be comprised of reactive particles that undergo thermite or intermetallic reactions. In this work nickel (Ni) and aluminum (Al) particles were chosen as reinforcing constituents due to their well characterized mechanical and energetic properties. Although, the reactivity of nickel and aluminum is well characterized, the effects of their particle size, volume fractions, and spatial distribution on the mechanical behavior of the epoxy matrix and composite, across a large range of strain rates, are not well understood. To examine these effects castings of epoxy reinforced with 20--40 vol.% Al and 0--10 vol.% Ni were prepared, while varying the aluminum nominal particle size from 5 to 50 mum and holding the nickel nominal particle size constant at 50 mum. Through these variations eight composite materials were produced, possessing unique microstructures exhibiting different particle spatial distributions and constituent makeup. In order to correlate the microstructure to the constitutive response of the composites, techniques such as nearest-neighbor distances, and multiscale analysis of area fractions (MSAAF) were used to quantitatively characterize the microstructures. The composites were investigated under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading conditions to characterize

  18. EB treatment of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebényi, G.; Romhány, G.; Vajna, B.; Czvikovszky, T.

    2012-09-01

    A small amount — less than 0.5% — carbon nanotube reinforcement may improve the mechanical properties of epoxy based composite materials significantly. The basic technical problem on one side is the dispersion of the nanotubes into the viscous matrix resin, namely, the fine powder-like — less than 100 nanometer diameter — nanotubes are prone to form aggregates. On the other side, the good connection between the nanofiber and matrix, which is determining the success of the reinforcement, requires some efficient adhesion promoting treatment. The goal of our research was to give one such treatment capable of industrial size application. A two step curing epoxy/vinylester resin process technology has been developed where the epoxy component has been cured conventionally, while the vinylester has been cured by electron treatment afterwards. The sufficient irradiation dose has been selected according to Raman spectroscopy characterization. Using the developed hybrid resin system hybrid composites containing carbon fibers and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The effect of the electron beam induced curing of the vinylester resin on the mechanical properties of the composites has been characterized by three point bending and interlaminar shear tests, which showed clearly the superiority of the developed resin system. The results of the mechanical tests have been supported by AFM studies of the samples, which showed that the difference in the viscoelastic properties of the matrix constituents decreased significantly by the electron beam treatment.

  19. Dielectric Properties of Epoxy Resin Composites Filled with Nanocarbon Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macutkevic, J.; Kranauskaite, I.; Banys, J.; Paddubskaya, A.; Stefanutti, E.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.

    2013-05-01

    The epoxy resin composites with various carbon additives were investigated in the frequency range of 20 Hz - 3 GHz at temperatures from room to 500 K. The dielectric properties were found to be strongly impacted by percolation threshold. The lowest percolation threshold (< 0.25 wt.%), was observed in composites with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  20. Effect of nanoclay reinforcement on the X-band dielectric properties of epoxy resins for use in radome applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Carla; Fittipaldi, Mauro; Grace, Landon R.

    2015-05-01

    The suitability of nanoclay reinforcement for improvement of structural and electrical properties of thermosetting epoxy systems at 10 GHz is investigated via a resonant technique. The potential of nanoclay reinforcement to improve mechanical properties and mitigate moisture diffusion in polymer materials has been well-documented in recent years. Further, evidence has shown that the presence of moisture in polymer systems has a profoundly deleterious effect on relative permittivity and loss tangent of the material. This is particularly important for construction or coating of radar protecting structures (radome), in which low relative permittivity and loss tangent are critical to radar transparency. Therefore, the addition of nanoclay reinforcement to polymer composites used in radome applications may prove a viable method for dielectric and structural performance improvement and moisture absorption minimization. The relative permittivity and loss tangent of two epoxy resin systems are evaluated as a function of organoclay weight percentage using a split-post dielectric resonator operating at an X-band frequency. Nanoclay content up to 5% by weight is investigated for both systems. The addition of nanoclay did not have a significant effect on the relative permittivity of the material, contributing only up to a 1% decrease (improvement) compared to the neat epoxy. The material loss tangent, however, exhibited a consistent downward trend, with a nearly 13% decrease recorded for the nanoclay content of 5% by weight in the most extreme case. Based on these results, the addition of nanoclay to polymer composite materials used in radome applications has no detrimental effect on the dielectric properties of the material, and as such may prove to be a viable option for improving radome performance and longevity.

  1. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  2. Epoxy composites based on inexpensive tire waste filler

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmetli, Gulnare Gungor, Ahmet Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-15

    Tire waste (TW) was recycled as raw material for the preparation of DGEBA-type epoxy composite materials. The effects of filler amount and epoxy type on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the composites with NPEL were generally higher than composites with NPEF. The appropriate mass level for TW in both type composites was found to be 20 wt%. The equilibrium water sorption of NPEL/TW and NPEF/TW composites for 14-day immersion was determined as 0.10 % and 0.21 %, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for characterization of the composites.

  3. High-performance fiber/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.; Toland, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Activities described include: (1) determining the applicability of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber to composite pressure vessels; (2) defining the fatigue performance of thin-titanium-lined, high-strength graphite/epoxy pressure vessel; (3) selecting epoxy resin systems suitable for filament winding; (4) studying the fatigue life potential of Kevlar 49/epoxy pressure vessels; and (5) developing polymer liners for composite pressure vessels. Kevlar 49/epoxy and graphite fiber/epoxy pressure vessels, 10.2 cm in diameter, some with aluminum liners and some with alternation layers of rubber and polymer were fabricated. To determine liner performance, vessels were subjected to gas permeation tests, fatigue cycling, and burst tests, measuring composite performance, fatigue life, and leak rates. Both the metal and the rubber/polymer liner performed well. Proportionately larger pressure vessels (20.3 and 38 cm in diameter) were made and subjected to the same tests. In these larger vessels, line leakage problems with both liners developed the causes of the leaks were identified and some solutions to such liner problems are recommended.

  4. The Design and Synthesis of Epoxy Matrix Composites Curable by Electron Beam Induced Cationic Polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crivello, James V.

    2000-01-01

    Several new series of novel, high reactivity epoxy resins are described which are designed specifically for the fabrication of high performance carbon fiber reinforced composites for commercial aircraft structural applications using cationic UV and e-beam curing. The objective of this investigation is to provide resin matrices which rapidly and efficiently cure under low e-beam doses which are suitable to high speed automated composite fabrication techniques such as automated tape and tow placement. It was further the objective of this work to provide resins with superior thermal, oxidative and atomic oxygen resistance.

  5. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.; Antonucci, V.

    2014-05-01

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  6. Vacuum infusion manufacturing and experimental characterization of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ricciardi, M. R.; Giordano, M.; Antonucci, V.; Langella, A.; Nele, L.

    2014-05-15

    Epoxy/Kevlar composites have been manufactured by conventional Vacuum Infusion process and the Pulse Infusion technique. Pulse Infusion allows to control the pressure of the vacuum bag on the dry fiber reinforcement by using a proper designed pressure distributor that induces a pulsed transverse action and promotes the through thickness resin flow. The realized composite panel have been mechanically characterized by performing tensile and short beam shear tests according with the ASTM D3039 and ASTM D2344/D 2344M standard respectively in order to investigate the effect of Pulse Infusion on the tensile strength and ILSS.

  7. Basalt fiber reinforced polymer composites: Processing and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang

    A high efficiency rig was designed and built for in-plane permeability measurement of fabric materials. A new data derivation procedure to acquire the flow fluid pattern in the experiment was developed. The measurement results of the in-plane permeability for basalt twill 31 fabric material showed that a high correlation exists between the two principal permeability values for this fabric at 35% fiber volume fraction. This may be the most important scientific contribution made in this thesis. The results from radial measurements corresponded quite well with those from Unidirectional (UD) measurements, which is a well-established technique. No significant differences in mechanical properties were found between basalt fabric reinforced polymer composites and glass composites reinforced by a fabric of similar weave pattern. Aging results indicate that the interfacial region in basalt composites may be more vulnerable to environmental damage than that in glass composites. However, the basalt/epoxy interface may have been more durable than the glass/epoxy interface in tension-tension fatigue because the basalt composites have significantly longer fatigue life. In this thesis, chapter I reviews the literature on fiber reinforced polymer composites, with concentration on permeability measurement, mechanical properties and durability. Chapter II discusses the design of the new rig for in-plane permeability measurement, the new derivation procedure for monitoring of the fluid flow pattern, and the permeability measurement results. Chapter III compares the mechanical properties and durability between basalt fiber and glass fiber reinforced polymer composites. Lastly, chapter IV gives some suggestions and recommendations for future work.

  8. Interfacial stresses in shape memory alloy-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Prajapati, Maulik; Rakesh, S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    Debonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires in SMA reinforced polymer matrix composites is a complex phenomenon compared to other fabric fiber debonding in similar matrix composites. This paper focuses on experimental study and analytical correlation of stress required for debonding of thermal SMA actuator wire reinforced composites. Fiber pull-out tests are carried out on thermal SMA actuator at parent state to understand the effect of stress induced detwinned martensites. An ASTM standard is followed as benchmark method for fiber pull-out test. Debonding stress is derived with the help of non-local shear-lag theory applied to elasto-plastic interface. Furthermore, experimental investigations are carried out to study the effect of Laser shot peening on SMA surface to improve the interfacial strength. Variation in debonding stress due to length of SMA wire reinforced in epoxy are investigated for non-peened and peened SMA wires. Experimental results of interfacial strength variation due to various L/d ratio for non-peened and peened SMA actuator wires in epoxy matrix are discussed.

  9. Thermal expansion of an epoxy-glass microsphere composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal expansion of a composite of epoxy (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and solid glass microspheres was investigated. The microspheres had surfaces which were either untreated or treated with a silicone release agent, an epoxy coupling agent, or a general purpose silane coupling agent. Both room temperature (about 300 K) and elevated temperature (about 475 K) cures were used for the epoxy. Two microsphere size ranges were used, about 50 microns, which is applicable in filled moldings, and about 125 microns, which is applicable as bond line spacers. The thermal expansion of the composites was measured from 300 to 350 K or from 300 to 500 K, depending on the epoxy cure temperature. Measurements were made on composites containing up to .6 volume fraction microspheres. Two predictive models, which required only the values of thermal expansion of the polymer and glass and their specific gravities, were tested against the experimental data. A finite element analysis was made of the thermal strain of a composite cell containing a single microsphere surrounded by a finite-thickness interface.

  10. Woven graphite epoxy composite test specimens with glass buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnar, G. R.; Palmer, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Woven unidirectional graphite cloth with bands of fiberglass replacing the graphite in discrete lengthwise locations was impregnated with epoxy resin and used to fabricate a series of composite tensile and shear specimens. The finished panels, with the fiberglass buffer strips, were tested. Details of the fabrication process are reported.

  11. The effects of environmental aging on the durability of glass/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajorncheappunngam, Somjai

    1999-11-01

    Glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) are beginning to be used as structural materials in construction. However, their mechanical properties can degrade after prolonged exposure to the environment. Understanding this degradation was the focus of this research. Epoxy neat resin and glass/epoxy composite samples were soaked in four different solutions (distilled water, saturated salt solution, 5 M NaOH, and 1 M HCl solution) for 5 months. The samples were also subjected to a combination of temperature and sustained load at room temperature and at 60°C. The glass transition temperature (Tg), storage modulus, tensile strength, and strain at failure were measured. The fracture surface of samples used in the tensile test were examined using a SEM. Results showed that immersion in aging media lowers Tg and enhances apparent phase separation in the samples due to polymer plasticization. At the elevated temperature, the Tg and the stiffness increased owing to continued resin curing. Sustained load, at the level used, had little effect on the mechanical behavior of the aged samples. At room temperature, water had the greatest influence in reducing the stiffness of epoxy neat resin samples. Combined effect of elevated temperature and sustained load caused an increase in Tg and a gain in stiffness in both epoxy neat resin and composite samples. This result is attributed more to the effect of temperature rather than to the effect of sustained load. At room temperature, glass/epoxy composite samples soaked in acid solution showed the highest reduction in tensile strength; this failure was the result of fiber damage. Other composite samples soaked in water and alkali were found to fail by adhesive failure mode. At 60°C, alkali was found to be the most damaging solution to glass/epoxy composite samples in terms of tensile strength. Here the composite samples failed under fiber failure mode while the composite samples soaked in water and acid solution failed under adhesive

  12. A novel epoxy/electrospun PLA nanofibre composite material: fabrication and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Mosaval, T.; Haroosh, H. J.

    2013-08-01

    Electrospun nanofibres as the potential reinforcement in manufacturing composite materials are recently attractive due to their simple fabrication process via electrospinning to produce continuous fibrous structures. This study concentrates on the development of novel epoxy composites laminated by layers of electrospun polylactic acid (PLA) nanofibre mats to evaluate their mechanical and thermal properties by means of flexural testing and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. The moulded composite sheets were prepared at the fibre contents of 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 10 wt% using a solution casting method. The flexural moduli of composites have been shown to be increased by 50.8% and 24.0% for 5 wt% and 10 wt% fibre contents, respectively, as opposed to that of neat epoxy. This similar trend was also found for corresponding flexural strengths being increased by 31.6% and 4.8%. However, the flexural properties become worse at the fibre content of 3 wt% with decreases of flexural modulus by 36.9% and flexural strength by 22.9%. The examination of fractured surface morphology of composites using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms a full penetration of cured epoxy matrix into electrospun PLA nanofibres despite some existences of typical fibrous structures/networks detected inside the large void cavities. On the other hand, the glass transition temperatures of composites have increased to 54-60°C due to the addition of electrospun fibres as compared to 50°C for that of epoxy, indicating that those fibrous networks may further restrict the intermolecular mobility of matrix for thermal effects.

  13. Composite Bombcase Program: Static tests on Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/epoxy plates and rings

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1986-10-01

    An experimental study supporting the Composite Bombcase Program is described. The purpose of the study was to generate mechanical properties and structural response data on composite plates and cylinders. This data base is now available to assist in the evaluation of composite materials for bombcase applications. Two composites, Kevlar 49/epoxy and IM6 graphite/epoxy, were chosen for testing. The mechanical properties from flat unidirectional specimens were used to predict the elastic response of thick quasi-isotropic laminates in four-point bending and the elastic response of 18.0 inch diameter quasi-isotropic rings to diametral compressive loading. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental values of elastic response was obtained for both geometries. Load-deflection and load-strain curves in the elastic, post-yield, and failure regions were obtained for composite and aluminum rings. Delamination between plies was the principal failure mode in the QI composite plate and ring specimens. Even with many delaminations at large deflections, composite rings continued to carry load and retain some structural integrity.

  14. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  15. Composite aluminum-fiberglass epoxy pressure vessels for transportation of LNG at intermediate temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ladkany, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    The design of large, 6-m diameter, composite aluminum-fiber-glass epoxy pressure vessels for the transportation of liquified natural gas at intermediate temperatures is presented. The pressure vessels are designed to have an operating pressure range of up to 6.21 MPa and pressure-to-burst ratio close to two. The cylindrical pressure vessels are circumferentially reinforced with layers of high-strength fiberglass epoxy or pultruded glass polyester overwrap. The vessels are prestressed at ambient temperature with the sizing technique of autofrettage. They are designed for temperature and pressure conditions between the critical conditions of 191 K and 4.69 MPa and atmospheric conditions of 106 K and 0.1 MPa. The ultimate failure modes are leak-before-burst and are designed in the circumferential direction to prevent the possibility of an axial separation of the vessel at failure.

  16. MICROMECHANICS IN CONTINOUS GRAPHITE FIBER/EPOXY COMPOSITES DURING CREEP

    SciTech Connect

    C. ZHOU; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Micro Raman spectroscopy and classic composite shear-lag models were used to analyze the evolution with time of fiber and matrix strain/stress around fiber breaks in planar model graphite fiber-epoxy matrix composites. Impressive agreements were found between the model predictions and the experimental results. The local matrix creep leads to an increase in the load transfer length around the break under a constant load. This increases the chance of fiber breakage in the neighboring intact fibers.

  17. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2016-10-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  18. Preparation and characterization of glass fibers - polymers (epoxy) bars (GFRP) reinforced concrete for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkjk, Saeed; Jabra, Rafee; Alkhater, Salem

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents some of the results from a large experimental program undertaken at the Department of Civil Engineering of Damascus University. The project aims to study the ability to reinforce and strengthen the concrete by bars from Epoxy polymer reinforced with glass fibers (GFRP) and compared with reinforce concrete by steel bars in terms of mechanical properties. Five diameters of GFRP bars, and steel bars (4mm, 6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm) tested on tensile strength tests. The test shown that GFRP bars need tensile strength more than steel bars. The concrete beams measuring (15cm wide × 15cm deep × and 70cm long) reinforced by GFRP with 0.5 vol.% ratio, then the concrete beams reinforced by steel with 0.89 vol.% ratio. The concrete beams tested on deflection test. The test shown that beams which reinforced by GFRP has higher deflection resistance, than beams which reinforced by steel. Which give more advantage to reinforced concrete by GFRP.

  19. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 3: Major component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, L. L.; Mccarty, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations, performed to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites, are reported. Aluminum-boron-epoxy and titanium-boron-epoxy were used in the design and manufacture of three major structural components. The components were representative of subsonic aircraft fuselage and window belt panels and supersonic aircraft compression panels. Both unidirectional and multidirectional reinforcement concepts were employed. Blade penetration, axial compression, and inplane shear tests were conducted. Composite reinforced structural components designed to realistic airframe structural criteria demonstrated the potential for significant weight savings while maintaining strength, stability, and damage containment properties of all metal components designed to meet the same criteria.

  20. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  1. Durability of Intercalated Graphite Epoxy Composites in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Davidson, Michelle L.; Shively, Rhonda

    1996-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of graphite epoxy composites can be substantially increased by intercalating (inserting guest atoms or molecules between the graphene planes) the graphite fibers before composite formation. The resulting high strength, low density, electrically conducting composites have been proposed for EMI shielding in spacecraft. Questions have been raised, however, about their durability in the space environment, especially with respect to outgassing of the intercalates, which are corrosive species such as bromine. To answer those concerns, six samples of bromine intercalated graphite epoxy composites were included in the third Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM-3) experiment flown on the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-46). Changes in electrical conductivity, optical reflectance, surface texture, and mass loss for SiO2 protected and unprotected samples were measured after being exposed to the LEO environment for 42 hours. SiO2 protected samples showed no degradation, verifying conventional protection strategies are applicable to bromine intercalated composites. The unprotected samples showed that bromine intercalation does not alter the degradation of graphite-epoxy composites. No bromine was detected to have been released by the fibers allaying fears that outgassing could be disruptive to the sensitive electronics the EMI shield is meant to protect.

  2. Novel Diels-Alder based self-healing epoxies for aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Turkenburg, D. H.; Fischer, H. R.; Luterbacher, R.; van Bracht, H.; Bond, I. P.

    2016-08-01

    Epoxy resins containing Diels-Alder (DA) furan and maleimide moieties are presented with the capability to self-heal after exposure to an external heat source. A conventional epoxy amine system has been combined with furfuryl and maleimide functional groups in a two-step process, to avoid major side-reactions, and the concentration of a thermo-reversibly binding cross-linker was considered to balance thermoset and thermoplastic behaviours, and the subsequent self-healing performance. In the context of self-repair technologies an inbuilt ‘intrinsic’ self-healing system is deemed favourable as the healing agent can be placed in known ‘hot spot’ regions (i.e. skin-stringer run outs, ply drops and around drilled holes) where operational damage predominately occurs in load bearing aerospace structures. In this study, the mechanical and self-healing performance of furan functionalised epoxy resins containing varying amounts (10, 20, 30 or 40 pph) of bismaleimide were investigated using a bulk epoxy polymer tapered double cantilever beam test specimen geometry. Two forms, a thin film and a bulk material, were evaluated to account for future integration methods into fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. The highest healing efficiency, with respect to the obtained initial load value, was observed from the 20 pph bulk material derivative. The polymers were successful in achieving consistent multiple (three) healing cycles when heated at 150 °C for 5 min. This novel investigated DA material exhibits favourable processing characteristics for FRP composites as preliminary studies have shown successful coextrution with reinforcing fibres to form free standing films and dry fibre impregnation.

  3. Dynamic small angle x-ray scattering study of stressed Kevlar 49 epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Fellers, J.F.; Tang, M.Y.; Lin, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The highly crosslinked epoxy resins gave rise to isotropic scattering patterns and applying tensile stresses resulted in very little scattering changes. The dynamic scattering studies on the epoxy resins indicate the failure process as a catastrophic dynamic process with fractures initiating from surface or internal flaws. The crack propagates across the whole sample in a very short time to complete failure. The Kevlar fibers are microporous giving rise to equatorially elongated anisotropic scattering patterns. These microvoids can be partially filled by liquid epoxy. Based on comparisons of the volume fraction of the microvoids obtained by SAXS absolute intensity measurements and by the density measurements, two sizes of microvoids are present in the Kevlar 49 fibers - one in the range of 10 to 20 nm and the other much larger. Applying tensile stresses results in an increase in the scattering intensities and in the volume fraction of smaller microvoids. The average radius of gyration of these microvoids remained constant, and hence the number of these smaller microvoids must have increased in order to account for increased scattering intensities. It is thus concluded that the failure of Kevlar 49 fibers is accompanied by the increase in number of smaller microvoids and the enlargement of the larger microvoids along the fiber axis direction. The reinforced epoxy composites of low volume fraction unidirectional Kevlar 49 fiber gave rise to anisotropic scattering patterns perpendicular to the fiber axis direction, and it is believed this scattering is due to voids within the fibers and voids entrapped along the fiber matrix interface during processing. The dynamic scattering studies on the composites indicate the failure as a catastrophic dynamic process, fracture initiating in the epoxy matrix and the fibers not being able to carry the load, thus failing catastrophically as well. The failure is thus instantaneous once incipient failure occurs.

  4. Manufacturing of vegetable oils-based epoxy and composites for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongpeng

    Epoxidized vegetable oil (EVO) is one of the largest industrial applications of vegetable oils (VOs) and is widely used as a plasticizer and as a synthetic intermediate for polyol or unsaturated polyester. However, the utility of EVO as monomer for high performance epoxy thermoset polymer is limited by its reactivity and by the resulting physical properties. Herein, VO-based epoxy monomers, i.e., glycidyl esters of epoxidized fatty acids derived from soybean oil (EGS) or linseed oil (EGL), have been synthesized and were benchmarked against commercial available diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and also epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) controls. EGS and EGL possessed higher oxirane content, more reactivity and lower viscosity than ESO or epoxidized linseed oil (ELO), provided better compatibility with DGEBA as a reactive diluent, and yielded thermally and mechanically stronger polymers than polymers obtained using ESO. Glass transition temperatures (T g) of the VO-based epoxy thermoset polymers were mostly a function of monomer oxirane content with some added structural influences of epoxy reactivity, and presence of a pendant chain. Organo-modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and long glass fiber reinforced composites (FRC) were efficiently manufactured using anhydride cured EGS as matrices. The OMMT nanocomposites showed higher mechanical and thermal strength than the neat polymers but were also dependent on the dispersion techniques and the clay concentration. Surprisingly, the neat EGS-anhydride matrix FRC showed comparable properties, such as flexural and impact strengths and slightly lower Tg, versus DGEBA based counterparts. These high performance monomers, polymers, and composites have potential to replace petroleum-based epoxy as value-added products from VOs compared to EVOs.

  5. Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jian; Rajagopal, Ramasubramaniam

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with linear molecular side chains of polyphenylene ether (PPE) has been shown to be effective in solubilizing the CNTs in the solvent components of solutions that are cast to make epoxy/CNT composite films. (In the absence of solubilization, the CNTs tend to clump together instead of becoming dispersed in solution as needed to impart, to the films, the desired CNT properties of electrical conductivity and mechanical strength.) Because the PPE functionalizes the CNTs in a noncovalent manner, the functionalization does not damage the CNTs. The functionalization can also be exploited to improve the interactions between CNTs and epoxy matrices to enhance the properties of the resulting composite films. In addition to the CNTs, solvent, epoxy resin, epoxy hardener, and PPE, a properly formulated solution also includes a small amount of polycarbonate, which serves to fill voids that, if allowed to remain, would degrade the performance of the film. To form the film, the solution is drop-cast or spin-cast, then the solvent is allowed to evaporate.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of MWNT-Epoxy Composites by Transient Thermoreflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Jagannadham, K.

    2015-08-01

    Multiwall nanotube composites with epoxy matrix were synthesized by sonication. Thermal conductivity of the composite samples was determined by a transient thermoreflectance method using indium film as a transducer. The thermal conductivity normal to the surface followed percolation behavior. The presence of higher mass fraction of MWNTs near the surface, and the higher purity and the larger aspect ratio of MWNTs were found to be responsible for significant improvement in thermal conductivity of the composites. The barrier to conduction was found to be the width of the epoxy film separating the MWNTs. Modeling analysis showed that the interface thermal conductance between MWNTs is fairly large and is not a limiting factor for the improvement in the thermal conductivity.

  7. Failure modes and durability of kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.; Mones, E.T.; Steele, W.J.; Deutscher, S.B.

    1981-04-01

    The fracture topographies of Kevlar 49/epoxy composite strands and multilayer composites in the form of pressure vessels are discussed in terms of the microscopic deformation and failure processes of the composites. The effect of resin ductility and fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength on mechanisms of fiber damage are considered. The failure of the Kevlar 49 fibers by a splitting process and the parameters, such as fiber fibrillation and macromolecular chain scission, that control such a process are discussed in relation to fiber and composite performance.

  8. Failure modes and durability of Kevlar/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.J.; Mones, E.T.; Steele, W.J.; Deutscher, S.B.

    1980-06-04

    The fracture topographies of Kevlar 49/epoxy composite strands and multilayer composites in the form of pressure vessels are discussed in terms of the microscopic deformation and failure processes of the composites. The effect of resin ductility and fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength on mechanisms of fiber damage are considered. The failure of the Kevlar 49 fibers by a splitting process and the parameters, such as fiber fibrillation and macromolecular chain scission, that control such a process, are discussed in relation to fiber and composite performance.

  9. Characterization of particle diameter and interphase effects on Young's modulus of SiO2/epoxy particulate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae-Soon; Gibson, Ronald F.; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2012-04-01

    This study involves the investigation of spherically shaped filler diameter and interphase effects on the Young's modulus of micro and nano size silicon dioxide (SiO2) particle reinforced epoxy composite materials. Specifically, 10μm and 80nm size SiO2 particles and Epon 862 epoxy are chosen as fillers and a matrix material, respectively. While 10μm and 80nm SiO2 particles are dispersed in the epoxy through a direct shear mixing method, nano-composites are fabricated with hardener at desirable ratios. Both micro- and nano-composites are prepared at 2 different particle loading fractions for tensile testing. It is observed that the nano-composites show significant increase in Young's modulus over micro-composites, showing a linear increase as particle volume fraction increases. This could indicate that for nano-composites, the interphase region between the particle and matrix can considerably affect their mechanical properties. Here, we develop a finite element analysis (FEA) model to investigate the interphase effect on the Young's modulus of both micro- and nano-composites. This model demonstrates how to estimate the effective volume fraction of a particle as filler using a combined experimental/numerical approach. The effective volume fraction is shown to be important in predicting the mechanical response of nano-scale particles reinforced composite materials.

  10. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  11. Effect of fluorination on the mechanical behavior and electromagnetic interference shielding of MWCNT/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Si-Eun; Lee, Man Young; Lee, Min-Kyung; Jeong, Euigyung; Lee, Young-Seak

    2016-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/epoxy composites were prepared using MWCNT fluorinated to different extents. The mechanical properties, fracture surface morphologies and electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI-SE) of these composites were evaluated for epoxy matrices containing MWCNT with degrees of fluorination. The tensile strengths of the MWCNT/epoxy composites improved by 31% with treated MWCNT compared to that of the epoxy composites with untreated MWCNT. The EMI-SE values of the fluorinated MWCNT/epoxy composites improved up to 26% with increasing fluorination extent. The mechanical and electrical properties enhancement of the composites were attributed to the fluorinated MWCNT, which improved both the dispersion of the MWCNT in epoxy matrix and interfacial interactions between the MWCNT and the epoxy matrix.

  12. Tensile Stress Acoustic Constants of Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the stress acoustic constants (SAC's) of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites were measured to determine the nonlinear moduli of this material. These measurements were made under compressive loading in order to obtain the sufficient number of values needed to calculate these moduli. However, because their strength in tension along fiber directions can be several times greater, most composites are used under tensile loading. Thus, it is important to characterize the nonlinear properties of these materials in tension as well. The SAC's which are defined as the slope of the normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress were measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy. Tensile load was applied along the fiber axis with the ultrasonic waves propagating perpendicular to the fiber direction. Changes in velocity were measured using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer with the nominal frequency of the ultrasonic waves being 2.25 MHz.

  13. Thermal expansion of epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Bridgman, C.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of three epoxy-fiberglass composite specimens was measured from 20 to 120/sup 0/C (70 to 250/sup 0/F) using a fused quartz push-rod dilatometer. Billets produced by vacuum impregnating layers of two types of fiberglass cloth with an epoxy resin were core-drilled to produce cylindrical specimens. These were used to study expansion perpendicular and parallel to the fiberglass layers. The dilatometer is held at a preselected temperature until steady-state is indicated by stable length and temperature data. Before testing the composite specimens, a reliability check of the dilatometer was performed using a copper secondary standard. This indicated thermal expansion coefficient (..cap alpha..) values within +-2% of expected values from 20 to 200/sup 0/C.

  14. Viscoelasticity of Epoxy nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2013-03-01

    Nanocomposites have been modeled in a multiscale covering from molecular scale (e.g., molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo), microscale (e.g., Brownian dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics, lattice Boltzmann, time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau method, dynamic density functional theory method) to mesoscale and macroscale (e.g., micromechanics, equivalent-continuum and self-similar approaches, finite element method) The presence of layered silicates in nonaqueous polymers changes the viscoelastic behavior of the unfilled matrix from liquid-like to solid-like because of the formation of a three-dimensional percolating network of exfoliated or intercalated stacks. This gel-like behavior is a direct consequence of the highly anisotropic nature of the nanoclays which prevents their free rotation and the dissipation of stress. Particle to particle interactions is the dominant mechanism in fumed silica nanocomposites whereas particle to polymer interaction is the dominant one in colloidal silica nanocomposites at identical filler concentrations. These interactions are balanced in each nanocomposite systems by the silica surface treatments (chain grafting, silane modification) and the molecular weight of the matrix. Two different types of nanocomposite structures exist namely, intercalated nanocomposites where the polymer chains are sandwiched between silicate layers and exfoliated nanocomposites where the layers can be considered individually but remain more or less dispersed in the polymer matrix. Yield stress from Carreau-Yasuda model has been correlated to exfoliation. Also, equilibrium modulus and zero shear rate viscosity has been used to analyze percolation threshold and sol-gel transition. Nano clays organically functionalized were mixed with Epoxy in a high shear mixer.

