Science.gov

Sample records for reinforcing steel evaluations

  1. Evaluating cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using impact-echo testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Feng

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete using the impact-echo testing. In order to evaluate the security of the construction, usually need to estimate the cover depth of the reinforced concrete. At present, the examination technique of the cover depth of the reinforced concrete without the steel fiber is mainly applied in the magnetic and electrical methods, its rapid detection and good results. But the research of the reactive powder concrete be gradually progress, with the steel fiber concrete structure will be increased, if should still operate the examination with the magnetic and electrical methods, theoretically the steel fiber will have the interference to its electromagnetism field. Therefore, this research designs four kinds of reinforced concrete plate that include different steel fiber contents, to evaluate test results of estimate of the cover depth of the reinforcing bar. The results showed that: estimate of the cover depth of steel fiber reinforced concrete reinforcing bar using the impact-echo testing, the variety of the steel fiber content does not have much influence, the test measurement error within ± 10%, and the most important source of uncertainty is the velocity of concrete.

  2. Mechanical evaluation of hip cement spacer reinforcement with stainless steel Kirschner wires, titanium and carbon rods, and stainless steel mesh.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Tomonori; Tsumura, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    In two-stage treatments for infections after total hip arthroplasty, antibiotic-loaded cement spacers help treat the infection by antibiotic elution and prevent contraction. However, such spacers are weak and may fracture while awaiting replacement, impairing functionality. We evaluated whether a Kirschner wire (K-wire) mounted into the spacer reinforced its strength along with the effects of the reinforcing material, position, and intensity. Spacers without reinforcing materials constituted the control group. As reinforcing materials, stainless steel K-wires (diameters 3 and 6 mm), titanium alloy and carbon fibers (diameter 3.175 mm), and stainless steel meshes (inner and outer diameters, 6 and 9 mm, respectively) were inserted into the spacer mold before filling with cement. The spacers complied with ISO 7206-4; a compressive load was applied using a testing machine with a velocity of 25.4 mm/min, and the maximum load was recorded. We used 1-3 K-wires positioned on the medial side, lateral side, neck only, and stem only and tested 3 specimens for each condition. The control group withstood the highest load. Stainless steel was the strongest material; 3-mm K-wires in the neck and lateral side withstood a higher load. The computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed a cavity between the K-wires and cement. When K-wires were inserted along the whole length, despite cement fractures, continuity was maintained because of the reinforcing materials. It is difficult to improve the reinforcing strength of spacers using K-wires; however, K-wires prevented dislocation of cement spacer fragments, which can help prevent contraction and facilitate spacer removal during replacement.

  3. 221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, J.T.

    1998-05-28

    This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade.

  4. Evaluation of passivation method and corrosion inhibitors for steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard; Lee, K. Wayne; Cao, Yong

    1999-02-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel due to the ingression of chloride ions from deicing salt and/or seawater has been a major cause of the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. Typically reinforcing steel is protected from corrosion by the formation of passive film because of highly alkaline concrete environment. The film can be damaged with the introduction of chloride ions to concrete, then corrosion occurs. There are mainly three approaches to tackle this problem, i.e., protective coating, cathodic protection and corrosion inhibitors.

  5. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored. PMID:28773824

  6. Hybrid Effect Evaluation of Steel Fiber and Carbon Fiber on the Performance of the Fiber Reinforced Concrete.

    PubMed

    Song, Weimin; Yin, Jian

    2016-08-18

    Fiber reinforcement is an important method to enhance the performance of concrete. In this study, the compressive test and impact test were conducted, and then the hybrid effect between steel fiber (SF) and carbon fiber (CF) was evaluated by employing the hybrid effect index. Compressive toughness and impact toughness of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC), carbon fiber reinforced concrete (CFRC) and hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC) were explored at steel fiber volume fraction 0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and carbon fiber 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%. Results showed that the addition of steel fiber and carbon fiber can increase the compressive strength. SF, CF and the hybridization between them could increase the compressive toughness significantly. The impact test results showed that as the volume of fiber increased, the impact number of the first visible crack and the ultimate failure also increased. The improvement of toughness mainly lay in improving the crack resistance after the first crack. Based on the test results, the positive hybrid effect of steel fiber and carbon fiber existed in hybrid fiber reinforced concrete. The relationship between the compressive toughness and impact toughness was also explored.

  7. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  8. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  9. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  10. Bond characteristics of reinforcing steel embedded in geopolymer concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathirvel, Parthiban; Thangavelu, Manju; Gopalan, Rashmi; Raja Mohan Kaliyaperumal, Saravana

    2017-07-01

    The force transferring between reinforcing steel and the surrounding concrete in reinforced concrete is influenced by several factors. Whereas, the study on bond behaviour of geopolymer concrete (GPC) is lagging. In this paper, an experimental attempt has been made to evaluate the geopolymer concrete bond with reinforcing steel of different diameter and embedded length using standard pull out test. The geopolymer concrete is made of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) as geopolymer source material (GSM). The tests were conducted to evaluate the development of bond between steel and concrete of grade M40 and M50 with 12 and 16 mm diameter reinforcing steel for geopolymer and cement concrete mixes and to develop a relation between bond strength and compressive strength. From the experimental results, it has been observed that the bond strength of the geopolymer concrete mixes was more compared to the cement concrete mixes and increases with the reduction in the diameter of the bar.

  11. Performance evaluation of a novel rotational damper for structural reinforcement steel frames subjected to lateral excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanati, M.; Khadem, S. E.; Mirzabagheri, S.; Sanati, H.; Khosravieh, M. Y.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a novel rotational damper called a Rotational Friction Viscoelastic Damper (RFVD) is introduced. Some viscoelastic pads are added to the Rotational Friction Damper (RFD) in addition to the friction discs used in this conventional device. Consequently, the amount of energy dissipated by the damper increases in low excitation frequencies. In fact, the input energy to the structure is simultaneously dissipated in the form of friction and heat by frictional discs and viscoelastic pads. In order to compare the performance of this novel damper with the earlier types, a set of experiments were carried out. According to the test results, the RFVD showed a better performance in dissipating input energy to the structure when compared to the RFD. The seismic behavior of steel frames equipped with these dampers was also numerically evaluated based on a nonlinear time history analysis. The numerical results verified the performance of the dampers in increasing the energy dissipation and decreasing the energy input to the structural elements. In order to achieve the maximum dissipated energy, the dampers need to be installed in certain places called critical points in the structure. An appropriate approach is presented to properly find these points. Finally, the performance of the RFVDs installed at these critical points was investigated in comparison to some other configurations and the validity of the suggested method in increasing the energy dissipation was confirmed.

  12. Steel - Structural, reinforcing; Pressure vessel, railway

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book contains specifications for structural steel used in various constructions; concrete reinforcement; plate and forgings for boilers and pressure vesseles; rails, axles, wheels and other accessories for railway service.

  13. Evaluation of Polyester Resin, Epoxy, and Cement Grouts for Embedding Reinforcing Steel Bars in Hardened Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Ultg IFILE COPY REPAIR, EVALUATION, MAINTENANCE, AND REHABILITATION RESEARCH PROGRAM ofEn in s TECHNICAL REPORT REMR-CS-23 EVALUATION OF POLYESTER...WESSC-85-01/TV-66369A Civil Works Research Work Unit 32303 The following two letters used a5 part of the number designating technical reports of... research publisher? under the Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation (REMR) Research Progr-m identify the problem area under which the report

  14. TiC-reinforced cast Cr steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Schrems, K. K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5-4.5Ti, and 1-1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  15. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  16. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  17. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  18. Evaluation of load-deflection properties of fiber-reinforced composites and its comparison with stainless steel wires

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Mamavi, Tayebe

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of common sized fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) to different deflections due to bending forces and comparing it with stainless steel (SS) wires. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two FRC groups with 0.75 mm and 1.2 mm diameters (Everstick Ortho, Stick Tech, Finland) and three SS groups with 0.016 × 0.022 inch, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.7 mm diameters (3M Uniteck, Monrovia, California, USA) were tested. Each group contained 10 samples that were tested according to a three point bending test. Each group was tested at deflections of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm and the data was analyzed using the repeated measure ANOVA by SPSS software (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, IBM SPSS, Inc. in Chicago, Illinois, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The highest recorded load belonged to the 1.2 mm FRC and after that 0.7 mm SS wire, 0.75 mm FRC, 0.0215 × 0.028 inch SS wire and finally 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wire. The 0.7 mm SS wire and 0.75 mm FRC were compared as retainers and the results showed the 0.7 mm SS wire showed significantly higher load compared with 0.75 mm FRC (P < 0.05). The 1.2 mm FRC had significantly higher load compared to 0.0215 × 0.028 inch and 0.016 × 0.022 inch SS wires (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results showed that the 1.2 mm FRC group had significantly higher load compared to SS wires and other FRC groups under the 0.5, 1 and 1.5 mm deflections. Therefore, it can be suggested that FRC can be used as an esthetic replacement for SS wires for active and passive purposes in orthodontics. PMID:24932195

  19. TiC reinforced cast chromium steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Rawers, James C.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2003-11-01

    A series of new titanium carbide reinforced cast chromium steels were developed for wear applications. Objective of the program was to enhance wear resistant alloys and, if possible, improve mechanical properties. The new steels which were melted in a vacuum induction furnace contained 12 Cr, 3-5 Ti, 1-2 C in weight percent. Alloying with Ti changed the precipitate microstructure from Cr carbide to TiC dispersed in a martensitic matrix. Yield strength and impact resistance improved with Ti alloying. Wear rates of the cast Cr/TiC steels, (determined from high- and low-stress abrasion tests, erosion test, and scratch tests) were generally lower than both the as-cast and heat-treated AISI type 440°C steel and were often further reduced by increasing the Ti alloy concentration. The exceptions were the erosion test for which all materials had similar wear rate.

  20. Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass-ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    BUILDING STRONG® Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass- ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel Principal Investigator... ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...Vitreous- Ceramic Coating  Ease of Application to Reinforcement Steel  Bond Strength and Corrosion-Resistance  Field Demonstration Program  Testing in

  1. Corrosion inhibition of reinforcing steel by using acrylic latex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.X.; Lin, W.W.; Ceng, S.A.; Zhang, J.Q.

    1998-05-01

    Acrylic latex was introduced into steel-reinforcing steel concrete as concrete admixtures or rebar coatings in order to prevent corrosion of steel reinforcements. The results showed that applying the latex by both methods took effect in different ways, while the latter was more noticeable. The corrosion prevention mechanism and the surface state of the steel rebar were also explored, based on which suggestions for enhancing the corrosion-resistant ability were made.

  2. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E. Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A.; Hill, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness < 100 μm (<0.00394 in.) that can be utilized in a steel fiber-reinforced polymer. However, stainless steel is known to be susceptible to pitting corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance. PMID:28773132

  3. Mechanical Behavior of Stainless Steel Fiber-Reinforced Composites Exposed to Accelerated Corrosion.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Caitlin; McBride, Amanda; E Zaghi, Arash; Burke, Kelly A; Hill, Alex

    2017-07-08

    Recent advancements in metal fibers have introduced a promising new type of stainless steel fiber with high stiffness, high failure strain, and a thickness < 100 μm (<0.00394 in.) that can be utilized in a steel fiber-reinforced polymer. However, stainless steel is known to be susceptible to pitting corrosion. The main goal of this study is to compare the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced composites with those of conventional types of stainless steel. By providing experimental evidences, this study may promote the application of steel fiber-reinforced composite as a viable alternative to conventional metals. Samples of steel fiber-reinforced polymer and four different types of stainless steel were subjected to 144 and 288 h of corrosion in ferric chloride solution to simulate accelerated corrosion conditions. The weight losses due to corrosion were recorded. The corroded and control samples were tested under monotonic tensile loading to measure the ultimate stresses and strains. The effect of corrosion on the mechanical properties of the different materials was evaluated. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to investigate the failure mechanism of the corrosion-damaged specimens. Overall, steel fiber-reinforced composites had the greatest corrosion resistance.

  4. 61. photographer unknown November 1935 STEEL REINFORCING FOR APRON, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. photographer unknown November 1935 STEEL REINFORCING FOR APRON, SOUTH HALF OF MAIN DAM. OUTLINE OF SPILLWAY PAINTED ON INSIDE OF COFFERDAM. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  5. 62. photographer unknown undated ERECTING FORMS, PLACING REINFORCING STEEL, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. photographer unknown undated ERECTING FORMS, PLACING REINFORCING STEEL, AND CONCRETING DRAFT PIER OF POWERHOUSE. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  6. 5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL PLAN OF STRUCTURAL AND REINFORCING STEEL, PIERS AND DETAILS FOR SWIMMING POOL Drawing 103-21 - Glen Echo Park, Crystal Swimming Pool, 7300 McArthur Boulevard, Glen Echo, Montgomery County, MD

  7. Wear of Cast Chromium Steels With TiC Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan,O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2001-10-01

    Wear resistance of a series of new titanium carbide reinforced cast chromium steels was investigated under various wear conditions. The steels which were melted in a vacuum induction furnace contained 12 Cr, 3-5 Ti, 1-2 C in weight percent. Microstructure of these materials was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, light optical microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Microstructure of steels consisted of TiC phase dispersed in a martensitic matrix. High-stress and low-stress abrasion tests, and an erosion test, were utilized to understand the wear behavior of these materials under different environments. The steels were tested in as-cast and heat treated conditions. Wear rates of the cast Cr/TiC steels were compared to those of an AISI type 440C steel and P/M composites reinforced with TiC.

  8. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  9. 78 FR 55755 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey; Institution of Antidumping and... from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, primarily provided for in subheadings...

  10. 76 FR 48802 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... antidumping duty order on certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review...

  11. 78 FR 60831 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing Duty... (``CVD'') petition \\1\\ concerning imports of steel concrete reinforcing bar (``rebar'') from the Republic... Countervailing Duties on Imports of Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from the Republic of Turkey, dated September...

  12. 78 FR 60827 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey: Initiation of Antidumping Duty Investigations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Mexico and Turkey: Initiation of... imports of steel concrete reinforcing bar (``rebar'') from Mexico and Turkey filed in proper form on... Duties on Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey and the Imposition of...

  13. VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE THE STEEL REINFORCING RODS PROTRUDING FROM THE BROKEN TOP OF THE RETAINING WALL. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, East Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RETENTION BASIN. ERECTING REINFORCING STEEL FOR CONCRETE DECK. STACK RISES AT TOP LEFT. CAMERA FACES WEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2581. Unknown Photographer, 6/18/1951 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Shear Behavior Models of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Modifying Softened Truss Model Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin-Ha; Lee, Deuck Hang; Ju, Hyunjin; Kim, Kang Su; Seo, Soo-Yeon; Kang, Joo-Won

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that steel fibers can supplement the brittle tensile characteristics of concrete, many studies have been conducted on the shear performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) members. However, previous studies were mostly focused on the shear strength and proposed empirical shear strength equations based on their experimental results. Thus, this study attempts to estimate the strains and stresses in steel fibers by considering the detailed characteristics of steel fibers in SFRC members, from which more accurate estimation on the shear behavior and strength of SFRC members is possible, and the failure mode of steel fibers can be also identified. Four shear behavior models for SFRC members have been proposed, which have been modified from the softened truss models for reinforced concrete members, and they can estimate the contribution of steel fibers to the total shear strength of the SFRC member. The performances of all the models proposed in this study were also evaluated by a large number of test results. The contribution of steel fibers to the shear strength varied from 5% to 50% according to their amount, and the most optimized volume fraction of steel fibers was estimated as 1%–1.5%, in terms of shear performance. PMID:28788364

  16. Shear Behavior Models of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams Modifying Softened Truss Model Approaches.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin-Ha; Lee, Deuck Hang; Ju, Hyunjin; Kim, Kang Su; Seo, Soo-Yeon; Kang, Joo-Won

    2013-10-23

    Recognizing that steel fibers can supplement the brittle tensile characteristics of concrete, many studies have been conducted on the shear performance of steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) members. However, previous studies were mostly focused on the shear strength and proposed empirical shear strength equations based on their experimental results. Thus, this study attempts to estimate the strains and stresses in steel fibers by considering the detailed characteristics of steel fibers in SFRC members, from which more accurate estimation on the shear behavior and strength of SFRC members is possible, and the failure mode of steel fibers can be also identified. Four shear behavior models for SFRC members have been proposed, which have been modified from the softened truss models for reinforced concrete members, and they can estimate the contribution of steel fibers to the total shear strength of the SFRC member. The performances of all the models proposed in this study were also evaluated by a large number of test results. The contribution of steel fibers to the shear strength varied from 5% to 50% according to their amount, and the most optimized volume fraction of steel fibers was estimated as 1%-1.5%, in terms of shear performance.

  17. Damage evaluation of fiber reinforced plastic-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular columns under cyclic loading using the acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Du, Fangzhu; Ou, Jinping

    2017-03-01

    Glass-fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP)-confined circular concrete-filled steel tubular (CCFT) columns comprise of concrete, steel, and GFRP and show complex failure mechanics under cyclic loading. This paper investigated the failure mechanism and damage evolution of GFRP-CCFT columns by performing uniaxial cyclic loading tests that were monitored using the acoustic emission (AE) technique. Characteristic AE parameters were obtained during the damage evolution of GFRP-CCFT columns. Based on the relationship between the loading curve and these parameters, the damage evolution of GFRP-CCFT columns was classified into three stages that represented different damage degrees. Damage evolution and failure mode were investigated by analyzing the b-value and the ratio of rise time to waveform amplitude and average frequency. The damage severity of GFRP-CCFT columns were quantitatively estimated according to the modified index of damage and NDIS-2421 damage assessment criteria corresponding to each loading step. The proposed method can explain the damage evolution and failure mechanism for GFRP-CCFT columns and provide critical warning information for composite structures.

  18. Experimental and analytical behavior of strengthened reinforced concrete columns with steel angles and strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Essam S.; Al-Tersawy, Sherif H.

    2014-06-01

    The need of strengthening reinforced concrete columns, due to loss of strength and/or stiffness, is an essential requirement due to variation of the loads and environmental conditions applied on these columns. Steel jackets around the reinforced concrete (RC) columns are usually made by means of steel plates covering all over the column surface area. For the value of engineering purposes, another technique was developed using steel angles at the corners of the RC columns connected with discrete steel strips. In this paper, an experimental program is designed to evaluate the improvement in load-carrying capacity, stiffness and ductility of strengthened RC columns, concomitant with steel angles and strips. Despite of prevailing a substantially increased loading capacity and strength a pronounced enhancement in ductility and stiffness has been reported. A need for experimental test results with low value of concrete strength to mimic the local old-age structures condition that required strengthening in local countries. Seven columns specimens are tested to evaluate the strength improvement provided by steel strengthening of columns. The method of strengthened steel angles with strips is compared with another strengthening technique. This technique includes connected and unconnected steel-casing specimens. The observed experimental results describe load-shortening curves, horizontal strains in stirrups and steel strips, as well as description of failure mode. The extra-confinement pressure, due to existence of steel cage, of the strengthened RC column can be also observed from experimental results. The code provisions that predict the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened RC composite column has a discrepancy in the results. For this reason, an analytical model is developed in this paper to compare the code limit with experimental observed results. The proposed model accounts for the composite action for concrete confinement and enhancement of the local buckling

  19. Corrosion resistance and development length of steel reinforcement with cementitious coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Xiaofei

    This research program focused on the corrosion resistance and development length of reinforcing steel coated with Cementitious Capillary Crystalline Waterproofing (CCCW) materials. The first part of this research program involved using the half-cell potential method to evaluate the corrosion resistance of CCCW coating materials. One hundred and two steel bars were embedded in concrete cylinders and monitored. In total, 64 steel reinforcing bars were coated with CCCW prior to embedment, 16 mortar cylinders were externally coated with CCCW, and 22 control (uncoated) samples were tested. All the samples were immersed in a 3.5% concentration chloride solution for a period of one year. Three coating types were studied: CCCW-B, CCCW-B+ C and CCCW-C+D. The test results showed that the CCCW coating materials delayed the corrosion activity to varying degrees. In particular, CCCW-C+D applied on the reinforcing steel surface dramatically delayed the corrosion activity when compared to the control samples. After being exposed to the chloride solution for a period of one year, no sign of corrosion was observed for the cylinders where the concrete surface was coated. The second part of this research evaluated the bond strength and development length of reinforcing steel coated with two types of CCCW coating materials (CCCW-B+C and CCCW-C+D) using a modified pull-out test method. A self-reacting inverted T-shaped beam was designed to avoid compression in the concrete surrounding the reinforcing steel. Steel reinforcing bars were embedded along the web portion of the T-beam with various embedded lengths and were staggered side by side. In total, six T-beams were fabricated and each beam contained 8 samples. Both short-term (7 days) and long-term (3 months) effects of water curing were evaluated. The reinforcing steel bars coated with CCCW-B+C demonstrated a higher bond strength than did samples coated with CCCW-C+D. However, the bond strengths of samples with coating materials

  20. CP systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Soltesz, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for cathodic protection (CP) systems in Oregon?s reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. Oregon Department of Transportation (DOT) is investigating ways of monitoring the rebar corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges to identify conditions when protection of the rebar is needed. This approach reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for all environmental conditions, leading Oregon DOT to examine the use of intermittent, galvanic, and constant voltage cathodic protection systems. Results from these types of systems are reported.

  1. Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Steel Fibre- Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, A.; Tamme, V.; Laurson, M.

    2015-11-01

    Steel fibre-reinforced concrete (SFRC) is widely used in the structural elements of buildings: industrial floors, slabs, walls, foundation, etc. When a load is applied to a fibre- reinforced composite consisting of a low-modulus matrix reinforced with high-strength, high- modulus fibres, the plastic flow of the matrix under stress transfers the load to the fibre; this results in high-strength, high-modulus material which determines the stiffness and stress of the composite. In this study the equivalent flexural strength, equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 and the compressing strength of SFRC are investigated. Notched test specimens with five different dosages of steel fibres (20, 25, 30, 35, 40 kg/m3) were prepared using industrial concrete. Determination of flexural tension strength was carried out according to the EU norm EVS-EN 14651:2005+A1:2007. The equivalent flexural strength and subsequent equivalent flexural ratio Re,3 of SFRC with a dosage of 20, 25, 30, 35 kg/m3 similar to their average values and with a dosage of 40 kg/m3 were 31% higher than their average values. The compressive strength of the steel fibre-reinforced concrete was slightly higher compared to plain concrete, except specimens with the dosage of 40 kg/m3 where the increase was 30%.

