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Sample records for reinforcement function design

  1. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  2. Function transformation without reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, Franćois; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-05-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects.

  3. Reinforcement function design and bias for efficient learning in mobile robots

    SciTech Connect

    Touzet, C.; Santos, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    The main paradigm in sub-symbolic learning robot domain is the reinforcement learning method. Various techniques have been developed to deal with the memorization/generalization problem, demonstrating the superior ability of artificial neural network implementations. In this paper, the authors address the issue of designing the reinforcement so as to optimize the exploration part of the learning. They also present and summarize works relative to the use of bias intended to achieve the effective synthesis of the desired behavior. Demonstrative experiments involving a self-organizing map implementation of the Q-learning and real mobile robots (Nomad 200 and Khepera) in a task of obstacle avoidance behavior synthesis are described. 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Adaptive Design of Role Differentiation by Division of Reward Function in Multi-Agent Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tadahiro; Tabuchi, Kazuma; Sawaragi, Tetsuo

    There are several problems which discourage an organization from achieving tasks, e.g., partial observation, credit assignment, and concurrent learning in multi-agent reinforcement learning. In many conventional approaches, each agent estimates hidden states, e.g., sensor inputs, positions, and policies of other agents, and reduces the uncertainty in the partially-observable Markov decision process (POMDP), which partially solve the multiagent reinforcement learning problem. In contrast, people reduce uncertainty in human organizations in the real world by autonomously dividing the roles played by individual agents. In a framework of reinforcement learning, roles are mainly represented by goals for individual agents. This paper presents a method for generating internal rewards from manager agents to worker agents. It also explicitly divides the roles, which enables a POMDP task for each agent to be transformed into a simple MDP task under certain conditions. Several situational experiments are also described and the validity of the proposed method is evaluated.

  5. Reinforcing Functions of Androgyny: Partial Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartell, Patricia A.; And Others

    Given research findings that women have a strong tendency to describe the ideal man as androgynous, perhaps social interaction with an androgynous male could be seen as a social reward, whereas interaction with a masculine male may be less rewarding or aversive for women. A study was conducted to determine the functional properties of androgyny as…

  6. Automatic tuning of the reinforcement function

    SciTech Connect

    Touzet, C.; Santos, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work is to present a method that helps tuning the reinforcement function parameters in a reinforcement learning approach. Since the proposal of neural based implementations for the reinforcement learning paradigm (which reduced learning time and memory requirements to realistic values) reinforcement functions have become the critical components. Using a general definition for reinforcement functions, the authors solve, in a particular case, the so called exploration versus exploitation dilemma through the careful computation of the RF parameter values. They propose an algorithm to compute, during the exploration part of the learning phase, an estimate for the parameter values. Experiments with the mobile robot Nomad 200 validate their proposals.

  7. About the Reinforcement Function for Profit Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Wataru; Tatsumi, Shoji

    In this paper, we consider profit sharing that is one of the reinforcement learning methods. An agent learns a candidate solution of a problem from the reward that is received from the environment if and only if it reaches the destination state. A function that distributes the received reward to each action of the candidate solution is called the reinforcement function. On this learning system, the agent can reinforce the set of selected actions when it gets the reward. And the agent should not reinforce the detour actions. First, we will propose a new constraint equation about reinforcement functions to distribute the reinforcement values on the non-detour actions. If we use the reinforcement function to satisfy the constraint equation, the agent can select the non-detour actions directing to the destination state. Next, it is shown that the reinforcement function can be constant after learning process to suppress the selection of detour actions. Lastly, in computer simulations for maze problems, we show that the learning performance of agents does not depend on the size of environment.

  8. Reinforcement learning design for cancer clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yufan; Kosorok, Michael R.; Zeng, Donglin

    2009-01-01

    Summary We develop reinforcement learning trials for discovering individualized treatment regimens for life-threatening diseases such as cancer. A temporal-difference learning method called Q-learning is utilized which involves learning an optimal policy from a single training set of finite longitudinal patient trajectories. Approximating the Q-function with time-indexed parameters can be achieved by using support vector regression or extremely randomized trees. Within this framework, we demonstrate that the procedure can extract optimal strategies directly from clinical data without relying on the identification of any accurate mathematical models, unlike approaches based on adaptive design. We show that reinforcement learning has tremendous potential in clinical research because it can select actions that improve outcomes by taking into account delayed effects even when the relationship between actions and outcomes is not fully known. To support our claims, the methodology's practical utility is illustrated in a simulation analysis. In the immediate future, we will apply this general strategy to studying and identifying new treatments for advanced metastatic stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer, which usually includes multiple lines of chemotherapy treatment. Moreover, there is significant potential of the proposed methodology for developing personalized treatment strategies in other cancers, in cystic fibrosis, and in other life-threatening diseases. PMID:19750510

  9. Optimal Reward Functions in Distributed Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Tumer, Kagan

    2000-01-01

    We consider the design of multi-agent systems so as to optimize an overall world utility function when (1) those systems lack centralized communication and control, and (2) each agents runs a distinct Reinforcement Learning (RL) algorithm. A crucial issue in such design problems is to initialize/update each agent's private utility function, so as to induce best possible world utility. Traditional 'team game' solutions to this problem sidestep this issue and simply assign to each agent the world utility as its private utility function. In previous work we used the 'Collective Intelligence' framework to derive a better choice of private utility functions, one that results in world utility performance up to orders of magnitude superior to that ensuing from use of the team game utility. In this paper we extend these results. We derive the general class of private utility functions that both are easy for the individual agents to learn and that, if learned well, result in high world utility. We demonstrate experimentally that using these new utility functions can result in significantly improved performance over that of our previously proposed utility, over and above that previous utility's superiority to the conventional team game utility.

  10. Optimum detailed design of reinforced concrete frames using genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraj, V.; Ramasamy, J. V.

    2007-06-01

    This article presents the application of the genetic algorithm to the optimum detailed design of reinforced concrete frames based on Indian Standard specifications. The objective function is the total cost of the frame which includes the cost of concrete, formwork and reinforcing steel for individual members of the frame. In order for the optimum design to be directly constructible without any further modifications, aspects such as available standard reinforcement bar diameters, spacing requirements of reinforcing bars, modular sizes of members, architectural requirements on member sizes and other practical requirements in addition to relevant codal provisions are incorporated into the optimum design model. The produced optimum design satisfies the strength, serviceability, ductility, durability and other constraints related to good design and detailing practice. The detailing of reinforcements in the beam members is carried out as a sub-level optimization problem. This strategy helps to reduce the size of the optimization problem and saves computational time. The proposed method is demonstrated through several example problems and the optimum results obtained are compared with those in the available literature. It is concluded that the proposed optimum design model can be adopted in design offices as it yields rational, reliable, economical, time-saving and practical designs.

  11. Providing alternative reinforcers to facilitate tolerance to delayed reinforcement following functional communication training.

    PubMed

    Austin, Jillian E; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2015-09-01

    The earliest stages of functional communication training (FCT) involve providing immediate and continuous reinforcement for a communicative response (FCR) that is functionally equivalent to the targeted problem behavior. However, maintaining immediate reinforcement is not practical, and the introduction of delays is associated with increased problem behavior. The present study evaluated the effects of providing alternative reinforcers during delays to reinforcement with a 13-year-old boy with an intellectual disability. Problem behavior was less likely when alternative reinforcers were available during delays.

  12. Facilitating tolerance of delayed reinforcement during functional communication training.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W W; Thompson, R H; Hagopian, L P; Bowman, L G; Krug, A

    2000-01-01

    Few clinical investigations have addressed the problem of delayed reinforcement. In this investigation, three individuals whose destructive behavior was maintained by positive reinforcement were treated using functional communication training (FCT) with extinction (EXT). Next, procedures used in the basic literature on delayed reinforcement and self-control (reinforcer delay fading, punishment of impulsive responding, and provision of an alternative activity during reinforcer delay) were used to teach participants to tolerate delayed reinforcement. With the first case, reinforcer delay fading alone was effective at maintaining low rates of destructive behavior while introducing delayed reinforcement. In the second case, the addition of a punishment component reduced destructive behavior to near-zero levels and facilitated reinforcer delay fading. With the third case, reinforcer delay fading was associated with increases in masturbation and head rolling, but prompting and praising the individual for completing work during the delay interval reduced all problem behaviors and facilitated reinforcer delay fading.

  13. Engineering Design Handbook. Discontinuous Fiberglass Reinforced Thermoplastics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    polymer fami- ly. They can be formulated for excellent impact and creep resistance. Glass-reinforced ABS for- mulations for electroplating are also...generally are made of tough, hard, tool steels and beryllium- copper . They are built with sufficient mass and heat capacity so that they do not cool...generator de- signed to supply 2-5 kW output power and 3-30 MHz output frequency 2. A water-cooled copper work coil designed to establish the magnetic

  14. Working stress design method for reinforced soil walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, M. ); Mitchell, J.K. )

    1994-04-01

    A method for the internal design of reinforced soil walls based on working stresses is developed and evaluated using measurements from five full-scale structures containing a range of reinforcement types. It is shown that, in general, the stiffer the reinforcement system and the higher the stresses induced during compaction, the higher are the tensile stresses that must be resisted by the reinforcements. Unique features of this method, compared to currently used reinforced soil wall design methods, are that it can be applied to all types of reinforcement systems, reinforcement and soil stiffness properties are considered, and backfill compaction stresses are taken explicitly into account. The method can be applied either analytically or using design charts. A design example is included.

  15. Slope reinforcement design using geotextiles and geogrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setser, Darrell M.

    1990-08-01

    A geotextile is defined by ASTM as: any permeable textile material used with foundation, soil, rock, earth, or any other geotechnical engineering related material, as a integral part of a man-made project, structure, or system. A geogrid is defined as: any geotextile-related material used in a similar manner to geotextiles. They are usually made of plastic, but can be metal or wood. Geotextiles and geogrids are collectively referred to as geosynthetics in this paper. Geosynthetic reinforcement of slopes is a relatively new option available to the civil engineer. Slope angles can be increased and 'poor' soil can be used to construct economical soil-geosynthetic facilities. Uncertainties exist in the complex interaction between the soil and the geosynthetic but there are numerous procedures which ignore this in the design. The design procedures available may be conservative yet still may be an economical alternative when compared to more conventional options.

  16. Reinforce Design and Construction Issues with a Comprehensive Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schemmel, John J.

    In 1996, a comprehensive project was introduced in the first course of Reinforced Concrete Design, CVEG 4303 at the University of Arkansas. The primary purpose of this project was to highlight issues related to the construction of reinforced concrete elements. This semester-long project involves the design, fabrication, and testing of 8-foot long…

  17. Establishing Discriminative Control of Responding Using Functional and Alternative Reinforcers during Functional Communication Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Kuhn, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Two children with mental retardation were trained to emit different communication responses to request the reinforcer for destructive behavior and an alternative reinforcer. Differential reinforcement of communication reduced destructive behavior regardless of whether a functional reinforcer or an alternative reinforcer was available or whether…

  18. Providing Alternative Reinforcers to Facilitate Tolerance to Delayed Reinforcement Following Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Jillian E.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    The earliest stages of functional communication training (FCT) involve providing immediate and continuous reinforcement for a communicative response (FCR) that is functionally equivalent to the targeted problem behavior. However, maintaining immediate reinforcement is not practical, and the introduction of delays is associated with increased…

  19. Providing Alternative Reinforcers to Facilitate Tolerance to Delayed Reinforcement Following Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Jillian E.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    The earliest stages of functional communication training (FCT) involve providing immediate and continuous reinforcement for a communicative response (FCR) that is functionally equivalent to the targeted problem behavior. However, maintaining immediate reinforcement is not practical, and the introduction of delays is associated with increased…

  20. Choice as a function of reinforcer "hold": from probability learning to concurrent reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Greg; Neuringer, Allen

    2008-10-01

    Two procedures commonly used to study choice are concurrent reinforcement and probability learning. Under concurrent-reinforcement procedures, once a reinforcer is scheduled, it remains available indefinitely until collected. Therefore reinforcement becomes increasingly likely with passage of time or responses on other operanda. Under probability learning, reinforcer probabilities are constant and independent of passage of time or responses. Therefore a particular reinforcer is gained or not, on the basis of a single response, and potential reinforcers are not retained, as when betting at a roulette wheel. In the "real" world, continued availability of reinforcers often lies between these two extremes, with potential reinforcers being lost owing to competition, maturation, decay, and random scatter. The authors parametrically manipulated the likelihood of continued reinforcer availability, defined as hold, and examined the effects on pigeons' choices. Choices varied as power functions of obtained reinforcers under all values of hold. Stochastic models provided generally good descriptions of choice emissions with deviations from stochasticity systematically related to hold. Thus, a single set of principles accounted for choices across hold values that represent a wide range of real-world conditions.

  1. Glass Fiber Reinforced Metal Pressure Vessel Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Engineering Guide presents curves and general equations for safelife design of lightweight glass fiber reinforced (GFR) metal pressure vessels operating under anticipated Space Shuttle service conditions. The high composite vessel weight efficiency is shown to be relatively insensitive to shape, providing increased flexibility to designers establishing spacecraft configurations. Spheres, oblate speroids, and cylinders constructed of GFR Inconel X-750, 2219-T62 aluminum, and cryoformed 301 stainless steel are covered; design parameters and performance efficiencies for each configuration are compared at ambient and cryogenic temperature for an operating pressure range of 690 to 2760 N/sq cm (1000 to 4000 psi). Design variables are presented as a function of metal shell operating to sizing (proof) stress ratios for use with fracture mechanics data generated under a separate task of this program.

  2. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  3. Treatment of Pica through Multiple Analyses of Its Reinforcing Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazza, Cathleen C.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Hanley, Gregory P.; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Worsdell, April S.; And Others

    1998-01-01

    A study conducted functional analyses of the pica of three young children. The pica of one participant was maintained by automatic reinforcement; that of the other two was multiply-controlled by social and automatic reinforcement. Preference and treatment analyses were used to address the automatic function of the pica. (Author/CR)

  4. The Effects Of Reinforcement Magnitude On Functional Analysis Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The duration or magnitude of reinforcement has varied and often appears to have been selected arbitrarily in functional analysis research. Few studies have evaluated the effects of reinforcement magnitude on problem behavior, even though basic findings indicate that this parameter may affect response rates during functional analyses. In the current study, 6 children with autism or developmental disabilities who engaged in severe problem behavior were exposed to three separate functional analyses, each of which varied in reinforcement magnitude. Results of these functional analyses were compared to determine if a particular reinforcement magnitude was associated with the most conclusive outcomes. In most cases, the same conclusion about the functions of problem behavior was drawn regardless of the reinforcement magnitude. PMID:16033163

  5. Functional analysis screening for problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Querim, Angie C; Iwata, Brian A; Roscoe, Eileen M; Schlichenmeyer, Kevin J; Ortega, Javier Virués; Hurl, Kylee E

    2013-01-01

    A common finding in previous research is that problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement continues to occur in the alone condition of a functional analysis (FA), whereas behavior maintained by social reinforcement typically is extinguished. Thus, the alone condition may represent an efficient screening procedure when maintenance by automatic reinforcement is suspected. We conducted a series of 5-min alone (or no-interaction) probes for 30 cases of problem behavior and compared initial predictions of maintenance or extinction to outcomes obtained in subsequent FAs. Results indicated that data from the screening procedure accurately predicted that problem behavior was maintained by automatic reinforcement in 21 of 22 cases and by social reinforcement in 7 of 8 cases. Thus, results of the screening accurately predicted the function of problem behavior (social vs. automatic reinforcement) in 28 of 30 cases. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  6. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  7. Facilitating Tolerance of Delayed Reinforcement during Functional Communication Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Bowman, Lynn G.; Krug, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Three individuals with severe behavior disorders and mental retardation, whose destructive behaviors were being maintained by positive reinforcement, were treated using functional communication training with extinction. The case studies investigated techniques used to increase effectiveness of delayed reinforcement and to teach individuals with…

  8. Cohesive fracture model for functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Roesler, Jeffery

    2010-06-15

    A simple, effective, and practical constitutive model for cohesive fracture of fiber reinforced concrete is proposed by differentiating the aggregate bridging zone and the fiber bridging zone. The aggregate bridging zone is related to the total fracture energy of plain concrete, while the fiber bridging zone is associated with the difference between the total fracture energy of fiber reinforced concrete and the total fracture energy of plain concrete. The cohesive fracture model is defined by experimental fracture parameters, which are obtained through three-point bending and split tensile tests. As expected, the model describes fracture behavior of plain concrete beams. In addition, it predicts the fracture behavior of either fiber reinforced concrete beams or a combination of plain and fiber reinforced concrete functionally layered in a single beam specimen. The validated model is also applied to investigate continuously, functionally graded fiber reinforced concrete composites.

  9. Anisotropic reinforcement of acute anteroapical infarcts improves pump function.

    PubMed

    Fomovsky, Gregory M; Clark, Samantha A; Parker, Katherine M; Ailawadi, Gorav; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2012-07-01

    We hypothesize that a therapy that improves left ventricular (LV) pump function early after infarction should decrease the need for compensation through sympathetic activation and dilation, thereby reducing the risk of developing heart failure. The mechanical properties of healing myocardial infarcts are an important determinant of LV function, yet improving function by altering infarct properties has proven unexpectedly difficult. Using a computational model, we recently predicted that stiffening a large anterior infarct anisotropically (in only one direction) would improve LV function, whereas isotropic stiffening, the focus of previous studies and therapies, would not. The goal of this study was to test the novel strategy of anisotropic infarct reinforcement. We tested the effects of anisotropic infarct reinforcement in 10 open-chest dogs with large anteroapical infarcts that depressed LV pump function. We measured regional mechanics, LV volumes, and cardiac output at a range of preloads at baseline, 45 minutes after coronary ligation (ischemia), and 30 minutes later, after surgical reinforcement in the longitudinal direction (anisotropic). Ischemia shifted the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship and cardiac output curves rightward, decreasing cardiac output at matched end-diastolic pressure by 44%. Anisotropic reinforcement significantly improved systolic function without impairing diastolic function, recovering half the deficit in overall LV function. We conclude that anisotropic reinforcement is a promising new approach to improving LV function after a large myocardial infarction.

  10. Designing with figer-reinforced plastics (planar random composites)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    The use of composite mechanics to predict the hygrothermomechanical behavior of planar random composites (PRC) is reviewed and described. These composites are usually made from chopped fiber reinforced resins (thermoplastics or thermosets). The hygrothermomechanical behavior includes mechanical properties, physical properties, thermal properties, fracture toughness, creep and creep rupture. Properties are presented in graphical form with sample calculations to illustrate their use. Concepts such as directional reinforcement and strip hybrids are described. Typical data that can be used for preliminary design for various PRCs are included. Several resins and molding compounds used to make PRCs are described briefly. Pertinent references are cited that cover analysis and design methods, materials, data, fabrication procedures and applications.

  11. Establishing books as conditioned reinforcers for preschool children as a function of an observational intervention.

    PubMed

    Singer-Dudek, Jessica; Oblak, Mara; Greer, R Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects of an observational intervention (Greer & Singer-Dudek, 2008) on establishing children's books as conditioned reinforcers using a delayed multiple baseline design. Three preschool students with mild language and developmental delays served as the participants. Prior to the intervention, books did not function as reinforcers for any of the participants. The observational intervention consisted of a situation in which the participant observed a confederate being presented with access to books contingent on correct responses and the participant received nothing for correct responses. After several sessions of this treatment, the previously neutral books acquired reinforcing properties for maintenance and acquisition responses for all three participants.

  12. ESTABLISHING BOOKS AS CONDITIONED REINFORCERS FOR PRESCHOOL CHILDREN AS A FUNCTION OF AN OBSERVATIONAL INTERVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Singer-Dudek, Jessica; Oblak, Mara; Greer, R. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects of an observational intervention (Greer & Singer-Dudek, 2008) on establishing children's books as conditioned reinforcers using a delayed multiple baseline design. Three preschool students with mild language and developmental delays served as the participants. Prior to the intervention, books did not function as reinforcers for any of the participants. The observational intervention consisted of a situation in which the participant observed a confederate being presented with access to books contingent on correct responses and the participant received nothing for correct responses. After several sessions of this treatment, the previously neutral books acquired reinforcing properties for maintenance and acquisition responses for all three participants. PMID:21941376

  13. Feedback functions for variable-interval reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.; Baum, William M.

    1980-01-01

    On a given variable-interval schedule, the average obtained rate of reinforcement depends on the average rate of responding. An expression for this feedback effect is derived from the assumptions that free-operant responding occurs in bursts with a constant tempo, alternating with periods of engagement in other activities; that the durations of bursts and other activities are exponentially distributed; and that the rates of initiating and terminating bursts are inversely related. The expression provides a satisfactory account of the data of three experiments. PMID:16812187

  14. Design and behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mihilmy, Mahmoud Tharwat

    A comprehensive investigation of the design and behavior of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with externally bonded FRP laminates has been conducted. The study has confirmed the applicability of the strain compatibility method for calculating the increased ultimate moment capacity of the repaired beams. An upper limit to the amount of FRP that can be added to a specific structure was recommended to ensure ductile behavior. Design charts to facilitate calculations of the ultimate moment capacity for reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP laminates were developed. The results of a subsequent parametric investigation indicate that strengthening reinforced concrete beams with FRP laminates can enhance their ultimate capacity by as much as three times the original strength, especially for beams with a low steel ratio. It was also determined that, increasing the concrete compressive strength and the FRP modulus of elasticity increases the beam ultimate flexural capacity significantly; however, the repaired beams are less ductile than the pre-repaired concrete beams. During the course of the study, it had been noticed that the current ACI recommended method for calculating deflections for ordinary reinforced concrete beams does not render an accurate estimate for reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP laminates. A simplified equation for predicting the deflection of reinforced concrete beams repaired with FRP was developed and verified with comparisons to experimental results. The effectiveness of strengthening an existing bridge with externally bonded FRP laminates was investigated through comprehensive static and dynamic finite element analyses. The results of these analyses correlate well with field load test results. The repaired girders exhibited an average reduction in reinforcing steel stresses of 11 percent and an average reduction in midspan girder deflections of 9 percent. The results of the study also indicated that existing methods for

  15. Mohicanville Reinforced Dike Number 2 Design Memorandum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    ag O SO4 MOirrumU oOVER S6b MOITFlURE / OGRE[ NO.5• Z INa PuLA CONTAINED OVERnLAAcOs a. ZO- Of---.1 L w ro Id 40- I-* IQ Is Il ,1: LOAOING IN TOTAL...Figure A10. Law Engineering summary of undrained strength data on foundation cia .5 C 0.3 7TSF DESIGN STRENGTH4 FOR ETESTS 1.0 Ls DESIGN STRENGTH FOR VANE

  16. Design and fabrication of a boron reinforced intertank skirt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henshaw, J.; Roy, P. A.; Pylypetz, P.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to evaluate the structural efficiency of a boron reinforced shell, where the medium of reinforcement consists of hollow aluminum extrusions infiltrated with boron epoxy. Studies were completed for the design of a one-half scale minimum weight shell using boron reinforced stringers and boron reinforced rings. Parametric and iterative studies were completed for the design of minimum weight stringers, rings, shells without rings and shells with rings. Computer studies were completed for the final evaluation of a minimum weight shell using highly buckled minimum gage skin. The detail design is described of a practical minimum weight test shell which demonstrates a weight savings of 30% as compared to an all aluminum longitudinal stiffened shell. Sub-element tests were conducted on representative segments of the compression surface at maximum stress and also on segments of the load transfer joint. A 10 foot long, 77 inch diameter shell was fabricated from the design and delivered for further testing.

  17. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-01-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as ‘3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries. PMID:26494282

  18. Designing bioinspired composite reinforcement architectures via 3D magnetic printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua J.; Fiore, Brad E.; Erb, Randall M.

    2015-10-01

    Discontinuous fibre composites represent a class of materials that are strong, lightweight and have remarkable fracture toughness. These advantages partially explain the abundance and variety of discontinuous fibre composites that have evolved in the natural world. Many natural structures out-perform the conventional synthetic counterparts due, in part, to the more elaborate reinforcement architectures that occur in natural composites. Here we present an additive manufacturing approach that combines real-time colloidal assembly with existing additive manufacturing technologies to create highly programmable discontinuous fibre composites. This technology, termed as `3D magnetic printing', has enabled us to recreate complex bioinspired reinforcement architectures that deliver enhanced material performance compared with monolithic structures. Further, we demonstrate that we can now design and evolve elaborate reinforcement architectures that are not found in nature, demonstrating a high level of possible customization in discontinuous fibre composites with arbitrary geometries.

  19. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite high temperature component design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites (TFRS) are intended for use in high temperature turbine components. Current turbine component design methodology is based on applying the experience, sometimes semiempirical, gained from over 30 years of superalloy component design. Current composite component design capability is generally limited to the methodology for low temperature resin matrix composites. Often the tendency is to treat TFRS as just another superalloy or low temperature composite. However, TFRS behavior is significantly different than that of superalloys, and the high environment adds consideration not common in low temperature composite component design. The methodology used for preliminary design of TFRS components are described. Considerations unique to TFRS are emphasized.

  20. Flexural Strength of Functionally Graded Nanotube Reinforced Sandwich Spherical Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahapatra, Trupti R.; Mehar, Kulmani; Panda, Subrata K.; Dewangan, S.; Dash, Sushmita

    2017-02-01

    The flexural behaviour of the functionally graded sandwich spherical panel under uniform thermal environment has been investigated in the present work. The face sheets of the sandwich structure are made by the functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced material and the core face is made by the isotropic and homogeneous material. The material properties of both the fiber and matrix are assumed to be temperature dependent. The sandwich panel model is developed in the framework of the first order shear deformation theory and the governing equation of motion is derived using the variational principle. For the discretization purpose a suitable shell element has been employed from the ANSYS library and the responses are computed using a parametric design language (APDL) coding. The performance and accuracy of the developed model has been established through the convergence and validation by comparing the obtained results with previously published results. Finally, the influence of different geometrical parameters and material properties on the flexural behaviour of the sandwich spherical panel in thermal environment has been investigated through various numerical illustrations and discussed in details.

  1. Establishing Books as Conditioned Reinforcers for Preschool Children as a Function of an Observational Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer-Dudek, Jessica; Oblak, Mara; Greer, R. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effects of an observational intervention (Greer & Singer-Dudek, 2008) on establishing children's books as conditioned reinforcers using a delayed multiple baseline design. Three preschool students with mild language and developmental delays served as the participants. Prior to the intervention, books did not function as reinforcers…

  2. MODELING FUNCTIONALLY GRADED INTERPHASE REGIONS IN CARBON NANOTUBE REINFORCED COMPOSITES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, G. D.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Gates, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    A combination of micromechanics methods and molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the effective properties of the carbon nanotube reinforced composites with functionally graded interphase regions. The multilayer composite cylinders method accounts for the effects of non-perfect load transfer in carbon nanotube reinforced polymer matrix composites using a piecewise functionally graded interphase. The functional form of the properties in the interphase region, as well as the interphase thickness, is derived from molecular dynamics simulations of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. Results indicate that the functional form of the interphase can have a significant effect on all the effective elastic constants except for the effective axial modulus for which no noticeable effects are evident.

  3. Relative influences of establishing operations and reinforcement contingencies on self-injurious behavior during functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Worsdell, A S; Iwata, B A; Conners, J; Kahng, S W; Thompson, R H

    2000-01-01

    In the typical functional analysis in which the antecedent and consequent events associated with problem behavior are manipulated, the control condition involves elimination of both the relevant establishing operation (EO) and its associated contingency through a schedule of noncontingent reinforcement (usually fixed-time [FT] 30 s). In some functional analyses, however, antecedent events are manipulated in the absence of differential consequences, and a common test condition in such analyses also involves the delivery of reinforcement on an FT 30-s schedule. Thus, the same schedule of reinforcement (FT 30 s) is not considered to be an EO in the former type of analysis but is considered to be an EO in the latter. We examined the relative influences of EOs and reinforcement contingencies on problem behavior by exposing 6 individuals who engaged in self-injurious behavior (SIB) to four combinations of functional analysis conditions: EO present/contingency present, EO absent/contingency present, EO present/contingency absent, and EO absent/contingency absent. Results indicated that the only condition in which high rates of SIB were observed consistently was one in which the EO and the reinforcement contingency were both present. Implications of these results for the design of functional analysis test and control conditions are discussed.

  4. Functionally Graded Nickel Matrix Alumina Reinforced Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Austin; Farias, Stephen; Cammarata, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Hierarchical structured nanocomposites are of great interest particularly in the fields of defense, aeronautics, and metamaterials. Previous work has demonstrated the ability to create uniform nickel matrices embedded with aluminum oxide nanoparticles via electrodeposition using a rotating disk electrode (RDE). This process allows for controlled enhancement of yield strength without negatively affecting other properties. The speed of the RDE controls the rate of particle incorporation, and therefore, particle volume fraction. Hierarchical structures can be formed by simply changing the rotation rate during electrodeposition. This allows for controlled variations of composite structure throughout the material. Simply layered and functionally graded hierarchical materials have been produced using this method with structural resolution of the order of single microns. These layered structures produced unique mechanical properties, even exceeding those of uniformly dispersed composites.

  5. Comparisons of synthesized and individual reinforcement contingencies during functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Greer, Brian D; Romani, Patrick W; Zangrillo, Amanda N; Owen, Todd M

    2016-09-01

    Researchers typically modify individual functional analysis (FA) conditions after results are inconclusive (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, and Hanratty (2014) introduced a marked departure from this practice, using an interview-informed synthesized contingency analysis (IISCA). In the test condition, they delivered multiple contingencies simultaneously (e.g., attention and escape) after each occurrence of problem behavior; in the control condition, they delivered those same reinforcers noncontingently and continuously. In the current investigation, we compared the results of the IISCA with a more traditional FA in which we evaluated each putative reinforcer individually. Four of 5 participants displayed destructive behavior that was sensitive to the individual contingencies evaluated in the traditional FA. By contrast, none of the participants showed a response pattern consistent with the assumption of the IISCA. We discuss the implications of these findings on the development of accurate and efficient functional analyses.

  6. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-02-01

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system.

  7. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-02-15

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system.

  8. Evaluation of Mand-Reinforcer Relations Following Long-Term Functional Communication Training

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, David P.; Harding, Jay W.; Berg, Wendy K.

    2008-01-01

    The investigators evaluated the relation between mands and positive reinforcement in the form of parent attention following long-term in-home treatment with functional communication training (FCT) for destructive behavior. Participants were 3 five-year-old children (2 boys, 1 girl) with developmental disabilities who manded to obtain different levels of parent attention (Phase 1). To determine whether the children's rate of manding would vary based on the amount of reinforcement received, the investigators adjusted the duration of parent attention (12 s vs. 30 s) provided to each child for manding on an FR1 schedule (Phase 2) using a reversal design. All 3 children changed their rates of manding so that each child maintained consistent levels of reinforcement across Phase 2 conditions. PMID:19043601

  9. Reinforcement Schedule Thinning Following Functional Communication Training: Review and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Hagopian, Louis P; Boelter, Eric W; Jarmolowicz, David P

    2011-01-01

    This paper extends the Tiger, Hanley, and Bruzek (2008) review of functional communication training (FCT) by reviewing the published literature on reinforcement schedule thinning following FCT. As noted by Tiger et al. and others, schedule thinning may be necessary when the newly acquired communication response occurs excessively, to the extent that reinforcing it consistently is not practical in the natural environment. We provide a review of this literature including a discussion of each of the more commonly used schedule arrangements used for this purpose, outcomes obtained, a description of methods for progressing toward the terminal schedule, and a description of supplemental treatment components aimed at maintaining low levels of problem behavior during schedule thinning. Recommendations for schedule thinning are then provided. Finally, conceptual issues related to the reemergence of problem behavior during schedule thinning and areas for future research are discussed. PMID:22532899

  10. Incremental state aggregation for value function estimation in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takeshi; Ishii, Shin

    2011-10-01

    In reinforcement learning, large state and action spaces make the estimation of value functions impractical, so a value function is often represented as a linear combination of basis functions whose linear coefficients constitute parameters to be estimated. However, preparing basis functions requires a certain amount of prior knowledge and is, in general, a difficult task. To overcome this difficulty, an adaptive basis function construction technique has been proposed by Keller recently, but it requires excessive computational cost. We propose an efficient approach to this difficulty, in which the problem of approximating the value function is decomposed into a number of subproblems, each of which can be solved with small computational cost. Computer experiments show that the CPU time needed by our method is much smaller than that by the existing method.

  11. Strength Design of Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures. Report 9. Analysis and Design of Reinforced Concrete Conduits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    American Concrete Pipe Association ( ACPA ) Approach 15. The "indirect method" of the ACPA (2-5) follows the D-load method of ASTM, but accounts for...been used on many occasions and is currently being converted from main frame to PC use. ACPA intends to distribute this program to designers, so there...Philadelphia, Pa., 1984. 2-5. American Concrete Pipe Association, "Concrete Pipe Handbook", Chap.4, ACPA , Vienna, Va. 1988. 2-6. Olander, H.C., U.S

  12. Microcomputer aided design for reinforced concrete frames subjected to seismic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Lira, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    This study presents a design procedure for reinforced concrete frames based on nonlinear dynamic analysis. The design procedure consists of four basic steps: (1) preliminary design based on member forces obtained by linear elastic analysis with equivalent static loading as prescribed by design codes, for example, the UBC code; (2) nonlinear dynamic analysis; (3) checking of damage of structure; (4) redesign of the structure if necessary. The establishment of this design procedure required the development of the following: (a) a microcomputer program for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of R/C frames subjected to strong earthquakes; (b) design aids, if the redesign of the structure is necessary. The first group of design aids consists of charts for steel reinforcements as functions of curvature ductility. A second group of design aids provides some guidance to choose curvature ductilities of members for selected structural displacement ductility. The software was designed to have: (a) file-oriented input data; (b) nonlinear dynamic analysis; (c) capability of displaying plots of: (i) undeformed structural geometry; (ii) ground acceleration input; (iii) nodal displacement; (iv) deformed structure; (v) finite plastic regions and damage ratios.

  13. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites (strip hybrids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics were applied to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends to illustrate the use of these methods for the a priori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-glass random composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  14. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites /strip hybrids/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are described which were obtained by applying advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends. This was done in order to illustrate the use of these methods for the apriori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-Glass/Random Composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle, and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  15. Feedback Functions, Optimization, and the Relation of Response Rate to Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Paul L.; McDowell, Jack J.; Dallery, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment arranged a series of inverted U-shaped feedback functions relating reinforcer rate to response rate to test whether responding was consistent with an optimization account or with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate such as linear system theory's rate equation or Herrnstein's hyperbola. Reinforcer rate…

  16. Resistance to change as a function of concurrent reinforcer magnitude.

    PubMed

    Rau, J C; Pickering, L D; McLean, A P

    1996-12-01

    Six pigeons responded on two keys in each of three signalled multiple-schedule components, and resistance to disruption of responding on one (target) key by extinction and by response-independent food presented during inter-component blackouts was studied. Alternative reinforcement of different magnitudes was contingent on pecking a non-target key in two components, and in the third only the target response was reinforced. Resistance to change varied with the overall quantity of reinforcement in the component, regardless of whether reinforcers were contingent on the target or non-target response, but did not differ across the two key locations. These results using different magnitudes of reinforcement confirm previous findings using rate of reinforcement as the variable, and suggest that resistance to change is dependent on stimulus-reinforcer rather than response-reinforcer contingencies.

  17. The Function of Direct and Vicarious Reinforcement in Human Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Carl R.; And Others

    The role of reinforcement has long been an issue in learning theory. The effects of reinforcement in learning were investigated under circumstances which made the information necessary for correct performance equally available to reinforced and nonreinforced subjects. Fourth graders (N=36) were given a pre-test of 20 items from the Peabody Picture…

  18. Design guidelines for steel-reinforced polymer concrete using resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studies, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to recommend simple, yet effective design guidelines in shear and flexure for steel-reinforced PC. The recommended design procedures are mostly based on test results performed on PC beams using resins based on recycled poly(ethyleneterephthalate), PET, plastic waste (the PET waste is mainly recovered from used beverage bottles). Previous studies have shown that polyester resins based on recycled PET can produce very good quality PC at a potentially lower cost.

  19. Functional Contour-following via Haptic Perception and Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Randall B; Tekin, Cem; Schaar, Mihaela van der; Santos, Veronica J

    2017-09-18

    Many tasks involve the fine manipulation of objects despite limited visual feedback. In such scenarios, tactile and proprioceptive feedback can be leveraged for task completion. We present an approach for real-time haptic perception and decision-making for a haptics-driven, functional contour-following task: the closure of a ziplock bag. This task is challenging for robots because the bag is deformable, transparent, and visually occluded by artificial fingertip sensors that are also compliant. A deep neural net classifier was trained to estimate the state of a zipper within a robot's pinch grasp. A Contextual Multi-Armed Bandit (C-MAB) reinforcement learning algorithm was implemented to maximize cumulative rewards by balancing exploration versus exploitation of the state-action space. The C-MAB learner outperformed a benchmark Q-learner by more efficiently exploring the state-action space while learning a hard-to-code task. The learned C-MAB policy was tested with novel ziplock bag scenarios and contours (wire, rope). Importantly, this work contributes to the development of reinforcement learning approaches that account for limited resources such as hardware life and researcher time. As robots are used to perform complex, physically interactive tasks in unstructured or unmodeled environments, it becomes important to develop methods that enable efficient and effective learning with physical testbeds.

  20. Designing interventions that include delayed reinforcement: implications of recent laboratory research.

    PubMed Central

    Stromer, R; McComas, J J; Rehfeldt, R A

    2000-01-01

    The search for robust and durable interventions in everyday situations typically involves the use of delayed reinforcers, sometimes delivered well after a target behavior occurs. Integrating the findings from laboratory research on delayed reinforcement can contribute to the design and analysis of those applied interventions. As illustrations, we examine articles from the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior that analyzed delayed reinforcement with respect to response allocation (A. M. Williams & Lattal, 1999), stimulus chaining (B. A. Williams, 1999), and self-control (Jackson & Hackenberg, 1996). These studies help to clarify the conditions under which delayed reinforcement (a) exercises control of behavior, (b) entails conditioned reinforcement, and (c) displaces the effects of immediate reinforcement. The research has applied implications, including the development of positive social behavior and teaching people to make adaptive choices. DESCRIPTORS: delayed reinforcement, response allocation, stimulus chains, self-control, integration of basic and applied research PMID:11051582

  1. Roxythromycin reinforces epithelial defence function in rabbit trachea.

    PubMed

    Nakano, T; Ohashi, Y; Tanaka, A; Kakinoki, Y; Washio, Y; Nakai, Y

    1998-01-01

    Our study elucidates the effect of roxythromycin (RXM) on airway epithelial defence functions, especially the mucociliary and epithelial barrier functions, in the rabbit trachea. In vitro ciliary activity was not affected in the presence of 3.3 mg/ml of RMX, but was enhanced in the presence of 6.7 mg/ml of RXM. Oral administration of 10 and 100 mg of RXM for 14 days enhanced both ciliary activity and mucociliary transport velocity in the trachea. Epithelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextrans (FD-70s; molecular weight: 70,000 daltons) was not affected by oral administration of 10 mg of RXM for 14 days, but was significantly reduced by oral administration of 100 mg of RXM for 14 days. Inhalation of platelet activating factor (PAF) compromised the function of the mucociliary system and the tight junction barrier. However, pretreatment with 20 mg of RXM significantly alleviated the PAF-induced decrease in mucociliary function and the increase in epithelial permeability to FD-70s. In conclusion, such reinforcement of the epithelial defence functions is likely to be involved in the pharmacological action underlying the clinical efficacy of RXM for chronic airway inflammatory disease.

  2. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-10-01

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ~84.5% and ~70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS.Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non

  3. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene nanosheets for polymer reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinchen; Shi, Zixing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jialiang; Yin, Jie

    2012-11-21

    Aramid macroscale fibers, also called Kevlar fibers, exhibit extremely high mechanical performance. Previous studies have demonstrated that bulk aramid macroscale fibers can be effectively split into aramid nanofibers (ANFs) by dissolution in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence of potassium hydroxide (KOH). In this paper, we first introduced the ANFs into the structure of graphene nanosheets through non-covalent functionalization through π-π stacking interactions. Aramid nanofiber-functionalized graphene sheets (ANFGS) were successfully obtained by adding the graphene oxide (GO)/DMSO dispersion into the ANFs/DMSO solution followed by reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The ANFGS, with ANFs absorbed on the surface of the graphene nanosheets, can be easily exfoliated and dispersed in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Through a combination of these two ultra-strong materials, ANFs and graphene nanosheets (GS), the resultant ANFGS can act as novel nanofillers for polymer reinforcement. We used the ANFGS as an additive for reinforcing the mechanical properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). With a loading of 0.7 wt% of the ANFGS, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the ANFGS/PMMA composite film approached 63.2 MPa and 3.42 GPa, which are increases of ∼84.5% and ∼70.6%, respectively. The thermal stabilities of ANFGS/PMMA composite films were improved by the addition of ANFGS. Additionally, the transparencies of the ANFGS/PMMA composite films have a degree of UV-shielding due to the ultraviolet light absorption of the ANFs in the ANFGS.

  4. Design, Construction, and Analysis of Fabric-Reinforced Embankment Test Section at Pinto Pass, Mobile, Alabama.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    AD-A 07 556 ARM ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG--ETC F/G 13/13 DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND ANALYSIS OF FABRIC-REINFORCED EMBANKM--ETC(U...AND ANALYSIS OF ~FABRIC-REINFORCED EMBANKMENT TEST if SECTION AT PINTO PASS, MOBILE, ALABAMA Lr: by Jack Fowler Geoechnical Laboratory I U. S. Army...AND ANALYSIS OF FABRIC- REINFORCED EMBANKMENT TEST SECTION AT PINTO PASS, MOBILE, ALABAMA 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 1. CONTRACT

  5. In vitro analog of operant conditioning in aplysia. I. Contingent reinforcement modifies the functional dynamics of an identified neuron.

    PubMed

    Nargeot, R; Baxter, D A; Byrne, J H

    1999-03-15

    Previously, an analog of operant conditioning in Aplysia was developed using the rhythmic motor activity in the isolated buccal ganglia. This analog expressed a key feature of operant conditioning, namely a selective enhancement in the occurrence of a designated motor pattern by contingent reinforcement. Different motor patterns generated by the buccal central pattern generator were induced by monotonic stimulation of a peripheral nerve (i.e., n.2,3). Phasic stimulation of the esophageal nerve (E n.) was used as an analog of reinforcement. The present study investigated the neuronal mechanisms associated with the genesis of different motor patterns and their modifications by contingent reinforcement. The genesis of different motor patterns was related to changes in the functional states of the pre-motor neuron B51. During rhythmic activity, B51 dynamically switched between inactive and active states. Bursting activity in B51 was associated with, and predicted, characteristic features of a specific motor pattern (i.e., pattern I). Contingent reinforcement of pattern I modified the dynamical properties of B51 by decreasing its resting conductance and threshold for eliciting plateau potentials and thus increased the occurrences of pattern I-related activity in B51. These modifications were not observed in preparations that received either noncontingent reinforcement (i.e., yoke control) or no reinforcement (i.e., control). These results suggest that a contingent reinforcement paradigm can regulate the dynamics of neuronal activity that is centrally programmed by the intrinsic cellular properties of neurons.

  6. Design of Rock Slope Reinforcement: An Himalayan Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Latha, Gali Madhavi

    2016-06-01

    The stability analysis of the two abutment slopes of a railway bridge proposed at about 359 m above the ground level, crossing a river and connecting two hill faces in the Himalayas, India, is presented. The bridge is located in a zone of high seismic activity. The rock slopes are composed of a heavily jointed rock mass and the spacing, dip and dip direction of joint sets are varying at different locations. Geological mapping was carried out to characterize all discontinuities present along the slopes. Laboratory and field investigations were conducted to assess the geotechnical properties of the intact rock, rock mass and joint infill. Stability analyses of these rock slopes were carried out using numerical programmes. Loads from the foundations resting on the slopes and seismic accelerations estimated from site-specific ground response analysis were considered. The proposed slope profile with several berms between successive foundations was simulated in the numerical model. An equivalent continuum approach with Hoek and Brown failure criterion was initially used in a finite element model to assess the global stability of the slope abutments. In the second stage, finite element analysis of rock slopes with all joint sets with their orientations, spacing and properties explicitly incorporated into the numerical model was taken up using continuum with joints approach. It was observed that the continuum with joints approach was able to capture the local failures in some of the slope sections, which were verified using wedge failure analysis and stereographic projections. Based on the slope deformations and failure patterns observed from the numerical analyses, rock anchors were designed to achieve the target factors of safety against failure while keeping the deformations within the permissible limits. Detailed design of rock anchors and comparison of the stability of slopes with and without reinforcement are presented.

  7. Functional assessment and noncontingent reinforcement in the treatment of disruptive vocalization in elderly dementia patients.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Jeffrey A; Fisher, Jane E

    2002-01-01

    Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) was used as an intervention with 2 elderly dementia patients who engaged in disruptive vocalization. Several assessment procedures, including functional analysis, were conducted to identify reinforcing stimuli for use in the NCR intervention. Functional analyses and the NCR intervention were implemented in each participant's natural environment. NCR was effective in reducing disruptive vocalizations. PMID:11936554

  8. Functional assessment and noncontingent reinforcement in the treatment of disruptive vocalization in elderly dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Jeffrey A; Fisher, Jane E

    2002-01-01

    Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) was used as an intervention with 2 elderly dementia patients who engaged in disruptive vocalization. Several assessment procedures, including functional analysis, were conducted to identify reinforcing stimuli for use in the NCR intervention. Functional analyses and the NCR intervention were implemented in each participant's natural environment. NCR was effective in reducing disruptive vocalizations.

  9. A Comparison of Function-Based Differential Reinforcement Interventions for Children Engaging in Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeGray, Matthew W.; Dufrene, Brad A.; Sterling-Turner, Heather; Olmi, D. Joe; Bellone, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    This study provides a direct comparison of differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA). Participants included three children in center-based classrooms referred for functional assessments due to disruptive classroom behavior. Functional assessments included interviews and brief…

  10. Enzyme design: Functional Frankensteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2016-09-01

    An artificial esterase with no known natural structural analogues has been formed via the homo-heptameric self-assembly of a designed peptide. This esterase represents the first report of a functional catalytic triad rationally engineered into a de novo protein framework.

  11. Design and analysis of a novel latch system implementing fiber-reinforced composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Arreola, Francisco Javier

    in the load-displacement slopes while the percentage of glass fiber increased. In the other hand, results showed that a detent made of only glass fiber layers was preferable than a carbon-glass fiber hybrid detent due to the high stresses shown in carbon fiber layers. Ultimately, forkbolt and detent were redesigned according to their functionality and test results. It was observed that the new design was stiffer than the original by showing a steeper load-displacement curve. Subsequently, an experimental procedure was performed in order to correlate computational model results. Fiber-reinforced composite forkbolt and detent were waterjet cut from a composite laminate manufactured by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VART) process. Then, samples were tested according to the computational model. Six testing sample combinations of forkbolt and detent were tested including the top three woven iterations forkbolts from the computational model paired with woven and unidirectional glass fiber detents. Test results showed a stiffness drop of 15% when the carbon fiber percentage decreases from 100% to 75%. Also, it was observed that woven glass fiber detent was superior to the unidirectional glass fiber detent by presenting a forkbolt-detent stiffness 38% higher. Moreover, the new design of forkbolt and detent were tested showing a stiffness increment of 29%. Furthermore, it was observed that fiber-reinforced composite forkbolt and detent did not reach the desired load of 5000 N. However, the redesigned forkbolt made of 100% woven carbon fiber and the redesign detent made of 100% woven glass fiber were close to reach that load. The design review based on test results performed (DRBTR) showed that components did not fail where the computational model concluded to be the areas with the highest maximum principal stress. In contrast to the computational model, all samples failed at the contact area between forkbolt and detent.

  12. Context Transfer in Reinforcement Learning Using Action-Value Functions

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Amin; Nadjar Araabi, Babak; Nili Ahmadabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion of context transfer in reinforcement learning tasks. Context transfer, as defined in this paper, implies knowledge transfer between source and target tasks that share the same environment dynamics and reward function but have different states or action spaces. In other words, the agents learn the same task while using different sensors and actuators. This requires the existence of an underlying common Markov decision process (MDP) to which all the agents' MDPs can be mapped. This is formulated in terms of the notion of MDP homomorphism. The learning framework is Q-learning. To transfer the knowledge between these tasks, the feature space is used as a translator and is expressed as a partial mapping between the state-action spaces of different tasks. The Q-values learned during the learning process of the source tasks are mapped to the sets of Q-values for the target task. These transferred Q-values are merged together and used to initialize the learning process of the target task. An interval-based approach is used to represent and merge the knowledge of the source tasks. Empirical results show that the transferred initialization can be beneficial to the learning process of the target task. PMID:25610457

  13. Cell growth and function on calcium phosphate reinforced chitosan scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-03-01

    Macroporous chitosan scaffolds reinforced by calcium phosphate powders such as hydroxyapatite (HA) or calcium phosphate invert glass were fabricated using a thermally induced phase separation technique. Human osteoblast-like MG63 cells were cultured on the composite scaffolds for up to 11 days, and the cell growth and function were analyzed. The cell growth is much faster on the chitosan/HA scaffolds incorporated with the glass (CHG) than on the chitosan/HA scaffold without the glass (CH). The total protein content of cells were quantified and increased over time on both composites (CH, CHG) but was significantly higher on CHG after 7 days of culture. The cells on CHG also expressed significantly higher amount of alkaline phosphatase at days 7 and 11 and osteocalcin at day 7 than those on CH. The results suggested that the addition of glass in chitosan/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds might enhance the proliferation and osteoblastic phenotype expression of MG63 cells. However, the chitosan-matrix scaffolds did not show higher phenotype expression of MG63 cells, in comparison with the TCPS plate, probably due to the degradation of chitosan and release of acidic byproducts. Larger amount of soluble calcium phosphate invert glasses should be added into the scaffolds to prevent chitosan from fast degradation that may affect the differentiation of osteoblast cells.

  14. Context transfer in reinforcement learning using action-value functions.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Amin; Nadjar Araabi, Babak; Nili Ahmadabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the notion of context transfer in reinforcement learning tasks. Context transfer, as defined in this paper, implies knowledge transfer between source and target tasks that share the same environment dynamics and reward function but have different states or action spaces. In other words, the agents learn the same task while using different sensors and actuators. This requires the existence of an underlying common Markov decision process (MDP) to which all the agents' MDPs can be mapped. This is formulated in terms of the notion of MDP homomorphism. The learning framework is Q-learning. To transfer the knowledge between these tasks, the feature space is used as a translator and is expressed as a partial mapping between the state-action spaces of different tasks. The Q-values learned during the learning process of the source tasks are mapped to the sets of Q-values for the target task. These transferred Q-values are merged together and used to initialize the learning process of the target task. An interval-based approach is used to represent and merge the knowledge of the source tasks. Empirical results show that the transferred initialization can be beneficial to the learning process of the target task.