  15. Moisture diffusion parameter characteristics for epoxy composites and neat resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The moisture absorption characteristics of two graphite/epoxy composites and their corresponding cured neat resins were studied in high humidity and water immersion environments at elevated temperatures. Moisture absorption parameters, such as equilibrium moisture content and diffusion coefficient derived from data taken on samples exposed to high humidity and water soak environments, were compared. Composite swelling in a water immersion environment was measured. Tensile strengths of cured neat resin were measured as a function of their equilibrium moisture content after exposure to different moisture environments. The effects of intermittent moderate tensile loads on the moisture absorption parameters of composite and cured neat resin samples were determined.

  16. Comparative evaluation of woven graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Tayebi, A.; Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Nayak, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of some of the mechanical properties of woven graphite-epoxy composites are discussed. In particular, the types of weaves and the resin contents were chosen for comparison. The types of weaves selected are plain weave, satin weave, and tridirectional weave. The composites made of the fabrics are compared to composites made from unidirectional tapes under static and fatigue loading. During static loading, acoustic emission events were monitored. Also, examinations of fracture surfaces and polished sections both away from the fracture surface, and of virgin specimens under an electron microscope are discussed.

  17. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  18. Analysis and Tests of Reinforced Carbon-Epoxy/Foam-Core Sandwich Panels with Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rogers, Charles

    1996-01-01

    The results of a study of a low-cost structurally efficient minimum-gage shear-panel design that can be used in light helicopters are presented. The shear-panel design is based on an integrally stiffened syntactic-foam stabilized-skin with an all-bias-ply tape construction for stabilized-skin concept with an all-bias-ply tape construction for the skins. This sandwich concept is an economical way to increase the panel bending stiffness weight penalty. The panels considered in the study were designed to be buckling resistant up to 100 lbs/in. of shear load and to have an ultimate strength of 300 lbs/in. The panel concept uses unidirectional carbon-epoxy tape on a syntactic adhesive as a stiffener that is co-cured with the skin and is an effective concept for improving panel buckling strength. The panel concept also uses pultruded carbon-epoxy rods embedded in a syntactic adhesive and over-wrapped with a bias-ply carbon-epoxy tape to form a reinforcing beam which is an effective method for redistributing load around rectangular cutout. The buckling strength of the reinforced panels is 83 to 90 percent of the predicted buckling strength based on a linear buckling analysis. The maximum experimental deflection exceeds the maximum deflection predicted by a nonlinear analysis by approximately one panel thickness. The failure strength of the reinforced panels was two and a half to seven times of the buckling strength. This efficient shear-panel design concept exceeds the required ultimate strength requirement of 300 lbs/in by more than 100 percent.

  19. Highly Conducting Graphite Epoxy Composite Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Weight savings as high as 80 percent could be achieved if graphite polymer composites could replace aluminum in structures such as electromagnetic interference shielding covers and grounding planes. This could result in significant cost savings, especially for the mobile electronics found in spacecraft, aircraft, automobiles, and hand-held consumer electronics. However, such composites had not yet been fabricated with conductivity sufficient to enable these applications. To address this lack, a partnership of the NASA Lewis Research Center, Manchester College, and Applied Sciences, Inc., fabricated nonmetallic composites with unprecedented electrical conductivity. For these composites, heat-treated, vapor-grown graphite fibers were selected which have a resistivity of about 80 mW-cm, more than 20 times more conductive than typical carbon fibers. These fibers were then intercalated with iodine bromide (IBr). Intercalation is the insertion of guest atoms or molecules between the carbon planes of the graphite fibers. Since the carbon planes are not highly distorted in the process, intercalation has little effect on mechanical and thermal properties. Intercalation does, however, lower the carbon fiber resistivity to less than 10 mW-cm, which is comparable to that of metal fibers. Scaleup of the reaction was required since the initial intercalation experiments would be carried out on 20-mg quantities of fibers, and tens of grams of intercalated fibers would be needed to fabricate even small demonstration composites. The reaction was first optimized through a time and temperature study that yielded fibers with a resistivity of 8.7 2 mW-cm when exposed to IBr vapor at 114 C for 24 hours. Stability studies indicated that the intercalated fibers rapidly lost their conductivity when exposed to temperatures as low as 40 C in air. They were not, however, susceptible to degradation by water vapor in the manner of most graphite intercalation compounds. The 1000-fold scaleup

  20. Moisture effects on the high-temperature strength of fiber-reinforced resin composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Under NAS 8-27435, the Convair Aerospace Division of General Dynamics and their subcontractor, Hercules Incorporated, have conducted studies on the effects of moisture on the properties of fiber-reinforced resin composites and on the epoxy resins presently used in advanced composites. Data are presented on the resins and composites subjected to varying time/temperature/humidity or time/temperature/water-boil exposures. The effects of moisture on matrix, reinforcement, and fiber/resin interface are discussed and supported by experimental test data.

  1. Microstructural analysis using X-ray computed tomography (CT) in flax/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersani, M.; Lomov, SV; Van Vuure, AW; Bouabdallah, A.; Verpoest, I.

    2016-07-01

    Among natural fibres which have recently become attractive to researchers, flax is probably the most commonly used bast-type fibre today. Due to its properties and availability, flax fibre has potential to substitute glass in polymer composites. A flax fibre has a complex structure; it can be classified into elementary fibres, which are grouped into so-called technical fibres. These technical fibres themselves are actually composite structures. Several works [1, 2, 3] were focussed on the study of damage behaviour in unidirectional flax fibres reinforced composites, where materials were subjected to tensile loading. At the microscopic level and at low stress, microcracks arise within the material and by growing they may lead to other forms of damage such as delamination, fibre breakage, interfacial debonding...etc. In order to better understand the damage phenomena and to better control the parameters which lead to the failure, several methods and techniques have been developed on natural fibre reinforced composites [2, 3]. In the present work, X-ray computed tomography (CT) technique has been used to observe damage in flax/epoxy quasi-unidirectional woven laminates, loaded in uniaxial tension. The tensile tests show that these composites offer good mechanical properties. X-ray computed tomography technique allowed us, on the one hand to determine the microstructure parameters of the studied composites and to observe the damage occurring during loading, on the other. The inspection of the several tomography images showed cracks on interface of the yarns and technical fibres.

  2. Evaluation of metal landing gear door assembly selectively reinforced with filamentary composite for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, S. J.; Freeman, V. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a main landing gear door for space shuttle applications are discussed. The door is constructed on composite materials using a rib-stiffened titanium panel selectively reinforced with boron/epoxy composite. A weight comparison between the hybrid design and the all-titanium baseline design showed a weight saving of approximately fifteen percent. Detailed descriptions of the door structure and method of manufacture are presented.

  3. Reinforced rubber composition containing ground coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sperley, R.J.

    1984-10-16

    A reinforced rubber composition is provided comprising a mixture of (a) a sulfur vulcanizable rubber and (b) ground coal having an average mesh size of 25 or more and which produces an aqueous slurry with a pH of less than 7.0, and wherein a metallic reinforcing member is embedded in the rubber mixture of (a) and (b).

  4. Latent Hardeners for the Assembly of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank; Wohl, Christopher J.; Connell, John W.; Mercado, Zoar; Galloway, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale composite structures are commonly joined by secondary bonding of molded-and-cured thermoset components. This approach may result in unpredictable joint strengths. In contrast, assemblies made by co-curing, although limited in size by the mold, result in stable structures, and are certifiable for commercial aviation because of structural continuity through the joints. Multifunctional epoxy resins were prepared that should produce fully-cured subcomponents with uncured joining surfaces, enabling them to be assembled by co-curing in a subsequent out-of-autoclave process. Aromatic diamines were protected by condensation with a ketone or aldehyde to form imines. Properties of the amine-cured epoxy were compared with those of commercially available thermosetting epoxy resins and rheology and thermal analysis were used to demonstrate the efficacy of imine protection. Optimum conditions to reverse the protecting chemistry in the solid state using moisture and acid catalysis were determined. Alternative chemistries were also investigated. For example, chain reaction depolymerization and photoinitiated catalysts would be expected to minimize liberation of volatile organic content upon deprotection and avoid residual reactive species that could damage the resin. Results from the analysis of protected and deprotected resins will be presented.

  5. Abrasive Wear Performance of Aluminium Modified Epoxy-Glass Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vikram G.; Mishra, Punyapriya; Al Dabbas, Hassan A.; Panda, H. S.; Fernandez, Johnathan Bruce

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, Aluminum filled epoxies molds have been used in rapid tooling process. These molds are very economical when applied in manufacturing of low volume of plastic parts. To improve the thermal conductivity of the material, the metallic filler material is added to it and the glass fiber improves the wear resistance of the material. These two important parameters establish the life of composites. The present work reports on abrasive wear behavior of Aluminum modified epoxy and glass fiber composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of aluminum particles. Through pin on disc wear testing machine, we studied the wear behaviors of composites, and all these samples were fabricated by using hand layup process. Epoxy resin was used as matrix material which was reinforced with Glass fiber and Aluminum as filler. The composite with 5 wt.% and 10 wt.% of Al was cast with dimensions 100 × 100 × 6 mm. The specimens were machined to a size of 6 × 6 × 4 mm for abrasive testing. Abrasive tests were carried out for different grit paper sizes, i.e., 150, 320, 600 at different sliding distance, i.e., 20, 40, 60 m at different loads of 5, 10 and 15 N and at constant speed. The weight loss due to wear was calculated along with coefficient of friction. Hardness was found using Rockwell hardness machine. The SEM morphology of the worn out surface wear was analyzed to understand the wear mechanism. Results showed that the addition of Aluminum particles was beneficial for low abrasive conditions.

  6. Permeability Measurements in Carbon-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdenek, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the permeability of the composite feedline, that is proposed to be used in the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), three 8 x 8-in. coupons were constructed. Two of the coupons were layed-up with 4 plies of plain weave prepreg [0/90, plus or minus 45, plus or minus 45, 0/90] and the other one layed-up with 4 plies of unidirectional prepreg [0, 90, 90, 0]. The coupons were vacuumed bagged and cured to manufactures specifications. The coupons were then placed in an apparatus to test for permeability. Nitrogen gas was used to permeate through the coupons at a pressure of 5 psig. A manometer was placed on the opposite side of the coupons and was used to measure the height of the fluid with respect to time. From this data the mass flow rate of the gas could be calculated since the area of the manometer and the density of the gas is known. The results of the test are given. The permeability constant was calculated using Darcy's law, which related the pressure drop, flow rate of the permeating gas and resistance to flow through the coupon created. To put the results into prospective the permeability of sand stone and granite is 1E-15 and 1E-20 respectively.

  7. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  8. Carbon fiber epoxy composites for both strengthening and health monitoring of structures.

    PubMed

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-05-06

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the "wet process", which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring.

  9. Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites for Both Strengthening and Health Monitoring of Structures

    PubMed Central

    Salvado, Rita; Lopes, Catarina; Szojda, Leszek; Araújo, Pedro; Gorski, Marcin; Velez, Fernando José; Castro-Gomes, João; Krzywon, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the electrical and mechanical behavior of several continuous carbon fibers epoxy composites for both strengthening and monitoring of structures. In these composites, the arrangement of fibers was deliberately diversified to test and understand the ability of the composites for self-sensing low strains. Composites with different arrangements of fibers and textile weaves, mainly unidirectional continuous carbon reinforced composites, were tested at the dynamometer. A two-probe method was considered to measure the relative electrical resistance of these composites during loading. The measured relative electrical resistance includes volume and contact electrical resistances. For all tested specimens, it increases with an increase in tensile strain, at low strain values. This is explained by the improved alignment of fibers and resulting reduction of the number of possible contacts between fibers during loading, increasing as a consequence the contact electrical resistance of the composite. Laboratory tests on strengthening of structural elements were also performed, making hand-made composites by the “wet process”, which is commonly used in civil engineering for the strengthening of all types of structures in-situ. Results show that the woven epoxy composite, used for strengthening of concrete elements is also able to sense low deformations, below 1%. Moreover, results clearly show that this textile sensor also improves the mechanical work of the strengthened structural elements, increasing their bearing capacity. Finally, the set of obtained results supports the concept of a textile fabric capable of both structural upgrade and self-monitoring of structures, especially large structures of difficult access and needing constant, sometimes very expensive, health monitoring. PMID:25954955

  10. Nondestructive testing of externally reinforced structures for seismic retrofitting using flax fiber reinforced polymer (FFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Paoletti, D.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Natural fibers constitute an interesting alternative to synthetic fibers, e.g. glass and carbon, for the production of composites due to their environmental and economic advantages. The strength of natural fiber composites is on average lower compared to their synthetic counterparts. Nevertheless, natural fibers such as flax, among other bast fibers (jute, kenaf, ramie and hemp), are serious candidates for seismic retrofitting applications given that their mechanical properties are more suitable for dynamic loads. Strengthening of structures is performed by impregnating flax fiber reinforced polymers (FFRP) fabrics with epoxy resin and applying them to the component of interest, increasing in this way the load and deformation capacities of the building, while preserving its stiffness and dynamic properties. The reinforced areas are however prompt to debonding if the fabrics are not mounted properly. Nondestructive testing is therefore required to verify that the fabric is uniformly installed and that there are no air gaps or foreign materials that could instigate debonding. In this work, the use of active infrared thermography was investigated for the assessment of (1) a laboratory specimen reinforced with FFRP and containing several artificial defects; and (2) an actual FFRP retrofitted masonry wall in the Faculty of Engineering of the University of L'Aquila (Italy) that was seriously affected by the 2009 earthquake. Thermographic data was processed by advanced signal processing techniques, and post-processed by computing the watershed lines to locate suspected areas. Results coming from the academic specimen were compared to digital speckle photography and holographic interferometry images.

  11. Composites reinforced via mechanical interlocking of surface-roughened microplatelets within ductile and brittle matrices.

    PubMed

    Libanori, R; Carnelli, D; Rothfuchs, N; Binelli, M R; Zanini, M; Nicoleau, L; Feichtenschlager, B; Albrecht, G; Studart, A R

    2016-06-01

    Load-bearing reinforcing elements in a continuous matrix allow for improved mechanical properties and can reduce the weight of structural composites. As the mechanical performance of composite systems are heavily affected by the interfacial properties, tailoring the interactions between matrices and reinforcing elements is a crucial problem. Recently, several studies using bio-inspired model systems suggested that interfacial mechanical interlocking is an efficient mechanism for energy dissipation in platelet-reinforced composites. While cheap and effective solutions are available at the macroscale, the modification of surface topography in micron-sized reinforcing elements still represents a challenging task. Here, we report a simple method to create nanoasperities with tailored sizes and densities on the surface of alumina platelets and investigate their micromechanical effect on the energy dissipation mechanisms of nacre-like materials. Composites reinforced with roughened platelets exhibit improved mechanical properties for both organic ductile epoxy and inorganic brittle cement matrices. Mechanical interlocking increases the modulus of toughness (area under the stress-strain curve) by 110% and 56% in epoxy and cement matrices, respectively, as compared to those reinforced with flat platelets. This interlocking mechanism can potentially lead to a significant reduction in the weight of mechanical components while retaining the structural performance required in the application field. PMID:27070938

  12. Analytical and experimental investigation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites. Phase 1: Concept development and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; June, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The analytical and experimental investigations are described in the first phase of a program to establish the feasibility of reinforcing metal aircraft structures with advanced filamentary composites. The interactions resulting from combining the two types of materials into single assemblies as well as their ability to function structurally were studied. The combinations studied were boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum, boron-epoxy reinforced titanium, and boron-polyimide reinforced titanium. The concepts used unidirectional composites as reinforcement in the primary loading direction and metal for carrying the transverse loads as well as its portion of the primary load. The program established that several realistic concepts could be fabricated, that these concepts could perform to a level that would result in significant weight savings, and that there are means for predicting their capability within a reasonable degree of accuracy. This program also encountered problems related to the application of polyimide systems that resulted in their relatively poor and variable performance.

  13. An investigation of the compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, S. V.; Rosen, B. W.; Rice, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the effect of a wide range of variables including matrix properties, interface properties, fiber prestressing, secondary reinforcement, and others on the ultimate compressive strength of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites. Scanning electron microscopy is used to assess the resulting failure surfaces. In addition, a theoretical study is conducted to determine the influence of fiber anisotropy and lack of perfect bond between fiber and matrix on the shear mode microbuckling. The experimental evaluation of the effect of various constituent and process characteristics on the behavior of these unidirectional composites in compression did not reveal any substantial increase in strength. However, theoretical evaluations indicate that the high degree of fiber anisotropy results in a significant drop in the predicted stress level for internal instability. Scanning electron microscope data analysis suggests that internal fiber failure and smooth surface debonding could be responsible for the measured low compressive strengths.

  14. A Study of the Effect of Adhesive and Matrix Stiffnesses on the Axial, Normal, and Shear Stress Distributions of a Boron-epoxy Reinforced Composite Joint. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a symmetrical, eight-step, titanium-boron-epoxy joint are discussed. A study of the effect of adhesive and matrix stiffnesses on the axial, normal, and shear stress distributions was made using the finite element method. The NASA Structural Analysis Program (NASTRAN) was used for the analysis. The elastic modulus of the adhesive was varied from 345 MPa to 3100 MPa with the nominal value of 1030 MPa as a standard. The nominal values were used to analyze the stability of the joint. The elastic moduli were varied to determine their effect on the stresses in the joint.

  15. Radiation processing of carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ajit

    2001-12-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced advanced composites are being used for a variety of structural applications, because of their useful mechanical properties, including high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Thermal curing of composite products results in internal stresses, due to the mismatch of the coefficients of expansion of the tools and the composite products. Because radiation curing can be done at ambient temperatures, the possibility that the residual stresses might be absent, or much lower in the radiation-cured products, originally led to the start of work on radiation curing of advanced composites at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Pinawa, Canada, in 1985. Research work during the last two decades has shown that advanced composites can be radiation-cured with electron beams or γ radiation. Many of the advantages of radiation curing, as compared to thermal curing, which include curing at ambient temperature, reduced curing time, improved resin stability and reduced volatile emissions, have now been demonstrated. The initial work focussed on electron curing of acrylated epoxy matrices. Since then, procedures have been developed to radiation cure conventional aerospace epoxies, as well. Electron beam cured advanced composites are now being developed for use in the aircraft and aerospace industry. Repair of advanced composite structures is also possible using radiation curing technology. Radiation curing work is continuing at Pinawa and has also been done by Aerospatiale, who have facilities for electron curing composite rocket motor casings and by Chappas and co-workers who have electron cured part of a boat hull. In this paper, the work done on this emerging new technology by the various groups is briefly reviewed.

  16. Signature analysis of acoustic emission from graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Henneke, E. G., II

    1977-01-01

    Acoustic emissions were monitored for crack extension across and parallel to the fibers in a single ply and multiply laminates of graphite epoxy composites. Spectrum analysis was performed on the transient signal to ascertain if the fracture mode can be characterized by a particular spectral pattern. The specimens were loaded to failure quasistatically in a tensile machine. Visual observations were made via either an optical microscope or a television camera. The results indicate that several types of characteristics in the time and frequency domain correspond to different types of failure.

  17. Fatigue life prediction for carbon-epoxy composite design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, B. D.

    A simple design method for the prediction of fatigue life for long fiber carbon-epoxy composites with multi-angular lay-ups is presented. The approach, based in part on the traditional metallic method of fatigue life prediction, can be applied to fully tensile, fully compressive or part-tensile part-compressive loading of either constant or variable amplitude. Predictions produced by the method are compared with extensive data from fatigue tests on XAS/914C material for both relatively fatigue-sensitive and -insensitive lay-ups.

  18. Modeling and Characterization of a Graphite Nanoplatelet/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Chasiotis, I.; Chen, Q.; Gates, T. S.

    2004-01-01

    A micromechanical modeling procedure is developed to predict the viscoelastic properties of a graphite nanoplatelet/epoxy composite as a function of volume fraction and nanoplatelet diameter. The predicted storage and loss moduli from the model are compared to measured values from the same material using Dynamical Mechanical Analysis, nanoindentation, and tensile tests. In most cases, the model and experiments indicate that for increasing volume fractions of nanoplatelets, both the storage and loss moduli increase. Also, in most cases, the model and experiments indicate that as the nanoplatelet diameter is increased, the storage and loss moduli decrease and increase, respectively.

  19. High-toughness graphite/epoxy composite material experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felbeck, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effect of near-earth space exposure on three mechanical properties of specially toughened 5208/T300 graphite/epoxy composite materials. The properties measured are elastic modulus, strength, and fracture toughness. Six toughness specimens and nine tensile specimens were mounted on an external frame during the 5.8-year orbit of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Three identical sets of specimens were manufactured at the outset: the flight set, a zero-time non-flight set, and a total-time non-flight set.

  20. The interlaminar fracture toughness of woven graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Deaton, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    The interlaminar fracture toughness of 2-D graphite/epoxy woven composites was determined as a function of stacking sequence, thickness, and weave pattern. Plain, oxford, 5-harness satin, and 8-harness satin weaves of T300/934 material were evaluated by the double cantilever beam test. The fabric material had a G (sub Ic) ranging from 2 to 8 times greater than 0 degrees unidirectional T300/934 tape material. The interlaminar fracture toughness of a particular weave style was dependent on whether the stacking sequence was symmetric or asymmetric and, in some cases, on the fabric orientation.

  1. Aging results for PRD 49 III/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamstad, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy composite is growing in use as a structural material because of its high strength-to-weight ratio. Currently, it is used for the Trident rocket motor case and for various pressure vessels on the Space Shuttle. In 1979, the initial results for aging of filament-wound cylindrical pressure vessels which were manufactured with preproduction Kevlar 49 (Hamstad, 1979) were published. This preproduction fiber was called PRD 49 III. This report updates the continuing study to 10-year data and also presents 7.5-year data for spherical pressure vessels wound with production Kevlar 49. For completeness, this report will again describe the specimens of the original study with PRD 49 as well as specimens for the new study with Kevlar 49.

  2. Damping Behavior of Alumina Epoxy Nano-Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Priyanka; Kumar, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Polymer nano composites, consisting of a polymer matrix with nanoparticle filler, have been predicted to be one of the most beneficial applications of nanotechnology. Addition of nano particulates to a polymer matrix enhances its performance by capitalizing on the nature and properties of the nano-scale fillers. The damping behavior of composites with nano structured phases is significantly different from that of micro structured materials. Viscoelastic homopolymer exhibit a high material damping response over a relatively narrow range of temperature and frequencies. In many practical situations, a polymeric structure is required to possess better strength and stiffness properties together with a reasonable damping behavior. Viscoelastic polymers show higher loss factor beyond the glassy region which comes with a significant drop in the specific modulus. Addition of nano alumina particles to epoxy leads to improved strength and stiffness properties with an increase in glass transition temperature while retaining its damping capability. Experimental investigations are carried out on composite beam specimen fabricated with different compositions of alumina nano particles in epoxy to evaluate loss factor, tan δ. Impact damping method is used for time response analysis. A single point Laser is used to record the transverse displacement of a point on the composite beam specimen. The experimental results are compared with theoretical estimation of loss factor using Voigt estimation. The effect of inter phase is included in theoretical estimation of loss factor. The result reveals that the study of interface properties is very important in deriving the overall loss factor of the composite since interface occupies a significant volume fraction in the composite.

  3. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  4. Bisimide amine cured epoxy /IME/ resins and composites. II - Ten-degree off-axis tensile and shear properties of Celion 6000/IME composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Bisimide amines (BIAs), which are presently used as curing agents in a state-of-the-art epoxy resin, are oligomeric and polymeric mixtures. A series of composites consisting of the novel BIA-cured epoxy resin reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fibers were fabricated and evaluated, and the ten-degree, off-axis uniaxial tensile and shear properties of these composites were determined. The use of the intralaminar shear strain-to-failure was used in the calculation of resin shear strain-to-failure. Study results indicate that several of these novel composite systems exhibit shear strain properties that are superior to those of the control composite system of the present experiments, which employed a sulfone curing agent.

  5. Laser Surface Preparation of Epoxy Composites for Secondary Bonding: Optimization of Ablation Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John; Wohl, Christopher J.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.

    2015-01-01

    Surface preparation has been identified as one of the most critical aspects of attaining predictable and reliable adhesive bonds. Energetic processes such as laser ablation or plasma treatment are amenable to automation and are easily monitored and adjusted for controlled surface preparation. A laser ablation process was developed to accurately remove a targeted depth of resin, approximately 0.1 to 20 micrometers, from a carbon fiber reinforced epoxy composite surface while simultaneously changing surface chemistry and creating micro-roughness. This work demonstrates the application of this process to prepare composite surfaces for bonding without exposing or damaging fibers on the surface. Composite panels were prepared in an autoclave and had a resin layer approximately 10 micrometers thick above the fiber reinforcement. These composite panels were laser surface treated using several conditions, fabricated into bonded panels and hygrothermally aged. Bond performance of aged, experimental specimens was compared with grit blast surface treated specimens using a modified double cantilever beam test that enabled accelerated saturation of the specimen with water. Comparison of bonded specimens will be used to determine how ablation depth may affect average fracture energies and failure modes.

  6. Analysis of Tile-Reinforced Composite Armor. Part 1; Advanced Modeling and Strength Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, C. G.; Chen, Tzi-Kang; Baker, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental study of the structural response and strength of tile-reinforced components of the Composite Armored Vehicle are presented. The analyses are based on specialized finite element techniques that properly account for the effects of the interaction between the armor tiles, the surrounding elastomers, and the glass-epoxy sublaminates. To validate the analytical predictions, tests were conducted with panels subjected to three-point bending loads. The sequence of progressive failure events for the laminates is described. This paper describes the results of Part 1 of a study of the response and strength of tile-reinforced composite armor.

  7. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and prediction of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramoll, K. C.; Dillard, D. A.; Brinson, H. F.

    1990-01-01

    The thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material were studied. The four orthotropic material properties, S sub 11, S sub 12, S sub 22, and S sub 66, were characterized by 20 minute static creep tests on unidirectional (0) sub 8, (10) sub 8, and (90) sub 16 lamina specimens. The Time-Temperature Superposition-Principle (TTSP) was used successfully to accelerate the characterization process. A nonlinear constitutive model was developed to describe the stress dependent viscoelastic response for each of the material properties. A numerical procedure to predict long term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use. The final phase involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperatures and load level for 4 to 5 weeks. These results were compared with the VCAP program predictions to verify the testing procedure and to check the numerical procedure used in the program. The actual tests and predictions agreed for all test cases which included 1, 2, 3, and 4 fiber direction laminates.

  8. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and predictions of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gramoll, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study consisted of two main parts, the thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material. The four orthotropic material properties, S{sub 11}, S{sub 12}, S{sub 22}, and S{sub 66}, were characterized by 20-minute static creep tests on unidirectional ((0){sub s}, (10){sub s}, and (90){sub 16}) lamina specimens. A new numerical procedure to predict long-term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user-friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use and includes graphics, menus, help messages, etc. The final phase of the study involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperature and load levels for 4 to 5 weeks.

  9. Longitudinal splitting in epoxy and K-polymer composites - Shear lag analysis including the effect of fiber bridging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, John A.; Liu, Siulie; Chen, Hsichieh; Wedgewood, Alan R.

    1991-01-01

    The shear-lag model used previously by Nairn (1988) to derive a fracture mechanics analysis of longitudinal splitting in double-edge notched unidirectional composites was used to investigate the effect of fibers bridging across the longitudinal split in these composites. Using the new analysis, the longitudinal splitting fracture toughness, G(Lc), was determined for Hercules AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates and for K-polymer based laminates containing Magnamite IM-6 as the graphite reinforcing fiber. Results show that the inclusion of the fiber bridging in the fracture analysis significantly affects the reported fracture toughness.

  10. 3-D textile reinforcements in composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miravete, A.

    1999-11-01

    Laminated composite materials have been used in structural applications since the 1960s. However, their high cost and inability to accommodate fibers in the laminate`s thickness direction greatly reduce their damage tolerance and impact resistance. The second generation of materials--3-D textile reinforced composites--offers significant cost reduction, and by incorporating reinforcement in the thickness direction, dramatically increases damage tolerance and impact resistance. However, methods for predicting mechanical properties of 3-D textile reinforced composite materials tend to be more complex. These materials also have disadvantages--particularly in regard to crimps in the yarns--that require more research. Textile preforms, micro- and macromechanical modeling, manufacturing processes, and characterization all need further development. As researchers overcome these problems, this new generation of composites will emerge as a highly competitive family of materials. This book provides a state-of-the-art account of this promising technology. In it, top experts describe the manufacturing processes, highlight the advantages, identify the main applications, analyze methods for predicting mechanical properties, and detail various reinforcement strategies, including grid structure, knitted fabric composites, and the braiding technique. Armed with the information in this book, readers will be prepared to better exploit the advantages of 3-D textile reinforced composites, overcome its disadvantages, and contribute to the further development of the technology.

  11. Synthesis and electroconductivity of epoxy/aligned CNTs composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chechenin, N. G.; Chernykh, P. N.; Vorobyeva, E. A.; Timofeev, O. S.

    2013-06-01

    An efficient method is described of growing of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VANTs) densely packed on a large area with uniform height up to 1 mm. The method is based on injection of active solution of ferrocene in cyclohexane into reactor during the growth process. We also describe a method of ER/VANTs composite preparation based on infiltration of epoxy resin (ER) liquid monomer into arrays of the VANTs forest with polymerization followed. Further on we describe a press-and-draw method to reorient VANTs into horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes (HANTs) in the liquid composite precursor. The electrical conductivities up to 0.6 S/cm in ER/VANTs and up to 0.85 S/cm in ER/HANTs are obtained.

  12. Mechanical property characterization of polymeric composites reinforced by continuous microfibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubayar, Ali

    Innumerable experimental works have been conducted to study the effect of polymerization on the potential properties of the composites. Experimental techniques are employed to understand the effects of various fibers, their volume fractions and matrix properties in polymer composites. However, these experiments require fabrication of various composites which are time consuming and cost prohibitive. Advances in computational micromechanics allow us to study the various polymer based composites by using finite element simulations. The mechanical properties of continuous fiber composite strands are directional. In traditional continuous fiber laminated composites, all fibers lie in the same plane. This provides very desirable increases in the in-plane mechanical properties, but little in the transverse mechanical properties. The effect of different fiber/matrix combinations with various orientations is also available. Overall mechanical properties of different micro continuous fiber reinforced composites with orthogonal geometry are still unavailable in the contemporary research field. In this research, the mechanical properties of advanced polymeric composite reinforced by continuous micro fiber will be characterized based on analytical investigation and FE computational modeling. Initially, we have chosen IM7/PEEK, Carbon Fiber/Nylon 6, and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy as three different case study materials for analysis. To obtain the equivalent properties of the micro-hetero structures, a concept of micro-scale representative volume elements (RVEs) is introduced. Five types of micro scale RVEs (3 square and 2 hexagonal) containing a continuous micro fiber in the polymer matrix were designed. Uniaxial tensile, lateral expansion and transverse shear tests on each RVE were designed and conducted by the finite element computer modeling software ANSYS. The formulae based on elasticity theory were derived for extracting the equivalent mechanical properties (Young's moduli, shear

  13. Boron-epoxy-reinforced titanium aircraft landing-gear drag strut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    The structural performance of a boron-epoxy-reinforced titanium drag strut, containing a bonded scarf joint and designed to the criteria of a large commercial transport, has been evaluated experimentally and analytically. The strut was exposed to two lifetimes of fatigue loading and was statically loaded to the tensile and compressive design ultimate loads. Throughout the test program no evidence of any damage in the drag strut was detected by strain-gage measurements, ultrasonic inspection, or visual observation. The bonded joint was analyzed using the NASTRAN computer program. A comparison of the strains predicted by the NASTRAN computer program with the experimentally determined values shows excellent agreement. An analytical study indicated that the nonlinear behavior of a structural spacer at each end of the strut could be explained by the inelastic behavior and possible creep of the adhesive.