  2. Evaluating the influence of postsession reinforcement on choice of reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Kodak, Tiffany; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Factors that influence reinforcer choice have been examined in a number of applied studies (e.g., Neef, Mace, Shea, & Shade, 1992; Shore, Iwata, DeLeon, Kahng, & Smith, 1997; Tustin, 1994). However, no applied studies have evaluated the effects of postsession reinforcement on choice between concurrently available reinforcers, even though basic findings indicate that this is an important factor to consider (Hursh, 1978; Zeiler, 1999). In this bridge investigation, we evaluated the influence of postsession reinforcement on choice of two food items when task responding was reinforced on progressive-ratio schedules. Participants were 3 children who had been diagnosed with developmental disabilities. Results indicated that response allocation shifted from one food item to the other food item under thinner schedules of reinforcement when no postsession reinforcement was provided. These findings suggest that the efficacy of instructional programs or treatments for problem behavior may be improved by restricting reinforcers outside treatment sessions.

  3. Evaluating the Influence of Postsession Reinforcement on Choice of Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodak, Tiffany; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan

    2007-01-01

    Factors that influence reinforcer choice have been examined in a number of applied studies (e.g., Neef, Mace, Shea, & Shade, 1992; Shore, Iwata, DeLeon, Kahng, & Smith, 1997; Tustin, 1994). However, no applied studies have evaluated the effects of postsession reinforcement on choice between concurrently available reinforcers, even though basic…

  4. 10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Riverside Bridge with Steel Reinforcing Rods in Place and with 'Tower for Concrete' in the Background. The function of the 'tower for concrete' is uncertain, but may have to do with the transport of concrete from the point of mixing to the point of use (suggestion by NDOT Bridge Section personnel, February 1990). Original snapshot taken July, 1920. - Riverside Bridge, Spanning Truckee River at Booth Street, Reno, Washoe County, NV

  5. Fatigue testing of reinforced-concrete steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maropoulos, S.; Fasnakis, D.; Voulgaraki, Ch; Papanikolaou, S.; Maropoulos, A.; Antonatos, A.

    2016-11-01

    A number of low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on reinforced-concrete steel bars of various diameters to study their behaviour under axial loading according to EN 10080 and EN 1421-3. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the specimen fracture surfaces. The problems faced during testing are presented and a specimen preparation method is described that will aid researchers on fatigue testing to obtain accurate test results and save on material and time.

  6. 78 FR 68090 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Mexico and Turkey Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from Mexico and Turkey of steel concrete reinforcing bar, provided for in... alleged to be sold in the United States at less than fair value (LTFV), and by imports of steel...

  7. 78 FR 73838 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... International Trade Administration Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Turkey: Postponement of Preliminary... Department of Commerce (the Department) initiated a countervailing duty investigation on steel concrete... December 16, 2013.\\3\\ \\1\\ See Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar from Turkey: Initiation of Countervailing...

  8. 77 FR 71631 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine; Scheduling of Full Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel Concrete...) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar...

  9. Performance of Straight Steel Fibres Reinforced Alkali Activated Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faris, Meor Ahmad; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Nizar Ismail, Khairul; Muniandy, Ratnasamy; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah

    2016-06-01

    This paper focus on the performance of alkali activated concrete produced by using fly ash activated by sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. These alkali activated concrete were reinforced with straight steel fibres with different weight percentage starting from 0 % up to 5 %. Chemical composition of raw material in the production alkali activated concrete which is fly ash was first identified by using X-ray fluorescence. Results reveal there have an effect of straight steel fibres inclusion to the alkali activated concrete. Highest compressive strength of alkali activated concrete which is 67.72 MPa was obtained when 3 % of straight fibres were added. As well as flexural strength, highest flexural strength which is 6.78 MPa was obtained at 3 % of straight steel fibres inclusions.

  10. 77 FR 64127 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus... concrete reinforcing bar from Latvia and Moldova. The Commission found that the respondent interested...

  11. Reinforcement magnitude: an evaluation of preference and reinforcer efficacy.

    PubMed

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M; Lerman, Dorothea C; Call, Nathan A; Addison, Laura R; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relations among reinforcer magnitude, preference, and efficacy by drawing on the procedures and results of basic experimentation in this area. Three children who engaged in problem behavior that was maintained by social positive reinforcement (attention, access to tangible items) participated. Results indicated that preference for different magnitudes of social reinforcement may predict reinforcer efficacy and that magnitude effects may be mediated by the schedule requirement.

  12. Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members: Part 1-Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    structural steel reinforcing members. In large concrete structures such as locks and dams, the corrosion of tensioned steel components can lead to...loss of tension and consequent severe problems such as cracking of the concrete or fracturing of the steel. The theory and application address the...problem of determining tension in concrete - embedded pre- and post-tensioned steel reinforcement rods. BACKGROUND: Many concrete structures contain

  13. Effect of Steel Fibres Distribution on Impact Resistance Performance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Beddu, Salmia; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Itam, Zarina; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced with varied thickness and fraction volume subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the effect of the mesh distribution on the impact resistance SFRC for various slab thickness and fraction volume. Random fibre distribution is the more effective than the top and bottom fibre distribution in terms of absorption of impact energy, crack resistance, the ability to control crack formation and propagation against impact energy.

  14. Steel reinforcement corrosion detection with coaxial cable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchaidze, Iana; Pommerenke, David; Chen, Genda

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion processes in the steel reinforced structures can result in structural deficiency and with time create a threat to human lives. Millions of dollars are lost each year because of corrosion. According to the U. S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) the average annual cost of corrosion in the infrastructure sector by the end of 2002 was estimated to be $22.6 billion. Timely remediation/retrofit and effective maintenance can extend the structure's live span for much less expense. Thus the considerable effort should be done to deploy corrosion monitoring techniques to have realistic information on the location and the severity of damage. Nowadays commercially available techniques for corrosion monitoring require costly equipment and certain interpretational skills. In addition, none of them is designed for the real time quality assessment. In this study the crack sensor developed at Missouri University of Science and Technology is proposed as a distributed sensor for real time corrosion monitoring. Implementation of this technology may ease the pressure on the bridge owners restrained with the federal budget by allowing the timely remediation with the minimal financial and labor expenses. The sensor is instrumented in such a way that the location of any discontinuity developed along its length can be easily detected. When the sensor is placed in immediate vicinity to the steel reinforcement it is subjected to the same chemical process as the steel reinforcement. And corrosion pitting is expected to develop on the sensor exactly at the same location as in the rebar. Thus it is expected to be an effective tool for active corrosion zones detection within reinforced concrete (RC) members. A series of laboratory tests were conducted to validate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Nine sensors were manufactured and placed in the artificially created corrosive environment and observed over the time. To induce accelerated corrosion 3% and 5% Na

  15. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire. 1755.702 Section 1755.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  16. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire. 1755.702 Section 1755.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  17. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire. 1755.702 Section 1755.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  18. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire. 1755.702 Section 1755.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  19. 7 CFR 1755.702 - Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR) aerial service wire. 1755.702 Section 1755.702 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued..., ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.702 Copper coated steel reinforced (CCSR)...

  20. Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures using a fiber optic coil winding method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring.

  1. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Gong, Peng; Qiao, Guofu; Lu, Jie; Lv, Xingjun; Ou, Jinping

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. Then, three kinds of novel fiber optical Brillouin corrosion expansion sensors with different fiber optic coil winding packaging schemes are designed. Sensors were embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion, and their performance was studied in a designed electrochemical corrosion acceleration experiment. Experimental results have shown that expansion strain along the fiber optic coil winding area can be detected and measured by the three kinds of sensors with different measurement range during development the corrosion. With the assumption of uniform corrosion, diameters of corrosion steel rebars were obtained using calculated average strains. A maximum expansion strain of 6,738 με was monitored. Furthermore, the uniform corrosion analysis model was established and the evaluation formula to evaluate mass loss rate of steel rebar under a given corrosion rust expansion rate was derived. The research has shown that three kinds of Brillouin sensors can be used to monitor the steel rebar corrosion expansion of reinforced concrete structures with good sensitivity, accuracy and monitoring range, and can be applied to monitor different levels of corrosion. By means of this kind of monitoring technique, quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring can be carried out, with the virtues of long durability, real-time monitoring and quasi-distribution monitoring. PMID:22346672

  2. Cathodic protection of steel reinforced concrete facilitated by using carbon fiber reinforced mortar or concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1997-05-01

    Due to the decrease in volume electrical resistivity associated with carbon fiber addition (0.35 vol.%) to concrete (embedding steel rebar), concrete containing carbon fibers and silica fume reduced by 18% the driving voltage required for cathodic protection compared to plain concrete, and by 28% compared to concrete with silica fume. Due to the decrease in resistivity associated with carbon fiber addition (1.1 vol.%) to mortar, overlay (embedding titanium wires for electrical contacts to steel reinforced concrete) in the form of mortar containing carbon fibers and latex reduced by the 10% the driving voltage required for cathodic protection, compared to plain mortar overlay. In spite of the low resistivity of mortar overlay with carbon fibers, cathodic protection required multiple metal electrical contacts embedded in the mortar at a spacing of 11 cm or less.

  3. Acoustic Nondestructive Testing and Measurement of Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members: Part 2 - Field Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Many reinforced concrete structures contain embedded pre- and post- tensioned steel members that are subject to corrosion and fracturing...Tension for Steel Reinforcing Members Part 2 – Field Testing by Michael K. McInerney PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical...Specifically, the technology application addresses the problem of determining tension in concrete -embedded pre- and post-tensioned reinforcement rods

  4. The Use of Vitreous Enamel Coatings to Improve Bonding and Reduce Corrosion in Concrete Reinforcing Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    concrete apart • All normal reinforced concrete (cast-in-place and precast ) may have a short service life due to corrosion U S A r m y E n g i n e e...the Army, the Nation The Use of Vitreous Enamel Coatings to Improve Bonding and Reduce Corrosion in Concrete Reinforcing Steel Sean W. Morefield1...TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Use of Vitreous Enamel Coatings to Improve Bonding and Reduce Corrosion in Concrete Reinforcing Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  5. Hypervelocity Impacts into Stainless-Steel Tubes Armored with Reinforced Beryllium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1966-08-01

    INTO STAINLESS-STEEL TUBES ARMORED WITH REINFORCED BERYLLIUM) by A. R. McMillan General Motors Corporation James tk. Diedrich and Nestor Clough k Lewis...STAINLESS-STEEL TUBES ARMORED WITH REINFORCED BERYLLIUM By A. R. McMillan ɝi- General Motors Corporation -Defense Research Laboratories Santa Barbara...TUBES ARMORED WITH REINFORCED BERYLLIUM by A.R. McMilIan General Motors Corporation Defense Research Laboratories Santa Barbara, California James H

  6. 75 FR 7562 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision Not in Harmony With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey: Notice of Court Decision... certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey covering the period of review (POR) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final...

  7. 75 FR 22552 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... International Trade Administration Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey; Notice of Amended Final... Department) in the 2003-2004 administrative review of certain steel concrete of reinforcing bars (rebar) from...) of April 1, 2003, through March 31, 2004. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From...

  8. 75 FR 47260 - Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of Amended Final Results Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... International Trade Administration (A-489-807) Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars from Turkey: Notice of...) in the 2005-2006 administrative review of certain steel concrete reinforcing bars (rebar) from Turkey..., through March 31, 2006. See Certain Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Turkey; Final Results of...

  9. 77 FR 39254 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-02

    ... Ukraine; Institution of Five-Year Reviews Concerning the Antidumping Duty Orders on Steel Concrete... determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete reinforcing bar from Belarus..., 2001, the Department of Commerce (``Commerce'') issued antidumping duty orders on imports of steel...

  10. 78 FR 41079 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and Ukraine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bar From Belarus, China, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, and... Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)), that revocation of the antidumping duty orders on steel concrete... views of the Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4409 (July 2013), entitled Steel...

  11. 78 FR 43858 - Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...] Steel Concrete Reinforcing Bars From Belarus, Indonesia, Latvia, Moldova, Poland, the People's Republic... Department of Commerce (``Department'') that revocation of the antidumping duty orders \\1\\ on steel concrete... of the continuation of the antidumping duty orders. \\1\\ See Antidumping Duty Orders: Steel...

  12. Seismic evaluation of an underground reinforced concrete tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.N.

    1993-02-01

    An underground reinforced concrete tunnel under the influence of seismic wave propagation was analyzed. Methods previously developed for underground steel pipes were extended to assess the structural integrity of the underground reinforced concrete tunnel.

  13. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  14. Design guidelines for steel-reinforced polymer concrete using resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studies, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to recommend simple, yet effective design guidelines in shear and flexure for steel-reinforced PC. The recommended design procedures are mostly based on test results performed on PC beams using resins based on recycled poly(ethyleneterephthalate), PET, plastic waste (the PET waste is mainly recovered from used beverage bottles). Previous studies have shown that polyester resins based on recycled PET can produce very good quality PC at a potentially lower cost.

  15. Nonlinear Lamb waves for fatigue damage identification in FRP-reinforced steel plates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yikuan; Guan, Ruiqi; Lu, Ye

    2017-09-01

    A nonlinear Lamb-wave-based method for fatigue crack detection in steel plates with and without carbon fibre reinforcement polymer (CFRP) reinforcement is presented in this study. Both numerical simulation and experimental evaluation were performed for Lamb wave propagation and its interaction with a fatigue crack on these two steel plate types. With the generation of the second harmonic, the damage-induced wave nonlinearities were identified by surface-bonded piezoelectric sensors. Numerical simulation revealed that the damage-induced wave component at the second harmonic was slightly affected by the existence of CFRP laminate, although the total wave energy was decreased because of wave leakage into the CFRP laminate. Due to unavoidable nonlinearity from the experimental environments, it was impractical to directly extract the time-of-flight of the second harmonic for locating the crack. To this end, the correlation coefficient of benchmark and signal with damage at double frequency in the time domain was calculated, based on which an imaging method was introduced to locate the fatigue crack in steel plates with and without CFRP laminates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF WASTE SOLUTIONS ON CONCRETE AND REINFORCING STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    DANIEL JI; START DC; KAAR PH

    1983-05-28

    This report has been prepared for the In Situ Waste Disposal Program Tank Assessment Task (WG-11) as part of an investigation to evaluate the long-term performance of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This report, prepared by the Portland Cement Association, presents the results of four years of concrete degradation studies which exposed concrete and reinforcing steel, under load and at 180 F, to simulated double-shell slurry, simulated salt cake solution, and a control solution. Exposure length varied from 3 months to 36 months. In all cases, examination of the concrete and reinforcing steel at the end of the exposure indicated there was no attack, i.e., no evidence of rusting, cracking, disruption of mill scale or loss of strength. Radioactive waste resulting from the chemical processing of reactor fuel for recovery of special nuclear materials (primarily plutonium), has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. The defense waste is currently being stored in underground waste tanks and in capsules stored in water basins. Current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) strategy is to emphasize development and implementation of technology for removal, solidification, and final disposition of defense waste at the Savannah River Site first, then at the Hanford Site. Final disposal of waste in tanks at Hanford is expected to consist of in-place stabilization of most tanks. Selected tank wastes may be retrieved. Disposal operations will be carried out during the next several decades. Consequently, defense waste will remain in the existing underground tanks at Hanford for at least several decades. To ensure the safe storage of the waste, the waste storage tanks are being evaluated for continued service as part of the DOE Waste Tank Evaluation Program (AR-005-10-02-G). Technical studies and laboratory tests have been conducted to determine the effect of the stored waste's chemicals and temperature on the reinforced concrete. Waste solutions, which can be

  17. Test study on the impact damage performance of stainless steel reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guoxue; Xu, Shixiang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, in order to research the damage performance of stainless steel reinforced concrete under the action of repeated horizontal impact, an ultra-high drop hammer impact tester system was used for impact tests on ordinary reinforced concrete bridge piers and stainless steel reinforced concrete bridge piers with equal longitudinal bar diameter. In addition, ultrasonic waves were adopted for damage testing. The results show that, after each impact, the elastic modulus of the specimen was decreased. With the improvement of impact energy, the damage degrees of the two groups of specimens were also increased. Under the same impact energy, the damage degrees of the stainless steel reinforced concrete bridge pier specimens were lower than those of the ordinary reinforced concrete bridge pier specimens with equal longitudinal bar diameters.

  18. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vičan, Josef; Gocál, Jozef; Odrobiňák, Jaroslav; Koteš, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  19. New NDE technologies for evaluating reinforced concrete masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.M.; Haskins, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the Waterways' Experiment Station (WES) have demonstrated that two new nondestructive evaluation technologies show promise in making a more accurate diagnosis of the structural condition of concrete masonry walls than prior technologies. Traditionally, sounding with a hammer has been used to determine the presence and quality of the grout fill around the reinforcing bars in concrete masonry units (CMU's). First, WES has developed a new grout detection system, which senses the reverberating energy in the CMU's with a microphone. This energy is introduced into the CMU by using a pistol to fire a metal BB against the face of the block. A microphone and spectrum analyzer replaces the function of the human ear to distinguish different pitches of sound through sounding. Since a technician is more likely to get consistent results with the new system, it is not as subjective as sounding. Next, WES has evaluated the new digital steel detectors. A reinforced concrete masonry structure can contain many combinations of steel: vertical bars, horizontal bars, size of bar, number of bars, splices, etc. Digital steel detectors with microprocessors have the potential to provide much more information than traditional analog types.

  20. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    SciTech Connect

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  1. Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts

    SciTech Connect

    C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

    2012-03-01

    The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

  2. Nondestructive inspection of corrosion and delamination at the concrete-steel reinforcement interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tri Huu

    The proposed study explores the feasibility of detecting and quantifying corrosion and delamination (physical separation) at the interface between reinforcing steel bars and concrete using ultrasonic guided waves. The problem of corrosion of the reinforcing steel in structures has increased significantly in recent years. The emergence of this type of concrete deterioration, which was first observed in marine structures and chemical manufacturing plants, coincided with the increased applications of deicing salts (sodium and calcium chlorides) to roads and bridges during winter months in those states where ice and snow are of major concern. Concrete is strengthened by the inclusion of the reinforcement steel such as deformed or corrugated steel bars. Bonding between the two materials plays a vital role in maximizing performance capacity of the structural members. Durability of the structure is of concern when it is exposed to aggressive environments. Corrosion of reinforcing steel has led to premature deterioration of many concrete members before their design life is attained. It is therefore, important to be able to detect and measure the level of corrosion in reinforcing steel or delamination at the interface. The development and implementation of damage detection strategies, and the continuous health assessment of concrete structures then become a matter of utmost importance. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a nondestructive testing technique to quantify the amount of corrosion in the reinforcing steel. The guided mechanical wave approach has been explored towards the development of such methodology. The use of an embedded ultrasonic network for monitoring corrosion in real structures is feasible due to its simplicity. The ultrasonic waves, specifically cylindrical guided waves can p ropagate a long distance along the reinforcing steel bars and are found to be sensitive to the interface conditions between steel bars and concrete. Ultrasonic

  3. Use of steel fibres recovered from waste tyres as reinforcement in concrete: pull-out behaviour, compressive and flexural strength.

    PubMed

    Aiello, M A; Leuzzi, F; Centonze, G; Maffezzoli, A

    2009-06-01

    The increasing amount of waste tyres worldwide makes the disposition of tyres a relevant problem to be solved. In the last years over three million tons of waste tyres were generated in the EU states [ETRA, 2006. Tyre Technology International - Trends in Tyre Recycling. http://www.etra-eu.org]; most of them were disposed into landfills. Since the European Union Landfill Directive (EU Landfill, 1999) aims to significantly reduce the landfill disposal of waste tyres, the development of new markets for the tyres becomes fundamental. Recently some research has been devoted to the use of granulated rubber and steel fibres recovered from waste tyres in concrete. In particular, the concrete obtained by adding recycled steel fibres evidenced a satisfactory improvement of the fragile matrix, mostly in terms of toughness and post-cracking behaviour. As a consequence RSFRC (recycled steel fibres reinforced concrete) appears a promising candidate for both structural and non-structural applications. Within this context a research project was undertaken at the University of Salento (Italy) aiming to investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete reinforced with RSF (recycled steel fibres) recovered from waste tyres by a mechanical process. In the present paper results obtained by the experimental work performed up to now are reported. In order to evaluate the concrete-fibres bond characteristics and to determine the critical fibre length, pull-out tests were initially carried out. Furthermore compressive strength of concrete was evaluated for different volume ratios of added RSF and flexural tests were performed to analyze the post-cracking behaviour of RSFRC. For comparison purposes, samples reinforced with industrial steel fibres (ISF) were also considered. Satisfactory results were obtained regarding the bond between recycled steel fibres and concrete; on the other hand compressive strength of concrete seems unaffected by the presence of fibres despite their irregular

  4. [Study of an optical fiber grating sensor for monitoring corrosion of reinforcing steel].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wu, Jin; Gao, Jun-qi

    2010-01-01

    Based on the principle of the fiber Bragg grating strain sensor as well as the volume expansion of the reinforcing steel due to corrosion, an optical fiber grating sensor for monitoring corrosion of reinforcing steel and the method of temperature compensation were studied in the present paper. The sensor construction is that one Bragg grating is stuck on the inner center of two bars against each other, and the reinforcement volume as well as the diameter will expand due to corrosion. Based upon sensing mechanism, monitoring will be carried out by transforming the diameter increase to the fiber strain, and as a result the degree and rate of reinforcement corrosion can be obtained. The principle of corrosion monitoring is that the strain induced by corrosion and temperature fluctuation is measured by a reinforcing steel fiber grating sensor. At the same time, the strain induced by temperature fluctuation is also measured by an individual stainless fiber grating sensor. Therefore by two independent fiber grating sensors, the volume changed by corrosion can be separated. By the concrete encapsulating and embedding method of FBG corrosion sensor, the degree of corrosion of reinforcing reinforcement will be measured directly, which is not affected by corrosion factors and can be used in the early corrosion monitoring of reinforcement in concrete structures. Finally the relationship between corrosion rate and shift in center wavelength was calibrated by experiment.