  15. Clarifying inconclusive functional analysis results: Assessment and treatment of automatically reinforced aggression.

    PubMed

    Saini, Valdeep; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a series of studies in which multiple strategies were used to clarify the inconclusive results of one boy's functional analysis of aggression. Specifically, we (a) evaluated individual response topographies to determine the composition of aggregated response rates, (b) conducted a separate functional analysis of aggression after high rates of disruption masked the consequences that maintained aggression during the initial functional analysis, (c) modified the experimental design used during the functional analysis of aggression to improve discrimination and decrease interaction effects between conditions, and (d) evaluated a treatment matched to the reinforcer hypothesized to maintain aggression. An effective yet practical intervention for aggression was developed based on the results of these analyses and from data collected during the matched-treatment evaluation.

  16. Clarifying Inconclusive Functional Analysis Results: Assessment and Treatment of Automatically Reinforced Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Valdeep; Greer, Brian D.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a series of studies in which multiple strategies were used to clarify the inconclusive results of one boy’s functional analysis of aggression. Specifically, we (a) evaluated individual response topographies to determine the composition of aggregated response rates, (b) conducted a separate functional analysis of aggression after high rates of disruption masked the consequences maintaining aggression during the initial functional analysis, (c) modified the experimental design used during the functional analysis of aggression to improve discrimination and decrease interaction effects between conditions, and (d) evaluated a treatment matched to the reinforcer hypothesized to maintain aggression. An effective yet practical intervention for aggression was developed based on the results of these analyses and from data collected during the matched-treatment evaluation. PMID:25891269

  17. Dissociating error-based and reinforcement-based loss functions during sensorimotor learning

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Heather R.; Mohatarem, Ayman

    2017-01-01

    It has been proposed that the sensorimotor system uses a loss (cost) function to evaluate potential movements in the presence of random noise. Here we test this idea in the context of both error-based and reinforcement-based learning. In a reaching task, we laterally shifted a cursor relative to true hand position using a skewed probability distribution. This skewed probability distribution had its mean and mode separated, allowing us to dissociate the optimal predictions of an error-based loss function (corresponding to the mean of the lateral shifts) and a reinforcement-based loss function (corresponding to the mode). We then examined how the sensorimotor system uses error feedback and reinforcement feedback, in isolation and combination, when deciding where to aim the hand during a reach. We found that participants compensated differently to the same skewed lateral shift distribution depending on the form of feedback they received. When provided with error feedback, participants compensated based on the mean of the skewed noise. When provided with reinforcement feedback, participants compensated based on the mode. Participants receiving both error and reinforcement feedback continued to compensate based on the mean while repeatedly missing the target, despite receiving auditory, visual and monetary reinforcement feedback that rewarded hitting the target. Our work shows that reinforcement-based and error-based learning are separable and can occur independently. Further, when error and reinforcement feedback are in conflict, the sensorimotor system heavily weights error feedback over reinforcement feedback. PMID:28753634

  18. Dissociating error-based and reinforcement-based loss functions during sensorimotor learning.

    PubMed

    Cashaback, Joshua G A; McGregor, Heather R; Mohatarem, Ayman; Gribble, Paul L

    2017-07-01

    It has been proposed that the sensorimotor system uses a loss (cost) function to evaluate potential movements in the presence of random noise. Here we test this idea in the context of both error-based and reinforcement-based learning. In a reaching task, we laterally shifted a cursor relative to true hand position using a skewed probability distribution. This skewed probability distribution had its mean and mode separated, allowing us to dissociate the optimal predictions of an error-based loss function (corresponding to the mean of the lateral shifts) and a reinforcement-based loss function (corresponding to the mode). We then examined how the sensorimotor system uses error feedback and reinforcement feedback, in isolation and combination, when deciding where to aim the hand during a reach. We found that participants compensated differently to the same skewed lateral shift distribution depending on the form of feedback they received. When provided with error feedback, participants compensated based on the mean of the skewed noise. When provided with reinforcement feedback, participants compensated based on the mode. Participants receiving both error and reinforcement feedback continued to compensate based on the mean while repeatedly missing the target, despite receiving auditory, visual and monetary reinforcement feedback that rewarded hitting the target. Our work shows that reinforcement-based and error-based learning are separable and can occur independently. Further, when error and reinforcement feedback are in conflict, the sensorimotor system heavily weights error feedback over reinforcement feedback.

  19. Further evaluations of functional communication training and chained schedules of reinforcement to treat multiple functions of challenging behavior.

    PubMed

    Falcomata, Terry S; Muething, Colin S; Gainey, Summer; Hoffman, Katherine; Fragale, Christina

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated functional communication training (FCT) combined with a chained schedule of reinforcement procedure for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism. Following functional analyses that suggested that challenging behavior served multiple functions for both participants, we implemented FCT in which mands for a discriminative stimulus (S(D); wristband) were reinforced with access to the S(D) and all three functional reinforcers. Next, we modified the procedure by incorporating delays to increase ease of implementation and promote toleration of delays to reinforcement. Last, we made additional modifications to the procedure by incorporating a chained schedule of reinforcement such that (a) mands for the wristband were reinforced with access to the wristband and (b) specific mands for respective functional reinforcers were reinforced in the presence of the wristband. The results showed that the procedure successfully treated challenging behavior with multiple functions. Future directions in the evaluation and development of treatments that simultaneously address multiple functions are discussed.

  20. Differential Reinforcement as Treatment for Behavior Disorders: Procedural and Functional Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Timothy R.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the functional properties and procedural variations of differential reinforcement for the reduction of behavior disorders in individuals with developmental disabilities. The paper proposes that limited success may be a result of the arbitrary relationship that exists between reinforcers and target behaviors when behavioral…

  1. Feedback Functions, Optimization, and the Relation of Response Rate to Reinforcer Rate

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Paul L; McDowell, Jack J; Dallery, Jesse

    2006-01-01

    The present experiment arranged a series of inverted U-shaped feedback functions relating reinforcer rate to response rate to test whether responding was consistent with an optimization account or with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate such as linear system theory's rate equation or Herrnstein's hyperbola. Reinforcer rate was arranged according to a quadratic equation with a maximum at a unique response rate. The experiment consisted of two phases, during which 6 Long Evans rats lever pressed for food. In the first phase of the experiment, the rats responded on six fixed-interval-plus-quadratic-feedback schedules, and in the second phase the rats responded on three variable-interval-plus-quadratic-feedback schedules. Responding in both phases was inconsistent with a one-to-one relation of response rate to reinforcer rate. Instead, different response rates were obtained at equivalent reinforcer rates. Responding did vary directly with the vertex of the feedback function in both phases, a finding consistent with optimization of reinforcer rate. The present results suggest that the feedback function relating reinforcer rate to response rate imposed by a reinforcement schedule can be an important determinant of behavior. Furthermore, the present experiment illustrates the benefit of arranging feedback functions to investigate assumptions about the variables that control schedule performance. PMID:16602376

  2. Automatic design of fiber-reinforced soft actuators for trajectory matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Fionnuala; Walsh, Conor J.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Soft actuators are the components responsible for producing motion in soft robots. Although soft actuators have allowed for a variety of innovative applications, there is a need for design tools that can help to efficiently and systematically design actuators for particular functions. Mathematical modeling of soft actuators is an area that is still in its infancy but has the potential to provide quantitative insights into the response of the actuators. These insights can be used to guide actuator design, thus accelerating the design process. Here, we study fluid-powered fiber-reinforced actuators, because these have previously been shown to be capable of producing a wide range of motions. We present a design strategy that takes a kinematic trajectory as its input and uses analytical modeling based on nonlinear elasticity and optimization to identify the optimal design parameters for an actuator that will follow this trajectory upon pressurization. We experimentally verify our modeling approach, and finally we demonstrate how the strategy works, by designing actuators that replicate the motion of the index finger and thumb.

  3. Automatic design of fiber-reinforced soft actuators for trajectory matching

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Fionnuala; Walsh, Conor J.; Bertoldi, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Soft actuators are the components responsible for producing motion in soft robots. Although soft actuators have allowed for a variety of innovative applications, there is a need for design tools that can help to efficiently and systematically design actuators for particular functions. Mathematical modeling of soft actuators is an area that is still in its infancy but has the potential to provide quantitative insights into the response of the actuators. These insights can be used to guide actuator design, thus accelerating the design process. Here, we study fluid-powered fiber-reinforced actuators, because these have previously been shown to be capable of producing a wide range of motions. We present a design strategy that takes a kinematic trajectory as its input and uses analytical modeling based on nonlinear elasticity and optimization to identify the optimal design parameters for an actuator that will follow this trajectory upon pressurization. We experimentally verify our modeling approach, and finally we demonstrate how the strategy works, by designing actuators that replicate the motion of the index finger and thumb. PMID:27994133

  4. Motivational Use of Adaptable Designs in Reinforcing Geographic-Social Studies Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelow, Randall A.

    The purpose of this paper is to provide teachers with four adaptable designs that can be used to reinforce geographic-social studies knowledge. Adaptable designs are defined as structural formats that can be used repeatedly to teach different concepts and skills. The paper first discusses the advantageous features of adaptable designs and presents…

  5. Student Perceptions as a Function of Reinforcement and Expectancy Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, W. J.

    This paper describes a laboratory experiment which was a replication and extension of an earlier study, both of which are part of an effort to synthesize the findings of two somewhat different approaches to the study of interpersonal attraction. The first of these approaches is a secondary reinforcement interpretation and in general assumes a…

  6. Relative Persistence as a Function of Order of Reinforcement Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyal, James A.; Sytsma, Donald

    1976-01-01

    Stimulus analyzer theory as proposed by Sutherland and Mackintosh (1971) makes the unique prediction that the first-experienced reinforcement schedule will influence resistance to extinction more than subsequent schedules. Results presently reported of runaway acquisition and extinction indicate the opposite: C-P consistently produce substantially…

  7. Reinforcement learning controller design for affine nonlinear discrete-time systems using online approximators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qinmin; Jagannathan, Sarangapani

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, reinforcement learning state- and output-feedback-based adaptive critic controller designs are proposed by using the online approximators (OLAs) for a general multi-input and multioutput affine unknown nonlinear discretetime systems in the presence of bounded disturbances. The proposed controller design has two entities, an action network that is designed to produce optimal signal and a critic network that evaluates the performance of the action network. The critic estimates the cost-to-go function which is tuned online using recursive equations derived from heuristic dynamic programming. Here, neural networks (NNs) are used both for the action and critic whereas any OLAs, such as radial basis functions, splines, fuzzy logic, etc., can be utilized. For the output-feedback counterpart, an additional NN is designated as the observer to estimate the unavailable system states, and thus, separation principle is not required. The NN weight tuning laws for the controller schemes are also derived while ensuring uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system using Lyapunov theory. Finally, the effectiveness of the two controllers is tested in simulation on a pendulum balancing system and a two-link robotic arm system.

  8. A Robust Reinforcement Learning Control Design Method for Nonlinear System with Partially Unknown Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuhiro; Obayashi, Masanao; Kuremoto, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kunikazu

    We propose a robust control system which has robustness for disturbance and can deal with a nonlinear system with partially unknown structure by fusing reinforcement learning and robust control theory. First, we solved an optimal control problem without using unknown part of functions of the system, using neural network and the repetition learning of reinforcement learning algorithm. Second, we built the robust reinforcement learning control system which permits uncertainty and has robustness for disturbance by fusing the idea of H infinity control theory with above system.

  9. Circular Functions Based Comprehensive Analysis of Plastic Creep Deformations in the Fiber Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    Analytically based model is presented for behavioral analysis of the plastic deformations in the reinforced materials using the circular (trigonometric) functions. The analytical method is proposed to predict creep behavior of the fibrous composites based on basic and constitutive equations under a tensile axial stress. New insight of the work is to predict some important behaviors of the creeping matrix. In the present model, the prediction of the behaviors is simpler than the available methods. Principal creep strain rate behaviors are very noteworthy for designing the fibrous composites in the creeping composites. Analysis of the mentioned parameter behavior in the reinforced materials is necessary to analyze failure, fracture, and fatigue studies in the creep of the short fiber composites. Shuttles, spaceships, turbine blades and discs, and nozzle guide vanes are commonly subjected to the creep effects. Also, predicting the creep behavior is significant to design the optoelectronic and photonic advanced composites with optical fibers. As a result, the uniform behavior with constant gradient is seen in the principal creep strain rate behavior, and also creep rupture may happen at the fiber end. Finally, good agreements are found through comparing the obtained analytical and FEM results.

  10. Operant responding in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) as a function of schedule of reinforcement and visual reinforcers1

    PubMed Central

    Turnbough, P. Diane; Lloyd, Kenneth E.

    1973-01-01

    Siamese fighting fish were trained to emit an operant response that was reinforced by the opportunity to view a motion picture film image of another fish. Performance under various schedules of reinforcement was examined. When reinforcement followed every response and when reinforcement was delivered after every second response, the number of responses per session was higher than during operant level or during extinction. Reinforcement delivered following intervals of no responding (differential reinforcement of other behavior) markedly decreased responding. Light from a projector without film was found to be as effective a reinforcer as film reinforcement. Responding when projector light reinforcement followed every response was maintained at approximately the same level as that obtained under film reinforcement. Responses per session decreased when only the light was delivered on a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule. The behavior of the fish during presentation of the film was markedly different from their behavior while the projector light was being presented. PMID:4759058

  11. Operant responding in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) as a function of schedule of reinforcement and visual reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Turnbough, P D; Lloyd, K E

    1973-11-01

    Siamese fighting fish were trained to emit an operant response that was reinforced by the opportunity to view a motion picture film image of another fish. Performance under various schedules of reinforcement was examined. When reinforcement followed every response and when reinforcement was delivered after every second response, the number of responses per session was higher than during operant level or during extinction. Reinforcement delivered following intervals of no responding (differential reinforcement of other behavior) markedly decreased responding. Light from a projector without film was found to be as effective a reinforcer as film reinforcement. Responding when projector light reinforcement followed every response was maintained at approximately the same level as that obtained under film reinforcement. Responses per session decreased when only the light was delivered on a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule. The behavior of the fish during presentation of the film was markedly different from their behavior while the projector light was being presented.

  12. Manufacturing and Mechanical Testing of a New Functionally Graded Fiber Reinforced Cement Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Bin; Hubler, Mija; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Struble, Leslie J.

    2008-02-15

    A functionally graded (FG) material system is employed to make fiber use more efficient in a fiber reinforced cement composite (FRCC). This preliminary study demonstrates beam elements that were functionally graded fiber reinforced cement composite (FGFRCC) with four layers, each with a different fiber volume ratio. Fiber volume ratio was graded in accordance with its potential contribution to the mechanical load-bearing capacity so as to reduce the overall fiber volume ratio while preserving the flexural strength and ductility of the beam. Extrusion was used to produce single homogeneous layers of constant fiber volume ratio. The FRCC layers with different fiber volume ratios were stacked according to a desired configuration and then pressed to make an integrated FGFRCC. Flexural tests were carried out to characterize the mechanical behavior, and the results were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the designed fiber distribution. Compared with homogeneous FRCC with the same overall fiber volume fraction, the FGFRCC exhibited about 50% higher strength and comparable ductility.

  13. Manufacturing and Mechanical Testing of a New Functionally Graded Fiber Reinforced Cement Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Hubler, Mija; Paulino, Glaucio H.; Struble, Leslie J.

    2008-02-01

    A functionally graded (FG) material system is employed to make fiber use more efficient in a fiber reinforced cement composite (FRCC). This preliminary study demonstrates beam elements that were functionally graded fiber reinforced cement composite (FGFRCC) with four layers, each with a different fiber volume ratio. Fiber volume ratio was graded in accordance with its potential contribution to the mechanical load-bearing capacity so as to reduce the overall fiber volume ratio while preserving the flexural strength and ductility of the beam. Extrusion was used to produce single homogeneous layers of constant fiber volume ratio. The FRCC layers with different fiber volume ratios were stacked according to a desired configuration and then pressed to make an integrated FGFRCC. Flexural tests were carried out to characterize the mechanical behavior, and the results were analyzed to evaluate the effectiveness of the designed fiber distribution. Compared with homogeneous FRCC with the same overall fiber volume fraction, the FGFRCC exhibited about 50% higher strength and comparable ductility.

  14. Response latency as a function of amount of reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Stebbins, William C.

    1962-01-01

    Food-deprived rats were trained to press and hold down a telegraph key in the presence of a light. Subsequent release of the key during a tone was followed by 0.15 ml of a 20-percent sucrose solution as reinforcement. The Ss were subsequently shifted to a 0-percent and to a 5-percent solution from the 20-percent base line. The median RT and the variability of RT increased markedly as a result of the shift to the lower sucrose concentrations. For all Ss, the change in median and variability was greater for the shift to the 0-percent solution than for the shift to the 5-percent solution. It is probable that median RT and variability of RT are inversely related to amount of reinforcement. PMID:13916462

  15. Effects of continuous and intermittent reinforcement for problem behavior during functional communication training.

    PubMed

    Worsdell, A S; Iwata, B A; Hanley, G P; Thompson, R H; Kahng, S W

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of functional communication training (FCT) in reducing problem behavior and in strengthening alternative behavior when FCT was implemented without extinction. Following the completion of functional analyses in which social-positive reinforcement was identified as the maintaining variable for 5 participants' self-injurious behavior (SIB) and aggression, the participants were first exposed to FCT in which both problem behavior and alternative behavior were reinforced continuously (i.e., on fixed-ratio [FR] 1 schedules). During subsequent FCT conditions, the schedule of reinforcement for problem behavior was made more intermittent (e.g., FR 2, FR 3, FR 5, etc.), whereas alternative behavior was always reinforced according to an FR 1 schedule. Results showed that 1 participant's problem behavior decreased and alternative behavior increased during FCT when both behaviors were reinforced on FR 1 schedules. The remaining 4 participants shifted response allocation from problem to alternative behavior as the schedule of reinforcement for problem behavior became more intermittent. These results suggest that individuals might acquire alternative responses during FCT in spite of inconsistencies in the application of extinction, although even small errors in reinforcement may compromise treatment effects.

  16. Covalent cum noncovalent functionalizations of carbon nanotubes for effective reinforcement of a solution cast composite film.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2012-04-01

    Although carbon nanotubes have impressive tensile properties, exploiting these properties in composites, especially those made by the common solution casting technique, seems to be elusive thus far. The reasons could be partly due to the poor nanotube dispersion and the weak nanotube/matrix interface. To solve this dual pronged problem, we combine noncovalent and covalent functionalizations of nanotubes in a single system by the design and application of a novel dispersant, hydroxyl polyimide-graft-bisphenol A diglyceryl acrylate (PI(OH)-BDA), and use them with epoxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNTs). Our novel PI(OH)-BDA dispersant functionalizes the nanotubes noncovalently to achieve good dispersion of the nanotubes because of the strong π-π interaction due to main chain and steric hindrance of the BDA side chain. PI(OH)-BDA also functionalizes O-SWNTs covalently because it reacts with epoxide groups on the nanotubes, as well as the cyanate ester (CE) matrix used. The resulting solution-cast CE composites show 57%, 71%, and 124% increases in Young's modulus, tensile strength, and toughness over neat CE. These values are higher than those of composites reinforced with pristine SWNTs, epoxidized SWNTs, and pristine SWNTs dispersed with PI(OH)-BDA. The modulus and strength increase per unit nanotube weight fraction, i.e., dE/dW(NT) and dσ/dW(NT), are 175 GPa and 7220 MPa, respectively, which are significantly higher than those of other nanotube/thermosetting composites (22-70 GPa and 140-3540 MPa, respectively). Our study indicates that covalent cum noncovalent functionalization of nanotubes is an effective tool for improving both the nanotube dispersion and nanotube/matrix interfacial interaction, resulting in significantly improved mechanical reinforcement of the solution-cast composites.

  17. Design synthesis of a boron/epoxy reinforced metal shear web.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept has been developed for the Space Shuttle Orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad, boron/epoxy plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced stiffeners. Baseline composite and titanium shear resistant designs are compared; the composite concept is 28% lighter than the titanium web. Element test results show the metal cladding effectively reinforces critical composite load transfer and fastener hole areas making the composite web concept practical for other shear structure applications.-

  18. Multiple determinants of transfer of evaluative function after conditioning with free-operant schedules of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil; McHugh, Louise

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the four present experiments was to explore how different schedules of reinforcement influence schedule-induced behavior, their impact on evaluative ratings given to conditioned stimuli associated with each schedule through evaluative conditioning, and the transfer of these evaluations through derived stimulus networks. Experiment 1 compared two contrasting response reinforcement rules (variable ratio [VR], variable interval [VI]). Experiment 2 varied the response to reinforcement rule between two schedules but equated the outcome to response rate (differential reinforcement of high rate [DRH] vs. VR). Experiment 3 compared molar and molecular aspects of contingencies of reinforcement (tandem VIVR vs. tandem VRVI). Finally, Experiment 4 employed schedules that induced low rates of responding to determine whether, under these circumstances, responses were more sensitive to the molecular aspects of a schedule (differential reinforcement of low rate [DRL] vs. VI). The findings suggest that the transfer of evaluative functions is determined mainly by differences in response rate between the schedules and the molar aspects of the schedules. However, when neither schedule was based on a strong response reinforcement rule, the transfer of evaluative judgments came under the control of the molecular aspects of the schedule.

  19. Social reinforcement in block design performance by brain-damaged, emotionally disturbed, and non-disturbed retardates.

    PubMed

    Lehinger, S; McManis, D L

    1976-12-01

    48 retarded adults, equally divided by sex in three diagnostic categories (brain-damaged, nondamaged disturbed, and nondamaged-nondisturbed) were assigned to posttest reinforcement or control conditions on the basis of CA, IQ, and pretest performance on the Block Design. Reinforced subjects were praised for each individual correct block placement on the posttrest; control subjects repeated the test without reinforcement. Both brain-damaged and non-damaged-nondisturbed subjects showed accuracy gains under reinforcement, while nondamaged-disturbed subjects decreased in accuracy. Failure to replicate previous differential reinforcement effects with brain-damaged and nondamaged-nondisturbed subjects, and the discrepant reinforcement effect on nondamaged-disturbed subjects, did not support the use of reinforcement of performance on the Block Design test as an aid in detecting organic damage.

  20. A numerical approach for the design of multiscale fibre-reinforced cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-Chacón, Francisco; Schlangen, Erik; Cifuentes, Héctor; Medina, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    In the present work, a numerical framework for the design of new multiscale fibre-reinforced cementitious composites is presented. This is accomplished by covering three different length scales, namely the micro-, meso- and macroscale. At the microscale (here defined as ~1 mm), an enhanced fibre-reinforced lattice model is presented for the simulation of strain hardening cementitious composites. On the other hand, the analysis of fibre-reinforced concrete is performed at the mesoscale (~10 mm) by means of a novel lattice-particle model. The main variables in both models are the fibre dimensions (i.e. length and diameter), the fibre volume content and the fibre-matrix bond behaviour. Their contribution to the global mechanical properties is discussed in details. Finally, the structural characterisation of the fibre-reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC) is carried out by means of a hierarchical numerical homogenisation of the material behaviour, integrating the information obtained from lower scales into the macroscale problem (~1 m). The macroscopic response of the resulting material is characterised via three-point bending tests using a continuum damage plastic model. Although the described lattice models can be used independently as design tools in fibre cement-based composites at the micro- or mesoscale, the multiscale procedure described in this paper allows for the development of new types of FRCC by considering the effect of the multiple-scale fibre-reinforcement.

  1. Further Evaluations of Functional Communication Training and Chained Schedules of Reinforcement to Treat Multiple Functions of Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Muething, Colin S.; Gainey, Summer; Hoffman, Katherine; Fragale, Christina

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated functional communication training (FCT) combined with a chained schedule of reinforcement procedure for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism. Following functional analyses that suggested that challenging behavior served multiple functions for both participants,…

  2. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    nucleotides is usually pH dependent (pH < 6) four different TFOs were examined: TFO-1 was unmodified while TFOs 2-4 contained additional stabilizing analogues capable of extending triplex formation to pH 7. In addition, each of the TFOs contained a Cy5 dye at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide to aid in characterization of TFO binding - crystals were obtained with all four variations of TFOs. Formation of DNA triplex in the motif was characterized by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), UV melting studies and FRET. Crystals containing TFO-1 (unmodified) and TFO-2 (with 2'-amino ethoxy modification) were isolated and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen for X-ray data collection at beam line NSLS-X25. X-ray data was also collected for crystals of the 3-turn triangle without any TFO bound to it. Difference maps were done between the crystals with TFO against the one without to identify any additional electron density corresponding to the third strand in the triplex binding region. The data from the crystal containing TFO-2 was used to further analyze if the additional density can match the expected position of the TFO on the triangle motif. Since the additional density did not correspond to the entire binding region, 2Fo-Fc, 3Fo-2Fc and 4Fo-3Fc maps were done to check for missing pieces of the electron density. From the resulting 2Fo-Fc map, the asymmetric unit from the 3-turn triangle (31-bp duplex model based on previous structure 3UBI) was inserted into the density as a reference. However, the electron density corresponding to the TFO was still not continuous throughout the 13-nt triplex binding region and allowed only a partial fit of the TFO. The third nucleotide in positions 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 were fit into the density in the major groove of the underlying duplex with proper triplex configuration. The third chapter describes the triplex approach to position a functional group (the UV cross-linking agent psoralen) within a pre-formed DNA motif. Triplex formation and

  3. Stability analysis and optimum reinforcement design for an intense weathered rock slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Kuan; Tan, Zhuoying; Li, Wen

    2017-05-01

    In view of the complex structural characters of Chengmenshan copper mine slope, the slope stability should be analyzed and additional reinforcement measures need to be considered to ensure mining safety. In this paper, the slope model was built and its stability was analyzed by numerical simulation method under nature and dynamic loading state. After that the design of orthogonal experiment was discussed for the key factors which influence the reinforcement effect of anchors with SPSS software, and the primary and secondary relation of factors and the optimal combination were obtained using the range analysis method. Finally, the slope stability with optimal reinforcement measure was tested. The results show that the safety factor of slope under nature state is low and it is in the critical instability condition. Under dynamic loading state, the failure probability of slope increases from 0 to 18% as the seismic magnitude varies from 6 to 8. Primary and secondary sequence of factors that influence the anchor reinforcement effect is the bonding length, anchor installing angle, anchor length at 3rd bench, anchor length at 2nd bench and anchor length at 1st bench .The safety factor of slope reinforced with anchors is larger than 1.1, which could ensure the safety and stability of the slope.

  4. Improved Strength Design of Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures - Research Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE I. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I April 1992 Final report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING...for tension -control fail- ures and for pure compression failures. These are the failure zones that are of primary interest for the design of RCHS...concrete Tension control failures 16. PRICE CODE hydraulic structures 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY

  5. Minor Functional Deficits in Basic Response Patterns for Reinforcement after Frontal Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2016-10-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major contributor to numerous psychiatric conditions and chronic behavioral dysfunction. Recent studies in experimental brain injury have begun to adopt operant methodologies to assess these deficits, all of which rely on the process of reinforcement. No studies have directly examined how reinforced behaviors are affected by TBI, however. The current study assessed performance under the four most common schedules of reinforcement (fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval, variable interval) and one higher order schedule assessing motivation (progressive ratio) after bilateral, pre-frontal controlled cortical impact injury. TBI-induced differences on the basic schedules were minor, with the exception of the variable ratio, where increased efficacy (more reinforcers, higher response rates, lower interresponse times) at higher requirements was observed as a result of brain injury. Performance on the progressive ratio schedule showed some gross differences between the groups, in that sham rats became more efficient under this schedule while injured rats perseverated in lever pressing. Further, injured rats were specifically impaired at lower response requirements on the progressive ratio. Taken together, these findings indicate that simple reinforced behaviors are mostly unaffected after TBI, except in the case of variable ratio schedules, but the altered performance on the higher-order progressive ratio schedule suggests changes involving motivation or potentially perseveration. These findings validate operant measures of more complex behaviors for brain injury, all of which rely on reinforcement and can be taken into consideration when adapting and developing novel functional assessments.

  6. The IMAGEN study: reinforcement-related behaviour in normal brain function and psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Schumann, G; Loth, E; Banaschewski, T; Barbot, A; Barker, G; Büchel, C; Conrod, P J; Dalley, J W; Flor, H; Gallinat, J; Garavan, H; Heinz, A; Itterman, B; Lathrop, M; Mallik, C; Mann, K; Martinot, J-L; Paus, T; Poline, J-B; Robbins, T W; Rietschel, M; Reed, L; Smolka, M; Spanagel, R; Speiser, C; Stephens, D N; Ströhle, A; Struve, M

    2010-12-01

    A fundamental function of the brain is to evaluate the emotional and motivational significance of stimuli and to adapt behaviour accordingly. The IMAGEN study is the first multicentre genetic-neuroimaging study aimed at identifying the genetic and neurobiological basis of individual variability in impulsivity, reinforcer sensitivity and emotional reactivity, and determining their predictive value for the development of frequent psychiatric disorders. Comprehensive behavioural and neuropsychological characterization, functional and structural neuroimaging and genome-wide association analyses of 2000 14-year-old adolescents are combined with functional genetics in animal and human models. Results will be validated in 1000 adolescents from the Canadian Saguenay Youth Study. The sample will be followed up longitudinally at the age of 16 years to investigate the predictive value of genetics and intermediate phenotypes for the development of frequent psychiatric disorders. This review describes the strategies the IMAGEN consortium used to meet the challenges posed by large-scale multicentre imaging-genomics investigations. We provide detailed methods and Standard Operating Procedures that we hope will be helpful for the design of future studies. These include standardization of the clinical, psychometric and neuroimaging-acquisition protocols, development of a central database for efficient analyses of large multimodal data sets and new analytic approaches to large-scale genetic neuroimaging analyses.

  7. Functional Communication Training During Reinforcement Schedule Thinning: An Analysis of 25 Applications

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Brian D.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Saini, Valdeep; Owen, Todd M.; Jones, Jamie K.

    2016-01-01

    Two principal goals of functional communication training (FCT) are to (a) eliminate destructive behavior and (b) establish a more acceptable, yet functionally equivalent, communication response (FCR). A related and critically important goal is to thin the schedule of reinforcement for the FCR to levels that are reasonably managed by caregivers. Researchers have described several approaches to thinning FCT reinforcement schedules. We summarized the results of 25 consecutive applications (amongst 20 cases) in which schedule-thinning procedures employed discriminative stimuli to signal when the FCR would and would not produce reinforcement (i.e., using multiple schedules, response restriction, or chained schedules). Results suggest schedule-thinning procedures that use discriminative stimuli can maintain the effectiveness of FCT while minimizing the need for punishment or other supplemental procedures. PMID:26482103

  8. Functional communication training during reinforcement schedule thinning: An analysis of 25 applications.

    PubMed

    Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W; Saini, Valdeep; Owen, Todd M; Jones, Jamie K

    2016-03-01

    Two principal goals of functional communication training (FCT) are (a) to eliminate destructive behavior and (b) to establish a more acceptable, yet functionally equivalent, communication response (FCR). A related and critically important goal is to thin the schedule of reinforcement for the FCR to levels that can be reasonably managed by caregivers. Researchers have described several approaches to thinning FCT reinforcement schedules. We summarize the results of 25 consecutive applications (among 20 cases) in which schedule-thinning procedures employed discriminative stimuli to signal when the FCR would and would not produce reinforcement (i.e., using multiple schedules, response restriction, or chained schedules). Results suggest that schedule-thinning procedures that use discriminative stimuli can maintain the effectiveness of FCT while they minimize the need for punishment or other supplemental procedures.

  9. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application. Phase 1 summary report: Shear web design development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced composite shear web design concept was developed for the Space Shuttle orbiter main engine thrust beam structure. Various web concepts were synthesized by a computer-aided adaptive random search procedure. A practical concept is identified having a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web plate with vertical boron/epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners. The boron-epoxy laminate contributes to the strength and stiffness efficiency of the basic web section. The titanium-cladding functions to protect the polymeric laminate parts from damaging environments and is chem-milled to provide reinforcement in selected areas. Detailed design drawings are presented for both boron/epoxy reinforced and all-metal shear webs. The weight saving offered is 24% relative to all-metal construction at an attractive cost per pound of weight saved, based on the detailed designs. Small scale element tests substantiate the boron/epoxy reinforced design details in critical areas. The results show that the titanium-cladding reliably reinforces the web laminate in critical edge load transfer and stiffener fastener hole areas.

  10. Design optimization of a prosthesis stem reinforcing shell in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    de Beus, A M; Hoeltzel, D A; Eftekhar, N S

    1990-08-01

    The use of a perforated, titanium funicular shell to support the proximal femoral cortex in total hip arthroplasty was evaluated with the aid of both analytical and numerical techniques. The principal interactions between the femoral cortex, the metal shell, the implant stem and the acrylic bone cement were modeled using beam on elastic foundations theory and two-dimensional elasticity theory. Subsequent formulation of this model as a nonlinear design optimization problem enabled the determination of the dimensions of the implant and reinforcing shell which minimized an objective function based on a simplified material failure criterion. Two cases were examined, each with two cervico-diaphyseal angles: case A: with a rigid contact between a proximal prosthesis collar and the calcar femorale and case B: no collar contact (a collarless prosthesis or post-operative loosening). Case A achieved an optimal solution at a stem diameter 11-23 percent of the cortex inner diameter, a stem length to diameter ratio of 12-40, shell diameter 22-53 percent and thickness 0.2-7.2 percent of the cortex inner diameter and thickness, respectively. Case B achieved an optimal solution at a stem diameter 67-92 percent of the cortex inner diameter, length to diameter ratio of 4-6, and no shell. In case A the collar support makes the type of internal fixation unimportant, while in the more realistic case B, the shell is not recommended.

  11. Effects of Continuous and Intermittent Reinforcement for Problem Behavior during Functional Communication Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worsdell, April S.; Iwata, Brian A.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Kahng, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of functional communication training (FCT) in reducing problem behavior of 5 individuals with severe mental retardation and in strengthening alternative behavior. Four participants shifted response allocation from problem to alternative behavior as the schedule of reinforcement of problem behavior became more…

  12. Effects of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Functional Communication Training on Problem Behavior and Mands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Shannon S.; Anderson, Cynthia M.

    2006-01-01

    Two children with developmental delays and a history of problem behavior participated in this study to examine the efficacy of combining two treatments demonstrated to reduce problem behavior: noncontingent reinforcement and functional communication training. At issue was whether the noncontingent delivery of an alternative preferred stimulus and…

  13. Functional Communication Training without Extinction Using Concurrent Schedules of Differing Magnitudes of Reinforcement in Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dawn H.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Alberto, Paul A.; Gama, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of functional communication training (FCT) implemented with concurrent schedules of differing magnitudes of reinforcement in lieu of extinction to reduce inappropriate behaviors and increase alternative mands. Participants were four adolescent students diagnosed with severe emotional and behavior disorders…

  14. Effects of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Functional Communication Training on Problem Behavior and Mands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Shannon S.; Anderson, Cynthia M.

    2006-01-01

    Two children with developmental delays and a history of problem behavior participated in this study to examine the efficacy of combining two treatments demonstrated to reduce problem behavior: noncontingent reinforcement and functional communication training. At issue was whether the noncontingent delivery of an alternative preferred stimulus and…

  15. The Effects of a Local Negative Feedback Function between Choice and Relative Reinforcer Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Elliffe, Douglas; Marr, M. Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Four pigeons were trained on two-key concurrent variable-interval schedules with no changeover delay. In Phase 1, relative reinforcers on the two alternatives were varied over five conditions from 0.1 to 0.9. In Phases 2 and 3, we instituted a molar feedback function between relative choice in an interreinforcer interval and the probability of…

  16. The Effects of the Absence of an Adult on the Emergence of Conditioned Reinforcement as a Function of Observation in Preschool Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zrinzo, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    I tested the effects of the absence of an adult on the observational conditioning effect (Greer & Singer-Dudek, 2008). Neutral stimuli (metal washers) did not function to reinforce performance or learning tasks for three preschool age children as determined by a counterbalanced reversal design for the pre-intervention performance tasks and…

  17. The Clinical Utility of Two Reinforcement Preference Assessment Techniques: A Comparison of Duration of Assessment and Identification of Functional Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanner, Traci; Nichols, Brandon; Field, Sean; Hanson, Jennifer; Zane, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In order to maximize the learning of skills, it is crucial that the most powerful reinforcement be used. Research describes several different methods of reinforcement preference assessments, including forced choice, free-operant, and multiple stimulus array procedures. Researchers have also tested many variables to determine their potential impact…

  18. The effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on functional response classes: a translational study.

    PubMed

    Heinicke, Megan R; Carr, James E; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Research on functional response classes has applied significance because less severe forms of problem behavior have been found to co-occur with more severe forms. In addition, the most severe forms of problem behavior are sometimes targeted for intervention without monitoring other less severe forms. In such cases, it is unknown whether and how untreated forms of problem behavior covary with the targeted behaviors. The present study employed a translational procedure (with button presses as the target behavior) to investigate response covariation under noncontingent reinforcement with typically developing preschoolers. The results indicated that noncontingent reinforcement was generally effective in decreasing all response class members when only one member was targeted.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF FIXED-TIME REINFORCEMENT SCHEDULES ON FUNCTIONAL RESPONSE CLASSES: A TRANSLATIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Heinicke, Megan R; Carr, James E; LeBlanc, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Research on functional response classes has applied significance because less severe forms of problem behavior have been found to co-occur with more severe forms. In addition, the most severe forms of problem behavior are sometimes targeted for intervention without monitoring other less severe forms. In such cases, it is unknown whether and how untreated forms of problem behavior covary with the targeted behaviors. The present study employed a translational procedure (with button presses as the target behavior) to investigate response covariation under noncontingent reinforcement with typically developing preschoolers. The results indicated that noncontingent reinforcement was generally effective in decreasing all response class members when only one member was targeted. PMID:23060665

  20. Functional communication training with and without alternative reinforcement and punishment: an analysis of 58 applications.

    PubMed

    Rooker, Griffin W; Jessel, Joshua; Kurtz, Patricia F; Hagopian, Louis P

    2013-12-01

    Functional communication training (FCT) is an empirically supported treatment for problem behavior displayed by individuals with intellectual disabilities. Hagopian, Fisher, Sullivan, Acquisto, and LeBlanc (1998) analyzed 25 applications of FCT and showed that extinction was a necessary component of FCT, but sometimes punishment was needed to maintain low levels of problem behavior. The current consecutive case series summarized data from 58 applications of FCT in more recent cases. This analysis extended and updated Hagopian et al. by examining FCT when used in combination with alternative reinforcement (noncontingent and differential reinforcement) and multiple schedules during schedule thinning. Although it is difficult to make direct comparisons with the 1998 study, the results of the current case series analysis suggest that FCT can be enhanced when used in combination with alternative reinforcement and when multiple schedules are used during schedule thinning.

  1. Design and realization a skiff racing boat hull made of natural fibers reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collotta, M.; Solazzi, L.; Pandini, S.; Tomasoni, G.; Alberti, M.; Donzella, G.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses the development of a racing boat with an hull made of a composite material reinforced by natural fibers. In particular, we report here the design and realization of the boat hull, the assessment of its mechanical performance by means of a computer assisted simulation, and the cost analysis to assess the economic sustainability of the new composite developed. The results have shown that the new composite has a performance comparable with conventional glass fiber reinforced composites employed for the realization of this type of boat, accordingly to the technology employed and the lamination sequence adopted. Moreover, the FEM analysis performed over the skiff of the designed and constructed boat has demonstrated a successful choice of the material for real application, as it was later confirmed by the good performance of the boat in water. Finally, the cost analysis highlighted the economic sustainability of the new composite, allowing a cost saving of over 28% with respect to carbon fiber composites.

  2. Analysis and design of on-grade reinforced concrete track support structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, F. G.; Williams, R. D.; Greening, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    For the improvement of rail service, the Department of Transportation, Federal Rail Administration, is sponsoring a test track on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway. The test track will contain nine separate rail support structures, including one conventional section for control and three reinforced concrete structures on grade, one slab and two beam sections. The analysis and design of these latter structures was accomplished by means of the finite element method, NASTRAN, and is presented.

  3. Development of Mathematical and Computational Models to Design Selectively Reinforced Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baobao

    Different positions of a material used for structures experience different stresses, sometimes at both extremes, when undergoing processing, manufacturing, and serving. Taking the three-point bending as an example, the plate experiences higher stress in the middle span area and lower stress in both sides of the plate. In order to ensure the performance and reduce the cost of the composite, placement of different composite material with different mechanical properties, i.e. selective reinforcement, is proposed. Very few study has been conducted on selective reinforcement. Therefore, basic understanding on the relationship between the selective reinforcing variables and the overall properties of composite material is still unclear and there is still no clear methodology to design composite materials under different types of loads. This study started from the analysis of composite laminate under three point bending test. From the mechanical analysis and simulation result of homogeneously reinforced composite materials, it is found that the stress is not evenly distributed on the plate based on through-thickness direction and longitudinal direction. Based on these results, a map for the stress distribution under three point bending was developed. Next, the composite plate was selectively designed using two types of configurations. Mathematical and finite element analysis (FEA) models were built based on these designs. Experimental data from tests of hybrid composite materials was used to verify the mathematical and FEA models. Analysis of the mathematical model indicates that the increase in stiffness of the material at the top and bottom surfaces and middle-span area is the most effective way to improve the flexural modulus in three point bending test. At the end of this study, a complete methodology to perform the selective design was developed.

  4. Computer-Aided Construction at Designing Reinforced Concrete Columns as Per Ec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, M.; Grębowski, K.

    2015-02-01

    The article presents the authors' computer program for designing and dimensioning columns in reinforced concrete structures taking into account phenomena affecting their behaviour and information referring to design as per EC. The computer program was developed with the use of C++ programming language. The program guides the user through particular dimensioning stages: from introducing basic data such as dimensions, concrete class, reinforcing steel class and forces affecting the column, through calculating the creep coefficient taking into account the impact of imperfection depending on the support scheme and also the number of mating members at load shit, buckling length, to generating the interaction curve graph. The final result of calculations provides two dependence points calculated as per methods of nominal stiffness and nominal curvature. The location of those points relative to the limit curve determines whether the column load capacity is assured or has been exceeded. The content of the study describes in detail the operation of the computer program and the methodology and phenomena which are indispensable at designing axially and eccentrically the compressed members of reinforced concrete structures as per the European standards.

  5. Vacuum infusion equipment design and the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saputra, A. H.; Setyarso, G.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristic of composite material is greatly influenced by the manufacture method of composite. The conventional method that has been used such as hand lay-up and spray up are simple and easy to apply but the composite tend to have a void in it because of the air trapped during the manufacture process. Vacuum infusion is one of the modern composite manufacture process which can replace the conventional method. The problem of this method happens when the resin infusion time become longer due to the addition of reinforcement layers. When the resin infusion time is longer than the resin's gel time, the resin will become gel and not able to flow into the mold. In order to overcome this problem, a study that observe the influence of reinforcement layers addition to the resin infusion time is needed. In this study, vacuum infusion equipment for composite materials manufacturing process that are designed consists of: 1×1m glass as the mold, 1L PVC tube for the resin container, 1L glass tube for the resin trap, and ‘A HP vacuum pump with 7 CFM vacuum speed. The resin that is used in this study is unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) and the fiber used as reinforcement is fiber glass. It is observed that the more number of reinforcement layers the longer resin infusion time will be. The resin infusion time (in seconds) from two until six layers respectively for the area of 15×20cm are: 88, 115, 145, 174, 196; for the area of 15×25cm are: 119, 142, 168, 198, 235; and for the area of 15×35cm are: 181, 203, 235, 263, 303. The maximum reinforcement layers that can be accommodated for each 15×20cm, 15×25cm, and 15×35cm area are respectively 31 layers, 29 layers, and 25 layers.

  6. Conditioned reinforcement as a function of duration of stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Dinsmoor, James A.; Mulvaney, Dallas E.; Jwaideh, Alice R.

    1981-01-01

    Pigeons were provided with three keys. Pecking the center key produced grain on a schedule that alternated at unpredictable times between a variable-interval component and extinction. On concurrent variable-interval schedules, pecking either side key produced a stimulus associated with the variable-interval component on the center key provided that said schedule was currently in effect. The independent variable was the length of time this stimulus remained on the keys. Pecking one side key produced the stimulus for 27 seconds, whereas the duration produced by pecking the other key varied for successive blocks of sessions. For the first four birds, the values tested were 3, 9, 27, and 81 seconds. For the second group, numbering three birds, the values tested were 1, 3, 9, and 27 seconds. The dependent variable was the proportion of total side key pecks that occurred on the variable key. For all birds, the function was positive in slope and negative in acceleration. This finding supports a formulation that ascribes the maintenance of observing responses in a normal setting to the fact that the subject exposes itself to the positive discriminative stimulus for a longer mean duration than it does to the negative stimulus. PMID:16812230

  7. Design of reinforcement welding machine within steel framework for marine engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    In this project, a design scheme that reinforcement welding machine is added within the steel framework is proposed according to the double-side welding technology for box-beam structure in marine engineering. Then the design and development of circuit and transmission mechanism for new welding equipment are completed as well with one sample machine being made. Moreover, the trial running is finished finally. Main technical parameters of the equipment are: the working stroke: ≥1500mm, the welding speed: 8˜15cm/min and the welding sheet thickness: ≥20mm.

  8. Effects of reinforcement on children's academic behavior as a function of self-determined and externally imposed contingencies1

    PubMed Central

    Felixbrod, Jeffrey J.; O'Leary, K. Daniel

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was designed to compare the effects of contingent reinforcement under conditions of self-determined and externally imposed performance standards. A major purpose was to examine the maintenance of self-imposed performance standards over time. Children in one contingent reinforcement condition self-determined their academic performance standards. The same performance standards were externally imposed upon children in a second contingent reinforcement condition who were yoked to subjects in the first condition. Children in a no-reinforcement control condition performed in the absence of external reward. Behavioral productivity of the self-determination condition was greater than that of the no-reinforcement condition. Further, no attenuation of the efficacy of contingent reinforcement occurred when performance standards were self-determined rather than externally imposed. Over six sessions, children became progressively more lenient in their self-imposed performance demands in the absence of social surveillance. PMID:16795405

  9. Design, manufacturing, and verification of piezoceramics embedded in fiber-reinforced thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elspass, Wilfried J.; Kunzmann, J.; Flemming, M.; Baumann, D.

    1995-05-01

    Fiber reinforced thermoplastics offer substantial advantages over fiber reinforced thermosets. Besides high specific stiffness and strength and excellent resistance to impact damage, especially with respect to the manufacturing process considerable cost reductions are possible. The reason is the reduction of the processing times from hours to minutes. However the higher process temperatures close to the Curie temperature in the range from 250 degree(s) C to 400 degree(s) C are expected to have a significant impact on the polarization of embedded piezoceramic patches. Active structures require by definition embedded actuators and sensors as part of the load bearing structure. The success of the design philosophy of active structures is highly dependent on the manufacturing costs. For that reason fiber reinforced thermoplastics are supposed to be the ideal material for the host structure. Different manufacturing processes were applied to manufacture active test structures which are specifically designed with respect to the manufacturing process used. The embedding process of the active elements include the electrical insulation and wiring. Moreover the coefficient of thermal expansion of a typical PZT type ceramic was measured over a wide temperature range to understand the thermomechanical loading of the piezoceramic due to the manufacturing process. Moreover the electromechanical parameters of the active elements before and after the manufacturing process were measured. For this purpose a special test equipment has been developed. Furthermore the problem of thermal depolarization is touched. Basically it turns out that in spite of high processing temperatures the embedding of piezoceramics in fiber reinforced thermoplastics is feasible. The repolarization process of embedded piezoceramics is optimized for a given type of piezoceramics.

  10. Tungsten-fiber-reinforced superalloy composite, high-temperature component design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composites (TFRS) are intended for use in high temperature turbine components. Current turbine component design methodology is based on applying the experience, sometimes semiempirical, gained from over 30 years of superalloy component design. Current composite component design capability is generally limited to the methodology for low temperature resin matrix composites. Often the tendency is to treat TFRS as just another superalloy or low temperature composite. However, TFRS behavior is significantly different than that of superalloys, and the high environment adds consideration not common in low temperature composite component design. The methodology used for preliminary design of TFRS components are described. Considerations unique to TFRS are emphasized. Previously announced in STAR as N82-21259

  11. Free vibration of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite plates with cutout

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the past five years, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes act as an exceptional reinforcement for composites. For this reason, a large number of investigations have been devoted to analysis of fundamental, structural behavior of solid structures made of carbon-nanotube-reinforced composites (CNTRC). The present research, as an extension of the available works on the vibration analysis of CNTRC structures, examines the free vibration characteristics of plates containing a cutout that are reinforced with uniform or nonuniform distribution of carbon nanotubes. The first-order shear deformation plate theory is used to estimate the kinematics of the plate. The solution method is based on the Ritz method with Chebyshev basis polynomials. Such a solution method is suitable for arbitrary in-plane and out-of-plane boundary conditions of the plate. It is shown that through a functionally graded distribution of carbon nanotubes across the thickness of the plate, the fundamental frequency of a rectangular plate with or without a cutout may be enhanced. Furthermore, the frequencies are highly dependent on the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes and may be increased upon using more carbon nanotubes as reinforcement. PMID:27335742

  12. Free vibration of functionally graded carbon-nanotube-reinforced composite plates with cutout.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mostafa; Kiani, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    During the past five years, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes act as an exceptional reinforcement for composites. For this reason, a large number of investigations have been devoted to analysis of fundamental, structural behavior of solid structures made of carbon-nanotube-reinforced composites (CNTRC). The present research, as an extension of the available works on the vibration analysis of CNTRC structures, examines the free vibration characteristics of plates containing a cutout that are reinforced with uniform or nonuniform distribution of carbon nanotubes. The first-order shear deformation plate theory is used to estimate the kinematics of the plate. The solution method is based on the Ritz method with Chebyshev basis polynomials. Such a solution method is suitable for arbitrary in-plane and out-of-plane boundary conditions of the plate. It is shown that through a functionally graded distribution of carbon nanotubes across the thickness of the plate, the fundamental frequency of a rectangular plate with or without a cutout may be enhanced. Furthermore, the frequencies are highly dependent on the volume fraction of carbon nanotubes and may be increased upon using more carbon nanotubes as reinforcement.