  14. Thermo-oxidative degradation assessment in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Connor; Barnard, Dan J.; Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.; Bowler, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Components made from polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are finding increasing use in armored vehicles for the purpose of weight savings and fuel efficiency. Often times, these PMC components are installed next to engines, or in other high-temperature environments within the vehicle. The present work investigates the change in surface chemistry and its correlation with changes in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) due to accelerated thermo-oxidative aging of a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminate. Samples are aged isothermally at various temperatures whose selection is guided by degradation steps revealed by thermo-gravimetric analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) photoacoustic spectroscopy is utilized to identify the chemical changes due to aging, and compression-test results reveal a non-linear decrease in ILSS with increasing aging temperature. A correlation between the FTIR and ILSS data sets suggests that nondestructive FTIR techniques may be used for assessing ILSS of PMCs.

  15. Resistivity of pristine and intercalated graphite fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Hambourger, Paul D.; Slabe, Melissa E.

    1989-01-01

    Laminar composites were fabricated from pristine and bromine intercalated Amoco P-55, P-75, and P-100 graphite fibers and Hysol-Grafil EAG101-1 film epoxy. The thickness and r.f. eddy current resistivity of several samples were measured at grid points and averaged point by point to obtain final values. Although the values obtained this way have high precision (less than 3 percent deviation), the resistivity values appear to be 20 to 90 percent higher than resistivities measured on high aspect ratio samples using multi-point techniques, and by those predicted by theory. The temperature dependence of the resistivity indicates that the fibers are neither damaged nor deintercalated by the composite fabrication process. The resistivity of the composites is a function of sample thickness (i.e., resin content). Composite resistivity is dominated by fiber resistivity, so lowering the resistivity of the fibers, either through increased graphitization or intercalation, results in a lower composite resistivity. A modification of the simple rule of mixtures model appears to predict the conductivity of high aspect ratio samples measured along a fiber direction, but a directional dependence appears which is not predicted by the theory. The resistivity of these materials is clearly more complex than that of homogeneous materials.

  16. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  17. Thermal properties and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers filled epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidina, D. S.; Mariatti, M.; Juliewatty, J.

    2015-07-01

    This present study is aimed to enhance the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of ceramic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate, CaCu3Ti4O12 (CCTO) and Barium Titanate (BaTiO3) filled epoxy thin film composites. As can be seen from the results, 20 vol% BaTiO3/epoxy thin film composite showed the lowest coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value, the highest decomposition temperature (T5 and Tonset) and weight of residue among the composites as the filler has low CTE value, distributed homogeneously throughout the composite and less voids can be seen between epoxy resin and BaTiO3 filler.

  18. Dielectric and microwave attenuation properties of graphene nanoplatelet–epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhou; Luo, Jia; Zhao, Guang–Lin

    2014-01-15

    Graphene nanoplatelet (GNP)–epoxy composites were fabricated for the investigation of the dielectric permittivity and microwave absorption in a frequency range from 8 to 20 GHz. The intrinsically conductive GNP particles and polarized interfacial centers in the composites contribute to the microwave absorption. A minimum reflection loss of −14.5 dB at 18.9 GHz is observed for the GNP–epoxy composites with 15 wt. % GNP loading, which is mainly attributed to electric conductivity and the charge multipoles at the polarized interfaces in the GNP–epoxy composites.

  19. Neutron irradiation tests on B4C/epoxy composite for neutron shielding application and the parameters assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeli, Ruhollah; Shirmardi, Seyed Pezhman; Ahmadi, Seyed Javad

    2016-10-01

    In this investigation, epoxy resin with a low viscosity amine-based curing agent was chosen as matrix and additives were added to epoxy resin using low speed stirring with ultrasonic waves approach. The chemical stability of resin during fabrication of composites was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effect of B4C particle size (20 and 150 μm) on neutron shielding was investigated. Besides, in order to develop the high performance composites, the effect of ATH (flame retardant) and WO3 powders (for shielding from against gamma rays) on neutron shielding property is considered. The neutron experiments were based on foil activation analysis in thermal column of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). According to experimental data, required shield thickness (B4C, 150 μm, 3 wt%) for 80% absorption of neutron fluence was calculated about 9.8 mm. Consequently, data show thermal neutron absorption is dependent also on the size of the boron compound filler and show a significant enhancement in shielding performance when using smaller particle size of B4C filler. Furthermore, data obviously show that the neutron attenuation coefficient of reinforced composites increases to 0.345 cm-1 for B4C (20 μm, 5 wt%)/ Epoxy composite shield. As clearly data indicate, adding WO3 and ATH additive had a significant influence on the thermal neutron attenuation property and hybrid shield shows an enhancement of more than 60% in shielding performance.

  20. Composite laminate free edge reinforcement concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of a free edge in a laminated composite structure can result in delamination of the composite under certain loading conditions. Linear finite element analysis predicts large or even singular interlaminar stresses near the free edge. Edge reinforcements which will reduce these interlaminar stresses, prevent or delay the onset of delaminations, and thereby increase the strength and life of the structure were studied. Finite element models are used to analyze reinforced laminates which were subsequently fabricated and loaded to failure in order to verify the analysis results.

  1. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  2. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  3. Characterization of cure kinetics and physical properties of a high performance, glass fiber-reinforced epoxy prepreg and a novel fluorine-modified, amine-cured commercial epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyeu, Bryan

    Kinetic equation parameters for the curing reaction of a commercial glass fiber reinforced high performance epoxy prepreg composed of the tetrafunctional epoxy tetraglycidyl 4,4-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM), the tetrafunctional amine curing agent 4,4'-diaminodiphenylsulfone (DDS) and an ionic initiator/accelerator, are determined by various thermal analysis techniques and the results compared. The reaction is monitored by heat generated determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and by high speed DSC when the reaction rate is high. The changes in physical properties indicating increasing conversion are followed by shifts in glass transition temperature determined by DSC, temperature-modulated DSC (TMDSC), step scan DSC and high speed DSC, thermomechanical (TMA) and dynamic mechanical (DMA) analysis and thermally stimulated depolarization (TSD). Changes in viscosity, also indicative of degree of conversion, are monitored by DMA. Thermal stability as a function of degree of cure is monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The parameters of the general kinetic equations, including activation energy and rate constant, are explained and used to compare results of various techniques. The utilities of the kinetic descriptions are demonstrated in the construction of a useful time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a continuous heating transformation (CHT) diagram for rapid determination of processing parameters in the processing of prepregs. Shrinkage due to both resin consolidation and fiber rearrangement is measured as the linear expansion of the piston on a quartz dilatometry cell using TMA. The shrinkage of prepregs was determined to depend on the curing temperature, pressure applied and the fiber orientation. Chemical modification of an epoxy was done by mixing a fluorinated aromatic amine (aniline) with a standard aliphatic amine as a curing agent for a commercial Diglycidylether of Bisphenol-A (DGEBA) epoxy. The resulting cured network

  4. Carbon Nanotube/Cu Nanowires/Epoxy Composite Mats with Improved Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yajuan; Cao, Wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Hongyuan; Wang, Miao; Wei, Hanxing; Hu, Dongmei; Chen, Minghai; Li, Qingwen

    2015-04-01

    Polymer composites with carbon nanofillers have been regarded as a promising candidate for electronic package materials. The challenge for such materials is to increase the electrical and thermal conductivity of the composites. Herein, we reported an epoxy composite film with high thermal and electrical conductivity that were prepared by loading high volume fraction of well-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, around 50 nm in diameter, 1-10 µm in length) and copper nanowires (Cu NWs, 60-70 nm in diameter, 1-5 µm in length) in epoxy matrix. The MWCNT-Cu NW hybrid mats were prepared by a vacuum filtration method with an optimum Cu NW content of 50 wt%. The hybrid mats was then impregnated by epoxy solution to prepare epoxy composite films. The epoxy was modified by the toughening agent to make the composite films tough and flexible. The loading fraction of MWCNTs and Cu NWs was tuned by controlling the viscosity of epoxy solution. A remarkable synergetic effect between the MWCNTs and Cu NWs in improving the electrical and thermal conductivity of epoxy composites was demonstrated. The results showed that the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites with 42.5 wt% epoxy was 1500 S/m, and the thermal conductivity was 2.83 W/m K, which was 10.1 times of the neat epoxy. Its thermal resistance was as low as 1% of the pure epoxy. And the mechanical properties of composites were also investigated. These robust and flexible nanocomposites showed prospective applications as thermal interface materials (TIMs) in the electronic industry.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Sisal/Coir Fiber Reinforced Hybrid Composites Fabricated by Cold Pressing Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akash; Sreenivasa Rao, K. V.; Venkatesha Gupta, N. S.; kumar, D. S. Arun

    2016-09-01

    Bio-composites have less density and are environmental friendly materials that require less energy during production and subsequent machining. This paper reports the mechanical and water absorption properties of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treated sisal and coir fiber reinforced epoxy resin thermo set hybrid composites. The hybrid composites were prepared by traditional cold pressing method at room temperature with applied pressure of 410.4 kg/cm2 for 3 hours pressurization time. The mechanical properties were characterized according to ASTM standards. Hybrid composites with 40wt% of sisal and coir fiber were found to possess higher tensile strength of 48.2MPa and flexural strength of 76.68 MPa among the fabricated hybrid composite specimens. Absorption of water increases with increasing fiber volume. The experimental result also show that the sisal and coir fibers are promising reinforcement for use in low cost bio-composites which have high strength to weight ratio.

  6. Processing, properties and applications of composites using powder-coated epoxy towpreg technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayha, T. D.; Osborne, P. P.; Thrasher, T. P.; Hartness, J. T.; Johnston, N. J.; Marchello, J. M.; Hugh, M. K.

    1993-01-01

    Composite manufacturing using the current prepregging technology of impregnating liquid resin into three-dimensionally reinforced textile preforms can be a costly and difficult operation. Alternatively, using polymer in the solid form, grinding it into a powder, and then depositing it onto a carbon fiber tow prior to making a textile preform is a viable method for the production of complex textile shapes. The powder-coated towpreg yarn is stable, needs no refrigeration, contains no solvents and is easy to process into various woven and braided preforms for later consolidation into composite structures. NASA's Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) program has provided an avenue for developing the technology by which advanced resins and their powder-coated preforms may be used in aircraft structures. Two-dimensional braiding and weaving studies using powder-coated towpreg have been conducted to determine the effect of resin content, towpreg size and twist on textile composite properties. Studies have been made to customize the towpreg to reduce friction and bulk factor. Processing parameters have been determined for three epoxy resin systems on eight-harness satin fabric, and on more advanced 3-D preform architectures for the downselected resin system. Processing effects and the resultant mechanical properties of these textile composites will be presented and compared.

  7. Monitoring of reinforced composites processed by microwave radiation using fiber-Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, David; Roig, Inma; Sales, Salvador; Emmerich, Rudolf

    2014-05-01

    The use of microwave radiation for curing carbon-fiber reinforced polymer materials (CFRP) can solve the nonhomogeneous heating problems when using conventional techniques based on the use of catalysts and can reduce the processing times. Optical fiber sensors have well-known advantages for Fiber Reinforced Composites (FRC) monitoring. In this paper fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are used for online monitoring of the residual stress and distortions produced during the microwave curing process. The CFRP samples are composed by layers of unidirectional carbon fibers and epoxy resin. The results show a very different behavior between the direction of carbon fibers and the perpendicular direction. Results are compared with the conventional processing technique.

  8. Impact Damage In Carbon/Epoxy And Carbon/PEEK Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Magold, N. J.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes results of drop-weight impact testing of specimens of carbon-fiber/epoxy and carbon-fiber/polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composite materials. Panels made of these materials assembled into lightweight, strong, stiff structures useful in automobiles, aircraft, sporting goods, and many other products. PEEK specimens showed less delamination than epoxy specimens at given impact energy.

  9. Properties of two composite materials made of toughened epoxy resin and high-strain graphite fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Marvin B.; Smith, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental evaluation of IM7/8551-7 and IM6/18081, two new toughened epoxy resin, high strain graphite fiber composite materials. Data include ply-level strengths and moduli, notched tension and compression strengths and compression-after-impact assessments. The measured properties are compared with those of other graphite-epoxy materials.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, C. M.; Klimek-McDonald, D. R.; Pineda, E. J.; King, J. A.; Reichanadter, A. M.; Miskioglu, I.; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet Carbon Fiber Epoxy Hybrid Composites: Multiscale Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, Cameron M.; Klimek-McDonald, Danielle R.; Pineda, Evan J.; King, Julie A.; Reichanadter, Alex M.; Miskioglu, Ibrahim; Gowtham, S.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively high specific mechanical properties of carbon fiber/epoxy composite materials, they are often used as structural components in aerospace applications. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) can be added to the epoxy matrix to improve the overall mechanical properties of the composite. The resulting GNP/carbon fiber/epoxy hybrid composites have been studied using multiscale modeling to determine the influence of GNP volume fraction, epoxy crosslink density, and GNP dispersion on the mechanical performance. The hierarchical multiscale modeling approach developed herein includes Molecular Dynamics (MD) and micromechanical modeling, and it is validated with experimental testing of the same hybrid composite material system. The results indicate that the multiscale modeling approach is accurate and provides physical insight into the composite mechanical behavior. Also, the results quantify the substantial impact of GNP volume fraction and dispersion on the transverse mechanical properties of the hybrid composite, while the effect on the axial properties is shown to be insignificant.

  13. Epoxy coating and other protective measures for reinforceing steel embedded in concrete subjected to a chloride laden environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondratova, Irina

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion of steel reinforcement is the most significant factor in the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Corrosion of reinforcing steel in marine structures and bridges is initiated mainly by chloride contamination. When steel starts to corrode, the cross section of the reinforcing bar becomes smaller, also the volume of corrosion products exerts a pressure on the concrete resulting in spalling of the concrete cover and directly exposing the steel to the corrosive agents, thus accelerating the corrosion process and further reducing the load carrying capacity of the concrete member. Although there are corrosion protective measures available to the concrete producer such as use of protective coatings on steel surface and use of corrosion inhibitors, a very limited amount of information exists on the comparative behavior of these common corrosion protection strategies in cracked concrete, especially in cracked high performance concrete (HPC). The relative effectiveness of different protection methods for steel reinforcement such as the use of new types of epoxy-coated reinforcement, galvanized reinforcement, and corrosion inhibitors was investigated in concrete with water-to-cement ratios of 0.60 and 0.40 and 0.25. Concrete slabs were uncracked and had preformed transverse cracks. The effect of water-to-cement ratio and crack widths on the rate of corrosion in precracked reinforced concrete slabs also was investigated. Testing was performed in the laboratory and in the field. It was found that cracked HPC concrete alone or with addition of corrosion inhibitors cannot provide sufficient corrosion protection for uncoated steel reinforcement in a chloride-laden environment and that additional protection to the reinforcing steel in the form of epoxy coating is necessary to provide long-term service life of the concrete structure.

  14. Improvement of toughness and electrical properties of epoxy composites with carbon nanotubes prepared by industrially relevant processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollertz, R.; Chatterjee, S.; Gutmann, H.; Geiger, T.; Nüesch, F. A.; Chu, B. T. T.

    2011-03-01

    The addition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to polymeric matrices or master batches has the potential to provide composites with novel properties. However, composites with a uniform dispersion of CNTs have proved to be difficult to manufacture, especially at an industrial scale. This paper reports on processing methods that overcome problems related to the control and reproducibility of dispersions. By using a high pressure homogenizer and a three-roll calendaring mill in combination, CNT reinforced epoxies were fabricated by mould casting with a well dispersed nanofiller content from 0.1 to 2 wt%. The influence of the nano-carbon reinforcements on toughness and electrical properties of the CNT/epoxies was studied. A substantial increase of all mechanical properties already appeared at the lowest CNT content of 0.1 wt%, but further raising the nanofiller concentration only led to moderate further changes. The most significant enhancement was obtained for fracture toughness, reaching up to 82%. The low percolation thresholds were confirmed by electrical conductivity measurements on the same composites yielding a threshold value of only about 0.01 wt%. As corroborated by a thorough microscopic analysis of the composites, mechanical and electrical enhancement points to the formation of an interconnected network of agglomerated CNTs.

  15. Processing and damage recovery of intrinsic self-healing glass fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordo, Federica; Michaud, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Glass fiber reinforced composites with a self-healing, supramolecular hybrid network matrix were produced using a modified vacuum assisted resin infusion moulding process adapted to high temperature processing. The quality and fiber volume fraction (50%) of the obtained materials were assessed through microscopy and matrix burn-off methods. The thermo-mechanical properties were quantified by means of dynamic mechanical analysis, revealing very high damping properties compared to traditional epoxy-based glass fiber reinforced composites. Self-healing properties were assessed by three-point bending tests. A high recovery of the flexural properties, around 72% for the elastic modulus and 65% of the maximum flexural stress, was achieved after a resting period of 24 h at room temperature. Recovery after low velocity impact events was also visually observed. Applications for this intrinsic and autonomic self-healing highly reinforced composite material point towards semi-structural applications where high damping and/or integrity recovery after impact are required.

  16. The influence of semiconductive binary Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}–Yb{sub 3}S{sub 4} system on electrical conductivity property of epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Soydal, Ulku Ahmetli, Gulnare Kocaman, Suheyla

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop the semiconductive composites. Semiconducting glass (SG) binary system Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}–Yb{sub 3}S{sub 4} in mole ratio 1:1 was synthesized and was doped with I{sub 2}. Next, electrically conductive DGEBA-type epoxy resin (ER)/SG-filled composites and epoxy toluene oligomer (ETO) modified epoxy resin-SG filled composites were developed with 3–10 wt. % of fillers and characterized. As a result, the effects of the modifier and amount of semiconductive filler on the electrical properties of commercial epoxy resin were examined. Percolation concentration was 7 wt. % for all composites. For the SG-reinforced composites, the dispersion of the fillers is investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  17. Investigation of Structural Properties of Carbon-Epoxy Composites Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Jackson, K.; Sharma, A.; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as bonded on the surface of cylindrical structures fabricated out of such composites. Structural properties of such composites is investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and longitudinal and hoop strain on the surface is measured.

  18. Performance enhancement of epoxy based sandwich composites using multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the application of sockets in trans-femoral amputees.

    PubMed

    Arun, S; Kanagaraj, S

    2016-06-01

    A socket plays a vital role in giving the comfort to the amputees. However, the accumulation of heat inside the socket and its weight led to increase their metabolic cost. Hence, an attempt was made to increase the performance of the epoxy based sandwich composites to be used for the socket by reinforcing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), which was varied from 0.1 to 0.5wt%. It was homogeneously dispersed in epoxy to obtain the desired properties, where the enhancement of thermal conductivity, compressive strength and modulus of epoxy was observed to be 76.7%, 62.6% and 20.2%, respectively at 0.3wt% of MWCNT concentration beyond which the mechanical properties were found to be decreased. Hence, the epoxy, E-glass plain fabric, 2-10 layers of stockinet and 0.3wt% of MWCNT were used to prepare the sandwich composites. The flexural strength and thermal conductivity of 0.3wt% of MWCNT reinforced sandwich composites were found to be improved by 11.38±1.5% and 29.8±1.3% for the 4-10 layers and up to 10 layers of stockinet, respectively compared to unreinforced sandwich composites, which helped to reduce the weight of the socket and decrease the heat accumulation inside the socket. Thus, it is suggested to be explored for the application of socket in trans-femoral amputees to increase their comfort level by decreasing the metabolic cost.

  19. Behaviour of hybrid jute-glass/epoxy composite tubes subjected to lateral loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental work on hybrid and non-hybrid composite tubes subjected to lateral loading has been carried out using jute, glass and hybrid jute-glass/epoxy materials. Tubes of 200 mm length with 110 mm inner diameter were fabricated by hand lay-up method to investigate the effect of material used and the number of layers on lateral-load-displacement relations and on the failure mode. Crush force efficiency and the specific energy absorption of the composite tubes were calculated. Results show that the six layers glass/epoxy tubes supported load higher 10.6% than that of hybrid jute-glass/ epoxy made of two layers of jute/epoxy four layers of glass/epoxy. It has been found that the specific energy absorption of the glass/epoxy tubes is found higher respectively 11.6% and 46% than hybrid jute-glass/epoxy and jute/epoxy tubes. The increase in the number of layers from two to six increases the maximum lateral load from 0.53KN to 1.22 KN for jute/epoxy and from 1.35 KN to 3.87 KN for the glass/epoxy tubes. The stacking sequence of the hybrid tubes influenced on the maximum lateral load and the absorbed energy. The maximum load obtained for the six layers jute-glass/epoxy tubes of different staking sequence varies between 1.88 KN to 3.46 KN. Failure mechanisms of the laterally loaded composite tubes were also observed and discussed.

  20. Processing and characterization of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    1998-07-01

    The issues of processing and characterization of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with the embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. These fiber reinforced polymer reinforcements incorporate the optical fiber sensors to provide a strain monitoring of structures. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. Fabry Perot and Bragg Grating optical strain sensors were chosen due to their small size and excellent sensitivity. The small diameter of the sensor and optical fiber allow them to be embedded without adversely affecting the strength of the composite. Two types of reinforcement with vinylester resin were used to produce the experimental 9.5 mm diameter rods. The reinforcements were carbon and E-glass fibers. In order to fully characterize the pultrusion process, it was decided to subject the strain sensors separately to each of the variables pertinent to the pultrusion process. Thus, sensors were used to monitor strain caused by compaction pressure in the die, compaction pressure plus standard temperature profile, and finally compaction pressure plus temperature plus resin cure (complete pultrusion process). A strain profile was recorded for each experiment as the sensor travelled through the pultrusion die, and for the cool-down period after the sensor had exited the die.

  1. Anodization of carbon fibers on interfacial mechanical properties of epoxy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Chang, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Yeong-Cheol; Rhee, Kyong-Yop

    2010-01-01

    The influence of anodic oxidation on the mechanical interfacial properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy resin composites was investigated. The surface properties of the anodized carbon fibers were studied through the measurement of contact angles and through SEM, XPS, and FT-IR analyses. The mechanical interfacial properties of the composites were studied through measurements of interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and critical strain energy release rate (G(IC)). It was shown that the surface functional groups containing oxygen on the anodized carbon fibers exert great effects on the surface energetics of fibers and the mechanical interfacial properties, e.g., ILSS, of the resulting composites. Contact angle measurements based on the wicking rate of a test liquid showed that anodic oxidation lead to an increase in the surface free energy of the carbon fibers, mainly in its specific (or polar) component. In terms of surface energetics, it was found that wetting played an important role in increasing the degree of adhesion at interfaces between the fibers and the resin matrices of the composites. PMID:20352820

  2. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment.

  3. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A final program summary is reported for test and evaluation activities that were conducted for space shuttle web selection. Large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of advanced composite shear web construction to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners and logitudinal aluminum stiffening. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs.

  4. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  5. Investigation of transient heat transfer in composite walls using carbon/epoxy composites as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terpiłowski, Janusz; Gawron, Bartosz; Woroniak, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the application of similarity theory to investigations of transient heat transfer in materials with complex structure. It describes the theoretical-experimental method for identification and design of the structure of two-component composite walls based on the research of the thermal diffusivity for the composite and its matrix separately. The thermal diffusivity was measured by means of the modified flash method. The method was tested on two samples of double-layer `epoxy resin - polyamide'. All the investigated samples had the same diameter of 12 mm and thickness ranging from 1.39-2.60 mm and their equivalent value of thermal diffusivity ranging from (1.21-1.98)×10-7 m2/s. Testing the method and research on carbon/epoxy composites was carried out at temperatures close to room temperature.

  6. Analysis of Graphite Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robert E.; Gilbert, John A.; Spanyer, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes analytical methods that can be used to determine the deflections and stresses in highly compliant graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is demonstrated that the standard transform section fails to provide accurate results when the elastic modulus ratio exceeds 20. So an alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach; and, when the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subject to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is also investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed by incorporating material properties established from tensile tests. Finite element modeling is used to verity the results and, considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  7. Degradation of Terfenol-D particle epoxy composites under low frequency cyclic magneto-mechanical loading: comparisons of matrix polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, William D.; Shanmugham, Manikantan

    2005-05-01

    Magnetostrictive Terfenol-D particle actuated epoxy polymer matrix composites were prepared with polyamine and anhydride cured epoxy polymer matrices. The different matrix epoxies exhibited large differences in glass transition and creep behavior. The differences in matrix thermal-mechanical properties resulted in important differences in temperature dependant damage behavior and magneto-elastic strain output in the Terfenol-D particle actuated epoxy polymer matrix composites.

  8. Water absorption behavior and residual strength assessment of glass/epoxy and glass-carbon/epoxy hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S. C.; Singh, B. P.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2016-02-01

    Present investigation is aimed to study the water absorption behaviour and evaluation of residual strength of glass fibre/epoxy (GE) and alternate plies of glass- carbon/epoxy (GCE) hybrid composite. Both the composite systems were exposed to water at 70°C. Specimens were weighed after certain time periods to study the water uptake kinetic. Flexural tests were conducted after 4, 100 and 450 hours of ageing to evaluate the effect of hot water ageing on the mechanical properties of these potential materials. The water uptake kinetic was found to follow Fickian diffusion kinetic for GE as well as GCE hybrid composite but the rate of diffusion was higher for GE composite over GCE composite. The water content was also higher in GE composite over GCE composite after 450 hours of ageing. Significant decrement in flexural strength was observed with the increase in ageing time. Presence of water in the composite also imparted significant embrittlement to the matrix as reflected in the decrease in strain at peak for both the composite systems.

  9. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  10. Space Radiation Effects on Graphite-Epoxy Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on engineering properties, dimensional stability, and chemistry on state of the art composite systems were characterized. T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite was subjected to 1.0 MeV electron radiation for a total dose of 1.0 x 10(10) rads at a rate of 5.0 x 10(7) rads/hour. This simulates a worst case exposure equivalent to 30 years in space. Mechanical testing was performed on he 4-ply unidirectional laminates over the temperature range of -250 F (116K) to +250 F (394K). A complete set of in-plane tensile elastic and strength properties were obtained (E sub 1, E sub 2, nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T, and S). In addition electron microscopy was used to study and analyze the fracture surfaces of all specimens tested. Results indicate that little difference in properties is noted at room temperature, but significant differences are observed at both low and elevated temperatures.

  11. Self-healing of low-velocity impact damage in glass fabric/epoxy composites using an epoxy-mercaptan healing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao Yuan, Yan; Ye, Yueping; Zhi Rong, Min; Chen, Haibin; Wu, Jingshen; Qiu Zhang, Ming; Qin, Shi Xiang; Yang, Gui Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Self-healing woven glass fabric-reinforced epoxy composite laminates were made by embedding epoxy- and mercaptan-loaded microcapsules. After being subjected to low-velocity impact, the laminates were able to heal the damage in an autonomic way at room temperature. The healing-induced reduction in the damaged areas was visualized using a scanning acoustic microscope. The rate of damage area reduction, which is closely related to the effect of crack rehabilitation and mechanical recovery, is a function of impact energy, content and size of the healing microcapsules. Minor damage, such as microcracks in the matrix, can be completely repaired by the healing system without manual intervention, including external pressure. Microcapsules with larger size and/or higher concentration are propitious for delivering more healing agent to cracked portions, while imposition of lateral pressure on damaged specimens forces the separated faces to approach each other. Both can improve the rate of damage area reduction in the case of severe damage.

  12. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  13. Composites of Graphene Nanoribbon Stacks and Epoxy for Joule Heating and Deicing of Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Varadhachary, Tanvi; Nan, Kewang; Wang, Tuo; Lin, Jian; Ji, Yongsung; Genorio, Bostjan; Zhu, Yu; Kittrell, Carter; Tour, James M

    2016-02-10

    A conductive composite of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) stacks and epoxy is fabricated. The epoxy is filled with the GNR stacks, which serve as a conductive additive. The GNR stacks are on average 30 nm thick, 250 nm wide, and 30 μm long. The GNR-filled epoxy composite exhibits a conductivity >100 S/m at 5 wt % GNR content. This permits application of the GNR-epoxy composite for deicing of surfaces through Joule (voltage-induced) heating generated by the voltage across the composite. A power density of 0.5 W/cm(2) was delivered to remove ∼1 cm-thick (14 g) monolith of ice from a static helicopter rotor blade surface in a -20 °C environment. PMID:26780972

  14. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorption capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.

  15. Fracture, failure and compression behaviour of a 3D interconnected carbon aerogel (Aerographite) epoxy composite

    DOE PAGES

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Liebig, W. V.; Mecklenberg, M.; Fiedler, B.; Smazna, D.; Adelung, R.; Schulte, K.

    2015-11-04

    Aerographite (AG) is a mechanically robust, lightweight synthetic cellular material, which consists of a 3D interconnected network of tubular carbon [1]. The presence of open channels in AG aids to infiltrate them with polymer matrices, thereby yielding an electrical conducting and lightweight composite. Aerographite produced with densities in the range of 7–15 mg/cm3 was infiltrated with a low viscous epoxy resin by means of vacuum infiltration technique. Detailed morphological and structural investigations on synthesized AG and AG/epoxy composite were performed by scanning electron microscopic techniques. Our present study investigates the fracture and failure of AG/epoxy composites and its energy absorptionmore » capacity under compression. The composites displayed an extended plateau region when uni-axially compressed, which led to an increase in energy absorption of ~133% per unit volume for 1.5 wt% of AG, when compared to pure epoxy. Preliminary results on fracture toughness showed an enhancement of ~19% in KIC for AG/epoxy composites with 0.45 wt% of AG. Furthermore, our observations of fractured surfaces under scanning electron microscope gives evidence of pull-out of arms of AG tetrapod, interface and inter-graphite failure as the dominating mechanism for the toughness improvement in these composites. These observations were consistent with the results obtained from photoelasticity experiments on a thin film AG/epoxy model composite.« less

  16. Failure of wooden sandwich beam reinforced with glass/epoxy faces

    SciTech Connect

    Papakaliatakis, G. E.; Zacharopoulos, D. A.