  5. Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe to a stainless steel flange

    DOEpatents

    Allais, Arnaud; Hoffmann, Ernst

    2008-02-05

    Arrangement for connecting a fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) to a stainless steel flange (12, 16), in which the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) is accommodated in a ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) in the flange (12, 16), the groove conforming to the dimensions of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18), where the gap remaining between the end of the fiber-reinforced plastic pipe (18) and the ring-shaped groove (12a, 16a) is filled with a sealant (19).

  6. Enhanced tensile, hardness and wear behaviors of pure aluminum matrix reinforced with steel chips via powder metallurgy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Emara, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical properties and wear behavior of aluminum matrix reinforced with steel machining chips was investigated. Pure aluminum was reinforced with 5, 7.5, and 10 wt% steel chips with an average size of 100 μm using powder metallurgy technique. Aluminum reinforced with 5 and 10 Wt.% SiC particles were manufactured for comparison. The investigation showed clear evidence that the addition of steel machining chips resulted in significantly low porosity levels in the aluminum matrix composites compared with the use of SiC as reinforcement. The mechanical properties (tensile and hardness) as well as the wear resistance were also observed to improve with the use of the steel machining chips as reinforcement. The results demonstrate the capability of steel machining chips to act as efficient reinforcing material and a reliable cost effective candidate in the development of aluminum matrix composites.

  7. Reinforcement Magnitude: An Evaluation of Preference and Reinforcer Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Addison, Laura R.; Kodak, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Consideration of reinforcer magnitude may be important for maximizing the efficacy of treatment for problem behavior. Nonetheless, relatively little is known about children's preferences for different magnitudes of social reinforcement or the extent to which preference is related to differences in reinforcer efficacy. The purpose of the current…

  8. Reactive Silicate Coatings for Protecting and Bonding Reinforcing Steel in Cement-Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985; Wei, Mandel and Said, 1986; Horne, Richardson and Brydson, 2007). Most research have concluded that the...around a steel fiber. (after Bentur, Diamond and Mindess , 1985.) The ITZ is typically on the order of 100µm in thickness and the exact...International, West Conshohocken, PA. Bentur, A. Diamond, S. and Mindess , S., 1985: Cracking Processes in Steel Fibre Reinforced Cement Pastes

  9. A&M. TAN607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. TAN-607. Construction detail showing structural steel framework with reinforcing steel in place prior to pouring concrete for biparting doors between hot shop and special equipment service (SES) room. Facing north. Hot shop to left, SES room to right. slot for north half of door shows at upper left of view. Date: May 21, 1954. INEEL negative no. 10548 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. Strength and Fracture Behavior of a Particle-Reinforced Transformation-Toughened Trip Steel/ZrO2 Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckner, R.; Krampf, M.; Segel, C.; Krüger, L.

    2016-01-01

    A newly developed particle-reinforced composite based on a high-alloy metastable CrMnNi TRIP steel was investigated concerning its fracture toughness behavior. The particle reinforcement was done using 10 vol.% of metastable MgO-partially-stabilized ZrO 2 (Mg-PSZ), which has the capability of a stress-induced transformation from the tetragonal to the monoclinic phase. Moreover, the alloying concept of the steel matrix enables a strain-induced transformation from the metastable γ-austenite phase to the α'-martensite phase leading to an increase in strength and ductility. Both effects in combination are intended to dissipate energy and increase the fracture toughness of the composite material (R-curve behavior). To evaluate the mechanical performance of the composite, tensile and fracture mechanics tests according to ISO 12135 were performed, followed by microstructural investigations. The fracture process was analyzed in an in situ tensile test with simultaneous recording of SEM micrographs and subsequent optical analysis of deformation. The results obtained show that the toughness of the composite is primarily determined by the presence of reinforcement particles. The low interfacial strength between the steel and ceramic associated with small interparticle spaces leads to an accelerated fracture process and a low overall toughness. This behavior is amplified as soon as particle clusters are formed during processing.

  11. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  12. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-02-16

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented.

  13. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  14. The Impact of Corrosion on the Mechanical Behavior of Welded Splices of Reinforcing Steel S400 and B500c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Ch. Alk.; Michalopoulos, D.; Dimitrov, L.

    2008-02-01

    The reinforcing steel, used in concrete structures, when corroded causes reduction of the strength properties and especially drastic reduction of ductility. Steel corrosion constitutes an important factor of progressive devaluation of its mechanical properties and serious reduction of the integrity of structures. The problem becomes more evident specifically for structures near coastal areas where salt corrosion is predominant. Reinforced concrete columns and beams are quite often extended by welding new steel reinforcement to the already corroded existing steel. In the present article the impact of corrosion on the mechanical properties of welded splices of reinforcing Steel S400 and B500c is examined. An experimental investigation was conducted and tensile and compressive results are presented for welded precorroded S400 and noncorroded B500c steel splices. The mechanical behavior of welded splices in tension are different in compression and depend strongly on the level of corrosion of the S400 bars.

  15. Reinforcement learning improves behaviour from evaluative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littman, Michael L.

    2015-05-01

    Reinforcement learning is a branch of machine learning concerned with using experience gained through interacting with the world and evaluative feedback to improve a system's ability to make behavioural decisions. It has been called the artificial intelligence problem in a microcosm because learning algorithms must act autonomously to perform well and achieve their goals. Partly driven by the increasing availability of rich data, recent years have seen exciting advances in the theory and practice of reinforcement learning, including developments in fundamental technical areas such as generalization, planning, exploration and empirical methodology, leading to increasing applicability to real-life problems.

  16. Reinforcement learning improves behaviour from evaluative feedback.

    PubMed

    Littman, Michael L

    2015-05-28

    Reinforcement learning is a branch of machine learning concerned with using experience gained through interacting with the world and evaluative feedback to improve a system's ability to make behavioural decisions. It has been called the artificial intelligence problem in a microcosm because learning algorithms must act autonomously to perform well and achieve their goals. Partly driven by the increasing availability of rich data, recent years have seen exciting advances in the theory and practice of reinforcement learning, including developments in fundamental technical areas such as generalization, planning, exploration and empirical methodology, leading to increasing applicability to real-life problems.

  17. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor. PMID:27608029

  18. The Non-Destructive Test of Steel Corrosion in Reinforced Concrete Bridges Using a Micro-Magnetic Sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liao, Leng; Zhao, Ruiqiang; Zhou, Jianting; Yang, Mao; Xia, Runchuan

    2016-09-06

    This paper presents a non-destructive test method for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete bridges by using a 3-dimensional digital micro-magnetic sensor to detect and analyze the self-magnetic field leakage from corroded reinforced concrete. The setup of the magnetic scanning device and the measurement mode of the micro-magnetic sensor are introduced. The numerical analysis model is also built based on the linear magnetic charge theory. Compared to the self-magnetic field leakage data obtained from magnetic sensor-based measurement and numerical calculation, it is shown that the curves of tangential magnetic field at different lift-off height all intersect near the edge of the steel corrosion zone. The result indicates that the intersection of magnetic field curves can be used to detect and evaluate the range of the inner steel corrosion in engineering structures. The findings of this work propose a new and effective non-destructive test method for steel corrosion, and therefore enlarge the application of the micro-magnetic sensor.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the microstructure of interfaces in steel reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, A.T.; Richardson, I.G. Brydson, R.M.D.

    2007-12-15

    This article reports the results of a backscattered electron imaging study of the microstructure of the steel- and aggregate-cement paste interfaces in concrete containing 9 mm ribbed reinforcing bars. The water to cement (w/c) ratio, hydration age, steel orientation, and surface finish were varied. For vertically cast bars, there was more calcium hydroxide (CH) and porosity and less unreacted cement at both the steel- and aggregate-cement paste interfaces when compared to the bulk cement paste. As the hydration age increased, the porosity near the interfaces decreased, and the CH increased with more CH close to the steel than to the aggregate. Horizontal bars had more porosity and less CH under them than above. An increase in the w/c ratio produced interfaces of higher porosity and lower levels of CH. Wire-brush cleaned bars had higher levels of CH at the steel-cement paste interface at 365 days when compared to uncleaned bars.

  20. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing.

    PubMed

    de Alcantara, Naasson P; da Silva, Felipe M; Guimarães, Mateus T; Pereira, Matheus D

    2015-12-24

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works.

  1. Corrosion Assessment of Steel Bars Used in Reinforced Concrete Structures by Means of Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    de Alcantara, Naasson P.; da Silva, Felipe M.; Guimarães, Mateus T.; Pereira, Matheus D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental study on the use of Eddy Current Testing (ECT) to evaluate corrosion processes in steel bars used in reinforced concrete structures. The paper presents the mathematical basis of the ECT sensor built by the authors; followed by a finite element analysis. The results obtained in the simulations are compared with those obtained in experimental tests performed by the authors. Effective resistances and inductances; voltage drops and phase angles of wound coil are calculated using both; simulated and experimental data; and demonstrate a strong correlation. The production of samples of corroded steel bars; by using an impressed current technique is also presented. The authors performed experimental tests in the laboratory using handmade sensors; and the corroded samples. In the tests four gauges; with five levels of loss-of-mass references for each one were used. The results are analyzed in the light of the loss-of-mass and show a strong linear behavior for the analyzed parameters. The conclusions emphasize the feasibility of the proposed technique and highlight opportunities for future works. PMID:26712754

  2. Practical experience of steel fiber reinforced wet shotcrete in large underground construction projects

    SciTech Connect

    Garshol, K.

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses advantages of SFRS (steel fiber reinforced shotcrete) in underground construction projects, including trends in rock support design; quality and durability of wet mix shotcrete; advantages in safety and working environment and the technical properties of SFRS. Key data from cases illustrate the above. Cost and time factors are highlighted.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  4. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets.

    PubMed

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-06-17

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets.

  5. Mechanical Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Beams Bonded with External Carbon Fiber Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Gribniak, Viktor; Tamulenas, Vytautas; Ng, Pui-Lam; Arnautov, Aleksandr K.; Gudonis, Eugenijus; Misiunaite, Ieva

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) beams internally reinforced with steel bars and externally bonded with carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets fixed by adhesive and hybrid jointing techniques. In particular, attention is paid to the load resistance and failure modes of composite beams. The steel fibers were used to avoiding the rip-off failure of the concrete cover. The CFRP sheets were fixed to the concrete surface by epoxy adhesive as well as combined with various configurations of small-diameter steel pins for mechanical fastening to form a hybrid connection. Such hybrid jointing techniques were found to be particularly advantageous in avoiding brittle debonding failure, by promoting progressive failure within the hybrid joints. The use of CFRP sheets was also effective in suppressing the localization of the discrete cracks. The development of the crack pattern was monitored using the digital image correlation method. As revealed from the image analyses, with an appropriate layout of the steel pins, brittle failure of the concrete-carbon fiber interface could be effectively prevented. Inverse analysis of the moment-curvature diagrams was conducted, and it was found that a simplified tension-stiffening model with a constant residual stress level at 90% of the strength of the SFRC is adequate for numerically simulating the deformation behavior of beams up to the debonding of the CFRP sheets. PMID:28773024

  6. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcing steel in concrete by electrochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Guofu; Hong, Yi; Ou, Jinping

    2010-04-01

    Health degradation by corrosion of steel in civil engineering, especially in rough environment, is a persistent problem. Structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques can lead to improved estimates of structural safety and serviceability. A novel all solid state-current confined corrosion sensor has been developed to provide the platform for corrosion monitoring of the steel bar in concrete beam by electrochemical method. Finite element method has been used to certify the current confined effect of the sensor. The sensors have been used in concrete beams to monitor the corrosion of the steel bar. Also, half-cell potential of the beam has obtained. The results shows that the corrosion sensor can effectively confine the current in the fixed area which is 45mm×π×Dsteel bar and the monitoring results of the corrosion sensor are accurate.

  7. Prospects of increasing the strength of aluminum by reinforcing it with stainless steel wire (a review)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botvina, L. R.; Ivanova, V. S.; Kopev, I. M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental strength of aluminum reinforced with stainless steel wire is analyzed. Various methods of producing the composite material and it's static and cyclical strengths are considered. The reinforcement of aluminum with stainless steel wire was accomplished from the perspective of increasing the specific strength of aluminum and it's alloys, increasing the strength of the material with respect to high and low temperatures, as well as increasing the cyclical strength. The production of the composite aluminum-stainless steel wire material with approximated or calculated strengthening is possible by any of the considered methods. The selection of the proper production technology depends on precise details and conditions of application of the material.

  8. Internal impedance of steel-reinforced helically stranded conductors at commercial frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkushev, A. G.; Elagin, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    An original simplified mathematical model is proposed that describes the distribution of a harmonic electromagnetic field at a commercial frequency in steel-reinforced high-voltage cables with helically stranded single-layer winding. In the framework of the idealized physical concepts on which the proposed model is based, stranded conductors are treated as an anisotropic conducting layer. It is shown that taking into account the helical twist of conductors leads to the appearance of an axial magnetic field, the presence of which can significantly influence the level of ac losses. The model has been used to calculate the dependence of the internal impedance on the magnetic permeability of the steel core for commercial AS-70 grade steel-reinforced stranded aluminum cable. The results are compared to those obtained using a hollow cylinder model and full-scale numerical calculations using the finite element method.

  9. Comparative investigation of corrosion resistance of steel reinforcement in alinite and Portland cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Kostogloudis, G.C.; Kalogridis, D.; Ftikos, C.; Malami, C.; Georgali, B.; Kaloidas, V.

    1998-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of steel-reinforced mortar specimens made from alinite cement was investigated using ordinary Portland cement (OPC) specimens as reference. The specimens were prepared and exposed in three different environments: continuous exposure in tap water, interrupted exposure in tap water, and interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution. The steel weight loss and the half cell potential were measured vs. exposure time, up to the age of 12 months. Pore solution extraction and analysis and porosity determination were also performed. In continuous exposure in tap water, alinite cement provided adequate protection against corrosion. In interrupted exposure in tap water, a higher corrosion was observed for alinite cement compared to OPC. In the case of interrupted exposure in 3.5% NaCl solution, the simultaneous action of free chlorides and oxygen resulted in the depassivation of steel reinforcing bars in alinite and Portland cement mortars, and led to severe corrosion effect.

  10. Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Steel Reinforcement in Concrete — a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Ghoreishiamiri, Seyedmojtaba; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Reinforced concrete is one of the widely used construction materials for bridges, buildings, platforms and tunnels. Though reinforced concrete is capable of withstanding a large range of severe environments including marine, industrial and alpine conditions, there are still a large number of failures in concrete structures for many reasons. Either carbonation or chloride attack is the main culprit which is due to depassivation of reinforced steel and subsequently leads to rapid steel corrosion. Among many corrosion prevention measures, application of corrosion inhibitors play a vital role in metal protection. Numerous range of corrosion inhibitors were reported for concrete protection that were also used commercially in industries. This review summarizes the application of natural products as corrosion inhibitors for concrete protection and also scrutinizes various factors influencing its applicability.

  11. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  12. Characterization of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey M.

    This Dissertation investigates a carbon fiber reinforced polymer repair system for structurally deficient steel piping. Numerous techniques exist for the repair of high-pressure steel piping. One repair technology that is widely gaining acceptance is composite over-wraps. Thermal analytical evaluations of the epoxy matrix material produced glass transition temperature results, a cure kinetic model, and a workability chart. These results indicate a maximum glass transition temperature of 80°C (176°F) when cured in ambient conditions. Post-curing the epoxy, however, resulted in higher glass-transition temperatures. The accuracy of cure kinetic model presented is temperature dependent; its accuracy improves with increased cure temperatures. Cathodic disbondment evaluations of the composite over-wrap show the epoxy does not breakdown when subjected to a constant voltage of -1.5V and the epoxy does not allow corrosion to form under the wrap from permeation. Combustion analysis of the composite over-wrap system revealed the epoxy is flammable when in direct contact with fire. To prevent combustion, an intumescent coating was developed to be applied on the composite over-wrap. Results indicate that damaged pipes repaired with the carbon fiber composite over-wrap withstand substantially higher static pressures and exhibit better fatigue characteristics than pipes lacking repair. For loss up to 80 percent of the original pipe wall thickness, the composite over-wrap achieved failure pressures above the pipe's specified minimum yield stress during monotonic evaluations and reached the pipe's practical fatigue limit during cyclical pressure testing. Numerous repairs were made to circular, thru-wall defects and monotonic pressure tests revealed containment up to the pipe's specified minimum yield strength for small diameter defects. The energy release rate of the composite over-wrap/steel interface was obtained from these full-scale, leaking pipe evaluations and results

  13. Co-extrusion of Discontinuously, Non-centric Steel-reinforced Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Foydl, A.; Haase, M.; Khalifa, N. Ben; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-05-04

    The process of manufacturing discontinuously non-centric steel reinforced aluminum by means of co-extrusion has been examined. By this process semi-finished reinforced profiles can be fabricated for further treatment through forging techniques. Therefore, steel reinforcement elements consisting of E295GC were inserted into conventional aluminum billets and co-extruded into two different solid profiles; a rectangle one by an extrusion ratio of 10.1:1 and a round one by 4.8:1. The used aluminum alloy is EN AW-6060. The billet temperature as well as the ram speed were varied to investigate their influence on the position of the reinforcement elements inside the strand. The measurement was done by a video measurement system, called Optomess A250, after milling off the strand. The distances between the elements in longitudinal direction were nearly constant, apart from the rear part of the strand. The same was observed for the distance of the steel elements to the profile edge. This due to the inhomogeneous material flow in the transverse weld, related to the billet-to-billet extrusion. The rotation of the reinforcement elements occurs because the elements flow nearby the shear zone. Further, micrographs were made to investigate the embedding situation and the grain size distribution. The embedding of the reinforcement elements were good in the solid round profile, but in the rectangle profile were found some kind of air pocket. The grain size of the aluminum alloy close to the steel elements is much smaller than in the other parts of the solid round profile.

  14. Use of GIS for the development of digital structural integrity maps of high risk areas in Cyprus due to corrosion of steel reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofe, Andreas; Neocleous, Kyriacos; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2013-08-01

    Concrete reinforced with steel rebars remains one of the most widely used construction materials. Despite its good mechanical performance and expected service life of at least 50 years, reinforced concrete is subjected to corrosion of the steel rebars which normally leads to concrete spalling, deterioration of the reinforced concrete's (RC) mechanical properties and eventual reduction of the structural load capacity. In Cyprus, especially in coastal regions where almost 60% of the population resides, many structural problems have been identified in RC structures, which are caused by the severe corrosion of steel rebars. Most RC, located in coastal areas, show signs of corrosion within the first 15-20 years of their service life and this affects their structural integrity and reliability, especially against seismic loading. This paper presents the research undertaken as part of the `STEELCOR' project which aims to extensively evaluate the steel corrosion of RC buildings in coastal areas of Cyprus and conduct a risk assessment relating to steel corrosion. GIS are utilized in conjunction with non-destructive testing of corroded RC structures to develop a digital structural integrity map of Cyprus which shows the areas with high risk of steel corrosion of RC buildings.

  15. Stainless and Galvanized Steel, Hydrophobic Admixture and Flexible Polymer-Cement Coating Compared in Increasing Durability of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittarelli, Francesca; Giosuè, Chiara; Mobili, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    The use of stainless or galvanized steel reinforcements, a hydrophobic admixture or a flexible polymer-cement coating were compared as methods to improve the corrosion resistance of sound or cracked reinforced concrete specimens exposed to chloride rich solutions. The results show that in full immersion condition, negligible corrosion rates were detected in all cracked specimens, except those treated with the flexible polymer-cement mortar as preventive method against corrosion and the hydrophobic concrete specimens. High corrosion rates were measured in all cracked specimens exposed to wet-dry cycles, except for those reinforced with stainless steel, those treated with the flexible polymer-cement coating as restorative method against reinforcement corrosion and for hydrophobic concrete specimens reinforced with galvanized steel reinforcements.

  16. Development of hybrid polypropylene-steel fiber-reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, C.X.; Stroeven, P.

    2000-01-01

    This research first investigates the optimization of fiber size, fiber content, and fly ash content in hybrid polypropylene-steel fiber concrete with low fiber content based on general mechanical properties. The research results show that a certain content of fine particles such as fly ash is necessary to evenly disperse fibers. The different sizes of steel fibers contributed to different mechanical properties, at least to a different degree. Additions of a small fiber type had a significant influence on the compressive strength, but the splitting tensile strength was only slightly affected. A large fiber type gave rise to opposite mechanical effects, which were further fortified by optimization of the aspect ratio. There is a synergy effect in the hybrid fibers system. The fracture properties and the dynamic properties will be further investigated for the hybrid fibers concrete with good general mechanical properties.

  17. Evaluation of post-fire strength of concrete flexural members reinforced with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Devon S.