  13. Design Criteria for Deflection Capacity of Conventionally Reinforced Concrete Slabs. Phase II. Design and Construction Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    A T DERECHO , M IGRAL N68305-79-C00 UNCLASSIFIED CEL-CR-.A07 NL .... DTIC tC’ 80-EV27 T-4 CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORY Naval Construction Battalion...Design and Construction Requirements by T. Takayanagi, A.T. Derecho , and M. Iqbal* 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Objective and Scope The primary objective of this...functions are constructed for 6ult/L from slab test data and for cu from slab data and coupon tesY data other than slab data. This second approach allows a

  14. Design of Fiber Reinforced Foam Sandwich Panels for Large Ares V Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    2010-01-01

    The preliminary design of three major structural components within NASA's Ares V heavy lift vehicle using a novel fiber reinforced foam composite sandwich panel concept is presented. The Ares V payload shroud, interstage, and core intertank are designed for minimum mass using this panel concept, which consists of integral composite webs separated by structural foam between two composite facesheets. The HyperSizer structural sizing software, in conjunction with NASTRAN finite element analyses, is used. However, since HyperSizer does not currently include a panel concept for fiber reinforced foam, the sizing was performed using two separate approaches. In the first, the panel core is treated as an effective (homogenized) material, whose properties are provided by the vendor. In the second approach, the panel is treated as a blade stiffened sandwich panel, with the mass of the foam added after completion of the panel sizing. Details of the sizing for each of the three Ares V components are given, and it is demonstrated that the two panel sizing approaches are in reasonable agreement for thinner panel designs, but as the panel thickness increases, the blade stiffened sandwich panel approach yields heavier panel designs. This is due to the effects of local buckling, which are not considered in the effective core property approach.

  15. Development of design data for graphite reinforced epoxy and polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheck, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques and design data were characterized for a graphite/epoxy composite system that is useful from 75 K to 450 K, and a graphite/polyimide composite system that is useful from 75 K to 589 K. The Monsanto 710 polyimide resin was selected as the resin to be characterized and used with the graphite fiber reinforcement. Material was purchased using the prepreg specification for the design data generation for both the HT-S/710 and HM-S/710 graphite/polyimide composite system. Lamina and laminate properties were determined at 75 K, 297 K, and 589 K. The test results obtained on the skin-stringer components proved that graphite/polyimide composites can be reliably designed and analyzed much like graphite/epoxy composites. The design data generated in the program includes the standard static mechanical properties, biaxial strain data, creep, fatigue, aging, and thick laminate data.

  16. Piezoresistive properties of cement composites reinforced by functionalized carbon nanotubes using photo-assisted Fenton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianlin, Luo; Kwok L, Chung; Qiuyi, Li; Shunjian, Chen; Lu, Li; Dongshuai, Hou; Chunwei, Zhang

    2017-03-01

    A combined chemical technique for surface functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented in this paper. The functionalized CNTs (f-CNTs) were employed to reinforce both the mechanical and electromechanical properties of cementitious composites for the purpose of developing intrinsic self-sensing sensors. With moderate functionalization, the f-CNTs were found to easily disperse in an aqueous system while just aiding with low fraction of dispersants: (a) polyethylene oxide (MPEG), (b) Trition X-100 (Tx-100). Both the FTIR and DSC results show that the oxidation effect of this combined technique were not as strong as those when using conventional strong oxidation methods. As a result, the integrity of electronic structure inside the f-CNT reinforced cement matrixes can be effectively maintained. This paper is aimed at exploring the electrical resistivity and piezoresistive properties of the f-CNT reinforced cement composites (f-CNT-RCCs). Both the monoaxial and cyclic compression tests were undertaken on the specimens with different f-CNT doping levels of 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.3%. Experimental results indicated that excellent piezoresistive properties were achieved at the doping level of 0.3%, wherein high strain sensitivity were recorded as 254.9 and 286.6 for the cases of adding small amounts of surfactants, MPEG and combination of MPEG and Tx100, respectively.

  17. Improved design of special boundary elements for T-shaped reinforced concrete walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaodong; Liu, Dan; Qian, Jiaru

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the design provisions of the Chinese GB 50011-2010 code for seismic design of buildings for the special boundary elements of T-shaped reinforced concrete walls and proposes an improved design method. Comparison of the design provisions of the GB 50011-2010 code and those of the American code ACI 318-14 indicates a possible deficiency in the T-shaped wall design provisions in GB 50011-2010. A case study of a typical T-shaped wall designed in accordance with GB 50011-2010 also indicates the insufficient extent of the boundary element at the non-flange end and overly conservative design of the flange end boundary element. Improved designs for special boundary elements of T-shaped walls are developed using a displacement-based method. The proposed design formulas produce a longer boundary element at the non-flange end and a shorter boundary element at the flange end, relative to those of the GB 50011-2010 provisions. Extensive numerical analysis indicates that T-shaped walls designed using the proposed formulas develop inelastic drift of 0.01 for both cases of the flange in compression and in tension.

  18. Efficient exploration through active learning for value function approximation in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takayuki; Hachiya, Hirotaka; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2010-06-01

    Appropriately designing sampling policies is highly important for obtaining better control policies in reinforcement learning. In this paper, we first show that the least-squares policy iteration (LSPI) framework allows us to employ statistical active learning methods for linear regression. Then we propose a design method of good sampling policies for efficient exploration, which is particularly useful when the sampling cost of immediate rewards is high. The effectiveness of the proposed method, which we call active policy iteration (API), is demonstrated through simulations with a batting robot.

  19. Efficient Design and Analysis of Lightweight Reinforced Core Sandwich and PRSEUS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Lucking, Ryan C.; Collier, Craig S.; Ainsworth, James J.; Toubia, Elias A.

    2012-01-01

    Design, analysis, and sizing methods for two novel structural panel concepts have been developed and incorporated into the HyperSizer Structural Sizing Software. Reinforced Core Sandwich (RCS) panels consist of a foam core with reinforcing composite webs connecting composite facesheets. Boeing s Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) panels use a pultruded unidirectional composite rod to provide axial stiffness along with integrated transverse frames and stitching. Both of these structural concepts are ovencured and have shown great promise applications in lightweight structures, but have suffered from the lack of efficient sizing capabilities similar to those that exist for honeycomb sandwich, foam sandwich, hat stiffened, and other, more traditional concepts. Now, with accurate design methods for RCS and PRSEUS panels available in HyperSizer, these concepts can be traded and used in designs as is done with the more traditional structural concepts. The methods developed to enable sizing of RCS and PRSEUS are outlined, as are results showing the validity and utility of the methods. Applications include several large NASA heavy lift launch vehicle structures.

  20. Design and reinforcement: vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based sandwich composites.

    PubMed

    Zeng, You; Ci, Lijie; Carey, Brent J; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2010-11-23

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforcement of polymer composites has not yielded optimum results in that the composite properties are typically compromised by poor dispersion and random orientation of CNTs in polymers. Given the short lengths available for nanotubes, opportunities lie in incorporating CNTs with other structural reinforcements such as carbon fibers (CFs) to achieve improvement over existing composite designs. Growth of vertically aligned CNTs (VACNTs) offers new avenues for designing high-performance composites by integrating CFs and nanotubes into layered 3D architectures. To obtain composites with high rigidity and damping, we have designed and fabricated VACNT-based sandwich composites from simply stacking the freestanding VACNTs and CF fabrics and infiltrating with epoxy matrix. Comparing with the CF/epoxy laminates, the VACNT-based sandwich composites exhibit higher flexural rigidity and damping, which is achieved due to the effective integration of the VACNTs as an interfacial layer between the CF stacks. Furthermore, the lighter weight of these VACNT-based sandwich composites offers advantages in aerospace and transportation applications.

  1. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  2. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  3. Relationship of margin design for fiber-reinforced composite crowns to compressive fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Maghrabi, Abdulhamaid A; Ayad, Mohamed F; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2011-07-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite restorations provide excellent esthetics; however, little is known regarding the influence of margin design on marginal fit and fracture resistance for this type of crown. This study evaluated the effect of variations in tooth-preparation design on the marginal fit and compressive fracture resistance of fiber-reinforced composite crowns. Three metal dies with a total convergence of 5° and different margin designs (0.5-mm light chamfer, 1.0-mm deep chamfer, and 1.0-mm shoulder) were prepared. Sixty standardized crowns (FibreKor) were made on duplicated base metal alloy dies (n = 20 for each margin design). Marginal fit was stereoscopically evaluated by measuring the distances between each of the four pairs of indentations on the crowns and on the dies. The specimens were then subjected to a compressive fracture-loading test using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple-range test (α = 0.05). Analysis of marginal fit and fracture resistance disclosed a statistically significant difference for tooth-preparation design (p < 0.001). The marginal adaptation of preparations with the 0.5-mm light chamfer (66.2 μm) and 1.0-mm deep chamfer (69.7 μm) was significantly better than preparations with a shoulder finish line (92.8 μm) (p < 0.001). The fracture strength of the preparations with the 0.5-mm light chamfer (15.8 MPa) and 1.0-mm deep chamfer (15.1 MPa) was significantly greater than those of the preparations with the 1.0-mm shoulder (13.7 MPa) (p < 0.001). Marginal fit of fiber-reinforced crowns was adversely affected by tooth-preparation design. The marginal gaps were greater for the shoulder margin specimens than in the light or deep chamfer margin specimens; however, the fracture strength of the chamfer margin specimens was greater than that of the shoulder margin specimens. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  4. Assessing preferences for positive and negative reinforcement during treatment of destructive behavior with functional communication training.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Adelinis, John D; Volkert, Valerie M; Keeney, Kris M; Neidert, Pamela L; Hovanetz, Alyson

    2005-01-01

    Results of prior studies (e.g. [J. Appl. Behav. Anal. 32 (1999) 285]) showing that participants chose alternative behavior (compliance) over escape-reinforced destructive behavior when this latter response produced escape and the former response produced positive reinforcement may have been due to (a) the value of the positive reinforcer overriding the value of the negative reinforcer or (b) the presence of the positive reinforcer altering the value of the negative reinforcer (i.e., lessening the aversiveness of the demands). In this investigation we evaluated the relative contributions of these alternative mechanisms with two girls with autism. We compared the relative effects of positive and negative reinforcement using equivalent communication responses under both a restricted-choice condition (in which participants could choose positive or negative reinforcement, but not both) and an unrestricted-choice condition (in which participants could choose one or both reinforcers). Both participants often chose positive over negative reinforcement in the restricted-choice condition. However, in the unrestricted-choice condition (in which participants could choose one or both reinforcers), one participant consistently chose both reinforcers by the end of the analysis whereas the other primarily chose only positive reinforcement. Results suggested that for one participant the value of the positive reinforcer overrode the value of the negative reinforcer, whereas for the other participant, the presence of the positive reinforcer in the demand context lessened the aversiveness of the demands.

  5. Perceived Access to Reinforcers as a Function of Alcohol Consumption Among One First Nations Group

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, Nichea S.; Smith, Gregory T.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Spillane & Smith (2007) postulated that high levels of problem drinking in some First Nation (FN) communities resulted in part from the perception that there is low access to alternative reinforcers (e.g., jobs, friendships, family relationships, and financial security), that many alternative reinforcers are less contingent on sobriety, and that others are available regardless of drinking status for reserve-dwelling FN members. Methods This study examined perceptions of access to alternative reinforcers and the extent to which access varied as a function of drinking in 211 FN members living on one reserve in Canada, 138 middle-socioeconomic status Caucasians (MCC), and 98 low-socioeconomic status Caucasians (LCC). Results The FN group expected less access to employment, quality family and friend relationships, and financial security compared to the MCC group. After controlling for perceived access in general, gender, and age, the FN group reported that drinking would not cause a decrease in access to employment, family relationships, friendships, and finances as compared to the MCC group. The FN group did not differ from the LCC group in the degree to which they expected drinking to cost access to family relationships or finances, but the LCC group expected drinking to have less of an impact on access to jobs and friendships as compared to the FN group. Conclusions The results provide initial support for the Spillane and Smith theory of problem drinking among this one First Nation Group. The results suggest that increasing access to these reinforcers may reduce problematic drinking in this First Nation group. PMID:22823415

  6. German guidelines for steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnels with special consideration of design and statical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Schleicher, H.

    1995-12-31

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete can undoubtedly absorb tensile forces. The utilization of this characteristic for the design and specifications of support structures for underground tunnels is regulated by the new Guidelines from the German Concrete Association. Recommendations are given in these guidelines for construction design and for construction itself. The required tests for classification, suitability and quality monitoring are presented.

  7. Hardware design for Hash functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong Ki; Knežević, Miroslav; Verbauwhede, Ingrid M. R.

    Due to its cryptographic and operational key features such as the one-way function property, high speed and a fixed output size independent of input size the hash algorithm is one of the most important cryptographic primitives. A critical drawback of most cryptographic algorithms is the large computational overhead. This is getting more critical since the data amount to process or communicate is increasing a lot. In many cases, a proper use of the hash algorithm reduces the computational overhead. Digital signature generation and the message authentication are the most common applications of the hash algorithms. The increasing data size also motivates hardware designers to have a throughput optimal architecture for a given hash algorithm. In this chapter, some popular hash algorithms and their cryptanalysis are briefly introduced, and a design methodology for throughput optimal architectures of MD4-based hash algorithms is described in detail.

  8. Optimal design of variable-stiffness fiber-reinforced composites using cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setoodeh, Shahriar

    The growing number of applications of composite materials in aerospace and naval structures along with advancements in manufacturing technologies demand continuous innovations in the design of composite structures. In the traditional design of composite laminates, fiber orientation angles are constant for each layer and are usually limited to 0, 90, and +/-45 degrees. To fully benefit from the directional properties of composite laminates, such limitations have to be removed. The concept of variable-stiffness laminates allows the stiffness properties to vary spatially over the laminate. Through tailoring of fiber orientations and laminate thickness spatially in an optimal fashion, mechanical properties of a part can be improved. In this thesis, the optimal design of variable-stiffness fiber-reinforced composite laminates is studied using an emerging numerical engineering optimization scheme based on the cellular automata paradigm. A cellular automaton (CA) based design scheme uses local update rule for both field variables (displacements) and design variables (lay-up configuration and laminate density measure) in an iterative fashion to convergence to an optimal design. In the present work, the displacements are updated based on the principle of local equilibrium and the design variables are updated according to the optimality criteria for minimum compliance design. A closed form displacement update rule for constant thickness isotropic continua is derived, while for the general anisotropic continua with variable thickness a numeric update rule is used. Combined lay-up and topology design of variable-stiffness flat laminates is performed under the action of in-plane loads and bending loads. An optimality criteria based formulation is used to obtain local design rules for minimum compliance design subject to a volume constraint. It is shown that the design rule splits into a two step application. In the first step an optimal lay-up configuration is computed and in

  9. Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement: some reciprocal relations between basic and applied research.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R; Hackenberg, T D

    2001-01-01

    Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement are ubiquitous phenomena in applied behavior analysis. This discussion paper is divided into two sections. In the first section, reinforcement contingencies are discussed in terms of the necessary and sufficient conditions for reinforcement effects. Response-stimulus dependencies, conditional probabilities, and contiguity are discussed as possible mechanisms of, and arrangements for, reinforcement effects. In the second section, social reinforcement is discussed in terms of its functional subtypes and reinforcement context effects. Two underlying themes run throughout the discussion: (a) Applied research would benefit from a greater understanding of existing basic research, and (b) basic research could be designed to specifically address some of the issues about reinforcement that are central to effective application.

  10. Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement: some reciprocal relations between basic and applied research.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, T R; Hackenberg, T D

    2001-01-01

    Reinforcement contingencies and social reinforcement are ubiquitous phenomena in applied behavior analysis. This discussion paper is divided into two sections. In the first section, reinforcement contingencies are discussed in terms of the necessary and sufficient conditions for reinforcement effects. Response-stimulus dependencies, conditional probabilities, and contiguity are discussed as possible mechanisms of, and arrangements for, reinforcement effects. In the second section, social reinforcement is discussed in terms of its functional subtypes and reinforcement context effects. Two underlying themes run throughout the discussion: (a) Applied research would benefit from a greater understanding of existing basic research, and (b) basic research could be designed to specifically address some of the issues about reinforcement that are central to effective application. PMID:11421320

  11. Functional design of spider's silk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosline, John; Guerette, Paul; Ortlepp, Christine

    1996-02-01

    The orb-web weaving spiders produce a broad range of high performance structural fibers (i.e. silks) with mechanical properties that are superbly matched to their function. Our interest in these materials stems both from an interest in the biology of the spiders and the design of their webs and also from a desire to discover principles of mechanical design of protein-based structural materials that can guide the development of novel bio-engineered materials. All spiders produce silks, but the orb-web weaving spiders are unique in their ability to produce seven different silks, each from distinct gland/spinneret complexes. Considering the wide diversity of spider species, there is likely to be an enormous range of material properties available in spider silk. However, at present, we only have information on two species of spiders, and only two of their seven silks have been studied in any detail. These are: (1) the silk produced by the major ampullate gland, which forms the safety-line or dragline of the spider and also is used to form the frame of its orb-web, and (2) the viscid silk produced by the flagelliform gland, which forms the glue-covered catching spiral of the web. In this paper we describe several aspects of the mechanical design of the dragline and viscid silks produced by the spider Araneus diadematus.

  12. The Reinforcement Hierarchy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forness, Steven R.

    1973-01-01

    Reinforcement hierarchy implies movement along a continuum from top to bottom, from primitive levels of reinforcement to more sophisticated levels. Unless it is immediately obvious that a child cannot function without the use of lower-order reinforcers, we should approach him as though he responds to topmost reinforcers until he demonstrates…

  13. Serotonergic reinforcement of intestinal barrier function is impaired in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keszthelyi, D; Troost, F J; Jonkers, D M; van Eijk, H M; Lindsey, P J; Dekker, J; Buurman, W A; Masclee, A A M

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in serotonergic (5-HT) metabolism and/or intestinal integrity have been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To assess the effects of the precursor of 5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), on mucosal 5-HT availability and intestinal integrity, and to assess potential differences between healthy controls and IBS patients. Fifteen IBS patients and 15 healthy volunteers participated in this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. Intestinal integrity was assessed by dual-sugar test and by determining the mucosal expression of tight junction proteins after ingestion of an oral bolus of 100 mg 5-HTP or placebo. Mucosal serotonergic metabolism was assessed in duodenal biopsy samples. 5-HTP administration significantly increased mucosal levels of 5-HIAA, the main metabolite of 5-HT, in both healthy controls (7.1 ± 1.7 vs. 2.5 ± 0.7 pmol/mg, 5-HTP vs. placebo, P = 0.02) and IBS patients (20.0 ± 4.8 vs. 8.1 ± 1.3 pmol/mg, 5-HTP vs. placebo, P = 0.02), with the latter group showing a significantly larger increase. Lactulose/L-rhamnose ratios were significantly lower after administration of 5-HTP (P < 0.05) in healthy controls and were accompanied by redistribution of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), pointing to reinforcement of the barrier. In IBS, expression of the tight junction proteins was significantly lower compared to healthy controls, and 5-HTP resulted in a further decrease in occludin expression. Oral 5-HTP induced alterations in mucosal 5-HT metabolism. In healthy controls, a reinforcement of the intestinal barrier was seen whereas such reaction was absent in IBS patients. This could indicate the presence of a serotonin-mediated mechanism aimed to reinforce intestinal barrier function, which seems to dysfunction in IBS patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-02-06

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities.

  15. Dual Function Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer in Simulated Pore Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ji-Hua; Guo, Guanping; Wei, Liangliang; Zhu, Miaochang; Chen, Xianchuan

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and electrochemical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) were investigated regarding a novel improvement in the load-carrying capacity and durability of reinforced concrete structures by adopting CFRP as both a structural strengthener and an anode of the impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system. The mechanical and anode performance of CFRP were investigated in an aqueous pore solution in which the electrolytes were available to the anode in a cured concrete structure. Accelerated polarization tests were designed with different test durations and various levels of applied currents in accordance with the international standard. The CFRP specimens were mechanically characterized after polarization. The measured feeding voltage and potential during the test period indicates CFRP have stable anode performance in a simulated pore solution. Two failure modes were observed through tensile testing. The tensile properties of the post-polarization CFRP specimens declined with an increased charge density. The CFRP demonstrated success as a structural strengthener and ICCP anode. We propose a mathematic model predicting the tensile strengths of CFRP with varied impressed charge densities. PMID:28787900

  16. Design issues for a reinforcement-based self-learning fuzzy controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, John; Wang, Haojin; Dauherity, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic controllers have some often cited advantages over conventional techniques such as PID control: easy implementation, its accommodation to natural language, the ability to cover wider range of operating conditions and others. One major obstacle that hinders its broader application is the lack of a systematic way to develop and modify its rules and as result the creation and modification of fuzzy rules often depends on try-error or pure experimentation. One of the proposed approaches to address this issue is self-learning fuzzy logic controllers (SFLC) that use reinforcement learning techniques to learn the desirability of states and to adjust the consequent part of fuzzy control rules accordingly. Due to the different dynamics of the controlled processes, the performance of self-learning fuzzy controller is highly contingent on the design. The design issue has not received sufficient attention. The issues related to the design of a SFLC for the application to chemical process are discussed and its performance is compared with that of PID and self-tuning fuzzy logic controller.

  17. Optimum structural design of robotic manipulators with fiber reinforced composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Lamancusa, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    High-speed robotic arms with advanced structural characteristics can be fabricated from optimally tailored fiber reinforced composites. An integrated design methodology is presented for the optimal structural synthesis of composite robotic manipulators. Optimum configurations of ply angles and ply thicknesses are predicted for maximum structural end-effector stiffness and maximum end-effector load carrying capacity, without altering the geometric dimensions of the links. Multiple posture finite element-based static performance criteria are implemented. A new finite element has been developed for the modeling of tubular composite links. Unique features are the inclusion of shear effects and coupling between stretching and flexure. Numerical solutions are obtained via an efficient optimization algorithm. Applications to an existing SCARA-class manipulator illustrate the effectiveness of the method and demonstrate the dramatic influence of the multi-postural design criteria on the optimal design. For a filament wound structure using a high strength carbon fiber in a thermoplastic matrix, the resultant optimum ply configurations have increased the specific stiffness and specific load capacity by factors of 1.5 and 16, respectively, in comparison to identically sized aluminum links.

  18. Design issues for a reinforcement-based self-learning fuzzy controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, John; Wang, Haojin; Dauherity, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Fuzzy logic controllers have some often cited advantages over conventional techniques such as PID control: easy implementation, its accommodation to natural language, the ability to cover wider range of operating conditions and others. One major obstacle that hinders its broader application is the lack of a systematic way to develop and modify its rules and as result the creation and modification of fuzzy rules often depends on try-error or pure experimentation. One of the proposed approaches to address this issue is self-learning fuzzy logic controllers (SFLC) that use reinforcement learning techniques to learn the desirability of states and to adjust the consequent part of fuzzy control rules accordingly. Due to the different dynamics of the controlled processes, the performance of self-learning fuzzy controller is highly contingent on the design. The design issue has not received sufficient attention. The issues related to the design of a SFLC for the application to chemical process are discussed and its performance is compared with that of PID and self-tuning fuzzy logic controller.

  19. Design issues of a reinforcement-based self-learning fuzzy controller for petrochemical process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, John; Wang, Haojin; Daugherity, Walter C.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic controllers have some often-cited advantages over conventional techniques such as PID control, including easier implementation, accommodation to natural language, and the ability to cover a wider range of operating conditions. One major obstacle that hinders the broader application of fuzzy logic controllers is the lack of a systematic way to develop and modify their rules; as a result the creation and modification of fuzzy rules often depends on trial and error or pure experimentation. One of the proposed approaches to address this issue is a self-learning fuzzy logic controller (SFLC) that uses reinforcement learning techniques to learn the desirability of states and to adjust the consequent part of its fuzzy control rules accordingly. Due to the different dynamics of the controlled processes, the performance of a self-learning fuzzy controller is highly contingent on its design. The design issue has not received sufficient attention. The issues related to the design of a SFLC for application to a petrochemical process are discussed, and its performance is compared with that of a PID and a self-tuning fuzzy logic controller.

  20. Reinforcement of Polylactic acid using pyrene functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakki, Ram Kumar

    The conventional petroleum polymers are being replaced by the biopolymers that are biodegradable, biocompatible, eco-friendly. But to bridge the gap between them in terms of mechanical and thermal stability, reinforcement is used. This paper deals with the review of literature on production of polylactic acid, the reinforcement materials (natural and synthetic) used in the recent past, characterization methods used to determine the mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of the composites and a new method of functionalizing the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT) to improve the bonding with Polylactic acid (PLA) using pi-pi stacking. This method would avoid the damage caused by the harsh pretreatment of MWNTs with strong acids for functionalizing them and also provides an alternative method which is safe and effective. When the MWNTs are treated with 1-pyrene butyl amine, the pi-pi stacking occurs along the walls of the MWNTs which functionalizes them and ensures better bonding. The matrix is PLA and the filler material is the functionalized MWNTs. Composites were prepared varying the concentration of the filler material (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7wt %). The tensile strength and modulus was determined using Instron tensile testing machine, the morphological characteristics using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), the thermal stability using the Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) and the chemical bonding between the matrix and filler material was studied using Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy (FTIR). The composites prepared with 5 wt% exhibited 74.17% increase in the tensile strength and 117.5% increase in the modulus when compared to the neat PLA. The dispersion of the MWNT was studied using SEM.

  1. Bending analysis of laminated SWCNT Reinforced functionally graded plate Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Shivaji G.; Lal, Achchhe

    2017-01-01

    In this paper presents bending characteristic of multi-layered carbon nanotube reinforced functionally graded composite plates. The finite element implementation of bending analysis of laminated composite plate via well-established higher order shear deformation theory(HSDT). A seven degree of freedom and C0 continuity finite element model using nine noded isoperimetric elements is developed for precise computation of ply-by-ply deflection and stresses of laminated Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Reinforced composite plate subjected to uniform transverse loading. The finite element implementation is carried out through a finite element code developed in MATLAB.The results obtained by present approach are compared with results available in the literatures. The effective material properties of the laminated SWCNTRC plate are used by Mori-Tanaka method.Numerical results have been obtained with different parameters, width-to-thickness ratio(a/h), stress distribution profile along thickness direction,different SWCNTRC-FG plate, boundary condition and various lamination schemes.

  2. Reinforcer magnitude and resistance to disruption of forgetting functions and response rates.

    PubMed

    Berry, Meredith S; Odum, Amy L

    2014-05-01

    The present experiment investigated the effects of reinforcer magnitude on resistance to disruption of remembering and response rates. Pigeons were exposed to a variable-interval (VI), delayed-matching-to-sample (DMTS) procedure with two components (rich and lean, distinguished by differing discriminative stimuli and hopper presentation duration). Completion of a VI 20 s schedule resulted in DMTS trials. In a DMTS trial, a choice of one of two comparison stimuli resulted in food if the choice matched the color of the previously presented sample stimulus. Separable aspects of the forgetting functions (initial discrimination and rate of forgetting) were examined by determining accuracy across a range of delays. Response rates and accuracy were higher in the rich relative to the lean component during baseline, and were more persistent during disruptors (extinction and prefeeding). During DMTS trials, extinction decreased initial discrimination more in the lean than the rich component, but had no systematic effect on rate of forgetting. During prefeeding, the rate of forgetting increased more in the lean than the rich component, but initial discrimination was not systematically affected. These results show persistence of response rates and remembering are positively related to reinforcer magnitude. The type of disruptor also influences the way in which remembering is disrupted.

  3. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function.

  4. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii (Seed of Burdock) Reinforces Intestinal Barrier Function in Caco-2 Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Soon; Jung, Sun Young; Back, Su Yeon; Do, Jeong-Ryong; Shon, Dong-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Fructus Arctii is used as a traditional herbal medicine to treat inflammatory diseases in oriental countries. This study aimed to investigate effect of F. Arctii extract on intestinal barrier function in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and to reveal the active component of F. Arctii. We measured transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) value (as an index of barrier function) and ovalbumin (OVA) permeation (as an index of permeability) to observe the changes of intestinal barrier function. The treatment of F. Arctii increased TEER value and decreased OVA influx on Caco-2 cell monolayers. Furthermore, we found that arctigenin as an active component of F. Arctii increased TEER value and reduced permeability of OVA from apical to the basolateral side but not arctiin. In the present study, we revealed that F. Arctii could enhance intestinal barrier function, and its active component was an arctigenin on the functionality. We expect that the arctigenin from F. Arctii could contribute to prevention of inflammatory, allergic, and infectious diseases by reinforcing intestinal barrier function. PMID:26550018

  5. Functional Communication Training and Chained Schedules of Reinforcement to Treat Challenging Behavior Maintained by Terminations of Activity Interruptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Roane, Henry S.; Muething, Colin S.; Stephenson, Kasey M.; Ing, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors evaluated functional communication training (FCT) and a chained schedule of reinforcement for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism, respectively. Following a functional analysis with undifferentiated results, the authors demonstrated that…

  6. Functional Communication Training and Chained Schedules of Reinforcement to Treat Challenging Behavior Maintained by Terminations of Activity Interruptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Roane, Henry S.; Muething, Colin S.; Stephenson, Kasey M.; Ing, Anna D.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors evaluated functional communication training (FCT) and a chained schedule of reinforcement for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism, respectively. Following a functional analysis with undifferentiated results, the authors demonstrated that…

  7. Reinforcement of barrier function and scalp homeostasis by Senkyunolide A to fight against dandruff.

    PubMed

    Mondon, Philippe; Ringenbach, Caroline; Doridot, Emmanuel; Genet, Viviane; Criton, Pascaline

    2017-08-18

    Senkyunolide-A (SENKY) can be isolated from Apium graveolens seed oil obtained using supercritical CO2 extraction. SENKY and its parent compounds, the N-butyl phthalides, have been demonstrated to protect cells from CO poisoning, to prevent diabetes mellitus and to decrease cancer cell proliferation. This study was undertaken to evaluate in vitro and in vivo the effect of SENKY on epidermal function improvement, Malassezia effect control, scalp soothing and dandruff reduction via skin protection related pathways. DNA-Array and proteomic studies were performed on human keratinocytes, sebocytes and skin explants in order to demonstrate SENKY activities. Two clinical evaluations were performed under dermatologist control on 106volunteers, with greasy or dry scalp, experiencing dandruff, itching and redness. Volunteers tested a shampoo followed, or not, by a leave-on, containing SENKY, or their placebos. Dandruff severity and redness were scored on the scalp. Moisturisation and sebum release were recorded using relevant measuring apparatus. Itching and scratching evaluations came from volunteers' self-declarations. DNA-array studies on keratinocytes showed a clear regulation of skin barrier functions and epidermis defence pathways. Up-regulation of epidermal differentiation complex genes was observed. These preliminary observations were reinforced by immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry studies showing a significant increase of involucrin, filaggrin, loricrin, SPRR, LC3B and ceramide2 productions. Tight-junctions and corneodesmosomes were significantly reinforced both in keratinocyte cultures (corneodesmosin, claudin, ZO-1) and in skin explants (desmoglein). DNA-array studies also demonstrated upregulation of genes involved in detoxification and anti-inflammation pathways. Proteomic studies revealed that hBD2 production was increased in keratinocytes in contact with SENKY, whereas IL-8, PGE-2 and TLR-9 releases were repressed as well as sebocyte lipid

  8. Optimization design of pre-reinforcement scheme for large cross section shallow buried tunnel in Xi’an Metro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-mei, Gao; Jian-bo, Dai

    2017-09-01

    In order to control the deformation of the surrounding rock of the large section of the tunnel, the author analyzes the stratum displacement law caused by the tunnel excavation by means of on-site monitoring. And the optimized design of the existing tunnel pre-reinforcement scheme is carried out. The FLAC3D numerical simulation method is used to verify the feasibility of the pre-reinforcement optimization scheme. Field test showed that the tunnel surrounding rock deformation in the allowable range, and the deformation control measures of the surrounding rock are reasonable and effective. The research results have important guiding significance for future similar project.

  9. Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction...Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction Ralph P. I. Adler and Daniel J. Snoha...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and

  10. Design of stiff, tough and stretchy hydrogel composites via nanoscale hybrid crosslinking and macroscale fiber reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoting; Cao, Changyong; Wang, Qiming; Gonzalez, Mark; Dolbow, John E; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-10-14

    Hydrogels' applications are usually limited by their weak mechanical properties. Despite recent great progress in developing tough hydrogels, it is still challenging to achieve high values of , toughness and modulus all together in synthetic hydrogels. In this paper, we designed highly stretchable, tough, yet stiff hydrogel composites via a combination of nanoscale hybrid crosslinking and macroscale fiber reinforcement. The hydrogel composites were constructed by impregnating a 3D-printed thermoplastic-fiber mesh with a tough hydrogel crosslinked both covalently and ionically. The hydrogel composites can achieve a fracture energy of over 30,000 J m(-2), a modulus of over 6 MPa, and can be stretched over 2.8 times even in the presence of large structural defects. The enhancement of toughness in the new hydrogel composites relies on multiple pairs of toughening mechanisms which span over multiple length scales. A theoretical model is further developed to predict the toughness and modulus of the hydrogel composites and guide the design of future materials.

  11. Reinforcement-Learning-Based Robust Controller Design for Continuous-Time Uncertain Nonlinear Systems Subject to Input Constraints.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Yang, Xiong; Wang, Ding; Wei, Qinglai

    2015-07-01

    The design of stabilizing controller for uncertain nonlinear systems with control constraints is a challenging problem. The constrained-input coupled with the inability to identify accurately the uncertainties motivates the design of stabilizing controller based on reinforcement-learning (RL) methods. In this paper, a novel RL-based robust adaptive control algorithm is developed for a class of continuous-time uncertain nonlinear systems subject to input constraints. The robust control problem is converted to the constrained optimal control problem with appropriately selecting value functions for the nominal system. Distinct from typical action-critic dual networks employed in RL, only one critic neural network (NN) is constructed to derive the approximate optimal control. Meanwhile, unlike initial stabilizing control often indispensable in RL, there is no special requirement imposed on the initial control. By utilizing Lyapunov's direct method, the closed-loop optimal control system and the estimated weights of the critic NN are proved to be uniformly ultimately bounded. In addition, the derived approximate optimal control is verified to guarantee the uncertain nonlinear system to be stable in the sense of uniform ultimate boundedness. Two simulation examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness and applicability of the present approach.

  12. From free energy to expected energy: Improving energy-based value function approximation in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Elfwing, Stefan; Uchibe, Eiji; Doya, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Free-energy based reinforcement learning (FERL) was proposed for learning in high-dimensional state and action spaces. However, the FERL method does only really work well with binary, or close to binary, state input, where the number of active states is fewer than the number of non-active states. In the FERL method, the value function is approximated by the negative free energy of a restricted Boltzmann machine (RBM). In our earlier study, we demonstrated that the performance and the robustness of the FERL method can be improved by scaling the free energy by a constant that is related to the size of network. In this study, we propose that RBM function approximation can be further improved by approximating the value function by the negative expected energy (EERL), instead of the negative free energy, as well as being able to handle continuous state input. We validate our proposed method by demonstrating that EERL: (1) outperforms FERL, as well as standard neural network and linear function approximation, for three versions of a gridworld task with high-dimensional image state input; (2) achieves new state-of-the-art results in stochastic SZ-Tetris in both model-free and model-based learning settings; and (3) significantly outperforms FERL and standard neural network function approximation for a robot navigation task with raw and noisy RGB images as state input and a large number of actions.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S.; Watson, M.

    2003-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used for numerous applications to enhance the performance of electronics, sensors and composites. This presentation will demonstrate the synthesizing process of carbon nanotube by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes could be synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperature and hydrocarbon concentration but weakly on pressure. The sizes, orientations, and growth modes of carbon nanotubes will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential aerospace applications such as reinforced and functional composites, temperature sensing, and thermal control by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  14. Functional communication training and chained schedules of reinforcement to treat challenging behavior maintained by terminations of activity interruptions.

    PubMed

    Falcomata, Terry S; Roane, Henry S; Muething, Colin S; Stephenson, Kasey M; Ing, Anna D

    2012-09-01

    In this article, the authors evaluated functional communication training (FCT) and a chained schedule of reinforcement for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism, respectively. Following a functional analysis with undifferentiated results, the authors demonstrated that challenging behavior was occasioned by interruptions of ongoing activities and maintained by terminations of interruptions. Next, they demonstrated the effectiveness of a treatment consisting of FCT with a chained schedule of reinforcement. Last, they modified the chained schedule procedure to increase ease of implementation and promote toleration of activity interruptions, and academic tasks were incorporated into the treatment.

  15. Research on deformation characteristics and design method of concrete beams reinforced with GFRP bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, M. X.; Xu, X. S.

    2017-04-01

    Two different glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars were produced to reinforce concrete beams, including plain GFRP bars and ribbed surface GFRP bars. The flexural property of GFRP reinforced concrete beams was studied by testing four specimen beams under two point vertical loads. The crack development and stain distribution of beam cross section during loading were recorded, and the deformation characteristics and failure mode were also analyzed in this experiment. According to the test results, the bond property of plain GFRP bars was too poor to serve as reinforcement bars, while the ribbed surface GFRP bars showed good bond performance and worked well with concrete before final failure. The test beam reinforced with ribbed surface GFRP bars exhibited a uniform crack distribution, and the strain agreed with the assumption of plane cross section. Moreover, calculation method for bending capacity of concrete beam strengthened with GFRP bars was deducted based on this experiment.

  16. A clustering-based graph Laplacian framework for value function approximation in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Huang, Zhenhua; Graves, Daniel; Pedrycz, Witold

    2014-12-01

    In order to deal with the sequential decision problems with large or continuous state spaces, feature representation and function approximation have been a major research topic in reinforcement learning (RL). In this paper, a clustering-based graph Laplacian framework is presented for feature representation and value function approximation (VFA) in RL. By making use of clustering-based techniques, that is, K-means clustering or fuzzy C-means clustering, a graph Laplacian is constructed by subsampling in Markov decision processes (MDPs) with continuous state spaces. The basis functions for VFA can be automatically generated from spectral analysis of the graph Laplacian. The clustering-based graph Laplacian is integrated with a class of approximation policy iteration algorithms called representation policy iteration (RPI) for RL in MDPs with continuous state spaces. Simulation and experimental results show that, compared with previous RPI methods, the proposed approach needs fewer sample points to compute an efficient set of basis functions and the learning control performance can be improved for a variety of parameter settings.

  17. Design and evaluation of a bolted joint for a discrete carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, Carl Q.; Baker, Donald J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prefabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0% strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166% of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7% strain and at 110% of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7% in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Bolted Joint for a Discrete Carbon-Epoxy Rod-Reinforced Hat Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1996-01-01

    The use of pre-fabricated pultruded carbon-epoxy rods has reduced the manufacturing complexity and costs of stiffened composite panels while increasing the damage tolerance of the panels. However, repairability of these highly efficient discrete stiffeners has been a concern. Design, analysis, and test results are presented in this paper for a bolted-joint repair for the pultruded rod concept that is capable of efficiently transferring axial loads in a hat-section stiffener on the upper skin segment of a heavily loaded aircraft wing component. A tension and a compression joint design were evaluated. The tension joint design achieved approximately 1.0 percent strain in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section and failed in a metal fitting at 166 percent of the design ultimate load. The compression joint design failed in the carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section test specimen area at approximately 0.7 percent strain and at 110 percent of the design ultimate load. This strain level of 0.7 percent in compression is similar to the failure strain observed in previously reported carbon-epoxy rod-reinforced hat-section column tests.

  19. Towards Practical Carbonation Prediction and Modelling for Service Life Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekolu, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the scientific community, the interest in durability of concrete structures has been high for quite a long time of over 40 years. Of the various causes of degradation of concrete structures, corrosion is the most widespread durability problem and carbonation is one of the two causes of steel reinforcement corrosion. While much scientific understanding has been gained from the numerous carbonation studies undertaken over the past years, it is still presently not possible to accurately predict carbonation and apply it in design of structures. This underscores the complex nature of the mechanisms as influenced by several interactive factors. Based on critical literature and some experience of the author, it is found that there still exist major challenges in establishing a mathematical constitutive relation for realistic carbonation prediction. While most current models employ permeability /diffusion as the main model property, analysis shows that the most practical material property would be compressive strength, which has a low coefficient of variation of 20% compared to 30 to 50% for permeability. This important characteristic of compressive strength, combined with its merit of simplicity and data availability at all stages of a structure's life, promote its potential use in modelling over permeability. By using compressive strength in carbonation prediction, the need for accelerated testing and permeability measurement can be avoided. This paper attempts to examine the issues associated with carbonation prediction, which could underlie the current lack of a sound established prediction method. Suggestions are then made for possible employment of different or alternative approaches.

  20. Durability of a reinforced concrete designed for the construction of an intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Arva, E. A.; Schulz, F. M.; Vazquez, D. R.

    2012-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic is developing a nuclear waste disposal management programme that contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The major components are made in reinforced concrete so, the durability of these structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents an investigation performed on a reinforced concrete specifically designed for this purpose, to predict the service life of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility from data obtained with several techniques. Results obtained with corrosion sensors embedded in a concrete prototype are also included. The information obtained will be used for the final design of the facility in order to guarantee a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of facilities.

  1. Directly assessing uncertainty in designing the optimal operation of water resources systems by batch mode reinforcement learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biizzi, S.; Castelletti, A.; Pianosi, F.

    2012-04-01

    Optimal operating policies for water resources systems are obtained as the solution to a maximization/minimization problem, where the objective function is the operation target and the model of the physical system is the constraint set. Just as in any model-based analysis, the robustness and reliability of the result largely depend on the accuracy of the model. In water resource system applications this is a limitation since, despite the advances in data availability, systems understanding and computing facilities, still the characterization of most of these systems is affected by strong model uncertainties, including input, parameter and structural uncertainty. Traditionally, uncertainty estimation is evaluated via Monte Carlo methods: each source of uncertainty is given a statistical description (e.g. probability distribution function) and by random sampling from these distributions and repeated optimization and/or simulation uncertainty is propagated through the model. By doing so, the probability distribution of the objective function is derived for a given policy as well as a set of different policies, each one optimal for a different realization of the uncertain input. The approach is rather straightforward, though high resource demanding and then its effective application in real problems often unfeasible. In this paper we propose a novel optimization method that derives, just in one run, the set of optimal operating policies (and associated objective values) for all possible realizations of an uncertain variable in the model. The method is an extension of the Fitted-Q Iteration method, a model-free batch-mode reinforcement algorithm and it is demonstrated by application to a real water reservoir system. The case study is the Hoa Binh reservoir in Northern Vietnam, whose optimal operation is designed and assessed as a function of the uncertainty related to the evaporation rate of the reservoir model. It demonstrates the relevance of uncertainty in

  2. Functional polymorphism of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) influences reinforcement learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mary R; Gallen, Courtney L; Zhang, Xiaochu; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Stein, Elliot A; Barr, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports on the functional effects (i.e., gain or loss of function), and phenotypic outcomes (e.g., changes in addiction vulnerability and stress response) of a commonly occurring functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 A118G) have been inconsistent. Here we examine the effect of this polymorphism on implicit reward learning. We used a probabilistic signal detection task to determine whether this polymorphism impacts response bias to monetary reward in 63 healthy adult subjects: 51 AA homozygotes and 12 G allele carriers. OPRM1 AA homozygotes exhibited typical responding to the rewarded response--that is, their bias to the rewarded stimulus increased over time. However, OPRM1 G allele carriers exhibited a decline in response to the rewarded stimulus compared to the AA homozygotes. These results extend previous reports on the heritability of performance on this task by implicating a specific polymorphism. Through comparison with other studies using this task, we suggest a possible mechanism by which the OPRM1 polymorphism may confer reduced response to natural reward through a dopamine-mediated decrease during positive reinforcement learning.

  3. A composite-appropriate integration method of thick functional components in fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, A.; Höhne, R.; Kliem, M.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of integrated structural health monitoring systems for critical composite parts, such as wind turbine blades, fuselage and wing parts, is an promising approach to guarantee a safe and efficient operational lifetime of such components. Therefore, the integration of thick functional components like sensors, actuators and electronic components is often necessary. An optimal integration of such components should be ensured without material imperfections in the composite structure, i.e. voids and resin rich areas, and failure of the functional components. In this paper, first investigations were undertaken for a basic understanding of the mechanical performance of a fibre reinforced plastic component with integrated functional elements. The influence of different materials and treatment methods for the encapsulation of electronic components was experimentally investigated under static and dynamic loading tests. By means of a parametric finite element model, the effects of an encapsulation and various parameters such as the shape and orientation of the electronic components were examined. Several encapsulation variants were investigated in order to minimise the chance of failure initiations. Based both on experimental and numerical results, a preferred composite integration concept was selected for an electronic board and some first recommendations for an optimal integration were derived.

  4. Teacher Implementation of Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package on three middle school special education teachers' accurate implementation of trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) with their students with autism spectrum disorders or emotional and behavioral disorders in the…

  5. Teacher Implementation of Trial-Based Functional Analysis and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior for Students with Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a training package on three middle school special education teachers' accurate implementation of trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) with their students with autism spectrum disorders or emotional and behavioral disorders in the…

  6. Electronic Design Automation: Integrating the Design and Manufacturing Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachnak, Rafic; Salkowski, Charles

    1997-01-01

    As the complexity of electronic systems grows, the traditional design practice, a sequential process, is replaced by concurrent design methodologies. A major advantage of concurrent design is that the feedback from software and manufacturing engineers can be easily incorporated into the design. The implementation of concurrent engineering methodologies is greatly facilitated by employing the latest Electronic Design Automation (EDA) tools. These tools offer integrated simulation of the electrical, mechanical, and manufacturing functions and support virtual prototyping, rapid prototyping, and hardware-software co-design. This report presents recommendations for enhancing the electronic design and manufacturing capabilities and procedures at JSC based on a concurrent design methodology that employs EDA tools.

  7. FRP Reinforcing bars — designs and methods of manufacture (Review of Patents)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, G.; Bakis, C. E.; Lackey, E.; Kulakov, V.

    2013-09-01

    It is been suggested to devide all FRP reinforcing bars into three groups in accordance with the method used for establishing a bond between the core of the bars and concrete. Patents related to each group are cited and briefly described. At the end of the paper, ideas proposed in the patents are discussed. Problems connected with a practical implementation of FRP reinforcing bars will be considered in the next paper.

  8. Effort-Based Reinforcement Processing and Functional Connectivity Underlying Amotivation in Medicated Patients with Depression and Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Il Ho; Lee, Boung Chul; Kim, Jae-Jin; Kim, Joong Il; Koo, Min-Seung

    2017-04-19

    Amotivation is a common phenotype of major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, which are clinically distinct disorders. Effective treatment targets and strategies can be discovered by examining the dopaminergic reward network function underlying amotivation between these disorders. We conducted an fMRI study in healthy human participants and medicated patients with depression and schizophrenia using an effort-based reinforcement task. We examined regional activations related to reward type (positive and negative reinforcement), effort level, and their composite value, as well as resting-state functional connectivities within the meso-striatal-prefrontal pathway. We found that integrated reward and effort values of low effort-positive reinforcement and high effort-negative reinforcement were behaviorally anticipated and represented in the putamen and medial orbitofrontal cortex activities. Patients with schizophrenia and depression did not show anticipation-related and work-related reaction time reductions, respectively. Greater amotivation severity correlated with smaller work-related putamen activity changes according to reward type in schizophrenia and effort level in depression. Patients with schizophrenia showed feedback-related putamen hyperactivity of low effort compared with healthy controls and depressed patients. The strength of medial orbitofrontal-striatal functional connectivity predicted work-related reaction time reduction of high effort negative reinforcement in healthy controls and amotivation severity in both patients with schizophrenia and those with depression. Patients with depression showed deficient medial orbitofrontal-striatal functional connectivity compared with healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia. These results indicate that amotivation in depression and schizophrenia involves different pathophysiology in the prefrontal-striatal circuitry.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amotivation is present in both depression and schizophrenia

  9. Assessing Preferences for Positive and Negative Reinforcement during Treatment of Destructive Behavior with Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Adelinis, John D.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Keeney, Kris M.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Hovanetz, Alyson

    2005-01-01

    Results of prior studies (e.g. [J. Appl. Behav. Anal. 32 (1999) 285]) showing that participants chose alternative behavior (compliance) over escape-reinforced destructive behavior when this latter response produced escape and the former response produced positive reinforcement may have been due to (a) the value of the positive reinforcer…

  10. Assessing Preferences for Positive and Negative Reinforcement during Treatment of Destructive Behavior with Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Adelinis, John D.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Keeney, Kris M.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Hovanetz, Alyson

    2005-01-01

    Results of prior studies (e.g. [J. Appl. Behav. Anal. 32 (1999) 285]) showing that participants chose alternative behavior (compliance) over escape-reinforced destructive behavior when this latter response produced escape and the former response produced positive reinforcement may have been due to (a) the value of the positive reinforcer…

  11. A Function-Based Classroom Behavior Intervention Using Non-Contingent Reinforcement Plus Response Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Julene D.; Filter, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of noncontingent reinforcement with response cost to reduce problem verbal and physical behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement in an internationally adopted, post-institutionalized student diagnosed with ADHD. Systematic direct observation was employed to measure behavior in a single-subject withdrawal…

  12. A Function-Based Classroom Behavior Intervention Using Non-Contingent Reinforcement Plus Response Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Julene D.; Filter, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the use of noncontingent reinforcement with response cost to reduce problem verbal and physical behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement in an internationally adopted, post-institutionalized student diagnosed with ADHD. Systematic direct observation was employed to measure behavior in a single-subject withdrawal…

  13. Generic Automated Multi-function Finger Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honarpardaz, M.; Tarkian, M.; Sirkett, D.; Ölvander, J.; Feng, X.; Elf, J.; Sjögren, R.

    2016-11-01

    Multi-function fingers that are able to handle multiple workpieces are crucial in improvement of a robot workcell. Design automation of multi-function fingers is highly demanded by robot industries to overcome the current iterative, time consuming and complex manual design process. However, the existing approaches for the multi-function finger design automation are unable to entirely meet the robot industries’ need. This paper proposes a generic approach for design automation of multi-function fingers. The proposed approach completely automates the design process and requires no expert skill. In addition, this approach executes the design process much faster than the current manual process. To validate the approach, multi-function fingers are successfully designed for two case studies. Further, the results are discussed and benchmarked with existing approaches.