    2015-12-31

    The mechanical properties and the failure of wooden beam strengthened with two faces from glass/epoxy composite and a wooden beam without strengthening was studied. Stresses and deflections on both beams, which are imposed in three point bending loading. On the idealized geometry of the specimens with detailed nonlinear orthotropic analysis was performed with a finite elements program. The failure study of the wooden beams was performed, applying the criterion of Tsai-Hill. The shear strength of the adhesive was taken into account. All the specimens were tested with three point bending loading and the experimental results were compared to those of the theoretical approach with the finite elements analysis. Comparing the results, the advantage of strengthened wooden beam against the simple wooden beam becomes obvious. Theoretical predictions were in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Failure of wooden sandwich beam reinforced with glass/epoxy faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakaliatakis, G. E.; Zacharopoulos, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties and the failure of wooden beam strengthened with two faces from glass/epoxy composite and a wooden beam without strengthening was studied. Stresses and deflections on both beams, which are imposed in three point bending loading. On the idealized geometry of the specimens with detailed nonlinear orthotropic analysis was performed with a finite elements program. The failure study of the wooden beams was performed, applying the criterion of Tsai-Hill. The shear strength of the adhesive was taken into account. All the specimens were tested with three point bending loading and the experimental results were compared to those of the theoretical approach with the finite elements analysis. Comparing the results, the advantage of strengthened wooden beam against the simple wooden beam becomes obvious. Theoretical predictions were in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Fracture and fatigue in a 3-D woven carbon fiber/epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Wigent, D.E.; Mohamed, M.H.; Fahmy, A.A.

    1996-12-31

    To further understand fracture and fatigue in 3-D textile composites, plates of carbon fiber/epoxy composite were consolidated using 3-D woven preforms woven at the Mars Mission Research Center. Subsequent compact tension specimens were prepared and tested by methods based in part on ASTM test method E 647-78T. Stress intensities required to propagate a crack were determined with crack planes at 0, 90, and 45 degrees with respect to the production direction. Failure modes were related to 3-D preform structure and orientation. Fatigue testing was conducted at incremental stress intensity levels. Sequential radiographs were made in conjunction with compliance measurements on both fatigue and static specimens to monitor progressive damage. Results show that the stress intensity, K, required to propagate under static load ranged from 19.8MPa m{sup .5} to 29MPa m{sup .5} and a fatigue threshold yielding lifetimes above 10{sup 7} cycles was observed at roughly 65% of the static stress intensities. The failure modes observed in the 3-D woven composites were significantly different from those common in laminated structures. Fatigue did not result in fiber failure or delamination. High toughness, lack of delamination, and resistance to edge induced failures implies that the 3-D reinforcement yields advantages in durability, machinability, repair, and safety over laminated structures.

  19. Morphological characterization of carbon-nanofiber-reinforced epoxy nanocomposites using ultra-small angle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, R.S.; Anderson, D.P.; Brown, J.M.; Arlen, M.J.; Colleary, A.J.; Lafdi, K.; Schaefer, D.W.

    2010-07-01

    Studies of the properties of nanocomposites reinforced with vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs) can be found throughout the literature. Electrical, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties are just a few of the characteristics that have been well discussed. Although these properties depend on morphology, morphological characterization is rare. Due to its 2-dimensional nature, microscopy is of limited value when analyzing network morphologies. This work will show how the characterization of the three-dimensional geometry and network formation of VGCFs can be determined using ultra-small angle scattering techniques. Ultra-small angle x-ray and neutron scattering (USAXS and USANS) were used to characterize the morphology of carbon nanofibers suspended in epoxy. Using a simplified tube model, we estimate the dimensions of suspended fibers. The assumption of tubular fibers accounts for the increased surface area observed with USAXS that is not accounted for using a solid rod model. Furthermore, USANS was used to search for a structural signature associated with the electrical percolation threshold. USANS extends to longer dimensional scales than USAXS, which measures a smaller range of momentum transfer. To determine the electrical percolation threshold, AC impedance spectroscopy was employed to verify that an electrically conductive, percolated network forms at VGCNF loadings of 0.8% < CNF wt% < 1.2%. These values correlate with the USANS data, where a morphological transition is seen at {approx}1.2% loading.

  20. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  1. Adhesion at the interface in cured graphite fiber epoxy-amine resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Howard L.; Alger, Kenneth W.; Okamoto, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The effect of high temperature curing on the interface between unsized or epoxy-sized graphite fiber tow and epoxy-amine resin was examined by scanning electron microscopy of compression and freeze fractured specimens. Little or no adhesion was found between the unsized graphite fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin on curing at 165 C for 17 hrs. Epoxy-sized graphite fibers showed a similar lack of adhesion between the fiber tows and the epoxy-amine resin at 3 and 17 hr cures, although good penetration of the resin into the sized fiber tows had occurred. Interfacial bond strengths for the composites could not be effectively measured by compression fracture of specimens.

  2. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  3. Dynamic mechanical analysis of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were determined for unidirectional epoxy/glass composites at various fiber orientation angles. Resonant frequency and relative logarithmic decrement were measured as functions of temperature. In low angle and longitudinal specimens a transition was observed above the resin glass transition temperature which was manifested mechanically as an additional damping peak and thermally as a change in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The new transition was attributed to a heterogeneous resin matrix induced by the fiber. The temperature span of the glass-rubber relaxation was found to broaden with decreasing orientation angle, reflecting the growth of fiber contribution and exhibiting behavior similar to that of Young's modulus. The change in resonant frequency through the glass transition was greatest for samples of intermediate fiber angle, demonstrating behavior similar to that of the longitudinal shear modulus.

  4. Evaluation of Nanomaterial Approaches to Damping in Epoxy Resin and Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Structures by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, G.; Heimann, Paula J.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Johnston, J. Chris; Roberts, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration mitigation in composite structures has been demonstrated through widely varying methods which include both active and passive damping. Recently, nanomaterials have been investigated as a viable approach to composite vibration damping due to the large surface available to generate energy dissipation through friction. This work evaluates the influence of dispersed nanoparticles on the damping ratio of an epoxy matrix. Limited benefit was observed through dispersion methods, however nanoparticle application as a coating resulting in up to a three-fold increase in damping.

  5. Mechanical reinforcement of epoxy with self-assembled synthetic clay in smectic order.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; White, Kevin L; Lin, Chien-Hong; Kim, Daehak; Muliana, Anastasia; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Nishimura, Riichi; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2014-07-01

    Epoxy films containing self-assembled 2D colloidal α-zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets (ZrP) in smectic order were prepared using a simple, energy-efficient fabrication process suitable to industrial processing. The ZrP nanoplatelets form a chiral smectic mesophase with simultaneous lamellar order and helical arrangements in epoxy. The epoxy nanocomposite films are transparent and flexible and exhibit exceptionally high tensile modulus and strength. The findings have broad implications for development of multifunctional materials for engineering applications.

  6. Measuring Moisture Levels in Graphite Epoxy Composite Sandwich Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark; Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Graphite epoxy composite (GEC) materials are used in the construction of rocket fairings, nose cones, interstage adapters, and heat shields due to their high strength and light weight. However, they absorb moisture depending on the environmental conditions they are exposed to prior to launch. Too much moisture absorption can become a problem when temperature and pressure changes experienced during launch cause the water to vaporize. The rapid state change of the water can result in structural failure of the material. In addition, heat and moisture combine to weaken GEC structures. Diffusion models that predict the total accumulated moisture content based on the environmental conditions are one accepted method of determining if the material strength has been reduced to an unacceptable level. However, there currently doesn t exist any field measurement technique to estimate the actual moisture content of a composite structure. A multi-layer diffusion model was constructed with Mathematica to predict moisture absorption and desorption from the GEC sandwich structure. This model is used in conjunction with relative humidity/temperature sensors both on the inside and outside of the material to determine the moisture levels in the structure. Because the core materials have much higher diffusivity than the face sheets, a single relative humidity measurement will accurately reflect the moisture levels in the core. When combined with an external relative humidity measurement, the model can be used to determine the moisture levels in the face sheets. Since diffusion is temperaturedependent, the temperature measurements are used to determine the diffusivity of the face sheets for the model computations.

  7. Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

    1969-01-01

    Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

  8. Elastic properties of woven fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramnath, V.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model for the realistic representation of a woven fabric reinforced composite is presented in this paper. The approach uses a variable cross-section geometric model in order to achieve geometric compatibility at the yarn cross-over regions. Admissible displacement and stress fields are used to determine bounds on the fabric elastic properties. The approach adopted enables the determination of the complete three-dimensional woven fabric composite properties. The in-plane fabric properties obtained through this approach have been compared with results obtained from other approaches existing in the literature. Also, comparisons made with available experimental data indicate good agreement.

  9. Influence of the Geometric Parameters on the Mechanical Behaviour of Fabric Reinforced Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, Andrei; Taranu, Nicolae; Bejan, Liliana

    2016-05-01

    A polymer fabric reinforced composite is a high performance material, which combines strength of the fibres with the flexibility and ductility of the matrix. For a better drapeability, the tows of fibres are interleaved, resulting the woven fabric, used as reinforcement. The complex geometric shape of the fabric is of paramount importance in establishing the deformability of the textile reinforced composite laminates. In this paper, an approach based on Classical Lamination Theory (CLT), combined with Finite Element Methods (FEM), using Failure Analysis and Internal Load Redistribution, is utilised, in order to compare the behaviour of the material under specific loads. The main goal is to analyse the deformability of certain types of textile reinforced composite laminates, using carbon fibre satin as reinforcement and epoxy resin as matrix. This is accomplished by studying the variation of the in-plane strains, given the fluctuation of several geometric parameters, namely the width of the reinforcing tow, the gap between two consecutive tows, the angle of laminae in a multi-layered configuration and the tows fibre volume fraction.

  10. Influence of the Geometric Parameters on the Mechanical Behaviour of Fabric Reinforced Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, Andrei; Taranu, Nicolae; Bejan, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    A polymer fabric reinforced composite is a high performance material, which combines strength of the fibres with the flexibility and ductility of the matrix. For a better drapeability, the tows of fibres are interleaved, resulting the woven fabric, used as reinforcement. The complex geometric shape of the fabric is of paramount importance in establishing the deformability of the textile reinforced composite laminates. In this paper, an approach based on Classical Lamination Theory ( CLT), combined with Finite Element Methods ( FEM), using Failure Analysis and Internal Load Redistribution, is utilised, in order to compare the behaviour of the material under specific loads. The main goal is to analyse the deformability of certain types of textile reinforced composite laminates, using carbon fibre satin as reinforcement and epoxy resin as matrix. This is accomplished by studying the variation of the in-plane strains, given the fluctuation of several geometric parameters, namely the width of the reinforcing tow, the gap between two consecutive tows, the angle of laminae in a multi-layered configuration and the tows fibre volume fraction.

  11. Compressive strength of fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Results of an experimental and analytical investigation of the compressive strength of unidirectional boron-epoxy composite material are presented. Observation of fiber coordinates in a boron-epoxy composite indicates that the fibers contain initial curvature. Combined axial compression and torsion tests were conducted on boron-epoxy tubes and it was shown that the shear modulus is a function of axial compressive stress. An analytical model which includes initial curvature in the fibers and permits an estimate of the effect of curvature on compressive strength is proposed. Two modes of failure which may result from the application of axial compressive stress are analyzed - delamination and shear instability. Based on tests and analysis, failure of boron-epoxy under axial compressive load is due to shear instability.

  12. Evaluation of adhesives for adhering carbon/epoxy composites to various metallic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bonk, R.B.; Osterndorf, J.F.; Ambrosio, A.M.; Pettenger, B.L.

    1996-12-31

    The strength properties of composite matrix resins and adhesive are dependent on time, temperature, environment, and stress factors. All of these conditions combine to influence the properties of adhesives and composites in ways that are not yet fully known or quantifiable. Therefore, it is important to know the service conditions that structural adhesive bonded composite joints will encounter prior to fielding. This paper details an evaluation of five epoxy adhesives used to adhere a carbon/epoxy composite to 7075-T6 aluminum, 4340 steel and aluminum coated steel. Test results indicate that certain paste adhesives are capable of better lap-shear and peel performance than film adhesives, especially at elevated temperatures.

  13. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  14. Machining characteristics of graphite/epoxy composite. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    The first part of this study dealt with tool wear of Carbide and Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) inserts for machining Graphite/Epoxy (Gr/Ep) composite materials. Two different cutting modes, continuous and interrupted, were applied for carbide inserts under dry cutting conditions. In the interrupted cutting mode, a wave form of flank wear was observed with one third peak-to-peak value of one-ply thickness. In the continuous cutting mode, severe nose wear and rounding of cutting edge wear was observed due to the high temperature around the nose region, which accumulated heat on the cutting edge. Heat generation was found to influence the carbide life both under continuous cutting and interrupted cutting modes. The flank wear of PCD inserts was below 100 mu m for 60 minutes of cutting time, whereas that of carbide inserts exceeded 300 mu m within 5 seconds of cutting time. Therefore, it was found that PCD inserts have excellent tool life when compared to carbide inserts. Based on these experiments, flank wear models were constructed to predict tool life for given cutting conditions. The second part of this study dealt with orthogonal cutting characteristics of machining unidirectional and laminate Gr/Ep and unidirectional model Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composites. Chip formation, cutting force, and surface morphology were considered as cutting characteristics. Powder-like chips for Gr/Ep composites and ribbon-like chips in small depths of cut for CFRP composites were observed. Chip formation was found to be dependent on fiber orientation. Four common fiber orientations, 0 deg, 45 deg, 90 deg, and {minus}45 deg, had different cutting mechanisms of chip formation. Bending, peel fast fracture, and fracture perpendicular to the fiber direction were the general cutting mechanisms for the 0 deg fiber orientations when machining unidirectional and laminate composites.

  15. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    SciTech Connect

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  16. Fracture behavior of thick, laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the fracture behavior of laminated graphite epoxy (T300/5208) composites was studied. The predominantly experimental research program included the study of the 0/+ or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates with thickness of 8, 32, 64, 96 and 120 plies and the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate with thickness of 6, 30, 60, 90 and 120 plies. The research concentrated on the measurement of fracture toughness utilizing the center-cracked tension, compact tension and three point bend specimen configurations. The development of subcritical damage at the crack tip was studied nondestructively using enhanced X-ray radiography and destructively using the laminate deply technique. The test results showed fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness. The fracture toughness of the 0 + or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates decreased with increasing thickness and asymptotically approached lower bound values of 30 ksi square root of in. (1043 MPa square root of mm and 25 ksi square root of in (869 MPa square root of mm respectively. In contrast to the other two laminates, the fracture toughness of the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate increased sharply with increasing thickness but reached an upper plateau value of 40 ksi square root of in (1390 MPa square root of mm) at 30 plies. Fracture toughness was independent of crack size for both thin and thick laminates for all three laminate types except for the 0/90 sub 2s laminate which spilt extensively. The center cracked tension, three point bend and compact tension specimens gave comparable results.

  17. Evaluation of upper use temperature of toughened epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowsky, J.L.; Wong, D.G.; DiBerardino, M.F.; Cochran, R.C.

    1994-09-01

    Traditionally, the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), as determined by thermal analysis, has been used to calculate the material use threshold. The main drawback to the use of T{sub g} as a measure of upper use temperatures is that it results in use temperatures that are significantly higher than the use temperatures developed through mechanical testing. This study compared operating limits obtained from mechanical tests to glass transition temperatures obtained by several methods of thermal analysis. A toughened epoxy composite, IM7/977-3 from ICI Fiberite, was tested in this study, along with the corresponding neat resin. The mechanical tests performed were interlaminar shear, resin compression, and material operating limit (MOL) testing (a modified open-hole compression test). Specimens were tested over a range of temperatures to determine the upper use temperature. Thermal analysis testing included differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal mechanical analysis (TMA). Two types of dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS) tests were performed: dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Rheometrics dynamic analysis (RDA). The effects of moisture, heating rates, and test frequency on the measured T{sub g} were examined. The DMS tests were found to give more reproducible results than either the DSC or TMA. Higher heating rates and test frequencies resulted in higher measured T{sub g}`s. Shift factors were developed to allow comparison between data obtained at various heating rates and tests frequencies. Results from the mechanical testing corresponded more closely to the storage modulus measurements of the DMS tests than the values obtained from the tan delta curves.

  18. Effects of EB irradiation on stress-strain curves for carbon fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, K.; Mizutani, A.; Uchida, N.; Tanaka, K.; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2004-02-01

    In order to evaluate influence of electron beam (EB) irradiation on elasticity and stress- strain curve of composite materials reinforced by carbon fiber (CF), carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced graphite (C/C) were treated by EB irradiation of 0.3 MGy. Since the EB strengthening was mainly dominated by the ductility enhancements of carbon fiber and matrix of epoxy resin, EB irradiation enlarged fracture stress and enhanced fracture strain of CFRP. Furthermore, EB irradiation slightly enhanced bending elasticity of CFRP and largely enhanced the initial spring constant related to elasticity of C/C coil. Although the elasticity enhancement of carbon fibers did not largely contribute that of CFRP, that of treated graphite matrix in C/C mainly caused the C/C coil elasticity enhancement by EB irradiation. Such a new treatment is a dream-worthy technology for structural materials to be applied in the fields of future engineering.

  19. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-09-21

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas.

  20. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas. PMID:27650254

  1. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas. PMID:27650254

  2. A novel method based on selective laser sintering for preparing high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy ternary composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wei; Yan, Chunze; Shi, Yunsong; Wen, Shifeng; Liu, Jie; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2016-09-01

    A novel method based on selective laser sintering (SLS) process is proposed for the first time to prepare complex and high-performance carbon fibres/polyamide12/epoxy (CF/PA12/EP) ternary composites. The procedures are briefly described as follows: prepare polyamide12 (PA12) coated carbon fibre (CF) composite powder; build porous green parts by SLS; infiltrate the green parts with high-performance thermosetting epoxy (EP) resin; and finally cure the resin at high temperature. The obtained composites are a ternary composite system consisting of the matrix of novolac EP resin, the reinforcement of CFs and the transition thin layer of PA12 with a thickness of 595 nm. The SEM images and micro-CT analysis prove that the ternary system is a three-dimensional co-continuous structure and the reinforcement of CFs are well dispersed in the matrix of EP with the volume fraction of 31%. Mechanical tests show that the composites fabricated by this method yield an ultimate tensile strength of 101.03 MPa and a flexural strength of 153.43 MPa, which are higher than those of most of the previously reported SLS materials. Therefore, the process proposed in this paper shows great potential for manufacturing complex, lightweight and high-performance CF reinforced composite components in aerospace, automotive industries and other areas.

  3. Comparative study of nanomaterials for interlaminar reinforcement of fiber-composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Karen Rachel; Duenas, Terrisa; Dzenis, Yuris; Kaser, Jase; Bakis, Charles E.; Roberts, J. Keith; Carter, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites offer benefits of reduced weight and increased specific strength; however, these materials can have relatively weak interlaminar toughness. The first modes of composite material failure often remain undetected, since failure is not always visually apparent on the surface of composite materials. In this study, several nano-sized materials and integration approaches are investigated as nanoreinforcement for composite materials. Performance is characterized by the ability of each nanoreinforced composite type to improve Mode I interlaminar toughness. The nanomaterials include 1) commercially available surface-modified silica nanoparticles and 2) continuous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers. Test articles are manufactured using hand-layup vacuum bagging and feature either reinforced unidirectional carbon fiber or woven carbon fiber material and one of two investigated epoxy-based resin systems. The nanosilica particles were integrated into the fiber composite structure by mixing with the resin system prior to layup. The PAN nanofibers were produced by an electrospinning process; these fibers were integrated by either collecting the fibers of various areal densities as respective "nanomats" on an interim substrate for subsequent transfer during layup, or directly electrospun onto dry carbon fiber ply surfaces. Test articles were characterized according to ASTM D5528 for finding Mode I strain energy release rates. Results were compared to baseline coupons to determine fracture toughness performance. Results showed that the nanosilica-reinforced coupons increased an average of 35% and 25% in strain energy release rates for the coupons featuring unidirectional fibers and woven fibers, respectively, as compared to the corresponding baseline, whereas the nanomat-reinforced and directly deposited nanofiber-reinforced composites decreased. Low strain energy release rates for the PAN nanofiber-reinforced coupons is attributed

  4. Composite structural materials. [fiber reinforced composites for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberly, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Physical properties of fiber reinforced composites; structural concepts and analysis; manufacturing; reliability; and life prediction are subjects of research conducted to determine the long term integrity of composite aircraft structures under conditions pertinent to service use. Progress is reported in (1) characterizing homogeneity in composite materials; (2) developing methods for analyzing composite materials; (3) studying fatigue in composite materials; (4) determining the temperature and moisture effects on the mechanical properties of laminates; (5) numerically analyzing moisture effects; (6) numerically analyzing the micromechanics of composite fracture; (7) constructing the 727 elevator attachment rib; (8) developing the L-1011 engine drag strut (CAPCOMP 2 program); (9) analyzing mechanical joints in composites; (10) developing computer software; and (11) processing science and technology, with emphasis on the sailplane project.

  5. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  6. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 1 summary report: Shear web design development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept was developed for the Space Shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The boron-epoxy laminate contributes to the strength and stiffness efficiency of the basic web section. The titanium-cladding functions to protect the polymeric laminate parts from damaging environments and is chem-milled to provide reinforcement in selected areas. Detailed design drawings are presented for both boron/epoxy reinforced and all-metal shear webs. The weight saving offered is 24% relative to all-metal construction at an attractive cost per pound of weight saved, based on the detailed designs. Small scale element tests substantiate the boron/epoxy reinforced design details in critical areas. The results show that the titanium-cladding reliably reinforces the web laminate in critical edge load transfer and stiffener fastener hole areas.

  7. Design development of an advanced composite aileron. [graphite-epoxy structure for L-1011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes the design development of an advanced composite inboard aileron for the L-1011 commercial transport aircraft. Design details of the composite aileron are reported. Results of tests which substantiate the structural integrity of the design are also presented. The composite aileron is a multi-rib assembly with graphite/epoxy tape-syntactic core sandwich covers, a graphite/epoxy tape front spar, and graphite/epoxy fabric ribs. This structure is a direct replacement for the current metal aileron with a weight savings of 28.7 percent (40.3 lb.). Engineering cost estimates indicate that the composite structure will be cost competitive with the metal structure it is replacing.

  8. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers.

  9. Effect of stress on ultrasonic pulses in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, J. H.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustical-ultrasonic technique was used to demonstrate relationships existing between changes in attenuation of stress waves and tensile stress on an eight ply 0 degree graphite-epoxy fiber reinforced composite. All tests were conducted in the linear range of the material for which no mechanical or macroscopic damage was evident. Changes in attenuation were measured as a function of tensile stress in the frequency domain and in the time domain. Stress wave propagation in these specimens was dispersive, i.e., the wave speed depends on frequency. Wave speeds varied from 267,400 cm/sec to 680,000 cm/sec as the frequency of the signal was varied from 150 kHz to 1.9 MHz which strongly suggests that flexural/lamb wave modes of propagation exist. The magnitude of the attenuation changes depended strongly on tensile stress. It was further observed that the wave speeds increased slightly for all tested frequencies as the stress was increased.

  10. Advanced Multifunctional Properties of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Composites from Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thang; Liu, Peng; Fan, Zeng; Ngern, Nigel; Duong, Hai

    2015-03-01

    Unlike previous methods of making carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films, aligned CNT thin films in this work are synthesized directly from CNT aerogels in a CVD process. CH4/H2/He gases and ferrocene/thiophene catalysts are mixed and reacted in the reactor at 1200 °C to form CNT aerogel socks. By pulling out the socks with a metal rod, CNT thin films with 15-nm diameter MWNTs are aligned and produced continuously at a speed of a few meters per minute. The number of the aligned CNT thin film layers/ thickness can also be controlled well. The as-synthesized aligned CNT films are further condensed by acetone spray and post-treated by UV light. The aligned CNT films without any above post-treatment have a high electrical conductivity of 400S/cm. We also develop aligned CNT-epoxy composites by infiltrating epoxy into the above aligned CNT thin films using Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) method. Our cost-effective fabrication method of the aligned CNT films is more advanced for developing the composites having CNT orientation control. The mechanical, electrical and optical properties of the aligned CNT epoxy composites are measured. About 2% of the aligned CNTs can enhance significantly the electrical conductivity and hardness of aligned CNT-epoxy composite films. Effects of morphologies, volume fraction, and alignment of the CNTs on the advanced multifunctional properties of the aligned CNT-epoxy composites are also quantified.

  11. Biomechanical properties of an advanced new carbon/flax/epoxy composite material for bone plate applications.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad; Bougherara, Habiba

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of an ongoing program to develop a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite material for use as an orthopaedic long bone fracture plate, instead of a metal plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of this new novel composite material. The composite material had a "sandwich structure", in which two thin sheets of CF/epoxy were attached to each outer surface of the flax/epoxy core, which resulted in a unique structure compared to other composite plates for bone plate applications. Mechanical properties were determined using tension, three-point bending, and Rockwell hardness tests. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the failure mechanism of specimens in tension and three-point bending tests. The results of mechanical tests revealed a considerably high ultimate strength in both tension (399.8MPa) and flexural loading (510.6MPa), with a higher elastic modulus in bending tests (57.4GPa) compared to tension tests (41.7GPa). The composite material experienced brittle catastrophic failure in both tension and bending tests. The SEM images, consistent with brittle failure, showed mostly fiber breakage and fiber pull-out at the fractured surfaces with perfect bonding at carbon fibers and flax plies. Compared to clinically-used orthopaedic metal plates, current CF/flax/epoxy results were closer to human cortical bone, making the material a potential candidate for use in long bone fracture fixation. PMID:23499250

  12. Biomechanical properties of an advanced new carbon/flax/epoxy composite material for bone plate applications.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; El Sawi, Ihab; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad; Bougherara, Habiba

    2013-04-01

    This work is part of an ongoing program to develop a new carbon fiber/flax/epoxy (CF/flax/epoxy) hybrid composite material for use as an orthopaedic long bone fracture plate, instead of a metal plate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of this new novel composite material. The composite material had a "sandwich structure", in which two thin sheets of CF/epoxy were attached to each outer surface of the flax/epoxy core, which resulted in a unique structure compared to other composite plates for bone plate applications. Mechanical properties were determined using tension, three-point bending, and Rockwell hardness tests. Also, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the failure mechanism of specimens in tension and three-point bending tests. The results of mechanical tests revealed a considerably high ultimate strength in both tension (399.8MPa) and flexural loading (510.6MPa), with a higher elastic modulus in bending tests (57.4GPa) compared to tension tests (41.7GPa). The composite material experienced brittle catastrophic failure in both tension and bending tests. The SEM images, consistent with brittle failure, showed mostly fiber breakage and fiber pull-out at the fractured surfaces with perfect bonding at carbon fibers and flax plies. Compared to clinically-used orthopaedic metal plates, current CF/flax/epoxy results were closer to human cortical bone, making the material a potential candidate for use in long bone fracture fixation.

  13. Starch composites reinforced by bamboo cellulosic crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dagang; Zhong, Tuhua; Chang, Peter R; Li, Kaifu; Wu, Qinglin

    2010-04-01

    Using a method of combined HNO(3)-KClO(3) treatment and sulfuric acid hydrolysis, bamboo cellulose crystals (BCCs) were prepared and used to reinforce glycerol plasticized starch. The structure and morphology of BCCs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and solid-state (13)C NMR. Results showed that BCCs were of typical cellulose I structure, and the morphology was dependent on its concentration in the suspension. BCC of 50-100 nm were assembled into leaf nervations at low concentration (i.e. 0.1 wt.% of solids), but congregated into a micro-sized "flower" geometry at high concentration (i.e. 10.0 wt.% of solids). Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the starch/BCC composite films (SBC) were enhanced by the incorporation of the crystals due to reinforcement of BCCs and reduction of water uptake. BCCs at the optimal 8% loading level exhibited a higher reinforcing efficiency for plasticized starch plastic than any other loading level.

  14. Graphite/epoxy composite adapters for the Space Shuttle/Centaur vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, Harold J.; Ring, Darryl S.

    1990-01-01

    The decision to launch various NASA satellite and Air Force spacecraft from the Space Shuttle created the need for a high-energy upper stage capable of being deployed from the cargo bay. Two redesigned versions of the Centaur vehicle which employed a graphite/epoxy composite material for the forward and aft adapters were selected. Since this was the first time a graphite/epoxy material was used for Centaur major structural components, the development of the adapters was a major effort. An overview of the composite adapter designs, subcomponent design evaluation test results, and composite adapter test results from a full-scale vehicle structural test is presented.

  15. Hybrid S2/Carbon Epoxy Composite Armours Under Blast Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolce, F.; Meo, Michele; Wright, A.; French, M.; Bernabei, M.

    2012-06-01

    Civil and military structures, such as helicopters, aircrafts, naval ships, tanks or buildings are susceptible to blast loads as terroristic attacks increases, therefore there is the need to design blast resistant structures. During an explosion the peak pressure produced by shock wave is much greater than the static collapse pressure. Metallic structures usually undergo large plastic deformations absorbing blast energy before reaching equilibrium. Due to their high specific properties, fibre-reinforced polymers are being considered for energy absorption applications in blast resistant armours. A deep insight into the relationship between explosion loads, composite architecture and deformation/fracture behaviour will offer the possibility to design structures with significantly enhanced energy absorption and blast resistance performance. This study presents the results of a numerical investigation aimed at understanding the performance of a hybrid composite (glass/carbon fibre) plate subjected to blast loads using commercial LS-DYNA software. In particular, the paper deals with numerical 3D simulations of damages caused by air blast waves generated by C4 charges on two fully clamped rectangular plates made of steel and hybrid (S2/Carbon) composite, respectively. A Multi Materials Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (MMALE) formulation was used to simulate the shock phenomenon. For the steel plates, the Johnson-Cook material model was employed. For the composite plates both in-plane and out-of-plane failure criteria were employed. In particular, a contact tiebreak formulation with a mixed mode failure criteria was employed to simulate delamination failure. As for the steel plates the results showed that excellent correlation with the experimental data for the two blast load conditions in terms of dynamic and residual deflection for two different C4 charges. For the composite plates the numerical results showed that, as expected, a wider delamination damage was observed

  16. Epoxy + liquid crystalline epoxy coreacted network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punchaipetch, Prakaipetch

    2000-10-01

    Molecular reinforcement through in-situ polymerization of liquid crystalline epoxies (LCEs) and a non-liquid crystalline epoxy has been investigated. Three LCEs: diglycidyl ether of 4,4'-dihydroxybiphenol (DGE-DHBP) and digylcidyl ether of 4-hydroxyphenyl-4″-hydroxybiphenyl-4 '-carboxylate (DGE-HHC), were synthesized and blended with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBP-F) and subsequently cured with anhydride and amine curing agents. Curing kinetics were determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Parameters for autocatalytic curing kinetics of both pure monomers and blended systems were determined. The extent of cure for both monomers was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The glass transitions were evaluated as a function of composition using DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The results show that the LC constituent affects the curing kinetics of the epoxy resin and that the systems are highly miscible. The effects of molecular reinforcement of DGEBP-F by DGE-DHBP and DGE-HHC were investigated. The concentration of the liquid crystalline moiety affects mechanical properties. Tensile, impact and fracture toughness tests results are evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces shows changes in failure mechanisms compared to the pure components. Results indicate that mechanical properties of the blended samples are improved already at low concentration by weight of the LCE added into epoxy resin. The improvement in mechanical properties was found to occur irrespective of the absence of liquid crystallinity in the blended networks. The mechanism of crack study indicates that crack deflection and crack bridging are the mechanisms in case of LC epoxy. In case of LC modified epoxy, the crack deflection is the main mechanism. Moreover, the effect of coreacting an epoxy with a reactive monomer liquid crystalline epoxy as a matrix for glass fiber composites was investigated. Mechanical

  17. Fretting maps of glass fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Turki, C.; Salvia, M.; Vincent, L.

    1993-12-31

    Industrial development of new materials are often limited due to an insufficient knowledge in their functional properties. The paper deals with fretting behavior of glass fiber reinforced epoxy/metal contacts. Fretting is a plague for all industries, especially in the case of quasi-static loadings. Furthermore friction testing under small displacements appeared well fitted to understand the effect of fiber orientations and to relate results to microstructure (fiber, matrix and interface).