    Owing to their corrosion resistance and superior strength to weight ratio, there has been, over the past two decades, increased interest in the use of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete structural members. The mechanical behavior of FRP reinforcement differs from that of steel reinforcement. For example, FRP reinforcement exhibit a linear stress-strain behavior until the bar ruptures and the strength, stiffness and bond properties of FRP reinforcement are affected more adversely by elevated temperatures. All structures are subject to the risk of damage by fire and fires continue to be a significant cause of damage to structures. Many structures do not collapse after being exposed to fire. The safety of the structure for any future use is dependent on the ability to accurately estimate the post-fire load capacity of the structure. Assuming that the changes, due to fire exposure, in the mechanical behavior of the GFRP reinforcing bar and concrete, and the bond between the reinforcing bar and the concrete are understood, an analytical procedure for estimating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete flexural elements can be developed. This thesis investigates the changes in: a) tensile properties and bond of GFRP bars; and b) the flexural behavior of GFRP reinforced concrete beams flexural after being exposed to elevated temperatures up to 400°C and cooled to ambient temperature. To this end, twelve tensile tests, twelve pullout bond tests and ten four-point beam tests were performed. The data from the tests were used to formulate analytical procedures for evaluating the post-fire strength of GFRP reinforced concrete beams. The procedure produced conservative results when compared with the experimental data. In general, the residual tensile strength and modulus of elasticity of GFRP bars decrease as the exposure temperature increases. The loss in properties is however, smaller than that observed by other researchers when

  18. Assessment of Steel Reinforcement Corrosion State by Parameters of Potentiodynamic Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajči, Ľudovít; Jerga, Ján

    2015-12-01

    The environment of the steel reinforcement has a significant impact on the durability and service life of a concrete structure. It is not only the presence of aggressive substances from the environment, but also the own composition of concrete mixture. The use of new types of cements, additives and admixtures must be preceded by verification, if they themselves shall not initiate the corrosion. There is a need for closer physical expression of the parameters of the potentiodynamic diagrams allowing reliable assessment of the influence of the surrounding environment on electrochemical behaviour of reinforcement. The analysis of zero retardation limits of potentiodynamic curves is presented.

  19. Vertical impedance measurements on concrete bridge decks for assessing susceptibility of reinforcing steel to corrosion.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, Paul D; Guthrie, W Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a pressing problem for aging concrete infrastructure, especially bridge decks. Because of its sensitivity to factors that affect corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete, resistivity is an important structural health indicator for reinforced concrete structures. In this research, an instrument was developed to measure vertical impedance on concrete bridge decks. Measurements of vertical impedance on slabs prepared in the laboratory, on slabs removed from decommissioned bridge decks, and on an in-service bridge deck in the field demonstrate the utility of the new apparatus.

  20. Vertical impedance measurements on concrete bridge decks for assessing susceptibility of reinforcing steel to corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul D.; Guthrie, W. Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian A.

    2012-08-01

    Corrosion is a pressing problem for aging concrete infrastructure, especially bridge decks. Because of its sensitivity to factors that affect corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete, resistivity is an important structural health indicator for reinforced concrete structures. In this research, an instrument was developed to measure vertical impedance on concrete bridge decks. Measurements of vertical impedance on slabs prepared in the laboratory, on slabs removed from decommissioned bridge decks, and on an in-service bridge deck in the field demonstrate the utility of the new apparatus.

  1. Buckling of steel cylinders containing circular cutouts reinforced according to the area-replacement method

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, R.C.; Bennett, J.G.; Butler, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of the use of the area replacement method (ARM) for reinforcing circular penetrations in cylindrical steel shells has been studied both experimentally and analyticaly. How this type of reinforcement affects the buckling strength of a shell subjected to uniform axial compression is the specific area of investigation. In shells that are of such a quality that the penetration reduces the buckling strength, the use of the ARM will increase the bucking strength of the shell. In any case, the conservative knockdown factors suggested for buckling design by the American Society of Mechanical Engineer's (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code should ensure an adequate margin to failure under this loading condition.

  2. Fracture analysis of a high-strength concrete and a high-strength steel-fiber-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the use of R-curves to study the fracture behavior of high-strength concrete and steel-fiber-reinforced concrete subjected to crack ing in a three-point bending configuration. The R-curves are modeled through an effective approach based on the equations of linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), which relates the applied load to the fundamental displacements of notched-through beams loaded monotonically. It is initially shown that, for quasi-brittle materials, the R-curves responses can be evaluated in a quasi-analytical way, using the load-crack mouth opening, the load-load line displacement, or exclusively the displacement responses obtained experimentally. Afterward, the methodology is used to obtain the fracture responses of high-strength and fiber-reinforced concretes, up to the final stages of rupture.

  3. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. Materials and Methods: The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Conclusions: Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively. PMID:26124604

  4. Intermittent cathodic protection for steel reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Soltesz, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are used for impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on Oregon's reinforced concrete coastal bridges to prevent chloride-induced corrosion damage. Thermal-sprayed zinc performs well as an ICCP anode but the service life of the zinc anode is directly related to the average current density used to operate the systems. After a ICCP system is turned off, the rebar in the concrete remains passive and protected for a period of time. Intermittent operation of CP systems is possible when continuous corrosion rate monitoring is used to identify conditions when the CP system needs to be turned on to reestablish protection conditions for the rebar. This approach applies CP protection only when needed and reflects the fact that external protection may not be needed for a range of environmental conditions. In doing so, intermittent CP would lower the average current necessary to protect rebar, increase the anode service life, and reduce the lifetime costs for protecting reinforced concrete bridges.

  5. A micromorphic model for steel fiber reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J; Mora, D F; Huespe, A E; Weyler, R

    2012-10-15

    A new formulation to model the mechanical behavior of high performance fiber reinforced cement composites with arbitrarily oriented short fibers is presented. The formulation can be considered as a two scale approach, in which the macroscopic model, at the structural level, takes into account the mesostructural phenomenon associated with the fiber-matrix interface bond/slip process. This phenomenon is contemplated by including, in the macroscopic description, a micromorphic field representing the relative fiber-cement displacement. Then, the theoretical framework, from which the governing equations of the problem are derived, can be assimilated to a specific case of the material multifield theory. The balance equation derived for this model, connecting the micro stresses with the micromorphic forces, has a physical meaning related with the fiber-matrix bond slip mechanism. Differently to previous procedures in the literature, addressed to model fiber reinforced composites, where this equation has been added as an additional independent ingredient of the methodology, in the present approach it arises as a natural result derived from the multifield theory. Every component of the composite is defined with a specific free energy and constitutive relation. The mixture theory is adopted to define the overall free energy of the composite, which is assumed to be homogeneously constituted, in the sense that every infinitesimal volume is occupied by all the components in a proportion given by the corresponding volume fraction. The numerical model is assessed by means of a selected set of experiments that prove the viability of the present approach.

  6. Friction and wear of hydroxyapatite reinforced high density polyethylene against the stainless steel counterface.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Chandrasekaran, M; Bonfield, W

    2002-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) was invented as a biomaterial for skeletal applications. In this investigation, tribological properties (e.g. wear rate and coefficient of friction) of unfilled HDPE and HA/HDPE composites were evaluated against the duplex stainless steel in dry and lubricated conditions, with distilled water or aqueous solutions of proteins (egg albumen or glucose) being lubricants. Wear tests were conducted in a custom-built test rig for HDPE and HA/HDPE containing up to 40 vol % of HA. It was found that HA/HDPE composites had lower coefficients of friction than unfilled HDPE under certain conditions. HA/HDPE also exhibited less severe fatigue failure marks than HDPE. The degradation and fatigue failure of HDPE due to the presence of proteins were severe for low speed wear testing (100 rpm) as compared to high speed wear testing (200 rpm). This was due possibly to the high shear rate at the contact which could remove any degraded film instantaneously at high sliding speed, while with a low sliding speed the build-up of a degraded layer of protein could occur. The degraded protein layer would stay at the contact for a longer time and mechanical activation would induce adverse reactions, weakening the surface layer of HDPE. Both egg albumen and glucose were found to be corrosive to steel and adversely reactive for HDPE and HA/HDPE composites. The wear modes observed were similar to that of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Specimens tested with egg albumen also displayed higher wear rates, which was again attributed to corrosion accelerated wear.

  7. Effect of Thickness and Fibre Volume Fraction on Impact Resistance of Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete (SFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Usman, Fathoni; Syamsir, Agusril; Shao Yang, Chen; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and fibre volume fraction (VF) on the impact performance of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at 0.57 m height has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance SFRC against slab thickness and volume fraction. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistances of SFRC against slab thickness. However the impact resistance of SFRC against percentage of volume fraction exhibit a non-linear relationship.

  8. Effects of manufacturing techniques on the flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Toutanji, H.; Bayasi, Z.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents experimental research investigating the effects of manufacturing techniques on the mechanical properties of steel fiber-reinforced concrete. Both the effects of curing environments and that of testing direction relative to casting direction on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete are reported. Specimens were cured in three different environmental conditions: steam, moisture, and air. Results show that steam curing, as compared to moisture curing, does not enhance the flexural strength of steel fibrous concrete but does reduce flexural toughness. As expected, air curing shows detrimental effects on all aspects of the test results, as compared to steam and moisture curing. The flexural behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete is strongly affected by testing direction. When testing direction is perpendicular to casting direction, specimens exhibit reductions in both flexural strength and toughness compared to the case when testing and casting directions are parallel. The effect of testing direction relative to casting direction on flexural strength and toughness increases with increasing the flowability (workability) of the fibrous mixture, which encourages fiber settlement during placement.

  9. Seismic performance of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete composite frame joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changwang; Jia, Jinqing

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the seismic performance of a composite frame comprised of steel reinforced ultra high-strength concrete (SRUHSC) columns and steel reinforced concrete (SRC) beams, six interior frame joint specimens were designed and tested under low cyclically lateral load. The effects of the axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio were studied on the characteristics of the frame joint performance including crack pattern, failure mode, ductility, energy dissipation capacity, strength degradation and rigidity degradation. It was found that all joint specimens behaved in a ductile manner with flexural-shear failure in the joint core region while plastic hinges appeared at the beam ends. The ductility and energy absorption capacity of joints increased as the axial load ratio decreased and the volumetric stirrup ratio increased. The displacement ductility coefficient and equivalent damping coefficient of the joints fell between the corresponding coefficients of the steel reinforced concrete (SRC) frame joint and RC frame joint. The axial load ratio and volumetric stirrup ratio have less influence on the strength degradation and more influence on the stiffness degradation. The stiffness of the joint degrades more significantly for a low volumetric stirrup ratio and high axial load ratio. The characteristics obtained from the SRUHSC composite frame joint specimens with better seismic performance may be a useful reference in future engineering applications.

  10. Application of nanoindentation testing to study of the interfacial transition zone in steel fiber reinforced mortar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaohui Jacobsen, Stefan; He Jianying; Zhang Zhiliang; Lee, Siaw Foon; Lein, Hilde Lea

    2009-08-15

    The characteristics of the profiles of elastic modulus and hardness of the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zones in steel fiber reinforced mortars have been investigated by using nanoindentation and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), where two sets of parameters, i.e. water/binder ratio and content of silica fume were considered. Different interfacial bond conditions in the interfacial transition zones (ITZ) are discussed. For sample without silica fume, efficient interfacial bonds across the steel fiber-matrix and fiber-matrix-aggregate interfaces are shown in low water/binder ratio mortar; while in high water/binder ratio mortar, due to the discontinuous bleeding voids underneath the fiber, the fiber-matrix bond is not very good. On the other hand, for sample with silica fume, the addition of 10% silica fume leads to no distinct presence of weak ITZ in the steel fiber-matrix interface; but the effect of the silica fume on the steel fiber-matrix-aggregate interfacial zone is not obvious due to voids in the vicinity of steel fiber.

  11. PERFORMANCE OF RC AND FRC WALL PANELS REINFORCED WITH MILD STEEL AND GFRP COMPOSITES IN BLAST EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Garfield; William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Chris P. Pantelides; James E. Blakeley

    2011-06-01

    The structural integrity of reinforced concrete structures in blast events is important for critical facilities. This paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating detailed finite element models that predict the performance of reinforced concrete wall panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The test specimens were 1.2 m square wall panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consists of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type A); FRC panels without additional reinforcement (Type B); FRC panels with steel bar reinforcement (Type C); NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bar reinforcement (Type D); and NWC panels reinforced with steel bar reinforcement and external bidirectional GFRP overlays on both faces (Type E). An additional three Type C panels were used as control specimens (CON). Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. The panels were instrumented with strain gauges, and accelerometers; in addition, pressure sensors and high speed videos were employed during the blast events. Panel types C and E had the best performance, whereas panel type B did not perform well. Preliminary dynamic simulations show crack patterns similar to the experimental results.

  12. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Perceka, Wisena; Liao, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yo-de

    2016-04-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis by involving sixty-nine TRs of HSC without steel fibers and twenty-seven TRs of HSC with hybrid of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. The proposed TR equation was further verified by compression tests of seventeen HSC columns conducted in this study, where twelve specimens were reinforced by high strength rebars in longitudinal and transverse directions. The results show that the efficiency of steel fibers in concrete depends on transverse reinforcement spacing, where the steel fibers are more effective if the spacing transverse reinforcement becomes larger in the range of 0.25-1 effective depth of the section column. Furthermore, the axial load-strain curves were developed by employing finite element software (OpenSees) for simulating the response of the structural system. Comparisons between numerical and experimental axial load-strain curves were carried out.

  13. High Strength Concrete Columns under Axial Compression Load: Hybrid Confinement Efficiency of High Strength Transverse Reinforcement and Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Perceka, Wisena; Liao, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Yo-de

    2016-01-01

    Addition of steel fibers to high strength concrete (HSC) improves its post-peak behavior and energy absorbing capability, which can be described well in term of toughness. This paper attempts to obtain both analytically and experimentally the efficiency of steel fibers in HSC columns with hybrid confinement of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. Toughness ratio (TR) to quantify the confinement efficiency of HSC columns with hybrid confinement is proposed through a regression analysis by involving sixty-nine TRs of HSC without steel fibers and twenty-seven TRs of HSC with hybrid of transverse reinforcement and steel fibers. The proposed TR equation was further verified by compression tests of seventeen HSC columns conducted in this study, where twelve specimens were reinforced by high strength rebars in longitudinal and transverse directions. The results show that the efficiency of steel fibers in concrete depends on transverse reinforcement spacing, where the steel fibers are more effective if the spacing transverse reinforcement becomes larger in the range of 0.25–1 effective depth of the section column. Furthermore, the axial load–strain curves were developed by employing finite element software (OpenSees) for simulating the response of the structural system. Comparisons between numerical and experimental axial load–strain curves were carried out. PMID:28773391

  14. Research on construction technology of shaped steel reinforced concrete beam and column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shan; Zhang, Zimeng; Liu, Lengjing; Bu, Fangming

    2017-04-01

    The Shaped Steel Reinforced Concrete structures are increasingly used in large-span or irregularly shaped public buildings. In the actual construction, cross-operation of steel structures and concrete is more frequent. Traditional construction method causes a lot of quality problems easily like installation deviation of beam and column, improper treatment of steel at the joints of beams and columns, and unevenness of concrete surface. If you can not take timely measures to deal with or prevent, it will inevitably have a great impact on the reliability of the structure, and also delay the construction schedule. This paper makes related research about the quality issues, proposes corresponding solutions and provides a complete set of construction technology processes. At last, through engineering case, we analyze the economic and social benefits.

  15. Corrosion Behavior of Steel Reinforcement in Concrete with Recycled Aggregates, Fly Ash and Spent Cracking Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Gurdián, Hebé; García-Alcocel, Eva; Baeza-Brotons, Francisco; Garcés, Pedro; Zornoza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The main strategy to reduce the environmental impact of the concrete industry is to reuse the waste materials. This research has considered the combination of cement replacement by industrial by-products, and natural coarse aggregate substitution by recycled aggregate. The aim is to evaluate the behavior of concretes with a reduced impact on the environment by replacing a 50% of cement by industrial by-products (15% of spent fluid catalytic cracking catalyst and 35% of fly ash) and a 100% of natural coarse aggregate by recycled aggregate. The concretes prepared according to these considerations have been tested in terms of mechanical strengths and the protection offered against steel reinforcement corrosion under carbonation attack and chloride-contaminated environments. The proposed concrete combinations reduced the mechanical performance of concretes in terms of elastic modulus, compressive strength, and flexural strength. In addition, an increase in open porosity due to the presence of recycled aggregate was observed, which is coherent with the changes observed in mechanical tests. Regarding corrosion tests, no significant differences were observed in the case of the resistance of these types of concretes under a natural chloride attack. In the case of carbonation attack, although all concretes did not stand the highly aggressive conditions, those concretes with cement replacement behaved worse than Portland cement concretes. PMID:28788613

  16. Bond Behavior of Historical Clay Bricks Strengthened with Steel Reinforced Polymers (SRP)

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Ernesto; Imbimbo, Maura; Sacco, Elio

    2011-01-01

    In the strengthening interventions of past and historical masonry constructions, the non-standardized manufacture processes, the ageing and the damage of masonry units, could significantly affect the properties of the surfaces where strengthening materials are applied. This aspect requires particular care in evaluating the performance of externally bonded strengthening layers, especially with reference to the detachment mechanism. The bond response of old masonries could be very different from that occurring in new masonry units which are the ones generally considered in most of the bond tests available in technical literature. The aim of the present paper is the study of the bond behavior of historical clay bricks strengthened with steel reinforced polymers (SRP) materials. In particular, the results of an experimental study concerning new manufactured clay bricks and old bricks extracted from different historical masonry buildings are presented. The obtained results, particularly in terms of bond resistance, detachment mechanism and strain distributions, are discussed for the purpose of analyzing the peculiarities of the historical bricks in comparison with new manufactured ones. Some considerations on the efficacy of the theoretical formulations of the recent Italian code are also carried out.

  17. An Experimental Study on Strengthening of Reinforced Concrete Flexural Members using Steel Wire Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Saadi, Hamza Salim Mohammed; Mohandas, Hoby P.; Namasivayam, Aravind

    2017-01-01

    One of the major challenges and contemporary research in the field of structural engineering is strengthening of existing structural elements using readily available materials in the market. Several investigations were conducted on strengthening of various structural components using traditional and advanced materials. Many researchers tried to enhance the reinforced concrete (RC) beams strength using steel plate, Glass and Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (GFRP & CFRP). For the reason that high weight to the strength ratio and compatibility in strength between FRP composites and steel bars, steel plates and GFRP and CFRP composites are not used for strengthening works practically. Hence, in this present work the suitability of using wire mesh for the purpose of strengthening the RC flexural members is studied by conducting experimental works. New technique of strengthening system using wire mesh with a view to improve sectional properties and subsequently flexural strength of RC beams is adopted in this work. The results for experimental and theoretical analysis were compared and found that good correlation exists between them. The experimental results indicate that RC beams strengthened with steel wire mesh are easy technique for strengthening of existing flexural members.

  18. The Application of Magneto Inductive Sensors for Non-Destructive Testing of Steel Reinforcing Bars Embedded Within Pre-Stressed and Reinforced Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, D. S.; Quek, S.; Gaydecki, P.; Torres, V.; Fernandes, B.

    2006-03-06

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of using solid-state magneto-inductive probes for detecting and imaging of steel reinforcing bars embedded within pre-stressed and reinforced concrete. Changes in the inductance of the sensor material are directly proportional to the strength of the measured magnetic field parallel to the sensor. Experimental results obtained by scanning steel bars specimens are presented. General performance characteristics and sensor output limitations are investigated by using different orientations, sensing distance, excitation intensity, bar sizes and geometries.

  19. Development and mechanical characterization of carbon-fiber-reinforced cement composites and mechanical properties and structural applications of steel-fiber-reinforced concrete. (Volumes I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bayasi, M.Z.

    1989-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive experimental study on carbon fiber reinforced cement composites incorporating the Ashland's industrial grade carbon fiber reinforced cement composites incorporating the Ashland's inductrial grade carbon fibers (Carboflex), the optimum mix variables and processing techniques were decided. The types and proportions of different mix constituents, the fiber lengths and volume fractions, and the mixing and curing procedures which produce desirable fresh mix properties and superior hardened material performance were decided. A comprehensive experimental data set on the performance characteristics of carbon fiber reinforced cement was also generated. The research was performed in three phases: (1) Establishment of the mixing procedure and mix proportions for achieving desirable fresh mix characteristics; (2) Assessment of the trends in the effects of different mix variables on the strength of air cured specimens and further optimization of the mix proportions for achieving superior strength characteristics in addition to the desirable fresh mix workability; and (3) Optimization of the curing condition and full mechanical characterization for carbon fiber reinforced cement composites with some optimum values of fiber length and volume fraction. A comprehensive investigation was performed on the material properties and structural applications of steel fiber reinforced concrete. In studies on the application of steel fiber reinforced concrete a load bearing structural elements, the effects of steel fibers on improving the strength and ductility of concrete footings under bearing pressure, and enhancing bond between deformed bars and concrete were investigated.

  20. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete.

    PubMed

    Singh, M P; Singh, S P; Singh, A P

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together.

  1. Experimental Study on the Strength Characteristics and Water Permeability of Hybrid Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Singh, S. P.; Singh, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Results of an investigation conducted to study the effect of fibre hybridization on the strength characteristics such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability of steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) are presented. Steel fibres of different lengths, that is, 12.5 mm, 25 mm, and 50 mm, having constant diameter of 0.6 mm, were systematically combined in different mix proportions to obtain mono, binary, and ternary combinations at each of 0.5%, 1.0%, and 1.5% fibre volume fraction. A concrete mix containing no fibres was also cast for reference purpose. A total number of 1440 cube specimens of size 100∗100∗100 mm were tested, 480 each for compressive strength, split tensile strength, and water permeability at 7, 28, 90, and 120 days of curing. It has been observed from the results of this investigation that a fibre combination of 33% 12.5 mm + 33% 25 mm + 33% 50 mm long fibres can be adjudged as the most appropriate combination to be employed in hybrid steel fibre reinforced concrete (HySFRC) for optimum performance in terms of compressive strength, split tensile strength and water permeability requirements taken together. PMID:27379298

  2. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures. PMID:28788011

  3. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  4. Performance of epoxy-coated reinforced steel in the deck of the Perley Bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Tinnea, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Perley Bridge spanned the Ottawa River between the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec from 1931 to 1999. Epoxy-coated steel reinforcing bar (ECR) was used in 1979 in an effort to extend the service life of span 17. Patches were needed to repair corrosion of the west lane as little as 7 to 11 years later. No patches were needed for the east lane which had twice the cover concrete of the west lane. Examinations showed that the original concrete in both lanes and the patch concrete in the west lane were of good quality. Epoxy adhesion to the steel reinforcing bar was good to fair over much of the reinforcing bar, but poor to failed in isolated areas. Analytical scanning electron microscopy (ASEM) identified voids, rust, cracked epoxy, and cracked concrete at some ECR locations. Chloride profiling of the concrete in both lanes, coupled with the corrosion threshold level of chloride, indicated that the time required for corrosion to cause visible damage of the deck was 6.2 years for the west lane and 18.9 years for the east lane.