  14. Design Criteria for Deflection Capacity of Conventionally reinforced Concrete Slabs. Phase III. Summary of Design Criteria and Design and Construction Details - Design Examples.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Precast Bearing Wall Buildings to Withstand Abnormal Loads ," Journal of the Prestressed Concrete Institute, Vol. 21, No. 2, March/April 1976. - -76...details necessary to develop tensile membrane capacity of reinforced concrete slabs under uniform load . Major emphasis is placed on the deflection...on Johansen’s work (4). The theory has proved effective in predic- ting the initial hinging load in reinforced concrete slabs with

  15. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L.; Nover, Adam B.; Mandal, Biman B.; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N.; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue–scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber–hydrogel composites (SF–silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber–hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF–silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard. PMID:25281788

  16. Silk microfiber-reinforced silk hydrogel composites for functional cartilage tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Yodmuang, Supansa; McNamara, Stephanie L; Nover, Adam B; Mandal, Biman B; Agarwal, Monica; Kelly, Terri-Ann N; Chao, Pen-hsiu Grace; Hung, Clark; Kaplan, David L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage tissue lacks an intrinsic capacity for self-regeneration due to slow matrix turnover, a limited supply of mature chondrocytes and insufficient vasculature. Although cartilage tissue engineering has achieved some success using agarose as a scaffolding material, major challenges of agarose-based cartilage repair, including non-degradability, poor tissue-scaffold integration and limited processing capability, have prompted the search for an alternative biomaterial. In this study, silk fiber-hydrogel composites (SF-silk hydrogels) made from silk microfibers and silk hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as a support material for engineered cartilage. We demonstrated the use of 100% silk-based fiber-hydrogel composite scaffolds for the development of cartilage constructs with properties comparable to those made with agarose. Cartilage constructs with an equilibrium modulus in the native tissue range were fabricated by mimicking the collagen fiber and proteoglycan composite architecture of native cartilage using biocompatible, biodegradable silk fibroin from Bombyx mori. Excellent chondrocyte response was observed on SF-silk hydrogels, and fiber reinforcement resulted in the development of more mechanically robust constructs after 42 days in culture compared to silk hydrogels alone. Thus, we demonstrate the versatility of silk fibroin as a composite scaffolding material for use in cartilage tissue repair to create functional cartilage constructs that overcome the limitations of agarose biomaterials, and provide a much-needed alternative to the agarose standard.

  17. Dual system to reinforce biological containment of recombinant bacteria designed for rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Ronchel, M C; Ramos, J L

    2001-06-01

    Active biological containment (ABC) systems have been designed to control at will the survival or death of a bacterial population. These systems are based on the use of a killing gene, e.g., a porin-inducing protein such as the one encoded by the Escherichia coli gef gene, and a regulatory circuit that controls expression of the killing gene in response to the presence or absence of environmental signals. An ABC system for recombinant microorganisms that degrade a model pollutant was designed on the basis of the Pseudomonas putida TOL plasmid meta-cleavage regulatory circuit. The system consists of a fusion of the Pm promoter to lacI, whose expression is controlled by XylS with 3-methylbenzoate, and a fusion of a synthetic P(lac) promoter to gef. In the presence of the model pollutant, bacterial cells survived and degraded the target compound, whereas in the absence of the aromatic carboxylic acid cell death was induced. The system had two main drawbacks: (i) the slow death of the bacterial cells in soil versus the fast killing rate in liquid cultures in laboratory assays, and (ii) the appearance of mutants, at a rate of about 10(-8) per cell and generation, that did not die after the pollutant had been exhausted. We reinforced the ABC system by including it in a Deltaasd P. putida background. A P. putida Deltaasd mutant is viable only in complex medium supplemented with diaminopimelic acid, methionine, lysine, and threonine. We constructed a P. putida Deltaasd strain, called MCR7, with a Pm::asd fusion in the host chromosome. This strain was viable in the presence of 3-methylbenzoate because synthesis of the essential metabolites was achieved through XylS-dependent induction. In the P. putida MCR7 strain, an ABC system (Pm::lacI, xylS, P(lac)::gef) was incorporated into the host chromosome to yield strain MCR8. The number of MCR8 mutants that escaped killing was below our detection limit (<10(-9) mutants per cell and generation). The MCR8 strain survived and

  18. Stimulus control in the classroom as a function of the behavior reinforced.

    PubMed

    Marholin, D; Steinman, W M

    1977-01-01

    Eight fifth- and sixth-grade children with behavior problems performed in a classroom under three conditions: (1) unreinforced baseline, (2) reinforcement for being on task, and (3) reinforcement for the accuracy and rate of math problems solved. The teacher was absent for a portion of the class session under each of these conditions. In the teacher's absence, on-task behavior declined markedly and disruption markedly increased, regardless of the reinforcement condition in operation. In addition, the teacher's absence resulted in fewer problems attempted and decreased accuracy. However, the extent to which the children became disruptive was reduced and the number of problems attempted increased when reinforcement was contingent on academic accuracy and rate, instead of being contingent on being on task. The results suggest that by providing contingencies for the products of a child's classroom activities, rather than for being on task, the child will become more independent of the teacher's presence, and more under the control of the academic materials.

  19. Two functional serotonin polymorphisms moderate the effect of food reinforcement on BMI

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Katelyn A.; Lin, Henry; Fletcher, Kelly D.; Sucheston, Lara; Singh, Prashant K.; Salis, Robbert; Erbe, Richard; Faith, Myles; Allison, David; Stice, Eric; Epstein, Leonard H.

    2014-01-01

    Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin and opioid systems, and food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314 in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model influences only one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fit the dual-risk or diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement on BMI. PMID:23544600

  20. Two functional serotonin polymorphisms moderate the effect of food reinforcement on BMI.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Lin, Henry; Fletcher, Kelly D; Sucheston, Lara; Singh, Prashant K; Salis, Robbert J; Erbe, Richard W; Faith, Myles S; Allison, David B; Stice, Eric; Epstein, Leonard H

    2013-06-01

    Food reinforcement, or the motivation to eat, has been associated with increased energy intake, greater body weight, and prospective weight gain. Much of the previous research on the reinforcing value of food has focused on the role of dopamine, but it may be worthwhile to examine genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin and opioid systems as these neurotransmitters have been shown to be related to reinforcement processes and to influence energy intake. We examined the relationship among 44 candidate genetic polymorphisms in the dopamine, serotonin, and opioid systems, as well as food reinforcement and body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 245 individuals. Polymorphisms in the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA-LPR) and serotonin receptor 2A genes (rs6314) moderated the effect of food reinforcement on BMI, accounting for an additional 5-10% variance and revealed a potential role of the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs6314, in the serotonin 2A receptor as a differential susceptibility factor for obesity. Differential susceptibility describes a factor that can confer either risk or protection depending on a second variable, such that rs6314 is predictive of both high and low BMI based on the level of food reinforcement, while the diathesis stress or dual-gain model only influences one end of the outcome measure. The interaction with MAOA-LPR better fits the diathesis stress model, with the 3.5R/4R allele conferring protection for individuals low in food reinforcement. These results provide new insight into genes theoretically involved in obesity, and support the hypothesis that genetics moderate the association between food reinforcement and BMI.

  1. Technical features and criteria in designing fiber-reinforced composite materials: from the aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gloria, Antonio; Ronca, Dante; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Chierchia, Marianna; De Santis, Roberto; Nicolais, Luigi; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Polymer-based composite materials are ideal for applications where high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios are required. From aerospace and aeronautical field to biomedical applications, fiber-reinforced polymers have replaced metals, thus emerging as an interesting alternative. As widely reported, the mechanical behavior of the composite materials involves investigation on micro- and macro-scale, taking into consideration micromechanics, macromechanics and lamination theory. Clinical situations often require repairing connective tissues and the use of composite materials may be suitable for these applications because of the possibility to design tissue substitutes or implants with the required mechanical properties. Accordingly, this review aims at stressing the importance of fiber-reinforced composite materials to make advanced and biomimetic prostheses with tailored mechanical properties, starting from the basic principle design, technologies, and a brief overview of composites applications in several fields. Fiber-reinforced composite materials for artificial tendons, ligaments, and intervertebral discs, as well as for hip stems and mandible models will be reviewed, highlighting the possibility to mimic the mechanical properties of the soft and hard tissues that they replace.

  2. Designing pedagogy incorporating executive function.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    The National Academy of Neuropsychology defines clinical neuropsychology as "a sub-field of psychology concerned with the applied science of brain-behavior relationships. Clinical neuropsychologists use this knowledge in the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and/or rehabilitation of patients across the lifespan with neurological, medical, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, as well as other cognitive and learning disorders" (National Academy of Neuropsychology, 2011 ). Pediatric neuropsychologists have long been concerned about another area of functionality, making their recommendations educationally relevant. This article describes accommodated metacognitive instruction, a pedagogy based on cognitive neuropsychological principles of learning and used to instruct college faculty on a methodology for teaching in all-inclusive environments.

  3. Design and installation of a cathodic protection system for a large reinforced concrete intake structure in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.; Al-Ghannam, H.

    1997-09-01

    The paper describes the condition survey methodology, design and installation of a cathodic protection (C.P.) system for a large reinforced concrete reservoir and sea water intake structure. The structure is critical for the supply of cooling water for a 2.4 million metric ton steel plant. The C.P. System consisting of mixed metal oxide coating on titanium mesh type anodes and automatic voltage/current controlled rectifiers was successfully installed and has been operating within design guidelines for the past 15 months.

  4. Signaled alternative reinforcement and the persistence of operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Bland, Vikki J; Bai, John Y H; Fullerton, Jane A; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-07-01

    Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) is a treatment designed to eliminate problem behavior by reinforcing an alternative behavior at a higher rate. Availability of alternative reinforcement may be signaled, as with Functional Communication Training, or unsignaled. Whether or not alternative reinforcement is signaled could influence both the rate and persistence of problem behavior. The present study investigated whether signaling the availability of alternative reinforcement affects the rate and persistence of a concurrently available target response with pigeons. Three components of a multiple concurrent schedule arranged equal reinforcement rates for target responding. Two of the components also arranged equal reinforcement rates for an alternative response. In one DRA component, a discrete stimulus signaled the availability of response-contingent alternative reinforcement by changing the keylight color upon reinforcement availability. In the other DRA component, availability of alternative reinforcement was not signaled. Target responding was most persistent in the unsignaled DRA component when disrupted by satiation, free food presented between components, and extinction, relative to the signaled DRA and control components. These findings suggest the discrete stimulus functionally separated the availability of alternative reinforcement from the discriminative stimuli governing target responding. These findings provide a novel avenue to explore in translational research assessing whether signaling the availability of alternative reinforcement with DRA treatments reduces the persistence of problem behavior.

  5. Seismic Effects on the Design of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Earth Retaining Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    geosynthetics and are subjected to cyclic motion such as that caused by earthquakes. It will examine some case studies of the performance of... geosynthetic reinforced earth retaining structures (GSRW) and review some time tested concepts dealing with both geosynthetics and seismic earth pressures

  6. A Preliminary Investigation of the Reinforcement Function of Signal Detections in Simulated Baggage Screening: Further Support for the Vigilance Reinforcement Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Lindsey C.; Bell, Matthew; Olson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The vigilance reinforcement hypothesis (VRH) asserts that errors in signal detection tasks are partially explained by operant reinforcement and extinction processes. VRH predictions were tested with a computerized baggage screening task. Our experiment evaluated the effects of signal schedule (extinction vs. variable interval 6 min) and visual…

  7. A Preliminary Investigation of the Reinforcement Function of Signal Detections in Simulated Baggage Screening: Further Support for the Vigilance Reinforcement Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Lindsey C.; Bell, Matthew; Olson, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The vigilance reinforcement hypothesis (VRH) asserts that errors in signal detection tasks are partially explained by operant reinforcement and extinction processes. VRH predictions were tested with a computerized baggage screening task. Our experiment evaluated the effects of signal schedule (extinction vs. variable interval 6 min) and visual…

  8. Numerically design the injection process parameters of parts fabricated with ramie fiber reinforced green composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. P.; He, L. P.; Chen, D. C.; Lu, G.; Li, W. J.; Yuan, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The warpage deformation plays an important role on the performance of automobile interior components fabricated with natural fiber reinforced composites. The present work investigated the influence of process parameters on the warpage behavior of A pillar trim made of ramie fiber (RF) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites (RF/PP) via numerical simulation with orthogonal experiment method and range analysis. The results indicated that fiber addition and packing pressure were the most important factors affecting warpage. The A pillar trim can achieved the minimum warpage value as of 2.124 mm under the optimum parameters. The optimal process parameters are: 70% percent of the default value of injection pressure for the packing pressure, 20 wt% for the fiber addition, 185 °C for the melt °C for the mold temperature, 7 s for the filling time and 17 s for the packing time.

  9. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B. V.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970's, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/sq in mix and a 4.5 kip/sq in mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/sq in. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  10. Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, B.V.

    1995-03-03

    The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970`s, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in{sup 2} mix and a 4.5 kip/in{sup 2} mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in{sup 2}. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.

  11. In silico design of functional DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Alan; Welch, Mark; Minshull, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The promise of synthetic biology lies in the creation of novel function from the proper combination of genetic elements. De novo gene synthesis has become a cost-effective method for building virtually any conceptualized genetic construct, removing the constraints of extant sequences, and greatly facilitating study of the relationships between gene sequence and function. With the rapid increase in the number and variety of characterized and cataloged genetic elements, tools that facilitate assembly of such parts into functional constructs (genes, vectors, circuits, etc.) are essential. The Gene Designer software allows scientists and engineers to readily manage and recombine genetic elements into novel assemblies. It also provides tools for the simulation of molecular cloning schemes as well as the engineering and optimization of protein-coding sequences. Together, the functions in Gene Designer provide a complete capability to design functional genetic constructs.

  12. Behavioral variability in SHR and WKY rats as a function of rearing environment and reinforcement contingency.

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, M H; Saldana, R L; Neuringer, A

    1996-01-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) may model aspects of human attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). For example, just as responses by children with ADHD tend to be variable, so too SHRs often respond more variably than do Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats. The present study asked whether behavioral variability in the SHR strain is influenced by rearing environment, a question related to hypotheses concerning the etiology of human ADHD. Some rats from each strain were reared in an enriched environment (housed socially), and others were reared in an impoverished environment (housed in isolation). Four groups--enriched SHR, impoverished SHR, enriched WKY, and impoverished WKY--were studied under two reinforcement contingencies, one in which reinforcement was independent of response variability and the other in which reinforcement depended upon high variability. The main finding was that rearing environment did not influence response variability (enriched and impoverished subjects responded similarly throughout). However, rearing environment affected body weight (enriched subjects weighted more than impoverished subjects) and response rate (impoverished subjects generally responded faster than enriched subjects). In addition, SHRs tended to respond variably throughout the experiment, whereas WKYs were more sensitive to the variability contingencies. Thus, behavioral variability was affected by genetic strain and by reinforcement contingency but not by the environment in which the subjects were reared. PMID:8583193

  13. Positive and Negative Reinforcers: How about the Second and Third Functions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Arthur W.

    2006-01-01

    The author of this article presents his own explanation on the two types of conditioning--respondent and operant. He states that when withdrawal of a negative reinforcer is the contingency that increases the strength of the operant behavior, the stimulus will have a negative emotional response to the experimental chamber. However, when a positive…

  14. Network architecture functional description and design

    SciTech Connect

    Stans, L.; Bencoe, M.; Brown, D.; Kelly, S.; Pierson, L.; Schaldach, C.

    1989-05-25

    This report provides a top level functional description and design for the development and implementation of the central network to support the next generation of SNL, Albuquerque supercomputer in a UNIX{reg sign} environment. It describes the network functions and provides an architecture and topology.

  15. Design of membrane proteins: toward functional systems.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2009-12-01

    Over the years, membrane-soluble peptides have provided a convenient model system to investigate the folding and assembly of integral membrane proteins. Recent advances in experimental and computational methods are now being translated into the design of functional membrane proteins. Applications include artificial modulators of membrane protein function, inhibitors of protein-protein interactions, and redox membrane proteins.

  16. Improved mechanical properties of polylactide nanocomposites-reinforced with cellulose nanofibrils through interfacial engineering via amine-functionalization.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Cueva, Mario Calderón; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-10-20

    One of the main factors responsible for the mechanical and physical properties of nanocomposites is the effectiveness of the interfacial region to transfer loads and mechanical vibrations between the nano-reinforcements and the matrix. Surface functionalization has been the preferred approach to engineer the interfaces in polymer nanocomposites in order to maximize their potential in structural and functional applications. In this study, amine-functionalized cellulose nanofibrils (mCNF-G1) were synthesized via silylation of the hydroxyl groups on the CNF surface using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). To further increase the amine density (mCNF-G2), dendritic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) was grafted onto mCNF-G1 by the Michael addition of methacrylate onto mCNF-G1, followed by the transamidation of the ester groups of methacrylate using ethylenediamine. Compared to native CNF-reinforced, poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) nanocomposites, amine-functionalized CNF exhibited significantly improved dispersion and interfacial properties within the PLLA matrix due to the grafting of PLLA chains via aminolysis. It is also a more effective nucleating agent, with 15% mCNF-G1 leading to a crystallinity of 32.5%, compared to 0.1 and 8.7% for neat PLLA and native CNF-reinforced composites. We have demonstrated that APTMS-functionalized CNF (mCNF-G1) significantly improved the tensile strength compared to native CNF, with 10% mCNF-G1 being the most effective (i.e., >100% increase in tensile strength). However, we also found that excessive amines on the CNF surface (i.e., mCNF-G2) resulted in decreased tensile strength and modulus due to PLLA degradation via aminolysis. These results demonstrate the potential of optimized amine-functionalized CNF for future renewable material applications.

  17. Biocomposites from Natural Rubber: Synergistic Effects of Functionalized Cellulose Nanocrystals as Both Reinforcing and Cross-Linking Agents via Free-Radical Thiol-ene Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Parambath Kanoth, Bipinbal; Claudino, Mauro; Johansson, Mats; Berglund, Lars A; Zhou, Qi

    2015-08-05

    Natural rubber/cellulose nanocrystals (NR/CNCs) form true biocomposites from renewable resources and are demonstrated to show significantly improved thermo-mechanical properties and reduced stress-softening. The nanocomposites were prepared from chemically functionalized CNCs bearing thiols. CNCs served as both reinforcing and cross-linking agents in the NR matrix, and the study was designed to prove the cross-linking function of modified CNCs. CNCs were prepared from cotton, and the cross-linkable mercapto-groups were introduced onto the surface of CNCs by esterification. Nanocomposite films were prepared by dispersing the modified CNCs (m-CNCs) in NR matrix by solution casting. The cross-links at the filler-matrix (m-CNCs-NR) interface were generated by photochemically initiated thiol-ene reactions as monitored by real-time FTIR analysis. The synergistic effects of reinforcement and chemical cross-linking at the m-CNCs-NR interface on structure, thermo-mechanical, and stress-softening behavior were investigated. Methods included field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), swelling tests, dynamic mechanical analysis, and tensile tests. Compared to biocomposites from NR with unmodified CNCs, the NR/m-CNCs nanocomposites showed 2.4-fold increase in tensile strength, 1.6-fold increase in strain-to-failure, and 2.9-fold increase in work-of-fracture at 10 wt % of m-CNCs in NR.

  18. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Kumar, Vivek A; Martinez, Adam W; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-09-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyperplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239-2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8-8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35-192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 +/- 143 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 +/- 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 +/- 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo.

  19. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Martinez, Adam W.; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyerplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239–2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8–8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35–192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 ± 43 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 ± 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 ± 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo. PMID:20584549

  20. Graphene oxide versus functionalized carbon nanotubes as a reinforcing agent in a PMMA/HA bone cement.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Gil; Cruz, Sandra M A; Ramalho, A; Grácio, José; Marques, Paula A A P

    2012-04-28

    Graphene oxide (GO) and functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) (each in the concentration range of 0.01-1.00 wt/wt%) were investigated as the reinforcing agent in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/hydroxyapatite (HA) bone cement. Mixed results were obtained for the changes in the mechanical properties determined (storage modulus, bending strength, and elastic modulus) for the reinforced cement relative to the unreinforced counterpart; that is, some property changes were increased while others were decreased. We postulate that this outcome is a consequence of the fact that each of the nanofillers hampered the polymerization process in the cement; specifically, the nanofiller acts as a scavenger of the radicals produced during polymerization reaction due to the delocalized π-bonds. Results obtained from the chemical structure and polymer chain size distribution determined, respectively, by nuclear magnetic resonance and size exclusion chromatography analysis, on the polymer extracted from the specimens support the postulated mechanism. Furthermore, in the case of the 0.5 wt/wt% GO-reinforced cement, we showed that when the concentration of the radical species in the PMMA bone cement was doubled, mechanical properties markedly improved (relative to the value in the unreinforced cement), suggesting suppression of the aforementioned scavenger activity.

  1. Maximum correntropy based attention-gated reinforcement learning designed for brain machine interface.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbao; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Wang, Yiwen; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Principe, Jose C; Hongbao Li; Fang Wang; Qiaosheng Zhang; Shaomin Zhang; Yiwen Wang; Xiaoxiang Zheng; Principe, Jose C; Wang, Yiwen; Principe, Jose C; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Li, Hongbao; Wang, Fang

    2016-08-01

    Reinforcement learning is an effective algorithm for brain machine interfaces (BMIs) which interprets the mapping between neural activities with plasticity and the kinematics. Exploring large state-action space is difficulty when the complicated BMIs needs to assign credits over both time and space. For BMIs attention gated reinforcement learning (AGREL) has been developed to classify multi-actions for spatial credit assignment task with better efficiency. However, the outliers existing in the neural signals still make interpret the neural-action mapping difficult. We propose an enhanced AGREL algorithm using correntropy as a criterion, which is more insensitive to noise. Then the algorithm is tested on the neural data where the monkey is trained to do the obstacle avoidance task. The new method converges faster during the training period, and improves from 44.63% to 68.79% on average in success rate compared with the original AGREL. The result indicates that the combination of correntropy criterion and AGREL can reduce the effect of the outliers with better performance when interpreting the mapping between neural signal and kinematics.

  2. Optimal seismic design of reinforced concrete structures under time-history earthquake loads using an intelligent hybrid algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehbaghi, Sadjad; Khatibinia, Mohsen

    2015-03-01

    A reliable seismic-resistant design of structures is achieved in accordance with the seismic design codes by designing structures under seven or more pairs of earthquake records. Based on the recommendations of seismic design codes, the average time-history responses (ATHR) of structure is required. This paper focuses on the optimal seismic design of reinforced concrete (RC) structures against ten earthquake records using a hybrid of particle swarm optimization algorithm and an intelligent regression model (IRM). In order to reduce the computational time of optimization procedure due to the computational efforts of time-history analyses, IRM is proposed to accurately predict ATHR of structures. The proposed IRM consists of the combination of the subtractive algorithm (SA), K-means clustering approach and wavelet weighted least squares support vector machine (WWLS-SVM). To predict ATHR of structures, first, the input-output samples of structures are classified by SA and K-means clustering approach. Then, WWLS-SVM is trained with few samples and high accuracy for each cluster. 9- and 18-storey RC frames are designed optimally to illustrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IRM. The numerical results demonstrate the efficiency and computational advantages of IRM for optimal design of structures subjected to time-history earthquake loads.

  3. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer variable-curvature mirror used for optical zoom imaging: prototype design and experimental demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hui; Fan, Xuewu; Pang, Zhihai; Ren, Guorui; Wang, Wei; Xie, Yongjie; Ma, Zhen; Du, Yunfei; Su, Yu; Wei, Jingxuan

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, optical zoom imaging without moving elements has received much attention. The key to realizing this technique lies in the design of the variable-curvature mirror (VCM). To obtain enough optical magnification, the VCM should be able to change its radius of curvature over a wide range. In other words, the VCM must be able to provide a large sagittal variation, which requires the mirror material to be robust during curvature variation, require little force to deform, and have high ultimate strength. Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) satisfies all these requirements and is suitable for fabricating such a VCM. Therefore, in this research, a CFRP prototype VCM has been designed, fabricated, and tested. With a diameter of 100 mm, a thickness of 2 mm, and an initial radius of curvature of 1740 mm, this VCM can provide a maximum 23-μm sagittal variation and a minimum and maximum radius of curvature of 1705 and 1760 mm.

  4. Product functions: interfaces with ergonomic design.

    PubMed

    Campos, Lívia F de A; Lanutti, Jamille N de L; Paschoarelli, Luis Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In addition to technical quality, increasing emphasis is being placed on the importance of elements such as the appearance and meaning of products. To be successful, therefore, attention must be paid to the aesthetic and symbolic functions of objects as well as to reliability and physical quality. Study of the interfaces of these functions may provide a theoretical basis for the ergonomic design of products. The objective of this review is to attempt to establish the nature of these interfaces.

  5. Safety performance functions incorporating design consistency variables.

    PubMed

    Montella, Alfonso; Imbriani, Lella Liana

    2015-01-01

    Highway design which ensures that successive elements are coordinated in such a way as to produce harmonious and homogeneous driver performances along the road is considered consistent and safe. On the other hand, an alignment which requires drivers to handle high speed gradients and does not meet drivers' expectancy is considered inconsistent and produces higher crash frequency. To increase the usefulness and the reliability of existing safety performance functions and contribute to solve inconsistencies of existing highways as well as inconsistencies arising in the design phase, we developed safety performance functions for rural motorways that incorporate design consistency measures. Since the design consistency variables were used only for curves, two different sets of models were fitted for tangents and curves. Models for the following crash characteristics were fitted: total, single-vehicle run-off-the-road, other single vehicle, multi vehicle, daytime, nighttime, non-rainy weather, rainy weather, dry pavement, wet pavement, property damage only, slight injury, and severe injury (including fatal). The design consistency parameters in this study are based on operating speed models developed through an instrumented vehicle equipped with a GPS continuous speed tracking from a field experiment conducted on the same motorway where the safety performance functions were fitted (motorway A16 in Italy). Study results show that geometric design consistency has a significant effect on safety of rural motorways. Previous studies on the relationship between geometric design consistency and crash frequency focused on two-lane rural highways since these highways have the higher crash rates and are generally characterized by considerable inconsistencies. Our study clearly highlights that the achievement of proper geometric design consistency is a key design element also on motorways because of the safety consequences of design inconsistencies. The design consistency measures

  6. Function through synthesis-informed design.

    PubMed

    Wender, Paul A; Quiroz, Ryan V; Stevens, Matthew C

    2015-03-17

    In 1996, a snapshot of the field of synthesis was provided by many of its thought leaders in a Chemical Reviews thematic issue on "Frontiers in Organic Synthesis". This Accounts of Chemical Research thematic issue on "Synthesis, Design, and Molecular Function" is intended to provide further perspective now from well into the 21st century. Much has happened in the past few decades. The targets, methods, strategies, reagents, procedures, goals, funding, practices, and practitioners of synthesis have changed, some in dramatic ways as documented in impressive contributions to this issue. However, a constant for most synthesis studies continues to be the goal of achieving function with synthetic economy. Whether in the form of new catalysts, reagents, therapeutic leads, diagnostics, drug delivery systems, imaging agents, sensors, materials, energy generation and storage systems, bioremediation strategies, or molecules that challenge old theories or test new ones, the function of a target has been and continues to be a major and compelling justification for its synthesis. While the targets of synthesis have historically been heavily represented by natural products, increasingly design, often inspired by natural structures, is providing a new source of target structures exhibiting new or natural functions and new or natural synthetic challenges. Complementing isolation and screening approaches to new target identification, design enables one to create targets de novo with an emphasis on sought-after function and synthetic innovation with step-economy. Design provides choice. It allows one to determine how close a synthesis will come to the ideal synthesis and how close a structure will come to the ideal function. In this Account, we address studies in our laboratory on function-oriented synthesis (FOS), a strategy to achieve function by design and with synthetic economy. By starting with function rather than structure, FOS places an initial emphasis on target design

  7. Function through Synthesis-Informed Design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus In 1996, a snapshot of the field of synthesis was provided by many of its thought leaders in a Chemical Reviews thematic issue on “Frontiers in Organic Synthesis”. This Accounts of Chemical Research thematic issue on “Synthesis, Design, and Molecular Function” is intended to provide further perspective now from well into the 21st century. Much has happened in the past few decades. The targets, methods, strategies, reagents, procedures, goals, funding, practices, and practitioners of synthesis have changed, some in dramatic ways as documented in impressive contributions to this issue. However, a constant for most synthesis studies continues to be the goal of achieving function with synthetic economy. Whether in the form of new catalysts, reagents, therapeutic leads, diagnostics, drug delivery systems, imaging agents, sensors, materials, energy generation and storage systems, bioremediation strategies, or molecules that challenge old theories or test new ones, the function of a target has been and continues to be a major and compelling justification for its synthesis. While the targets of synthesis have historically been heavily represented by natural products, increasingly design, often inspired by natural structures, is providing a new source of target structures exhibiting new or natural functions and new or natural synthetic challenges. Complementing isolation and screening approaches to new target identification, design enables one to create targets de novo with an emphasis on sought-after function and synthetic innovation with step-economy. Design provides choice. It allows one to determine how close a synthesis will come to the ideal synthesis and how close a structure will come to the ideal function. In this Account, we address studies in our laboratory on function-oriented synthesis (FOS), a strategy to achieve function by design and with synthetic economy. By starting with function rather than structure, FOS places an initial emphasis on

  8. Design, Form, and Function in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vande Zande, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Human beings are influenced by design every day through continuous contact with functional form in and through visual culture. They encounter a continuous current of such new styles as clothing fashions, architecture, furniture and advertisements. The American pursuit of happiness has become related to an increasing flow of products and…

  9. Design, Form, and Function in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vande Zande, Robin

    2007-01-01

    Human beings are influenced by design every day through continuous contact with functional form in and through visual culture. They encounter a continuous current of such new styles as clothing fashions, architecture, furniture and advertisements. The American pursuit of happiness has become related to an increasing flow of products and…

  10. The Functional Approach to Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalden, Janice

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Wilkins' approach to curriculum design as presented in his "Notional Syllabuses." Discusses three components of the language teaching-language learning process: the semantic, the functional, and the formal component, showing how Wilkins' analytic approach implies a semantic rather than a grammatical syllabus, based on learners'…

  11. Designing for Functional Limitations. The Worksite. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, James

    This resource presents the functional effects of chronic disabilities in order to aid those persons who must plan environments usable by persons with disabilities. The guide does not concern architectural accessibility per se, but rather discusses designing the worksite to be usable by a disabled person. In the guide, drawings are provided for…

  12. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  13. Functional properties of the basal ganglia's re-entrant loop architecture: selection and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Redgrave, P; Vautrelle, N; Reynolds, J N J

    2011-12-15

    Multifunctional agents with limited motor resources must decide what actions will best ensure their survival. Moreover, given that in an unpredictable world things don't always work out, considerable advantage is to be gained by learning from experience - instrumental behaviour that maximises reward and minimises punishment. In this review we will argue that the re-entrant looped architecture of the basal ganglia represents biological solutions to these fundamental behavioural problems of selection and reinforcement. A potential solution to the selection problem is provided for by selective disinhibition within the parallel loop architecture that connects the basal ganglia with external neural structures. The relay points within these loops permit the signals of a particular channel to be modified by external influences. In part, these influences have the capacity to modify overall selections so that the probability of re-selecting reinforced behaviours in the future is altered. This is the basic process of instrumental learning, which we suggest decomposes into two sub-problems for the agent: (i) learning which external events it causes to happen and learning precisely what it is doing that is causal; and (ii) having determined agency and discovered novel action-outcome routines, how best to exploit this knowledge to maximise future reward acquisitions. Considerations of connectional architecture and signal timing suggest that the short-latency, sensory-evoked dopamine response, which can modulate the re-entrant loop structure within the basal ganglia, is ideally suited to reinforce the determination of agency and the discovery of novel actions. Alternatively, recent studies showing that presence or absence of reward can selectively modulate the magnitude of signals in structures providing input signals to the basal ganglia, offer an alternative mechanism for biasing selection within the re-entrant loop architecture. We suggest that this mechanism may be better

  14. Functionalization of Natural Graphite for Use as Reinforcement in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Rafael; Marques, Maria F V; Jonas, Renato; Grafova, Iryna; Grafov, Andriy

    2015-08-01

    Graphite is a naturally abundant material that has been used as reinforcing filler to produce polymeric nanocomposites for various applications including automotive, aerospace and electric-electronic. The objective of this study was to develop methodologies of graphite nanosheets preparation and for incorporation into polymer matrices. By means of different chemical and physical treatments, natural graphite was modified and subsequently characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetry (TGA) and the particle size determination. The results obtained clearly show that after the treatments employed, polar chemical groups were inserted on the natural graphite surface. Nanosized graphite particles of high aspect ratio were obtained.

  15. Durability-Based Design Criteria for a Quasi-Isotropic Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Automotive Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J; Corum, James; Klett, Lynn B; Davenport, Mike; Battiste, Rick; Simpson, Jr., William A

    2006-04-01

    This report provides recommended durability-based design properties and criteria for a quais-isotropic carbon-fiber thermoplastic composite for possible automotive structural applications. The composite consisted of a PolyPhenylene Sulfide (PPS) thermoplastic matrix (Fortron's PPS - Ticona 0214B1 powder) reinforced with 16 plies of carbon-fiber unidirectional tape, [0?/90?/+45?/-45?]2S. The carbon fiber was Hexcel AS-4C and was present in a fiber volume of 53% (60%, by weight). The overall goal of the project, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies and is closely coordinated with the Advanced Composites Consortium, is to develop durability-driven design data and criteria to assure the long-term integrity of carbon-fiber-based composite systems for automotive structural applications. This document is in two parts. Part 1 provides design data and correlations, while Part 2 provides the underlying experimental data and models. The durability issues addressed include the effects of short-time, cyclic, and sustained loadings; temperature; fluid environments; and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and kickups of roadway debris) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. Guidance for design analysis, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loadings, and damage-tolerance design guidance are provided.

  16. Analysis of Social Variables when an Initial Functional Analysis Indicates Automatic Reinforcement as the Maintaining Variable for Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Stephanie A. Contrucci; Triggs, Mandy

    2009-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) that occurs at high rates across all conditions of a functional analysis can suggest automatic or multiple functions. In the current study, we conducted a functional analysis for 1 individual with SIB. Results indicated that SIB was, at least in part, maintained by automatic reinforcement. Further analyses using…

  17. Designing of multiwalled carbon nanotubes reinforced low density polyethylene nanocomposites for suppression of electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Prabha; Saini, Parveen; Gupta, Tejendra; Garg, Parveen; Kumar, Gaurav; Pande, Indresh; Pande, Shailaja; Seth, R. K.; Dhawan, S. K.; Mathur, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    High aspect ratio multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced low density polyethylene (LDPE) composites were prepared by solvent casting followed by compression molding technique. Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of these composites was investigated in the frequency range of 12.4-18 GHz (Ku-band) for the first time. The experimental results indicate that the EMI-SE of these composites is sensitive to the MWCNT loading. The average value of EMI-SE reaches 22.4 dB for 10 wt% MWCNT-LDPE composites, indicating the usefulness of this material for EMI shielding in the Ku-band. The main reason for improved SE has been attributed to significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of the composites by 20 orders of magnitude, i.e., from 10-20 for pure LDPE to 0.63 S/cm for MWCNT-LDPE, which is three order of magnitude higher than the previous reports for MWCNT-LDPE composites. Differential scanning calorimetry of the MWCNT-LDPE composites showed around 37% improvement in the crystalline contents over pure LDPE samples which resulted into enhanced thermal stability of the composites. The thermal decomposition temperature of LDPE is shifted by 40 °C on addition of 5 wt% MWCNT. The studies therefore show that these composite can be used as light weight, thermally stable EMI shielding, and antistatic material.

  18. The design and function of birds' nests

    PubMed Central

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Deeming, D Charles

    2014-01-01

    All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s. PMID:25505520

  19. The design and function of birds' nests.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Deeming, D Charles

    2014-10-01

    All birds construct nests in which to lay eggs and/or raise offspring. Traditionally, it was thought that natural selection and the requirement to minimize the risk of predation determined the design of completed nests. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that sexual selection also influences nest design. This is an important development as while species such as bowerbirds build structures that are extended phenotypic signals whose sole purpose is to attract a mate, nests contain eggs and/or offspring, thereby suggesting a direct trade-off between the conflicting requirements of natural and sexual selection. Nest design also varies adaptively in order to both minimize the detrimental effects of parasites and to create a suitable microclimate for parents and developing offspring in relation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Our understanding of the design and function of birds' nests has increased considerably in recent years, and the evidence suggests that nests have four nonmutually exclusive functions. Consequently, we conclude that the design of birds' nests is far more sophisticated than previously realized and that nests are multifunctional structures that have important fitness consequences for the builder/s.

  20. Functional categories for future flight deck designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Terence S.

    1993-01-01

    With the addition of each new system on the flight deck, the danger of increasing overall operator workload while reducing crew understanding of critical mission information exists. The introduction of more powerful onboard computers, larger databases, and the increased use of electronic display media may lead to a situation of flight deck 'sophistication' at the expense of losses in flight crew capabilities and situational awareness. To counter this potentially negative impact of new technology, research activities are underway to reassess the flight deck design process. The fundamental premise of these activities is that a human-centered, systems-oriented approach to the development of advanced civil aircraft flight decks will be required for future designs to remain ergonomically sound and economically competitive. One of the initial steps in an integrated flight deck process is to define the primary flight deck functions needed to support the mission goals of the vehicle. This would allow the design team to evaluate candidate concepts in relation to their effectiveness in meeting the functional requirements. In addition, this would provide a framework to aid in categorizing and bookkeeping all of the activities that are required to be performed on the flight deck, not just activities of the crew or of a specific system. This could then allow for a better understanding and allocation of activities in the design, an understanding of the impact of a specific system on overall system performance, and an awareness of the total crew performance requirements for the design. One candidate set of functional categories that could be used to guide an advanced flight deck design are described.

  1. Combined semi-analytical and numerical vibro-acoustic design approach for anisotropic fibre-reinforced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannemann, Martin; Täger, Olaf; Modler, Niels

    2017-09-01

    In many applications, lightweight structures need to combine outstanding component properties and low weight. Here, fibre-reinforced polymers offer particular advantages, as their material-inherent anisotropic material damping behaviour facilitates the design of lightweight structures with both low sound radiation levels and low mass. At the same time, composite structures often have to fulfil a high level of stiffness and strength. These manifold requirements result in a complex design process with optimisation scenarios often involving contrary objectives in terms of weight, stiffness and sound radiation. Those objectives are in turn accompanied by many different design variables. The aim of the work presented in this paper was therefore to develop a material-specific design strategy for scenarios of this type. The authors developed semi-analytical models for the calculation of structural dynamics and sound radiation in composite structures before combining them with optimisation algorithms in order to perform effective sensitivity analyses. Parametric studies were used to define material-specific input parameters for physical characteristics, which in turn provided a basis for the detailed numerical simulation of the vibro-acoustic behaviour of complex geometries. This paper uses a trough-shaped structure as an application-oriented example of the optimisation of vibro-acoustic behaviour with the aid of the numerical model developed by the authors.

  2. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-01-15

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the 'addictive' play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning ('near-misses'). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time, modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes.

  3. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-02-26

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the ‘addictive’ play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning (’near-misses’). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time,modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes.

  4. Shifts in reinforcement signalling while playing slot-machines as a function of prior experience and impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Shao, R; Read, J; Behrens, T E J; Rogers, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electronic gaming machines (EGMs) offer significant revenue streams for mercantile gambling. However, limited clinical and experimental evidence suggests that EGMs are associated with heightened risks of clinically problematic patterns of play. Little is known about the neural structures that might mediate the transition from exploratory EGM play to the ‘addictive' play seen in problem gamblers; neither is it known how personality traits associated with gambling activity (and gambling problems) influence reinforcement processing while playing EGMs. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants, we show that a single episode of slot-machine play is subsequently associated with reduced amplitudes of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signals within reinforcement-related structures, such as the ventral striatum and caudate nucleus, following winning game outcomes; but increased amplitudes of anticipatory signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala while watching the game reels spin. Trait impulsivity enhanced positive signals within the ventral striatum and amygdala following the delivery of winning outcomes but diminished positive signals following the experience of almost-winning ('near-misses'). These results indicate that a single episode of slot-machine play engages the well-characterised reinforcement-learning mechanisms mediated by ascending dopamine mesolimbic and mesostriatal pathways, to shift reward value of EGMs away from game outcomes towards anticipatory states. Impulsivity, itself linked to problem gambling and heightened vulnerability to other addictive disorders, is associated with divergent coding of winning outcomes and almost-winning experiences within the ventral striatum and amygdala, potentially enhancing the reward value of successful slot-machine game outcomes but, at the same time, modulating the aversive motivational consequences of near-miss outcomes. PMID:23321810

  5. Space shuttle configuration accounting functional design specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the requirements for an on-line automated system which must be capable of tracking the status of requirements and engineering changes and of providing accurate and timely records. The functional design specification provides the definition, description, and character length of the required data elements and the interrelationship of data elements to adequately track, display, and report the status of active configuration changes. As changes to the space shuttle program levels II and III configuration are proposed, evaluated, and dispositioned, it is the function of the configuration management office to maintain records regarding changes to the baseline and to track and report the status of those changes. The configuration accounting system will consist of a combination of computers, computer terminals, software, and procedures, all of which are designed to store, retrieve, display, and process information required to track proposed and proved engineering changes to maintain baseline documentation of the space shuttle program levels II and III.

  6. Designing added functions in engineered cementitious composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, En-Hua

    In this dissertation, a new and systematic material design approach is developed for ECC with added functions through material microstructures linkage to composite macroscopic behavior. The thesis research embodies theoretical development by building on previous ECC micromechanical models, and experimental investigations into three specific new versions of ECC with added functions aimed at addressing societal demands of our built infrastructure. Specifically, the theoretical study includes three important ECC modeling elements: Steady-state crack propagation analyses and simulation, predictive accuracy of the fiber bridging constitutive model, and development of the rate-dependent strain-hardening criteria. The first element establishes the steady-state cracking criterion as a fundamental requirement for multiple cracking behavior in brittle matrix composites. The second element improves the accuracy of crack-width prediction in ECC. The third element establishes the micromechanics basis for impact-resistant ECC design. Three new ECCs with added functions were developed and experimentally verified in this thesis research through the enhanced theoretical framework. A green ECC incorporating a large volume of industrial waste was demonstrated to possess reduced crack width and drying shrinkage. The self-healing ECC designed with tight crack width was demonstrated to recover transport and mechanical properties after microcrack damage when exposed to wet and dry cycles. The impact-resistant ECC was demonstrated to retain tensile ductility with increased strength under moderately high strain-rate loading. These new versions of ECC with added functions are expected to contribute greatly to enhancing the sustainability, durability, and safety of civil infrastructure built with ECC. This research establishes the effectiveness of micromechanics-based design and material ingredient tailoring for ECC with added new attributes but without losing its basic tensile ductile

  7. Electrostatic camera system functional design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botticelli, R. A.; Cook, F. J.; Moore, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A functional design study for an electrostatic camera system for application to planetary missions is presented. The electrostatic camera can produce and store a large number of pictures and provide for transmission of the stored information at arbitrary times after exposure. Preliminary configuration drawings and circuit diagrams for the system are illustrated. The camera system's size, weight, power consumption, and performance are characterized. Tradeoffs between system weight, power, and storage capacity are identified.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used to enhance numerous applications such as electronics, sensors and composite strength. This presentation will show the synthesizing process of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperatures and hydrocarbon concentrations but weakly on pressures. The size, growth modes and orientations of carbon nanotube will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential applications including sensor, heat pipe, field emission, radiation shielding, and reinforcements for composites by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  9. A Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Composite with a Damage Indication Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulderberga, O.; Aniskevich, A.; Vidinejevs, S.

    2016-05-01

    A method for the manufacture of a glass-fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) containing a sensitive layer with a damage visualization capability is developed. The layer is based on a glass fabric impregnated with a mixture of three components — microcapsules with a leuco dye, a dye developer, and a polymer adhesive. Specimens of the GFRP epoxy composite with an integrated damage-indicating layer were manufactured by the method of vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding. It was established that both the shear and compression strains above the threshold of sensitivity of the layer led to a change in color of the specimen. The kinetics of the halochromic transformation in room conditions was estimated in series of quasi-static compression and shear strength experiments. The effect of the integrated damage indicating layer on the interlaminar shear strength of the composite was estimated in a series of test on double-notch specimens.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes for Reinforced and Functional Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Many efforts have been engaged recently in synthesizing single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes due to their superior mechanical, electrical and thermal properties, which could be used to enhance numerous applications such as electronics, sensors and composite strength. This presentation will show the synthesizing process of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the characterization results by using electron microscopy and optical spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on various substances. The conditions of fabricating single-walled or multi-walled carbon nanotubes depend strongly on temperatures and hydrocarbon concentrations but weakly on pressures. The size, growth modes and orientations of carbon nanotube will be illustrated. The advantages and limitations of several potential applications including sensor, heat pipe, field emission, radiation shielding, and reinforcements for composites by using carbon nanotubes will be discussed.

  11. The Measurement and Functional Properties of Reinforcer Value in Single-Alternative Responding: A Test of Linear System Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallery, Jesse; McDowell, J. J.; Soto, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Matching theory and linear system theory make different predictions about how the y-asymptote, k, of Herrnstein's (1970) hyperbola varies with reinforcer value. The present experiment tested both these predictions and linear system theory's account of how reinforcement rate and reinforcer value jointly govern response rate. Eight rats served as…

  12. The Measurement and Functional Properties of Reinforcer Value in Single-Alternative Responding: A Test of Linear System Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallery, Jesse; McDowell, J. J.; Soto, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Matching theory and linear system theory make different predictions about how the y-asymptote, k, of Herrnstein's (1970) hyperbola varies with reinforcer value. The present experiment tested both these predictions and linear system theory's account of how reinforcement rate and reinforcer value jointly govern response rate. Eight rats served as…

  13. Functional cooperation between the hippocampal subregions and the medial septum in unreinforced and reinforced spatial memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kana; Okaichi, Hiroshige

    2010-06-19

    Anatomical connections between the medial septum (MS) and hippocampus (Hipp) via the fimbria-fornix suggest that functional cooperation between these structures may be important for the acquisition and use of spatial reference memories. The present study examined the extent to which this was true for both an unreinforced learning task (object exploration task) and a reinforced learning task (Morris water maze task). In Experiment 1, we compared the performance of MS/Hipp contralateral- and MS/Hipp ipsilateral-lesioned rats. MS/Hipp contralateral-lesioned rats exhibited deficient performance in both the object exploration and Morris water maze tasks. In Experiment 2, we examined the task performance of MS/CA1 contralateral-, MS/CA1 ipsilateral-, MS/CA3 contralateral- and MS/CA3 ipsilateral-lesioned rats. Contralateral MS/CA3 and MS/CA1 lesions were respectively associated with deficient performance at the spatial recognition test and object recognition test in the object exploration task. None of the lesioned rats performed deficiently in the Morris water maze task. These results indicate the importance of spatial reference memory of a functional cooperation between the MS and Hipp as a whole, irrespective of reward contingency. In contrast, functional cooperation between the MS and each of CA1 and CA3 played an important role in the performance of the unreinforced voluntary task, but not in the reinforced task. Further, the functional cooperation of both MS/CA3 and MA/CA1 were important in the spatial reference memory with the unreinforced task.

  14. Application of composites to the selective reinforcement of metallic aerospace structures. [application of structural design criteria for weight reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, W. A., Jr.; Mathauser, E. E.; Pride, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    The use of composite materials to selectively reinforce metallic structures provides a low-cost way to reduce weight and a means of minimizing the risks usually associated with the introduction of new materials. An overview is presented of the NASA Langley Research Center programs to identify the advantages and to develop the potential of the selective reinforcement approach to the use of composites. These programs have shown that selective reinforcement provides excellent strength and stiffness improvements to metallic structures. Significant weight savings can be obtained in a cost effective manner. Flight service programs which have been initiated to validate further the merits of selective reinforcement are described.

  15. "Reinforcement" in behavior theory.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, W N

    1978-01-01

    In its Pavlovian context, "reinforcement" was actually a descriptive term for the functional relation between an unconditional and a conditional stimulus. When it was adopted into operant conditioning, "reinforcement" became the central concept and the key operation, but with new qualifications, new referents, and new expectations. Some behavior theorists believed that "reinforcers" comprise a special and limited class of stimuli or events, and they speculated about what the essential "nature of reinforcement" might be. It is now known that any stimulus can serve a reinforcing function, with due recognition of such parameters as subject species characteristics, stimulus intensity, sensory modality, and schedule of application. This paper comments on these developments from the standpoint of reflex behavior theory.

  16. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    PubMed

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (p<0.05) (a dual wing + horizontal groove 222±9 N). The highest fracture strengths were observed with dual wing + occlusal rest FPDs: 250±10 N compared to inlay-retained FPDs (p<0.001) and wing-retained FPDs (p<0.001). FEA showed more favorable stress distributions within the tooth/restoration complex for dual wing retainers+ occlusal rest FPDs. There was stress concentration around connectors and retainers near connectors. A dual-wing retainer with occlusal rest is the optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  17. Functional analysis of erratic body movement maintained by visual stimulation. Incorporating conjugate reinforcement into a paired-stimulus preference assessment.

    PubMed

    Rapp, John T; Dozier, Claudia L; Carr, James E; Patel, Meeta R; Enloe, Kimberly A

    2004-01-01

    A concurrent-operants design was used to analyze the repetitive behavior of observing reflective surfaces while simultaneously engaging in erratic gross-motor body movements (EBMs) exhibited by a young boy diagnosed with autism. The assessment involved an evaluation of preference for controlled (i.e., the participant controlled the visual activity on a TV screen) versus uncontrolled (i.e., the participant viewed a previously recorded tape from the controlled condition) TV footage of his EBMs. The analysis indicated that both observing and EBMs were maintained by the direct correspondence between the body movements and the visual stimulation they produced when controlled by the participant. Thus, the EBMs appeared to be maintained on a conjugate schedule of reinforcement.

  18. Preserving SSC Design Function Using RCM Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, K

    2009-02-04

    Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) can be defined as an approach that employs preventive, predictive, proactive, and reactive maintenance practices and strategies in an integrated manner to increase the probability that a Structure, System, or Component (SSC) will function as designed over its life cycle with optimum maintenance. The goal of RCM is to preserve the SSC intended design function at the lowest cost by developing a maintenance strategy that is supported by sound technical and economic justification. RCM has been used extensively by the aircraft, space, defense, power generation, and manufacturing industries where functional failures of SSCs can have the potential to compromise worker or public safety, cause adverse environmental impact, cause loss of production, and/or result in excessive damage to critical SSCs. This paper provides a framework for performing an RCM analysis in support of DOE Order 430.1A (Life Cycle Asset Management) and DOE Order 420.1B (Facility Safety). The influence of RCM on the various aspects of the maintenance program including the work control process is also discussed.

  19. Mechanical reinforcement of gelatin hydrogel with nanofiber cellulose as a function of percolation concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhang; Zhang, Xiaowei; Teng, Anguo; Liu, Anjun

    2017-10-01

    Given a variety of distinguished aspect ratio-related characteristics of nanofiber cellulose (NFC), the impact of NFC on gelatin hydrogel performance involving strength, rheology, microstructure was investigated, focusing on concentration percolation mechanism for it. The inner topography displayed a compact three-dimensional network structure in the NFC-added gelatin gel, however, an NFC amount of 7.5gkg(-1) caused more inhomogeneous aggregation. Texture profile analysis showed that the addition of NFC increased the hardness but reduced the elasticity of gelatin gel at 10°C, depending on NFC concentration. For static rheology, adding NFC transformed gelatin solution from the Newtonian action into pseudoplastic behavior at 60°C, with a marked increase of viscosity. Furthermore, NFC improved the temperature of sol-gel transition of gelatin, even no obvious transformation as ≥5gkg(-1) NFC used. NFC reinforcement provides the potential to use as texture modifier along with gelatin in food field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Variation in Herrnstein's ro as a function of alternative reinforcement rate

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, James D.; McSweeney, Frances K.