  18. Creep-rupture of polymer-matrix composites. [graphite-epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Morris, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    An accelerated characterization method for resin matrix composites is reviewed. Methods for determining modulus and strength master curves are given. Creep rupture analytical models are discussed as applied to polymers and polymer matrix composites. Comparisons between creep rupture experiments and analytical models are presented. The time dependent creep rupture process in graphite epoxy laminates is examined as a function of temperature and stress level.

  19. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  20. Kinetics of Formation of Molecular Weight Distribution of Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, Lyudmila A.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.

    Curing of epoxy matrix prepreg in free space environment is a complex problem. A simulation of the chemical reaction, evaporation and radiation effects in the matrix is a way to understand and predict the curing process. We have developed a mathematical apparatus of the epoxy resin kinetics in term of molecular weight distribution (MWD), which includes the polymerization mechanism of bifunctional epoxy and sixfunctional triethylenetetraamine (TETA) molecules. The mathematical model for a number of molecules with the mass m at time t is based on the following equation $ beta(t,m)=m_{am} / m sum(6}_{i=0) alpha(am) _i (t,m)+ m_{ep} / m sum(2}_{i=0) alpha(ep) _i (t,m), where m_{am} and m_{ep} are the masses of one amine block and one epoxy block, respectively; alpha^{am}_i (t,m) is the MWD near the TETA blocks with the chemical bonds i at time t for the mass values m>0; alpha_i^{ep}(t,m) is the MWD parameters of the epoxy blocks with chemical bonds i at time t for the mass values m>0. For the distribution densities alpha^{am}_i (t,m) and alpha_i^{ep}(t,m), we propose the differential system of equations, which has been solved by applying boundary conditions which are based on the results of chromatography and infrared spectroscopy measurements of the epoxy matrix having different concentration of the hardener. For the initial MWD we accept a Gaussian distribution with parameters alpha^{am}_0 (t,m_1) =146 amu, alpha_0^{ep}(t,m_1) =340 amu and alpha_1^{ep}(t,m_1) =624 amu. Dispersion of the molecular weight for the initial distribution equals to 25 amu. A portion of TETA molecules in the fraction was 25%, and the portion of epoxy molecules with i=0 and i=1 was 67.5% and 7.5%$, respectively. Solutions were obtained at mass step equals to 5 amu and at time step equals to 0.25 min over the interval from 0 to 500 min. The model gives a full kinetic of MWD during the curing reaction. The study is supported by the RFBR (grants N 12-08-00970-a and N 14-08-96011-r-ural-a).

  1. A biomimetic approach to enhancing interfacial interactions: polydopamine-coated clay as reinforcement for epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liping; Phua, Si Lei; Teo, Jun Kai Herman; Toh, Cher Ling; Lau, Soo Khim; Ma, Jan; Lu, Xuehong

    2011-08-01

    A facile biomimetic method was developed to enhance the interfacial interaction in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites. By mimicking mussel adhesive proteins, a monolayer of polydopamine was constructed on clay surface by a controllable coating method. The modified clay (D-clay) was incorporated into an epoxy resin, it is found that the strong interfacial interactions brought by the polydopamine benefits not only the dispersion of the D-clay in the epoxy but also the effective interfacial stress transfer, leading to greatly improved thermomechanical properties at very low inorganic loadings. Rheological and infrared spectroscopic studies show that the interfacial interactions between the D-clay and epoxy are dominated by the hydrogen bonds between the catechol-enriched polydopamine and the epoxy. PMID:21728371

  2. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  3. Interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Khondaker S.; Keng, Ang K.

    2013-09-01

    A shear-lag model is proposed to obtain interface characteristics of nanorope reinforced polymer composites using representative volume element (RVE) concept. In the axisymmetric RVE, the nanorope is modelled as a closed-packed cylindrical lattice consisting seven single-walled carbon nanotubes. In the model, rope is considered to be perfectly bonded with the polymer resin where the nanotubes are assumed to be chemically non-bonded with each other in the rope system. Since, nanotubes are considered to be non-bonded in the nanorope there must exist a van der Waals interaction in terms of Lennard-Jones potential. A separate model is also proposed to determine the cohesive stress caused by this interaction. Closed form analytical solutions are derived for stress components of rope, resin and individual carbon nanotubes in the rope system. Parametric study has also been conducted to investigate the influences of key composite factors involved at both perfectly bonded and non-bonded interfaces.

  4. Fibre reinforced composites in aircraft construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutis, C.

    2005-02-01

    Fibrous composites have found applications in aircraft from the first flight of the Wright Brothers’ Flyer 1, in North Carolina on December 17, 1903, to the plethora of uses now enjoyed by them on both military and civil aircrafts, in addition to more exotic applications on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), space launchers and satellites. Their growing use has risen from their high specific strength and stiffness, when compared to the more conventional materials, and the ability to shape and tailor their structure to produce more aerodynamically efficient structural configurations. In this paper, a review of recent advances using composites in modern aircraft construction is presented and it is argued that fibre reinforced polymers, especially carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) can and will in the future contribute more than 50% of the structural mass of an aircraft. However, affordability is the key to survival in aerospace manufacturing, whether civil or military, and therefore effort should be devoted to analysis and computational simulation of the manufacturing and assembly process as well as the simulation of the performance of the structure, since they are intimately connected.

  5. Processing and evaluation of smart composite reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Fitzgerald, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Douglas O.

    1997-11-01

    The issues of processing and evaluation of pultruded smart composite reinforcements with embedded fiber optic sensors are discussed. The required modification of the pultrusion processing technology to allow for the incorporation of fiber optic sensors is developed. In order to fully evaluate the loads imposed on the Fabry Perot fiber optic sensors during the pultrusion process, the strain sensors were subjected to the separate variables of the total process. The following data was obtained for the carbon fiber rods. Compaction pressure alone caused negligible residual strain. The temperature profile caused a similar strain profile over the length of the pultrusion die. For the total pultrusion process, the residual strain after cooling appeared to present somewhat of a problem. For several experiments, the residual strain after exiting the pultrusion die was in the range of plus 200 to 400 microstrain, after which the sensors ceased to function. Calculations indicated that the radial shrinkage of the carbon fiber rods may have been sufficient to cause failure of the Fabry Perot sensors. A special procedure of reinforcing sensors prior to embedding them into the composite was successful in allowing the sensors to survive with only a slightly negative residual strain.

  6. Thermal Properties of epoxy composites with silicon carbide and/or graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun; Bae, Jong-Seong; Yeum, Jeong Hyun; Oh, Weontae

    2016-02-01

    Epoxy composites were fabricated with a filler of silicon carbide (SiC) and/or graphite to improve the thermal conductivity and thereby enhance the transfer of the heat from the light-emitting diode (LED) to the heat sink. The two fillers (SiC and graphite) were each added either separately, within a content range of 10 - 50 wt.%, or together to give a combined total content of 40 - 60 wt.%. The effect of the filler addition on the thermal and the mechanical properties of the epoxy composites was examined. The filler-induced change on the structural properties was investigated by using a morphological analysis of the epoxy composites, and the thermal conductivity was analyzed by measuring the thermal diffusivity, heat specific, and density. To confirm the adhesive property with aluminum, which is mostly used as the heat sink material were tested, the mechanical properties by using a bonding test with a modified tensile test. The thermal and the mechanical properties were improved with increasing filler content in the epoxy composites. In the case of combined filler addition, graphite was more effective than SiC in increasing the thermal properties. However, excessive filler addition reduced the epoxy's natural adhesive property and hence degraded the mechanical properties.

  7. Effect of interfacial chemical bonding and surface topography on adhesion in carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Drzal, L.T.; Sugiura, N.; Hook, D. |

    1994-12-31

    A series of PAN-based IM6 carbon fibers having varying amounts of surface treatment were, pretreated with compounds representing the constituents encountered in epoxy composites to pre-react any groups on the fiber surface before composite fabrication in order to determine the effect of chemical bonding on fiber-matrix adhesion. Chemical bonding was quantified using XPS. Chemical bonding between reactive groups in amine cured epoxy matrices and the surface groups present on IN46 carbon fibers as a result of commercial surface treatments has been detected although the absolute amount of chemical bonding is low (1-3%). It was found that reaction with monofunctional epoxy groups having hydrocarbon functionalities blocked the surface from further reaction and reduced the adhesion that could be attained to its lowest value. Prereaction with difunctional amines had little effect on adhesion when compared to normal composite fabrication procedures. Prereaction with difunctional epoxy groups did enhance adhesion levels over the level attained in normal composite fabrication methods. These results showed that chemical bonding between epoxy and the carbon fiber surface could increases the adhesion between fiber and matrix about 25% while between the amino group and the carbon fiber surface about 15%. Quantitative measurements of the fiber surface microtopography were made with scanning tunneling microscopy. An increase in roughness was detected with increasing surface treatment. It was concluded that surface roughness also accounted for a significant increase in fiber-matrix adhesion.

  8. Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinders, Mark; Dickinson, Larry

    1997-01-01

    A Trans-Laminar-Reinforced (TLR) composite is defined as composite laminate with up to five percent volume of fibrous reinforcement oriented in a 'trans-laminar' fashion in the through-thickness direction. The TLR can be continuous threads as in 'stitched laminates', or it can be discontinuous rods or pins as in 'Z-Fiber(TM) materials. It has been repeatedly documented in the literature that adding TLR to an otherwise two dimensional laminate results in the following advantages: substantially improved compression-after-impact response; considerably increased fracture toughness in mode 1 (double cantilever beam) and mode 2 (end notch flexure); and severely restricted size and growth of impact damage and edge delamination. TLR has also been used to eliminate catastrophic stiffener disbonding in stiffened structures. TLR directly supports the 'Achilles heel' of laminated composites, that is delamination. As little as one percent volume of TLR significantly alters the mechanical response of laminates. The objective of this work was to characterize the effects of TLR on the in-plane and inter-laminar mechanical response of undamaged composite laminates. Detailed finite element models of 'unit cells', or representative volumes, were used to study the effects of adding TLR on the elastic constants; the in-plane strength; and the initiation of delamination. Parameters investigated included TLR material, TLR volume fraction, TLR diameter, TLR through-thickness angle, ply stacking sequence, and the microstructural features of pure resin regions and curved in-plane fibers. The work was limited to the linear response of undamaged material with at least one ply interface. An inter-laminar dominated problem of practical interest, a flanged skin in bending, was also modeled.

  9. Long-term influence of physical aging processes in epoxy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Selected mechanical properties of (plus or minus 45 degree sub 4s) graphite/epoxy composites were found to be affected by sub T sub g annealing. Postcured specimens of Thornel 300 graphite/Narmco 5208 epoxy were sub T sub G annealed at 413 K (140 C) for ca. 10 to the first through 10 to the fifth powers min., with a prior quenching from above T sub g. The ultimate tensile strength, strain-to-break, and toughness of the composite were found to decrease as a function of sub T sub g annealing time. The time-dependent change in properties can be explained on the basis of physical aging which is related to free volume changes in the non-equilibrium glassy state of network epoxies. The results imply possible changes in composite properties with service time.

  10. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assessed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  11. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  12. Solvent-free fabrication of thermally conductive insulating epoxy composites with boron nitride nanoplatelets as fillers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A solvent-free method for the fabrication of thermally conductive epoxy-boron nitride (BN) nanoplatelet composite material is developed in this study. By this method, polymer composites with nearly any filler fractions can be easily fabricated. The maximum thermal conductivity reaches 5.24 W/mK, which is 1,600% improvement in comparison with that of pristine epoxy material. In addition, the as-fabricated samples exhibit excellent overall performances with great mechanical property and thermal stability well preserved. PMID:25489292

  13. Low-temperature thermal conductivity of composites: Alumina fiber/epoxy and alumina fiber/PEEK

    SciTech Connect

    Rule, D.L.; Sparks, L.L.

    1989-05-01

    The thermal conductivities of poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK), of alumina fiber in a matrix of PEEK, and of alumina fiber in a matrix of epoxy, were determined along with the effects of fiber orientation and thermal cycling. Thermal conductivity was measured over the temperature range of 4.2 to 310 K using a steady-state apparatus. Data are presented and discussed relative to specimen characteristics. It appears that, after accounting for different fiber fractions in the specimens, the thermal conductivity of the PEEK composite material is less than that of the epoxy composite material in particular temperature ranges.

  14. Scheming of microwave shielding effectiveness for X band considering functionalized MWNTs/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, S.; Saha, S.

    2016-02-01

    Present typescript encompasses anextraordinary electrical and mechanical behaviors of carboxylic (-COOH) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs)/epoxy composites at low wt.% (0,5, 0,75, 1wt.%). Functionalization on the surface of the nanotube assists MWNTs in dispersing it into epoxy polymer in a respectable manner, Fabricated composites are exposed to different characterization techniques in order to examine the overall physical properties, Microwave shielding effectiveness (SE) for X band (8-12 GHz) and the flexural properties have been premeditated to predict the electrical and mechanical performances. It was found that the total SE of the nanocomposites was increased with the positive gradient of MWNT contents, The best result was recorded for 1 wt.% MWNT loading (SE of about 51,72 dB).In addition, incorporation of nanofillers enhanced the flexural modulus, flexural strength and micro-hardness of the resulting composites while comparing with neat epoxy, Nanocomposites with 0,75 wt,% MWNT loading demonstrated an incrementof 101% in modulus than that of neat epoxy, Theincrement in mechanical properties was due to achievement of good dispersion quality, effective bonding between MWNTs and epoxy polymer analyzed by micrographs of fracture surfaces

  15. Monitoring Fiber Stress During Curing of Single Fiber Glass- and Graphite-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1994-01-01

    The difference in thermal expansion characteristics of epoxy matrices and graphite fibers can produce significant residual stresses in the fibers during curing of composite materials. Tests on single fiber glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite specimens were conducted in which the glass and graphite fibers were preloaded in tension, and the epoxy matrix was cast around the fibers. The fiber tension was monitored while the matrix was placed around the fiber and subjected to the temperature-time curing cycle. Two mechanisms responsible for producing stress in embedded fibers were identified as matrix thermal expansion and contraction and matrix cure shrinkage. A simple analysis based on the change in fiber tension during the curing cycle was conducted to estimate the produced stresses. Experimental results on single fiber glass- and graphite-epoxy composites show that the fiber was subjected to significant tensile stresses when the temperature was raised from the first to the second dwell period. When initial fiber pretension is about 60 percent of the fiber failure load, these curing-induced stresses can cause tensile fracture of the embedded fiber.

  16. Formulation and Characterization of Epoxy Resin Copolymer for Graphite Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Maximum char yield was obtained with a copolymer containing 25% mol fraction DGEBE and 75% mol fraction DGEBA (Epon 828). To achieve the high values (above 40%), a large quantity of catalyst (trimethoxyboroxine) was necessary. Although a graphite laminate 1/8" thick was successfully fabricated, the limited life of the catalyzed epoxy copolymer system precludes commercial application. Char yields of 45% can be achieved with phenolic cured epoxy systems as indicated by data generated under NAS2-10207 contract. A graphite laminate using this type of resin system was fabricated for comparison purposes. The resultant laminate was easier to process and because the graphite prepreg is more stable, the fabrication process could readily be adapted to commercial applications.

  17. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.; Esgar, Jack B.; Gougeon, Meade; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft. long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications.

  18. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  19. Micromechanics analysis of space simulated thermal deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, David E.

    1990-01-01

    Space simulated thermally induced deformations and stresses in continuous fiber reinforced composites were investigated with a micromechanics analysis. The investigation focused on two primary areas. First, available explicit expressions for predicting the effective coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) for a composite were compared with each other, and with a finite element (FE) analysis, developed specifically for this study. Analytical comparisons were made for a wide range of fiber/matrix systems, and predicted values were compared with experimental data. The second area of investigation focused on the determination of thermally induced stress fields in the individual constituents. Stresses predicted from the FE analysis were compared to those predicted from a closed-form solution to the composite cylinder (CC) model, for two carbon fiber/epoxy composites. A global-local formulation, combining laminated plate theory and FE analysis, was used to determine the stresses in multidirectional laminates. Thermally induced damage initiation predictions were also made.

  20. Applications of magnetically active fibre reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etches, Julie; Bond, Ian; Mellor, Philip

    2005-05-01

    As the application of fibre reinforced polymer composites (FRP) becomes more widespread there is a desire to add functionality beyond that of simple mechanical properties in order to facilitate the development of 'smart' materials. For example, the functionality being discussed in this paper is the imparting of significant magnetic properties to a FRP. This can take the form of soft magnetic performance for use in electrical machines or hard magnetic performance for novel forms of sensing or power generation. It has been demonstrated that by using hollow glass fibres as a reinforcement, magnetic material can be introduced into these fibres without significant effects on the structural behaviour of the FRP. The current studies have included the assessment of such a magnetic FRP in a variety of applications. The addition of hard magnetic materials, e.g. magnetite and barium ferrite, has been achieved through the use of nanopowders and the resulting FRP has been assessed for morphing structures applications. The magnitude of magnetic performance that can be currently achieved is controlled by the availability of suitable magnetic materials in fine powder form and the volume of magnetic material which can be incorporated within the fibres.

  1. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  2. Environmental effects on mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.T.; Chin, W.K.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to determine the mechanical properties of a Kevlar 49/epoxy composite in a simulated flywheel service environment. The composite was filament-wound using an epoxy formulated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The temperature and vacuum chosen were 75/sup 0/C and approx. 7 x 10/sup -3/ torr, respectively. Specimens were preconditioned in the test environment for periods of 1 to 5 months before mechanical tests. The simulated service environment of 75/sup 0/C in vacuum was found to have little effect on static and fatigue properties. While the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C was not deleterious, the lack of air could be beneficial because it eliminates the possibility of oxidation. Thus, the elevated temperature of 75/sup 0/C is no deterrent to the application of the present Kevlar 49/epoxy in flywheels.

  3. Thermal-mechanical Properties of Epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Godeke, Arno; Ye, Liyang; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    Knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramic sleeve.

  4. Space radiation effects on the thermo-mechanical behavior of graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, Scott M.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Sykes, George F.

    1986-01-01

    This investigation of composite material properties utilized T300/934 graphite-epoxy that was subjected to 1.0 MeV electron radiation for a total dose of 1.0 x 10 to the 10th rads at a rate of 5.0 x 10 to the 7th rads/hour, simulating a worst-case exposure equivalent to 30 years in space. Mechanical testing was performed on 4-ply unidirectional laminates over the temperature range of -250 F (116 K) to +250 F (394 K). In-plane elastic tensile and shear properties as well as strength were obtained. The results show that electron radiation degrades the epoxy matrix and produces products that volatilize at the temperatures considered. These degradation products plasticize the epoxy at elevated temperatures and embrittle it at low temperatures, thereby altering the mechanical properties of the composite.

  5. Application of In Situ Fiberization for fabrication of improved strain isolation pads and graphite epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosser, R. W.; Seibold, R. W.; Basiulis, D. I.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of applying the in situ fiberization process to the fabrication of strain isolation pads (SIP) for the Space Shuttle and to the fabrication of graphite-epoxy composites was evaluated. The ISF process involves the formation of interconnected polymer fiber networks by agitation of dilute polymer solutions under controlled conditions. High temperature polymers suitable for SIP use were fiberized and a successful fiberization of polychloro trifluoroethylene, a relatively high melting polymer, was achieved. Attempts to fiberize polymers with greater thermal stability were unsuccessful, apparently due to characteristics caused by the presence of aromaticity in the backbone of such materials. Graphite-epoxy composites were fabricated by interconnecting two dimensional arrays of graphite fiber with polypropylene IS fibers with subsequent epoxy resin impregnation. Mechanical property tests were performed on laminated panels of this material to evaluate intralaminar and interlaminar shear strength, and thus fracture toughness. Test results were generally unpromising.

  6. Thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy-impregnated Bi-2212/Ag composite

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Pei; Wang, Yang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Godeke, Arno; National High Magnetic Field Lab., Tallahassee, FL; Ye, Liyang; Fermi National Accelerator Lab.; Flanagan, Gene; Shen, Tengming

    2014-11-26

    In this study, knowledge of the thermal-mechanical properties of epoxy/superconductor/insulation composite is important for designing, fabricating, and operating epoxy impregnated high field superconducting magnets near their ultimate potentials. We report measurements of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, and the coefficient of thermal contraction of epoxy-impregnated composite made from the state-of-the-art powder-in-tube multifilamentary Ag/Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. Stress-strain curves of samples made from single-strand and Rutherford cables were tested under both monotonic and cyclic compressive loads, with single strands insulated using a thin TiO2 insulation coating and the Rutherford cable insulated with a braided ceramicmore » sleeve.« less

  7. Temperature and humidity dependent performance of FBG-strain sensors embedded in carbon/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frövel, Malte; Carrión, Gabriel; Gutiérrez, César; Moravec, Carolina; Pintado, José María

    2009-03-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors, FBGSs, are very promising for Structural Health Monitoring, SHM, of aerospace vehicles due to their capacity to measure strain and temperature, their lightweight harnesses, their multiplexing capacities and their immunity to electromagnetic interferences, within others. They can be embedded in composite materials that are increasingly forming an important part of aerospace structures. The use of embedded FBGSs for SHM purposes is advantageous, but their response under all operative environmental conditions of an aerospace structure must be well understood for the necessary flight certification of these sensors. This paper describes the first steps ahead for a possible in future flight certification of FBGSs embedded in carbon fiber reinforced plastics, CFRP. The investigation work was focused on the validation of the dependence of the FBGS's strain sensitivity in tensile and compression load, in dry and humid condition and in a temperature range from -150°C to 120°C. The test conditions try to simulate the in service temperature and humidity range and static load condition of military aircraft. FBGSs with acrylic and with polyimide coating have been tested. The FBGSs are embedded in both, unidirectional and quasi isotropic carbon/epoxy composite material namely M21/T800 and also MTM-45-1/IM7. Conventional extensometers and strain gages have been used as reference strain sensors. The performed tests show an influence of the testing temperatures, the dry or wet specimen condition, the load direction and the coating material on the sensor strain sensitivity that should be taken into account when using these sensors.

  8. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  9. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable. PMID:21485555

  10. [Fiber-reinforced composite in fixed prosthodontics].

    PubMed

    Pilo, R; Abu Rass, Z; Shmidt, A

    2010-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composite (FRC) is composed of resin matrix and fibers filler. Common types of fibers: polyethylene, carbon and glass. Fibers can be continuous and aligned, discontinuous and aligned, discontinuous and randomly oriented. The architecture of the fibers is unidirectional, woven or braided. The two main types are: dry fibers or impregnated. Inclusion of fibers to resin composite increased its average flexural strength in 100-200 MPa. FRC can be utilized by the dentist in direct approach (splinting, temporary winged bridge) or indirect approach (laboratory made fixed partial denture). Laboratory fixed partial denture (FPD) is made from FRC substructure and Hybrid/Microfill particulate composite veneer. Main indications: interim temporary FPD or FPD in cases of questionable abutment teeth, in aesthetic cases where All Ceram FPD is not feasible. Retention is attained by adhesive cementation to minimally prepared teeth or to conventionally prepared teeth; other options are inlay-onlay bridges or hybrid bridges. Contraindications are: poor hygiene, inability to control humidity, parafunction habits, and more than two pontics. Survival rate of FRC FPD over 5 years is 75%, lower compared to porcelain fused to metal FPD which is 95%. Main reasons for failure are: fracture of framework and delamination of the veneer. Part of the failures is repairable.

  11. Evaluation of Carbon Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessels Fabricated Using Ionic Liquid Epoxies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The intent of the work proposed here is to ascertain the viability of ionic liquid (IL) epoxy based carbon fiber composites for use as storage tanks at cryogenic temperatures. This IL epoxy has been specifically developed to address composite cryogenic tank challenges associated with achieving NASA's in-space propulsion and exploration goals. Our initial work showed that an unadulterated ionic liquid (IL) carbon-fiber composite exhibited improved properties over an optimized commercial product at cryogenic temperatures. Subsequent investigative work has significantly improved the IL epoxy and our first carbon-fiber Composite Overwrap Pressure Vessel (COPV) was successfully fabricated. Here additional COPVs, using a further improved IL epoxy, will be fabricated and pressure tested at cryogenic temperatures with the results rigorously analyzed. Investigation of the IL composite for lower pressure liner-less cryogenic tank applications will also be initiated. It is expected that the current Technology Readiness Level (TRL) will be raised from about TRL 3 to TRL 5 where unambiguous predictions for subsequent development/testing can be made.

  12. Controlling dispersion and electric-field-assisted alignment of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for multi-functional epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ambuj

    The objective of this investigation is to enhance the elastic modulus and tailor the electrical conductivity of nanoreinforced epoxy composites. The resin employed in this investigation is a bisphenol F epoxide with an aromatic diamine curative, extensively used for high performance composites. The nanofillers are unfunctionalized and functionalized carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The objectives are achieved by controlling the dispersion and alignment of unfunctionalized and functionalized CNFs and CNTs. The process of ultrasonic agitation was used to disperse nanofillers in epoxy resin. The dispersed nanofillers were aligned using alternating current electric field (AC). Continuous use of ultrasonic agitation reduced the lengths, and increased the degree of dispersion of CNFs and CNTs. The parameters of the ultrasonic agitation process were optimized to minimize the reduction in CNF and CNT lengths while achieving good dispersion of CNFs and CNTs in the resin. The composites manufactured with well dispersed CNFs and CNTs increased the elastic modulus as expected based on the theory of short fiber reinforced composites. The alignment and chaining of CNFs and CNTs dispersed in resin were investigated by experiments and modeling. The assembly of chains was found to depend on the frequency of AC electric field used. The mechanism of CNF/CNT chain assembly and growth in a low viscosity epoxy was investigated by developing a finite element model of a chain attached to an electrode. The model includes the combined effects of electrostatic and electro-hydrodynamic forces on chain morphology. The electro-hydrodynamic forces are modeled using the theory of AC electroosmosis. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results. The experiments were conducted on a CNF/epoxide/curative mixture by applying an AC field at frequencies ranging from 100 -- 100,000 Hz. Predictions of the model qualitatively capture the variations of

  13. Development of a novel test-setup for identifying the frictional characteristics of carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites at high surface pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Prateek; Schinzel, Marie; Andrich, Manuela; Modler, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites are extensively used in industrial applications. They are light in weight and have excellent load bearing properties. To understand this material's behaviour when carrying loads at high pressure, a tensile-friction test device was developed that can apply a contact surface pressure between composite and counterpart of 50–300 MPa. A tribological investigation of carbon fibre reinforced epoxy composites was carried out, in which the influence of the surface morphology was investigated by using grinding and sandblasting techniques. The friction coefficient of the polymer composite was measured at 100 MPa surface pressure against uncoated and Diamond-Like Carbon coated stainless steel counterparts.

  14. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  15. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  16. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways. PMID:27550050

  17. Characterization of the Nonlinear Elastic Properties of Graphite/Epoxy Composites Using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The normalized change in ultrasonic "natural" velocity as a function of stress and temperature was measured in a unidirectional laminate of T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite using a pulsed phase locked loop ultrasonic interferometer. These measurements were used together with the linear (second order) elastic moduli to calculate some of the nonlinear (third order) moduli of this material.

  18. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.It is established that the changes of the relative intensities of the bands in FTIR spectra indicate the destruction of the carboxyl group -COOH and group -OH. Electrical conductivity of composites has percolation character and graphite nanoplatelets (ultraviolet ozone treatment for 20 min) addition which leads to a decrease of percolation threshold 0.005 volume fraction and increase values of electrical conductivity (by 2-3 orders of magnitude) above the percolation threshold in comparison with composite materials-graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin. The changes of the value and behavior of temperature dependences of the electrical resistivity of epoxy composites with ultraviolet/ozone-treated graphite nanoparticles have been analyzed within the model of effective electrical conductivity. The model takes into account the own electrical conductivity of the filler and the value of contact electric resistance between the filler particles of the formation of continuous conductive pathways.

  19. Humidity sensing of an epoxy/MWCNT composite by electrical conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitzert, Heinz C.; Sorrentino, Andrea; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    An epoxy/CNT composite material with a low concentration of multiwall carbon nanotubes (0.5wt%) in a diglycidilether bisphenol-A based epoxy matrix has been shown to be applicable, when maintained at a constant temperature, as humidity sensing element. An almost linear decrease of the electrical conductivity with increase of the sample humidity has been measured. The investigated samples with vaporated gold contacts exhibited a perfect ohmic behavior and an excellent long-term stability, even after prolonged immersion of the sample into distilled water.

  20. Influence of Ultraviolet/Ozonolysis Treatment of Nanocarbon Filler on the Electrical Resistivity of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perets, Yulia; Matzui, Lyudmila; Vovchenko, Lyudmila; Ovsiienko, Irina; Yakovenko, Olena; Lazarenko, Oleksandra; Zhuravkov, Alexander; Brusylovets, Oleksii

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have investigated concentration and temperature dependences of electrical conductivity of graphite nanoplatelets/epoxy resin composites. The content of nanocarbon filler is varied from 0.01 to 0.05 volume fraction. Before incorporation into the epoxy resin, the graphite nanoplatelets were subjected to ultraviolet ozone treatment at 20-min ultraviolet exposure. The electric resistance of the samples was measured by two- or four-probe method and teraohmmeter E6-13. Several characterization techniques were employed to identify the mechanisms behind the improvements in the electrical properties, including SEM and FTIR spectrum analysis.

  1. Nanographene reinforced carbon/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Dhruv

    Carbon/Carbon Composites (CCC) are made of carbon reinforcement in carbon matrix and have high thermal stability and fatigue resistance. CCC are used in nose cones, heat shields and disc brakes of aircrafts due to their exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The manufacturing process of CCC involves a carbonization stage in which unwanted elements, except carbon, are eliminated from the polymer precursor. Carbonization results in the formation of voids and cracks due to the thermal mismatch between the reinforcement and the matrix and expulsion of volatiles from the polymer matrix. Thermal cracks and voids decrease the density and mechanical properties of the manufactured CCC. In this work, Nanographene Platelets (NGP) were explored as nanofillers to fill the voids/cracks and reduce thermal shrinkage in CCC. They were first compared with Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofibers (VGCNF) by dispersion of different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%) in resole-type phenolic resin and were characterized to explore their effect on rheology, heat of reaction and wetting behavior. The dispersions were then cured to form nanocomposites and were characterized for morphology, flexure and thermal properties. Finally, NGP were introduced into the carbon/carboncomposites in two stages, first by spraying in different concentrations (0.5wt%, 1.5wt%, 3wt%, 5wt %) during the prepreg formation and later during densification by directly mixing in the corresponding densification mix. The manufactured NGP reinforced CCC were characterized for microstructure, porosity, bulk density and mechanical properties (Flexure and ILSS) which were further cross-checked by non-destructive techniques (vibration and ultrasonic). In this study, it was further found that at low concentration (≤ 1.5 wt%) NGP were more effective in increasing the heat of reaction and in decreasing the viscosity of the phenolic resin. The decrease in viscosity led to better wetting properties of NGP / phenolic

  2. Carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for future automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, K.