  5. Comparative Study on Corrosion Protection of Reinforcing Steel by Using Amino Alcohol and Lithium Nitrite Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Ryu, Hwa-Sung; Park, Won-Jun; Ismail, Mohamed A

    2015-01-14

    In this study, the ability of lithium nitrite and amino alcohol inhibitors to provide corrosion protection to reinforcing steel was investigated. Two types of specimens-reinforcing steel and a reinforced concrete prism that were exposed to chloride ion levels resembling the chloride attack environment-were prepared. An autoclave accelerated corrosion test was then conducted. The variables tested included the chloride-ion concentration and molar ratios of anti-corrosion ingredients in a CaOH₂-saturated aqueous solution that simulated a cement-pore solution. A concentration of 25% was used for the lithium nitrite inhibitor LiNO₂, and an 80% solution of dimethyl ethanolamine ((CH₃)₂NCH₂CH₂OH, hereinafter DMEA) was used for the amino alcohol inhibitor. The test results indicated that the lithium nitrite inhibitor displayed anti-corrosion properties at a molar ratio of inhibitor of ≥0.6; the amino alcohol inhibitor also displayed anti-corrosion properties at molar ratios of inhibitor greater than approximately 0.3.

  6. Comparative Study on Corrosion Protection of Reinforcing Steel by Using Amino Alcohol and Lithium Nitrite Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Ryu, Hwa-Sung; Park, Won-Jun; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the ability of lithium nitrite and amino alcohol inhibitors to provide corrosion protection to reinforcing steel was investigated. Two types of specimens—reinforcing steel and a reinforced concrete prism that were exposed to chloride ion levels resembling the chloride attack environment—were prepared. An autoclave accelerated corrosion test was then conducted. The variables tested included the chloride-ion concentration and molar ratios of anti-corrosion ingredients in a CaOH2-saturated aqueous solution that simulated a cement-pore solution. A concentration of 25% was used for the lithium nitrite inhibitor LiNO2, and an 80% solution of dimethyl ethanolamine ((CH3)2NCH2CH2OH, hereinafter DMEA) was used for the amino alcohol inhibitor. The test results indicated that the lithium nitrite inhibitor displayed anti-corrosion properties at a molar ratio of inhibitor of ≥0.6; the amino alcohol inhibitor also displayed anti-corrosion properties at molar ratios of inhibitor greater than approximately 0.3. PMID:28787936

  7. Study of corrosion behavior of high strength low alloy steel reinforcing bars in industrial and marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Hocking, M.G.; Jha, R.; Chatterjee, A.; Mukherjee, T.

    1996-11-01

    Mild steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete exposed to marine environment are prone to severe corrosion leading to serious damage to the structures. The various technologies developed and adopted to reduce the corrosion of steel reinforcement, have been discussed in this paper along with a new high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel reinforcing bar. The bare HSLA rebars have been tested extensively along with mild steel rebars for comparative study in saline and sulfurous electrolytes in the laboratory by Potentiodynamic tests as well as in natural marine and industrial environments. The HSLA and mild steel rebars embedded in concrete were also tested in saline water by alternate immersion test and by impressed anodic current methods. The bare HSLA rebars showed 2--3 and 1.5--1.9 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars in laboratory and field exposure tests respectively. The HSLA rebars embedded in concrete and exposed to saline water with impressed anodic current of 200 {micro}A/sq. cm showed 2.5 times better corrosion resistance to mild steel rebars. The XRD analysis of the rust formed on the samples of field exposure tests conducted in marine and industrial environments, clearly showed the formation of compounds which reduce the corrosion rate of steel.

  8. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-03-04

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred.

  9. Compressibility of 304 Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Materials Reinforced with 304 Short Stainless Steel Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Bibo; Zhou, Zhaoyao; Duan, Liuyang; Xiao, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    Powder metallurgy (P/M) technique is usually used for manufacturing porous metal materials. However, some P/M materials are limitedly used in engineering for their performance deficiency. A novel 304 stainless steel P/M material was produced by a solid-state sintering of 304 stainless steel powders and 304 short stainless steel fibers, which were alternately laid in layers according to mass ratio. In this paper, the compressive properties of the P/M materials were characterized by a series of uniaxial compression tests. The effects of fiber content, compaction pressure and high temperature nitriding on compressive properties were investigated. The results indicated that, without nitriding, the samples changed from cuboid to cydariform without damage in the process of compression. The compressive stress was enhanced with increasing fiber content ranging from 0 to 8 wt.%. For compaction pressure from 55 to 75 MPa, greater compaction pressure improved compressive stress. Moreover, high temperature nitriding was able to significantly improve the yield stress, but collapse failure eventually occurred. PMID:28773285

  10. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT INVERT-LOW STEEL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. E. Taylor and D. H. Tang

    2000-09-29

    This technical report evaluates and develops options for reducing the amount of steel in the emplacement drift invert. Concepts developed in the ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' were evaluated to determine material properties required for the proposed invert concepts. Project requirements documents prescribe the use of a carbon steel frame for the invert with a granular material of crushed tuff as ballast. The ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' developed three concepts: (1) All-Ballast Invert; (2) Modified Steel Invert with Ballast; and (3) Steel Tie with Ballast Invert. Analysis of the steel frame members, runway beams, and guide beams, for the modified steel invert with ballast, decreased the quantity of steel in the emplacement drift invert, however a substantial steel support frame for the gantry and waste package/pallet assembly is still required. Use of one of the other two concepts appears to be an alternative to the steel frame and each of the concepts uses considerably less steel materials. Analysis of the steel tie with ballast invert shows that the bearing pressure on the ballast under the single steel tie, C 9 x 20, loaded with the waste package/pallet assembly, drip shield, and backfill exceeds the upper bound of the allowable bearing capacity for tuff used in this study. The single tie, C 10 x 20, will also fail for the same loading condition except for the tie length of 4.2 meters and longer. Analysis also shows that with two ties, C 9 or 10 x 20's, the average ballast pressure is less than the allowable bearing capacity. Distributing the waste package/pallet, drip shield, and backfill loads to two steel ties reduces the contact bearing pressure. Modifying the emplacement pallet end beams to a greater width, reducing the tie spacing, and increasing the width of the ties would ensure that the pallet beams are always supported by two steel ties. Further analysis is required to determine compatible tie size and spacing

  11. Comparison of rates of general corrosion and maximum pitting penetration on concrete embedded steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Feliu, S. ); Andrade, C.; Alonso, C. )

    1995-02-01

    Local attack of reinforcement is observed usually in chloride-contaminated concrete. When mechanical weakening of the concrete structure is affected by the bar section loss in the places where corrosion is intensified, the maximum penetration of the deepest pits happens to be a very relevant datum. In this work average corrosion values are compared with maximum pit depth values. Using natural corrosion tests and accelerated tests, it has been found that the maximum penetration of localized attack on steel embedded in concrete containing chlorides is equivalent to about four to eight times the average general penetration.

  12. Design of reinforcement welding machine within steel framework for marine engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    In this project, a design scheme that reinforcement welding machine is added within the steel framework is proposed according to the double-side welding technology for box-beam structure in marine engineering. Then the design and development of circuit and transmission mechanism for new welding equipment are completed as well with one sample machine being made. Moreover, the trial running is finished finally. Main technical parameters of the equipment are: the working stroke: ≥1500mm, the welding speed: 8˜15cm/min and the welding sheet thickness: ≥20mm.

  13. Statistical variations in impact resistance of steel fiber-reinforced concrete subjected to drop weight test

    SciTech Connect

    Nataraja, M.C.; Dhang, N.; Gupta, A.P.

    1999-07-01

    The variation in impact resistance of steel fiber-reinforced concrete and plain concrete as determined from a drop weight test is reported. The observed coefficients of variation are about 57 and 46% for first-crack resistance and the ultimate resistance in the case of fiber concrete and the corresponding values for plain concrete are 54 and 51%, respectively. The goodness-of-fit test indicated poor fitness of the impact-resistance test results produced in this study to normal distribution at 95% level of confidence for both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete. However, the percentage increase in number of blows from first crack to failure for both fiber-reinforced concrete and as well as plain concrete fit to normal distribution as indicated by the goodness-of-fit test. The coefficient of variation in percentage increase in the number of blows beyond first crack for fiber-reinforced concrete and plain concrete is 51.9 and 43.1%, respectively. Minimum number of tests required to reliably measure the properties of the material can be suggested based on the observed levels of variation.

  14. Finite element analysis of bridge steel pedestal anchor bolts in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan Hancock, B.; Hite Head, Monique

    2009-10-01

    Steel pedestals are short, column-like structures currently being used to elevate highway bridges to reduce the risk of collisions with over-height vehicles. Previous full-scale experimental research has been done to examine the efficacy of these steel pedestals and their components under quasi-static loading to evaluate any added instability in the event of an earthquake. As part of the Undergraduate Summer Research Grant (USRG) program at Texas A&M University, this specific project was focused on observing the behavior of the post-installed steel pedestal anchor bolts under applied shear and tensile loading using the finite element (FE) software Abaqus. The results from some of the preliminary analyses are compared to theoretical anchorage calculations with the aim of producing a benchmark for future steel pedestal anchor bolt embedment design. Future research improvements regarding FE modeling and structural design suggestions are proposed as well.

  15. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  16. Performance Evaluation for Enhancement of Some of the Engineering Properties of Bamboo as Reinforcement in Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kute, S. Y.; Wakchaure, M. R.

    2013-11-01

    Bamboo is one of the alternative materials with strong potential for reinforcing the cement matrices. Unlike steel, during casting and curing of concrete, reinforced bamboo absorbs water and expands, which results in radial cracking of surrounding concrete. When curing is stopped, bamboo starts shrinking slowly loosing the contact with concrete. The dimensional changes of bamboo resulting from moisture and temperature variations, causes de-bonding which affects the bond strength severely. This paper presents the results of experimental investigations made to evaluate potential of bamboo to be used as concrete reinforcement. Specimens with and without node were extracted from well seasoned Dendrocalamus strictus variety of bamboo. They were tested for water absorption, dimensional changes, tensile and bond strength in M20 concrete with twenty different treatments. The paper also presents the comparison of bond strength of mild steel, TMT steel and untreated bamboo with that of bamboo having different low cost treatments for reducing the water absorption thereby enhancing bond strength of bamboo in concrete.

  17. The surgical treatment of reinforced steel bar injury penetrating the skull base and maxilla-mandibular area.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Pan, Lini; Xu, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Penetrating injuries with reinforced screwed steel bar in the skull base represent a unique challenge for oral maxillofacial surgeons. Management of these injuries is complicated by associated injuries and the proximity to vital neurovascular structures. A 35-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of injury due to a downward fall upon a reinforced steel rod. Radiologic studies of the skull base revealed that the steel bar traversed the temporomandibular space between the left cervical spine and the mastoid process to the space between the inner side of the left mandibular ramus and the maxilla. We performed osteotomy of the left mastoid process tip and the left mandibular ramus to take out the steel bar from the maxilla and repaired the left mandible with internal fixation. Appropriate preoperative planning, including three-dimensional computed tomographic images, is integral in the surgical approach for the safe removal of such objects.

  18. Inductively coupled corrosion potential sensor for steel reinforced concrete with time domain gating interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, D. J.; Perveen, K.; Bridges, G. E.; Bhadra, S.

    2012-04-01

    Corrosion is a major problem for civil infrastructure and is one of the leading factors in infrastructure deterioration. Techniques such as half-cell potential can be used to periodically monitor corrosion, but can be difficult to reliably interpret. Wired systems have large installation cost and long-term reliability issues due to wire corrosion. In this paper an embedded inductively coupled coil sensor able to monitor the corrosion potential of reinforcement steel in concrete is presented. The sensor is based on a coil resonator whose resonant frequency changes due to the corrosion potential being applied across a parallel varactor diode. The corrosion potential can be monitored externally using an inductively coupled coil. An accelerated corrosion test shows that it can measure corrosion potentials with a resolution of less than 10 mV. This sensor will detect corrosion at the initiation stage before observable corrosion has taken place. The wireless sensor is passive and simple in design, making it an inexpensive, battery less option for long-term monitoring of the corrosion potential of reinforcing steel.

  19. Orientation factor and number of fibers at failure plane in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Kim, H.

    2010-05-15

    Considering the probabilistic distributions of fibers in ring-type steel fiber reinforced concrete, the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers crossing the failure plane were theoretically derived as a function of fiber geometry, specimen dimensions, and fiber volume fraction. A total number of 24 specimens were tested incorporating different fiber types, specimen geometry, and fiber volume fractions of 0.2% and 0.4%: 5 beams and 5 panels containing straight steel fibers; and 6 beams and 8 panels containing ring-type steel fibers. Measurements were made to assess the number of fibers at fractured surfaces of steel fiber reinforced concrete. The developed theoretical expressions reasonably predicted the orientation factor and the number of ring-type steel fibers at failure plane: the average and the standard deviation for the ratios of the test to theory were 1.03 and 0.26, respectively. Theoretical investigations and comparisons were made for the values of orientation factor and the number of fibers at failure plane for straight steel fibers and ring-type steel fibers.

  20. Vertical impedance measurements of concrete bridge deck cover condition without a direct electrical connection to the reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, Brian A.; Baxter, Jared; Barton, Jeffrey; Guthrie, W. Spencer

    2017-02-01

    Vertical impedance measurements provide significant quantitative information about the ability of concrete cover to slow the penetration of chloride ions that can corrode steel reinforcement in a bridge deck. The primary limitations preventing the widespread adoption of vertical impedance for assessment of concrete bridge decks are (1) the necessity to have a direct electrical connection to the embedded steel reinforcement and (2) the low speeds of data acquisition. This work presents solutions to both limitations. A method using a large-area electrode as a reference electrode for vertical impedance testing is validated using both simulations and measurements in the field.

  1. Corrosion of steel members strengthenened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumadian, Ibrahim

    Due to many years of service at several cases of exposure at various environments there are many of steel bridges which are in need of rehabilitation. The infrastructure needs upgrading, repair or maintenance, and also strengthening, but by using an alternative as retrofits methods. The alternative retrofit method, which used fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials which their strength materials comes largely from the fiber such as carbon, glass, and aramid fiber. Of the most important materials used in the rehabilitation of infrastructure is a composite material newly developed in bonded externally carbon fiber and polymer (CFRP) sheets, which has achieved remarkable success in the rehabilitation and upgrading of structural members. This technique has many disadvantages one of them is galvanic corrosion. This study presents the effect of galvanic corrosion on the interfacial strength between carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets and a steel substrate. A total of 35 double-lap joint specimens and 19 beams specimens are prepared and exposed to an aggressive service environment in conjunction with an electrical potential method accelerating corrosion damage. Six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including five specimens per category for double-lap joint specimens. And six test categories are planned at a typical exposure interval of 12 hours, including three specimens per category for Beam section specimens. In addition one beam section specimen is control. The degree of corrosion is measured. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy has been used to monitor and confirm the proposed corrosion mechanisms on the surface of CFRP. In this study we are using FTIR-spectroscopic measurement systems in the mid infrared (MIR) wavelength region (4000 - 400) cm-1 to monitor characteristic spectral features. Upon completion of corrosion processes, all specimens are monotonically loaded until failure

  2. Strengthening of beam - column joint with steel fibre reinforced concrete under seismic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, K.; Ramasubramani, R.; Anandh, K. S.; Saisabarish; Krupaker Maddu, Vijay

    2017-07-01

    Earthquakes not only kill the human beings but the structures too. Considering this above fact, there is a necessity to take care of the beam column joint region in a structure. Under seismic excitation, the bar segment joint district is subjected to even and the vertical shear force extents are normally commonly greater than those in the adjoining bits of the structural segments. In the event that the joint is not precisely nitty gritty, the shaft segment joint may end up plainly frail. To keep this, an adequate control ought to be given in the joint area. The seismic examination and outline technique ought to be utilised as a part of the plan of the building structures and their segments ought to be recommended in the segment. The building structures incorporate finish sidelong and vertical drive opposing frameworks fit for giving satisfactory quality. Stiffness and the vitality dissemination ability to withstand the outline ground movements inside the recommended furthest reaches of twisting and quality request. The plan ground movements are accepted to happen along any even headings of a building structure. This work focuses on behaviour of M20 concrete in beam-column joint subjected to seismic loading, by using steel fibre (1.5%). The specimens detailed as per IS: 456-2000 and IS: 13920-1993 were casted and tested under cyclic and reverse cyclic loading. The parameters analysed were ductility, energy dissipation, load v/s displacement curve, beam-column reinforcement strain and crack pattern. From the experimental investigation, it is found that the fibre reinforced beam-column joint with fibre (1.50% of steel fibre) performs better ductility, load carrying capacity, energy dissipation and strength by 10% more than conventional reinforced beam-column joint.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Reinforcing Steel and Fatigue Behavior in Corrosive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Ch. Alk.; Michalopoulos, D.

    2007-10-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel has a great impact on the mass reduction and high- and low-cycle fatigue. An experimental study showed that the mass loss, the fatigue limit and the life expectancy were reduced by approximately 1.50-3.00%, 20-40%, and 55-75%, respectively, according to the level of corrosion. Low-cycle strain controlled fatigue testing under ±1% and ±2.5% constant amplitude strain, indicated that the corroded steel bars exhibit gradual reduction in available energy, number of cycles to failure and the load-bearing ability. Formation of pits and notches took place on the corroded steel surface and stress concentration points were developed which are highly localized at imperfections and especially at the rib bases. The fatigue limit was reduced considerably since the existence of ribs and the formation of pits and notches combined with the mass loss led to reduction of the exterior hard layer of martensite and drastic drop in the energy density of the corroded specimens. Antiseismic design that does not take into account the maximum and cumulative plastic deformation demands and the strain history that a structure will suffer under severe ground motion could lead to unpredictable performance.

  4. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  5. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior.

  6. Evaluation of RC Bridge Piers Retrofitted using Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP)

    SciTech Connect

    Shayanfar, M. A.; Zarrabian, M. S.

    2008-07-08

    For many long years, steel reinforcements have been considered as the only tool for concrete confinements and studied widely, but nowadays application of Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) as an effective alternative is well appreciated. Many bridges have been constructed in the past that are necessary to be retrofitted for resisting against the earthquake motions. The objective of this research is evaluation of nonlinear behavior of RC bridge piers. Eight RC bridge piers have been modeled by ABAQUS software under micromechanical model for homogeneous anisotropic fibers. Also the Bilinear Confinement Model by Nonlinear Transition Zone of Mirmiran has been considered. Then types and angles of fibers and their effects on the final responses were evaluated. Finally, effects of retrofitting are evaluated and some suggestions presented.

  7. Feasibility of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete in Cold Regions for High Volume Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Eid, Mahear A.

    There are many challenges faced with the use of Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) in cold regions, but with the inclusion of new technologies such as steel fibers and recycled tire crumb rubber efficient construction may be possible. Research was conducted on a modified concrete material that included both steel fibers and crumb rubber. The composite material was called Steel Fiber-Reinforced Rubberized Concrete (SFRRC). The objective of this investigation was to provide evidence showing that SFRRC can reduce tire rutting compared to asphaltic pavement. In addition, the research showed that the SFRRC could withstand freeze-thaw cycles and increase service life of roadways. Several tests were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Freeze-thaw testing was performed to determine compressive strength loss and visual deterioration of the material. Wheel tracker rut testing was performed both with the standard steel wheel and with a modified studded rubber tire to determine plastic deformation and rut resistance. An experimental test slab was cast in place on a public approach to observe the construction procedures, the effects of studded tire wear and the frost actions in cold region conditions. Based on freeze-thaw and wheel tracker test results and observations of the experimental test slab, the SFRRC material shows viability in cold regions for resisting freeze-thaw actions. The freeze-thaw testing resulted in increased compressive strength after 300 freeze-thaw cycles and very low deterioration of material compared to standard PCC. The wheel tracker testing resulted in very low plastic deformation and minor material rutting with use of the studded rubber tire. The test slab showed very minor surface wear, no freeze-thaw cracking and no rutting after one winter of use. It is recommended that further testing of the material be conducted by means of a large-scale trial section. This would provide information with respect to cost analysis and

  8. German guidelines for steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnels with special consideration of design and statical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Schleicher, H.

    1995-12-31

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete can undoubtedly absorb tensile forces. The utilization of this characteristic for the design and specifications of support structures for underground tunnels is regulated by the new Guidelines from the German Concrete Association. Recommendations are given in these guidelines for construction design and for construction itself. The required tests for classification, suitability and quality monitoring are presented.

  9. Friction behavior of ceramic fiber-reinforced aluminum metal-matrix composites against a 440C steel counterface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. V.; Mecklenburg, K. R.

    1993-04-01

    The friction behavior of short ceramic fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs against a steel counterface is investigated. The friction coefficients between metallographically polished surfaces of kaowool and saffil fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs and 44 C steel counterface varied between 0.4 and 0.6. The friction traces were rough with characteristic stick-slip behavior. Transfer of aluminum to steel counterface was observed in all cases. The friction coefficients dropped to below 0.2 when the MMC surface was etched; the stick-slip behavior disappeared. The increase in normal load, the friction coefficients of etched MMC surfaces increased progressively with sliding distance and the rough stick-slip type behavior reappeared. The transition from smooth to rough friction behavior was not observed for the etched surface of the MMC reinforced with 17 percent kaowool fibers even at a normal load of 0.7 N; aluminum transfer to steel was not detected in this case. The results demonstrate the feasibility of producing kaowool and saffil-fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs by a squeeze infiltration route.