    1985-01-01

    In a test of Herrnstein's (1970, 1974) equation for simple schedules, 15 pigeons pecked a key that produced food delivered according to variable-interval schedules. One group of birds was water deprived, and food-reinforced key pecking occurred in the presence of free water. Two other groups were not water deprived; water was present for one and absent for the other. As predicted by Herrnstein, the parameter ro was significantly higher in the water-deprived group than in the two nondeprived groups. Contrary to Herrnstein's interpretation of ro, the rate of drinking varied across schedules. Herrnstein's interpretation can be salvaged by considering ro to be an average. However, if ro is an average, the equation is not a good explanation of behavior because this average is not valid until all schedules have been sampled. In addition, low percentages of variance accounted for suggest that Herrnstein's equation may be of limited usefulness even as a descriptive model for these situations. PMID:16812413

  1. Strength Design of Reinforced Concrete Hydraulic Structures: Report 8. Design of Buried Circular Conduits - Flexure and Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    American Concrete Pipe Association ( ACPA ) that will be discussed. The ACPA studies have resulted in design criteria for the effects of radial tension...7 (Gerstle, i988) for flexural strength with the radial tension and shear criteria developed by ACPA . The procedure uses the EM loading distribution... ACPA (Heger, Liepins, and Selig, 1985). The computer program called SPIDA (Soil-Pipe Interaction Design and Analysis) incorporates multiple finite

  2. Numerical estimation of fire resistance and a flexible design of fire protection for structures made of reinforced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaledin, Vl. O.; Mitkevich, A. B.; Strakhov, V. L.

    2012-07-01

    The basic principles of a progressive methodology for calculating the fire resistance of reinforced structures, meant for application to high-rise, multifunctional, and unique buildings, are presented. The methodology is universal with respect to materials, types of building structures with fire protection, and different force and heat loads acting on them under the conditions of fire. It permits one to take into account all particularities of the thermomechanical behavior of structures in the case of joint action of thermal and force loads. The solution procedure is based on using high-level mathematical models and universal methods of numerical analysis, i.e., the finite-element method (FEM) and the finite-difference method (FDM). To simplify and reduce the labor content of computational algorithms, a mathematical model of special beam finite element has been developed, which in a natural way takes into account the complex structure of buildings, spatial nonuniformity of temperature fields, and the nonlinear behavior of materials. This procedure allowed us to determine the limits of applicability of the known approximate approach, which is based on the use of the concept of "critical temperature," to the estimation of fire resistance and to the design of fire protection of concrete structures. The procedure has been used in designing a number of unique structures built in Moscow.

  3. The use of the direct optimized probabilistic calculation method in design of bolt reinforcement for underground and mining workings.

    PubMed

    Krejsa, Martin; Janas, Petr; Yilmaz, Işık; Marschalko, Marian; Bouchal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The load-carrying system of each construction should fulfill several conditions which represent reliable criteria in the assessment procedure. It is the theory of structural reliability which determines probability of keeping required properties of constructions. Using this theory, it is possible to apply probabilistic computations based on the probability theory and mathematic statistics. Development of those methods has become more and more popular; it is used, in particular, in designs of load-carrying structures with the required level or reliability when at least some input variables in the design are random. The objective of this paper is to indicate the current scope which might be covered by the new method-Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation (DOProC) in assessments of reliability of load-carrying structures. DOProC uses a purely numerical approach without any simulation techniques. This provides more accurate solutions to probabilistic tasks, and, in some cases, such approach results in considerably faster completion of computations. DOProC can be used to solve efficiently a number of probabilistic computations. A very good sphere of application for DOProC is the assessment of the bolt reinforcement in the underground and mining workings. For the purposes above, a special software application-"Anchor"-has been developed.

  4. The Use of the Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation Method in Design of Bolt Reinforcement for Underground and Mining Workings

    PubMed Central

    Krejsa, Martin; Janas, Petr; Yilmaz, Işık; Marschalko, Marian; Bouchal, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The load-carrying system of each construction should fulfill several conditions which represent reliable criteria in the assessment procedure. It is the theory of structural reliability which determines probability of keeping required properties of constructions. Using this theory, it is possible to apply probabilistic computations based on the probability theory and mathematic statistics. Development of those methods has become more and more popular; it is used, in particular, in designs of load-carrying structures with the required level or reliability when at least some input variables in the design are random. The objective of this paper is to indicate the current scope which might be covered by the new method—Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation (DOProC) in assessments of reliability of load-carrying structures. DOProC uses a purely numerical approach without any simulation techniques. This provides more accurate solutions to probabilistic tasks, and, in some cases, such approach results in considerably faster completion of computations. DOProC can be used to solve efficiently a number of probabilistic computations. A very good sphere of application for DOProC is the assessment of the bolt reinforcement in the underground and mining workings. For the purposes above, a special software application—“Anchor”—has been developed. PMID:23935412

  5. Characterization of hydroxyapatite whisker reinforced composites and scaffolds for mechanical and biological function in orthopaedic and spinal implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Timothy L.

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the mechanical and biological properties of HA whisker reinforced polyaryletherketone (PAEK) composites and scaffolds which are key to clinical translation for orthopedic and spinal implants. The fatigue behavior of polyetherketoneketone (PEKK) reinforced with 0, 20, and 40 vol% hydroxyapatite (HA) was investigated in four-point bending fatigue. The fatigue life decreased with increasing HA reinforcement. However, PEKK reinforced with 40 vol% HA whiskers exhibited a fatigue life greater than 2.106 cycles at 40 MPa. Moreover, HA whisker reinforcement resulted in decreased creep deformation and minimal modulus degradation. The effects of the mold temperature and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) powder were investigated on the mechanical properties and crystallinity of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared using compression molding and porogen leaching. The mechanical properties of the scaffolds increased while the PEEK crystallinity decreased, with increasing mold temperature and suggested an optimal mold temperature of 370--375°C for PEEK scaffolds comprising of 75% porosity and 20 vol% HA whisker reinforcement, regardless of the PEEK powder size. The effects of the porogen morphology on the architecture, mechanical properties, and permeability of HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds were investigated in 75--90% porous scaffolds. HA whisker reinforced PEEK scaffolds prepared with an ellipsoidal porogen exhibited a greater permeability than scaffolds prepared with a cubic porogen. The compressive modulus, yield strength, and yield strain were not affected by the porogen morphology. The effects of HA reinforcement morphology and content was investigated on the behavior of primary osteoblasts on dense HA reinforced PEEK substrates in vitro. At day 7, the number of osteoblasts attached to PEEK substrate surfaces increased with increasing HA content and for HA whiskers compared to equiaxed HA powder reinforcement

  6. Preliminary design methods for fiber reinforced composite structures employing a personal computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastlake, C. N.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a user-friendly interactive computer program to be used as an analytical tool by structural designers. Its intent was to do preliminary, approximate stress analysis to help select or verify sizing choices for composite structural members. The approach to the project was to provide a subroutine which uses classical lamination theory to predict an effective elastic modulus for a laminate of arbitrary material and ply orientation. This effective elastic modulus can then be used in a family of other subroutines which employ the familiar basic structural analysis methods for isotropic materials. This method is simple and convenient to use but only approximate, as is appropriate for a preliminary design tool which will be subsequently verified by more sophisticated analysis. Additional subroutines have been provided to calculate laminate coefficient of thermal expansion and to calculate ply-by-ply strains within a laminate.

  7. Meta-analysis of noncontingent reinforcement effects on problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Richman, David M; Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Grubb, Laura; Bosch, Amanda; Abby, Layla

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) outcomes was conducted using hierarchical linear modeling (a) to document the effect size for decreasing problem behavior, (b) to compare effect sizes for NCR using functional reinforcers and nonfunctional reinforcers, and (c) to document the influence of schedule thinning on effect size. Analyses were conducted with data from 55 studies and 91 participants. Results indicate that NCR was associated with a very strong effect size (d =-1.58) for reduction of problem behavior, functional reinforcers were slightly more effective than nonfunctional reinforcers, and schedule thinning resulted in minor degradation of effect size. Meta-analysis of single-case design data provides a method to quantitatively estimate effect sizes of interventions across participants. Therefore, it allows one to identify important variables that are not otherwise evident in single-case data, helps to disseminate findings to the broader scientific community, and contributes to the documentation of empirically supported interventions.

  8. Blast Design of Reinforced Concrete and Masonry Components Retrofitted with FRP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    polymeric resin matrix . The fibers provide strength and stiffness to the composite, while the resin matrix provides stress transfer between fibers...unclassified 2 The most widely used type of polymer matrix for applications in building structures is epoxy resins. Other types of polymer matrix ...to the polymer matrix . All the fiber types in Table 1 can be used for blast design and the choice of fiber type is often an economic one. Table

  9. Structures to Resist the Effects of Accidential Explosions. Volume 4. Reinforced Concrete Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Analysis 78 4-30.1 Genet al 78 4-30.2 Ultimate Flexurai Resistance 78 4-30.2. 1, General 78 4-30.2.2 Virtual Work Method 79 4-30.2.3 Effect of Column...gineering Practice No. 42, American Society of Civil Engineeri , New York, NY, 1961. 9. Design of Structures to Resist the Effects of Nuclear Weapons

  10. Design and Analysis of Complex D-Regions in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yindeesuk, Sukit

    2009-01-01

    STM design provisions, such as those in Appendix A of ACI318-08, consist of rules for evaluating the capacity of the load-resisting truss that is idealized to carry the forces through the D-Region. These code rules were primarily derived from test data on simple D-Regions such as deep beams and corbels. However, these STM provisions are taken as…

  11. Design and Analysis of Complex D-Regions in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yindeesuk, Sukit

    2009-01-01

    STM design provisions, such as those in Appendix A of ACI318-08, consist of rules for evaluating the capacity of the load-resisting truss that is idealized to carry the forces through the D-Region. These code rules were primarily derived from test data on simple D-Regions such as deep beams and corbels. However, these STM provisions are taken as…

  12. Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes for the mechanical reinforcement of polystyrene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Michele T.; McNamee, William P.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2008-10-01

    An organometallic approach was used to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes with n-butyllithium. This procedure was repeated two more times to achieve a higher degree of multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalization. The functionalized nanotubes have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetrical analysis, scanning electron microscopy and sedimentation studies. It was possible to form stable suspensions of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran and they were used to make nanotube polymer composites. The mechanical properties of these new nanotube polymer composites were tested and they were found to show an increase of up to 25% in their Young's moduli and up to 50% in their tensile strength over pure polystyrene.

  13. Designing electron wave functions in assembled nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Christopher Ryan

    We use the scanning tunneling microscope to not only to map electron wave functions but also to engineer them. By assembling nanostructures from individual atoms and molecules, we confine two-dimensional electronic states into closed electron resonators, or "quantum corrals". Precise control over the geometry of these structures allows electronic states to be tailored to suit particular experiments. Specifically, we design wave functions that enable studies of normally inaccessible quantum phases. First, we create pairs of quantum corrals with shapes drawn from contemporary mathematics. Exploiting special topological relationships between these structures, we retrieve internal quantum phase of electron wave functions without using interferometry. Second, we demonstrate that adding a single atom to a quantum corral can cause its electronic states to recombine into coherent superpositions. The real-space position of the additional atom controls abstract superposition phase angles, enabling arbitrary time-independent superpositions to be created. Third, we study geometric phase by creating a series of quantum corrals that traverse a closed path through a parameter space. Tracking the corral wave functions reveals a phase shift depending solely on the path taken, directly visualizing Berry's phase evolution in a quantum system. Finally, we extend beyond closed electron resonators and engineer wave functions in open nanostructures. We show that arbitrary patterns can be encoded into electronic states, creating a new form of holography on the nanoscale. We exhibit letters written in electron density rather than with atomic matter, and show that multiple letters may be simultaneously embedded at different energies in the same region of space. Because the wavelength of the electrons diminishes as energy is increased, this technique allows local information densities that exceed the conventionally assumed limit of 1 bit per atom. Taken together, the results in this thesis

  14. Active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded laminated composite plates using piezoelectric fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper deals with the geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis of functionally graded (FG) laminated composite plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber reinforced composite (PFRC) material. Each layer of the substrate FG laminated composite plate is made of fiber-reinforced composite material in which the fibers are longitudinally aligned in the plane parallel to the top or bottom surface of the layer and the layer is assumed to be graded in the thickness direction by way of varying the fiber orientation angle across its thickness according to a power-law. The novelty of the present work is that, unlike the traditional laminated composite plates, the FG laminated composite plates are constructed in such a way that the continuous variation of material properties and stresses across the thickness of the plates is achieved. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation (FSDT) theory, a finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG laminated composite plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric FG laminated composite plates are considered as the substrate plates for presenting the numerical results. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear forced vibrations of FG laminated composite plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also investigated.

  15. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants.

  16. The Effects of Consequence Manipulation During Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior Maintained by Negative Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Potoczak, Kathryn; Carr, James E; Michael, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct analytic methods have been used to identify the function of problem behavior. The antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) method (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) includes the delivery of consequences for problem behavior. The AB method (Carr & Durand, 1985) does not include consequence delivery, instead relying exclusively on antecedent conditions to evoke the behavior. The AB and ABC functional analysis methods were compared in this study with 4 children with developmental disabilities who engaged in task-related problem behavior. Results show that the ABC method identified an escape method for all four cases, whereas the AB method failed to identify a function for any case. PMID:18189106

  17. The effects of consequence manipulation during functional analysis of problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Potoczak, Kathryn; Carr, James E; Michael, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct analytic methods have been used to identify the function of problem behavior. The antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) method (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) includes the delivery of consequences for problem behavior. The AB method (Carr & Durand, 1985) does not include consequence delivery, instead relying exclusively on antecedent conditions to evoke the behavior. The AB and ABC functional analysis methods were compared in this study with 4 children with developmental disabilities who engaged in task-related problem behavior. Results show that the ABC method identified an escape method for all four cases, whereas the AB method failed to identify a function for any case.

  18. Preimpregnated, fiber-reinforced prostheses. Part I. Basic rationale and complete-coverage and intracoronal fixed partial denture designs.

    PubMed

    Freilich, M A; Duncan, J P; Meiers, J C; Goldberg, A J

    1998-11-01

    This is the first of two articles describing the development and use of a continuous fiber-reinforced composite as a framework for the fabrication of fixed partial dentures and splints. The chemical composition and physical structure of the fiber-reinforced composite, along with the progression and development of a variety of fiber-reinforced composite materials, are discussed. Criteria for case selection, tooth preparation, and the clinical and laboratory procedures required for partial- or complete-coverage fixed partial denture fabrication and delivery are described.

  19. Sliding Wear Response of Beryl Reinforced Aluminum Composite - A Factorial Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharat, V.; Durga Prasad, B.; Prabhakar, M. Bhovi; Venkateswarlu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Al-Beryl MMCs were successfully fabricated using powder metallurgy route. Processing conditions such as beryl content and particle size were varied and its influence on dry sliding wear response was studied. Effect of test parameters like applied load and sliding distance on wear performance of Al-Beryl MMCs were discussed detail. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a pin on disc machine based on the 24 (4 factors at 2 levels) factorial design. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to obtain the contribution of control parameters on wear rate. The present study shows that wear resistance of Al-beryl MMCs not only depends on the beryl content but also influenced by normal load, sliding distance and particle size. The results show that most significant variables affecting wear rate of Al - beryl MMCs are size of the beryl particles (22%), beryl content (19.60%), sliding distance (18.47%), and normal load (10.30%). The interaction effects of these parameters are less significant in influencing wear rate compared to the individual parameters. The correlation between sliding wear and its parameters was obtained by multiple regression analysis. Regression model developed in the present study can be successfully implemented to predict the wear response of Al-Beryl MMCs.

  20. Textile carbon reinforcement structures with integrated optical fibre sensors designed for SHM applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwis, L. S. M.; Bremer, K.; Weigand, F.; Kuhne, M.; Helbig, R.; Roth, B.

    2017-04-01

    An optical fibre-based strain sensor embroidered to a functionalised carbon structure (FCS) that can be used for structural health monitoring (SHM) is introduced. The aim of the design is not only to monitor strain, but also to act as a structural strengthening mechanism in the target application. The integration of optical fibres on the FCS is achieved by "interweaving" the two elements on a polymer textile substrate in a grid formation using a specialised fabrication process. The thus obtained sensor was then characterised using a fibre optic Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometric setup where a variation in the fibre length, i.e. resulting from strain, would induce a variation in the interference pattern. To do so, two different functionalised skein samples (incorporating optical fibres) were subjected to varying elongation using a tensile testing machine by carefully incrementing the applied force. A good correlation between the applied force and measured length change was observed, showing the value of the dual-achievement of the proposed optical fibre-based mechanism in obtaining strain measurement while being utilised as a strengthening agent.

  1. Transfer Function Design for Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jian Huang

    2008-12-08

    As computation scales beyond terascale, the scientific problems under study through computing are increasingly pushing the boundaries of human knowledge about the physical world. It is more pivotal than ever to quickly and reliably extract new knowledge from these complex simulations of ultra scale. In this project, the PI expanded the traditional notion of transfer function, which maps physical quantities to visual cues via table look-ups, to include general temporal as well as multivariate patterns that can be described procedurally through specialty mini programming languages. Their efforts aimed at answering a perpetual question of fundamental importance. That is "what a visualization should show". Instead of waiting for application scientists to initiate the process, the team at University of Tennessee worked closely with scientists at ORNL in a proactive role to envision and design elegant, powerful, and reliable tools that a user can use to specify "what is interesting". Their new techniques include visualization operators that revolve around correlation and graph properties, relative patterns in statistical distribution, temporal regular expressions, concurrent attribute subspaces and traditional compound boolean range queries. The team also paid special attention to ensure that all visualization operators are inherently designed with great parallel scalability to handle tera-scale datasets in both homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Success has been demonstrated with leading edge computational science areas include climate modeling, combustion and systems genetics.

  2. The several roles of stimuli in token reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Christopher E; Hackenberg, Timothy D

    2015-03-01

    Three experiments were conducted with pigeons to identify the stimulus functions of tokens in second-order token-reinforcement schedules. All experiments employed two-component multiple schedules with a token-reinforcement schedule in one component and a schedule with equivalent response requirements and/or reinforcer density in the other. In Experiment 1, response rates were lower under a token-reinforcement schedule than under a tandem schedule with the same response requirements, suggesting a discriminative role for the tokens. In Experiment 2, response rates varied systematically with signaling functions of the tokens in a series of conditions designed to explore other aspects of the temporal-correlative relations between tokens and food. In Experiment 3, response rates were reduced but not eliminated by presenting tokens independent of responding, yoked to their temporal occurrence in a preceding token component, suggesting both a reinforcing function and eliciting/evocative functions based on stimulus-food relations. Only when tokens were removed entirely was responding eliminated. On the whole, the results suggest that tokens, as stimuli temporally correlated with food, may serve multiple stimulus functions in token-reinforcement procedures--reinforcing, discriminative, or eliciting--depending on the precise arrangement of the contingencies in which they are embedded.

  3. Induction when Rats Respond for Liquid-Sucrose Reinforcement as a Function of Amount of Upcoming "Work"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Bauste, Grant A.; McDougall, Casey L.; Nurnberger, Jeri T.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that rats increase their rate of responding for 1% sucrose reinforcement in the first half of the session if food-pellet, rather than 1% sucrose, reinforcement will be available in the second half (i.e., positive induction). Four experiments investigated whether this induction effect would be changed by altering the…

  4. Induction when Rats Respond for Liquid-Sucrose Reinforcement as a Function of Amount of Upcoming "Work"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Bauste, Grant A.; McDougall, Casey L.; Nurnberger, Jeri T.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that rats increase their rate of responding for 1% sucrose reinforcement in the first half of the session if food-pellet, rather than 1% sucrose, reinforcement will be available in the second half (i.e., positive induction). Four experiments investigated whether this induction effect would be changed by altering the…

  5. Sampling design optimization for spatial functions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olea, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure is presented for minimizing the sampling requirements necessary to estimate a mappable spatial function at a specified level of accuracy. The technique is based on universal kriging, an estimation method within the theory of regionalized variables. Neither actual implementation of the sampling nor universal kriging estimations are necessary to make an optimal design. The average standard error and maximum standard error of estimation over the sampling domain are used as global indices of sampling efficiency. The procedure optimally selects those parameters controlling the magnitude of the indices, including the density and spatial pattern of the sample elements and the number of nearest sample elements used in the estimation. As an illustration, the network of observation wells used to monitor the water table in the Equus Beds of Kansas is analyzed and an improved sampling pattern suggested. This example demonstrates the practical utility of the procedure, which can be applied equally well to other spatial sampling problems, as the procedure is not limited by the nature of the spatial function. ?? 1984 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  6. The Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Schedules on Functional Response Classes: A Translational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinicke, Megan R.; Carr, James E.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Research on functional response classes has applied significance because less severe forms of problem behavior have been found to co-occur with more severe forms. In addition, the most severe forms of problem behavior are sometimes targeted for intervention without monitoring other less severe forms. In such cases, it is unknown whether and how…

  7. The Effects of Consequence Manipulation during Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior Maintained by Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoczak, Kathryn; Carr, James E.; Michael, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct analytic methods have been used to identify the function of problem behavior. The antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) method (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) includes the delivery of consequences for problem behavior. The AB method (Carr & Durand, 1985) does not include consequence delivery, instead relying…

  8. The Effects of Consequence Manipulation during Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior Maintained by Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potoczak, Kathryn; Carr, James E.; Michael, Jack

    2007-01-01

    Two distinct analytic methods have been used to identify the function of problem behavior. The antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) method (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) includes the delivery of consequences for problem behavior. The AB method (Carr & Durand, 1985) does not include consequence delivery, instead relying…

  9. The Effects of Fixed-Time Reinforcement Schedules on Functional Response Classes: A Translational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinicke, Megan R.; Carr, James E.; LeBlanc, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Research on functional response classes has applied significance because less severe forms of problem behavior have been found to co-occur with more severe forms. In addition, the most severe forms of problem behavior are sometimes targeted for intervention without monitoring other less severe forms. In such cases, it is unknown whether and how…

  10. Adaptive critic autopilot design of bank-to-turn missiles using fuzzy basis function networks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Kai

    2005-04-01

    A new adaptive critic autopilot design for bank-to-turn missiles is presented. In this paper, the architecture of adaptive critic learning scheme contains a fuzzy-basis-function-network based associative search element (ASE), which is employed to approximate nonlinear and complex functions of bank-to-turn missiles, and an adaptive critic element (ACE) generating the reinforcement signal to tune the associative search element. In the design of the adaptive critic autopilot, the control law receives signals from a fixed gain controller, an ASE and an adaptive robust element, which can eliminate approximation errors and disturbances. Traditional adaptive critic reinforcement learning is the problem faced by an agent that must learn behavior through trial-and-error interactions with a dynamic environment, however, the proposed tuning algorithm can significantly shorten the learning time by online tuning all parameters of fuzzy basis functions and weights of ASE and ACE. Moreover, the weight updating law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory is capable of guaranteeing both tracking performance and stability. Computer simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive critic autopilot.

  11. EELS Analysis of Nylon 6 Nanofibers Reinforced with Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Leyva-Porras, César; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C; Miki-Yoshida, M; Avila-Vega, Yazmín I; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of nitroxide-functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT) dispersed in Nylon 6 nanofibers is reported herein. The functionalization and exfoliation process of graphite oxide to GOFT was confirmed by TEM using electron diffraction patterns (EDP), wherein 1 to 4 graphene layers of GOFT were observed. The distribution and alignment of GOFT layers within a sample of Nylon 6 nanofiber reveals that GOFT platelets are mainly within the fiber, but some were partially protruding from it. Furthermore, Nylon 6 nanofibers exhibit an average diameter of 225 nm with several microns in length. GOFT platelets embedded into the fiber, the pristine fiber, and amorphous carbon were analyzed by EELS where each spectra [corresponding to the carbon edge (C-K)] exhibited changes in the fine structure, allowing a clear distinction between: i) GOFT single-layers, ii) Nylon-6 nanofibers, and iii) the carbon substrate. EELS analysis is presented here for the first time as a powerful tool to identify functionalized graphene single-layers (< 4 layers of GOFT) into a Nylon 6 nanofiber composite.

  12. EELS Analysis of Nylon 6 Nanofibers Reinforced with Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Porras, César; Ornelas-Gutiérrez, C.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Avila-Vega, Yazmín I.; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2014-01-01

    A detailed analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of nitroxide-functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT) dispersed in Nylon 6 nanofibers is reported herein. The functionalization and exfoliation process of graphite oxide to GOFT was confirmed by TEM using electron diffraction patterns (EDP), wherein 1 to 4 graphene layers of GOFT were observed. The distribution and alignment of GOFT layers within a sample of Nylon 6 nanofiber reveals that GOFT platelets are mainly within the fiber, but some were partially protruding from it. Furthermore, Nylon 6 nanofibers exhibit an average diameter of 225 nm with several microns in length. GOFT platelets embedded into the fiber, the pristine fiber, and amorphous carbon were analyzed by EELS where each spectra [corresponding to the carbon edge (C-K)] exhibited changes in the fine structure, allowing a clear distinction between: i) GOFT single-layers, ii) Nylon-6 nanofibers, and iii) the carbon substrate. EELS analysis is presented here for the first time as a powerful tool to identify functionalized graphene single-layers (< 4 layers of GOFT) into a Nylon 6 nanofiber composite. PMID:24634536

  13. Effects of Signaled Positive Reinforcement on Problem Behavior Maintained by Negative Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schieltz, Kelly M.; Wacker, David P.; Romani, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of providing positive reinforcement for task completion, signaled via the presence of a tangible item, on escape-maintained problem behavior displayed by three typically developing children during one-time 90-min outpatient evaluations. Brief functional analyses of problem behavior, conducted within a multielement design,…

  14. Conjugate Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard F.

    Conjugate reinforcement is a new attention measure which has emerged from experimental psychology. It can provide accurate measurement of a subject's attention to a stimulus. In conjugate reinforcement, the duration of the stimulus varies directly and immediately with the subject's rate of response. In this process, the subject must demonstrate…

  15. Processing and characterization of PMMA/PI composites reinforced with surface functionalized hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Garima; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Park, Soo Jin

    2017-09-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is acknowledged as a conventional polymer matrix because of its light weight, low friction, optical clarity, and environmental stability, with properties including UV resistance and moisture resistance. In the present study, PMMA/polyimide (PI)/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) composites were processed by incorporating PI and hBN powder into the PMMA matrix. To augment the dispersion, the surfaces of hBN particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS), which serves as a coupling agent. Two cases of composites were considered: one with as-received hBN and another one with silanized hBN. For validation of changes after silane treatment, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infra-red were performed. The changes in morphology after surface treatment were analyzed through field-emission scanning electron microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The effects of hBN functionalization on the thermal properties of the composites were analyzed by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The tribological properties of the composites were studied by friction and wear tests and the morphology of the wear track was investigated using a surface profilometer and field-emission scanning electron microscope. The outcomes of these investigations indicated that the composite with silanized hBN exhibited superior tribological properties in comparison to the composites with as-received hBN.

  16. Processing speed enhances model-based over model-free reinforcement learning in the presence of high working memory functioning

    PubMed Central

    Schad, Daniel J.; Jünger, Elisabeth; Sebold, Miriam; Garbusow, Maria; Bernhardt, Nadine; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Smolka, Michael N.; Heinz, Andreas; Rapp, Michael A.; Huys, Quentin J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Theories of decision-making and its neural substrates have long assumed the existence of two distinct and competing valuation systems, variously described as goal-directed vs. habitual, or, more recently and based on statistical arguments, as model-free vs. model-based reinforcement-learning. Though both have been shown to control choices, the cognitive abilities associated with these systems are under ongoing investigation. Here we examine the link to cognitive abilities, and find that individual differences in processing speed covary with a shift from model-free to model-based choice control in the presence of above-average working memory function. This suggests shared cognitive and neural processes; provides a bridge between literatures on intelligence and valuation; and may guide the development of process models of different valuation components. Furthermore, it provides a rationale for individual differences in the tendency to deploy valuation systems, which may be important for understanding the manifold neuropsychiatric diseases associated with malfunctions of valuation. PMID:25566131

  17. Processing speed enhances model-based over model-free reinforcement learning in the presence of high working memory functioning.

    PubMed

    Schad, Daniel J; Jünger, Elisabeth; Sebold, Miriam; Garbusow, Maria; Bernhardt, Nadine; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Smolka, Michael N; Heinz, Andreas; Rapp, Michael A; Huys, Quentin J M

    2014-01-01

    Theories of decision-making and its neural substrates have long assumed the existence of two distinct and competing valuation systems, variously described as goal-directed vs. habitual, or, more recently and based on statistical arguments, as model-free vs. model-based reinforcement-learning. Though both have been shown to control choices, the cognitive abilities associated with these systems are under ongoing investigation. Here we examine the link to cognitive abilities, and find that individual differences in processing speed covary with a shift from model-free to model-based choice control in the presence of above-average working memory function. This suggests shared cognitive and neural processes; provides a bridge between literatures on intelligence and valuation; and may guide the development of process models of different valuation components. Furthermore, it provides a rationale for individual differences in the tendency to deploy valuation systems, which may be important for understanding the manifold neuropsychiatric diseases associated with malfunctions of valuation.

  18. Demand for food on fixed-ratio schedules as a function of the quality of concurrently available reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Lea, S. E. G.; Roper, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    Six rats lever pressed for food on concurrent fixed-ratio schedules, in a two-compartment chamber. In one compartment, mixed diet pellets were delivered on fixed-ratio schedules of 1, 6, 11, and 16; in the other, either no food was delivered, or sucrose or mixed diet pellets were delivered on fixed-ratio 8. The number of pellets obtained in the first compartment declined as a function of fixed-ratio size in that compartment in all three conditions, but the decline was greatest overall with mixed diet pellets concurrently available in the other compartment, and least with no food concurrently available. The result is discussed in terms of economic demand theory, and is consistent with the prediction that elasticity of demand for a commodity (defined in operant terms as the ratio of the proportionate change in number of reinforcements per session to the proportionate change in fixed-ratio size) is greater the more substitutable for that commodity are any concurrently available commodities. PMID:16811999

  19. Brain Reinforcement System Function is Ghrelin Dependent: Studies in the Rat Using Pharmacological fMRI and Intracranial Self-Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Paul J.; Clifford, P. Shane; Rodriguez, Juan A; Hughes, Samuel; Di Francesco, Carla; Melotto, Sergio; Tessari, Michela; Corsi, Mauro; Bifone, Angelo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin (GHR) is an orexigenic gut peptide that interacts with brain ghrelin receptors (GHR-Rs) to promote food intake. Recent research suggests that GHR acts as a modulator of motivated behavior, suggesting a direct influence of GHR on brain reinforcement circuits. In the present studies, we investigated the role of GHR and GHR-Rs in brain reinforcement function. Pharmacological Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to spatially-resolve the functional activation produced by systemic administration of an orexigenic GHR dose. The imaging data revealed a focal activation of a network of subcortical structures that comprise brain reinforcement circuits – ventral tegmental area, lateral hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens. We next analyzed whether brain reinforcement circuits require functional GHR-Rs. To this purpose, wild type (WT) or mutant rats sustaining ENU-induced knockout of GHR-Rs (GHR-R null rats) were implanted with stimulating electrodes aimed at the lateral hypothalamus, shaped to respond for intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) and then tested using a rate-frequency procedure to examine ICSS response patterns. WT rats were readily shaped using stimulation intensities of 75 uA, whereas GHR-R null rats required 300 uA for ICSS shaping. No differences in rate-frequency curves were noted for WT rats at 75 uA and GHR-R null rats at 300 uA. When current intensity was lowered to 100 uA, GHR-R null rats did not respond for ICSS. Taken collectively, these data suggest that systemic GHR can activate mesolimbic dopaminergic areas, and highlight a facilitative role of GHR-Rs on the activity of brain reinforcement systems. PMID:22017465

  20. Functionalized carbon nanotube reinforced scaffolds for bone regenerative engineering: fabrication, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mikael, Paiyz E; Amini, Ami R; Basu, Joysurya; Josefina Arellano-Jimenez, M; Laurencin, Cato T; Sanders, Mary M; Barry Carter, C; Nukavarapu, Syam P

    2014-06-01

    Designing biodegradable scaffolds with bone-compatible mechanical properties has been a significant challenge in the field of bone tissue engineering and regenerative engineering. The objective of this work is to improve the polymeric scaffold's mechanical strength by compositing it with mechanically superior carbon nanotubes. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microsphere scaffolds exhibit mechanical properties in the range of human cancellous bone. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes have outstanding mechanical properties. The aim of this study is to improve further the mechanical strength of PLGA scaffolds such that they may be applicable for a wide range of load-bearing repair and regeneration applications. We have formed composite microspheres of PLGA containing pristine and modified (with hydroxyl (OH), carboxylic acid (COOH)) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and fabricated them into three-dimensional porous scaffolds. Results show that by adding only 3% MWCNTs, the compressive strength and modulus was significantly increased (35 MPa, 510.99 MPa) compared to pure PLGA scaffolds (19 MPa and 166.38 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy images showed excellent cell adhesion and proliferation. In vitro studies exhibited good cell viability, proliferation and mineralization. The in vivo study, however, indicated differences in inflammatory response throughout the 12 weeks of implantation, with OH-modified MWCNTs having the least response, followed by unmodified and COOH-modified exhibiting a more pronounced response. Overall, our results show that PLGA scaffolds containing water-dispersible MWCNTs are mechanically stronger and display good cellular and tissue compatibility, and hence are potential candidates for load-bearing bone tissue engineering.

  1. Design Guidelines for In-Plane Mechanical Properties of SiC Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay V.

    2008-01-01

    In-plane tensile stress-strain, tensile creep, and after-creep retained tensile properties of melt-infiltrated SiC-SiC composites reinforced with different fiber types were evaluated with an emphasis on obtaining simple or first-order microstructural design guidelines for these in-plane mechanical properties. Using the mini-matrix approach to model stress-strain behavior and the results of this study, three basic general design criteria for stress and strain limits are formulated, namely a design stress limit, a design total strain limit, and an after-creep design retained strength limit. It is shown that these criteria can be useful for designing components for high temperature applications.

  2. Reinforcement Learning Through Gradient Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-14

    Reinforcement learning is often done using parameterized function approximators to store value functions. Algorithms are typically developed for...practice of existing types of algorithms, the gradient descent approach makes it possible to create entirely new classes of reinforcement learning algorithms

  3. Behavioral mechanisms underlying nicotine reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, Laura E; Smith, Tracy T; Schassburger, Rachel L; Buffalari, Deanne M; Sved, Alan F; Donny, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide, and nicotine, the primary psychoactive constituent in tobacco, drives sustained use. The behavioral actions of nicotine are complex and extend well beyond the actions of the drug as a primary reinforcer. Stimuli that are consistently paired with nicotine can, through associative learning, take on reinforcing properties as conditioned stimuli. These conditioned stimuli can then impact the rate and probability of behavior and even function as conditioning reinforcers that maintain behavior in the absence of nicotine. Nicotine can also act as a conditioned stimulus (CS), predicting the delivery of other reinforcers, which may allow nicotine to acquire value as a conditioned reinforcer. These associative effects, establishing non-nicotine stimuli as conditioned stimuli with discriminative stimulus and conditioned reinforcing properties as well as establishing nicotine as a CS, are predicted by basic conditioning principles. However, nicotine can also act non-associatively. Nicotine directly enhances the reinforcing efficacy of other reinforcing stimuli in the environment, an effect that does not require a temporal or predictive relationship between nicotine and either the stimulus or the behavior. Hence, the reinforcing actions of nicotine stem both from the primary reinforcing actions of the drug (and the subsequent associative learning effects) as well as the reinforcement enhancement action of nicotine which is non-associative in nature. Gaining a better understanding of how nicotine impacts behavior will allow for maximally effective tobacco control efforts aimed at reducing the harm associated with tobacco use by reducing and/or treating its addictiveness.

  4. Examining the reinforcing value of stimuli within social and non-social contexts in children with and without high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Melissa C; Allman, Melissa J; Hagopian, Louis P; Triggs, Mandy M; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Denckla, Martha B; DeLeon, Iser G

    2017-10-01

    One of the key diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder includes impairments in social interactions. This study compared the extent to which boys with high-functioning autism and typically developing boys "value" engaging in activities with a parent or alone. Two different assessments that can empirically determine the relative reinforcing value of social and non-social stimuli were employed: paired-choice preference assessments and progressive-ratio schedules. There were no significant differences between boys with high-functioning autism and typically developing boys on either measure. Moreover, there was a strong correspondence in performance across these two measures for participants in each group. These results suggest that the relative reinforcing value of engaging in activities with a primary caregiver is not diminished for children with autism spectrum disorder.

  5. Design of the IPIRG-2 simulated seismic forcing function

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.; Scott, P.; Wilkowski, G.

    1996-02-01

    A series of pipe system experiments was conducted in IPIRG-2 that used a realistic seismic forcing function. Because the seismic forcing function was more complex than the single-frequency increasing-amplitude sinusoidal forcing function used in the IPIRG-1 pipe system experiments, considerable effort went into designing the function. This report documents the design process for the seismic forcing function used in the IPIRG-2 pipe system experiments.

  6. A system decomposition approach to the design of functional observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Tyrone; Trinh, Hieu

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports a system decomposition that allows the construction of a minimum-order functional observer using a state observer design approach. The system decomposition translates the functional observer design problem to that of a state observer for a smaller decomposed subsystem. Functional observability indices are introduced, and a closed-form expression for the minimum order required for a functional observer is derived in terms of those functional observability indices.

  7. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed.

  8. Muscle beta1D integrin reinforces the cytoskeleton-matrix link: modulation of integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Belkin, A M; Retta, S F; Pletjushkina, O Y; Balzac, F; Silengo, L; Fassler, R; Koteliansky, V E; Burridge, K; Tarone, G

    1997-12-15

    Expression of muscle-specific beta1D integrin with an alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain in CHO and GD25, beta1 integrin-minus cells leads to their phenotypic conversion. beta1D-transfected nonmuscle cells display rounded morphology, lack of pseudopodial activity, retarded spreading, reduced migration, and significantly enhanced contractility compared with their beta1A-expressing counterparts. The transfected beta1D is targeted to focal adhesions and efficiently displaces the endogenous beta1A and alphavbeta3 integrins from the sites of cell-matrix contact. This displacement is observed on several types of extracellular matrix substrata and leads to elevated stability of focal adhesions in beta1D transfectants. Whereas a significant part of cellular beta1A integrin is extractable in digitonin, the majority of the transfected beta1D is digitonin-insoluble and is strongly associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Increased interaction of beta1D integrin with the actin cytoskeleton is consistent with and might be mediated by its enhanced binding to talin. In contrast, beta1A interacts more strongly with alpha-actinin, than beta1D. Inside-out driven activation of the beta1D ectodomain increases ligand binding and fibronectin matrix assembly by beta1D transfectants. Phenotypic effects of beta1D integrin expression in nonmuscle cells are due to its enhanced interactions with both cytoskeletal and extracellular ligands. They parallel the transitions that muscle cells undergo during differentiation. Modulation of beta1 integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing serves as a physiological mechanism reinforcing the cytoskeleton- matrix link in muscle cells. This reflects the major role for beta1D integrin in muscle, where extremely stable association is required for contraction.

  9. Muscle β1D Integrin Reinforces the Cytoskeleton–Matrix Link: Modulation of Integrin Adhesive Function by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Belkin, Alexey M.; Retta, S. Francesco; Pletjushkina, Olga Y.; Balzac, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Fassler, Reinhard; Koteliansky, Victor E.; Burridge, Keith; Tarone, Guido

    1997-01-01

    Expression of muscle-specific β1D integrin with an alternatively spliced cytoplasmic domain in CHO and GD25, β1 integrin-minus cells leads to their phenotypic conversion. β1D-transfected nonmuscle cells display rounded morphology, lack of pseudopodial activity, retarded spreading, reduced migration, and significantly enhanced contractility compared with their β1A-expressing counterparts. The transfected β1D is targeted to focal adhesions and efficiently displaces the endogenous β1A and αvβ3 integrins from the sites of cell–matrix contact. This displacement is observed on several types of extracellular matrix substrata and leads to elevated stability of focal adhesions in β1D transfectants. Whereas a significant part of cellular β1A integrin is extractable in digitonin, the majority of the transfected β1D is digitonin-insoluble and is strongly associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton. Increased interaction of β1D integrin with the actin cytoskeleton is consistent with and might be mediated by its enhanced binding to talin. In contrast, β1A interacts more strongly with α-actinin, than β1D. Inside-out driven activation of the β1D ectodomain increases ligand binding and fibronectin matrix assembly by β1D transfectants. Phenotypic effects of β1D integrin expression in nonmuscle cells are due to its enhanced interactions with both cytoskeletal and extracellular ligands. They parallel the transitions that muscle cells undergo during differentiation. Modulation of β1 integrin adhesive function by alternative splicing serves as a physiological mechanism reinforcing the cytoskeleton– matrix link in muscle cells. This reflects the major role for β1D integrin in muscle, where extremely stable association is required for contraction. PMID:9396762

  10. Numerical simulation of the fluid-solid interaction for CNT reinforced functionally graded cylindrical shells in thermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Hamed

    2017-09-01

    Spacecraft and satellite are susceptible to aerothermoelastic flutter instability, which may jeopardize the mission of the spacecraft and satellite. This kind of instability may result from the coupling of the thermal radiation from the sun and the elastic deformations of aeronautical components. As a first endeavor, the aerothermoelastic flutter and buckling instabilities of functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite (FG-CNTRC) cylindrical shell under simultaneous actions of aerodynamic loading and elevated temperature conditions are investigated. The formulations are derived according to the first-order shear deformation theory, Donnell shell theory in conjunction with von Karman geometrical nonlinearity. Thermomechanical properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent and modified rule of mixture is used to determine the equivalent material properties of the FG-CNTRC cylindrical shell. The quasi-steady Krumhaar's modified piston theory by taking into account the effect of panel curvature, is used to determine the aerodynamic pressure. The nonlinear dynamic equations are discretized in the circumferential and longitudinal directions using the trigonometric expression and the harmonic differential quadrature method, respectively. Effects of various influential factors, including CNT volume fraction and distribution, boundary conditions, geometrical parameters, thermal environments, freestream static pressure and Mach number on the aerothermoelastic instabilities of the FG-CNTRC cylindrical shell are studied in details. It is found that temperature rise has a significant effect on the aerothermoelastic flutter characteristics of the FG-CNTRC cylindrical shell. It is revealed that cylindrical shells with intermediate CNT volume fraction have intermediate critical dynamic pressure, while do not have, necessarily, intermediate critical buckling temperature. It is concluded that the critical circumferential mode number (mCr) corresponding to the

  11. Punishment and psychopathy: a case-control functional MRI investigation of reinforcement learning in violent antisocial personality disordered men.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Sarah; Blair, R James; Ffytche, Dominic; Simmons, Andrew; Kumari, Veena; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Blackwood, Nigel

    2015-02-01

    Men with antisocial personality disorder show lifelong abnormalities in adaptive decision making guided by the weighing up of reward and punishment information. Among men with antisocial personality disorder, modification of the behaviour of those with additional diagnoses of psychopathy seems particularly resistant to punishment. We did a case-control functional MRI (fMRI) study in 50 men, of whom 12 were violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy, 20 were violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder but not psychopathy, and 18 were healthy non-offenders. We used fMRI to measure brain activation associated with the representation of punishment or reward information during an event-related probabilistic response-reversal task, assessed with standard general linear-model-based analysis. Offenders with antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy displayed discrete regions of increased activation in the posterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula in response to punished errors during the task reversal phase, and decreased activation to all correct rewarded responses in the superior temporal cortex. This finding was in contrast to results for offenders without psychopathy and healthy non-offenders. Punishment prediction error signalling in offenders with antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy was highly atypical. This finding challenges the widely held view that such men are simply characterised by diminished neural sensitivity to punishment. Instead, this finding indicates altered organisation of the information-processing system responsible for reinforcement learning and appropriate decision making. This difference between violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder with and without psychopathy has implications for the causes of these disorders and for treatment approaches. National Forensic Mental Health Research and Development Programme, UK Ministry of Justice, Psychiatry Research Trust, NIHR

  12. The substitutability of reinforcers

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Freed, Debra E.

    1993-01-01

    Substitutability is a construct borrowed from microeconomics that describes a continuum of possible interactions among the reinforcers in a given situation. Highly substitutable reinforcers, which occupy one end of the continuum, are readily traded for each other due to their functional similarity. Complementary reinforcers, at the other end of the continuum, tend to be consumed jointly in fairly rigid proportion, and therefore cannot be traded for one another except to achieve that proportion. At the center of the continuum are reinforcers that are independent with respect to each other; consumption of one has no influence on consumption of another. Psychological research and analyses in terms of substitutability employ standard operant conditioning paradigms in which humans and nonhumans choose between alternative reinforcers. The range of reinforcer interactions found in these studies is more readily accommodated and predicted when behavior-analytic models of choice consider issues of substitutability. New insights are gained into such areas as eating and drinking, electrical brain stimulation, temporal separation of choice alternatives, behavior therapy, drug use, and addictions. Moreover, the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974) gains greater explanatory power and comprehensiveness when measures of substitutability are included. PMID:16812696

  13. Optimal design for nonlinear estimation of the hemodynamic response function.

    PubMed

    Maus, Bärbel; van Breukelen, Gerard J P; Goebel, Rainer; Berger, Martijn P F

    2012-06-01

    Subject-specific hemodynamic response functions (HRFs) have been recommended to capture variation in the form of the hemodynamic response between subjects (Aguirre et al., [ 1998]: Neuroimage 8:360-369). The purpose of this article is to find optimal designs for estimation of subject-specific parameters for the double gamma HRF. As the double gamma function is a nonlinear function of its parameters, optimal design theory for nonlinear models is employed in this article. The double gamma function is linearized by a Taylor approximation and the maximin criterion is used to handle dependency of the D-optimal design on the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. A realistic range of double gamma HRF parameters is used for the expansion point of the Taylor approximation. Furthermore, a genetic algorithm (GA) (Kao et al., [ 2009]: Neuroimage 44:849-856) is applied to find locally optimal designs for the different expansion points and the maximin design chosen from the locally optimal designs is compared to maximin designs obtained by m-sequences, blocked designs, designs with constant interstimulus interval (ISI) and random event-related designs. The maximin design obtained by the GA is most efficient. Random event-related designs chosen from several generated designs and m-sequences have a high efficiency, while blocked designs and designs with a constant ISI have a low efficiency compared to the maximin GA design.

  14. Tank SY-101 void fraction instrument functional design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    McWethy, L.M.

    1994-10-18

    This document presents the functional design criteria for design, analysis, fabrication, testing, and installation of a void fraction instrument for Tank SY-101. This instrument will measure the void fraction in the waste in Tank SY-101 at various elevations.

  15. Reinforcement pathology and obesity.

    PubMed

    Carr, Katelyn A; Daniel, Tinuke Oluyomi; Lin, Henry; Epstein, Leonard H

    2011-09-01

    Obesity is, in part, a result of positive energy balance or energy intake exceeding physiological needs. Excess energy intake is determined by a series of food choices over time. These choices involve both motivational and executive function processes. Problems arise when there is excessive motivation to eat and low impulse control, a situation we have termed reinforcement pathology. Motivational and executive function processes have also been implicated in the development of drug dependence and addiction. In this review we discuss the application of reinforcement pathology to obesity, and implications of this approach for obesity treatment.

  16. Diagnosis And Prescription: Reinforcement Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fair, George W.

    This learning module has been designed to aid the teacher trainee in identifying ways in which he influences student behavior in the classroom and also explores means of selecting more meaningful reinforcers and their application. Terminal objectives of the module are the ability to (1) define the terms "reinforcement,""positive…

  17. Design Criteria for Deflection Capacity of conventionally Reinforced Concrete Slabs. Phase I. State-of-the-Art Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Arching Action in Restrained Reinforced Concrete Slabs (from Ref. 13) -5- is split into two parts. Part of the load is assumed carried by strips in the X...of the tensile strength of the concrete. Nor could catenary action due to tensile membrane stresses account for the observed behavior. It was...concluded that the large increase in slab capacity was due to the development of in-plane com- pressive forces, termed " arching " or "dome action". For

  18. Computer-aided design of functional protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Daniel J; Kortemme, Tanja

    2009-11-01

    Predictive methods for the computational design of proteins search for amino acid sequences adopting desired structures that perform specific functions. Typically, design of 'function' is formulated as engineering new and altered binding activities into proteins. Progress in the design of functional protein-protein interactions is directed toward engineering proteins to precisely control biological processes by specifically recognizing desired interaction partners while avoiding competitors. The field is aiming for strategies to harness recent advances in high-resolution computational modeling-particularly those exploiting protein conformational variability-to engineer new functions and incorporate many functional requirements simultaneously.

  19. Modern Physics Buildings, Design and Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, R. Ronald; Rice, William Maxwell

    In order to serve college administrators, architects and physics educators, a collection was made of material reflecting the state-of-the-art of physics building design. This body of material, including drawings, diagrams, and photographs, resulted largely from extensive interviews with about 50 institutions who had recently built such facilities.…

  20. [The systems process of reinforcement].

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1996-01-01

    The process of reinforcement is considered in the context of the general theory of functional systems as an important part of behavioural act organization closely interacting with the dominant motivation. It is shown that reinforcement substantially changes the activities of separate neurons in different brain structures involved in dominant motivation. After a preliminary reinforcement under the influence of corresponding motivation the ribosomal apparatus of neurons begins to synthesize special molecular engrams of the action acceptor. The sensory mechanisms of reinforcement and, especially, the role of emotions are considered in details in the paper.