    2016-05-01

    After a brief introduction to polymer composite properties and markets, the state of the art activities in the field of manufacturing of advanced composites for automotive applications are elucidated. These include (a) long fiber reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) for secondary automotive components, and (b) continuous carbon fiber reinforced thermosetting composites for car body applications. It is followed by future possibilities of carbon fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites for e.g. (i) crash elements, (ii) racing car seats, and (iii) production and recycling of automotive fenders.

  3. Repeated self-healing of microvascular carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coope, T. S.; Wass, D. F.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-11-01

    A self-healing, high performance, carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite is demonstrated by embedding a Lewis-acid catalytic curing agent within a laminate, manufactured using out of autoclave (OOA) composite manufacturing methods. Two configurations of healing agent delivery, pre-mixed and autonomous mixing, are investigated via injection of a healing agent through bio-inspired microvascular channels exposed on Mode I fractured crack planes. Healing is effected when an epoxy resin-solvent healing agent mixture reaches the boundary of embedded solid-state scandium(III) triflate (Sc(OTf)3) catalyst, located on the crack plane, to initiate the ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of epoxides. Tailored self-healing agents confer high healing efficiency values after multiple healing cycles (69-108%) to successfully mitigate against crack propagation within the composite microstructure.

  4. Studies on Effective Elastic Properties of CNT/Nano-Clay Reinforced Polymer Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Arvind Kumar; Kumar, Puneet; Srinivas, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a computational approach to predict elastic propertiesof hybrid nanocomposite material prepared by adding nano-clayplatelets to conventional CNT-reinforced epoxy system. In comparison to polymers alone/single-fiber reinforced polymers, if an additional fiber is added to the composite structure, it was found a drastic improvement in resultant properties. In this regard, effective elastic moduli of a hybrid nano composite are determined by using finite element (FE) model with square representative volume element (RVE). Continuum mechanics based homogenization of the nano-filler reinforced composite is considered for evaluating the volumetric average of the stresses and the strains under different periodic boundary conditions.A three phase Halpin-Tsai approach is selected to obtain the analytical result based on micromechanical modeling. The effect of the volume fractions of CNTs and nano-clay platelets on the mechanical behavior is studied. Two different RVEs of nano-clay platelets were used to investigate the influence of nano-filler geometry on composite properties. The combination of high aspect ratio of CNTs and larger surface area of clay platelets contribute to the stiffening effect of the hybrid samples. Results of analysis are validated with Halpin-Tsai empirical formulae.

  5. Investigation of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins for utilization in vibration assisted liquid composite molding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, R.; Kirdar, C.; Rudolph, N.; Zaremba, S.; Drechsler, K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient production and consumption of energy are of greatest importance for contemporary industries and their products. This has led to an increasing application of lightweight materials in general and of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) in particular. However, broader application of CFRP is often limited by high costs and manual labor production processes. These constraints are addressed by Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) processes. In LCM a dry fibrous preform is placed into a cavity and infiltrated mostly by thermoset resins; epoxy resins are wide spread in CFRP applications. One crucial parameter for a fast mold filling is the viscosity of the resin, which is affected by the applied shear rates as well as temperature and curing time. The work presented focuses on the characterization of the shear thinning behavior of epoxy resins. Furthermore, the correlation with the conditions in vibration assisted LCM processes, where additional shear rates are created during manufacture, is discussed. Higher shear rates result from high frequencies and/or high amplitudes of the vibration motions which are created by a vibration engine mounted on the mold. In rheological investigations the shear thinning behavior of a representative epoxy resin is studied by means of rotational and oscillatory experiments. Moreover, possible effects of shear rates on the chemical curing reaction are studied. Here, the time for gelation is measured for different levels of shear rates in a pre-shearing phase. Based on the rheological studies, the beneficial effect of vibration assistance in LCM processes with respect to mold filling can further be predicted and utilized.

  6. Finite element analysis of the stiffness of fabric reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is the prediction of all three dimensional elastic moduli of textile fabric reinforced composites. The analysis is general enough for use with complex reinforcing geometries and capable of subsequent improvements. It places no restrictions on fabric microgeometry except that the unit cell be determinate and rectangular. The unit cell is divided into rectangular subcells in which the reinforcing geometries are easier to define and analyze. The analysis, based on inhomogeneous finite elements, is applied to a variety of weave, braid, and knit reinforced composites. Some of these predictions are correlated to test data.

  7. Analysis of woven fabrics for reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Ramnath, V.; Rosen, B. Walter

    1987-01-01

    The use of woven fabrics as reinforcements for composites is considered. Methods of analysis of properties are reviewed and extended, with particular attention paid to three-dimensional constructions having through-the-thickness reinforcements. Methodology developed is used parametrically to evaluate the performance potential of a wide variety of reinforcement constructions including hybrids. Comparisons are made of predicted and measured properties of representative composites having biaxial and triaxial woven, and laminated tape lay-up reinforcements. Overall results are incorporated in advanced weave designs.

  8. A study on the DC-electrical and thermal conductivities of epoxy/ZnO composites doped with carbon black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juwhari, Hassan K.; Zihlif, Awwad; Elimat, Ziad; Ragosta, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    Thermo-electrical characterizations of hybrid polymer composites, made of epoxy matrix filled with various zinc oxide (ZnO) concentrations (0, 4.9, 9.9, 14.9, and 19.9 wt%), and reinforced with conductive carbon black (CB) nanoparticles (0.1 wt%), have been investigated as a function of ZnO concentration and temperature. Both the measured DC-electrical and thermal conductivities showed ZnO concentration and temperature dependencies. Increasing the temperature and filler concentrations were reflected in a negative temperature coefficient of resistivity and enhancement of the electrical conductivity as well. The observed increase in the DC conductivity and decrease in the determined activation energy were explained based on the concept of existing paths and connections between the ZnO particles and the conductive CB nanoparticles. Alteration of ZnO concentration with a fixed content of CB nanoparticles and/or temperature was found to be crucial in the thermal conductivity behavior. The addition of CB nanoparticles to the epoxy/ZnO matrix was found to enhance the electrical conduction resulting from the electronic and impurity contributions. Also, the thermal conductivity enhancement was mostly attributed to the heat transferred by phonons and electrons hopping to higher energy levels throughout the thermal processes. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to observe the morphology and elements' distribution in the composites. The observed thermal conductivity behavior was found to correlate well with that of the DC-electrical conductivity as a function of the ZnO content. The overall enhancements in both the measured DC- and thermal conductivities of the prepared hybrid composites are mainly produced through mutual interactions between the filling conductive particles and also from electrons tunneling in the composite's bulk as well.

  9. Calibration of an analytical thermal model for an epoxy-based composite sandwich design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Davis, Darrell; Stuckey, Charles I.

    2001-02-01

    An epoxy-based sandwich configuration was designed to meet the structural and thermal requirements of a nose cap for the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRB's). This project was suspended in late 1999, but the information gathered during this work is unique in the sense that portions of graphite-epoxy layers were modeled at temperatures exceeding their glass transition temperatures. This work presents the results of the thermal model calibration efforts. A symmetric sandwich configuration was chosen that includes an inner and outer structural skin with a graphite-epoxy composite, Hexcel's AGP370-8H/3501-6 (AS4/3501-6), and a center epoxy-based syntactic core. 3M SC350G, that provides thermal protection. Each graphite-epoxy section consists of seven layers, each layer with a 0°, 90°, or +/-45° graphite fiber orientation. Three flat panels (0.305×0.483 m top view dimensions) using this sandwich construction were fabricated and exposed to an aerothermal environment in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF). Each of these panels had ten interstitial thermocouples in the panel. The exact locations of the thermocouples and thickness of the different layers were determined by X-ray evaluation. A 1-D model was generated that used the outer surface IR measured temperature as a boundary condition, and the predicted temperatures were compared with the measured temperatures, calibrating the code. .

  10. Electrical transport in carbon black-epoxy resin composites at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macutkevic, J.; Kuzhir, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Maksimenko, S.; Banys, J.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.; Bistarelli, S.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Bellucci, S.

    2013-07-01

    Results of broadband electric/dielectric properties of different surface area—carbon black/epoxy resin composites above the percolation threshold are reported in a wide temperature range (25-500 K). At higher temperatures (above 400 K), the electrical conductivity of composites is governed by electrical transport in polymer matrix and current carriers tunneling from carbon black clusters to polymer matrix. The activation energy of such processes decreases when the carrier concentration increases, i.e., with the increase of carbon black concentration. At lower temperatures, the electrical conductivity is governed by electron tunneling and hopping. The electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of composites strongly decrease after annealing composites at high temperatures (500 K); at the same time potential barrier for carriers tunneling strongly increases. All the observed peculiarities can be used for producing effective low-cost materials on the basis of epoxy resin working at different temperatures for electrical applications.

  11. Electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of Ni-CNT filled epoxy-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinbao; Xiao, Huigang; Li, Hui

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates properties about electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-filled epoxy-based composite and its further use for strain sensing. The MWCNTs dispersed epoxy resin, using MWCNTs in the amount of 1.5~3.0 vol.%, was first prepared by combined high-speed stirring and sonication methods. Then, the MWCNTs dispersed epoxy resin was cast into an aluminum mold to form specimens measuring 10×10×36 mm. After curing, DC electrical resistance measurements were performed along the longitudinal axis using the four-probe method, in which copper nets served as electrical contacts. The percolation threshold zone of resistivity was got as MWCNTs in the amount of 2.00-2.50 vol.%. Further compressive testing of these specimens was conducted with four-probe method for resistance measurements at the same time. Testing results show that the electrical resistivity of the composites changes with the strain's development, namely piezoresistivity. While for practical strain sensing use, signals of electric resistance and current in the acquisition circuits were both studied. Results show that the signal of current, compared with that of resistance, had better linear relationship with the compressive strain, better stability and longer effective section to reflect the whole deformation process of the specimens under pressure. Further works about the effects of low magnetic field on the electrical resistivity and piezoresistivity of Ni-CNTs filled epoxy-based composites were presented briefly at the end of the paper.

  12. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3−/I−) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization. PMID:26961256

  13. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-03-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3‑/I‑) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization.

  14. Pt-Free Counter Electrodes with Carbon Black and 3D Network Epoxy Polymer Composites.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyeongho; Choi, Jongmin; Park, Taiho

    2016-01-01

    Carbon black (CB) and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite, representing dual functions for conductive corrosion protective layer (CCPL) and catalytic layer (CL) by the control of CB weight ratio against polymer is developed. Our strategy provides a proper approach which applies high catalytic ability and chemical stability of CB in corrosive triiodide/iodide (I3(-)/I(-)) redox electrolyte system. The CB and a 3D network epoxy polymer composite coated on the stainless steel (SS) electrode to alternate counter electrodes in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A two-step spray pyrolysis process is used to apply a solution containing epoxy monomers and a polyfunctional amine hardener with 6 wt% CB to a SS substrate, which forms a CCPL. Subsequently, an 86 wt% CB is applied to form a CL. The excellent catalytic properties and corrosion protective properties of the CB and 3D network epoxy polymer composites produce efficient counter electrodes that can replace fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with CCPL/SS and Pt/FTO with CL/CCPL/SS in DSSCs. This approach provides a promising approach to the development of efficient, stable, and cheap solar cells, paving the way for large-scale commercialization. PMID:26961256

  15. Ultrasonic determination of the elastic constants of the stiffness matrix for unidirectional fiberglass epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marques, E. R. C.; Williams, J. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic constants of a fiberglass epoxy unidirectional composite are determined by measuring the phase velocities of longitudinal and shear stress waves via the through transmission ultrasonic technique. The waves introduced into the composite specimens were generated by piezoceramic transducers. Geometric lengths and the times required to travel those lengths were used to calculate the phase velocities. The model of the transversely isotropic medium was adopted to relate the velocities and elastic constants.

  16. Highly conductive epoxy/graphite polymer composite bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ling

    In this work, highly conductive carbon-filled epoxy composites were developed for manufacturing bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These composites were prepared by solution intercalation mixing, followed by compression molding and curing. The in-plane and through-plane electrical conductivity, thermal and mechanical properties, gas barrier properties, and hygrothermal characteristics were determined as a function of carbon-filler type and content. For this purpose, expanded graphite and carbon black were used as a synergistic combination. Mixtures of aromatic and aliphatic epoxy resin were used as the polymer matrix to capitalize on the ductility of the aliphatic epoxy and chemical stability of the aromatic epoxy. The composites showed high glass transition temperatures (Tg ˜ 180°C), high thermal degradation temperatures (T2˜ 415°C), and in-plane conductivity of 200-500 S/cm with carbon fillers as low as 50 wt%. These composites also showed strong mechanical properties, such as flexural modulus, flexural strength, and impact strength, which either met or exceeded the targets. In addition, these composites showed excellent thermal conductivity greater than 50 W/m/K, small values of linear coefficient of thermal expansion, and dramatically reduced oxygen permeation rate. The values of mechanical and thermal properties and electrical conductivity of the composites did not change upon exposure to boiling water, aqueous sulfuric acid solution and hydrogen peroxide solution, indicating that the composites provided long-term reliability and durability under PEM fuel cell operating conditions. Experimental data show that the composites developed in this study are suitable for application as bipolar plates in PEM fuel cells.

  17. The Lhc Cryomagnet Supports in Glass-Fiber Reinforced Epoxy: a Large Scale Industrial Production with High Reproducibility in Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.; Struik, M.; Trigo, J.; Parma, V.

    2008-03-01

    The about 1700 LHC main ring super-conducting magnets are supported within their cryostats on 4700 low heat in leak column-type supports. The supports were designed to ensure a precise and stable positioning of the heavy dipole and quadrupole magnets while keeping thermal conduction heat loads within budget. A trade-off between mechanical and thermal properties, as well as cost considerations, led to the choice of glass fibre reinforced epoxy (GFRE). Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), featuring a high level of automation and control, was the manufacturing process retained to ensure the reproducibility of the performance of the supports throughout the large production. The Spanish aerospace company EADS-CASA Espacio developed the specific RTM process, and produced the total quantity of supports between 2001 and 2004. This paper describes the development and the production of the supports, and presents the production experience and the achieved performance.

  18. Development of novel single-wall carbon nanotube epoxy composite ply actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yeo-Heung; Shanov, Vesselin; Schulz, Mark J.; Narasimhadevara, Suhasini; Subramaniam, Srinivas; Hurd, Douglas; Boerio, F. J.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a carbon nanotube epoxy ply material that has electrochemical actuation properties. The material was formed by dispersing single-wall carbon nanotubes in a solvent and then solution casting a thin paper using a mold and vacuum oven. In order to take advantage of the high elastic modulus of carbon nanotubes for actuation, epoxy as a chemically inert polymer is considered. An epoxy layer was cast on the surface of the nanotube paper to make a two-layer ply. A wet electrochemical actuator was formed by placing the nanotube epoxy ply in a 2 M NaCl electrolyte solution. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were carried out to characterize the electrochemical properties of the actuator. The voltage-current relationship and power to drive the actuator material were also determined. Compared to previous single-wall carbon nanotube buckypaper tape actuators, which had poor adhesion between the nanotubes and tape, and other nanotube-thermal plastic polymer actuators, which could not provide high strength, the epoxy based actuator has a higher elastic modulus and strength, which will be useful for future structural applications. This demonstrates that a polymer layer can reinforce nanotube paper, which is an important step in building a new structural material that actuates. Further work is under way to develop a solid electrolyte to allow dry actuation. Finally, these actuator plies will be laminated to build a carbon nanocomposite material. This smart structural material will have potential applications that range from use in robotic surgical tools to use as structures that change shape.

  19. Compatibility of the Radio Frequency Mass Gauge with Graphite-Epoxy Composite Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, G. A.; Mueller, C. H.

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency mass gauge (RFMG) is a low-gravity propellant quantity gauge being developed at NASA for possible use in long-duration space missions utilizing cryogenic propellants. As part of the RFMG technology development process, we evaluated the compatibility of the RFMG with a graphite-epoxy composite material used to construct propellant tanks. The key material property that can affect compatibility with the RFMG is the electrical conductivity. Using samples of 8552/IM7 graphite-epoxy composite, we characterized the resistivity and reflectivity over a range of frequencies. An RF impedance analyzer was used to characterize the out-of-plane electrical properties (along the sample thickness) in the frequency range 10 to 1800 MHZ. The resistivity value at 500 MHz was 4.8 ohm-cm. Microwave waveguide measurements of samples in the range 1.7 - 2.6 GHz, performed by inserting the samples into a WR-430 waveguide, showed reflectivity values above 98%. Together, these results suggested that a tank constructed from graphite/epoxy composite would produce good quality electromagnetic tank modes, which is needed for the RFMG. This was verified by room-temperature measurements of the electromagnetic modes of a 2.4 m diameter tank constructed by Boeing from similar graphite-epoxy composite material. The quality factor Q of the tank electromagnetic modes, measured via RF reflection measurements from an antenna mounted in the tank, was typically in the range 400 less than Q less than 3000. The good quality modes observed in the tank indicate that the RFMG is compatible with graphite-epoxy tanks, and thus the RFMG could be used as a low-gravity propellant quantity gauge in such tanks filled with cryogenic propellants.

  20. Graphite/epoxy composite stiffened panel fabrication development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the manufacturing development procedures used to fabricate a series of carbon/epoxy panels with integrally molded stiffeners. Panel size was started at 6 inches by 18 inches and one stiffener and increased to 30 inches by 60 inches and six integral stiffeners. Stiffener concepts were optimized for minimum weight (or mass) to carry stress levels from 1500 lbs/inch to 25,000 lbs/inch compression load. Designs were created and manufactured with a stiffener configuration of integrally molded hat, J, I, sine wave I, solid blade, and honeycomb blade shapes. Successful and unsuccessful detail methods of tooling, lay-up methods, and bagging methods are documented. Recommendations are made for the best state-of-the-art manufacturing technique developed for type of stiffener construction.

  1. Hygrothermal damage mechanisms in graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman, F. W.; Mauri, R. E.; Warren, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    T300/5209 and T300/5208 graphite epoxy laminates were studied experimentally and analytically in order to: (1) determine the coupling between applied stress, internal residual stress, and moisture sorption kinetics; (2) examine the microscopic damage mechanisms due to hygrothermal cycling; (3) evaluate the effect of absorbed moisture and hygrothermal cycling on inplane shear response; (4) determine the permanent loss of interfacial bond strength after moisture absorption and drying; and (5) evaluate the three dimensional stress state in laminates under a combination of hygroscopic, thermal, and mechanical loads. Specimens were conditioned to equilibrium moisture content under steady exposure to 55% or 95% RH at 70 C or 93 C. Some specimens were tested subsequent to moisture conditioning and 100 cycles between -54 C and either 70 C or 93 C.

  2. SiC Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Celsian is a promising matrix material for fiber-reinforced composites for high temperature structural applications. Processing and fabrication of small diameter multifilament silicon carbide tow reinforced celsian matrix composites are described. Mechanical and microstructural properties of these composites at ambient and elevated temperatures are presented. Effects of high-temperature exposures in air on the mechanical behavior of these composites are also given. The composites show mechanical integrity up to 1100 C but degrade at higher temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. A model has been proposed for the degradation of these composites in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures.

  3. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  4. Adaptation And Innovation In High-Modulus Graphite/Epoxy Composite Design: Notes On Recent Developments 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumweide, G. C.; Chamberlin, D. N.; Rule, J. E.

    1988-04-01

    Graphite/epoxy (Gr/E) composites offer significant advantages over other candidate materials for optical instrument structures where stiffness, strength and stability are required at minimal weight and cost. This paper presents Composite Optics' experience in design and fabrication using graphite/epoxy for telescope assemblies, camera assemblies, and other precision optical instrument support structures. Approaches and solutions developed by Composite Optics, Incorporated, for specific design challenges will be discussed and illustrated by actual fabricated optical instrument hardware.

  5. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  6. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  7. Distributed Sensing of Carbon-Epoxy Composites and Filament Wound Pressure Vessels Using Fiber-Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J.; Kaul, R.; Taylor, S.; Myer, G.; Jackson, K.; Osei, A.; Sharma, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple Fiber Bragg-gratings are embedded in carbon-epoxy laminates as well as in composite wound pressure vessel. Structural properties of such composites are investigated. The measurements include stress-strain relation in laminates and Poisson's ratio in several specimens with varying orientation of the optical fiber Bragg-sensor with respect to the carbon fiber in an epoxy matrix. Additionally, fiber Bragg gratings are bonded on the surface of these laminates and cylinders fabricated out of carbon-epoxy composites and multiple points are monitored and compared for strain measurements at several locations.

  8. Analysis of interfacial debonding in shape memory alloy wire-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miramini, A.; Kadkhodaei, M.; Alipour, A.; Mashayekhi, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the common types of failure in shape memory alloy (SMA) wire-reinforced composites is interfacial debonding between the fiber and the matrix. In this paper, a three dimensional finite element model for an SMA wire-reinforced composite is developed based on cohesive zone modeling to predict interfacial debonding between the SMA wire and the surrounding matrix. The interfacial debonding is also experimentally investigated by conducting a number of pull-out tests on steel as well as Nitinol wires embedded in an epoxy matrix. To evaluate the presented method, the developed finite element analysis is employed to simulate a single wire pull-out test for ordinary (e.g. steel) wires. In order to simulate SMA wire pull-out, a 3D SMA constitutive model is implemented into the commercial finite element software ABAQUS using a user material subroutine (UMAT). An acceptable agreement is shown to exist between the theoretical results and the experimental data, indicating the efficiency of the proposed approach to model interfacial debonding in SMA wire-reinforced composites.

  9. Solvent-based self-healing approaches for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Amanda R.

    Damage in composite materials spans many length scales and is often difficult to detect or costly to repair. The incorporation of self-healing functionality in composite materials has the potential to greatly extend material lifetime and reliability. Although there has been remarkable progress in self-healing polymers over the past decade, self-repair in fiber-reinforced composite materials presents significant technical challenges due to stringent manufacturing and performance requirements. For high performance, fiber-reinforced composites, the self-healing components need to survive high temperature processing, reside in matrix interstitial regions to retain a high fiber volume fraction, and have minimal impact on the mechanical properties of the host material. This dissertation explores several microencapsulated solvent-based self-healing approaches for fiber-reinforced composites at the fiber/ matrix interface size scale as well as matrix cracking. Systems are initially developed for room temperature cured epoxies/ glass fiber interfaces and successfully transitioned to carbon fibers and high temperature-cured, thermoplastic-toughened matrices. Full recovery of interfacial bond strength after complete fiber/matrix debonding is achieved with a microencapsulated solvent-based healing chemistry. The surface of a glass fiber is functionalized with microcapsules containing varying concentrations of reactive epoxy resin and ethyl phenyl acetate (EPA) solvent. Microbond specimens consisting of a single fiber and a microdroplet of epoxy are cured at 35°C, tested, and the interfacial shear strengths (IFSS) during the initial (virgin) debonding and subsequent healing events are measured. Debonding of the fiber/matrix interface ruptures the capsules, releasing resin and solvent into the crack plane. The solvent swells the matrix, initiating transport of residual amine functionality for further curing with the epoxy resin delivered to the crack plane. Using a resin

  10. Superelastic SMA-FRP composite reinforcement for concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, Nicholas; Andrawes, Bassem

    2010-02-01

    For many years there has been interest in using fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) as reinforcement in concrete structures. Unfortunately, due to their linear elastic behavior, FRP reinforcing bars are never considered for structural damping or dynamic applications. With the aim of improving the ductility and damping capability of concrete structures reinforced with FRP reinforcement, this paper studies the application of SMA-FRP, a relatively novel type of composite reinforced with superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) wires. The cyclic tensile behavior of SMA-FRP composites are studied experimentally and analytically. Tests of SMA-FRP composite coupons are conducted to determine their constitutive behavior. The experimental results are used to develop and calibrate a uniaxial SMA-FRP analytical model. Parametric and case studies are performed to determine the efficacy of the SMA-FRP reinforcement in concrete structures and the key factors governing its behavior. The results show significant potential for SMA-FRP reinforcement to improve the ductility and damping of concrete structures while still maintaining its elastic characteristic, typical of FRP reinforcement.

  11. A comparative evaluation of in-plane shear test methods for laminated graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, John; Ho, Henjen

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to evaluate popular shear test methods for various forms of graphite-epoxy composite materials and to determine the shear response of graphite-epoxy composites with various forms of fiber architecture. Numerical and full-field experimental stress analyses were performed on four shear test configurations for unidirectional and bidirectional graphite-epoxy laminates to assess the uniformity and purity of the shear stress (strain) fields produced in the specimen test section and to determine the material in-plane shear modulus and shear response. The test methods were the 10 deg off-axis, the +/- 45 deg tension, the Iosipescu V-notch, and a compact U-notch specimen. Specimens were prepared from AS4/3501-6 graphite-epoxy panels, instrumented with conventional strain gage rosettes and with a cross-line moire grating, and loaded in a convenient testing machine. The shear responses obtained for each test method and the two methods of specimen instrumentation were compared. In a second phase of the program the shear responses obtained from Iosipescu V-notch beam specimens were determined for woven fabric geometries of different weave and fiber architectures. Again the responses of specimens obtained from strain gage rosettes and moire interferometry were compared. Additional experiments were performed on a bidirectional cruciform specimen which was also instrumented with strain gages and a moire grating.

  12. Influence of microstructural features on thermal expansion coefficient in graphene/epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Li, Xiao-Fei; Bai, Hua; Xu, Wei-Wei; Yang, Shui-Yuan; Lu, Yong; Han, Jia-Jia; Wang, Cui-Ping; Liu, Xing-Jun; Li, Wei-Bin

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, theoretical calculations were conducted to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) based on the effective medium approach using Green's function method. The influences of microstructural features were investigated, including volume fraction, aspect ratio, and the orientation of graphene fillers. Calculated results demonstrated strong anisotropy of CTE when all graphene sheets in the composite were aligned in the in-plane direction due to the large difference between the elastic moduli of the graphene and epoxy. The in-plane CTE in the graphene/epoxy composite can be effectively reduced with small additions of graphene additive. Orientation dispersion among the graphene fillers significantly decreases the anisotropy of CTE. Accounting for the influences of all microstructural features, simulation results closely align with current experimental results. This work will provide a general guideline and a solid foundation for the optimal design and preparation of graphene/polymer composites. PMID:27441268

  13. Exploring the piezoelectric performance of PZT particulate-epoxy composites loaded in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loock, F.; Deutz, D. B.; van der Zwaag, S.; Groen, W. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active and passive piezoelectric response of lead zirconium titanate (PZT)-epoxy particulate composites loaded in shear is studied using analytical models, a finite element model and by experiments. The response is compared to that of the same composites when loaded in simple tension. Analogously to bulk PZT, particulate PZT-polymer composites loaded in shear show higher piezoelectric charge coefficient (d 15) and energy density figure of merit (FOM15) values compared to simple tension (d 33) and (FOM33). This outcome demonstrates the as-yet barely explored potential of piezoelectric particulate composites for optimal strain energy harvesting when activated in shear.

  14. Development of composite material test methodology for fractue toughness/damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, M. V.

    1986-01-01

    Fracture toughness testing techniques for composite materials are reviewed for simplicity, applicability to filament wound systems, and correlation with fracture mechanics preinciples. Toughness test results are repesented for homogeneous epoxy and graphite reinforced epoxy.

  15. Resin characterization in cured graphite fiber reinforced composites using diffuse reflectance-FTIR. [Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.; Stein, B. A.; Chang, A. C.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using diffuse reflectance in combination with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to obtain information on cured graphite fiber reinforced polymeric matrix resin composites was investigated. Several graphite/epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide composites exposed to thermal or radiation environments were examined. An experimental polyimide-sulfone adhesive tape was also studied during processing. In each case, significant changes in resin molecular structure was observed due to environmental exposure. These changes in molecular structure were correlated with previously observed changes in material properties providing new insights into material behavior.

  16. Simulated space environmental effects on a polyetherimide and its carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Kristen T.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Harries, Wynford L.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1993-01-01

    The selection of materials for spacecraft construction requires identification of candidate materials which can perform reliably in the space environment. Understanding the effects of the space environment on the materials is an important step in the selection of candidate materials. This work examines the effects of energetic electrons, thermal cycling, electron radiation in conjunction with thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen on a thermoplastic polyetherimide and its carbon-fiber-reinforced composites. Composite materials made with non-sized fibers as well as materials made with fibers sized with an epoxy were evaluated. The mechanical and thermomechanical properties of the materials were studied and spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the mechanisms for the observed effects. Considerations for future material development are suggested.

  17. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  19. Boundary layer thermal stresses in angle-ply composite laminates, part 1. [graphite-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal boundary-layer stresses (near free edges) and displacements were determined by a an eigenfunction expansion technique and the establishment of an appropriate particular solution. Current solutions in the region away from the singular domain (free edge) are found to be excellent agreement with existing approximate numerical results. As the edge is approached, the singular term controls the near field behavior of the boundary layer. Results are presented for cases of various angle-ply graphite/epoxy laminates with (theta/-theta/theta/theta) configurations. These results show high interlaminar (through-the-thickness) stresses. Thermal boundary-layer thicknesses of different composite systems are determined by examining the strain energy density distribution in composites. It is shown that the boundary-layer thickness depends on the degree of anisotropy of each individual lamina, thermomechanical properties of each ply, and the relative thickness of adjacent layers. The interlaminar thermal stresses are compressive with increasing temperature. The corresponding residual stresses are tensile and may enhance interply delaminations.

  20. Self-sealing of thermal fatigue and mechanical damage in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Jericho L.