  10. Impressed-current cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete pilings: Protection criteria and the threshold for hydrogen embrittlement

    SciTech Connect

    Enos, D.G.; Williams, A.J. Jr.; Scully, J.R.; Clemena, G.G.

    1998-05-01

    Safe cathodic protection (CP) limits for prestressing steel in concrete and the adequacy of CP using established criteria were evaluated in regard to hydrogen embrittlement (HE). Impressed-current CP was applied to laboratory scale pilings at current densities from 0.1 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} to 3.0 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Adequate CP was achieved at positions 25 cm (9.8 in.) above to 50 cm (19.7 in.) below the waterline, according to the 100-mV depolarization criterion, at an apparent applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. However, the {minus}780 mV{sub SCE} criterion was not met for currents as high as 1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} for these positions. Hydrogen production, absorption, and permeation in steel first was observed via embedded hydrogen sensors 50 cm and 25 cm above the water line at an applied current density of 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}. Observation of hydrogen production verified concerns that the local oxygen concentration might be depleted readily at modest CP levels and that local pH levels may be below 12.5. Experimentation demonstrated that steel crevice corrosion was initiated readily within chloride (Cl{sup {minus}})-contaminated concrete prior to CP application and that this corrosion was accompanied by acidification of the local environment to pH {le} 6 as a result of ferrous ion (Fe{sup 2+}) hydrolysis. The mobile subsurface hydrogen concentration present within the steel reinforcement was determined for each applied cathodic current density. Although hydrogen production and uptake occurred at current densities as low as 0.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}, the critical hydrogen concentration for embrittlement (i.e., 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} mol H/cm{sup 3}, as determined in prior research for bluntly notched prestressing steel) was not exceeded at area averaged current densities <1.33 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Modelling of steel fiber-reinforced concrete under multi-axial loads

    SciTech Connect

    Swaddiwudhipong, Somsak . E-mail: cvesomsa@nus.edu.sg; Seow, Puay Eng Constance

    2006-07-15

    Fifty-four plain concrete and steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) plate specimens containing 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% of hooked fibers were tested under biaxial compression. The experimental results obtained were used to verify a failure surface developed earlier by the authors for SFRC under multi-axial loads. An equation has also been proposed in this study to predict the strain at failure for SFRC under multi-axial loads, {epsilon} {sub ci}. The proposed failure criterion and equation to predict {epsilon} {sub ci} were incorporated into a constitutive model in a well-established finite-element software, ABAQUS. Experiments of SFRC plate specimens under multi-axial loads and beams under two-point load were modeled to illustrate the application of the failure surface to SFRC under varying load conditions. Good agreement between analytical and experimental results is observed.

  12. Pseudo-dynamic tests on masonry residential buildings seismically retrofitted by precast steel reinforced concrete walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenfeng; Wang, Tao; Chen, Xi; Zhong, Xiang; Pan, Peng

    2017-07-01

    A retrofitting technology using precast steel reinforced concrete (PSRC) panels is developed to improve the seismic performance of old masonry buildings. The PSRC panels are built up as an external PSRC wall system surrounding the existing masonry building. The PSRC walls are well connected to the existing masonry building, which provides enough confinement to effectively improve the ductility, strength, and stiffenss of old masonry structures. The PSRC panels are prefabricated in a factory, significantly reducing the situ work and associated construction time. To demonstrate the feasibility and mechanical effectivenss of the proposed retrofitting system, a full-scale five-story specimen was constructed. The retrofitting process was completed within five weeks with very limited indoor operation. The specimen was then tested in the lateral direction, which could potentially suffer sigifnicant damage in a large earthquake. The technical feasibility, construction workability, and seismic performance were thoroughly demonstrated by a full-scale specimen construction and pseudo-dynamic tests.

  13. Autopsy results of epoxy coated reinforcing steels embedded in test slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.K.; Hartt, W.H.

    1998-12-31

    This paper addresses preliminary results of an on-going research project, which is to investigate performance of epoxy coated reinforcing steels (ECRs) exposed to a laboratory testing environment The ECRs acquired from six sources were embedded in 76 chloride contaminated test slabs (two ECRs per slab, in most cases) and connected to bottom mat of {number_sign}5 black rebar. After they were exposed to different environments, some of the slabs were autopsied at three different times (10 months to 3.5 years). According to the autopsy results in terms of degree of coating disbondment, corrosion state at the substrate and macrocell current, it was observed that ECR performance ranged from excellent to poor and key factor was the density and size of coating defects which were initially present or developed during exposure.

  14. Characterization of bond in steel-fiber-reinforced cementitious composites under tensile loads

    SciTech Connect

    Namur, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Investigated was bonding in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composites, like fiber-reinforced mortar. The study was basically analytical, consisting primarily of two analytical models that predict the bond shear stress distribution at the interface between the fibers and the matrix, as well as the normal tensile distributions in the fibers and the matrix. The two models were, however, based on separate assumptions. While the first model assumed a known bond shear stress versus slip relationship at the interface between the fibers and the surrounding matrix, the second model was based on a mechanism of force transfer between the fibers and the matrix, hence circumventing the rather complex task of determining the relationship between the bond stress and the slip for the given type of fiber and matrix. Some applications to this second model, such as the bond modulus, the debonding stress, the length of the debonded zone were also investigated. A theoretical study of the pull-out process of steel fibers in cementitious matrices is included. The problem consisted of relating an idealized bond shear stress versus slip relationship to a pull-out curve. The derivation as based on the assumption that this relationship is linearly elastic-perfectly frictional, and then extended to the case of a fiction decaying linearly with the slip. The problem was subdivided into two components: a primal problem, whereby the pull-out curve is predicted from an assumed bond shear stress-slip relationship, and the dual problem, in which an experimentally obtained pull-out curve was used to predict the interfacial constitutive model, namely the bond-slip curve. Model application was illustrated by three examples of pull-out tests. The pull-out curves obtained in the laboratory, which featured the pull-out force versus the end slip of the pull-out fiber, were used to predict bond shear stress-slip relationships.

  15. Non-linear finite element-based material constitutive law for zero slump steel fiber reinforced concrete pipe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova, Alena

    This study presents a comprehensive investigation of performance and behavior of steel-fiber reinforced concrete pipes (SFRCP). The main goal of this study is to develop the material constitutive model for steel fiber reinforced concrete used in dry-cast application. To accomplish this goal a range of pipe sizes varying from 15 in. (400 mm) to 48 in. (1200 mm) in diameter and fiber content of 0.17%, 0.25%, 0.33%, 0.5%, 0.67% and 83% by volume were produced. The pipes were tested in three-edge bearing condition to obtain the load-deformation response and overall performance of the pipe. The pipes were also subjected to hydrostatic joint and joint shear tests to evaluate the performance of the fiber-pipe joints for water tightness and under differential displacements, respectively. In addition, testing on hardened concrete was performed to obtain the basic mechanical material properties. High variation in the test results for material testing was identified as a part of experimental investigation. A three-dimensional non-linear finite element model of the pipe under the three edge bearing condition was developed to identify the constitutive material relations of fiber-concrete composite. A constitutive model of concrete implementing the concrete plasticity and continuum fracture mechanics was considered for defining the complex non-linear behavior of fiber-concrete. Three main concrete damage algorithms were examined: concrete brittle cracking, concrete damaged plasticity with adaptive meshing technique and concrete damaged plasticity with visco-plastic regularization. The latter was identified as the most robust and efficient to model the post-cracking behavior of fiber reinforced concrete and was used in the subsequent studies. The tension stiffening material constitutive law for composite concrete was determined by converging the FEM solution of load-deformation response with the results of experimental testing. This was achieved by iteratively modifying the non

  16. The Performance Analysis of Distributed Brillouin Corrosion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2014-01-01

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage. PMID:24379048

  17. Experimental Study on Mechanical Property of Steel Reinforced Concrete L-Shaped Short Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Qin, Hao; Dang, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jian-Shan

    The horizontal press performance of column is deteriorated because of its special-shaped section. Moreover, because the antiseismic performance of column is worse, special-shaped column is only used in regions where seismic intensity is lower. So the main problem is to enhance the ductility and shear capacity. This test study on mechanical performance has been carried out through 14 SRCLSSC and 2 RCLSSC. The study focuses on the impacts of test axial load ratio (nt), hooped reinforcement ratio (ρv), shear span ratio (λ) and steel ratio (ρss) on the shear strength and the antiseismic performance of SRCLSSC. It can be concluded that the shear strength of SRCLSSC is increasing with the increasing of nt and ρss, but the degree of increasing is small when nt is a certainty value, and that the shear strength of SRCLSSC is decreasing with increasing of λ The shear resistance formula of L-shaped column is derived through tests, the calculated results are in correspondence with those of the tests. It also can be concluded that the hysteretic loops of the SRCLSSC are full and the hysteretic behaviors are improved; the displacement ductility is increasing with increasing of ρv and ρss, but decreasing with the increasing of nt; the degree of variety in high axial load ratio is larger than that in low axial load ratio. If steel bars are added, the shear strength and displacement ductility of SRCLSSC are increased in a large degree.

  18. The performance analysis of distributed Brillouin corrosion sensors for steel reinforced concrete structures.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heming; Zhao, Xuefeng; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Cui, Yanjun; Sun, Changsen

    2013-12-27

    The Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA)-based optical fiber method has been proposed to measure strain variations caused by corrosion expansion. Spatial resolutions of 1 m can be achieved with this kind of Brillouin sensor for detecting the distributed strain. However, when the sensing fiber is wound around the steel rebar in a number of circles in a range of several meters, this spatial resolution still has limitations for corrosion monitoring. Here, we employed a low-coherent fiber-optic strain sensor (LCFS) to survey the performance of Brillouin sensors based on the fact that the deformation measured by the LCFS equals the integral of the strains obtained from Brillouin sensors. An electrochemical accelerated corrosion experiment was carried out and the corrosion expansion was monitored by both BOTDA and the LCFS. Results demonstrated that the BOTDA can only measure the expansion strain of about 1,000 με, which was generated by the 18 mm steel rebar corrosion, but, the LCFS had high sensitivity from the beginning of corrosion to the destruction of the structure, and no obvious difference in expansion speed was observed during the acceleration stage of the corrosion developed in the reinforced concrete (RC) specimens. These results proved that the BOTDA method could only be employed to monitor the corrosion inside the structure in the early stage.

  19. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl-]/[OH-] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  20. Effect of Waste Plastic Shreds on Bond Resistance between Concrete and Steel Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osifala, K. B.; Salau, M. A.; Adeniyi, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the effect of waste plastic shreds on steel-concrete bond. Forty RILEM test specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter high-yield reinforcing bars were cast and tested. Fifteen specimens with 16mm and 20mm each were cast with the addition of waste plastic shreds at varying percentages of 1%, 1.5% and 2%; another ten RILEM specimens with 16mm and 20mm diameter bars at 0% of waste plastic shreds were cast as reference. Nine 150mm cubes, with three taken from each batch of various percentages of waste plastic shreds, were used to monitor the concrete strength. From the test results and analysis, the compressive strength of concrete was found to reduce with increased percentages of waste plastic shreds, while the waste plastic shreds material was found not to improve the bond resistance between concrete and steel. However, though lower than normal concrete, there was an increase in the bond resistance with increase in the percent of plastic shreds. The bond resistance of 16mm was also found to be higher than that of 20mm in all the specimens tested.

  1. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-12-17

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl(-)]/[OH(-)] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels.

  2. Self-immunity microcapsules for corrosion protection of steel bar in reinforced concrete

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanshuai; Fang, Guohao; Ding, Weijian; Han, Ningxu; Xing, Feng; Dong, Biqin

    2015-01-01

    A novel microcapsule-based self-immunity system for reinforced concrete is proposed. Its feasibility for hindering the corrosion of steel rebar by means of lifting the threshold value of [Cl−]/[OH−] is discussed. Precisely controlled release behavior enables corrosion protection in the case of depassivation. The release process is characterized over a designated range of pH values, and its release characteristics of the microcapsules, triggered by decreasing pH value, are captured by observing that the core crystals are released when exposed to a signal (stimulus). The aim of corrosion protection of steel bar is achieved through the constantly-stabilized passive film, and its stability is promoted using continuous calcium hydroxide released from the microcapsule, restoring alkaline conditions. The test results exhibited that the release process of the microcapsules is a function of time. Moreover, the release rate of core materials could interact with environmental pH value, in which the release rate is found to increase remarkably with decreasing pH value, but is inhibited by high pH levels. PMID:26673425

  3. Research on the mechanical properties of a glass fiber reinforced polymer-steel combined truss structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status.

  4. Research on the Mechanical Properties of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Steel Combined Truss Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Qilin; Li, Fei; Liu, Jinchun; Chen, Haosen

    2014-01-01

    An assembled plane truss structure used for vehicle loading is designed and manufactured. In the truss, the glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) tube and the steel joint are connected by a new technology featuring a pretightened tooth connection. The detailed description for the rod and node design is introduced in this paper, and a typical truss panel is fabricated. Under natural conditions, the short-term load test and long-term mechanical performance test for one year are performed to analyze its performance and conduct a comparative analysis for a reasonable FEM model. The study shows that the design and fabrication for the node of an assembled truss panel are convenient, safe, and reliable; because of the creep control design of the rods, not only does the short-term structural stiffness meet the design requirement but also the long-term creep deformation tends towards stability. In addition, no significant change is found in the elastic modules, so this structure can be applied in actual engineering. Although the safety factor for the strength of the composite rods is very large, it has a lightweight advantage over the steel truss for the low density of GFRP. In the FEM model, simplifying the node as a hinge connection relatively conforms to the actual status. PMID:25247203

  5. Heat treatment response of TiC-reinforced steel matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Hong, Hyun Uk; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2016-09-01

    A particulate TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite is fabricated by using a pressure infiltration casting, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the particles with 60 vol%. The retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix is approximately 19% after quenching from the austenitization temperature of 1010 °C, which is larger than 13% in as-quenched condition of unreinforced SKD11. A combined analysis on the austenite lattice parameter using XRD profiles and first-principle calculation suggests the increase of carbon content in the steel matrix possibly by partial dissolution of TiC during casting. The change of carbon content and prior austenite grain size reasonably accounts for the increase of retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix. In the austenitizing temperatures ranging from 950 °C to 1040 °C, the retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix in as-quenched condition increases more rapidly than that of unreinforced SKD11 with the increase of austenitization temperature, while the hardness of the composite is less sensitive to the austenitization temperature. This suggests that it is advantageous to conduct the austenitization at a temperature below 1010 °C, which is typical practice of austenitization of the unreinforced SKD11, because the retention of austenite is effectively suppressed while minimizing the loss of hardness.

  6. Hysteretic behavior of special shaped columns composed of steel and reinforced concrete (SRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zongping; Xu, Jinjun; Xue, Jianyang

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a series of experimental investigations on seventeen specimens of steel reinforced concrete special shaped (SRCSS) columns under low cyclic reversed loading using parallel crosshead equipment. Nine T-shaped SRC columns, four L-shaped SRC columns and four +-shaped SRC columns were tested to examine the effects of shape steel configuration, loading angle, axial compressive ratio and shear-span ratio on the behavior (strength, stiffness, energy dissipation, ductility, etc.) of SRCSS column specimens. The failure modes and hysteretic performance of all the specimens were obtained in the tests. Test results demonstrate that the shear-span ratio is the main parameter affecting the failure modes of SRCSS columns. The specimens with small shear-span ratio are prone to shear failure, and the primary failure planes in SRCSS columns are parallel to the loading direction. As a result, there is a symmetry between positive and negative loading directions in the hysteretic curves of the SRCSS columns. The majority of displacement ductility coefficients for all the specimens are over 3.0, so that the SRCSS columns demonstrate a better deformation capacity. In addition, the equivalent viscous damping coefficients of all the specimens are greater than 0.2, indicating that the seismic behavior of SRCSS columns is adequate. Finally, the superposition theory was used to calculate the limits of axial compressive ratio for the specimens, and it is found that the test axial compressive ratio is close to or smaller than the calculated axial compressive ratio limit.

  7. Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  8. Numerical Study on Section Constitutive Relations of Members Reinforced by Steel-BFRP Composite Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tongliang; Qiu, Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    Steel-Basalt FRP Composite Bar (S-BFCB) is a new kind of substitute material for longitudinal reinforcement, with high elastic modulus, stable post-yield stiffness and excellent corrosive resistance. Based on mechanical properties of S-BFCB and the plane cross-section assumption, the moment-curvature curves of beam and column members are simulated. Some parameters such as equivalent rebar ratio, postyeild stiffness, concrete strength and axial compression ratio of column were discussed. Results show that the constitutive relation of the cross section is similar with RC member in elastic and cracking stages, while different in post-yield stage. With the increase of postyeild stiffness ratio of composite bar, the ultimate bearing capacity of component improved observably, member may turn out over-reinforced phenomenon, concrete crushing may appear before the fibersarefractured. The effect of concrete strength increase in lower postyeild stiffness ratio is not obvious than in higher. The increase of axial compression ratio has actively influence on bearing capacity of column, but decreases on the ductility.

  9. Using Fuzzy Logic for Performance Evaluation in Reinforcement Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.; Khedkar, Pratap S.

    1992-01-01

    Current reinforcement learning algorithms require long training periods which generally limit their applicability to small size problems. A new architecture is described which uses fuzzy rules to initialize its two neural networks: a neural network for performance evaluation and another for action selection. This architecture is applied to control of dynamic systems and it is demonstrated that it is possible to start with an approximate prior knowledge and learn to refine it through experiments using reinforcement learning.

  10. Corrosive effect of carbon-fibre reinforced plastic on stainless-steel screws during implantation into man.

    PubMed

    Tayton, K

    1983-01-01

    The corrosion of stainless-steel screws used to fix carbon-fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) plates to human fractures was compared with the corrosion on similar screws used to fix stainless-steel AO plates. Corrosive changes were noted in both sets of screws with similar frequency and severity; however, the stainless-steel plates were 'in situ' almost twice as long as the CFRP ones, showing that the corrosive changes occurred more rapidly on screws in contact with CFRP. Nevertheless, over the implantation time necessary for bone healing, corrosion was very mild and there is no clinical contra-indication to the use of stainless-steel and CFRP together in this particular application.

  11. Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures of Waste Water Treatment Reservoirs with Stainless Steel Coating Using Arc Thermal Spraying Technique in Acidified Water

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Park, Jin-Ho; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Waste water treatment reservoirs are contaminated with many hazardous chemicals and acids. Reservoirs typically comprise concrete and reinforcement steel bars, and the main elements responsible for their deterioration are hazardous chemicals, acids, and ozone. Currently, a variety of techniques are being used to protect reservoirs from exposure to these elements. The most widely used techniques are stainless steel plating and polymeric coating. In this study, a technique known as arc thermal spraying was used. It is a more convenient and economical method for protecting both concrete and reinforcement steel bar from deterioration in waste water treatment reservoirs. In this study, 316L stainless steel coating was applied to a concrete surface, and different electrochemical experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of coatings in different acidic pH solutions. The coating generated from the arc thermal spraying process significantly protected the concrete surface from corrosion in acidic pH solutions, owing to the formation of a double layer capacitance—a mixture of Cr3+ enriched with Cr2O3 and Cr-hydroxide in inner and Fe3+ oxide on the outer layer of the coating. The formation of this passive film is defective owing to the non-homogeneous 316L stainless steel coating surface. In the pH 5 solution, the growth of a passive film is adequate due to the presence of un-dissociated water molecules in the aqueous sulfuric acid solution. The coated surface is sealed with alkyl epoxide, which acts as a barrier against the penetration of acidic solutions. This coating exhibits higher impedance values among the three studied acidic pH solutions. PMID:28773875

  12. Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures of Waste Water Treatment Reservoirs with Stainless Steel Coating Using Arc Thermal Spraying Technique in Acidified Water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Park, Jin-Ho; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A

    2016-09-03

    Waste water treatment reservoirs are contaminated with many hazardous chemicals and acids. Reservoirs typically comprise concrete and reinforcement steel bars, and the main elements responsible for their deterioration are hazardous chemicals, acids, and ozone. Currently, a variety of techniques are being used to protect reservoirs from exposure to these elements. The most widely used techniques are stainless steel plating and polymeric coating. In this study, a technique known as arc thermal spraying was used. It is a more convenient and economical method for protecting both concrete and reinforcement steel bar from deterioration in waste water treatment reservoirs. In this study, 316L stainless steel coating was applied to a concrete surface, and different electrochemical experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of coatings in different acidic pH solutions. The coating generated from the arc thermal spraying process significantly protected the concrete surface from corrosion in acidic pH solutions, owing to the formation of a double layer capacitance-a mixture of Cr(3+) enriched with Cr₂O₃ and Cr-hydroxide in inner and Fe(3+) oxide on the outer layer of the coating. The formation of this passive film is defective owing to the non-homogeneous 316L stainless steel coating surface. In the pH 5 solution, the growth of a passive film is adequate due to the presence of un-dissociated water molecules in the aqueous sulfuric acid solution. The coated surface is sealed with alkyl epoxide, which acts as a barrier against the penetration of acidic solutions. This coating exhibits higher impedance values among the three studied acidic pH solutions.

  13. Shear Strength at 75 F to 500 F of Fourteen Adhesives Used to Bond a Glass-fabric-reinforced Phenolic Resin Laminate to Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, John R

    1956-01-01

    Fourteen adhesives used to bond a glass-fabric-reinforced phenolic resin laminate to steel were tested in order to determine their shear strengths at temperatures from 75 F to 500 F. Fabrication methods were varied to evaluate the effect of placing cloth between the facing surfaces to maintain a uniform bond-line thickness. One glass-fabric supported phenolic adhesive was found to have a shear strength of 3,400 psi at 300 F and over 1,000 psi at 500 F. Strength and fabrication data are tabulated for all adhesives tested.