  1. Computational approaches for rational design of proteins with novel functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ranjitha; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes. PMID:24688643

  2. The nature of sexual reinforcement.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, L L; Holloway, K S; Domjan, M

    1993-01-01

    Sexual reinforcers are not part of a regulatory system involved in the maintenance of critical metabolic processes, they differ for males and females, they differ as a function of species and mating system, and they show ontogenetic and seasonal changes related to endocrine conditions. Exposure to a member of the opposite sex without copulation can be sufficient for sexual reinforcement. However, copulatory access is a stronger reinforcer, and copulatory opportunity can serve to enhance the reinforcing efficacy of stimulus features of a sexual partner. Conversely, under certain conditions, noncopulatory exposure serves to decrease reinforcer efficacy. Many common learning phenomena such as acquisition, extinction, discrimination learning, second-order conditioning, and latent inhibition have been demonstrated in sexual conditioning. These observations extend the generality of findings obtained with more conventional reinforcers, but the mechanisms of these effects and their gender and species specificity remain to be explored. PMID:8354970

  3. Reinforced Stimulus Preexposure Effects as a Function of US Intensity: Implications for Understanding the Hall-Pearce Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Gabriel; Alonso, Gumersinda

    2011-01-01

    Three conditioned suppression experiments examined the Hall-Pearce (1979) negative transfer effect in rats. Experiment 1 replicated the effect: CS-US[subscript weak] pairings retarded subsequent fear conditioning to the CS as a result of CS-US[subscript strong] pairings. The size of this retardation was less than that produced by non-reinforced CS…

  4. Reinforced Stimulus Preexposure Effects as a Function of US Intensity: Implications for Understanding the Hall-Pearce Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Gabriel; Alonso, Gumersinda

    2011-01-01

    Three conditioned suppression experiments examined the Hall-Pearce (1979) negative transfer effect in rats. Experiment 1 replicated the effect: CS-US[subscript weak] pairings retarded subsequent fear conditioning to the CS as a result of CS-US[subscript strong] pairings. The size of this retardation was less than that produced by non-reinforced CS…

  5. REINFORCER MAGNITUDE ATTENUATES

    PubMed Central

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Lamb, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    When given to pigeons, the direct-acting dopamine agonist apomorphine elicits pecking. The response has been likened to foraging pecking because it bears remarkable similarity to foraging behavior, and it is enhanced by food deprivation. On the other hand, other data suggest the response is not related to foraging behavior and may even interfere with food ingestion. Although elicited pecking interferes with food capture, it may selectively alter procurement phases of feeding, which can be isolated in operant preparations. To explore the relation between operant and elicited pecking, we provided pigeons the opportunity to earn different reinforcer magnitudes during experimental sessions. During signaled components, each of 4 pigeons could earn 2-, 4-, or 8-s access to grain for a single peck made at the end of a 5-min interval. In general, responding increased as a function of reinforcer magnitude. Apomorphine increased pecking for 2 pigeons and decreased pecking for the other 2. In both cases, apomorphine was more potent under the component providing the smallest reinforcer magnitude. Analysis of the pattern of pecking across the interval indicated that behavior lost its temporal organization as dose increased. Because apomorphine-induced pecking varied inversely with reinforcer magnitude, we conclude that elicited pecks are not functionally related to food procurement. The data are consistent with the literature on behavioral resistance to change and suggest that the effects of apomorphine may be modulated by prevailing stimulus–reinforcer relationships. PMID:23144505

  6. Functional interaction of medial MD thalamus but not nucleus accumbens with amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex is essential for adaptive response selection after reinforcer devaluation

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Murray, Elisabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates, reward-based decision making may be assessed through choices of objects overlying two different foods, one of which has been devalued by selective satiation. The most adaptive object choices yield the food of higher value. A large body of data identifies the amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex (PFo) as neural mediators of adaptive responses to reinforcer devaluation. More recent work in nonhuman primates reveals the critical role of the medial, magnocellular portion of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MDm) as well. Because both the nucleus accumbens (NA) and the MDm are anatomically related to the amygdala and PFo, and because both regions are implicated in reward processing, we tested whether either region necessarily interacts with the amygdala and PFo to mediate reinforcer devaluation effects. We used a crossed-disconnection design in which monkeys received amygdala and PFo lesions in one hemisphere combined with either NA or MDm lesions in the contralateral hemisphere. Monkeys that sustained NA disconnection, like controls, showed robust shifts in objects choices in response to reinforcer devaluation. By contrast, monkeys that sustained MDm disconnection failed to adjust their object choices. Thus, MDm, but not NA, works together with the amygdala and PFo to support reward-based decision making. PMID:20071531

  7. Functional interaction of medial mediodorsal thalamic nucleus but not nucleus accumbens with amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex is essential for adaptive response selection after reinforcer devaluation.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2010-01-13

    In nonhuman primates, reward-based decision making may be assessed through choices of objects overlying two different foods, one of which has been devalued by selective satiation. The most adaptive object choices yield the food of higher value. A large body of data identifies the amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex (PFo) as neural mediators of adaptive responses to reinforcer devaluation. More recent work in nonhuman primates reveals the critical role of the medial, magnocellular portion of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus (MDm) as well. Because both the nucleus accumbens (NA) and the MDm are anatomically related to the amygdala and PFo, and because both regions are implicated in reward processing, we tested whether either region necessarily interacts with the amygdala and PFo to mediate reinforcer devaluation effects. We used a crossed-disconnection design in which monkeys received amygdala and PFo lesions in one hemisphere combined with either NA or MDm lesions in the contralateral hemisphere. Monkeys that sustained NA disconnection, like controls, showed robust shifts in object choices in response to reinforcer devaluation. In contrast, monkeys that sustained MDm disconnection failed to adjust their object choices. Thus, MDm, but not NA, works together with the amygdala and PFo to support reward-based decision making.

  8. Does supplementary reinforcement of stereotypy facilitate extinction?

    PubMed

    Dozier, Claudia L; Iwata, Brian A; Wilson, David M; Thomason-Sassi, Jessica L; Roscoe, Eileen M

    2013-01-01

    Results of several studies suggest that delivery of supplemental (social) reinforcement for stereotypy might facilitate its subsequent extinction. We examined this possibility with 9 subjects who engaged in stereotypy by including methodological refinements to ensure that (a) subjects' stereotypy was maintained in the absence of social consequences, (b) supplementary reinforcers were highly preferred and were shown to be reinforcers for some behavior, and (c) subjects were exposed to lengthy reinforcement and extinction conditions. In spite of these modifications, only 4 subjects' stereotypy increased when supplementary reinforcement was delivered contingent on stereotypy, and no subject's stereotypy decreased below initial baseline levels when social reinforcement was subsequently withheld. Decreases in stereotypy occurred with the implementation of noncontingent reinforcement. Thus, delivery of supplementary reinforcers either did not increase stereotypy or did not facilitate extinction of stereotypy maintained by automatic reinforcement. We discuss the practical and conceptual bases of these results with respect to our current understanding of function-based interventions.

  9. Online learning of shaping rewards in reinforcement learning.

    PubMed

    Grześ, Marek; Kudenko, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    Potential-based reward shaping has been shown to be a powerful method to improve the convergence rate of reinforcement learning agents. It is a flexible technique to incorporate background knowledge into temporal-difference learning in a principled way. However, the question remains of how to compute the potential function which is used to shape the reward that is given to the learning agent. In this paper, we show how, in the absence of knowledge to define the potential function manually, this function can be learned online in parallel with the actual reinforcement learning process. Two cases are considered. The first solution which is based on the multi-grid discretisation is designed for model-free reinforcement learning. In the second case, the approach for the prototypical model-based R-max algorithm is proposed. It learns the potential function using the free space assumption about the transitions in the environment. Two novel algorithms are presented and evaluated.

  10. Functional design specification for the problem data system. [space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boatman, T. W.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the Functional Design Specification is to outline the design for the Problem Data System. The Problem Data System is a computer-based data management system designed to track the status of problems and corrective actions pertinent to space shuttle hardware.

  11. UML Profiles for Design Decisions and Non-Functional Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian

    2007-06-30

    A software architecture is composed of a collection of design decisions. Each design decision helps or hinders certain Non-Functional Requirements (NFR). Current software architecture views focus on expressing components and connectors in the system. Design decisions and their relationships with non-functional requirements are often captured in separate design documentation, not explicitly expressed in any views. This disassociation makes architecture comprehension and architecture evolution harder. In this paper, we propose a UML profile for modeling design decisions and an associated UML profile for modeling non-functional requirements in a generic way. The two UML profiles treat design decisions and nonfunctional requirements as first-class elements. Modeled design decisions always refer to existing architectural elements and thus maintain traceability between the two. We provide a mechanism for checking consistency over this traceability. An exemplar is given as

  12. Depression and anxiety symptoms moderate the relation between negative reinforcement smoking outcome expectancies and nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Pang, Raina D; Khoddam, Rubin; Guillot, Casey R; Leventhal, Adam M

    2014-09-01

    Smoking reinforcement expectancies-expectations that smoking modulates mood-can be powerful motivators to smoke, resulting in increased nicotine dependence. The impact of smoking reinforcement expectancies on nicotine dependence may be particularly strong in individuals with increased mood or anxiety symptoms because they may be more likely to act on expectancies with smoking behavior in order to offset their affective symptoms. This study examined levels of emotional symptom dimensions as moderators of the relation between positive and negative smoking reinforcement expectancies and nicotine dependence severity in a community sample. In a cross-sectional design, 317 daily cigarette smokers (215 men) completed self-report measures of smoking reinforcement expectancies, mood and anxiety symptoms, and nicotine dependence. Increasing levels of negative affect and anxiety symptoms strengthened associations between negative reinforcement smoking expectancies and nicotine dependence severity (moderation effects; (βs > .13; ps < .03) but did not moderate relations between positive reinforcement expectancies and dependence. Anhedonia did not moderate relations involving either positive or negative reinforcement smoking expectancies. Distinct components of anxiety and depressive symptoms interact differently with smoking reinforcement expectancies. Emotional symptoms characterized by excesses in aversive (but not deficits in appetitive) functioning may amplify tendencies to compulsively act on negative reinforcement expectancies by smoking. Cessation treatments that target negative reinforcement expectancies may be particularly salient for emotionally distressed smokers.

  13. De novo design of functional proteins: Toward artificial hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Faiella, Marina; Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2013-11-01

    Over the last 25 years, de novo design has proven to be a valid approach to generate novel, well-folded proteins, and most recently, functional proteins. In response to societal needs, this approach is been used increasingly to design functional proteins developed with an eye toward sustainable fuel production. This review surveys recent examples of bioinspired de novo designed peptide based catalysts, focusing in particular on artificial hydrogenases.

  14. Functional design specification: NASA form 1510

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The 1510 worksheet used to calculate approved facility project cost estimates is explained. Topics covered include data base considerations, program structure, relationship of the 1510 form to the 1509 form, and functions which the application must perform: WHATIF, TENENTER, TENTYPE, and data base utilities. A sample NASA form 1510 printout and a 1510 data dictionary are presented in the appendices along with the cost adjustment table, the floppy disk index, and methods for generating the calculated values (TENCALC) and for calculating cost adjustment (CONSTADJ). Storage requirements are given.

  15. Analysis, design and development of a carbon fibre reinforced plastic knee-ankle-foot orthosis prototype for myopathic patients.

    PubMed

    Granata, C; De Lollis, A; Campo, G; Piancastelli, L; Merlini, L

    1990-01-01

    A traditional knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO) for myopathic patients has been studied for the assessment of loads and fatigue resistance. Starting from this basis a thermoplastic matrix carbon fibre reinforced plastic composite (CFRP) KAFO has been developed in order to reduce the weight. A finite-element simulation programme for deformation analysis was used to compare the behaviour of conventional and CFRP orthosis. There were no breakages either of the prototype or of its parts. The CFRP orthosis allows a weight reduction of more than 40 per cent.

  16. Ethical considerations for a better collaboration between architects and structural engineers: design of buildings with reinforced concrete frame systems in earthquake zones.

    PubMed

    Hurol, Yonca

    2014-06-01

    Architects design building structures, although structural design is the profession of structural engineers. Thus, it is better for architects and structural engineers to collaborate starting from the initial phases of the architectural design. However, this is not very common because of the contradictory design processes and value systems held within the two professions. This article provides a platform upon which architects and structural engineers can resolve the value conflicts between them by analysing phases of the structural design of reinforced concrete frame systems in architecture, the criteria of the structural design for each phase and determining the conflicting values for each criterion. The results shown in the article demonstrate that the architectural design of structures is a complex process, which is based on contradictory values and value systems. Finally, the article suggests to architects and structural engineers to use Value Sensitive Design and to choose an appropriate team leader in order to resolve the unethical conflict between them and to avoid any unreasonable decision making.

  17. Robustness, canalyzing functions and systems design.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Johannes; Ay, Nihat

    2014-06-01

    We study a notion of knockout robustness of a stochastic map (Markov kernel) that describes a system of several input random variables and one output random variable. Robustness requires that the behaviour of the system does not change if one or several of the input variables are knocked out. Gibbs potentials are used to give a mechanistic description of the behaviour of the system after knockouts. Robustness imposes structural constraints on these potentials. We show that robust systems can be described in terms of suitable interaction families of Gibbs potentials, which allows us to address the problem of systems design. Robustness is also characterized by conditional independence constraints on the joint distribution of input and output. The set of all probability distributions corresponding to robust systems can be decomposed into a finite union of components, and we find parametrizations of the components.

  18. Skeletal muscle design to meet functional demands.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2011-05-27

    Skeletal muscles are length- and velocity-sensitive force producers, constructed of a vast array of sarcomeres. Muscles come in a variety of sizes and shapes to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. How does muscle design match task performance? In this review, we outline muscle's basic properties and strategies that are used to produce movement. Several examples are provided, primarily for human muscles, in which skeletal muscle architecture and moment arms are tailored to a particular performance requirement. In addition, the concept that muscles may have a preferred sarcomere length operating range is also introduced. Taken together, the case is made that muscles can be fine-tuned to perform specific tasks that require actuators with a wide range of properties.

  19. Skeletal muscle design to meet functional demands

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Richard L.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscles are length- and velocity-sensitive force producers, constructed of a vast array of sarcomeres. Muscles come in a variety of sizes and shapes to accomplish a wide variety of tasks. How does muscle design match task performance? In this review, we outline muscle's basic properties and strategies that are used to produce movement. Several examples are provided, primarily for human muscles, in which skeletal muscle architecture and moment arms are tailored to a particular performance requirement. In addition, the concept that muscles may have a preferred sarcomere length operating range is also introduced. Taken together, the case is made that muscles can be fine-tuned to perform specific tasks that require actuators with a wide range of properties. PMID:21502118

  20. Sensory extinction and sensory reinforcement principles for programming multiple adaptive behavior change.

    PubMed

    Rincover, A; Cook, R; Peoples, A; Packard, D

    1979-01-01

    The role of sensory reinforcement was examined in programming multiple treatment gains in self-stimulation and spontaneous play for developmentally disabled children. Two phases were planned. First, we attempted to identify reinforcers maintaining self-stimulation. Sensory Extinction procedures were implemented in which auditory, proprioceptive, or visual sensory consequences of self-stimulatory behavior were systematically removed and reintroduced in a reversal design. When self-stimulation was decreased or eliminated as a result of removing one of these sensory consequences, the functional sensory consequence was designated as a child's preferred sensory reinforcer. In Phase 2, we assessed whether children would play selectively with toys producing the preferred kind of sensory stimulation. The results showed the following. (1) Self-stimulatory behavior was found to be maintained by sensory reinforcement. When the sensory reinforcer was removed, self-stimulation extinguished. (2) The sensory reinforcers identified for self-stimulatory behavior also served as reinforcers for new, appropriate toy play. (3) The multiple treatment gains observed appeared to be relatively durable in the absence of external reinforcers for play or restraints on self-stimulation. These results illustrate one instance in which multiple behavior change may be programmed in a predictable, lawful fashion by using "natural communities of sensory reinforcement."

  1. A Role-Functional Model of Design Problem Solving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    material that was in the design, (3) removing some material from the design, ( 4 ) including new information in the design space, and (5) commenting on...ITechnical Feb 1, 1988 - July 31, 1991 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 6NIV8 MRERSos A Role-Functional Model of Design Problem Solving- PE 6115N PR RR04206...94305-3096 GK- 4 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESSES) 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING Cognitive Science Program AGENCY REPORT NUMBIR

  2. Role of the dorsal medial habenula in the regulation of voluntary activity, motor function, hedonic state, and primary reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Wang, Si D; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A; de la Iglesia, Horacio O; Turner, Eric E

    2014-08-20

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit.

  3. Role of the Dorsal Medial Habenula in the Regulation of Voluntary Activity, Motor Function, Hedonic State, and Primary Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A.; Wang, Si D.; Wang, Shirong; Morton, Glenn; Zariwala, Hatim A.; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.

    2014-01-01

    The habenular complex in the epithalamus consists of distinct regions with diverse neuronal populations. Past studies have suggested a role for the habenula in voluntary exercise motivation and reinforcement of intracranial self-stimulation but have not assigned these effects to specific habenula subnuclei. Here, we have developed a genetic model in which neurons of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb) are developmentally eliminated, via tissue-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a). Mice with dMHb lesions perform poorly in motivation-based locomotor behaviors, such as voluntary wheel running and the accelerating rotarod, but show only minor abnormalities in gait and balance and exhibit normal levels of basal locomotion. These mice also show deficits in sucrose preference, but not in the forced swim test, two measures of depression-related phenotypes in rodents. We have also used Cre recombinase-mediated expression of channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin to activate dMHb neurons or silence their output in freely moving mice, respectively. Optical activation of the dMHb in vivo supports intracranial self-stimulation, showing that dMHb activity is intrinsically reinforcing, whereas optical silencing of dMHb outputs is aversive. Together, our findings demonstrate that the dMHb is involved in exercise motivation and the regulation of hedonic state, and is part of an intrinsic reinforcement circuit. PMID:25143617

  4. Parametric Cost Analysis: A Design Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Edwin B.

    1989-01-01

    Parametric cost analysis uses equations to map measurable system attributes into cost. The measures of the system attributes are called metrics. The equations are called cost estimating relationships (CER's), and are obtained by the analysis of cost and technical metric data of products analogous to those to be estimated. Examples of system metrics include mass, power, failure_rate, mean_time_to_repair, energy _consumed, payload_to_orbit, pointing_accuracy, manufacturing_complexity, number_of_fasteners, and percent_of_electronics_weight. The basic assumption is that a measurable relationship exists between system attributes and the cost of the system. If a function exists, the attributes are cost drivers. Candidates for metrics include system requirement metrics and engineering process metrics. Requirements are constraints on the engineering process. From optimization theory we know that any active constraint generates cost by not permitting full optimization of the objective. Thus, requirements are cost drivers. Engineering processes reflect a projection of the requirements onto the corporate culture, engineering technology, and system technology. Engineering processes are an indirect measure of the requirements and, hence, are cost drivers.

  5. Sorbitol dehydrogenase: structure, function and ligand design.

    PubMed

    El-Kabbani, O; Darmanin, C; Chung, R P-T

    2004-02-01

    Sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase protein family and the second enzyme of the polyol pathway of glucose metabolism, converts sorbitol to fructose strictly using NAD(+) as coenzyme. SDH is expressed almost ubiquitously in all mammalian tissues. The enzyme has attracted considerable interest due to its implication in the development of diabetic complications and thus its tertiary structure may facilitate the development of drugs for the treatment of diabetes sufferers. Modelling studies suggest that SDH is structurally homologous to mammalian alcohol dehydrogenase with respect to conserved zinc binding motif and a hydrophobic substrate-binding pocket. Recently, the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a mammalian SDH was solved, and it was found that while the overall 3-D structures of SDH and alcohol dehydrogenase are similar, the zinc coordination in the active sites of the two enzymes is different. The available structural and biochemical information of SDH are currently being utilized in a structure-based approach to develop drugs for the treatment or prevention of the complications of diabetes. This review provides an overview of the recent advances in the structure, function and drug development fields of sorbitol dehydrogenase.

  6. Rational and Mechanistic Perspectives on Reinforcement Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chater, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This special issue describes important recent developments in applying reinforcement learning models to capture neural and cognitive function. But reinforcement learning, as a theoretical framework, can apply at two very different levels of description: "mechanistic" and "rational." Reinforcement learning is often viewed in mechanistic terms--as…

  7. Optimization of reinforced soil embankments by genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponterosso, P.; Fox, D. St. J.

    2000-04-01

    A Genetic Algorithm (GA) is described, which produces solutions to the cost optimization problem of reinforcement layout for reinforced soil slopes. These solutions incorporate different types of reinforcement within a single slope. The GA described is implemented with the aim of optimizing the cost of materials for the preliminary layout of reinforced soil embankments. The slope design method chosen is the U.K. Department of Transport HA 68/94 Design Methods for the Reinforcement of Highway Slopes by Reinforced Soil and Soil Nailing Techniques. The results confirm that there is a role for the GA in optimization of reinforced soil design.

  8. Controller design for TS models using delayed nonquadratic Lyapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Lendek, Zsofia; Guerra, Thierry-Marie; Lauber, Jimmy

    2015-03-01

    In the last few years, nonquadratic Lyapunov functions have been more and more frequently used in the analysis and controller design for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy models. In this paper, we developed relaxed conditions for controller design using nonquadratic Lyapunov functions and delayed controllers and give a general framework for the use of such Lyapunov functions. The two controller design methods developed in this framework outperform and generalize current state-of-the-art methods. The proposed methods are extended to robust and H∞ control and α -sample variation.

  9. On singular cases in the design derivative of Green's functional

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The author's prior development of a general abstract representation for the design sensitivities of Green's functional for linear structural systems is extended to the case where the structural stiffness vanishes at an internal location. This situation often occurs in the optimal design of structures. Most optimality criteria require that optimally designed beams be statically determinate. For clamped-pinned beams, for example, this is possible only if the flexural stiffness vanishes at some intermediate location. The Green's function for such structures depends upon the stiffness and the location where it vanishes. A precise representation for Green's function's sensitivity to the location of vanishing stiffness is presented for beams and axisymmetric plates.

  10. Experimental design for functional MRI of scene memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Veena M; Kimberg, Daniel Y; Tang, Kathy Z; Detre, John A

    2005-03-01

    The use of functional imaging to identify encoding-related areas in the medial temporal lobe has previously been explored for presurgical evaluation in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Optimizing sensitivity in such paradigms is critical for the reliable detection of regions most closely engaged in memory encoding. A variety of experimental designs have been used to detect encoding-related activity, including blocked, sparse event-related, and rapid event-related designs. Although blocked designs are generally more sensitive than event-related designs, design and analysis advantages could potentially overcome this difference. In the present study, we directly contrast different experimental designs in terms of the intensity, extent, and lateralization of activation detected in healthy subjects. Our results suggest that although improved design augments the sensitivity of event-related designs, these benefits are not sufficient to overcome the sensitivity advantages of traditional blocked designs.

  11. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navak, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a program designed to optimize the fabrication procedures for graphite thermoplastic composites are described. The properties of the composites as a function of temperature were measured and graphite thermoplastic fan exit guide vanes were fabricated and tested. Three thermoplastics were included in the investigation: polysulfone, polyethersulfone, and polyarylsulfone. Type HMS graphite was used as the reinforcement. Bending fatigue tests of HMS graphite/polyethersulfone demonstrated a gradual shear failure mode which resulted in a loss of stiffness in the specimens. Preliminary curves were generated to show the loss in stiffness as a function of stress and number of cycles. Fan exit guide vanes of HMS graphite polyethersulfone were satisfactorily fabricated in the final phase of the program. These were found to have stiffness and better fatigue behavior than graphite epoxy vanes which were formerly bill of material.

  12. Design and fabrication of carbon fibers with needle-like nano-HA coating to reinforce granular nano-HA composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xudong; Zhao, Xueni; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wanying; Zhang, Jing; He, Fuzhen; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    Carbon fibers (CFs) with needle-like nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) coating were first used as reinforcing materials named nHA-CFs to improve the mechanical properties of pure HA. A powder mixture containing nHA-CFs and granular nano-HA (gHA) was directly sintered by hot pressing at appropriate sintering pressure and temperature. A three-phase nHA-CFs/gHA composite was designed, fabricated, and used as an artificial bone. Results show that the bending strengths of the nHA-CFs/gHA composite are approximately 41.1% and 59.2% higher than those of CFs/gHA composite and pure HA, respectively. The possible reinforcing mechanism of nHA-CFs in the composite is also proposed at the end. When nHA-CFs are applied for preparation of nHA-CFs/gHA composites, the internal stress on its phase boundary with gHA matrix generated during cooling of sintered is significantly reduced due to the presence of the nHA coatings. It infers that nHA coatings on CFs might act as a bridge to control the forming of interfacial gaps between the gHA matrix and the CFs effectively. Our work provides additional insights into the feasibility of nHA-CFs/gHA composites as load-bearing implant materials in clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials: Design of Optimum Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a study of optimal experiment design applied to the measure of thermal properties in functionally graded materials. As a first step, a material with linearly-varying thermal properties is analyzed, and several different tran- sient experimental designs are discussed. An optimality criterion, based on sen- sitivity coefficients, is used to identify the best experimental design. Simulated experimental results are analyzed to verify that the identified best experiment design has the smallest errors in the estimated parameters. This procedure is general and can be applied to design of experiments for a variety of materials.

  14. BEHAVIORAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING NICOTINE REINFORCEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Rupprecht, Laura E.; Smith, Tracy T.; Schassburger, Rachel L.; Buffalari, Deanne M.; Sved, Alan F.; Donny, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths worldwide and nicotine, the primary psychoactive constituent in tobacco, drives sustained use. The behavioral actions of nicotine are complex and extend well beyond the actions of the drug as a primary reinforcer. Stimuli that are consistently paired with nicotine can, through associative learning, take on reinforcing properties as conditioned stimuli. These conditioned stimuli can then impact the rate and probability of behavior and even function as conditioning reinforcers that maintain behavior in the absence of nicotine. Nicotine can also act as a conditioned stimulus, predicting the delivery of other reinforcers, which may allow nicotine to acquire value as a conditioned reinforcer. These associative effects, establishing non-nicotine stimuli as conditioned stimuli with discriminative stimulus and conditioned reinforcing properties as well as establishing nicotine as a conditioned stimulus, are predicted by basic conditioning principles. However, nicotine can also act non-associatively. Nicotine directly enhances the reinforcing efficacy of other reinforcing stimuli in the environment, an effect that does not require a temporal or predictive relationship between nicotine and either the stimulus or the behavior. Hence, the reinforcing actions of nicotine stem both from the primary reinforcing actions of the drug (and the subsequent associative learning effects) as well as the reinforcement enhancement action of nicotine which is non-associative in nature. Gaining a better understanding of how nicotine impacts behavior will allow for maximally effective tobacco control efforts aimed at reducing the harm associated with tobacco use by reducing and/or treating its addictiveness. PMID:25638333

  15. Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0101 TITLE: Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0101 5c. PROGRAM...mobile refrigeration. These technological advances are critically dependent on the development of new and currently non-existing materials . This

  16. Negative effects of positive reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive-those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say the distinction is untenable). When the distinction is made purely in operational terms, experiments reveal that positive reinforcement has aversive functions. On a practical level, positive reinforcement can lead to deleterious effects, and it is implicated in a range of personal and societal problems. These issues challenge us to identify other criteria for judging behavioral procedures.

  17. Negative effects of positive reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Perone, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Procedures classified as positive reinforcement are generally regarded as more desirable than those classified as aversive—those that involve negative reinforcement or punishment. This is a crude test of the desirability of a procedure to change or maintain behavior. The problems can be identified on the basis of theory, experimental analysis, and consideration of practical cases. Theoretically, the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement has proven difficult (some would say the distinction is untenable). When the distinction is made purely in operational terms, experiments reveal that positive reinforcement has aversive functions. On a practical level, positive reinforcement can lead to deleterious effects, and it is implicated in a range of personal and societal problems. These issues challenge us to identify other criteria for judging behavioral procedures. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:22478391

  18. Computational design of proteins with novel structure and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yang; Lu-Hua, Lai

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of proteins is a relatively new field, where scientists search the enormous sequence space for sequences that can fold into desired structure and perform desired functions. With the computational approach, proteins can be designed, for example, as regulators of biological processes, novel enzymes, or as biotherapeutics. These approaches not only provide valuable information for understanding of sequence-structure-function relations in proteins, but also hold promise for applications to protein engineering and biomedical research. In this review, we briefly introduce the rationale for computational protein design, then summarize the recent progress in this field, including de novo protein design, enzyme design, and design of protein-protein interactions. Challenges and future prospects of this field are also discussed. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB910300), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012AA020308), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11021463).

  19. Canberra Alpha Sentry Installation Functional Design Criteria (FDC)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITE, W.F.

    1999-12-16

    This document provides the functional design criteria for the installation of the Canberra Alpha Sentry System at selected locations within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The equipment being installed is identified by part number in Section 3 and the locations are given in Section 5. The design, procurement and installation are assigned to Fluor Federal Services.

  20. Serial discrimination reversal learning in pigeons as a function of signal properties during the delay of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Ploog, Bertram O; Williams, Ben A

    2013-09-01

    Pigeons learned a series of reversals of a simultaneous red-green discrimination with a 6-s delay of reinforcement. The signal properties during the 6-s reinforcement delay were varied across blocks of reversals, such that the delay was either unsignaled (intertrial interval conditions during the delay) or signaled by illumination of the center key. Four different signal conditions were presented: (1) signals only after S+ responses, (2) signals only after S- responses, (3) differential signals after S+ versus S- responding, and (4) the same nondifferential signals after S+ and S- responses. (A zero-delay control condition was also included.) Learning was at a high level in the S+ -only and differential-signal conditions, and learning was at a low level during the unsignaled, nondifferentially signaled, and S- signal conditions. Thus, a differential stimulus contingent on correct choices was necessary for proficient learning-to-learn, even though within-reversal learning occurred in all conditions. During the S+ and differential-signal conditions, improvement in learning continued to occur even after more than 240 reversals (more than 38,000 trials).

  1. Miniemulsion copolymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for reinforced coating applications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, Bertha T; Farías-Cepeda, Lorena; Ovando-Medina, Víctor M; Asua, José M; Rosales-Marines, Lucero; Tomovska, Radmila

    2017-01-01

    Film forming, stable hybrid latexes made of methyl metacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer reinforced with modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by in situ miniemulsion polymerization. The MWCNTs were pretreated by an air sonication process and stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone. The presence of the MWCNTs had no significant effect on the polymerization kinetics, but strongly affected the polymer characteristics (Tg and insoluble polymer fraction). The performance of the in situ composites was compared with that of the neat polymer dispersion as well as with those of the polymer/MWCNT physical blends. The in situ composites showed the presence of an additional phase likely due to the strong interaction between the polymer and MWNCTs (including grafting) that reduced the mobility of the polymer chains. As a result, a substantial increase of both the storage and the loss moduli was achieved. At 60 °C, which is above the main transition region of the polymer, the in situ composites maintained the reinforcement, whereas the blends behaved as a liquid-like material. This suggests the formation of a 3D network, in good agreement with the high content of insoluble polymer in the in situ composites.

  2. Miniemulsion copolymerization of (meth)acrylates in the presence of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes for reinforced coating applications

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, Bertha T; Ovando-Medina, Víctor M; Asua, José M; Rosales-Marines, Lucero

    2017-01-01

    Film forming, stable hybrid latexes made of methyl metacrylate (MMA), butyl acrylate (BA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) copolymer reinforced with modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized by in situ miniemulsion polymerization. The MWCNTs were pretreated by an air sonication process and stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone. The presence of the MWCNTs had no significant effect on the polymerization kinetics, but strongly affected the polymer characteristics (T g and insoluble polymer fraction). The performance of the in situ composites was compared with that of the neat polymer dispersion as well as with those of the polymer/MWCNT physical blends. The in situ composites showed the presence of an additional phase likely due to the strong interaction between the polymer and MWNCTs (including grafting) that reduced the mobility of the polymer chains. As a result, a substantial increase of both the storage and the loss moduli was achieved. At 60 °C, which is above the main transition region of the polymer, the in situ composites maintained the reinforcement, whereas the blends behaved as a liquid-like material. This suggests the formation of a 3D network, in good agreement with the high content of insoluble polymer in the in situ composites. PMID:28690968

  3. A systems process of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, K V

    1997-01-01

    Functional systems theory was used to consider the process of reinforcement of the actions on the body of reinforcing factors, i.e., the results of behavior satisfying the body's original needs. The systems process of reinforcement includes reverse afferentation entering the CNS from receptors acted upon by various parameters of the desired results, and mechanisms for comparing reverse afferentation with the apparatus which accepts the results of the action and the corresponding emotional component. A tight interaction between reinforcement and the dominant motivation is generated on the basis of the hologram principle. Reinforcement forms an apparatus for predicting a desired result, i.e. a result-of-action acceptor. Reinforcement procedures significant changes in the activities of individual neurons in the various brain structures involved in dominant motivation, transforming their spike activity for a burst pattern to regular discharges; there are also molecular changes in neuron properties. After preliminary reinforcement, the corresponding motivation induces the ribosomal system of neurons to start synthesizing special effector molecules, which organize molecular engrams of the acceptor of the action's result. Sensory mechanisms of reinforcement are considered, with particular reference to the information role of emotions.

  4. Designing future landscapes from principles of form and function

    Treesearch

    Larry D. Harris; Patrick Kangas

    1979-01-01

    Future landscapes will consist of a gradient of types ranging from wilderness areas to totally "humanized" environments. The man-dominated landscapes will be required to fulfill multiple functions only one of which is aesthetic enjoyment. It is suggested that basic principles of form and function may contribute to design criteria. Applications to the...

  5. Effects of conservative laparoscopic endometrial cystectomy and use of kidney-reinforcing and blood activating traditional Chinese medicine on ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y H; Shen, L; Cai, A H; Liang, X F

    2015-01-30

    This study investigated functional changes in the ovaries of women who have had conservative laparoscopic endometrial cystectomy and the effects of traditional kidney-reinforcing and blood-activating Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) on ovarian function. Seventy female patients who underwent laparoscopic endometrial cystectomy were randomized into two groups: TCM group receiving kidney-reinforcing and blood-activating Chinese medicine (N = 35) and control group receiving only routine follow-up (N = 35). The serum levels of all study participants were measured for follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2) and inhibin B (INHB) prior to and after endometrial surgery. Postoperative menstruation conditions were also assessed. Compared to preoperative conditions, both LH and FSH levels during the postoperative 1st month increased in both groups, while E2 and INHB levels decreased (P < 0.05). In the TCM group, in contrast to the control group and the postoperative 1st month, we observed a decrease in LH and FSH levels during the postoperative 4th month, while E2 and INHB levels increased (P < 0.05). In this study, we found that certain TCM prescriptions lowered postoperative serum FSH and LH levels and increased the serum INHB and basal E2 levels, thereby improving the ovarian reserve.

  6. Matrix Transfer Function Design for Flexible Structures: An Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, T. J.; Compito, A. V.; Doran, A. L.; Gustafson, C. L.; Wong, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The application of matrix transfer function design techniques to the problem of disturbance rejection on a flexible space structure is demonstrated. The design approach is based on parameterizing a class of stabilizing compensators for the plant and formulating the design specifications as a constrained minimization problem in terms of these parameters. The solution yields a matrix transfer function representation of the compensator. A state space realization of the compensator is constructed to investigate performance and stability on the nominal and perturbed models. The application is made to the ACOSSA (Active Control of Space Structures) optical structure.

  7. Comments on fuzzy control systems design via fuzzy Lyapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Guelton, Kevin; Guerra, Thierry-Marie; Bernal, Miguel; Bouarar, Tahar; Manamanni, Noureddine

    2010-06-01

    This paper considers the work entitled "Fuzzy control systems design via fuzzy Lyapunov functions" and published in IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics-Part B , where the authors try to extend the work of Rhee and Won. Nevertheless, the results proposed by Li have been obtained without taking into account a necessary path independency condition to ensure the line integral function to be a Lyapunov function candidate, and consequently, the proposed global asymptotic stability and stabilization conditions are unsuitable.

  8. Fuzzy control system design via fuzzy Lyapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Zhou, S; Xu, S

    2008-12-01

    This correspondence deals with the problems of analysis and design for a class of continuous-time Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy control systems. Sufficient conditions for the stability of fuzzy control systems are derived based on a fuzzy Lyapunov function. Both parallel and nonparallel distributed compensation controllers are considered. Sufficient conditions for the solvability of the controller design problem are given in the form of linear matrix inequalities. Unlike the fuzzy Lyapunov function approaches reported in the literature, the bound of the time derivatives of the fuzzy basis functions is not required in the proposed approaches. The effectiveness of the proposed approaches is shown through a numerical example.

  9. Design of treatment trials for functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, S J O V.; Talley, N; Bytzer, P; Klein, K; Whorwell, P; Zinsmeister, A

    1999-01-01

    Until recently many clinical trials of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) suffered from important weaknesses in trial design, study execution, and data analysis. This makes it difficult to determine whether truly efficacious therapies exist for these disorders. One of the important methodologic problems is the absence of validated outcome measures and lack of consensus among stakeholders on how to measure outcome. Currently much of the effort is being put into the development of validated outcome measures for several of the FGIDs. The randomized, controlled trial with parallel groups is the design of choice. In this report, guidelines are given for the basic architecture of intervention studies of FGIDs. Further studies on design issues are required to ensure the recommendations will become evidence based in the future.


Keywords: clinical trial; random allocation; functional gastrointestinal disorder(s); dyspepsia; functional dyspepsia; irritable bowel syndrome; evidence based medicine; study design; outcome measures; Rome II PMID:10457048

  10. Function combined method for design innovation of children's bike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Qiu, Tingting; Chen, Huijuan

    2013-03-01

    As children mature, bike products for children in the market develop at the same time, and the conditions are frequently updated. Certain problems occur when using a bike, such as cycle overlapping, repeating function, and short life cycle, which go against the principles of energy conservation and the environmental protection intensive design concept. In this paper, a rational multi-function method of design through functional superposition, transformation, and technical implementation is proposed. An organic combination of frog-style scooter and children's tricycle is developed using the multi-function method. From the ergonomic perspective, the paper elaborates on the body size of children aged 5 to 12 and effectively extracts data for a multi-function children's bike, which can be used for gliding and riding. By inverting the body, parts can be interchanged between the handles and the pedals of the bike. Finally, the paper provides a detailed analysis of the components and structural design, body material, and processing technology of the bike. The study of Industrial Product Innovation Design provides an effective design method to solve the bicycle problems, extends the function problems, improves the product market situation, and enhances the energy saving feature while implementing intensive product development effectively at the same time.

  11. The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, James L.

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

  12. Competition between noncontingent and contingent reinforcement schedules during response acquisition.

    PubMed

    Goh, H L; Iwata, B A; DeLeon, I G

    2000-01-01

    We examined the extent to which noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), when used as treatment to reduce problem behavior, might interfere with differential reinforcement contingencies designed to strengthen alternative behavior. After conducting a functional analysis to identify the reinforcers maintaining 2 participants' self-injurious behavior (SIB), we delivered those reinforcers under dense NCR schedules. We delivered the same reinforcers concurrently under differential-reinforcement-of-alternative-behavior (DRA) contingencies in an attempt to strengthen replacement behaviors (mands). Results showed that the NCR plus DRA intervention was associated with a decrease in SIB but little or no increase in appropriate mands. In a subsequent phase, when the NCR schedule was thinned while the DRA schedule remained unchanged, SIB remained low and mands increased. These results suggest that dense NCR schedules may alter establishing operations that result in not only suppression of problem behavior but also interference with the acquisition of appropriate behavior. Thus, the strengthening of socially appropriate behaviors as replacements for problem behavior during NCR interventions might best be achieved if the NCR schedule is first thinned.

  13. A Comparison of Functional Models for Use in the Function-Failure Design Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Michael E.; Stone, Robert B.; Tumer, Irem Y.

    2006-01-01

    When failure analysis and prevention, guided by historical design knowledge, are coupled with product design at its conception, shorter design cycles are possible. By decreasing the design time of a product in this manner, design costs are reduced and the product will better suit the customer s needs. Prior work indicates that similar failure modes occur with products (or components) with similar functionality. To capitalize on this finding, a knowledge base of historical failure information linked to functionality is assembled for use by designers. One possible use for this knowledge base is within the Elemental Function-Failure Design Method (EFDM). This design methodology and failure analysis tool begins at conceptual design and keeps the designer cognizant of failures that are likely to occur based on the product s functionality. The EFDM offers potential improvement over current failure analysis methods, such as FMEA, FMECA, and Fault Tree Analysis, because it can be implemented hand in hand with other conceptual design steps and carried throughout a product s design cycle. These other failure analysis methods can only truly be effective after a physical design has been completed. The EFDM however is only as good as the knowledge base that it draws from, and therefore it is of utmost importance to develop a knowledge base that will be suitable for use across a wide spectrum of products. One fundamental question that arises in using the EFDM is: At what level of detail should functional descriptions of components be encoded? This paper explores two approaches to populating a knowledge base with actual failure occurrence information from Bell 206 helicopters. Functional models expressed at various levels of detail are investigated to determine the necessary detail for an applicable knowledge base that can be used by designers in both new designs as well as redesigns. High level and more detailed functional descriptions are derived for each failed component based

  14. Improved Mechanical Properties of Various Fabric-Reinforced Geocomposite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Sneha; Phan Thanh, Nhan; Petríková, Iva; Marvalová, Bohadana

    2015-07-01

    This article signifies the improved performance of the various types of fabric reinforcement of geopolymer as a function of physical, thermal, mechanical, and heat-resistant properties at elevated temperatures. Geopolymer mixed with designed Si:Al ratios of 15.6 were synthesized using three different types of fabric reinforcement such as carbon, E-glass, and basalt fibers. Heat testing was conducted on 3-mm-thick panels with 15 × 90 mm surface exposure region. The strength of carbon-based geocomposite increased toward a higher temperature. The basalt-reinforced geocomposite strength decreased due to the catastrophic failure in matrix region. The poor bridging effect and dissolution of fabric was observed in the E-glass-reinforced geocomposite. At an elevated temperature, fiber bridging was observed in carbon fabric-reinforced geopolymer matrix. Among all the fabrics, carbon proved to be suitable candidate for the high-temperature applications in thermal barrier coatings and fire-resistant panels.

  15. Development and modification of a response class via positive and negative reinforcement: a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Mendres, Amber E; Borrero, John C

    2010-01-01

    When responses function to produce the same reinforcer, a response class exists. Researchers have examined response classes in applied settings; however, the challenges associated with conducting applied research on response class development have recently necessitated the development of an analogue response class model. To date, little research has examined response classes that are strengthened by negative reinforcement. The current investigation was designed to develop a laboratory model of a response class through positive reinforcement (i.e., points exchangeable for money) and through negative reinforcement (i.e., the avoidance of scheduled point losses) with 11 college students as participants and clicks as the operant. Results of both the positive and negative reinforcement evaluations showed that participants usually selected the least effortful response that produced points or the avoidance of point losses, respectively. The applied implications of the findings are discussed, along with the relevance of the present model to the study of punishment and resurgence.

  16. Excitotoxic lesions of the medial striatum delay extinction of a reinforcement color discrimination operant task in domestic chicks; a functional role of reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yoko; Izawa, Ei-Ichi; Matsushima, Toshiya

    2004-12-01

    To reveal the functional roles of the striatum, we examined the effects of excitotoxic lesions to the bilateral medial striatum (mSt) and nucleus accumbens (Ac) in a food reinforcement color discrimination operant task. With a food reward as reinforcement, 1-week-old domestic chicks were trained to peck selectively at red and yellow beads (S+) and not to peck at a blue bead (S-). Those chicks then received either lesions or sham operations and were tested in extinction training sessions, during which yellow turned out to be nonrewarding (S-), whereas red and blue remained unchanged. To further examine the effects on postoperant noninstrumental aspects of behavior, we also measured the "waiting time", during which chicks stayed at the empty feeder after pecking at yellow. Although the lesioned chicks showed significantly higher error rates in the nonrewarding yellow trials, their postoperant waiting time gradually decreased similarly to the sham controls. Furthermore, the lesioned chicks waited significantly longer than the controls, even from the first extinction block. In the blue trials, both lesioned and sham chicks consistently refrained from pecking, indicating that the delayed extinction was not due to a general disinhibition of pecking. Similarly, no effects were found in the novel training sessions, suggesting that the lesions had selective effects on the extinction of a learned operant. These results suggest that a neural representation of memory-based reward anticipation in the mSt/Ac could contribute to the anticipation error required for extinction.

  17. Highly specific role of hypocretin (orexin) neurons: differential activation as a function of diurnal phase, operant reinforcement versus operant avoidance and light level.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Ronald; Wu, Ming-Fung; Barber, Grace; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2011-10-26

    Hypocretin (Hcrt) cell loss is responsible for narcolepsy, but Hcrt's role in normal behavior is unclear. We found that Hcrt knock-out mice were unable to work for food or water reward during the light phase. However, they were unimpaired relative to wild-type (WT) mice when working for reward during the dark phase or when working to avoid shock in the light or dark phase. In WT mice, expression of Fos in Hcrt neurons occurs only in the light phase when working for positive reinforcement. Expression was seen throughout the mediolateral extent of the Hcrt field. Fos was not expressed when expected or unexpected unearned rewards were presented, when working to avoid negative reinforcement, or when given or expecting shock, even though these conditions elicit maximal electroencephalogram (EEG) arousal. Fos was not expressed in the light phase when light was removed. This may explain the lack of light-induced arousal in narcoleptics and its presence in normal individuals. This is the first demonstration of such specificity of arousal system function and has implications for understanding the motivational and circadian consequences of arousal system dysfunction. The current results also indicate that comparable and complementary specificities must exist in other arousal systems.

  18. Highly specific role of hypocretin (orexin) neurons: differential activation as a function of diurnal phase, operant reinforcement vs. operant avoidance and light level

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Ronald; Wu, Ming-Fung; Barber, Grace; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin (Hcrt) cell loss is responsible for narcolepsy, but Hcrt's role in normal behavior is unclear. We found that Hcrt KO mice were unable to work for food or water reward during the light phase. However, they were unimpaired relative to wild type (WT) mice when working for reward during the dark phase or when working to avoid shock in the light or dark phases. In WT, expression of Fos in Hcrt neurons occurs only in the light phase when working for positive reinforcement. Expression was seen throughout the medio-lateral extent of the Hcrt field. Fos was not expressed when expected or unexpected, unearned rewards were presented, when working to avoid negative reinforcement, or when given or expecting shock, even though these conditions elicit maximal electroencephalographic (EEG) arousal. Fos was not expressed in the light phase when light was removed. This may explain the lack of light induced arousal in narcoleptics and its presence in normal individuals. This is the first demonstration of such specificity of arousal system function and has implications for understanding the motivational and circadian consequences of arousal system dysfunction. The current results also indicate that comparable and complementary specificities must exist in other “arousal” systems. PMID:22031892

  19. Hyperbolic tangential function-based progressive addition lens design.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gufeng; Cui, Xudong

    2015-12-10

    The diopter distribution is key to the successful design of a progressive addition lens. A hyperbolic tangential function is then introduced to describe well the desired diopter distribution on the lens. Simulation and fabrication show that the astigmia on the whole surface is very close to the addition, exhibiting superior performance than that of currently used high-order polynomials and cosine functions. Our investigations found that once the diopter distribution design is reasonable, both the direct and indirect methods of constructing a progressive addition lens can give consistent results. With this function we are able to effectively control the design of critical areas, the position, sizes of far-view and near-view zones, as well as the channel of the lens. This study would provide an efficient way to customize different progressive lenses not only for presbyopia, but also for anti-fatigue, office progressive usages, etc.

  20. Learning from data to design functional materials without inversion symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Young, Joshua; Lookman, Turab; Rondinelli, James M.

    2017-02-01

    Accelerating the search for functional materials is a challenging problem. Here we develop an informatics-guided ab initio approach to accelerate the design and discovery of noncentrosymmetric materials. The workflow integrates group theory, informatics and density-functional theory to uncover design guidelines for predicting noncentrosymmetric compounds, which we apply to layered Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. Group theory identifies how configurations of oxygen octahedral rotation patterns, ordered cation arrangements and their interplay break inversion symmetry, while informatics tools learn from available data to select candidate compositions that fulfil the group-theoretical postulates. Our key outcome is the identification of 242 compositions after screening ~3,200 that show potential for noncentrosymmetric structures, a 25-fold increase in the projected number of known noncentrosymmetric Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. We validate our predictions for 19 compounds using phonon calculations, among which 17 have noncentrosymmetric ground states including two potential multiferroics. Our approach enables rational design of materials with targeted crystal symmetries and functionalities.

  1. Tuning RNA folding and function through rational design of junction topology.

    PubMed

    Daher, May; Mustoe, Anthony M; Morriss-Andrews, Alex; Brooks Iii, Charles L; Walter, Nils G

    2017-09-19

    Structured RNAs such as ribozymes must fold into specific 3D structures to carry out their biological functions. While it is well-known that architectural features such as flexible junctions between helices help guide RNA tertiary folding, the mechanisms through which junctions influence folding remain poorly understood. We combine computational modeling with single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and catalytic activity measurements to investigate the influence of junction design on the folding and function of the hairpin ribozyme. Coarse-grained simulations of a wide range of junction topologies indicate that differences in sterics and connectivity, independent of stacking, significantly affect tertiary folding and appear to largely explain previously observed variations in hairpin ribozyme stability. We further use our simulations to identify stabilizing modifications of non-optimal junction topologies, and experimentally validate that a three-way junction variant of the hairpin ribozyme can be stabilized by specific insertion of a short single-stranded linker. Combined, our multi-disciplinary study further reinforces that junction sterics and connectivity are important determinants of RNA folding, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained simulations as a tool for rationally tuning and optimizing RNA folding and function. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Functional design to support CDTI/DABS flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goka, T.

    1982-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) provide a generalized functional design of CDTI avionics using the FAA developd DABS/ATARS ground system as the 'traffic sensor', (2) specify software modifications and/or additions to the existing DABS/ATARS ground system to support CDTI avionics, (3) assess the existing avionics of a NASA research aircraft in terms of CDTI applications, and (4) apply the generalized functional design to provide research flight experiment capability. DABS Data Link Formats are first specified for CDTI flight experiments. The set of CDTI/DABS Format specifications becomes a vehicle to coordinate the CDTI avionics and ground system designs, and hence, to develop overall system requirements. The report is the first iteration of a system design and development effort to support eventual CDTI flight test experiments.

  3. Filter design for molecular factor computing using wavelet functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyong; Xu, Zhihong; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-23

    Molecular factor computing (MFC) is a new strategy that employs chemometric methods in an optical instrument to obtain analytical results directly using an appropriate filter without data processing. In the present contribution, a method for designing an MFC filter using wavelet functions was proposed for spectroscopic analysis. In this method, the MFC filter is designed as a linear combination of a set of wavelet functions. A multiple linear regression model relating the concentration to the wavelet coefficients is constructed, so that the wavelet coefficients are obtained by projecting the spectra onto the selected wavelet functions. These wavelet functions are selected by optimizing the model using a genetic algorithm (GA). Once the MFC filter is obtained, the concentration of a sample can be calculated directly by projecting the spectrum onto the filter. With three NIR datasets of corn, wheat and blood, it was shown that the performance of the designed filter is better than that of the optimized partial least squares models, and commonly used signal processing methods, such as background correction and variable selection, were not needed. More importantly, the designed filter can be used as an MFC filter in designing MFC-based instruments.

  4. Reinforced structural plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubowitz, H. R.; Kendrick, W. P.; Jones, J. F.; Thorpe, R. S.; Burns, E. A. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    Reinforced polyimide structures are described. Reinforcing materials are impregnated with a suspension of polyimide prepolymer and bonded together by heat and pressure to form a cured, hard-reinforced, polyimide structure.