    Fiber reinforced composite tanks provide a promising method of storage for liquid oxygen and hydrogen for aerospace applications. The inherent thermal fatigue of these vessels leads to the formation of microcracks, which allow gas phase leakage across the tank walls. In this dissertation, self-healing functionality is imparted to a structural composite to effectively seal microcracks induced by both mechanical and thermal loading cycles. Two different microencapsulated healing chemistries are investigated in woven glass fiber/epoxy and uni-weave carbon fiber/epoxy composites. Self-healing of mechanically induced damage was first studied in a room temperature cured plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite with encapsulated dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) monomer and wax protected Grubbs' catalyst healing components. A controlled amount of microcracking was introduced through cyclic indentation of opposing surfaces of the composite. The resulting damage zone was proportional to the indentation load. Healing was assessed through the use of a pressure cell apparatus to detect nitrogen flow through the thickness direction of the damaged composite. Successful healing resulted in a perfect seal, with no measurable gas flow. The effect of DCPD microcapsule size (51 microm and 18 microm) and concentration (0--12.2 wt%) on the self-sealing ability was investigated. Composite specimens with 6.5 wt% 51 microm capsules sealed 67% of the time, compared to 13% for the control panels without healing components. A thermally stable, dual microcapsule healing chemistry comprised of silanol terminated poly(dimethyl siloxane) plus a crosslinking agent and a tin catalyst was employed to allow higher composite processing temperatures. The microcapsules were incorporated into a satin weave E-glass fiber/epoxy composite processed at 120°C to yield a glass transition temperature of 127°C. Self-sealing ability after mechanical damage was assessed for different microcapsule sizees (25 microm and 42

  1. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  2. Fracture and fatigue of discontinuously reinforced copper/tungsten composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, B.; Ramani, S. V.

    1975-01-01

    The strength, toughness and resistance to cyclic crack propagation of composites consisting of copper reinforced with short tungsten wires of various lengths have been studied and the results compared with the behavior of continuously reinforced composites manufactured by the same method, i.e., by vacuum hot-pressing. It has been found that whereas the resistance to fatigue crack growth of continuously reinforced composites is very similar to that of continuous Al/stainless steel composites reported elsewhere, the addition of short fibers completely changes the mode of fracture, and no direct comparisons are possible. In effect, short fibers inhibit single crack growth by causing plastic flow to be distributed rather than localized, and although these composites are much less strong than continuous fiber composites, they nevertheless have much greater fatigue resistance.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  4. Compressive strength of the mineral reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Rama; Sharma, Anju; Kumar, Suresh; Singh, Gurmel; Pandey, O. P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the results of quasi-static compressive strength of aluminium alloy reinforced with different concentration of rutile mineral particles. The reinforced material shows increase in compressive strength with 5wt% rutile concentration as compared to the base alloy. This increase in compressive strength of composite is attributed to direct strengthening due to transfer of load from lower stiffness matrix (LM13 alloy) to higher stiffness reinforcement (rutile particles). Indirect strengthening mechanisms like increase in dislocation density at the matrix-reinforcement interface, grain size refinement of the matrix and dispersion strengthening are also the contributing factors. The decrease in compressive strength of composite with the increased concentration of rutile concentration beyond 5 wt.% can be attributed to the increase in dislocation density due to the void formation at the matrix-reinforcement interface.

  5. Evaluation of atomic oxygen resistant protective coatings for fiberglass-epoxy composites in LEO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Brady, Joyce A.

    1989-01-01

    Fiberglass-epoxy composite masts are the prime structural members for the Space Station Freedom solar array. At the altitude where Space Station Freedom will operate, atomic oxygen atoms are the most predominant species. Atomic oxygen is highly reactive and has been shown to oxidize organic and some metallic materials. Tests with random and directed atomic oxygen exposure have shown that the epoxy is removed from the composite exposing brittle glass fibers which could be easily removed from the surface where they could contaminate Space Station Freedom Systems. Protection or fiber containment systems; inorganic based paints, aluminum braid, and a metal coating; were evaluated for resistance to atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. All appeared to protect well against atomic oxygen and provide fiber containment except for the single aluminum braid covering. UV radiation resistance was acceptable and in general, thermal cycling and flexure had little to no effect on the mass loss rate for most coatings.

  6. Ultrasonic Determination of the Elastic Constants of Epoxy-natural Fiber Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, C. A. Meza; Pazos-Ospina, J. F.; Franco, E. E.; Ealo, Joao L.; Collazos-Burbano, D. A.; Garcia, G. F. Casanova

    This paper shows the applications ultrasonic through-transmission technique to determine the elastic constants of two polymer-natural fiber composite materials with potential industrial application and economic and environmental advantages. The transversely isotropic coconut-epoxy and fique-epoxy samples were analyzed using an experimental setup which allows the sample to be rotated with respect to transducers faces and measures the time-of-flight at different angles of incidence. Then, the elastic properties of the material were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the Christoffel equation. Results show a good agreement between the measured elastic constants and the values predicted by an analytical model. The velocities as a function of the incidence angle are reported and the effect of the natural fiber on the stiffness of the composite is discussed.

  7. The effects of radiation on the interlaminar fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. G.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study is made of the effect of electron irradiation (10 to the 10th rad), simulating a 30-year geosynchronous orbit exposure, on the fracture toughness of a graphite/epoxy composite, T300/934. The double cantilever beam (DBC) test is used to determine Mode I (peel) critical strain energy release rate and the edge delamination tension (EDT) test is used to determine mixed Mode I and II (peel and shear) critical strain energy release rate. It is found that the electron interaction of the epoxy matrix material enhances the fracture toughness properties of the composite and that the test temperature has a significant effect on the fracture toughness of both baseline and irradiated material.

  8. Effect of machining on the performance of carbon/epoxy 3-D woven composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M.; Carlson, C.; Gu, P.; Sadler, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper evaluates 3-D orthogonal woven Carbon/Epoxy composites with holes for joint locations. The preforms were manufactured on a newly patented automatic 3-D weaving machine developed at North Carolina State University. The machine uses an electronic jacquard head and is capable of weaving the holes in the preforms without cutting the fibers. Composites were made at NC A&T State University by a resin transfer molding technique using an epoxy resin and a special mold which allows the holes to be formed. Holes were also made in other samples by regular drilling. Specimens were subjected to tensile tests. Comparison is made between samples without holes and samples with holes created by the two methods.

  9. Strain rate, temperature, and humidity on strength and moduli of a graphite/epoxy composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lifshitz, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of strain rate, temperature and humidity on the mechanical behavior of a graphite/epoxy fiber composite are presented. Three principal strengths (longitudinal, transverse and shear) and four basic moduli (E1, E2, G12 and U12) of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite were followed as a function of strain rate, temperature and humidity. Each test was performed at a constant tensile strain rate in an environmental chamber providing simultaneous temperature and humidity control. Prior to testing, specimens were given a moisture preconditioning treatment at 60 C. Values for the matrix dominated moduli and strength were significantly influenced by both environmental and rate parameters, whereas the fiber dominated moduli were not. However, the longitudinal strength was significantly influenced by temperature and moisture content. A qualitative explanation for these observations is presented.

  10. Properties of Two Carbon Composite Materials Using LTM25 Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruz, Juan R.; Shah, C. H.; Postyn, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, the properties of two carbon-epoxy prepreg materials are presented. The epoxy resin used in these two materials can yield lower manufacturing costs due to its low initial cure temperature, and the capability of being cured using vacuum pressure only. The two materials selected for this study are MR50/LTM25, and CFS003/LTM25 with Amoco T300 fiber; both prepregs are manufactured by The Advanced Composites Group. MR50/LTM25 is a unidirectional prepreg tape using Mitsubishi MR50 carbon fiber impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. CRS003/LTM25 is a 2 by 2 twill fabric using Amoco T300 fiber and impregnated with LTM25 epoxy resin. Among the properties presented in this report are strength, stiffness, bolt bearing, and damage tolerance. Many of these properties were obtained at three environmental conditions: cold temperature/dry (CTD), room temperature/dry (RTD), and elevated temperature/wet (ETW). A few properties were obtained at room temperature/wet (RTW), and elevated temperature/dry (ETD). The cold and elevated temperatures used for testing were -125 F and 180 F, respectively. In addition, several properties related to processing are presented.

  11. Mechanical and anticorrosion properties of nanosilica-filled epoxy-resin composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradi, M.; Kocijan, A.; Kek-Merl, D.; Zorko, M.; Verpoest, I.

    2014-02-01

    Homogeneous, 50-μm-thick, epoxy coatings and composite epoxy coatings containing 2 wt% of 130-nm silica particles were successfully synthetized on austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L. The surface morphology and mechanical properties of these coatings were compared and characterized using a profilometer, defining the average surface roughness and the Vickers hardness, respectively. The effects of incorporating the silica particles on the surface characteristics and the corrosion resistance of the epoxy-coated steel were additionally investigated with contact-angle measurements as well as by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. The silica particles were found to significantly improve the microstructure of the coating matrix, which was reflected in an increased hardness, increased surface roughness and induced hydrophobicity. Finally, the silica/epoxy coating was proven to serve as a successful barrier in a chloride-ion-rich environment with an enhanced anticorrosive performance, which was confirmed by the reduced corrosion rate and the increased coating resistance due to zigzagging of the diffusion path available to the ionic species.

  12. Development of Manila Hemp Fiber Epoxy Composite with High Tensile Properties Through Handpicking Fiber Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Takagi, Hitoshi; Yang, Zhimao

    Manila hemp fibers are separated to several sequent fragments from single fiber. The tensile strength of each fiber fragments and their epoxy composite are measured, followed by scanning electronic microscopic (SEM) analysis. The results show that the tensile strength of fiber fragments is almost constant along fiber. For composite, the tensile strength first increases and then decreases at the position near to root. The Young's modulus presents increasing with location from root to top for fiber and composite. Microstructure analysis indicates that the difference of tensile properties between fiber fragments derive from the difference of fiber diameter.

  13. Effect of alumina composition and surface integrity in alumina/epoxy composites on the ultrasonic attenuation properties.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eikhyun; Park, Gwanwoo; Lee, Jae-Wan; Cho, Sung-Min; Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Joongeok; Choi, Wonjoon; Ohm, Won-Suk; Kang, Shinill

    2016-03-01

    We report a method of fabricating backing blocks for ultrasonic imaging transducers, using alumina/epoxy composites. Backing blocks contain scatterers such as alumina particles interspersed in the epoxy matrix for the effective scattering and attenuation of ultrasound. Here, the surface integrity can be an issue, where the composite material may be damaged during machining because of differences in strength, hardness and brittleness of the hard alumina particles and the soft epoxy matrix. Poor surface integrity results in the formation of air cavities between the backing block and the piezoelectric element upon assembly, hence the increased reflection off the backing block and the eventual degradation in image quality. Furthermore, with an issue of poor surface integrity due to machining, it is difficult to increase alumina as scatterers more than a specific mass fraction ratio. In this study, we increased the portion of alumina within epoxy matrix by obtaining an enhanced surface integrity using a net shape fabrication method, and verified that this method could allow us to achieve higher ultrasonic attenuation. Backing blocks were net-shaped with various mass fractions of alumina to characterize the formability and the mechanical properties, including hardness, surface roughness and the internal micro-structure, which were compared with those of machined backing blocks. The ultrasonic attenuation property of the backing blocks was also measured.

  14. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49/epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three L-1011s, were inspected after three years' service, and found to be performing satisfactorily. There are six Kevlar-49 panels on each aircraft, including sandwich and solid laminate wing-body panels, and 150 C service aft engine fairings. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structure.

  15. Tomographic Imaging of Glass/Epoxy Composite with a Laser Based Ultrasonics Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, N.; Raghuram, V.; Munshi, P.; Kishore, N. N.; Arnold, W.

    2008-09-26

    The present work is an attempt to augment the classical laser-based-ultrasonics setup for tomographic imaging purposes. A Glass/epoxy composite with steel insert is the test specimen and time-of-flight data has been used for tomographic reconstruction. Multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique is used for this limited-view experiment. The resulting image is able to bring out the strong metal features.

  16. The elevated temperature behavior of particle reinforced Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    The elevated temperature modulus, strength and creep of SiC particle reinforced composites produced by the DURALCAN{trademark} are discussed. It is shown that the reinforcing particles provide an increased modulus over the complete temperature range studied, and the temperature dependence of the composite modulus is controlled by the temperature dependence of the matrix modulus. The composite strength decreases with increasing temperature, reflecting softening of the matrix due to over aging, and as a result, is dependent on the thermal stability of the matrix. The particles provide increased creep resistance, and there are differences between the creep of melt processed composites and those produced by powder metallurgy.

  17. Load-induced debonding of FRP composites applied to reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blok, Joel; Brown, Jeff

    2009-05-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composites are widely used to increase the flexural and shear capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) elements. One potential disadvantage is that strengthened surfaces are no longer visible and cracks or delaminations that result from excessive loading or fatigue may go undetected. This research investigated thermal imaging techniques for monitoring and evaluating load-induced delamination of FRP composites applied to small scale RC beams. Two beams (3.5 in x 4.5 in x 58 in) were loaded monotonically to failure. Infrared thermography (IRT) inspections were performed at various load levels through failure using a composite phase imaging technique. Two similar beams were tested in fatigue and periodic IRT inspections were performed at 50,000-cycle intervals. Individual phase values for each pixel were designated as "well-bonded", "suspect" or "unbonded" to indicate the quality of FRP bond. Suspect areas included regions of excess thickened-epoxy tack-coat and smaller installation defects in the unloaded specimens. The long-term objective of this research is to develop a practical framework for conducting quantitative IRT inspections of FRP composites applied to RC and incorporating these results into acceptance criteria for new installations and predictions for the remaining service life of in-service FRP systems. This method may also offer insight into the necessity for repairs to in-service systems.

  18. Computational simulation of surface waviness in graphite/epoxy woven composites due to initial curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    Several models simulating plain weave, graphite/epoxy woven composites are presented, along with the effects that the simultaneous application of pressure and thermal loads have on their surfaces. The surface effects created by moisture absorption are also examined. The computational simulation consisted of using a two-dimensional finite element model for the composite. The properties of the finite element (FE) model are calculated by using the in-house composite mechanics computer code ICAN (Integrated Composite ANalyzer). MSC/NASTRAN is used for the FE analysis which yields the composite's top surface normalized displacements. These results demonstrate the importance of parameters such as the cure temperature (T sub o) and the resin content in the curing process of polymer-matrix composites. The modification of these parameters will help tailor the composite system to the desired requirements and applications.

  19. Durability of self-healing woven glass fabric/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tao; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Zhao, Jian Qing

    2009-07-01

    In this work, the durability of the healing capability of self-healing woven glass fabric/epoxy laminates was investigated. The composites contained a two-component healing system with epoxy-loaded urea-formaldehyde microcapsules as the polymerizable binder and CuBr2(2-methylimidazole)4 (CuBr2(2-MeIm)4) as the latent hardener. It was found that the healing efficiency of the laminates firstly decreased with storage time at room temperature, and then leveled off for over two months. By means of a systematic investigation and particularly verification tests with dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), diffusion of epoxy monomer from the microcapsules due to volumetric contraction of the composites during manufacturing was found to be the probable cause. The diffusing sites on the microcapsules were eventually blocked because the penetrated resin was gradually cured by the remnant amine curing agent in the composites' matrix, and eventually the healing ability was no longer reduced after a longer storage time. The results should help to develop approaches for improving the service stability of the laminates.

  20. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Vallittu, Pekka

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC) prostheses offer the advantages of good aesthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairsidemade composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. PMID:21526023

  1. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  2. Physical aging of linear and network epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, E. S.-W.; Wilkes, G. L.; Mcgrath, J. E.; Banthia, A. K.; Mohajer, Y.; Tant, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    Network and linear epoxy resins principally based on the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A and its oligomers are prepared and studied using diamine and anhydride crosslinking agents. Rubber modified epoxies and a carbon fiber reinforced composite are also investigated. All materials display time-dependent changes when stored at temperatures below the glass transition temperature after quenching (sub-T/g/ annealing). Solvent sorption experiments initiated after different sub-T(g) annealing times demonstrate that the rate of solvent uptake can be indirectly related to the free volume of the epoxy resins. Residual thermal stresses and water are found to have little effect on the physical aging process, which affects the sub-T(g) properties of uniaxial carbon fiber reinforced epoxy material. Finally, the importance of the recovery phenomenon which affects the durability of epoxy glasses is considered.

  3. Holographic and ultrasonic detection of bond flaws in aluminum panels reinforced with boron-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, R. J., Jr.; Thurston, L. B., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the application of holographic interferometry to the nondestructive detection of unbonded areas (flaws) in bonded panels. Flaw detection results were compared with results obtained with an ultrasonic flaw detector. Holography, with panel deformation accomplished by a reduction in ambient pressure, is less sensitive for flaws beneath 5 and 10 plies of boron-epoxy than the ultrasonic method, though it does have its operational advantages. A process for the manufacture of bonded panels which incorporate known unbonded areas was also developed. The unbonded areas were formed without the use of foreign materials, which makes the method suitable for the construction of reference standards for bonded panels whenever needed for the proper setup of ultrasonic flaw-detection instruments.

  4. Nonlinear FE simulations of structural behavior parameters of reinforced concrete beam with epoxy-bonded FRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasmal, Saptarshi; Kalidoss, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, investigations on fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP) plated-reinforced concrete (RC) beam are carried out. Numerical investigations are performed by using a nonlinear finite element analysis by incorporating cracking and crushing of concrete. The numerical models developed in the present study are validated with the results obtained from the experiment under monotonic load using the servo-hydraulic actuator in displacement control mode. Further, the validated numerical models are used to evaluate the influence of different parameters. It is found from the investigations that increase in the elastic modulus of adhesive layer and CFRP laminate increases the interfacial stresses whereas increase in laminate modulus decreases the displacement and reinforcement strain of the beam. It is also observed that increase in the adhesive layer can largely reduce the interfacial stresses, whereas increase in laminate thickness increases it. However, increase in laminate thickness decreases the displacement and reinforcement strain of the beam significantly. It is mention worthy that increase in laminate length reduces the interfacial stresses, whereas CFRP width change does not affect the interfacial stresses. The study will be useful for the design and practicing engineers for arriving at the FRP-based strengthening schemes for RC structures judiciously.

  5. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  6. Modelling of dimensional stability of fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Hosangadi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Various methods of predicting the expansion and diffusion properties of composite laminates are reviewed. The prediction equations for continuous fiber composites can be applied to SMC composites as the effective fiber aspect ratio in the latter is large enough. The effect of hygrothermal expansion on the dimensional stability of composite laminates was demonstrated through the warping of unsymmetric graphite/epoxy laminates. The warping is very sensitive to the size of the panel, and to the moisture content which is in turn sensitive to the relative humidity in the environment. Thus, any long term creep test must be carried out in a humidity-controlled environment. Environmental effects in SMC composites and bulk polyester were studied under seven different environments. The SMC composites chosen are SMC-R25, SMC-R40, and SMC-R65.

  7. Modelling of volumetric composition and mechanical properties of unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites - Effect of enzymatic fibre treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Thygesen, A.; Meyer, AS; Madsen, B.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to assess the effect of enzymatic fibre treatments on the fibre performance in unidirectional hemp/epoxy composites by modelling the volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites. It is shown that the applied models can well predict the changes in volumetric composition and mechanical properties of the composites when differently treated hemp fibres are used. The decrease in the fibre correlated porosity factor with the enzymatic fibre treatments shows that the removal of pectin by pectinolytic enzymes results in a better fibre impregnation by the epoxy matrix, and the mechanical properties of the composites are thereby increased. The effective fibre stiffness and strength established from the modelling show that the enzymatic removal of pectin also leads to increased mechanical properties of the fibres. Among the investigated samples, the composites with hydrothermally pre-treated and enzymatically treated fibres have the lowest porosity factor of 0.08 and the highest mechanical properties. In these composites, the effective fibre stiffness and strength are determined to be 83 GPa and 667 MPa, respectively, when the porosity efficiency exponent is set equal to 2. Altogether, it is demonstrated that the applied models provide a concept to be used for the evaluation of performance of treated fibres in composites.

  8. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  9. Effect of reinforcement surface functionalization on the mechanical properties of nacre-like bulk lamellar composites processed by a hybrid conventional method.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Selen N; Dericioglu, Arcan F

    2013-05-01

    Alumina platelet reinforced epoxy matrix composites with an architecture resembling to natural nacre were fabricated by a hybrid conventional method called Hot-press Assisted Slip Casting process (HASC). Correlation between processing parameters, platelet content, platelet orientation and mechanical property enhancement of the fabricated composites was examined. In order to investigate the effect of interfacial compatibility and bonding on the mechanical properties of the fabricated inorganic-organic composites, platelet surfaces were modified with both epoxy- and amino-functional silanes. As received and functionalized platelet surfaces were studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the success of surface modification. Fabricated bio-inspired bulk lamellar composite materials were characterized in terms of their microstructural architecture and mechanical properties. The results obtained indicated that HASC processed composites exhibit enhanced flexural strength, stiffness and hardness, as compared to neat epoxy and composites fabricated by simple mixing, as a result of their nacre-like architecture with well aligned platelets. It has been also observed that functionalization by both type of silanes improves interfacial adhesion between platelets and epoxy matrix resulting in further enhancement of the mechanical properties of bulk lamellar composites fabricated by HASC. PMID:23498226

  10. Studies of Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Nanotubes/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guang-Lin

    2010-10-01

    Less weight, excellent mechanical properties, and high efficiency in absorbing electromagnetic (EM) wave make carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composites attractive for microwave technology applications. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have much higher performance-to-price ratio (PPR) than SWNTs do in the composite applications. In this work, we aim to study the effect of the outside diameter (OD) distributions of MWNTs on their microwave absorption properties. We have fabricated six groups of carbon nanotube/epoxy composite samples with various OD distributions. The weight percentages of MWNTs in the composites were controlled in the range from 1 to 10%. We utilized a microwave resonant cavity technique to measure the microwave absorption properties of all the sixty samples around the central frequency of 9.968 GHz. Our results have shown that the maxima of EM wave absorptions for the six groups of samples were all around 7% MWNTs weight percentage. We further studied the effective attenuations of the electric and magnetic fields in six groups of MWNT composite samples with the same (7 %) MWNT blend in epoxy. The results show that, in general, the MWNTs with smaller diameters have higher microwave absorption at 9.968 GHz. However, sample group M5 (OD<8nm) shows unusual results, a lower microwave absorption than the other samples. We then used a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the morphologies of the MWNT samples. Based on the SEM analysis and microwave absorption measurements, we found that the efficiency of the microwave absorption of MWNT/Epoxy composites is strongly affected by the morphologies/structures of MWNTs in individual bundles.

  11. Spray-Coated Halloysite-Epoxy Composites: A Means To Create Mechanically Robust, Vertically Aligned Nanotube Composites.

    PubMed

    Song, Kenan; Polak, Roberta; Chen, Dayong; Rubner, Michael F; Cohen, Robert E; Askar, Khalid A

    2016-08-10

    Halloysite nanotube-filled epoxy composites were fabricated using spray-coating methods. The halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were aligned by the hydrodynamic flow conditions at the spray nozzle, and the polymer viscosity helped to preserve this preferential orientation in the final coatings on the target substrates. Electron microscopy demonstrated a consistent trend of higher orientation degree in the nanocomposite coatings as viscosity increased. The nanoindentation mechanical performances of these coatings were studied using a Hysitron TriboIndenter device. Composites showed improvements up to ∼50% in modulus and ∼100% in hardness as compared to pure epoxy, and the largest improvements in mechanical performance correlated with higher alignment of HNTs along the plane-normal direction. Achieving this nanotube alignment using a simple spray-coating method suggests potential for large-scale production of multifunctional anisotropic nanocomposite coatings on a variety of rigid and deformable substrates. PMID:27428814

  12. TECHNICAL NOTE: Active control for stress intensity of crack-tips under mixed mode by shape memory TiNi fiber epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamoto, A.; Zhao, H.; Azakami, T.

    2007-06-01

    The paper presented the effectiveness of a shape memory alloy hybrid composite. It was designed to actively suppress stress intensity in the vicinity of a crack-tip. A shape memory alloy (SMA) TiNi fiber reinforced epoxy composite was fabricated based on the proposed design concept and its material and mechanical properties were investigated by photoelastic examinations. The stress intensity factors, KI and KII, at a crack-tip decreased temperatures greater than Af under mixed mode. The phenomenon was caused by the recovery force of the TiNi fiber. The relationship of the stress intensity factors with the prestrain in the SMA fiber as well as with the ambient temperature in an isothermal furnace was clarified. On this basis, the active control for stress intensity by a shape memory composite was discussed.

  13. Epoxy matrix composites filled with micro-sized LD sludge: wear characterization and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Abhilash; Satapathy, Alok

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the very high cost of conventional filler materials in polymer composites, exploring the possibility of using low cost minerals and industrial wastes for this purpose has become the need of the hour. In view of this, the present work includes the development and the wear performance evaluation of a new class of composites consisting of epoxy and microsized LD sludge. LD sludge or the Linz-Donawitz Sludge (LDS) are the fine solid particles recovered after wet cleaning of the gas emerging from LD convertors during steel making. Epoxy composites filled with different proportions (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt %) of LDS are fabricated by conventional hand lay-up technique. Dry sliding wear trials are performed on the composite specimens under different test conditions as per ASTM G 99 following a design of experiment approach based on Taguchi's orthogonal arrays. The Taguchi approach leads to the recognition of most powerful variables that predominantly control the wear rate. This parametric analysis reveals that LDS content and sliding velocity affects the specific wear rate more significantly than normal load and sliding distance. Furthermore with increase in LDS content specific wear rate of the composite decreases for a constant sliding velocity. The sliding wear behavior of these composites under an extended range of test conditions is predicted by a model based on the artificial neural network (ANN).

  14. Combining Through-Thickness Reinforcement and Self-Healing for Improved Damage Tolerance and Durability of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Czabaj, Michael W.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Tsampas, Spiros; Greenhalgh, Emile S.; McCombe, Gregory; Bond, Ian P.; Trask, Richard

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to develop a prototype method for adding through-thickness hollow glass tubes infused with uncured resin and hardener in a carbon Z-pin through-thickness reinforcement field embedded in a composite laminate. Two types of tube insertion techniques were attempted in an effort to ensure the glass tubes survived the panel manufacturing process. A self-healing resin was chosen with a very low viscosity, two component, liquid epoxy resin system designed to be mixed at a 2-to-1 ratio of epoxy to hardener. IM7/8552 carbon epoxy double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were cut from the hybrid Z-pin and glass tube reinforced panels and tested. In-situ injection of resin and hardener directly into glass tubes, in a staggered pattern to allow for 2-to-1 ratio mixing, resulted in partial healing of the fracture plane, but only if the injection was performed while the specimen was held at maximum load after initial fracture. Hence, there is some potential for healing delamination via resin and hardener delivered through a network of through-thickness glass tubes, but only if the tubes are connected to a reservoir where additional material may be injected as needed.

  15. Multilayered Glass Fibre-reinforced Composites In Rotational Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. C.; Harkin-Jones, E.; Kearns, M.; McCourt, M.

    2011-05-01

    The potential of multiple layer fibre-reinforced mouldings is of growing interest to the rotational moulding industry because of their cost/performance ratio. The particular problem that arises when using reinforcements in this process relate to the fact that the process is low shear and good mixing of resin and reinforcement is not optimum under those conditions. There is also a problem of the larger/heavier reinforcing agents segregating out of the powder to lay up on the inner part surface. In this study, short glass fibres were incorporated and distributed into a polymer matrix to produce fibre-reinforced polymer composites using the rotational moulding process and characterised in terms of morphology and mechanical properties.

  16. Mechanical properties of woven glass fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Kanie, Takahito; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to measure the flexural and compressive strengths and the corresponding moduli of cylindrical composite specimens reinforced with woven glass fiber. Test specimens were made by light-curing urethane dimethacrylate oligomer with woven glass fiber of 0.18-mm standard thickness. Tests were conducted using four reinforcement methods and two specimen diameters. Flexural strength and modulus of woven glass fiber-reinforced specimens were significantly greater than those without woven glass fiber (p < 0.01). Likewise, compressive strength of reinforced specimens was significantly greater than those without woven glass fiber (p < 0.01), except for specimens reinforced with woven glass fiber oriented at a tilt direction in the texture (p > 0.05). In terms of comparison between the two specimen diameters, no statistically significant differences in flexural strength and compressive strength (p > 0.05) were observed.

  17. Designing with figer-reinforced plastics (planar random composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of composite mechanics to predict the hygrothermomechanical behavior of planar random composites (PRC) is reviewed and described. These composites are usually made from chopped fiber reinforced resins (thermoplastics or thermosets). The hygrothermomechanical behavior includes mechanical properties, physical properties, thermal properties, fracture toughness, creep and creep rupture. Properties are presented in graphical form with sample calculations to illustrate their use. Concepts such as directional reinforcement and strip hybrids are described. Typical data that can be used for preliminary design for various PRCs are included. Several resins and molding compounds used to make PRCs are described briefly. Pertinent references are cited that cover analysis and design methods, materials, data, fabrication procedures and applications.

  18. Electrical and mechanical properties of titanium dioxide nanoparticle filled epoxy resin composites

    SciTech Connect

    Polyzos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; More, Karren Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles. In this work we investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  19. ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE NANOPARTICLE FILLED EPOXY RESIN COMPOSITES

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, G.; Tuncer, E.; Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Ellis, A. R.; More, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous solution. They were dispersed into an epoxy polymer matrix (commercially available under the trade name Araldite 5808) using a planetary mixer. Nanocomposite materials were prepared with several weight loadings of nanoparticles In this work we Investigate the effects of the particle agglomeration on the mechanical and electrical properties of the composites. The structure of the composites was probed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For investigating the mechanical properties, a dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA) was employed. The dielectric breakdown strength and the impedance response were also measured in order to characterize the insulating properties of the nanocomposites and their potential use in high voltage applications.

  20. Microwave behaviour comparison between different carbon based materials in epoxy resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorcelli, M.; Savi, P.; Guastella, S.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2016-05-01

    Because of their low weight and high performance, polymer composites are important materials for new applications. Their properties (electrical, mechanical, …) can in fact be tuned using different kind of filler and percentage. Carbon fillers are among the most used in composites when tuning electrical proprieties is the target. Different carbon fillers can be used. From cheaper (e.g. carbon black), to eco-friendly (e.g. Biochar) or more sophisticate (e.g. carbon nanotubes). In this work, we studied the microwave performance of these different kinds of carbon filler dispersed in Epoxy resin.

  1. Equation of state of aluminum-iron oxide-epoxy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Jennifer L.; Ferranti, Louis; Austin, Ryan A.; Dick, Richard D.; Foley, Jason R.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; McDowell, David L.; Benson, David J.

    2007-05-01

    We report on the measurements of the shock equation of state (Hugoniot) of an Al/Fe2O3/epoxy composite, prepared by epoxy cast curing of powder mixtures. Explosive loading, with Baratol, trinitrotoluene (TNT), and Octol, was used for performing experiments at higher pressures, in which case shock velocities were measured in the samples and aluminum, copper, or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) donor material, using piezoelectric pins. The explosive loading of the metal donors (aluminum and copper) will be discussed. Gas gun experiments provide complementary lower pressure data in which piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) stress gauges were used to measure the input and propagated stress wave profiles in the sample and the corresponding shock propagation velocity. The results of the Hugoniot equation of state are compared with mesoscale finite-element simulations, which show good agreement.

  2. Comparison of energy absorption of carbon/epoxy and carbon/PEEK composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, H.; Coppola, J. C.; Hull, D.; Maekawa, Z.; Sato, H.