  14. Cyclotriphosphazene and TiO2 reinforced nanocomposite coated on mild steel plates for antibacterial and corrosion resistance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnadevi, Krishnamoorthy; Selvaraj, Vaithilingam

    2016-03-01

    The mild steel surface has been modified to impart anticorrosion and antibacterial properties through a dip coating method followed by thermal curing of a mixture containing amine terminated cyclotriphosphazene and functionalized titanium dioxide nanoparticles reinforced benzoxazine based cyanate ester composite (ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE). The corrosion resistance behavior of coating material has been investigated by electrochemical and antibacterial studies by disc diffusion method. The nanocomposites coated mild steels have displayed a good chemical stability over long immersion in a corrosive environment. The protection efficiency has found to be high for ATCP/FTiO2/Bz-CE composites, which can be used in microelectronics and marine applications.

  15. Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on 4340 Steel Substrate for Aircraft Landing Gear Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2010-4149 EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR AIRCRAFT LANDING GEAR...March 2010 – 01 March 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE EVALUATION OF DIRECT DIODE LASER DEPOSITED STAINLESS STEEL 316L ON 4340 STEEL SUBSTRATE FOR...Code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 Evaluation of Direct Diode Laser Deposited Stainless Steel 316L on

  16. An Experimental Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Kumar, A.; Ganesan, G.; Karthikeyan, K.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the mechanical properties of unidirectional hybrid reinforcements formed from continuous fibres impregnated with a fibre binding material which are used for reinforcing the concrete. Recently FRP (Fibre Reinforced Polymer) manufacturers and suppliers have been increased all over the world because of the superior performance of FRP products in the construction industry. Its non-corrosive nature has turned the attention of many researchers to make several studies on different type of FRP products. Through a vast research, several standards also have been formulated. In this regard a new combination of FRP materials is tried in this paper and its properties have been derived. Carbon fibre and glass fibres fuse in this study to form a new hybrid rebar. The design properties such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, and compressive strength have been studied as per ASTM standards and it has been identified that the Hybrid rebar show a superior performance in comparison with GFRP (Glass FRP) and Steel rebars. This extraordinary performance of hybrid composite material increases the extensive engineering applications such as transport industry, aeronautics, naval, automotive industries.

  17. Using electroless nickel to coat reinforcing steel in chloride contaminated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, M.A.; Parra, L.A.; Perez, O.A.; Rincon, O. de

    1998-12-31

    This work is a study of the behavior of steel rebar coated by electroless nickel in chloride-contaminated concrete. The steel rebars were coated in an electroless nickel bath for 1, 2 and 3 hours. They were then subjected to heat treatment at 400 C for periods of 1, 2 and 3 hours. The nickel-coated rebars were embedded in concrete samples with NaCl concentrations at 0.00; 0.10; 0.15 and 0.20 %, based on concrete weight. Their behavior was evaluated by measurement of potentials, polarization resistance, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrical resistance and visual inspection. Corrosion rates were less than 0.01 {micro}A/cm{sup 2} after 40 months` testing.

  18. Experimental Investigation of the Capacity of Steel Fibers to Ensure the Structural Integrity of Reinforced Concrete Specimens Coated with CFRP Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribniak, V.; Arnautov, A. K.; Norkus, A.; Tamulenas, V.; Gudonis, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of steel fibers to ensure the structural integrity of reinforced concrete specimens coated with CFRP sheets was investigated. Test data for four ties and eight beams reinforced with steel or glass-FRP bars are presented. Experiments showed that the fibers significantly increased the cracking resistance and altered the failure character from the splitting of concrete to the debonding of the external sheets, which noticeably increased the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened specimens.

  19. Electrochemical behavior of steel in concrete and evaluation of the corrosion rate

    SciTech Connect

    Videm, K.; Myrdal, R.

    1997-09-01

    Various electrochemical methods for evaluation of corrosion of steel reinforcement in concrete were studied regarding their applicability in the field. Laboratory experiments were carried out with steel in synthetic pore water and in concrete blocks with chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}) additions. Field measurements were performed at a large, coastal concrete bridge. Methods examined included manual potential mapping, automatic measurements of corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) with embedded reference electrodes (RE), potentiokinetic linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements with cut reinforcement bars, analysis of the shape of galvanostatic charging curves, and LPR measurements of the reinforcement with a commercial instrument containing a guard ring. Corrosion rates determined with the guard electrode (GE) instrument were not in good agreement with estimates based upon potential mapping or visual inspection. Because of the high interfacial capacitance (C) of the steel in concrete, potentiokinetic LPR measurements will ill-suited for determination of corrosion rates. Goo experience was obtained by computer modeling of the galvanostatic charging curve with calculation of the polarization resistance (R{sub p}) from this type of data. Advantages of this method were that it was influenced little by electrical resistance in the concrete and that unreliable measurements could be sorted out when curves did not follow the theoretical pattern.

  20. Retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames using glass fiber reinforced plastic laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakam, Zeyad Hamed-Ramzy

    2000-11-01

    This study focuses on the retrofit of hollow concrete masonry infilled steel frames subjected to in-plane lateral loads using glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates that are epoxy-bonded to the exterior faces of the infill walls. An extensive experimental investigation using one-third scale modeling was conducted and consisted of two phases. In the first phase, 64 assemblages, half of which were retrofitted, were tested under various combined in-plane loading conditions similar to those which different regions of a typical infill wall are subjected to. In the second phase, one bare and four masonry-infilled steel frames representative of a typical single-story, single-bay panel were tested under diagonal loading to study the overall behavior and the infill-frame interaction. The relative infill-to-frame stiffness was varied as a test parameter by using two different steel frame sections. The laminates altered the failure modes of the masonry assemblages and reduced the variability and anisotropic nature of the masonry. For the prisms which failed due to shear and/or mortar joint slip, significant strength increases were observed. For those exhibiting compression failure modes, a marginal increase in strength resulted. Retrofitting the infilled frames resulted in an average increase in initial stiffness of two-fold compared to the unretrofitted infilled frames, and seemed independent of the relative infill-to-frame stiffness. However, the increase in the load-carrying capacity of the retrofitted frames compared to the unretrofitted counterparts was higher for those with the larger relative infill-to-frame stiffness parameter. Unlike the unretrofitted infill walls, the retrofitted panels demonstrated almost identical failure modes that were characterized as "strictly comer crushing" in the vicinity of the loaded comers whereas no signs of distress were evident throughout the remainder of the infill. The laminates also maintained the structural integrity of

  1. Probabilistic lifetime assessment of marine reinforced concrete with steel corrosion and cover cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Jin, Wei-Liang; Liu, Rong-Gui

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the durability behavior of marine reinforced concrete structure suffering from chloride attack, the structural service life is assumed to be divided into three critical stages, which can be characterized by steel corrosion and cover cracking. For each stage, a calculated model used to predict the lifetime is developed. Based on the definition of durability limit state, a probabilistic lifetime model and its time-dependent reliability analytical method are proposed considering the random natures of influencing factors. Then, the probabilistic lifetime prediction models are applied to a bridge pier located in the Hangzhou Bay with Monte Carlo simulation. It is found that the time to corrosion initiation t 0 follows a lognormal distribution, while that the time from corrosion initiation to cover cracking t 1 and the time for crack to develop from hairline crack to a limit crack width t 2 can be described by Weibull distributions. With the permitted failure probability of 5.0%, it is also observed that the structural durability lifetime mainly depends on the durability life t 0 and that the percentage of participation of the life t 0 to the total service life grows from 61.5% to 83.6% when the cover thickness increases from 40 mm to 80 mm. Therefore, for any part of the marine RC bridge, the lifetime predictions and maintenance efforts should also be directed toward controlling the stage of corrosion initiation induced by chloride ion.

  2. Measurement and simulation of millimeter wave scattering cross-sections from steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A. M.; Martys, N. S.; Garboczi, E. J.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Provenzano, V.; Surek, J. T.; Novotny, D. R.; Coder, J. B.; Janezic, M. D.; Kim, S.

    2014-02-01

    Some iron oxide corrosion products exhibit antiferromagnetic magnetic resonances (AFMR) at frequencies on the order of 100 GHz at ambient temperatures. AFMR can be detected in laboratory conditions, which serves as the basis for a new non-destructive spectroscopic method for detecting early corrosion. When attempting to measure the steel corrosion in reinforced concrete in the field, rebar geometry must be taken into account. Experiments and numerical simulations have been developed at frequencies near 100 GHz to sort out these effects. The experimental setup involves a vector network analyzer with converter heads to up-convert the output frequency, which is then connected to a horn antenna followed by a 7.5 cm diameter polymer lens to focus the waves on the sample. Two sets of samples were studied: uniform cylindrical rods and rebar corrosion samples broken out of concrete with different kinds of coatings. Electromagnetic scattering from uniform rods were calculated numerically using classical modal expansion. A finite-element electromagnetic solver was used to model more complex rebar geometry and non-uniform corrosion layers. Experimental and numerical data were compared to help quantify and understand the anticipated effect of local geometrical features on AFMR measurements.

  3. Erosion Characteristics of Nanoparticle-Reinforced Polyurethane Coatings on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syamsundar, C.; Chatterjee, Dhiman; Kamaraj, M.; Maiti, A. K.

    2015-04-01

    Hydropower generation from the Himalayan rivers in India faces challenge in the form of silt-laden water which can erode the turbine blades and reduce turbine life. To address this issue, polyurethane coatings reinforced with boron carbide (B4C) or silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on 16Cr-5Ni martensitic stainless steel substrate were used in the present investigation to improve erosion wear resistance in silt erosion conditions. Slurry erosive wear tests were carried out based on ASTM G-73 protocol at various test conditions of impact velocity, impingement angle, and erodent particle size as well as slurry concentrations as determined by the implementation of Taguchi design of experiments. Analysis of variance studies of erosion rate indicated that nanoparticle content in PU material is the single most important parameter, and interaction of impact velocity and impingement angle was also proved to be significant. The coatings with B4C nanoparticles had higher wear resistances than those with SiC nanoparticles due to higher hardness of the former. An interesting finding from the results is that there is an optimum amount of nanoparticles at which mass removal is the minimum. This observation has been explained in terms of surface characteristics of coatings as brought out by a combination of measurements including SEM images as well as roughness measurement.

  4. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  5. Numerical analysis on seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tubular column connections with ring-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yi.; Xu, Li. Hua.

    2016-06-08

    This paper presents numerical study of the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete beam to concrete filled steel tube column connections with ring-beam. The material stress-strain relations, element type and boundary condition are selected, which are consistent with actual situation. Then the seismic behavior of this type of joint are researched by ABAQUS, and finite element analyses are conducted under cyclic loading. Its parameters are discussed including thickness of steel tubular column wall, sectional dimension of the ring-beam and strength of the core concrete. The results show that the ultimate capacity of the connections is improved with sectional dimension of the ring-beam increased. In the meanwhile, the influence on skeleton curve of the joints is slight of which included thickness of steel tubular column wall and strength of the core concrete.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of High-Performance Steel-Fiber Reinforced Cement Composites with Self-Healing Effect

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Joo; Kang, Seok Hee; Ahn, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The crack self-healing behavior of high-performance steel-fiber reinforced cement composites (HPSFRCs) was investigated. High-strength deformed steel fibers were employed in a high strength mortar with very fine silica sand to decreasing the crack width by generating higher interfacial bond strength. The width of micro-cracks, strongly affected by the type of fiber and sand, clearly produced the effects on the self-healing behavior. The use of fine silica sand in HPSFRCs with high strength deformed steel fibers successfully led to rapid healing owing to very fine cracks with width less than 20 μm. The use of very fine silica sand instead of normal sand produced 17%–19% higher tensile strength and 51%–58% smaller width of micro-cracks. PMID:28788471

  7. Evaluating the Role of Contingency in Differentially Reinforced Tic Suppression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himle, Michael B.; Woods, Douglas W.; Bunaciu, Liviu

    2008-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of tokens delivered on differential reinforcement of zero-rate behavior (DRO) schedules or noncontingently on tic suppression in 4 children with tics. Tic frequency was lower in 3 of 4 children when tokens were delivered contingent on the absence of tics than when tokens were delivered noncontingently.…

  8. A Brief Overview and Evaluation of Covert Positive Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Michael J.

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview of the theoretical and technical components of covert positive reinforcement and reviews the experimental literature to ascertain the efficacy of CPR and to evaluate the operant basis for the technique. The empirical evidence confirmed the effectiveness of CPR in modifying analogue and clinical target behaviors, but challenged…

  9. Evaluation of the Benefits of HSLA Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    quenched and tempered steels , such as HY80 and HY1OO, require preheat and interpass temperature controls during welding of plates thicker than 1/2 inch...interpass tempera- tures and heat input limitations. Strict adherence to these requirements is mandatory to avoid cracking in hydrogen- sensitive steels ...requirement and excellent weldability of this steel will probably lower produc- tion costs and cracking -related repairs enough to overcome the slight

  10. Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Cement Using Digital Image Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W.; Carey, Jason P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile – digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure. PMID:26039590

  11. Evaluation of fiber reinforced cement using digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Melenka, Garrett W; Carey, Jason P

    2015-01-01

    The effect of short fiber reinforcements on the mechanical properties of cement has been examined using a splitting tensile - digital image correlation (DIC) measurement method. Three short fiber reinforcement materials have been used in this study: fiberglass, nylon, and polypropylene. The method outlined provides a simple experimental setup that can be used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength of brittle materials as well as measure the full field strain across the surface of the splitting tensile test cylindrical specimen. Since the DIC measurement technique is a contact free measurement this method can be used to assess sample failure.

  12. Perceived Objectivity and the Effects of Evaluative Reinforcement upon Compliance and Self-Evaluation in Blacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, W. Curtis; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of positive and negative reinforcements upon black college students. The perceived objectivity of white evaluators was compared to that of black evaluators. Perceived objectivity being the social reinforcement likely to be accepted, internalized, and complied with in proportion to the…

  13. Adhesive properties of bonded orthodontic retainers to enamel: stainless steel wire vs fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Ozcan, Mutlu; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application procedures of stainless steel wires on bond strength. Caries-free, intact human mandibular incisors (N = 80, n = 10 per group) were selected and randomly distributed into 8 groups. After etching with 37% H3PO4 for 30 s, rinsing and drying, bonding agent (Stick Resin) was applied and light polymerized. Then one of the following FRC materials was applied on the flowable composite (Stick Flow) using standard molds: group 1: Angelus Fibrex Ribbon; group 2: DentaPreg Splint; group 3: ever-Stick Ortho; group 4: Ribbond. In group 5, Quad Cat Wire was applied in the same manner as in FRC groups. In group 6, after applying bonding agent (Stick Resin), Quad Cat Wire was placed directly on the tooth surface and covered with Stick Flow composite. In group 7, after bonding agent (Heliobond) was applied, Quad Cat Wire was placed directly on the tooth surface and covered with Tetric Flow composite. In group 8, after applying bonding agent (Heliobond) and polymerization, Tetric Flow composite was applied, not polymerized, and Quad Cat Wire was placed and covered with Tetric Flow again. Specimens were thermocycled for 6000 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and loaded in a universal testing machine under shear stress (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) until debonding occurred. The failure sites were examined under an optical light microscope. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer adjustment test (alpha = 0.05). Significant differences were found between the groups (p = 0.0011) (ANOVA). Bond strength results did not significantly differ either between the FRC groups (groups 1 to 4) (6.1 +/- 2.5 to 8.4 +/- 3.7 MPa) (p > 0.05) or the wire groups (groups 5 to 8) (10.6 +/- 3.8 to 14

  14. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  15. Assessment of high performance concrete containing fly ash and calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor as a mean to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-García, P.; Jiménez-Quero, V.; López-Calvo, H.

    2015-01-01

    This research analyses the effectiveness of the water-to-cement ratio (w/c), fly ash and a calcium nitrite based corrosion inhibitor to prevent the corrosion of reinforcing steel embedded in high performance concrete. The interactive effect between the inhibitor and fly ash was evaluated because the occurrence of a negative effect when both ingredients are added together in a concrete mixture has been reported. All the concrete mixtures studied in this investigation had 8.2% of silica fume. Twenty seven prismatic concrete specimens were fabricated with dimensions of 55 × 230 × 300 mm each containing two steel rods embedded for the purpose of corrosion monitoring. The specimens were exposed to a simulated marine environment with two daily cycles of wetting and drying for one year. To evaluate the deterioration of the specimens corrosion potentials and linear polarization resistance tests were carried out. The results indicate that the use of a low w/c, the addition of fly ash and the addition of the corrosion inhibitor contributed to the reduction of the corrosion of steel in the concrete specimens. The results further suggest that the combination of fly ash and corrosion inhibitor does not promote the deterioration of the concrete matrix.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Eco-Efficiency of Steel Fiber Reinforced Alkali-Activated Slag Concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Woo; Jang, Seok-Joon; Kang, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Kyung-Lim; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2015-10-30

    Conventional concrete production that uses ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as a binder seems unsustainable due to its high energy consumption, natural resource exhaustion and huge carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions. To transform the conventional process of concrete production to a more sustainable process, the replacement of high energy-consumptive PC with new binders such as fly ash and alkali-activated slag (AAS) from available industrial by-products has been recognized as an alternative. This paper investigates the effect of curing conditions and steel fiber inclusion on the compressive and flexural performance of AAS concrete with a specified compressive strength of 40 MPa to evaluate the feasibility of AAS concrete as an alternative to normal concrete for CO₂ emission reduction in the concrete industry. Their performances are compared with reference concrete produced using OPC. The eco-efficiency of AAS use for concrete production was also evaluated by binder intensity and CO₂ intensity based on the test results and literature data. Test results show that it is possible to produce AAS concrete with compressive and flexural performances comparable to conventional concrete. Wet-curing and steel fiber inclusion improve the mechanical performance of AAS concrete. Also, the utilization of AAS as a sustainable binder can lead to significant CO₂ emissions reduction and resources and energy conservation in the concrete industry.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Eco-Efficiency of Steel Fiber Reinforced Alkali-Activated Slag Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Woo; Jang, Seok-Joon; Kang, Dae-Hyun; Ahn, Kyung-Lim; Yun, Hyun-Do

    2015-01-01

    Conventional concrete production that uses ordinary Portland cement (OPC) as a binder seems unsustainable due to its high energy consumption, natural resource exhaustion and huge carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. To transform the conventional process of concrete production to a more sustainable process, the replacement of high energy-consumptive PC with new binders such as fly ash and alkali-activated slag (AAS) from available industrial by-products has been recognized as an alternative. This paper investigates the effect of curing conditions and steel fiber inclusion on the compressive and flexural performance of AAS concrete with a specified compressive strength of 40 MPa to evaluate the feasibility of AAS concrete as an alternative to normal concrete for CO2 emission reduction in the concrete industry. Their performances are compared with reference concrete produced using OPC. The eco-efficiency of AAS use for concrete production was also evaluated by binder intensity and CO2 intensity based on the test results and literature data. Test results show that it is possible to produce AAS concrete with compressive and flexural performances comparable to conventional concrete. Wet-curing and steel fiber inclusion improve the mechanical performance of AAS concrete. Also, the utilization of AAS as a sustainable binder can lead to significant CO2 emissions reduction and resources and energy conservation in the concrete industry. PMID:28793639

  18. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  19. Ultrasonic phased array transducers for nondestructive evaluation of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Shin, Hyeon Jae; Jang, You Hyun

    2000-05-01

    An ultrasonic phased array transducer has been developed and demonstrated for the nondestructive evaluation of steel structures. The number of array elements is 64 and the center frequency is about 5 MHz. This phased array transducer is designed to use with the phased array system that does steering, transmission focusing and dynamic receive focusing. Each of the array elements is individually excited according to the focal laws and steering angles. Measurements of ultrasonic beam profiles for the array transducer in a reference steel block are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Some of the phased array transducer design concepts for the application in steel structures are discussed. The two-dimensional ultrasonic images of the sample steel block including flat bottom holes and side drilled holes are presented. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate excellent feasibility of the utility of the phased array transducer in imaging and detection of defects in steel structures.

  20. Corrosion resistance of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particle for steel reinforcement in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fujian

    Porcelain enamel has stable chemical property in harsh environments such as high temperature, acid and alkaline, and it can also chemically react with substrate reinforcing steel resulting in improved adherence strength. In this study, the corrosion resistances of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate and sand particles, which are designed for improved bond strength with surrounding concrete, were investigated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution. It consists of two papers that describe the results of the study. The first paper investigates the corrosion behavior of enamel coating modified by calcium silicate applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The coatings include a pure enamel, a mixed enamel that consists of 50% pure enamel and 50% calcium silicate by weight, and a double enamel that has an inner pure enamel layer and an outer mixed enamel layer. Electrochemical tests demonstrates that both pure and double enamel coatings can significantly improve corrosion resistance, while the mixed enamel coating offers very little protection due to connected channels. The second paper is focused on the electrochemical characteristics of enamel coating modified by sand particle applied to reinforcing steel bar in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by EIS. Six percentages by weight are considered including 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. Results reveal that addition of sand particle does not affect its corrosion resistance significantly. Most of the sand particles can wet very well with enamel body, while some have a weak zone which is induced during the cooling stage due to different coefficient of thermal expansion. Therefore, quality control of sand particle is the key factor to improve its corrosion resistance.

  1. Acoustic inspection of bond strength of steel-reinforced mortar after exposure to elevated temperatures

    PubMed

    Chiang; Tsai; Kan

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the bond strength between the reinforcement and concrete after fire damage, a combination of acoustic through-transmission and pull-out tests were used. Previous studies have shown a 25% decrease in the ultrasonic pulse velocity at 90% of the maximum load at room temperature. The specimens were kept in the oven at an elevated temperature for 1, 2, or 3 h. They were then removed and cooled to room temperature. Inspection was conducted using a high-power ultrasonic pulse velocity system while a pull-out load was applied. The correlation between preheated temperature, acoustic wave velocity, and the applied load was analyzed. Initial results show that bond strength and pulse velocity decreased substantially as the temperature or the heating time increased.

  2. Field Trial of impressed current, sacrificial anode, constant voltage and intermittent cathodic protection on a steel reinforced coastal bridge

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Williamson, K.M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A.; Cryer, C.B.; Tran, H.