  5. Diagonal dominance using function minimization algorithms. [multivariable control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leininger, G. G.

    1977-01-01

    A new approach to the design of multivariable control systems using the inverse Nyquist array method is proposed. The technique utilizes a conjugate direction function minimization algorithm to achieve dominance over a specified frequency range by minimizing the ratio of the moduli of the off-diagonal terms to the moduli of the diagonal term of the inverse open loop transfer function matrix. The technique is easily implemented in either a batch or interactive computer mode and will yield diagonalization when previously suggested methods fail. The proposed method has been successfully applied to design a control system for a sixteenth order state model of the F-100 turbofan engine with three inputs.

  6. Study design for a randomized controlled trial to increase the relative reinforcing value of vegetable consumption using incentive sensitization among obese and overweight people.

    PubMed

    Jahns, Lisa; Roemmich, James N

    2016-09-01

    In this manuscript, we present the protocol for a study that applies incentive sensitization theory to improve vegetable intake in overweight and obese adults. This 8-week, randomized, controlled, community-based feeding study with an 8-week follow-up seeks to use repeated exposure to amounts of vegetables recommended by federal guidance to increase the primary outcome of the relative reinforcing value of vegetables compared to a snack food. A community-based design is used to give participants autonomy in choosing their method of exposure. Secondary outcomes include: 1) Determine potential moderators of incentive sensitization of vegetables, including genetic polymorphisms associated with food reinforcement and obesity, 6-n-propylthiouracil tasting status, and delay discounting. 2) Determine whether adding vegetables to the diet results in participants substituting low-energy-dense vegetables for energy-dense foods or whether energy-dense food consumption is independent of vegetable consumption. 3) Determine whether reductions in adiposity are associated with substitution of vegetables in the diet. 4) Determine if markers of bone turnover change. 5) Assess changes in self-reported secondary outcomes measured by questionnaire such as self-efficacy to eat vegetables. The results of this study will provide information about the drivers of individual choice to consume recommended amounts of vegetables. The understanding gained will help increase the effectiveness and sustainability of behavior-based interventions focused on improving vegetable intake. This information may also be used to assist in setting dietary guidance targets for the amounts and types of vegetables Americans can, and should, consume.

  7. Systematic Description of Functional Knowledge based on Functional Ontologies and Its Use for Supporting Design of Functional Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Yoshinobu; Kasai, Toshinobu; Yoshikawa, Mariko; Takahashi, Masaru; Kozaki, Kouji; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    In conceptual design, a designer decomposes a required function into sub-functions, so-called functional decomposition, using a kind of functional knowledge representing achievement relations among functions. Aimin at systematization of such functional knowledge, we proposed ontologies that guide conceptualization of artifacts from the functional point of view. This paper discusses its systematic description based on the functional ontologies. Firstly, we propose a new concept named “way of achievement” as a key concept for its systematization. Categorization of typical representations of the knowledge and organization as is-a hierarchies are also discussed. Such concept, categorization, and functional ontologies make the functional knowledge consistent and applicable to other domains. Next, the implementation of the functional ontologies and their utility on description of the knowledge are shown. Lastly, we discuss development of a knowledge-based system to help human designers redesign an existin artifact. The ontology of functional concepts and the systematic description of functional knowledge enable the supporting system to show designers a wide range of alternative ways and then to facilitate innovative redesign.

  8. Laminates and reinforced metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A selective review is presented of the state of the art of metallic laminates and fiber reinforced metals called metallic matrix laminates (MMLs). Design and analysis procedures that are used for, and typical structural components that have been made from MMLs are emphasized. Selected MMLs, constituent materials, typical material properties and fabrication procedures are briefly described, including hybrids and superhybrids. Advantages, disadvantages, and special considerations required during design, analysis, and fabrication of MMLs are examined. Tabular and graphical data are included to illustrate key aspects of MMLs. Appropriate references are cited to provide a selective bibliography of a rapidly expanding and very promising research and development field.

  9. Complete RNA inverse folding: computational design of functional hammerhead ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Dotu, Ivan; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Slinger, Betty L.; Mechery, Vinodh; Meyer, Michelle M.; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology and synthetic biology currently constitute one of the most innovative, interdisciplinary fields of research, poised to radically transform society in the 21st century. This paper concerns the synthetic design of ribonucleic acid molecules, using our recent algorithm, RNAiFold, which can determine all RNA sequences whose minimum free energy secondary structure is a user-specified target structure. Using RNAiFold, we design ten cis-cleaving hammerhead ribozymes, all of which are shown to be functional by a cleavage assay. We additionally use RNAiFold to design a functional cis-cleaving hammerhead as a modular unit of a synthetic larger RNA. Analysis of kinetics on this small set of hammerheads suggests that cleavage rate of computationally designed ribozymes may be correlated with positional entropy, ensemble defect, structural flexibility/rigidity and related measures. Artificial ribozymes have been designed in the past either manually or by SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment); however, this appears to be the first purely computational design and experimental validation of novel functional ribozymes. RNAiFold is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAiFold/. PMID:25209235

  10. Investigation of Selectively-Reinforced Metallic Lugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Abada, Christopher H.

    2007-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of material and geometric variables on the response of U-shaped band-reinforced metallic lugs was performed. Variables studied were reinforcement, adhesive and metallic lug mechanical properties, hole diameter, reinforcement and adhesive thickness, and the distance from the hole s center to the end of the lug. Generally, U-shaped band reinforced lugs exhibited superior performance than non-reinforced lugs, that is higher load at the conventional lug design criteria of four percent hole elongation. Depending upon the reinforcement configuration the increase in load may be negligible to 15 or 20 percent. U-shaped band reinforcement increases lug load carrying capability primarily through two mechanisms; increasing the slope of the response curve after the initial knee and restraining overall deformation of the metallic portion of the lug facilitating increased yielding of metallic material between the hole and the edge of the metallic portion of the lug.

  11. Functional DNA switches: rational design and electrochemical signaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yiting; Ge, Bixia; Sen, Dipankar; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-01-21

    Recent developments in nanoscience research have demonstrated that DNA switches (rationally designed DNA nanostructures) constitute a class of versatile building blocks for the fabrication and assembly of electronic devices and sensors at the nanoscale. Functional DNA sequences and structures such as aptamers, DNAzymes, G-quadruplexes, and i-motifs can be readily prepared in vitro, and subsequently adapted to an electrochemical platform by coupling with redox reporters. The conformational or conduction switching of such electrode-bound DNA modules in response to an external stimulus can then be monitored by conventional voltammetric measurements. In this review, we describe how we are able to design and examine functional DNA switches, particularly those systems that utilize electrochemical signaling. We also discuss different available options for labeling functional DNA with redox reporters, and comment on the function-oriented signaling pathways.

  12. Control design based on a linear state function observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to the design of low-order controllers for large scale systems is proposed. The method is derived from the theory of linear state function observers. First, the realization of a state feedback control law is interpreted as the observation of a linear function of the state vector. The linear state function to be reconstructed is the given control law. Then, based on the derivation for linear state function observers, the observer design is formulated as a parameter optimization problem. The optimization objective is to generate a matrix that is close to the given feedback gain matrix. Based on that matrix, the form of the observer and a new control law can be determined. A four-disk system and a lightly damped beam are presented as examples to demonstrate the applicability and efficacy of the proposed method.

  13. Effect of crosslinking functionality on microstructure, mechanical properties, and in vitro cytocompatibility of cellulose nanocrystals reinforced poly (vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate hybrid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Lee, Yujin; Kim, Doyeon; Rao, Kummara Madhusudana; Kim, Jisoo; Park, Soyoung; Haider, Adnan; Lee, Do Hyun; Han, Sung Soo

    2017-02-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals reinforced poly (vinyl alcohol)/sodium alginate hybrid scaffolds were fabricated by using freeze casting and freeze drying method. In this study, the effect of crosslinking agents such as calcium chloride, orthophosphoric acid, and borax on morphological, structural, thermal, mechanical, and cytocompatibility (cell adhesion and proliferation) properties was investigated. The results showed that the change in type of crosslinking agent significantly changed the properties of the hybrid scaffolds. Based on this study, borax-crosslinked hybrid scaffold showed good fibrous porous structure with high porosity (95.2%), highest water uptake capacity, good thermal stability, mechanical stability (storage modulus), and in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation with fibroblast (NIH3T3) cells. This primarily research study explores the way for further use of this crosslinking agent to design and fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conditioned inhibition and reinforcement rate.

    PubMed

    Harris, Justin A; Kwok, Dorothy W S; Andrew, Benjamin J

    2014-07-01

    We investigated conditioned inhibition in a magazine approach paradigm. Rats were trained on a feature negative discrimination between an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) reinforced at one rate versus a compound of that CS and a visual stimulus (L) reinforced at a lower rate. This training established L as a conditioned inhibitor. We then tested the inhibitory strength of L by presenting it in compound with other auditory CSs. L reduced responding when tested with a CS that had been reinforced at a high rate, but had less or even no inhibitory effect when tested with a CS that had been reinforced at a low rate. The inhibitory strength of L was greater if it signaled a decrease in reinforcement from an already low rate than if it signaled an equivalent decrease in reinforcement from a high rate. We conclude that the strength of inhibition is not a linear function of the change in reinforcement that it signals. We discuss the implications of this finding for models of learning (e.g., Rescorla & Wagner, 1972) that identify inhibition with a difference (subtraction) rule.

  15. Automated Dental Epidemiology System. II. Systems Analysis and Functional Design,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    A"D-n134 803 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM II SYSTEMSi/ ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DE5IGN(U) NAVAnL DENTAL RESERRCH INST GREAT LAKES IL M C DIEHL... DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL DESIGN M. C. DIEHL DTICSELECTEOCT 218 D >- NAVAL 8DENTAL RESEARCH ’INSTITUTE Naval...NAVAL DENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE NAVAL BASE, BUILDING I-H GREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS 60088 AUTOMATED DENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY SYSTEM: II. SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

  16. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting “affinity clamp” had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution. PMID:18445649

  17. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-05-06

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting "affinity clamp" had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution.

  18. Damage tolerance in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, H.J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-11-01

    Properly designed discontinuously-reinforced MMCs have been projected by linear-elastic fracture mechanics to be competitive, on both cost and performance bases, with cross-plied graphite-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and continuously-reinforced MMCs. With respect to the latter, discontinuously-reinforced MMCs achieve considerable advantages in virtue of their lower-cost reinforcements and their fabricability by standard metal-working practices. Discontinuously reinforced MMC billets can also be produced through powder-blending and direct-spraying techniques. SiC short fibers, whiskers, and particulates are typical of the discontinuous reinforcements used in 2124 and 6061 aluminum matrices. 18 references.

  19. Conditioned reinforcement value and choice.

    PubMed Central

    Preston, R A; Fantino, E

    1991-01-01

    The delay-reduction hypothesis of conditioned reinforcement states that the reinforcing value of a food-associated stimulus is determined by the delay to primary reinforcement signaled by the onset of the stimulus relative to the average delay to primary reinforcement in the conditioning situation. In contrast, most contemporary models of conditioned reinforcement strength posit that the reinforcing strength of a stimulus is some simple function only of the delay to primary reinforcement in the presence of stimulus. The delay-reduction hypothesis diverges from other conditioned reinforcement models in that it predicts that a fixed-duration food-paired stimulus will have different reinforcing values depending on the frequency of its presentation. In Experiment 1, pigeons' key pecks were reinforced according to concurrent-chains schedules with variable-interval 10-second and variable-interval 20-second terminal-link schedules. The initial-link schedule preceding the shorter terminal link was always variable-interval 60 seconds, and the initial-link schedule requirement preceding the longer terminal link was varied between 1 second and 60 seconds across conditions. In Experiment 2, the initial-link schedule preceding the longer of two terminal links was varied for each of three groups of pigeons. The terminal links of the concurrent chains for the three groups were variable-interval 10 seconds and 20 seconds, variable-interval 10 seconds and 30 seconds, and variable-interval 30 seconds and 50 seconds. In both experiments, preference for the shorter terminal link was either a bitonic function or an inverse function of the initial-link schedule preceding the longer terminal-link schedule. Consistent with the predictions of the delay-reduction hypothesis, the relative values of the terminal-link stimuli changed as a function of the overall frequency of primary reinforcement. Vaughan's (1985) melioration model, which was shown to be formally similar to Squires and Fantino

  20. Evaluation of an interviewer as a function of interviewer gaze, reinforcement of subject gaze, and interviewer attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Kleinke, C L; Staneski, R A; Berger, D E

    1975-01-01

    Male subjects were interviewed by female interviewers who gazed constantly, intermittently, or not at all. Experimental subjects were reinforced with green light feedback whenever they gazed at the interviewers and were punished with red light feedback when they averted gaze for more than 6 seconds. Control subjects received noncontingent green and red light feedback. Although gaze of experimental subjects toward the interviewers was increased significantly, their attitudes toward the interviewers remained the same. This was probably because the subjects did not discriminate that their gazing behavior had changed. Subjects gave the most unfavorable reactions to the nongazing interviewers, rating them as least attractive, giving them the shortest answers, and sitting farthest from them during the debriefing session. Subjects did not discriminate between high and low attractive interviewers, except that the latter were rated disproportionately low on attentiveness if they did not gaze. Interviewers with high rates of talking were preferred over interviewers with low rates of talking. It was concluded that interpersonal attraction is related to gaze and physical attractiveness through a number of mediating variables which will have to be isolated more specifically in future research.

  1. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  2. Engineering study for the functional design of a multiprocessor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. S.; Vandever, W. H.; Stanten, S. F.; Avakian, A. E.; Kosmala, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to generate a functional system design of a multiprocessing computer system capable of satisfying the computational requirements of a space station. These data management system requirements were specified to include: (1) real time control, (2) data processing and storage, (3) data retrieval, and (4) remote terminal servicing.

  3. Balancing Form and Function: The Internal Design of Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Carol; Cameron, Ruth; Curry, Dallas; Thomson, Margaret; McKeown, Deirdre; Shaughnessy, Graeme; Gordon, Heather; Panich, Catherine; Spriggs, Murray

    1998-01-01

    Includes eight articles that address issues related to library design and function in Australia. Highlights include renovations and redevelopments; public libraries' expansions for changing needs, including a youthspace; a joint-use university and public library; the new Australian War Memorial research center; and a new university library. (LRW)

  4. A Designer's View: The Perspective of Form and Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Waarlo, Arend Jan; Boersma, Kerst

    2009-01-01

    Perspectives are domain-specific strategies employed by experts in a specific field to formulate and investigate questions. Such strategies may therefore serve as good models for acquiring knowledge. Based on this premise, we developed the perspective of form and function, as used by both biologists and technical designers, into a tool for…

  5. Design and Analysis of Hydraulic Chassis with Obstacle Avoidance Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yingjie; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-07-01

    This article mainly expounds the design of hydraulic system for the hydraulic chassis with obstacle avoidance function. Including the selection of hydraulic motor wheels, hydraulic pump, digital hydraulic cylinder and the matching of engine power. And briefly introduces the principle of obstacle avoidance.

  6. Optimization of a novel method for determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes in hair and waste water samples by carbon nanotubes reinforced sol-gel based hollow fiber solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography using factorial experimental design.

    PubMed

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Mohammad-Saeid

    2011-05-27

    A novel design of solid phase microextraction fiber containing carbon nanotube reinforced sol-gel which was protected by polypropylene hollow fiber (HF-SPME) was developed for pre-concentration and determination of BTEX in environmental waste water and human hair samples. The method validation was included and satisfying results with high pre-concentration factors were obtained. In the present study orthogonal array experimental design (OAD) procedure with OA(16) (4(4)) matrix was applied to study the effect of four factors influencing the HF-SPME method efficiency: stirring speed, volume of adsorption organic solvent, extraction and desorption time of the sample solution, by which the effect of each factor was estimated using individual contributions as response functions in the screening process. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed for estimating the main significant factors and their percentage contributions in extraction. Calibration curves were plotted using ten spiking levels of BTEX in the concentration ranges of 0.02-30,000ng/mL with correlation coefficients (r) 0.989-0.9991 for analytes. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity (0.3-20,000ng/L), repeatability, low limits of detections (0.49-0.7ng/L) and excellent pre-concentration factors (185-1872). The best conditions which were estimated then applied for the analysis of BTEX compounds in the real samples.

  7. Concept and design of a multiple-function laser (MFL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karning, Heinrich; Ruger, James F.; Weispfenning, Martin

    1998-10-01

    The multifunctional properties of modern Laser sources for future military sensor applications will be studied. The goal of this study is the design of a modular laser source which covers various functions like: Laser rangefinding. Target designation (1.06 micrometer), Eyesafe target designation (1.5 micrometer), Laser radar for Automatic target recognition, Identification friend or foe using Laser interrogation with D- band response as well as allowance for Covert communication and Missile jamming with a laser in the 3 to 5 micrometer range. It is obvious that these applications require a wide range of power levels, wavelength agility and pulse repetition rates. The concept for a compact Laser source to cover these requirements will be presented. In addition a concept for the integrated sensor to provide the above mentioned functions will also be presented.

  8. Functional Design in Rehabilitation: Modular Mechanisms for Ankle Complex

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at presenting an innovative ankle rehabilitation device based on a parallel mechanism. A functional analysis and design are described to obtain a device able to guarantee ankle movement while patient's body remains stationary. Human ankle is a challenging context where a series of joints are highly integrated. The proposed rehabilitation device permits a patient with walking defects to improve his or her gait. The research focuses on plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion movement. The robust design starts from an accurate modelling of ankle movements during walking, assessing motion data from healthy individuals and patients. The kinematics analysis and functional evaluations lead the study and development of the articulated system. In particular, results of simulations support the effectiveness of the current design. A 3D prototype is presented highlighting that the ankle motion is successfully demonstrated. PMID:27524881

  9. Establishing operations and reinforcement effects.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R; Iwata, B A

    1991-01-01

    Positive reinforcement procedures have had a major impact on educational programs for the developmentally disabled; nevertheless, variation in reinforcer effectiveness both within and across individuals is a common phenomenon. This study examined one class of variables--establishing operations--that might influence the effectiveness of reinforcers. Five developmentally disabled adult males participated. Responding on one of two motor tasks--switch closure or block placement--was assessed during baseline, satiation, and deprivation conditions with respect to three classes of consequences: small food items, music, and social praise. Deprivation and satiation conditions were constructed so as not to alter significantly the normal course of events in a subject's day. For example, food deprivation entailed scheduling sessions just prior to a subject's regular lunch, and social deprivation involved limiting a subject's access to social interaction for 15 minutes, during which time the subject had access to an assortment of other activities. Results showed that each stimulus class functioned as reinforcement with different degrees of effectiveness during satiation versus deprivation conditions. These results are discussed in light of previous research on enhancement of reinforcer efficacy as well as the assessment and identification of functional reinforcers, and implications are presented for future research and client habilitation.

  10. Token Reinforcement: A Review and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Token reinforcement procedures and concepts are reviewed and discussed in relation to general principles of behavior. The paper is divided into four main parts. Part I reviews and discusses previous research on token systems in relation to common behavioral functions--reinforcement, temporal organization, antecedent stimulus functions, and…

  11. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  12. Implications of Functional Analysis Methodology for the Design of Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.; Worsdell, April S.

    2005-01-01

    Functional analysis methodology is an assessment strategy that identifies sources of reinforcement that maintain problem behavior and prescribes individualized interventions that directly alter the conditions under which behavior occurs. In this article we describe the environmental determinants of problem behavior, methods for conducting…

  13. Vestibular Function Research (VFR) experiment. Phase B: Design definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vestibular Functions Research (VFR) Experiment was established to investigate the neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome and to develop logical means for its prediction, prevention and treatment. The VFR Project consists of ground and spaceflight experimentation using frogs as specimens. The phase B Preliminary Design Study provided for the preliminary design of the experiment hardware, preparation of performance and hardware specification and a Phase C/D development plan, establishment of STS (Space Transportation System) interfaces and mission operations, and the study of a variety of hardware, experiment and mission options. The study consist of three major tasks: (1) mission mode trade-off; (2) conceptual design; and (3) preliminary design.

  14. Fiber-reinforced scaffolds in soft tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Xiumei; Watari, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Soft tissue engineering has been developed as a new strategy for repairing damaged or diseased soft tissues and organs to overcome the limitations of current therapies. Since most of soft tissues in the human body are usually supported by collagen fibers to form a three-dimensional microstructure, fiber-reinforced scaffolds have the advantage to mimic the structure, mechanical and biological environment of natural soft tissues, which benefits for their regeneration and remodeling. This article reviews and discusses the latest research advances on design and manufacture of novel fiber-reinforced scaffolds for soft tissue repair and how fiber addition affects their structural characteristics, mechanical strength and biological activities in vitro and in vivo. In general, the concept of fiber-reinforced scaffolds with adjustable microstructures, mechanical properties and degradation rates can provide an effective platform and promising method for developing satisfactory biomechanically functional implantations for soft tissue engineering or regenerative medicine. PMID:28798872

  15. A comparison of procedures for programming noncontingent reinforcement schedules.

    PubMed

    Kahng, S W; Iwata, B A; DeLeon, I G; Wallace, M D

    2000-01-01

    We compared two methods for programming and thinning noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules during the treatment of self-injurious behavior (SIB). The participants were 3 individuals who had been diagnosed with mental retardation. Results of functional analyses indicated that all participants' SIB was maintained by positive reinforcement (i.e., access to attention or food). Following baseline, the effects of two NCR schedule-thinning procedures were compared in multielement designs. One schedule (fixed increment) was initially set at fixed-time 10-s reinforcer deliveries and was also thinned according to fixed-time intervals. The other schedule (adjusting IRT) was initially determined by participants' baseline interresponse times (IRTs) for SIB and was thinned based on IRTs observed during subsequent treatment sessions. Results indicated that both schedules were effective in initially reducing SIB and in maintaining response suppression as the schedules were thinned.

  16. Reinforced active middle ear implant fixation in incus vibroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Robert; Dalhoff, Ernst; Heyd, Andreas; Wildenstein, Daniela; Hagen, Rudolf; Gummer, Anthony W; Schraven, Sebastian P

    2015-01-01

    The active middle ear implant Vibrant Soundbridge® was originally designed to treat mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing losses. The floating mass transducer (FMT) is crimped onto the long incus process. The procedure is termed incus vibroplasty to distinguish from other attachment sites or stimulus modi for treating conductive and mixed hearing losses. Rare but possible complications are difficult incus anatomy, necrosis of the long incus process, secondary detachment, and loosening of the FMT with concomitant amplification loss. The aim of this study was to functionally evaluate reinforcement of the standard attachment of the FMT to the long incus process. The head of a Soft CliP® stapes prosthesis was used for reinforcement. Functional evaluation was performed in temporal-bone preparations and in clinical practice. A subtotal mastoidectomy and a posterior tympanotomy were performed in ten fresh human temporal bones. As a control for normal middle-ear function, the tympanic membrane was stimulated acoustically and the vibration of the stapes footplate and the round-window (RW) membrane, respectively, were measured by laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). FMT-induced vibration responses of the stapes and RW were then measured for standard attachment and attachment reinforced with the head of a Soft CliP® stapes prosthesis. Additionally, the outcome in two groups of patients with incus vibroplasty using standard and the reinforced FMT attachment were compared. Eleven patients were treated by standard coupling; nine patients obtained reinforcement with the head of the Soft CliP® stapes prosthesis. Three to six months postoperatively, auditory thresholds for frequency-modulated (warble) tones and vibroplasty thresholds for pure tones were measured. In temporal bone, laser Doppler vibrometer measurements showed significantly enhanced vibration amplitudes of the stapes footplate and the RW membrane for the reinforced attachment compared with those for the standard

  17. Biomimetic scaffold design for functional and integrative tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M; Lu, Helen H

    2012-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscores the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The 2 critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft-tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and discussion of future directions.

  18. Biomimetic Scaffold Design for Functional and Integrative Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscore the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The two critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and future directions section. PMID:22244070

  19. Structural Behavior of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer (BFRP) Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovitigala, Thilan

    The main challenge for civil engineers is to provide sustainable, environmentally friendly and financially feasible structures to the society. Finding new materials such as fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material that can fulfill the above requirements is a must. FRP material was expensive and it was limited to niche markets such as space shuttles and air industry in the 1960s. Over the time, it became cheaper and spread to other industries such as sporting goods in the 1980-1990, and then towards the infrastructure industry. Design and construction guidelines are available for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), aramid fiber reinforced polymer (AFRP) and glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and they are currently used in structural applications. Since FRP is linear elastic brittle material, design guidelines for the steel reinforcement are not valid for FRP materials. Corrosion of steel reinforcement affects the durability of the concrete structures. FRP reinforcement is identified as an alternative to steel reinforcement in corrosive environments. Although basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) has many advantages over other FRP materials, but limited studies have been done. These studies didn't include larger BFRP bar diameters that are mostly used in practice. Therefore, larger beam sizes with larger BFRP reinforcement bar diameters are needed to investigate the flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams. Also, shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams was not yet studied. Experimental testing of mechanical properties and bond strength of BFRP bars and flexural and shear behavior of BFRP reinforced concrete beams are needed to include BFRP reinforcement bars in the design codes. This study mainly focuses on the use of BFRP bars as internal reinforcement. The test results of the mechanical properties of BFRP reinforcement bars, the bond strength of BFRP reinforcement bars, and the flexural and shear behavior of concrete beams

  20. Reducing Behavior through Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitz, Diane E. D.; Repp, Alan C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of reinforcement to reduce inappropriate behaviors of mentally retarded and emotionally disturbed students may involve the following procedures: differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL), the differential reinforcement of response omission (DRO), and the differential reinforcement of incompatible (DRI) or alternative…

  1. Dynamic interaction between medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens as a function of both motivational state and reinforcer magnitude: A c-Fos immunocytochemistry study

    PubMed Central

    Moscarello, Justin M.; Ben-Shahar, Osnat; Ettenberg, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of simultaneous variations in motivational state (food deprivation) and reinforcer magnitude (food presentation) on c-Fos immunoreactivity in the pre-and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) core and shell, and dorsal striatum. In the first experiment, c-Fos was reliably increased in pre- and infralimbic mPFC of animals 12- and 36-h compared to 0-h deprived. In the second experiment, a small meal (2.5g) selectively increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in both mPFC subdivisions of 36-h deprived animals, as well as in both NAcc subdivisions of 12-h deprived animals. Correlational analyses revealed a changing relationship between mPFC subregions and the NAcc compartments to which they project. In subjects 12-h deprived and allowed a small meal, c-Fos counts in prelimbic mPFC and NAcc core were positively correlated, as were those in infralimbic mPFC and NAcc shell (r = . 83 and .76, respectively). The opposite was true of animals 36-h deprived, with prelimbic mPFC/NAcc core and infralimbic mPFC/NAcc shell negatively correlated (r = -.85 and -.82, respectively). The third experiment examined the effects of unrestricted feeding (presentation of 20g food) after 0, 12, or 36-h deprivation. No differences between mean c-Fos counts were found, though prelimbic mPFC/NAcc core, and mPFC/NAcc shell were positively correlated in animals 36-h deprived (r = .76 and .89, respectively). These data suggest that the activity within the mPFC and NAcc, as well as the interaction between the two, change as a complex combinatorial function of motivational state and reinforcer magnitude. Section: Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience PMID:17706947

  2. Effect of reinforcement surface functionalization on the mechanical properties of nacre-like bulk lamellar composites processed by a hybrid conventional method.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Selen N; Dericioglu, Arcan F

    2013-05-01

    Alumina platelet reinforced epoxy matrix composites with an architecture resembling to natural nacre were fabricated by a hybrid conventional method called Hot-press Assisted Slip Casting process (HASC). Correlation between processing parameters, platelet content, platelet orientation and mechanical property enhancement of the fabricated composites was examined. In order to investigate the effect of interfacial compatibility and bonding on the mechanical properties of the fabricated inorganic-organic composites, platelet surfaces were modified with both epoxy- and amino-functional silanes. As received and functionalized platelet surfaces were studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the success of surface modification. Fabricated bio-inspired bulk lamellar composite materials were characterized in terms of their microstructural architecture and mechanical properties. The results obtained indicated that HASC processed composites exhibit enhanced flexural strength, stiffness and hardness, as compared to neat epoxy and composites fabricated by simple mixing, as a result of their nacre-like architecture with well aligned platelets. It has been also observed that functionalization by both type of silanes improves interfacial adhesion between platelets and epoxy matrix resulting in further enhancement of the mechanical properties of bulk lamellar composites fabricated by HASC.

  3. 3-O-Laurylglyceryl ascorbate reinforces skin barrier function through not only the reduction of oxidative stress but also the activation of ceramide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Y; Taira, N; Tsuboi, T; Yoshioka, M; Masaki, H; Muraoka, O

    2017-02-01

    A higher trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) occurs in rough skin, in elder skin and also in atopic dermatitis. An impaired skin barrier function is considered to be caused by an incomplete construction of the intercellular lamellar structure due to the quantitative reduction of ceramides. Since these symptoms coexist with oxidative stress, we hypothesized that impairment of the skin barrier function is accelerated by oxidative stress. Thus, the purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of oxidative stress on ceramide synthesis and to characterize whether antioxidants can improve skin barrier function. 3-O-Laurylglyceryl ascorbate (VC-3LG), which is a newly amphipathic derivative of ascorbic acid, was evaluated as a candidate antioxidant. We characterized the mRNA expression levels of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) treated with H2 O2 using real-time PCR analysis. In order to evaluate the effect of VC-3LG on skin barrier function, we used several assays with reconstructed human epidermis equivalents (RHEEs). Ceramide synthesis was down-regulated in NHEKs by oxidative stress. Treatment with VC-3LG abrogated the down-regulation of SPT mRNA in NHEKs caused by oxidative stress, and stimulated SPT mRNA expression levels. In experiments characterizing the antioxidative properties of VC-3LG, VC-3LG reduced oxidative stress in NHEKs by up-regulating catalase mRNA expression. In addition, VC-3LG stimulated the skin barrier function in RHEEs, which had lower TEWL values compared with untreated RHEEs. Furthermore, VC-3LG increased the quantity of ceramide in RHEEs. Taken together, we conclude that VC-3LG reinforces the skin barrier function due to its reduction of oxidative stress and its promotion of ceramide synthesis. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  4. Conditioned Reinforcement Value and Resistance to Change

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2008-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of conditioned reinforcement value and primary reinforcement rate on resistance to change using a multiple schedule of observing-response procedures with pigeons. In the absence of observing responses in both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) schedule food reinforcement alternated with extinction. Observing responses in both components intermittently produced 15 s of a stimulus associated with the VI schedule (i.e., S+). In the first experiment, a lower-valued conditioned reinforcer and a higher rate of primary reinforcement were arranged in one component by adding response-independent food deliveries uncorrelated with S+. In the second experiment, one component arranged a lower valued conditioned reinforcer but a higher rate of primary reinforcement by increasing the probability of VI schedule periods relative to extinction periods. In the third experiment, the two observing-response components provided similar rates of primary reinforcement but arranged different valued conditioned reinforcers. Across the three experiments, observing-response rates were typically higher in the component associated with the higher valued conditioned reinforcer. Resistance to change was not affected by conditioned reinforcement value, but was an orderly function of the rate of primary reinforcement obtained in the two components. One interpretation of these results is that S+ value does not affect response strength and that S+ deliveries increase response rates through a mechanism other than reinforcement. Alternatively, because resistance to change depends on the discriminative stimulus–reinforcer relation, the failure of S+ value to impact resistance to change could have resulted from a lack of transfer of S+ value to the broader discriminative context. PMID:18540215

  5. Conditioned reinforcement value and resistance to change.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2008-05-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of conditioned reinforcement value and primary reinforcement rate on resistance to change using a multiple schedule of observing-response procedures with pigeons. In the absence of observing responses in both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) schedule food reinforcement alternated with extinction. Observing responses in both components intermittently produced 15 s of a stimulus associated with the VI schedule (i.e., S+). In the first experiment, a lower-valued conditioned reinforcer and a higher rate of primary reinforcement were arranged in one component by adding response-independent food deliveries uncorrelated with S+. In the second experiment, one component arranged a lower valued conditioned reinforcer but a higher rate of primary reinforcement by increasing the probability of VI schedule periods relative to extinction periods. In the third experiment, the two observing-response components provided similar rates of primary reinforcement but arranged different valued conditioned reinforcers. Across the three experiments, observing-response rates were typically higher in the component associated with the higher valued conditioned reinforcer. Resistance to change was not affected by conditioned reinforcement value, but was an orderly function of the rate of primary reinforcement obtained in the two components. One interpretation of these results is that S+ value does not affect response strength and that S+ deliveries increase response rates through a mechanism other than reinforcement. Alternatively, because resistance to change depends on the discriminative stimulus-reinforcer relation, the failure of S+ value to impact resistance to change could have resulted from a lack of transfer of S+ value to the broader discriminative context.

  6. HAL/SM system functional design specification. [systems analysis and design analysis of central processing units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, C.; Williams, G. P. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The functional design of a preprocessor, and subsystems is described. A structure chart and a data flow diagram are included for each subsystem. Also a group of intermodule interface definitions (one definition per module) is included immediately following the structure chart and data flow for a particular subsystem. Each of these intermodule interface definitions consists of the identification of the module, the function the module is to perform, the identification and definition of parameter interfaces to the module, and any design notes associated with the module. Also described are compilers and computer libraries.

  7. Porous Organic Materials: Strategic Design and Structure-Function Correlation.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Heasman, Patrick; Ben, Teng; Qiu, Shilun

    2017-02-08

    Porous organic materials have garnered colossal interest with the scientific fraternity due to their excellent gas sorption performances, catalytic abilities, energy storage capacities, and other intriguing applications. This review encompasses the recent significant breakthroughs and the conventional functions and practices in the field of porous organic materials to find useful applications and imparts a comprehensive understanding of the strategic evolution of the design and synthetic approaches of porous organic materials with tunable characteristics. We present an exhaustive analysis of the design strategies with special emphasis on the topologies of crystalline and amorphous porous organic materials. In addition to elucidating the structure-function correlation and state-of-the-art applications of porous organic materials, we address the challenges and restrictions that prevent us from realizing porous organic materials with tailored structures and properties for useful applications.

  8. Matching and conditioned reinforcement rate.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Podlesnik, Christopher A; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina

    2006-03-01

    Attempts to examine the effects of variations in relative conditioned reinforcement rate on choice have been confounded by changes in rates of primary reinforcement or changes in the value of the conditioned reinforcer. To avoid these problems, this experiment used concurrent observing responses to examine sensitivity of choice to relative conditioned reinforcement rate. In the absence of observing responses, unsignaled periods of food delivery on a variable-interval 90-s schedule alternated with extinction on a center key (i.e., a mixed schedule was in effect). Two concurrently available observing responses produced 15-s access to a stimulus differentially associated with the schedule of food delivery (S+). The relative rate of S+ deliveries arranged by independent variable-interval schedules for the two observing responses varied across conditions. The relation between the ratio of observing responses and the ratio of S+ deliveries was well described by the generalized matching law, despite the absence of changes in the rate of food delivery. In addition, the value of the S+ deliveries likely remained constant across conditions because the ratio of S+ to mixed schedule food deliveries remained constant. Assuming that S+ deliveries serve as conditioned reinforcers, these findings are consistent with the functional similarity between primary and conditioned reinforcers suggested by general choice theories based on the concatenated matching law (e.g., contextual choice and hyperbolic value-added models). These findings are inconsistent with delay reduction theory, which has no terms for the effects of rate of conditioned reinforcement in the absence of changes in rate of primary reinforcement.

  9. Motion sickness: a negative reinforcement model.

    PubMed

    Bowins, Brad

    2010-01-15

    Theories pertaining to the "why" of motion sickness are in short supply relative to those detailing the "how." Considering the profoundly disturbing and dysfunctional symptoms of motion sickness, it is difficult to conceive of why this condition is so strongly biologically based in humans and most other mammalian and primate species. It is posited that motion sickness evolved as a potent negative reinforcement system designed to terminate motion involving sensory conflict or postural instability. During our evolution and that of many other species, motion of this type would have impaired evolutionary fitness via injury and/or signaling weakness and vulnerability to predators. The symptoms of motion sickness strongly motivate the individual to terminate the offending motion by early avoidance, cessation of movement, or removal of oneself from the source. The motion sickness negative reinforcement mechanism functions much like pain to strongly motivate evolutionary fitness preserving behavior. Alternative why theories focusing on the elimination of neurotoxins and the discouragement of motion programs yielding vestibular conflict suffer from several problems, foremost that neither can account for the rarity of motion sickness in infants and toddlers. The negative reinforcement model proposed here readily accounts for the absence of motion sickness in infants and toddlers, in that providing strong motivation to terminate aberrant motion does not make sense until a child is old enough to act on this motivation.

  10. Functional Analysis of Erratic Body Movement Maintained by Visual Stimulation: Incorporating Conjugate Reinforcement Into a Paired-Stimulus Preference Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Dozier, Claudia L.; Carr, James E.; Patel, Meeta R.; Enloe, Kimberly A.

    2004-01-01

    A concurrent-operants design was used to analyze the repetitive behavior of observing reflective surfaces while simultaneously engaging in erratic gross-motor body movements (EBMs) exhibited by a young boy diagnosed with autism. The assessment involved an evaluation of preference for controlled (i. e., the participant controlled the visual…

  11. Learning from data to design functional materials without inversion symmetry.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Prasanna V; Young, Joshua; Lookman, Turab; Rondinelli, James M

    2017-02-17

    Accelerating the search for functional materials is a challenging problem. Here we develop an informatics-guided ab initio approach to accelerate the design and discovery of noncentrosymmetric materials. The workflow integrates group theory, informatics and density-functional theory to uncover design guidelines for predicting noncentrosymmetric compounds, which we apply to layered Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. Group theory identifies how configurations of oxygen octahedral rotation patterns, ordered cation arrangements and their interplay break inversion symmetry, while informatics tools learn from available data to select candidate compositions that fulfil the group-theoretical postulates. Our key outcome is the identification of 242 compositions after screening ∼3,200 that show potential for noncentrosymmetric structures, a 25-fold increase in the projected number of known noncentrosymmetric Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. We validate our predictions for 19 compounds using phonon calculations, among which 17 have noncentrosymmetric ground states including two potential multiferroics. Our approach enables rational design of materials with targeted crystal symmetries and functionalities.

  12. Learning from data to design functional materials without inversion symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Young, Joshua; Lookman, Turab; Rondinelli, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Accelerating the search for functional materials is a challenging problem. Here we develop an informatics-guided ab initio approach to accelerate the design and discovery of noncentrosymmetric materials. The workflow integrates group theory, informatics and density-functional theory to uncover design guidelines for predicting noncentrosymmetric compounds, which we apply to layered Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. Group theory identifies how configurations of oxygen octahedral rotation patterns, ordered cation arrangements and their interplay break inversion symmetry, while informatics tools learn from available data to select candidate compositions that fulfil the group-theoretical postulates. Our key outcome is the identification of 242 compositions after screening ∼3,200 that show potential for noncentrosymmetric structures, a 25-fold increase in the projected number of known noncentrosymmetric Ruddlesden-Popper oxides. We validate our predictions for 19 compounds using phonon calculations, among which 17 have noncentrosymmetric ground states including two potential multiferroics. Our approach enables rational design of materials with targeted crystal symmetries and functionalities. PMID:28211456

  13. Design of multi-function Hanford tank corrosion monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    EDGEMON, G.L.

    1999-04-01

    A multi-fiction corrosion monitoring system has been designed for installation into DST 241-AN-105 at the Hanford Site in fiscal year 1999. The 241-AN-105 system is the third-generation corrosion monitoring system described by TTP RLO-8-WT-21. Improvements and upgrades from the second-generation system (installed in 241-AN-102) that have been incorporated into the third-generation system include: Gasket seating surfaces utilize O-rings instead of a washer type gasket for improved seal; Probe design contains an equally spaced array of 22 thermocouples; Probe design contains an adjustable verification thermocouple; Probe design contains three ports for pressure/gas sampling; Probe design contains one set of strain gauges to monitor probe flexure if flexure occurs; Probe utilizes an adjustable collar to allow depth adjustment of probe during installation; System is capable of periodically conducting LPR scans; System is housed in a climate controlled enclosure adjacent to the riser containing the probe; System uses wireless Ethernet links to send data to Hanford Local Area Network; System uses commercial remote access software to allow remote command and control; and Above ground wiring uses driven shields to reduce external electrostatic noise in the data. These new design features have transformed what was primarily a second-generation corrosion monitoring system into a multi-function tank monitoring system that adds a great deal of functionality to the probe, provides for a better understanding of the relationship between corrosion and other tank operating parameters, and optimizes the use of the riser that houses the probe in the tank.

  14. EFFECTS OF VERBAL REINFORCEMENT ON INTELLECTIVE TASK PERFORMANCE AS A FUNCTION OF SELF-ESTEEM AND TASK-INVOLVEMENT. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FISCHER, EDWARD H.; HERSCHBERGER, AUSTIN C.

    USE OF THE VERBAL REINFORCEMENT TECHNIQUE (VRT) IN DEVELOPMENTAL, PERSONALITY, AND SOCIALIZATION STUDIES OFTEN RESTS ON TENUOUS AND UNTESTED ASSUMPTIONS. THIS STUDY EXAMINED FIVE VARIABLES WHICH HYPOTHETICALLY RELATE TO PERFORMANCE UNDER REINFORCEMENT--SELF-ESTEEM OF S. TASK-INVOLVEMENT, EXPERIMENTER, ORDINAL POSITION, AND FAMILY SIZE. THE METHOD…

  15. Reinforcement of vocalizations through contingent vocal imitation.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Martha; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Gewirtz, Jacob L

    2011-01-01

    Maternal vocal imitation of infant vocalizations is highly prevalent during face-to-face interactions of infants and their caregivers. Although maternal vocal imitation has been associated with later verbal development, its potentially reinforcing effect on infant vocalizations has not been explored experimentally. This study examined the reinforcing effect of maternal vocal imitation of infant vocalizations using a reversal probe BAB design. Eleven 3- to 8-month-old infants at high risk for developmental delays experienced contingent maternal vocal imitation during reinforcement conditions. Differential reinforcement of other behavior served as the control condition. The behavior of 10 infants showed evidence of a reinforcement effect. Results indicated that vocal imitations can serve to reinforce early infant vocalizations.

  16. REINFORCEMENT OF VOCALIZATIONS THROUGH CONTINGENT VOCAL IMITATION

    PubMed Central

    Pelaez, Martha; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Gewirtz, Jacob L

    2011-01-01

    Maternal vocal imitation of infant vocalizations is highly prevalent during face-to-face interactions of infants and their caregivers. Although maternal vocal imitation has been associated with later verbal development, its potentially reinforcing effect on infant vocalizations has not been explored experimentally. This study examined the reinforcing effect of maternal vocal imitation of infant vocalizations using a reversal probe BAB design. Eleven 3- to 8-month-old infants at high risk for developmental delays experienced contingent maternal vocal imitation during reinforcement conditions. Differential reinforcement of other behavior served as the control condition. The behavior of 10 infants showed evidence of a reinforcement effect. Results indicated that vocal imitations can serve to reinforce early infant vocalizations. PMID:21541136

  17. Manifold Regularized Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Liu, Derong; Wang, Ding

    2017-01-27

    This paper introduces a novel manifold regularized reinforcement learning scheme for continuous Markov decision processes. Smooth feature representations for value function approximation can be automatically learned using the unsupervised manifold regularization method. The learned features are data-driven, and can be adapted to the geometry of the state space. Furthermore, the scheme provides a direct basis representation extension for novel samples during policy learning and control. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on two benchmark control tasks, i.e., the inverted pendulum and the energy storage problem. Simulation results illustrate the concepts of the proposed scheme and show that it can obtain excellent performance.

  18. Design Rules for Enhanced Interfacial Shear Response in Functionalized Carbon Fiber Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Demir, Baris; Henderson, Luke C; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2017-04-05

    Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are ideal light-weighting candidates to replace traditional engineering materials. The mechanical performance of these composites results from a complex interplay of influences operating over several length and time scales. The mechanical performance may therefore be limited by many factors, one of which being the modest interfacial adhesion between the carbon fiber and the polymer. Chemical modification of the fiber, via surface grafting of molecules, is one possible strategy to enhance interactions across the fiber-polymer interface. To achieve systematic improvements in these modified materials, the ability to manipulate and monitor the molecular structure of the polymer interphase and the surface grafted molecules in the composite is essential, but challenging to accomplish from a purely experimental perspective. Alternatively, molecular simulations can bridge this knowledge gap by providing molecular-scale insights into the optimal design of these surface-grafted molecules to deliver superior mechanical properties. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to predict the interfacial shear response of a typical epoxy/carbon-fiber composite for both pristine fiber and a range of surface graftings. We allow for the dynamic curing of the epoxy in the presence of the functionalized surface, including cross-link formation between the grafted molecules and the polymer matrix. Our predictions agree with recently reported experimental data for these systems and reveal the molecular-scale origins of the enhanced interfacial shear response arising from functionalization. In addition to the presence of interfacial covalent bonds, we find that the interfacial structural complexity, resulting from the presence of the grafted molecules, and a concomitant spatial homogeneity of the interphase polymer density are beneficial factors in conferring high interfacial shear stress. Our approach paves the way for computational screening processes

  19. Positive reinforcement as treatment for problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Payne, Steven W; Dozier, Claudia L

    2013-01-01

    Functional analyses (Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1982/1994) have been useful in determining function-based treatments for problem behavior. Recently, however, researchers have evaluated the use of arbitrary reinforcers (e.g., positive reinforcers) to decrease problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement, particularly in the absence of extinction. We provide a brief review of recent research on this topic and discuss implications regarding mechanisms, practice, and future research directions.

  20. The fabrication and tribological behavior of epoxy composites modified by the three-dimensional polyurethane sponge reinforced with dopamine functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Huaiyuan; Sun, Liyuan; Wang, Enqun; Zhu, Yixing; Zhu, Yanji

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interpenetrating network structure epoxy composites were fabricated based on the modified carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced flexible polyurethane (PU) sponge. CNTs were first functionalized with polydopamine (PDA) as revealed by TEM imaging, which is formed via the oxidative self-polymerization of dopamine. Then the functionalized CNTs (CNT-PDA) were successfully anchored on the skeleton surfaces of sponge, forming a continuous 3D carbon network. The interfacial interaction between modified PU sponge and epoxy (EP) matrix was significantly enhanced due to the covalent linkage of PDA. Improvement in the thermal stability of CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites was observed by TG analysis and related to the CNTs anchored on the skeleton of sponge. The tribological properties of pure EP, PU3D/EP and CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites were comparatively investigated in terms of different loads and velocities. Results demonstrated that CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites exhibited the best tribological performance owing to the strong interfacial interaction and the 3D carbon network structure. In particular, the wear resistance of CNT-PDA/PU3D/EP composites was 6.2 times and 3 times higher than those of pure EP and PU3D/EP composites under the applied load of 1.6 MPa, respectively.

  1. Evaluating the integrity of the reinforced concrete structure repaired by epoxy injection using simulated transfer function of impact-echo response

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chia-Chi; Yu, Chih-peng; Wu, Jiunn-Hong; Hsu, Keng-Tsan; Ke, Ying-Tsu

    2014-02-18

    Cracks and honeycombs are often found inside reinforced concrete (RC) structure caused by excessive external force, or improper casting of concrete. The repairing method usually involves epoxy injection. The impact-echo method, which is a sensitive for detecting of the interior voids, may not be applicable to assess the integrity of the repaired member as both air and epoxy are less in acoustic impedances. In this study, the repaired RC structure was evaluated by the simulated transfer function of the IE displacement waveform where the R-wave displacement waveform is used as a base of a simulated force-time function. The effect of different thickness of the epoxy layer to the amplitude corresponding to the interface is studied by testing on specimen containing repaired naturally delaminated cracks with crack widths about 1 mm, 3 mm and 5 mm. The impact-echo responses were compared with the drilling cores at the test positions. The results showed the cracks were not fully filled with epoxy when the peak amplitude corresponding to the interface dropped less than 20%. The peak corresponding to the thicker epoxy layer tends to be larger in amplitude. A field study was also performed on a column damaged by earthquake before and after repairing.

  2. Reinforcement Delay Fading During Differential Reinforcement of Communication: The Effects of Signals on Response Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Michael E; Lerman, Dorothea C; Fisher, Wayne W; Roane, Henry S; Zangrillo, Amanda N

    2011-01-01

    Signals during delays to reinforcement may lessen reductions in responding that typically occur when there is a delay between a response and its reinforcer. Sparse applied research has been devoted to understanding the conditions under which responding may be maintained when delays to reinforcement are introduced. We evaluated the extent to which providing signals during delay fading affected responding in the context of differential reinforcement of communication responses. Three individuals were exposed to gradually increasing signaled and unsignaled reinforcement delays in multiple-schedule and/or withdrawal designs. Results for 2 of 3 participants suggested that (a) the presence of signals facilitated response maintenance under delayed reinforcement and (b) coordinated basic and applied research may advance both conceptual understanding and clinical outcomes of delayed reinforcement. PMID:21765548

  3. Optimum weight design of functionally graded material gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shikai; Zhang, He; Zhou, Jingtao; Song, Guohua

    2015-11-01

    Traditional gear weight optimization methods consider gear tooth number, module, face width or other dimension parameters of gear as design variables. However, due to the complicated form and geometric features peculiar to the gear, there will be large amounts of design parameters in gear design, and the influences of gear parameters changing on gear trains, transmission system and the whole equipment have to be taken into account, which increases the complexity of optimization problem. This paper puts forward to apply functionally graded materials (FGMs) to gears and then conduct the optimization. According to the force situation of gears, the material distribution form of FGM gears is determined. Then based on the performance parameters analysis of FGMs and the practical working demands for gears, a multi-objective optimization model is formed. Finally by using the goal driven optimization (GDO) method, the optimal material distribution is achieved, which makes gear weight and the maximum deformation be minimum and the maximum bending stress do not exceed the allowable stress. As an example, the applying of FGM to automotive transmission gear is conducted to illustrate the optimization design process and the result shows that under the condition of keeping the normal working performance of gear, the method achieves in greatly reducing the gear weight. This research proposes a FGM gears design method that is able to largely reduce the weight of gears by optimizing the microscopic material parameters instead of changing the macroscopic dimension parameters of gears, which reduces the complexity of gear weight optimization problem.