    1992-07-01

    Axial compressive tests have been carried out on carbon fiber/epoxy and carbon fiber/PEEK tubes made from unidirectional prepreg materials. Three fiber architectures were investigated: unidirectional fibers parallel (0 deg) to the axis of the tube, +/- 30 deg, and +/- 45 deg. One set of tubes was machined with a 45-deg chamfer at one end in an attempt to trigger progressive crushing, and the other set had square ends to determine the compressive strength of the material. Stable progressive crushing occurred in +/- 45 deg carbon fiber/epoxy tubes and 0-deg carbon fiber/PEEK tubes where the crush stress was significantly lower than the compressive fracture strength. The 0-deg carbon fiber/PEEK tubes had a specific energy absorption of 180 kJ/kg, which is the highest value recorded for any material. This high value is interpreted in terms of the high interlaminar toughness of PEEK-matrix composites.

  3. Properties of multiaxial and 3-D orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bilisik, A.K.; Mohamed, M.H.

    1995-06-01

    A new three-dimensional multiaxial weaving technique was developed at NCSU. Rectangular cross-sectional preforms were fabricated. The preforms have five sets of yarn: these are warp, filling, Z-yarn and {+-}45{degree} yarns. The preforms which are made from carbon fibers were consolidated by vacuum impregnation molding at N.C. A and T State University. Epoxy/resin was used as the matrix. The unit cell of the multiaxial 3-D woven structure has been described. Mechanical tests were carried out on multiaxial 3-D woven and orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites. The tests included bending, interlaminar shear and in-plane shear. Test results for both structures were compared and are presented.

  4. Fundamental analysis of the failure of polymer-based fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanninen, M. F.; Rybicki, E. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Broek, D.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model predicting the strength of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites containing known flaws and with linear elastic-brittle material behavior was developed. The approach was to imbed a local heterogeneous region surrounding the crack tip into an anisotropic elastic continuum. This (1) permits an explicit analysis of the micromechanical processes involved in the fracture, and (2) remains simple enough to be useful in practical computations. Computations for arbitrary flaw size and orientation under arbitrary applied loads were performed. The mechanical properties were those of graphite epoxy. With the rupture properties arbitrarily varied to test the capabilities of the model to reflect real fracture modes, it was shown that fiber breakage, matrix crazing, crack bridging, matrix-fiber debonding, and axial splitting can all occur during a period of (gradually) increasing load prior to catastrophic failure. The calculations also reveal the sequential nature of the stable crack growth process proceding fracture.

  5. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Fiber-Reinforced Composite Stiffened Plate Under Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Abdi, Frank; Chamis, Christos C.; Tsouros, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    S-Glass/epoxy laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate structure with laminate configuration (0/90)5 was simulated to investigate damage and fracture progression, under uniform pressure. For comparison reasons a simple plate was examined, in addition with the stiffened plate. An integrated computer code was used for the simulation. The damage initiation began with matrix failure in tension, continuous with damage and/or fracture progression as a result of additional matrix failure and fiber fracture and followed by additional interply delamination. Fracture through the thickness began when the damage accumulation was 90%. After that stage, the cracks propagate rapidly and the structures collapse. The collapse load for the simple plate is 21.57 MPa (3120 psi) and for the stiffened plate 25.24 MPa (3660 psi).

  6. An Assessment of Self-Healing Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Several reviews and books have been written concerning self-healing polymers over the last few years. These have focused primarily on the types of self-healing materials being studied, with minor emphasis given to composite properties. The purpose of this review is to assess the self-healing ability of these materials when utilized in fiber reinforced composites

  7. Hybrid carbon-glass fiber/toughened epoxy thick composites subject to drop-weight and ballistic impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevkat, Ercan

    The goals of this study are to investigate the low velocity and ballistic impact response of thick-section hybrid fiber composites at room temperature. Plain-woven S2-Glass and IM7 Graphite fabrics are chosen as fiber materials reinforcing the SC-79 epoxy. Four different types of composites consisting of alternating layers of glass and graphite woven fabric sheets are considered. Tensile tests are conducted using 98 KN (22 kip) MTS testing machine equipped with environmental chamber. Low-velocity impact tests are conducted using an Instron-Dynatup 8250 impact test machine equipped with an environmental chamber. Ballistic impact tests are performed using helium pressured high-speed gas-gun. Tensile tests results were used to define the material behavior of the hybrid and non-hybrid composites in Finite Element modeling. The low velocity and ballistic impact tests showed that hybrid composites performance was somewhere between non-hybrid woven composites. Using woven glass fabrics as outer skin improved the impact performance of woven graphite composite. However hybrid composites are prone to delamination especially between dissimilar layers. The ballistic limit velocity V50 hybrid composites were higher that of woven graphite composite and lower than that of woven glass composite. Both destructive cross-sectional micrographs and nondestructive ultrasonic techniques are used to evaluate the damage created by impact. The Finite Element code LS-DYNA is chosen to perform numerical simulations of low velocity and ballistic impact on thick-section hybrid composites. The damage progression in these composites shows anisotropic nonlinearity. The material model to describe this behavior is not available in LS-DYNA material library. Initially, linear orthotropic material with damage (Chan-Chan Model) is employed to simulate some of the experimental results. Then, user-defined material subroutine is incorporated into LS-DYNA to simulate the nonlinear behavior. The

  8. Regeneration efficiency, shuttle heat loss and thermal conductivity in epoxy-composite annualr gap regenerators from 4K to 80K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrtle, K.; Cygax, S.; Plateel, C.; Winter, C.

    1983-01-01

    A test apparatus designed to simulate a section of a Stirling cycle cryocooler was built. Measurements of regeneration efficiency, shuttle heat loss and thermal conductivity reported for several regenerator test sections. The test composites were epoxy glass, epoxy glass with lead particles, epoxy glass with activated charcoal and epoxy graphite. Losses measured for these materials were approximately the same. Losses are in good agreement with those calculated theoretically for an epoxy glass (C-10) composite. The implications of these results on cryocooler design are discussed.

  9. Recent progress in NASA Langley textile reinforced composites program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dexter, H. Benson; Harris, Charles E.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and sponsoring research to explore the benefits of textile reinforced composites for civil transport aircraft primary structures. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate the potential of affordable textile reinforced composite materials to meet design properties and damage tolerance requirements of advanced aircraft structural concepts. In addition to in-house research, the program was recently expanded to include major participation by the aircraft industry and aerospace textile companies. The major program elements include development of textile preforms, processing science, mechanics of materials, experimental characterization of materials, and development and evaluation of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. The NASA Langley in-house focus is as follows: development of a science-based understanding of resin transfer molding (RTM), development of powder-coated towpreg processes, analysis methodology, and development of a performance database on textile reinforced composites. The focus of the textile industry participation is on development of multidirectional, damage-tolerant preforms, and the aircraft industry participation is in the areas of design, fabrication and testing of textile reinforced composite structural elements and subcomponents. Textile processes such as 3D weaving, 2D and 3D braiding, and knitting/stitching are being compared with conventional laminated tape processes for improved damage tolerance. Through-the-thickness reinforcements offer significant damage tolerance improvements. However, these gains must be weighed against potential loss in in-plane properties such as strength and stiffness. Analytical trade studies are underway to establish design guidelines for the application of textile material forms to meet specific loading requirements. Fabrication and testing of large structural components are required to establish the full potential of textile reinforced

  10. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olowojoba, Ganiu B.; Eslava, Salvador; Gutierrez, Eduardo S.; Kinloch, Anthony J.; Mattevi, Cecilia; Rocha, Victoria G.; Taylor, Ambrose C.

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites. However, several challenges need to be overcome to take full advantage of the aforementioned properties of graphene. These include achieving good dispersion and interfacial properties between the graphene filler and the polymeric matrix. In the present work, we report the thermal and mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites prepared via a facile, scalable and commercially viable method. Electron micrographs of the composites demonstrate that the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is well dispersed throughout the composite. Although no improvements in glass transition temperature, tensile strength and thermal stability in air of the composites were observed, good improvements in thermal conductivity (about 36 %), tensile and storage moduli (more than 13 %) were recorded with the addition of 2 wt% of rGO.

  11. Manufacture and performance of carbon/epoxy 3-D woven composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J.; Drechsler, K.; Mohamed, Mansour; Gu, PU

    1992-01-01

    This paper evaluates 3-D orthogonal woven carbon/epoxy composites. Preforms were manufactured on an automatic 3-D weaving machine developed at N.C. State University. Matrix infiltration was conducted at MBB Central Laboratories. Testing was carried out at both locations and the joint results will be reported. The properties investigated include: interlaminar shear strength, compression, compression after impact, bending, tensile and penetration resistance. The 3-D orthogonal woven composites were compared with laminated and other 3-D composites made with preforms having interlock structure. C-scans were used to examine the quality of infiltration and the damage area after impact. The performance of the composites made from the 3-D orthogonal preforms showed superior properties compared to the other composites. The penetration resistance test showed unexpectedly very good performance.

  12. Ultrasonic and mechanical characterizations of fatigue states of graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Yuce, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Eight-ply (0, + or - 45, 0)s laminates of Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite epoxy composite are fabricated using various cure pressures ranging from 0.52 to 0.86 MPa and cure temperatures ranging from 150 C to 200 C. In general, the minimum composite void volume fraction is obtained at a cure temperature of 175 C and a cure pressure of 0.86 MPa, or at 200 C and 0.86 MPa. The ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz was found to correlate with the composite void volume fraction. Composite specimens were tested in flexural fatigue. Beyond 10,000 fatigue cycles, the ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz was found to increase and the flexural stiffness was found to decrease. The ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz of the as-fabricated composite can be correlated with the number of fatigue cycles to failure.

  13. Detection of environmental deterioration in fiber reinforced composites by Ft-Raman spectroscopy. Phase I. Final report, 30 July 1993-30 April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Farquharson, S.; Bananno, A.; Basilakis, R.; Carangelo, M.; DiTaranto, M.

    1994-05-01

    A number of advanced fiber reinforced organic matrix composites are being developed and applied in the aerospace industry. In these applications, the composites may be exposed to a variety of harsh environments, which may induce chemical and physical changes in the composite material, and ultimately lead to component failure. The successful use of these composites, therefore, requires methods to reliably detect and assess these changes. During this Phase I Program, a fiber optic based Fourier transform Raman spectrometer was specifically developed to perform nondestructive evaluation of environmentally damaged composites. Specifically, graphite and Kevlar reinforced epoxy and polyimide composite samples were subjected to thermal cycling, moisture exposure and ultraviolet irradiation. Three point flexure tests were used to measure flexural strength, flexural modulus, failure strain and failure load to assess induced mechanical property changes in the composites. Reflectance infrared spectra of the sample surfaces, as well as transmission infrared spectra of evolved gas phase chemical species were used to further characterize these changes.

  14. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  15. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  16. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  17. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  18. Reinforcement of composite laminate free edges with U-shaped caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Generalized plane strain finite element analysis is used to predict reduction of interlaminar normal stresses when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a laminate. Three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge cap designs. In an experimental program, symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of Kevlar-epoxy cloth are shown to be 130 to 140 percent stronger than uncapped laminates under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading. In addition, the coefficient of variation of the static tensile failure load decreases from 24 to 8 percent when edge caps are added. The predicted failure load calculated with the finite element results is 10 percent lower than the actual failure load. For both capped and uncapped laminates, actual failure loads are much lower than those predicted using classical lamination theory stresses and a two-dimensional failure criterion. Possible applications of the free edge reinforcement concept are described, and future research is suggested.

  19. Tensile and fatigue strength properties of Kevlar 29 aramid/epoxy unidirectional composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, C.

    1981-07-22

    Static and fatigue tensile strength properties of filament wound undirectional Kevlar 29/epoxy, typical of filament wound material used in flywheel rotors, were studied. Machining techniques were developed to minimize fiber fuzzing on edges. The static modulus, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 8.87 x 10/sup 6/ psi. The major Poisson's ratio is 0.37. The static composite tensile strength, normalized to 70% fiber volume fraction is 200 x 10/sup 3/ psi, corresponding to a fiber stress at failure of 286 x 10/sup 3/ psi, which is good for materials having a very high fiber volume fraction. The S-N curve for R = 0.7 was found to be quite flat. Although the techniques used in this program had previously been employed successfully to study the fatigue behavior of Kevlar 29/epoxy and Kevlar 49/epoxy unidirectional materials, we were unable to overcome the persistent problem of cohesive material failure in the tab regions. The apparent reason for this is the very low interlaminar shear strength of the filament wound material. 16 figures.

  20. The effects of space radiation on a chemically modified graphite-epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.; Sykes, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the space environment on the engineering properties and chemistry of a chemically modified T300/934 graphite-epoxy composite system are characterized. The material was subjected to 1.0 x 10 to the 10th power rads of 1.0 MeV electron irradiation under vacuum to simulate 30 years in geosynchronous earth orbit. Monotonic tension tests were performed at room temperature (75 F/24 C) and elevated temperature (250 F/121 C) on 4-ply unidirectional laminates. From these tests, inplane engineering and strength properties (E sub 1, E sub 2, Nu sub 12, G sub 12, X sub T, Y sub T) were determined. Cyclic tests were also performed to characterize energy dissipation changes due to irradiation and elevated temperature. Large diameter graphite fibers were tested to determine the effects of radiation on their stiffness and strength. No significant changes were observed. Dynamic-mechanical analysis demonstrated that the glass transition temperature was reduced by 50 F(28 C) after irradiation. Thermomechanical analysis showed the occurrence of volatile products generated upon heating of the irradiated material. The chemical modification of the epoxy did not aid in producing a material which was more radiation resistant than the standard T300/934 graphite-epoxy system. Irradiation was found to cause crosslinking and chain scission in the polymer. The latter produced low molecular weight products which plasticize the material at elevated temperatures and cause apparent material stiffening at low stresses at room temperature.

  1. Fabrication and Dielectric Properties of Lead-Free Inorganic Particles-Epoxy Resin Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobune, Masafumi; Takasaki, Keiko; Yazawa, Tetsuo

    2006-09-01

    Inorganic-organic composites with a 0-3 connectivity are fabricated from inorganic particles with a high relative permittivity (\\varepsilonr) and a low dielectric loss (\\tanδ), and epoxy resin. The compacted powder obtained by pulverizing BaZrO3-BaTiO3-Ba(Fe1/2Ta1/2)O3 (BZTFT) ceramics has 1/12th the \\varepsilonr and 72 times the \\tanδ of the ceramics. On the basis of the relationship between \\varepsilonr and BZTFT filler content, the experimental values of the composites are determined to be in good agreement with theoretical values calculated by following Nielsen’s complex rule in the filler content range of 50-80 vol %. The temperature dependence of the dielectric properties of BZTFT powder/epoxy resin (90/10, v/v) composites measured at different frequencies suggests that the temperature characteristics of the present materials correspond to the Z8T characteristics [Z8T; Electronic Industries Association (EIA) standard: Δ C/C25 {\\degC} is expressed as a rate of change within +22 and -33% in the temperature range from 10 to 150 °C] when represented by the temperature characteristics of surface-mounted capacitors. It is shown that the effect of the vacuum drying of the filler on the dielectric properties of the composites is larger than that of the silane coupling treatment and that the dielectric properties can be improved synergistically by performing both treatments.

  2. Effect of SiC Particles on the Electrical Conductivity of Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogti, F.; David, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the behavior of the electrical conductivity of epoxy/silicon carbide (SiC) composites as a function of weight fraction and particle size of SiC at room temperature has been investigated. Composite samples were prepared by a mixture composed of the same amount of hardener and resin (5 mg) with different amounts (ranging from 5 mg to 7 mg) of silicon carbide powder with different grain sizes (400 and 800 grit). The conduction current was measured under different applied voltages from 1 to 10 kV (corresponding to applied electrical fields from 0.04 kV/mm to 0.4 kV/mm), and the composites microstructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was shown that the electrical conductivity of epoxy/SiC composites was found to increase when the weight fraction of SiC was increased and also to increase non-linearly as a function of the electrical field.

  3. Impact Damage and Strain Rate Effects for Toughened Epoxy Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    Structural integrity of composite systems under dynamic impact loading is investigated herein. The GENOA virtual testing software environment is used to implement the effects of dynamic loading on fracture progression and damage tolerance. Combinations of graphite and glass fibers with a toughened epoxy matrix are investigated. The effect of a ceramic coating for the absorption of impact energy is also included. Impact and post impact simulations include verification and prediction of (1) Load and Impact Energy, (2) Impact Damage Size, (3) Maximum Impact Peak Load, (4) Residual Strength, (5) Maximum Displacement, (6) Contribution of Failure Modes to Failure Mechanisms, (7) Prediction of Impact Load Versus Time, and (8) Damage, and Fracture Pattern. A computer model is utilized for the assessment of structural response, progressive fracture, and defect/damage tolerance characteristics. Results show the damage progression sequence and the changes in the structural response characteristics due to dynamic impact. The fundamental premise of computational simulation is that the complete evaluation of composite fracture requires an assessment of ply and subply level damage/fracture processes as the structure is subjected to loads. Simulation results for the graphite/epoxy composite were compared with the impact and tension failure test data, correlation and verification was obtained that included: (1) impact energy, (2) damage size, (3) maximum impact peak load, (4) residual strength, (5) maximum displacement, and (6) failure mechanisms of the composite structure.

  4. Osteogenesis and cytotoxicity of a new Carbon Fiber/Flax/Epoxy composite material for bone fracture plate applications.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Zahra S; Giles, Erica; El Sawi, Ihab; Amleh, Asma; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    This study is part of an ongoing program to develop a new CF/Flax/Epoxy bone fracture plate to be used in orthopedic trauma applications. The purpose was to determine this new plate's in-vitro effects on the level of bone formation genes, as well as cell viability in comparison with a medical grade metal (i.e. stainless steel) commonly employed for fabrication of bone plates (positive control). Cytotoxicity and osteogenesis induced by wear debris of the material were assessed using Methyl Tetrazolium (MTT) assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for 3 osteogenesis specific gene markers, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osterix. Moreover, the Flax/Epoxy and CF/Epoxy composites were examined separately for their wettability properties by water absorption and contact angle (CA) tests using the sessile drop technique. The MTT results for indirect and direct assays indicated that the CF/Flax/Epoxy composite material showed comparable cell viability with no cytotoxicity at all incubation times to that of the metal group (p≥0.05). Osteogenesis test results showed that the expression level of Runx2 marker induced by CF/Flax/Epoxy were significantly higher than those induced by metal after 48 h (p=0.57). Also, the Flax/Epoxy composite revealed a hydrophilic character (CA=68.07°±2.05°) and absorbed more water up to 17.2% compared to CF/Epoxy, which reached 1.25% due to its hydrophobic character (CA=93.22°±1.95°) (p<0.001). Therefore, the new CF/Flax/Epoxy may be a potential candidate for medical applications as a bone fracture plate, as it showed similar cell viability with no negative effect on gene expression levels responsible for bone formation compared to medical grade stainless steel.

  5. Composition and method for making polyimide resin-reinforced fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A composition for making polyimide resin reinforced fibers or fabric is discussed. The composition includes a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end capping agent. The composition is impregnated into fibers or fabric and heated to form prepreg material. The tack retention characteristics of this prepreg material are improved by incorporating into the composition a liquid olefinic material compatible with the other ingredients of the composition. The prepreg material is heated at a higher temperature to effect formation of the polyimide resin and the monomeric additive is incorporated in the polyimide polymer structure.

  6. Friction and wear behavior of nanosilica-filled epoxy resin composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yingke; Chen, Xinhua; Song, Shiyong; Yu, Laigui; Zhang, Pingyu

    2012-06-01

    Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles (abridged as nano-SiO2) surface-capped with epoxide were dispersed in the solution of epoxy resin (abridged as EP) in tetrahydrofuran under magnetic stirring. Resultant suspension of nano-SiO2 in EP was then coated onto the surface of glass slides and dried at 80 °C in a vacuum oven for 2 h, generating epoxy resin-nanosilica composite coatings (coded as EP/nano-SiO2). EP coating without nano-SiO2 was also prepared as a reference in the same manner. A water contact angle meter and a surface profiler were separately performed to measure the water contact angles and surface roughness of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings. The friction and wear behavior of as-prepared EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings sliding against steel in a ball-on-plate contact configuration under unlubricated condition was evaluated. Particularly, the effect of coating composition on the friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings was highlighted in relation to their microstructure and worn surface morphology examined by means of scanning electron microscopy. Results indicate that EP/nano-SiO2 composite coatings have a higher surface roughness and water contact angle than EP coating. The EP-SiO2 coatings doped with a proper amount of hydrophilic SiO2 nanoparticles show lower friction coefficient than EP coating. However, the introduction of surface-capped nanosilica as the filler results in inconsistent change in the friction coefficient and wear rate of the filled EP-matrix composites; and it needs further study to achieve well balanced friction-reducing and antiwear abilities of the composite coatings for tribological applications.

  7. SiC reinforced aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, Pamela K.

    1987-01-01

    The tensile properties of SiC fiber, Ti3Al+Nb and SiC/Ti3Al+Nb composite have been determined from 300 to 1365 K. The composite results compared favorably to rule-of-mixtures (ROM) predictions in the intermediate temperature regime of 475 to 700 K. Deviations from ROM are discussed. Composite tensile results were compared on a strength/density basis to wrought superalloys and found to be superior. Fiber-matrix compatibility was characterized for the composite at 1250 and 1365 K for 1 to 100 hours.

  8. Studying Some of Electrical and Mechanical Properties for Kevlar Fiber Reinforced Epoxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafeeq, Sewench N.; Hussein, Samah M.

    2011-12-01

    As ordinary known the ability of synthesizing electrical conducting polymer composites is possible but with poor mechanical properties, for the solution of this problem, we carried out this study in order to obtain that both properties. Three methods were applied for preparing the conductive polyaniline (PANI) composites using Kevlar fiber fabric as substrate for the deposition of the PANI at one time and the prepared composite (EP/Kevlar fiber) at others. The chemical oxidative method was adopted for polymerization of the aniline and simultaneously protonated of PANI with a hydrochloric acid at concentration (1M). Two kinds of oxidation agents (FeCl3.6H2O) and ((NH4)2S2O8) were used. The electrical measurements indicate the effect of each preparation method, kind of oxidant agent and the kind of mat erial which PANI deposited on the electrical results. The conductivity results showed that the prepared composites lie within semiconductors region. Temperature—dependence of electric conductivity results showed semiconductors and conductors behavior of this material within the applied temperature ranges. The mechan ical property (tensile strength) was studied. X-ray diffraction study showed the crystalline structure for EP/Kevlar fiber/PANI composites prepared by the three methods. These results gave optimism to the synthesis of conductive polymer composites with excellent mechanical properties..

  9. The effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion of graphite fiber-epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Maciag, C.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fiber epoxy composites, several pristine and brominated carbon fiber-epoxy composite samples were subjected to thermomechanical analysis. The CTE's of these samples were measured in the uniaxial and transverse directions. The CTE was dominated by the fibers in the uniaxial direction, while it was dominated by the matrix in the transverse directions. Bromination had no effect on the CTE of any of the composites. In addition, the CTE of fiber tow was measured in the absence of a polymer matrix, using an extension probe. The results from this technique were inconclusive.

  10. Strength of fabric reinforced Blackglas composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, C.; Ko, F.K.

    1996-12-31

    In brittle matrix composites the role of matrix porosity; interface; and matrix/fiber properties degradation due to processing are especially critical for the strength of the composite. In this paper, the Fabric Geometry Model (FGM) is modified to predict the strength of fabric composites. An incremental strain approach in conjunction with strain energy criterion is presented in order to account for the potentially nonlinear behavior of the materials, as seen in the experimental stress-strain curves of Nextel/Blackglas, composites. The failure of the composite is determined by use of a modified maximum strain energy criterion, which is based on the relative magnitudes of the various energy terms in corresponding direction. The effects of porosity, microcracks, fiber and matrix degradation, and fiber/matrix interface are also considered in the modified model.

  11. Mode II Interlaminar Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Characterization of a Graphite Epoxy Composite Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, T. Kevin; Johnston, William M.; Toland, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness and delamination onset and growth characterization data were generated for IM7/8552 graphite epoxy composite materials from two suppliers for use in fracture mechanics analyses. Both the fracture toughness testing and the fatigue testing were conducted using the End-notched Flexure (ENF) test. The ENF test for mode II fracture toughness is currently under review by ASTM as a potential standard test method. This current draft ASTM protocol was used as a guide to conduct the tests on the IM7/8552 material. This report summarizes the test approach, methods, procedures and results of this characterization effort.

  12. Flight service evaluation of Kevlar-49 epoxy composite panels in wide-bodied commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Kevlar-49 fairing panels, installed as flight service components on three l-1011's, were inspected after 8 years service. The fairings had accumulated a total of 62,000 hours, with one ship set having 20,850 hours service. Kevlar-49 components were found to be performing satisfactorily in service with no major problems. The only defects noted were minor impact damage, a few minor disbonds and a minor degree of fastener hole fraying and elongation. The service history to date indicates that Kevlar-49 epoxy composite materials have satisfactory service characteristics for use in aircraft secondary structures.

  13. Thermal response of radiantly heated Kevlar and graphite/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fanucci, J.P.

    1987-02-01

    The response of Kevlar and graphite/epoxy composites subjected to simulated nuclear or laser thermal loads was measured. A solar furnace was used to radiantly heat samples at flux rates of up to 55 cal/sq cm per sec and total fluences of approximately 100 cal/sq cm. An iterative numerical technique was used to estimate the thermophysical properties of the materials by matching observed temperature-time histories with analytical predictions. Comparison of results obtained during this program with previously published data suggests that free stream velocity, which affects smoke blockage and char layer removal, is a critical design parameter. 8 references.

  14. Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A method for measuring the acoustic velocity in a thin sheet of a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) material was investigated. This method uses two identical acoustic-emission (AE) sensors, one to transmit and one to receive. The delay time as a function of distance between sensors determines a bulk velocity. A lightweight fixture (balsa wood in the current implementation) provides a consistent method of positioning the sensors, thus providing multiple measurements of the time delay between sensors at different known distances. A linear fit to separation, x, versus delay time, t, will yield an estimate of the velocity from the slope of the line.

  15. CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE MATERIALS PRODUCED BY GAMMA RADIATION INDUCED CURING OF EPOXY RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Dispenza, C.; Spadaro, G.; Alessi, S.

    2008-08-28

    It is well known that ionizing radiation can initiate polymerization of suitable monomers for many applications. In this work an epoxy difunctional monomer has been used as matrix of a carbon fibre composite in order to produce materials through gamma radiation, for aerospace and advanced automotive applications. Radiation curing has been performed at different absorbed doses and, as comparison, also thermal curing of the same monomer formulations has been done. Furthermore some irradiated samples have been also subjected to a post irradiation thermal curing in order to complete the polymerization reactions. The properties of the cured materials have been studied by moisture absorption isotherms, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis and mechanical flexural tests.

  16. Evaluation of Microcracking in Two Carbon-Fiber/Epoxy-Matrix Composite Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two graphite/epoxy cryogenic pressure vessels were evaluated for microcracking. The X-33 LH2 tank lobe skins were extensively examined for microcracks. Specimens were removed from the inner skin of the X-33 tank for tensile testing. The data obtained from these tests were used to model expected microcrack density as a function of stress. Additionally, the laminate used in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Composite Conformal, Cryogenic, Common Bulkhead, Aerogel-Insulated Tank (CBAT) was evaluated. Testing was performed in an attempt to predict potential microcracking during testing of the CBAT.

  17. A biosensor based on graphite epoxy composite electrode for aspartame and ethanol detection.

    PubMed

    Kirgöz, Ulkü Anik; Odaci, Dilek; Timur, Suna; Merkoçi, Arben; Alegret, Salvador; Beşün, Nurgün; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2006-06-16

    A gelatin membrane with carboxyl esterase and alcohol oxidase was subsequently integrated onto the surface of a graphite epoxy composite electrode (GECE). The developed biosensors showed linearity in the range of 2.5-400 microM for aspartame and 2.5-25 microM for ethanol with response times of 170 and 70s for each analyte, respectively. The resulting bienzyme biosensor was used for aspartame detection in diet coke samples and ethanol detection in beer and wine samples. From the obtained results, it can be concluded that the developed biosensor is a selective, practical and economic tool for aspartame and ethanol detection in real samples.

  18. Through-the-thickness properties of three-dimensionally woven carbon/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hartranft, D.; Parvizi-Majidi, A.

    1994-12-31

    A multi-section specimen has been designed and used for the direct measurement of the through-the-thickness tensile properties of three-dimensionally woven carbon/epoxy composites. Design optimization was conducted through the analysis of the stress fields using a two-dimensional boundary element method. three woven architectures were studied: a layer-to-layer angle interlock, a through-the-thickness angle interlock, and through-the-thickness orthogonal weave. All the preforms were infiltrated by the resin transfer molding technique. Several configurations of the multi-section specimen were tested and the results verified the findings of the numerical analyses.

  19. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes Upon Emissions From Cutting and Sanding Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Composites

    PubMed Central

    Heitbrink, William A.; Lo, Li-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being incorporated into structural composites to enhance material strength. During fabrication or repair activities, machining nanocomposites may release CNTs into the workplace air. An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the emissions generated by cutting and sanding on three types of epoxy-composite panels: Panel A containing graphite fibers, Panel B containing graphite fibers and carbon-based mat, and Panel C containing graphite fibers, carbon-based mat, and multi-walled CNTs. Aerosol sampling was conducted with direct-reading instruments, and filter samples were collected for measuring elemental carbon (EC) and fiber concentrations. Our study results showed that cutting Panel C with a band saw did not generate detectable emissions of fibers inspected by transmission electron microscopy but did increase the particle mass, number, and EC emission concentrations by 20% to 80% compared to Panels A and B. Sanding operation performed on two Panel C resulted in fiber emission rates of 1.9×108 and 2.8×106 fibers per second (f/s), while no free aerosol fibers were detected from sanding Panels A and B containing no CNTs. These free CNT fibers may be a health concern. However, the analysis of particle and EC concentrations from these same samples cannot clearly indicate the presence of CNTs, because extraneous aerosol generation from machining the composite epoxy material increased the mass concentrations of the EC. PMID:26478716

  20. Multilayer Graphene Enables Higher Efficiency in Improving Thermal Conductivities of Graphene/Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xi; Wang, Zhenyu; Wu, Ying; Liu, Xu; He, Yan-Bing; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2016-06-01

    The effects of number of graphene layers (n) and size of multilayer graphene sheets on thermal conductivities (TCs) of their epoxy composites are investigated. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the in-plane TCs of graphene sheets and the TCs across the graphene/epoxy interface simultaneously increase with increasing n. However, such higher TCs of multilayer graphene sheets will not translate into higher TCs of bulk composites unless they have large lateral sizes to maintain their aspect ratios comparable to the monolayer counterparts. The benefits of using large, multilayer graphene sheets are confirmed by experiments, showing that the composites made from graphite nanoplatelets (n > 10) with over 30 μm in diameter deliver a TC of ∼1.5 W m(-1) K(-1) at only 2.8 vol %, consistently higher than those containing monolayer or few-layer graphene at the same graphene loading. Our findings offer a guideline to use cost-effective multilayer graphene as conductive fillers for various thermal management applications. PMID:27140423