  4. Systematic design and functional analysis of artificial microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Jason D.; Gallichotte, Emily N.; Tewari, Muneesh

    2014-01-01

    Unlike short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which are commonly designed to repress a single messenger RNA (mRNA) target through perfect base pairing, microRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs that have evolved to concurrently repress multiple mRNA targets through imperfect complementarity. MicroRNA target recognition is primarily determined by pairing of the miRNA seed sequence (nucleotides 2–8) to complementary match sites in each mRNA target. Whereas siRNA technology is well established for single target knockdown, the design of artificial miRNAs for multi-target repression is largely unexplored. We designed and functionally analysed over 200 artificial miRNAs for simultaneous repression of pyruvate carboxylase and glutaminase by selecting all seed matches shared by their 3′ untranslated regions. Although we identified multiple miRNAs that repressed endogenous protein expression of both genes, seed-based artificial miRNA design was highly inefficient, as the majority of miRNAs with even perfect seed matches did not repress either target. Moreover, commonly used target prediction programs did not substantially discriminate effective artificial miRNAs from ineffective ones, indicating that current algorithms do not fully capture the features important for artificial miRNA targeting and are not yet sufficient for designing artificial miRNAs. Our analysis suggests that additional factors are strong determinants of the efficacy of miRNA-mediated target repression and remain to be discovered. PMID:24598260

  5. Batch Mode Reinforcement Learning based on the Synthesis of Artificial Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Raphael; Murphy, Susan A; Wehenkel, Louis; Ernst, Damien

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we consider the batch mode reinforcement learning setting, where the central problem is to learn from a sample of trajectories a policy that satisfies or optimizes a performance criterion. We focus on the continuous state space case for which usual resolution schemes rely on function approximators either to represent the underlying control problem or to represent its value function. As an alternative to the use of function approximators, we rely on the synthesis of "artificial trajectories" from the given sample of trajectories, and show that this idea opens new avenues for designing and analyzing algorithms for batch mode reinforcement learning.

  6. Assessing preference and reinforcer effectiveness in dogs.

    PubMed

    Vicars, Sara M; Miguel, Caio F; Sobie, Jennifer L

    2014-03-01

    The paired-stimulus (PS) preference assessment has been shown to be effective in assessing preference with animal subjects, including dogs; however, evaluations on whether preferred stimuli would also function as reinforcers are lacking. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the use of the PS preference assessment as a predictor of reinforcer effectiveness in eight dogs. The assessment was followed by concurrent and progressive ratio schedules to evaluate the reinforcer efficacy of food items. Results showed that the preference assessment predicted reinforcer efficacy for all subjects. Benefits of using this assessment with dogs are discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Reinforcement of inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    A differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) schedule with trials and delayed reinforcement was investigated. Periodically a wheel was briefly available to rats, followed six seconds later by brief availability of a bar. Variable-ratio food reinforcement of wheel turns was adjusted to give 95% turns. After variable-ratio-five reinforcement of bar presses produced 100% pressing, then separate ratio schedules were used for presses following turns (turn presses) and presses following nonturns (nonturn presses). Increasing nonturn-press reinforcements decreased turns, even though total reinforcements increased. Reversal by decreasing nonturn-press reinforcements raised turns, though with hysteresis. Thus food reinforcement increased nonturns even though delayed six to ten seconds after nonturns, a delay that greatly reduces response reinforcement. Those and other results indicate that the turn decrease was not due to reinforcement of competing responses. Evidence against other alternatives, and the reduction of responding by increased reinforcement, indicate that the term inhibition is appropriate for the phenomenon reinforced. Response-specific inhibition appears appropriate for this particular kind, since its effects are more specific to particular responses than Pavlovian conditioned-inhibition. Response-specific inhibition seems best considered a behavioral output comparable to responses (e.g., both reinforcible) but with important properties different from responses (e.g., different reinforcement-delay gradients). PMID:16812315

  8. Fiber-reinforced concretes with a high fiber volume fraction — a look in future. Can a design determine the fiber amount in concrete in real time in every part of a structure in production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfers, R.

    2010-09-01

    In near future, when the control of the load-bearing capacity of fiber-only-reinforced concrete members will be safely guaranteed, the deletion of the ordinary continuous steel reinforcing bars might be possible. For the time being, it is difficult to change the fiber amount during the casting with today's techniques. Therefore, the fiber concentration has to be determined by the maximum tensile stress in concrete structural members, resulting in an unnecessary fiber addition in compressed zones. However, if the right amount of fibers could be regulated and added to concrete in real time at the pump outlet, a future vision could be to design and produce a structure by using FEM-controlled equipment. The signals from calculation results could be transmitted to a concrete casting system for addition of a necessary amount of fibers to take care of the actual tensile stresses in the right position in the structure. The casting location could be determined by using a GPS for positioning the pump outlet for targeting the casting location horizontally and a laser vertically. The addition of fibers to concrete at the outlet of a concrete pump and proportioning them there according to the actual needs of the stress situation in a structure, given by a FEM analysis in real time, is a future challenge. The FEM analysis has to be based on material properties of fiber-only-reinforced concrete. This means that the resistance and stiffness of different-strength concrete members with a varying fiber content has to be determined in tests and conveyed to the FEM analysis. The FEM analysis has to be completed before the casting and controlled. Then it can be used as the base for adding a correct amount of fibers to concrete in every part of the structure. Thus, a system for introducing a correct amount of fibers into concrete has to be developed. The fibers have to be added at the outlet of concrete pump. Maybe a system to shotcrete concrete with electronically controlled fiber

  9. Behavior systems and reinforcement: an integrative approach.

    PubMed Central

    Timberlake, W

    1993-01-01

    Most traditional conceptions of reinforcement are based on a simple causal model in which responding is strengthened by the presentation of a reinforcer. I argue that reinforcement is better viewed as the outcome of constraint of a functioning causal system comprised of multiple interrelated causal sequences, complex linkages between causes and effects, and a set of initial conditions. Using a simplified system conception of the reinforcement situation, I review the similarities and drawbacks of traditional reinforcement models and analyze the recent contributions of cognitive, regulatory, and ecological approaches. Finally, I show how the concept of behavior systems can begin to incorporate both traditional and recent conceptions of reinforcement in an integrative approach. PMID:8354963

  10. Treating problem behaviors maintained by negative reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Cipani, E; Spooner, F

    1997-01-01

    The examination of controlling contingencies in an analysis of problem behavior has been an important clinical topic of discussion in the field of developmental disabilities for many years. We know that problem behavior may be maintained by positive reinforcement or by negative reinforcement. From a clinical perspective, we seem to know more about behavioral techniques that are used when the problem behavior is maintained by positive reinforcement that we understand about those techniques that may be applied when a problem behavior is maintained by negative reinforcement. In this paper, we identify four treatment techniques that may be applied when problem; behavior is maintained by negative reinforcement: (a) functional communication training; (b) behavioral momentum; (c) differential reinforcement or an alternative escape behavior; and (d) errorless learning. Each of the four techniques will be defined, applications and guidelines for use delineated.

  11. Reinforcement of Existing Cast-Iron Structural Elements by Means of Fiber Reinforced Composites / Wzmacnianie Istniejących, Żeliwnych Elementów Konstrukcyjnych za Pomocą Włóknokompozytów

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcinowski, Jakub; Różycki, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The paperdeals with tubular, cast-iron columns which should be reinforced due to the planned new structural function of these elements. According to the requirements of the monument conservator the general appearance of columns should not be altered significantly. Reinforcement with an external, thin coating (sleeve or jacket) made of composite (carbon fibre reinforced polymer - CFRP) was proposed. Details of the proposedtechniquewerepresented. The reinforcementeffect was verifiedin destructivetestsperformed on two columns without reinforcement and the two other columns reinforced with the chosentechnique. Due to the expected very high load capacity of the axially loaded column, the test rig was designed in such a manner that the force could be applied on big eccentricity. For this purpose a specialbase was prepared(comp. Fig. 1). Destructivetests have confirmed the high effectiveness of the adopted strengthening technique.

  12. [Reinforcement learning by striatum].

    PubMed

    Kunisato, Yoshihiko; Okada, Go; Okamoto, Yasumasa

    2009-04-01

    Recently, computational models of reinforcement learning have been applied for the analysis of neuroimaging data. It has been clarified that the striatum plays a key role in decision making. We review the reinforcement learning theory and the biological structures such as the brain and signals such as neuromodulators associated with reinforcement learning. We also investigated the function of the striatum and the neurotransmitter serotonin in reward prediction. We first studied the brain mechanisms for reward prediction at different time scales. Our experiment on the striatum showed that the ventroanterior regions are involved in predicting immediate rewards and the dorsoposterior regions are involved in predicting future rewards. Further, we investigated whether serotonin regulates both the reward selection and the striatum function are specialized reward prediction at different time scales. To this end, we regulated the dietary intake of tryptophan, a precursor of serotonin. Our experiment showed that the activity of the ventral part of the striatum was correlated with reward prediction at shorter time scales, and this activity was stronger at low serotonin levels. By contrast, the activity of the dorsal part of the striatum was correlated with reward prediction at longer time scales, and this activity was stronger at high serotonin levels. Further, a higher proportion of small reward choices, together with a higher rate of discounting of delayed rewards is observed in the low-serotonin condition than in the control and high-serotonin conditions. Further examinations are required in future to assess the relation between the disturbance of reward prediction caused by low serotonin and mental disorders related to serotonin such as depression.

  13. Digital controller design for absolute value function constrained nonlinear systems via scalar sign function approach.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Singla, Mithun; Olmi, Claudio; Shieh, Leang S; Song, Gangbing

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a scalar sign function-based digital design methodology is developed for modeling and control of a class of analog nonlinear systems that are restricted by the absolute value function constraints. As is found to be not uncommon, many real systems are subject to the constraints which are described by the non-smooth functions such as absolute value function. The non-smooth and nonlinear nature poses significant challenges to the modeling and control work. To overcome these difficulties, a novel idea proposed in this work is to use a scalar sign function approach to effectively transform the original nonlinear and non-smooth model into a smooth nonlinear rational function model. Upon the resulting smooth model, a systematic digital controller design procedure is established, in which an optimal linearization method, LQR design and digital implementation through an advanced digital redesign technique are sequentially applied. The example of tracking control of a piezoelectric actuator system is utilized throughout the paper for illustrating the proposed methodology. 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computational design of receptor and sensor proteins with novel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looger, Loren L.; Dwyer, Mary A.; Smith, James J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2003-05-01

    The formation of complexes between proteins and ligands is fundamental to biological processes at the molecular level. Manipulation of molecular recognition between ligands and proteins is therefore important for basic biological studies and has many biotechnological applications, including the construction of enzymes, biosensors, genetic circuits, signal transduction pathways and chiral separations. The systematic manipulation of binding sites remains a major challenge. Computational design offers enormous generality for engineering protein structure and function. Here we present a structure-based computational method that can drastically redesign protein ligand-binding specificities. This method was used to construct soluble receptors that bind trinitrotoluene, L-lactate or serotonin with high selectivity and affinity. These engineered receptors can function as biosensors for their new ligands; we also incorporated them into synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathways, regulating gene expression in response to extracellular trinitrotoluene or L-lactate. The use of various ligands and proteins shows that a high degree of control over biomolecular recognition has been established computationally. The biological and biosensing activities of the designed receptors illustrate potential applications of computational design.

  15. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A.; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf. PMID:27096600

  16. Combining noncontingent reinforcement and differential reinforcement schedules as treatment for aberrant behavior.

    PubMed

    Marcus, B A; Vollmer, T R

    1996-01-01

    Research has shown that noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) can be an effective behavior-reduction procedure when based on a functional analysis. The effects of NCR may be a result of elimination of the contingency between aberrant behavior and reinforcing consequences (extinction) or frequent and free access to reinforcers that may reduce the participant's motivation to engage in aberrant behaviors or mands. If motivation is momentarily reduced, behavior such as mands may not be sensitive to positive reinforcement. In this study, for 3 children with aberrant behavior maintained by tangible positive reinforcement, differential-reinforcement-of-alternative-behavior schedules were superimposed on NCR schedules to determine if mands could be strengthened. Results for the participants indicated that NCR did not preclude reinforcement of mands.

  17. Elementary tetrahelical protein design for diverse oxidoreductase functions

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Bruce R; Sheehan, Molly M; Fry, Bryan A; Bialas, Chris; Ennist, Nathan M; Siedlecki, Jessica A; Zhao, Zhenyu; Stetz, Matthew A; Valentine, Kathleen G; Anderson, J L Ross; Wand, A Joshua; Discher, Bohdana M; Moser, Christopher C; Dutton, P Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Emulating functions of natural enzymes in man-made constructs has proven challenging. Here we describe a man-made protein platform that reproduces many of the diverse functions of natural oxidoreductases without importing the complex and obscure interactions common to natural proteins. Our design is founded on an elementary, structurally stable 4-α-helix protein monomer with a minimalist interior malleable enough to accommodate various light- and redox-active cofactors and with an exterior tolerating extensive charge patterning for modulation of redox cofactor potentials and environmental interactions. Despite its modest size, the construct offers several independent domains for functional engineering that targets diverse natural activities, including dioxygen binding and superoxide and peroxide generation, interprotein electron transfer to natural cytochrome c and light-activated intraprotein energy transfer and charge separation approximating the core reactions of photosynthesis, cryptochrome and photolyase. The highly stable, readily expressible and biocompatible characteristics of these open-ended designs promise development of practical in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24121554

  18. Treating Problem Behaviors Maintained by Negative Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipani, Ennio; Spooner, Fred

    1997-01-01

    Identifies four treatment techniques that may be applied when problem behavior is maintained by negative reinforcement: (1) functional communication training; (2) behavioral momentum; (3) differential reinforcement or an alternative escape behavior; and (4) errorless learning. Each of the techniques is defined, and applications and guidelines for…

  19. Test-specific control conditions for functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Fahmie, Tara A; Iwata, Brian A; Querim, Angie C; Harper, Jill M

    2013-01-01

    Most functional analyses of problem behavior include a common condition (play or noncontingent reinforcement) as a control for both positive and negative reinforcement. However, test-specific conditions that control for each potential source of reinforcement may be beneficial occasionally. We compared responding during alone, ignore, play, and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) control conditions for individuals whose problem behavior was maintained by positive or negative reinforcement. Results showed that all of the conditions were effective controls for problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement; however, the DRO condition was consistently ineffective as a control for problem behavior maintained by negative reinforcement. Implications for the design of functional analyses and future research are discussed. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  20. Optimizing Experimental Design for Comparing Models of Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Daunizeau, Jean; Preuschoff, Kerstin; Friston, Karl; Stephan, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the first attempt to formalize the optimization of experimental design with the aim of comparing models of brain function based on neuroimaging data. We demonstrate our approach in the context of Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), which relates experimental manipulations to observed network dynamics (via hidden neuronal states) and provides an inference framework for selecting among candidate models. Here, we show how to optimize the sensitivity of model selection by choosing among experimental designs according to their respective model selection accuracy. Using Bayesian decision theory, we (i) derive the Laplace-Chernoff risk for model selection, (ii) disclose its relationship with classical design optimality criteria and (iii) assess its sensitivity to basic modelling assumptions. We then evaluate the approach when identifying brain networks using DCM. Monte-Carlo simulations and empirical analyses of fMRI data from a simple bimanual motor task in humans serve to demonstrate the relationship between network identification and the optimal experimental design. For example, we show that deciding whether there is a feedback connection requires shorter epoch durations, relative to asking whether there is experimentally induced change in a connection that is known to be present. Finally, we discuss limitations and potential extensions of this work. PMID:22125485

  1. Functional and aesthetic approach to design of bird feeders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhta, A.; Kukhta, M.

    2015-10-01

    Anthropogenic objects which load the urban environment negatively affects the human psyche. The alternative is attracting elements of the natural environment into urban environment, of which some of the most frequently identified are birds. Attracting birds in the city is possible by means of feeders and artificial nests, however, both must be harmonious. The aim of this study is to analyze the essential functions of the feeders, and their integration into the environmental design and development of the city. On this basis an original feeder which is convenient for use by birds and attracts people's attention is developed. In this paper we apply comparative analysis of different types of feeders encountered in Tomsk, bird watching, and evaluate usability of different types of feeders from the position of their convenience both for birds and human beings. Historical-cultural analysis for determining features of the architectural and environmental design of Tomsk is carried out, the method allows us to solve engineering problems. In this study the feeder convenient for bird use is designed which blends harmoniously with the architectural design of Tomsk.

  2. ATRP in the design of functional materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Daniel J; Oh, Jung Kwon; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) is an effective technique for the design and preparation of multifunctional, nanostructured materials for a variety of applications in biology and medicine. ATRP enables precise control over macromolecular structure, order, and functionality, which are important considerations for emerging biomedical designs. This article reviews recent advances in the preparation of polymer-based nanomaterials using ATRP, including polymer bioconjugates, block copolymer-based drug delivery systems, cross-linked microgels/nanogels, diagnostic and imaging platforms, tissue engineering hydrogels, and degradable polymers. It is envisioned that precise engineering at the molecular level will translate to tailored macroscopic physical properties, thus enabling control of the key elements for realized biomedical applications.

  3. ATRP in the design of functional materials for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Siegwart, Daniel J.; Oh, Jung Kwon; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization (ATRP) is an effective technique for the design and preparation of multifunctional, nanostructured materials for a variety of applications in biology and medicine. ATRP enables precise control over macromolecular structure, order, and functionality, which are important considerations for emerging biomedical designs. This article reviews recent advances in the preparation of polymer-based nanomaterials using ATRP, including polymer bioconjugates, block copolymer-based drug delivery systems, cross-linked microgels/nanogels, diagnostic and imaging platforms, tissue engineering hydrogels, and degradable polymers. It is envisioned that precise engineering at the molecular level will translate to tailored macroscopic physical properties, thus enabling control of the key elements for realized biomedical applications. PMID:23525884

  4. DNA from natural sources in design of functional devices.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Chueh; Bauer, Dennis M; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2014-05-15

    The role of DNA as structuring or templating agent has become more significant with the development of nanobiotechnology. Although short single and double stranded DNA have extensively been used as immobilization tool, as a template for nanoparticle preparation and in design of various devices such as nanomotors and biosensors, DNA from natural sources has an advantage of being abundant, cheap and readily available. Therefore, it is not surprising that there is a huge interest in making the use of natural DNA properties for both nano- and micro-applications. In this review we attempt to give an overview of the up to date applications of natural DNA, either from viral, marine or mammalian sources, in design of functional devices. This article is meant to be a starting point and a guide to the platforms in which natural DNA is employed such as DNA origami, optoelectronic devices and organic catalysis.

  5. Model-Based Reinforcement Learning under Concurrent Schedules of Reinforcement in Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huh, Namjung; Jo, Suhyun; Kim, Hoseok; Sul, Jung Hoon; Jung, Min Whan

    2009-01-01

    Reinforcement learning theories postulate that actions are chosen to maximize a long-term sum of positive outcomes based on value functions, which are subjective estimates of future rewards. In simple reinforcement learning algorithms, value functions are updated only by trial-and-error, whereas they are updated according to the decision-maker's…

  6. Model-Based Reinforcement Learning under Concurrent Schedules of Reinforcement in Rodents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huh, Namjung; Jo, Suhyun; Kim, Hoseok; Sul, Jung Hoon; Jung, Min Whan

    2009-01-01

    Reinforcement learning theories postulate that actions are chosen to maximize a long-term sum of positive outcomes based on value functions, which are subjective estimates of future rewards. In simple reinforcement learning algorithms, value functions are updated only by trial-and-error, whereas they are updated according to the decision-maker's…

  7. Rational design of functional and tunable oscillating enzymatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Wong, Albert S. Y.; van der Made, R. Martijn; Postma, Sjoerd G. J.; Groen, Joost; van Roekel, Hendrik W. H.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2015-02-01

    Life is sustained by complex systems operating far from equilibrium and consisting of a multitude of enzymatic reaction networks. The operating principles of biology's regulatory networks are known, but the in vitro assembly of out-of-equilibrium enzymatic reaction networks has proved challenging, limiting the development of synthetic systems showing autonomous behaviour. Here, we present a strategy for the rational design of programmable functional reaction networks that exhibit dynamic behaviour. We demonstrate that a network built around autoactivation and delayed negative feedback of the enzyme trypsin is capable of producing sustained oscillating concentrations of active trypsin for over 65 h. Other functions, such as amplification, analog-to-digital conversion and periodic control over equilibrium systems, are obtained by linking multiple network modules in microfluidic flow reactors. The methodology developed here provides a general framework to construct dissipative, tunable and robust (bio)chemical reaction networks.

  8. Epoxy elastomers reinforced with functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stimuli-responsive shape memory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lama, G. C.; Nasti, G.; Cerruti, P.; Gentile, G.; Carfagna, C.; Ambrogi, V.

    2014-05-15

    In this work, the incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) into epoxy-based elastomers was carried out in order to obtain nanocomposite systems with shape memory effect. For the preparation of elastomeric matrices, p-bis(2,3-epoxypropoxy)-α-methylstilbene (DOMS) was cured with sebacic acid. DOMS was synthesized in our laboratory and it is characterized by a rigid-rod, potentially liquid crystalline structure. A lightly cross-linked liquid crystalline elastomer was obtained. As for nanocomposites, variable amounts (0.75, 1.50, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0 wt.%) of COOH-MWCNTs were employed. In order to improve the nanotubes dispersibility and the interfacial adhesion with the epoxy matrix, an optimized two-step procedure was developed, which consisted in grafting the epoxy monomer onto the nanotube surface and then curing it in presence of crosslinking agent. DOMS-functionalized MWCNT were characterized through solvent dispersion experiments, FTIR spectroscopy and TGA analysis, which demonstrated the occurred covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with the epoxy monomers. The morphological analysis through electron microscopy demonstrated that this was an efficient strategy to improve the dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix. The second part of the work was devoted to the structural, thermal, mechanical and electric characterization of elastomeric nanocomposites. The results indicated a general improvement of properties of nanocomposites. Also, independently of the nanotube content, a smectic phase formed. Shape memory features of LC systems were also evaluated. It was demonstrated the shape could be recovered through heating, solvent immersion, as well as upon the application of an electrical field.

  9. In situ compatibilizer-reinforced interface between a flexible polymer (a functionalized polypropylene) and a rodlike polymer (a thermotropic liquid crystalline polymer).

    PubMed

    Seo, Yongsok; Ninh, Tran Hai; Hong, Soon Man; Kim, Sehyun; Kang, Tae Jin; Kim, Hansung; Kim, Jinyeol

    2006-03-28

    We present an investigation of the interfacial reinforcement between a flexible folded-chain polymer (functionalized polypropylene-maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene, MAPP) and a rodlike polymer (a themotropic liquid crystalline polymer, TCLP - poly(ester amide)). Fracture toughness was measured using an asymmetric double-cantilever beam test (ADCB). High fracture toughness at the bonding temperature of 200 degrees C indicates that a chemical reaction has occurred at the interface to provide a strong interaction between MAPP and TLCP. Despite the higher modulus of TLCP, the fracture was propagated in the TLCP phase because of inherent TLCP domain structure. An analysis on the locus of failure revealed that at constant bonding temperature the fracture toughness between MAPP and TLCP was influenced not only by the bonding temperature but also by the bonding time. The fracture toughness increased with the bonding temperature until 200 degrees C was reached and then decreased at higher bonding temperature. The fracture toughness increased with annealing time until it reached a plateau value. We ascribe the dependence of the fracture toughness on the bonding time to the progressive occurrence of two different failure mechanisms, adhesive failure and cohesive failure. The adhesive strength increased with bonding temperature whereas the cohesive strength decreased because of weaker adhesion between TLCP crystalline domains. The dependence of fracture toughness on bonding time was explained in terms of the TLCP crystalline domain structure.

  10. Reinforcement stresses during deformation of sphere- and particulate-reinforced Al-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, I.; Poza, P.; Martinez, J.L.; Llorca, J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent experimental results showed that reinforcement fracture is very often the dominant damage mechanism during ambient temperature deformation of discontinuously reinforced Al-matrix composites (DRAC). The reinforcements are broken by cracks perpendicular to the loading axis, and the fraction of broken reinforcements increases during plastic deformation as the load transferred from the matrix to the ceramic particulates increases. This process continues until a criteria fraction of broken reinforcements is reached, and then fracture takes place suddenly by a ductile mechanism involving localized necking of the intervoid matrix. The rate of reinforcement fracture depends on the strength of the ceramic reinforcements and on the stresses acting on them, and the modeling of the processes of damage accumulation in DRAC requires the knowledge of both. In particular, the stresses acting on the reinforcements during monotonic tensile deformation are a function of the applied strain, of the matrix and reinforcement properties, and of the volume fraction and shape of the ceramic reinforcements. A parametrical study is presented in this article of the influence of these factors on the stress acting on the reinforcements. The numerical results covered the whole range of matrix strengths which are typical in DRAC and were fitted to simple analytical expressions to facilitate their use by other researchers.

  11. Strong fiber-reinforced hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Animesh; Rahbar, Nima; Calvert, Paul D

    2013-02-01

    In biological hydrogels, the gel matrix is usually reinforced with micro- or nanofibers, and the resulting composite is tough and strong. In contrast, synthetic hydrogels are weak and brittle, although they are highly elastic. The are many potential applications for strong synthetic hydrogels in medical devices, including as scaffolds for tissue growth. This work describes a new class of hydrogel composites reinforced with elastic fibers, giving them a cartilage-like structure. A three-dimensional rapid prototyping technique was used to form crossed "log-piles" of elastic fibers that are then impregnated with an epoxy-based hydrogel in order to form the fiber-reinforced gel. The fibrous construct improves the strength, modulus and toughness of the hydrogel, and also constrains the swelling. By altering the construct geometry and studying the effect on mechanical properties, we will develop the understanding needed to design strong hydrogels for biomedical devices and soft machines. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Operative mechanisms of noncontingent reinforcement at varying magnitudes and schedules.

    PubMed

    Wilder, D A; Fisher, W W; Anders, B M; Cercone, J J; Neidert, P L

    2001-01-01

    In order to examine the mechanism(s) responsible for response reductions from noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), multiple magnitudes and densities of NCR were superimposed on a variable ratio (VR) 3 schedule of contingent reinforcement for the performance of an arbitrary manual response. Data were collected on responding that occurred during access to the reinforcer separately from responding that occurred between reinforcer access intervals (i.e.. when the participant did not have access to the reinforcer). Higher magnitudes and denser schedules of NCR produced greater reductions in responding than did lower magnitudes and leaner schedules. Within-session response patterns suggested that decrements in responding were primarily a function of the increased amount of reinforcer access time associated with higher magnitudes and denser schedules of NCR. That is, it appeared that the participant consumed reinforcers (regardless of whether they were delivered contingently or noncontingently) when they were available and responded for contingent reinforcers primarily when reinforcers were absent.

  13. Suboptimal choice in pigeons: Choice is primarily based on the value of the conditioned reinforcer rather than overall reinforcement rate.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron P; Zentall, Thomas R

    2016-04-01

    Pigeons have sometimes shown a preference for a signaled 50% reinforcement alternative (leading half of the time to a stimulus that signaled 100% reinforcement and otherwise to a stimulus that signaled 0% reinforcement) over a 100% reinforcement alternative. We hypothesized that pigeons may actually be indifferent between the 2 alternatives with previous inconsistent preferences resulting in part from an artifact of the use of a spatial discrimination. In the present experiments, we tested the hypothesis that pigeons would be indifferent between alternatives that provide conditioned reinforcers of equal value. In Experiment 1, we used the signaled 50% reinforcement versus 100% reinforcement procedure, but cued the alternatives with shapes that varied in their spatial location from trial to trial. Consistent with the stimulus value hypothesis, the pigeons showed indifference between the alternatives. In Experiment 2, to confirm that the pigeons could discriminate between the shapes, we removed the discriminative function from the 50% reinforcement alternative and found a clear preference for the 100% reinforcement alternative. Finally, in Experiment 3, when we returned the discriminative function to the 50% reinforcement alternative and reduced the 100% reinforcement alternative to 50% reinforcement, we found a clear preference for the discriminative stimulus alternative. These results support the hypothesis that pigeons prefer the alternative with the conditioned reinforcer that best predicts reinforcement, whereas its frequency may be relatively unimportant.

  14. Accessing FMS Functionality: The Impact of Design on Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, Karl; Sherry, Lance; Roberts, Ralph, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In modern commercial and military aircraft, the Flight Management System (FMS) lies at the heart of the functionality of the airplane. The nature of the FMS has also caused great difficulties learning and accessing this functionality. This study examines actual Air Force pilots who were qualified on the newly introduced advanced FMS and shows that the design of the system itself is a primary source of difficulty learning the system. Twenty representative tasks were selected which the pilots could be expected to accomplish on an ' actual flight. These tasks were analyzed using the RAFIV stage model (Sherry, Polson, et al. 2002). This analysis demonstrates that a great burden is placed on remembering complex reformulation of the task to function mapping. 65% of the tasks required retaining one access steps in memory to accomplish the task, 20% required two memorized access steps, and 15% required zero memorized access steps. The probability that a participant would make an access error on the tasks was: two memorized access steps - 74%, one memorized access step - 13%, and zero memorized access steps - 6%. Other factors were analyzed as well, including experience with the system and frequency of use. This completed the picture of a system with many memorized steps causing difficulty with the new system, especially when trying to fine where to access the correct function.

  15. Dynamic Response of Reinforced Soil Systems. Volume 1. Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    types of structures. To design blast-protective structures usiiig reinforced soil, the dynamic response characteristics and analytical theory of...the properties of reinforced soil under static loading condition, little work has been carried out to determine reinforced soil properties or theory ...40 2. Deformation Theories .. . .. .. . . . . .. . .. . 4k 3. Incremental Theories ..... ..... ................. 42 4. Endochronic Theories

  16. Establishing Operations and Reinforcement Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Timothy R.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1991-01-01

    Five adult males with profound retardation were assessed on a motor task during baseline, satiation, and deprivation conditions, with three classes of consequences: small food items, music, and social praise. Each stimulus class functioned as reinforcement, with different degrees of effectiveness during satiation versus deprivation conditions.…

  17. Is extinction the hallmark of operant discrimination? Reinforcement and S(Delta) effects.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, Matthew E; Ryals, Curtis D; Higgins, Sean; Sulkowski, Jennifer; Doney, Janice; Kelley, Ann E; Bersh, Philip J

    2007-01-10

    Using a successive discrimination procedure with rats, three experiments investigated the contribution of reinforcement rate and amount of S(Delta) exposure on the acquisition of an operant discrimination. S(D) components and were always 2 min in length, while S(Delta) (extinction) components were either 1 min or 4 min in length; responses in S(D) were reinforced on one of four schedules. In Experiment 1, each of eight groups were exposed to one possible combination of rate of reinforcement and S(Delta) component length. At every level of reinforcement, the 4 min S(Delta) groups acquired the discrimination more quickly. However, within each level of reinforcement, the proportions of responding in S(D) as a function cumulative S(Delta) exposure were equivalent, regardless of the number of reinforcers earned in S(D), suggesting that extinction is the "hallmark" of discrimination. Experiment 2 sought to replicate these results in a within-subjects design, and although the 4 min S(Delta) conditions always produced superior discriminations, the lack of discriminated responding in some conditions suggested that stimulus disparity was reduced. Experiment 3 clarified those results and extended the finding that the acquisition of operant discrimination closely parallels extinction of responding in S(Delta). In sum, it appears that higher reinforcement rates and longer S(Delta) exposure facilitate the acquisition of discriminated operant responding.

  18. A variation of noncontingent reinforcement in the treatment of aberrant behavior.

    PubMed

    Britton, L N; Carr, J E; Kellum, K K; Dozier, C L; Weil, T M

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of a variation of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) that incorporated a stimulus-delay procedure in the reduction of aberrant behavior maintained by positive reinforcement. Functional analyses for three individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities indicated that their behaviors were maintained by positive reinforcement: one in the form of access to a tangible item, another by attention, and the third by physical contact. We implemented NCR with the delay procedure with two participants using reversal designs to evaluate effects. We also compared this NCR variation and DRO with the third participant to evaluate reinforcer-delivery rates. The variation of NCR was successful in reducing all aberrant behavior to near-zero levels. A comparison of reinforcer delivery between NCR with the stimulus-delay procedure and DRO demonstrated that the participant accessed more reinforcement with NCR. Results are discussed in the context of enhancing decelerative interventions with emphases on minimizing response effort for caregivers and maximizing access to reinforcement for the individuals.

  19. Food reinforcement during infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kai Ling

    2017-01-01

    The motivation to eat, as operationalized by measuring how hard someone will work for food, is cross-sectionally and prospectively related to obesity. Persons high in food reinforcement consume more calories, and energy intake mediates the relationship between food reinforcement and obesity. Research has shown avid sucking for milk in early infancy predicts later adiposity, and the relationship between food reinforcement and excess body weight has been observed in infants as young as 9 months of age. New methodological developments in studying food reinforcement in infants and young children provide the first opportunity to study the origin of food reinforcement. This review seeks to provide background on the measurement of food reinforcement, and to present, for the first time, prenatal and postnatal predictors of infant food reinforcement. Lastly, potential mechanisms for an increasing trajectory of food reinforcement throughout development are proposed. PMID:27373207

  20. Functional, thermal, and antimicrobial properties of soluble soybean polysaccharide biocomposites reinforced by nano TiO2.

    PubMed

    Shaili, Teymourpour; Abdorreza, Mohammadi Nafchi; Fariborz, Nahidi

    2015-12-10

    This study describes a new polysaccharide-based bionanocomposite developed through solvent casting. Different concentrations (i.e., 0%, 1%, 3%, and 5% (w/w)) of nano titanium dioxide (TiO2-N) were incorporated into soluble soybean polysaccharide (SSPS), and the functional properties of the resultant SSPS films were estimated. Incorporation of TiO2-N into the SSPS matrix decreased water vapor permeability from 7.41 to 4.44 × (10(-11)gm(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1)) and oxygen permeability from 202 to 98 (cm(3)μmm(-2) d(-1) atm(-1)). Moisture content also decreased, the glass transition temperature increased, and the mechanical properties and heat seal strength of the SSPS films improved. SSPS bionanocomposite films showed excellent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In summary, TiO2-N shows potential use as a filler in SSPS-based films for the food and non-food industries.

  1. A Brief Opportunity to Run Does Not Function as a Reinforcer for Mice Selected for High Daily Wheel-running Rates

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Terry W; GarlandJr, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Mice from replicate lines, selectively bred based on high daily wheel-running rates, run more total revolutions and at higher average speeds than do mice from nonselected control lines. Based on this difference it was assumed that selected mice would find the opportunity to run in a wheel a more efficacious consequence. To assess this assumption within an operant paradigm, mice must be trained to make a response to produce the opportunity to run as a consequence. In the present study an autoshaping procedure was used to compare the acquisition of lever pressing reinforced by the opportunity to run for a brief opportunity (i.e., 90 s) between selected and control mice and then, using an operant procedure, the effect of the duration of the opportunity to run on lever pressing was assessed by varying reinforcer duration over values of 90 s, 30 min, and 90 s. The reinforcement schedule was a ratio schedule (FR 1 or VR 3). Results from the autoshaping phase showed that more control mice met a criterion of responses on 50% of trials. During the operant phase, when reinforcer duration was 90 s, almost all control, but few selected mice completed a session of 20 reinforcers; however, when reinforcer duration was increased to 30 min almost all selected and control mice completed a session of 20 reinforcers. Taken together, these results suggest that selective breeding based on wheel-running rates over 24 hr may have altered the motivational system in a way that reduces the reinforcing value of shorter running durations. The implications of this finding for these mice as a model for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are discussed. It also is proposed that there may be an inherent trade-off in the motivational system for activities of short versus long duration. PMID:17970415

  2. Single-order diffraction grating designed by trapezoidal transmission function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quanping; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Zuhua; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xie, Changqing; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Yan, Zhuoyang; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhou, Weimin; Jiang, Gang; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-06-01

    Diffraction grating is a widely used dispersion element in spectral analysis from the infrared to the x-ray region. Traditionally, it has a square-wave transmission function, suffering from high-order diffraction contamination. Single-order diffraction can be achieved by sinusoidal amplitude transmission grating, but the fabrication is difficult. Here, we propose a novel idea to design a grating based on trapezoidal transmission function, which makes traditional grating a special case. Grating designed by this idea can not only suppress higher order diffraction by several orders of magnitude as sinusoidal amplitude grating does but also greatly reduce the fabrication difficulty to the level of processing for traditional grating. It offers a new opportunity for fabrication of grating with single-order diffraction and measurement of spectrum without contamination of high-order harmonic components. This idea can easily extend to varied-line-space grating, concave grating with single-order diffraction, or zone plates with single foci and will bring great changes in the field of grating applications.

  3. Harvesting bioenergy with rationally designed complex functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Liangju

    A key challenge in renewable energy is to capture, convert and store solar power with earth-abundant materials and environmentally benign technologies. The goal of this thesis is to develop rationally designed complex functional materials for bio-renewable energy applications. On one hand, photoconversion membrane proteins (MPs) are nature's nanoengineering feats for renewable energy management. Harnessing their functions in synthetic systems could help understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the nanoscale. This is particularly enticing in the post-genome era as recombinant or cell-free expression of many MPs with high yields becomes possible. However, the labile nature of lipid bilayers renders them unsuitable for use in a broad range of engineered systems. A knowledge gap exists about how to design robust synthetic nanomembranes as lipid-bilayer-mimics to support MP functions and how to direct hierarchical MP reconstitution into those membranes to form 2-D or 3-D ordered proteomembrane arrays. Our studies on proteorhodopsin (PR) and bacterial reaction center (BRC), the two light-harvesting MPs, reveal that a charge-interaction-directed reconstitution (CIDR) mechanism induces spontaneous reconstitution of detergent-solubilized MPs into various amphiphilic block copolymer membranes, many of which have far superior stability than lipid bilayers. Our preliminary data also suggest MPs are not enslaved by the biological membranes they derive from; rather, the chemically nonspecific material properties of MP-supporting membranes may act as allosteric regulators. Versatile chemical designs are possible to modulate the conformational energetics of MPs, hence their transport performance in synthetic systems. On the other hand, microalgae are widely regarded as a sustainable feedstock for biofuel production. Microalgae-derived biofuels have not been commercialized yet because current technologies for microalgae dewatering add a huge cost to the

  4. ZnO-reinforced poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites with antimicrobial function for food packaging.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Díez-Vicente, Angel L

    2014-06-25

    Biodegradable nanocomposites were prepared by adding ZnO nanoparticles to bacterial polyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) via solution casting technique. The morphology, thermal, mechanical, antibacterial, barrier, and migration properties of the nanocomposites were analyzed. The nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed within PHBV without the aid of coupling agents, and acted effectively as nucleating agents, raising the crystallization temperature and the level of crystallinity of the matrix while decreasing its crystallite size. A gradual rise in thermal stability was found with increasing ZnO loading, since the nanofillers hinder the diffusion of volatiles generated during the decomposition process. The nanocomposites displayed superior stiffness, strength, toughness, and glass transition temperature, whereas they displayed reduced water uptake and oxygen and water vapor permeability compared to the neat biopolymer, related to the strong matrix-nanofiller interfacial adhesion attained via hydrogen bonding interactions. At an optimal concentration of 4.0 wt % ZnO, the tensile strength and Young's and storage moduli showed a maximum that coincided with the highest crystallinity and the best barrier properties. PHBV/ZnO films showed antibacterial activity against human pathogen bacteria, and the effect on Escherichia coli was stronger than on Staphylococcus aureus. The overall migration levels of the nanocomposites in both nonpolar and polar simulants dropped upon increasing nanoparticle content, and were well below the limits required by the current normative for food packaging materials. These sustainable nanomaterials with antimicrobial function are very promising to be used as containers for beverage and food products as well as for disposable applications like cutlery or overwrap films.

  5. Reinforcement learning and Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palminteri, Stefano; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, we report the first experimental explorations of reinforcement learning in Tourette syndrome, realized by our team in the last few years. This report will be preceded by an introduction aimed to provide the reader with the state of the art of the knowledge concerning the neural bases of reinforcement learning at the moment of these studies and the scientific rationale beyond them. In short, reinforcement learning is learning by trial and error to maximize rewards and minimize punishments. This decision-making and learning process implicates the dopaminergic system projecting to the frontal cortex-basal ganglia circuits. A large body of evidence suggests that the dysfunction of the same neural systems is implicated in the pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome. Our results show that Tourette condition, as well as the most common pharmacological treatments (dopamine antagonists), affects reinforcement learning performance in these patients. Specifically, the results suggest a deficit in negative reinforcement learning, possibly underpinned by a functional hyperdopaminergia, which could explain the persistence of tics, despite their evident inadaptive (negative) value. This idea, together with the implications of these results in Tourette therapy and the future perspectives, is discussed in Section 4 of this chapter.

  6. Interfacial properties and design of functional energy materials.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality and performance. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly, a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately noncovalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, for example, lithographic, approach. However, while function in simple systems such as single crystals can often be evaluated a priori, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various support substrates. Typical molecular self-assembly involves noncovalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions. These interactions remain poorly understood, due to the combination of many-body interactions compounded by local or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice and electronic structure. Progress toward unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling, and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. Theory, modeling, and simulation can accelerate the process of materials understanding and design

  7. Relationship between intracortical electrode design and chronic recording function.

    PubMed

    Karumbaiah, Lohitash; Saxena, Tarun; Carlson, David; Patil, Ketki; Patkar, Radhika; Gaupp, Eric A; Betancur, Martha; Stanley, Garrett B; Carin, Lawrence; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-11-01

    Intracortical electrodes record neural signals directly from local populations of neurons in the brain, and conduct them to external electronics that control prosthetics. However, the relationship between electrode design, defined by shape, size and tethering; and long-term (chronic) stability of the neuron-electrode interface is poorly understood. Here, we studied the effects of various commercially available intracortical electrode designs that vary in shape (cylindrical, planar), size (15 μm, 50 μm and 75 μm), and tethering [electrode connections to connector with (tethered) and without tethering cable (untethered)] using histological, transcriptomic, and electrophysiological analyses over acute (3 day) and chronic (12 week) timepoints. Quantitative analysis of histological sections indicated that Michigan 50 μm (M50) and Michigan tethered (MT) electrodes induced significantly (p < 0.01) higher glial scarring, and lesser survival of neurons in regions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach when compared to microwire (MW) and Michigan 15 μm (M15) electrodes acutely and chronically. Gene expression analysis of the neurotoxic cytokines interleukin (Il)1 (Il1α, Il1β), Il6, Il17 (Il17a, Il17b, Il17f), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnf) indicated that MW electrodes induced significantly (p < 0.05) reduced expression of these transcripts when compared to M15, M50 and FMAA electrodes chronically. Finally, electrophysiological assessment of electrode function indicated that MW electrodes performed significantly (p < 0.05) better than all other electrodes over a period of 12 weeks. These studies reveal that intracortical electrodes with smaller size, cylindrical shape, and without tethering cables produce significantly diminished inflammatory responses when compared to large, planar and tethered electrodes. These studies provide a platform for the rational design and assessment of chronically functional intracortical electrode implants in the future. © 2013

  8. Fiber reinforced engineering plastics

    Treesearch

    Daniel F. Caulfield; Rodney E. Jacobson; Karl D. Sears; John H. Underwood

    2001-01-01

    Although natural fiber reinforced commodity thermoplastics have a wide range of nonstructural applications in the automotive and decking industries, there have been few reports of cellulosic fiber-reinforced engineering thermoplastics. The commonly held belief has been that the only thermoplastics amenable to natural-fibre reinforcement are limited to low-melting (...

  9. Variable Resolution Reinforcement Learning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-04-01

    Can reinforcement learning ever become a practical method for real control problems? This paper begins by reviewing three reinforcement learning algorithms... reinforcement learning . In addition to exploring state space, and developing a control policy to achieve a task, partigame also learns a kd-tree partitioning of

  10. Partial Planning Reinforcement Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-31

    This project explored several problems in the areas of reinforcement learning , probabilistic planning, and transfer learning. In particular, it...studied Bayesian Optimization for model-based and model-free reinforcement learning , transfer in the context of model-free reinforcement learning based on

  11. Reinforcement of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Peter

    1977-01-01

    A company trainer shows some ways of scheduling reinforcement of learning for trainees: continuous reinforcement, fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval, and variable interval. As there are problems with all methods, he suggests trying combinations of various types of reinforcement. (MF)

  12. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  13. Design analysis of an MPI human functional brain scanner

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Erica E.; Cooley, Clarissa Z.; Cauley, Stephen F.; Griswold, Mark A.; Conolly, Steven M.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2017-01-01

    MPI’s high sensitivity makes it a promising modality for imaging brain function. Functional contrast is proposed based on blood SPION concentration changes due to Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) increases during activation, a mechanism utilized in fMRI studies. MPI offers the potential for a direct and more sensitive measure of SPION concentration, and thus CBV, than fMRI. As such, fMPI could surpass fMRI in sensitivity, enhancing the scientific and clinical value of functional imaging. As human-sized MPI systems have not been attempted, we assess the technical challenges of scaling MPI from rodent to human brain. We use a full-system MPI simulator to test arbitrary hardware designs and encoding practices, and we examine tradeoffs imposed by constraints that arise when scaling to human size as well as safety constraints (PNS and central nervous system stimulation) not considered in animal scanners, thereby estimating spatial resolutions and sensitivities achievable with current technology. Using a projection FFL MPI system, we examine coil hardware options and their implications for sensitivity and spatial resolution. We estimate that an fMPI brain scanner is feasible, although with reduced sensitivity (20×) and spatial resolution (5×) compared to existing rodent systems. Nonetheless, it retains sufficient sensitivity and spatial resolution to make it an attractive future instrument for studying the human brain; additional technical innovations can result in further improvements. PMID:28752130

  14. The Role of Automatic Negative Reinforcement in Clinical Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of automatic negative reinforcement in the maintenance of clinical problems. Following a brief introduction to the functional conceptualization of clinical problems and discussion of four classes of reinforcement maintaining clinical problems, the paper suggests that automatic negative reinforcement is an understudied…

  15. Optimal Design of Functionally Graded Metallic Foam Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Sankar, Bhavani; Venkataraman, Satchi; Zhu, Huadong

    2002-01-01

    The focus of our work has been on developing an insight into the physics that govern the optimum design of thermal insulation for use in thermal protection systems of launch vehicle. Of particular interest was to obtain optimality criteria for designing foam insulations that have density (or porosity) distributions through the thickness for optimum thermal performance. We investigate the optimum design of functionally graded thermal insulation for steady state heat transfer through the foam. We showed that the heat transfer in the foam has competing modes, of radiation and conduction. The problem assumed a fixed inside temperature of 400 K and varied the aerodynamic surface heating on the outside surface from 0.2 to 1.0 MW/sq m. The thermal insulation develops a high temperature gradient through the thickness. Investigation of the model developed for heat conduction in foams showed that at high temperatures (as on outside wall) intracellular radiation dominates the heat transfer in the foam. Minimizing radiation requires reducing the pore size, which increases the density of the foam. At low temperatures (as on the inside wall), intracellular conduction (of the metal and air) dominates the heat transfer. Minimizing conduction requires increasing the pore size. This indicated that for every temperature there was an optimum value of density that minimized the heat transfer coefficient. Two optimization studies were performed. One was to minimize the heat transmitted though a fixed thickness insulation by varying density profiles. The second was to obtain the minimum mass insulation for specified thickness. Analytical optimality criteria were derived for the cases considered. The optimality condition for minimum heat transfer required that at each temperature we find the density that minimizes the heat transfer coefficient. Once a relationship between the optimum heat transfer coefficient and the temperature was found, the design problem reduced to the solution of a

  16. Bioinspiration from fish for smart material design and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauder, G. V.; Madden, P. G. A.; Tangorra, J. L.; Anderson, E.; Baker, T. V.

    2011-09-01

    Fish are a potentially rich source of inspiration for the design of smart materials. Fish exemplify the use of flexible materials to generate forces during locomotion, and a hallmark of fish functional design is the use of body and fin deformation to power propulsion and maneuvering. As a result of nearly 500 million years of evolutionary experimentation, fish design has a number of interesting features of note to materials engineers. In this paper we first provide a brief general overview of some key features of the mechanical design of fish, and then focus on two key properties of fish: the bilaminar mechanical design of bony fish fin rays that allows active muscular control of curvature, and the role of body flexibility in propulsion. After describing the anatomy of bony fish fin rays, we provide new data on their mechanical properties. Three-point bending tests and measurement of force inputs to and outputs from the fin rays show that these fin rays are effective displacement transducers. Fin rays in different regions of the fin differ considerably in their material properties, and in the curvature produced by displacement of one of the two fin ray halves. The mean modulus for the proximal (basal) region of the fin rays was 1.34 GPa, but this varied from 0.24 to 3.7 GPa for different fin rays. The distal fin region was less stiff, and moduli for the different fin rays measured varied from 0.11 to 0.67 GPa. These data are similar to those for human tendons (modulus around 0.5 GPa). Analysis of propulsion using flexible foils controlled using a robotic flapping device allows investigation of the effect of altering flexural stiffness on swimming speed. Flexible foils with the leading edge moved in a heave show a distinct peak in propulsive performance, while the addition of pitch input produces a broad plateau where the swimming speed is relatively unaffected by the flexural stiffness. Our understanding of the material design of fish and the control of tissue

  17. Short Time Impulse Response Function (STIRF) for automatic evaluation of the variation of the dynamic parameters of reinforced concrete framed structures during strong earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco

    2015-04-01

    the results provided in this study, the methodology seems to be able to evaluate fast variations (over time) of dynamic parameters of a generic reinforced concrete framed structure. Further analyses are necessary to better calibrate the length of the moving time-window (in order to minimize the spurious frequency within each Interferometric Response Function evaluated on both weak and strong motion phases) and to verify the possibility to use the STIRF to analyse the nonlinear behaviour of general systems. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Civil Protection Department within the project DPC-RELUIS 2014 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring''. References R. Ditommaso, F.C. Ponzo (2015). Automatic evaluation of the fundamental frequency variations and related damping factor of reinforced concrete framed structures using the Short Time Impulse Response Function (STIRF). Engineering Structures, 82 (2015), 104-112. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.engstruct.2014.10.023.

  18. The Effect of Contingent Reinforcement on Target Variables in Outpatient Psychotherapy for Depression: A Successful and Unsuccessful Case Using Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Landes, Sara J.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.; Brown, Keri R.; Baruch, David E.; Holman, Gareth I.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated a behavior-analytic treatment, functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP), for outpatient depression utilizing two single-subject A/A+B designs. The baseline condition was cognitive behavioral therapy. Results demonstrated treatment success in 1 client after the addition of FAP and treatment failure in the 2nd. This…

  19. Effects of Prevent-Teach-Reinforce on Academic Engagement and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJager, Brett W.; Filter, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of prevent-teach-reinforce (P-T-R), a functional behavioral assessment-based intervention for students with behavior problems, using an A-B-A-B design with follow-up. Participants included three students in kindergarten, fourth grade, and fifth grade in a rural Midwestern school district. P-T-R interventions…

  20. Effects of Prevent-Teach-Reinforce on Academic Engagement and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJager, Brett W.; Filter, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of prevent-teach-reinforce (P-T-R), a functional behavioral assessment-based intervention for students with behavior problems, using an A-B-A-B design with follow-up. Participants included three students in kindergarten, fourth grade, and fifth grade in a rural Midwestern school district. P-T-R interventions…