    2007-03-01

    Equipment has been designed and installed for a field trial being conducted on a coastal reinforced concrete bridge with a newly installed cathodic protection (CP) system. The purpose of the field trial is to determine the optimum form of intermittent CP for protecting coastal bridges. The forms of CP that were considered for the field trial are: (1) impressed current CP as the control; (2) currentinterrupted ICCP; (3) corrosion rate monitoring device controlled ICCP; (4) constant voltage CP; and (5) sacrificial anode CP. Once the test is initiated, the performance of these four forms of CP on a coastal RC bridge and their effectiveness in providing protection to reinforcing steel will be is compared with that achieved by present Oregon Department of Transportation ICCP practices. Details are presented on the set up of the experiment and the logic used to control CP intermittently. The field trial is scheduled to be started early 2007.

  3. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  4. Behaviour and Analysis of Steel and Macro-Synthetic Fibre Reinforced Concrete Subjected to Reversed Cyclic Loading: A Pilot Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnovale, David Joseph

    The benefits of fibre reinforced concrete (FRC) have been thoroughly investigated. Much of this work has focussed on steel FRC subjected to monotonic loads. Data on the structural behaviour of macro-synthetic FRC or FRC under cyclic loads is scarce. A pilot investigation on the shear behaviour of macro-synthetic FRC and on the behaviour of FRC under reversed cyclic in-plane shear loading was carried out. Five in-plane shear panel tests were performed. The parameters under study were the fibre material type (steel or macrosynthetic) and loading protocol. Additionally, a number of compression, direct tension, and flexural tests were performed to determine the material properties of the concretes for comparison. The material response of 2.0% by volume of macro-synthetic FRC matched closely with 1.0% steel FRC. Finally, building upon an existing steel FRC model, a model for macro-synthetic FRC in tension was proposed and a short verification study was undertaken.

  5. Corrosion detection of steel reinforced concrete using combined carbon fiber and fiber Bragg grating active thermal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijie; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Song, Gangbing

    2016-04-01

    Steel reinforcement corrosion is one of the dominant causes for structural deterioration for reinforced concrete structures. This paper presents a novel corrosion detection technique using an active thermal probe. The technique takes advantage of the fact that corrosion products have poor thermal conductivity, which will impede heat propagation generated from the active thermal probe. At the same time, the active thermal probe records the temperature response. The presence of corrosion products can thus be detected by analyzing the temperature response after the injection of heat at the reinforcement-concrete interface. The feasibility of the proposed technique was firstly analyzed through analytical modeling and finite element simulation. The active thermal probe consisted of carbon fiber strands to generate heat and a fiber optic Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor. Carbon fiber strands are used due to their corrosion resistance. Wet-dry cycle accelerated corrosion experiments were performed to study the effect of corrosion products on the temperature response of the reinforced concrete sample. Results suggest a high correlation between corrosion severity and magnitude of the temperature response. The technique has the merits of high accuracy, high efficiency in measurement and excellent embeddability.

  6. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case.

  7. Strain measurement in concrete structure using distributed fiber optic sensing based on Brillouin scattering with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforcing vinyl ester rod and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhoa, Cia Y.; Bao, Xiaoyi; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2001-08-01

    The strain distribution in a 1.65m long reinforced concrete beam was measured using the distributed fiber optic sensing system developed by Dr. Bao's Fiber Optic Group at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) with center point and two point loading pattern. A spatial resolution of 0.5m was used. Past experience has shown that the bare optical fiber is too fragile to act as a sensor in a reinforced concrete structure. Therefore, in this experiment, two methods of protecting the fibers were incorporated into the concrete beam to increase the fibers' resistance to mechanical damages and prevent chemical reaction from occurring between the fibers and the concrete. The fibers were either embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced vinyl ester (GFRP) rods or bonded to the steel reinforcing bars with an epoxy adhesive. The strain at midspan of the beam as measured by the distributed sensing system was compared with the readings of electrical resistance strain (ERS) and mechanical strain (MS) gauges. The experimental results showed that the pultruded GFRP rods effectively protected the fibers, but the strain readings from the GFRP rods did not agree with the strain measurement of the ERS on the steel reinforcing bars due to the possible slippage of the rods in the concrete. However, the fiber bonded to steel reinforcing bars produced more accurate results and confirmed the potential of this technology to accurately measure strain in a reinforced concrete structure. As expected, the fiber with direct contact to the concrete and steel reinforcing bar, can effectively measured the strain under center point or two point loading.

  8. Flexural Toughness of Steel Fiber Reinforced High Performance Concrete Containing Nano-SiO2 and Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (PV-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (PV-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%. PMID:24883395

  9. Flexural toughness of steel fiber reinforced high performance concrete containing nano-SiO2 and fly ash.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Li, Qing-Fu; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Tian-Hang

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify the effect of steel fiber on the flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2. The flexural toughness was evaluated by two methods, which are based on ASTM C1018 and DBV-1998, respectively. By means of three-point bending method, the flexural toughness indices, variation coefficients of bearing capacity, deformation energy, and equivalent flexural strength of the specimen were measured, respectively, and the relational curves between the vertical load and the midspan deflection (P(V)-δ) were obtained. The results indicate that steel fiber has great effect on the flexural toughness parameters and relational curves (P(V)-δ) of the three-point bending beam specimen. When the content of steel fiber increases from 0.5% to 2%, the flexural toughness parameters increase gradually and the curves are becoming plumper and plumper with the increase of steel fiber content, respectively. However these flexural toughness parameters begin to decrease and the curves become thinner and thinner after the steel fiber content exceeds 2%. It seems that the contribution of steel fiber to the improvement of flexural toughness of the high performance concrete containing fly ash and nano-SiO2 is well performed only when the steel fiber content is less than 2%.

  10. Stainless Steel Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan T

    2010-06-01

    A nitrogen strengthened 21-6-9 stainless steel plate was spinformed into hemispherical test shapes. A battery of laboratory tests was used to characterize the hemispheres. The laboratory tests show that near the pole (axis) of a spinformed hemisphere the yield strength is the lowest because this area endures the least “cold-work” strengthening, i.e., the least deformation. The characterization indicated that stress-relief annealing spinformed stainless steel hemispheres does not degrade mechanical properties. Stress-relief annealing reduces residual stresses while maintaining relatively high mechanical properties. Full annealing completely eliminates residual stresses, but reduces yield strength by about 30%.

  11. Distributed and accumulated reinforcement arrangements: evaluations of efficacy and preference.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Iser G; Chase, Julie A; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A; Carreau-Webster, Abbey B; Triggs, Mandy M; Bullock, Christopher E; Jennett, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement.

  12. DISTRIBUTED AND ACCUMULATED REINFORCEMENT ARRANGEMENTS: EVALUATIONS OF EFFICACY AND PREFERENCE

    PubMed Central

    DELEON, ISER G.; CHASE, JULIE A.; FRANK-CRAWFORD, MICHELLE A.; CARREAU-WEBSTER, ABBEY B.; TRIGGS, MANDY M.; BULLOCK, CHRISTOPHER E.; JENNETT, HEATHER K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement. PMID:24782203

  13. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  14. Comparing energy use and environmental emissions of reinforced wood doors and steel doors

    Treesearch

    Lynn Knight; Melissa Huff; Janet I. Stockhausen; Robert J. Ross

    2005-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory has patented a technology that incorporates fiberglass-reinforced wood into the structure of wood doors and other wood building products. The process of reinforcing wood doors with epoxy and fiberglass increases the strength and durability of the product. Also, it allows the use of low-value, small-diameter wood which...

  15. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites for anti-icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciardullo, Samuel W.; Mitchell, Stephen C.; Zerkle, Ronald D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of glass capillary reinforced advanced composite structures for anti-icing purposes. The concept involves embedding glass capillary tubes on the surface of a composite structure and ducting heated air through the tubes. A computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate the actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate the feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating in order to combat ice accumulation on advanced composite structures.

  16. Development and evaluation of the epoxy repair method for reinforced concrete flexural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsuwan, S.

    1980-03-01

    Repair procedures were developed based on both the evaluation of the past epoxy repair methods and the pilot study in this research. Fifteen reinforced concrete beams were failed in flexure to produce failures ranging from light to heavily damaged. The damaged beams were repaired using the methods developed and tested. It was concluded that it is possible to repair failed reinforced concrete beams (particularly in flexure) by using the developed repair method. The loading capacity of a repaired beam was verified both experimentally and theoretically as being restorable to approximately the same level as of the original beam regardless of the type and degree of failure. The durability of repaired beams, subjected to cycle loading, is somewhat less than the durability of the original beams. The decrease of durability of the repaired beams is attributed by the softening of steel, the amount of epoxy present in the concrete, and the presence of microcracks. Repaired beams which were failed by one cycle loading were found to behave identically to the original undamaged beams.

  17. Static and Fatigue Strength Evaluations for Bolted Composite/Steel Joints for Heavy Vehicle Chassis Components

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-09-14

    In May 2003, ORNL and PNNL began collaboration on a four year research effort focused on developing joining techniques to overcome the technical issues associated with joining lightweight materials in heavy vehicles. The initial focus of research is the development and validation of joint designs for a composite structural member attached to a metal member that satisfy the structural requirements both economically and reliably. Huck-bolting is a common joining method currently used in heavy truck chassis structures. The initial round of testing was conducted to establish a performance benchmark by evaluating the static and fatigue behavior of an existing steel/steel chassis joint at the single huck-bolt level. Both tension and shear loading conditions were considered, and the resulting static and fatigue strengths will be used to guide the joint design for a replacement composite/steel joint. A commercially available, pultruded composite material was chosen to study the generic issues related to composite/steel joints. Extren is produced by STRONGWELL, and it is a combination of fiberglass reinforcement and thermosetting polyester or vinyl ester resin systems. Extren sheets of 3.2 mm thick were joined to 1.4 mm SAE1008 steel sheets with a standard grade 5 bolt with 6.35 mm diameter. Both tension and shear loading modes were considered for the single hybrid joint under static and fatigue loading conditions. Since fiberglass reinforced thermoset polymer composites are a non-homogenous material, their strengths and behavior are dependent upon the design of the composite and reinforcement. The Extren sheet stock was cut along the longitudinal direction to achieve maximum net-section strength. The effects of various manufacturing factors and operational conditions on the static and fatigue strength of the hybrid joint were modeled and experimentally verified. It was found that loading mode and washer size have significant influence on the static and fatigue strength of

  18. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  19. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  20. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes for cathodic protection of steel-reinforced concrete bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Cramer, Stephen D.; McGill, Galen E.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are being used in Oregon in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for reinforced concrete bridges. The U.S. Department of Energy, Albany Research Center, is collaborating with the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) to evaluate the long-term performance and service life of these anodes. Laboratory studies were conducted on concrete slabs coated with 0.5 mm (20 mil) thick, thermal-sprayed zinc anodes. The slabs were electrochemically aged at an accelerated rate using an anode current density of 0.032 A/m2 (3mA/ft2). Half the slabs were preheated before thermal-spraying with zinc; the other half were unheated. Electrochemical aging resulted in the formation at the zinc-concrete interface of a thin, low pH zone (relative to cement paste) consisting primarily of ZnO and Zn(OH)2, and in a second zone of calcium and zinc aluminates and silicates formed by secondary mineralization. Both zones contained elevated concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. The original bond strength of the zinc coating decreased due to the loss of mechanical bond to the concrete with the initial passage of electrical charge (aging). Additional charge led to an increase in bond strength to a maximum as the result of secondary mineralization of zinc dissolution products with the cement paste. Further charge led to a decrease in bond strength and ultimately coating disbondment as the interfacial reaction zones continued to thicken. This occurred at an effective service life of 27 years at the 0.0022 A/m2 (0.2 mA/ft2) current density typically used by ODOT in ICCP systems for coastal bridges. Zinc coating failure under tensile stress was primarily cohesive within the thickening reaction zones at the zinc-concrete interface. There was no difference between the bond strength of zinc coatings on preheated and unheated concrete surfaces after long service times.

  1. Evaluation of Additive Manufacturing for Stainless Steel Components

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, William H.; Lou, Xiaoyuan; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Webber, David

    2016-09-01

    This collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and General Electric Company aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties, microstructure, and porosity of the additively manufactured 316L stainless steel by ORNL’s Renishaw AM250 machine for nuclear application. The program also evaluated the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the same material in high temperature water environments. Results show the properties of this material to be similar to the properties of 316L stainless steel fabricated additively with equipment from other manufacturers with slightly higher porosity. The stress corrosion crack growth rate is similar to that for wrought 316L stainless steel for an oxygenated high temperature water environment and slightly higher for a hydrogenated high temperature water environment. Optimized heat treatment of this material is expected to improve performance in high temperature water environments.

  2. Bond Durability of Carbon-Microfiber-Reinforced Alkali-Activated High-Temperature Cement Adhering to Carbon Steel

    DOE PAGES

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Pyatina, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    The study aims at evaluating the bond durability of a carbon microfiber (CMF)-reinforced alkali-activating calcium aluminate cement (CAC)/fly ash F (FAF) blend cementitious material adhering to carbon steel (CS) under stresses induced by a 350°C heat-25°Cwater cooling cycle. This cementitious material/CS joint sample was originally prepared in an autoclave at 300°C under a pressure of 8.3 MPa. For comparison, two reference geothermal well cements, Class G modified with silica (G) and calciumaluminum phosphate (CaP), were employed as well reinforced with CMF. In the CAC/FAF blending cement systems, the CAC-derived cementitious reaction products preferentially adhered to CS surfaces, rather than thatmore » of FAF-related reaction products. CMF played a pivotal role in creating tough interfacial bond structure of cement layer adhering to CS. The bond toughness also was supported by the crystalline cementitious reaction products including sodalite, brownmillerite, and hedenbergite as major phases, and aragonite, boehmite, and garronite as minor ones. The brownmillerite as an interfacial reaction product between cement and CS promoted the chemical bonding of the cement to CS, while the other phases served in providing the attractive bonding of the cement to CS. The post-stress-test joint samples revealed the formation of additional brown-millerite, aragonite, and garronite, in particular brownmillerite as the major one. The combination of chemical bonding and self-advancing adherence behavior of the cement was essential for creating a better interfacial bond structure. A similar interfacial bond structure was observed with CaP. The crystalline phase composition of the autoclaved cement revealed apatite, zeolite, and ferrowyllieite as major reaction products, and aragonite and al-katoite as the minor ones. Ferrowyllieite was identified as cement/CS interfacial reaction product contributing to the chemical bond of cement, while the other phases aided in providing the

  3. Galvanic interaction between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites and steel in chloride contaminated concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Acosta, A.A.; Sagues, A.A.; Sen, R.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were performed to determine the possible extent of galvanic corrosion when CFRP and steel are in contact in chloride contaminated concrete. Three concrete environments (water-to-cement (w/c) ratio of 0.41) at relative humidities (RH) of {approx}60%, {approx}80% and {approx}95%, and 14 kg/m{sup 3} chloride were investigated. The CFRP composite potential reached between {minus}180 and {minus}590 mV (vsCSE) when it was in contact with steel at these environments. Results showed significant galvanic action in the 80% RH chloride contaminated concrete (nominal steel current densities as high as 0.3 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}).

  4. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  5. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  6. Mesoscale Characterization of Fracture Properties of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using a Lattice-Particle Model.

    PubMed

    Montero-Chacón, Francisco; Cifuentes, Héctor; Medina, Fernando

    2017-02-21

    This work presents a lattice-particle model for the analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). In this approach, fibers are explicitly modeled and connected to the concrete matrix lattice via interface elements. The interface behavior was calibrated by means of pullout tests and a range for the bond properties is proposed. The model was validated with analytical and experimental results under uniaxial tension and compression, demonstrating the ability of the model to correctly describe the effect of fiber volume fraction and distribution on fracture properties of SFRC. The lattice-particle model was integrated into a hierarchical homogenization-based scheme in which macroscopic material parameters are obtained from mesoscale simulations. Moreover, a representative volume element (RVE) analysis was carried out and the results shows that such an RVE does exist in the post-peak regime and until localization takes place. Finally, the multiscale upscaling strategy was successfully validated with three-point bending tests.

  7. New Insights in the Long-Term Atmospheric Corrosion Mechanisms of Low Alloy Steel Reinforcements of Cultural Heritage Buildings

    PubMed Central

    Bouchar, Marie; Dillmann, Philippe; Neff, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Reinforcing clamps made of low alloy steel from the Metz cathedral and corroded outdoors during 500 years were studied by OM, FESEM/EDS, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion product layer is constituted of a dual structure. The outer layer is mainly constituted of goethite and lepidocrocite embedding exogenous elements such as Ca and P. The inner layer is mainly constituted of ferrihydrite. The behaviour of the inner layer under conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH wet/dry atmospheric corrosion cycle was observed by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy. The disappearance of ferrihydrite near the metal/oxide interface strongly suggests a mechanism of reductive dissolution caused by the oxidation of the metallic substrate and was observed for the first time in situ on an archaeological system. PMID:28773030

  8. New Insights in the Long-Term Atmospheric Corrosion Mechanisms of Low Alloy Steel Reinforcements of Cultural Heritage Buildings.

    PubMed

    Bouchar, Marie; Dillmann, Philippe; Neff, Delphine

    2017-06-19

    Reinforcing clamps made of low alloy steel from the Metz cathedral and corroded outdoors during 500 years were studied by OM, FESEM/EDS, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion product layer is constituted of a dual structure. The outer layer is mainly constituted of goethite and lepidocrocite embedding exogenous elements such as Ca and P. The inner layer is mainly constituted of ferrihydrite. The behaviour of the inner layer under conditions simulating the wetting stage of the RH wet/dry atmospheric corrosion cycle was observed by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy. The disappearance of ferrihydrite near the metal/oxide interface strongly suggests a mechanism of reductive dissolution caused by the oxidation of the metallic substrate and was observed for the first time in situ on an archaeological system.

  9. Mesoscale Characterization of Fracture Properties of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Using a Lattice–Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Chacón, Francisco; Cifuentes, Héctor; Medina, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a lattice–particle model for the analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). In this approach, fibers are explicitly modeled and connected to the concrete matrix lattice via interface elements. The interface behavior was calibrated by means of pullout tests and a range for the bond properties is proposed. The model was validated with analytical and experimental results under uniaxial tension and compression, demonstrating the ability of the model to correctly describe the effect of fiber volume fraction and distribution on fracture properties of SFRC. The lattice–particle model was integrated into a hierarchical homogenization-based scheme in which macroscopic material parameters are obtained from mesoscale simulations. Moreover, a representative volume element (RVE) analysis was carried out and the results shows that such an RVE does exist in the post-peak regime and until localization takes place. Finally, the multiscale upscaling strategy was successfully validated with three-point bending tests. PMID:28772568

  10. Corrosion evaluation of stainless steel root weld shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Gorog, M.; Sawyer, L.A.

    1999-07-01

    The effect of five shielding methods for gas tungsten arc root pass welds, on the corrosion resistance of stainless steel was evaluated in two laboratory solutions. The first experiment was performed in 6% ferric chloride solution, a test designed to corrode stainless steel. The second experiment was performed in a simulated paper machine white water solution that contained hydrogen peroxide. Argon shielding produced excellent results by maintaining corrosion resistance in both solutions. Nitrogen purging and flux coated TIG rod techniques produced variable results. Paste fluxes and welding without shielding are not recommended for root protection. They performed very poorly with the welds corroding in both tests.

  11. Fiber optic pH sensor for early detection of danger of corrosion in steel-reinforced concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantan, Nathalie; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Wolfbeis, Otto S.

    2005-05-01

    Corrosion in steel-reinforced concrete structures is a critical issue. Corrosion appears if the pH value of the concrete matrix decreases due to deterioration of the calcium hydroxide layer on the steel surface. At present, several reliable systems for determination of chemical parameters in aggressive environments are available on the market, but can not be used for long-term monitoring of pH in concrete structures. This paper describes the development of a fiber optic chemical sensor for this purpose. Particular attention is paid to the requirements on such a sensing system. Usually applied methods of fiber optical chemical sensing were investigated and compared by using several pH-sensitive materials. Based on these results, a functional pH sensor has been configured. It shows good response behavior and works under strongly alkaline conditions for one year. Therefore, it represents a promising sensor type for in-situ long-term monitoring in concrete structures. Further work is in progress to test such sensors on-site under real application conditions, e.g. in ground anchors.

  12. Prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi SMA fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams. The SMA fibres were mixed with 1.5% volume content in a mortar matrix with the compressive strength of 50 MPa. The SMA fibres had an average length of 34 mm, and they were manufactured with a dog-bone shape: the diameters of the end- and middle-parts were 1.024 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Twenty mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B × H × L) were prepared. Two types of tests were conducted. One was to investigate the prestressing effect of the SMA fibres, and the beams with the SMA fibres were heated at the bottom. The other was to assess the bending behaviour of the beams prestressed by the SMA fibres. The SMA fibres induced upward deflection and cracking at the top surface by heating at the bottom; thus, they achieved an obvious prestressing effect. The beams that were prestressed by the SMA fibres did not show a significant difference in bending behaviour from that of the SMA fibre reinforced beams that were not subjected to heating. Stress analysis of the beams indicated that the prestressing effect decreased in relation to the cooling temperature.

  13. The long term effects of cathodic protection on corroding, pre-stressed concrete structures: Hydrogen embrittlement of the reinforcing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enos, David George

    Assessment of the effect of cathodic protection on a chloride contaminated bridge pile involves the definition of the hydrogen embrittlement behavior of the pearlitic reinforcement combined with quantification of the local (i.e., at the steel/concrete interface) chemical and electrochemical conditions, both prior to and throughout the application of cathodic protection. The hydrogen embrittlement behavior of the reinforcement was assessed through a combination of Devanathan/Stachurski permeation experiments to quantify subsurface hydrogen concentrations, CsbH, as a function of the applied hydrogen overpotential, eta, and crack initiation tests for bluntly notched and fatigue pre-cracked tensile specimens employing elastic-plastic finite element analysis and linear elastic fracture mechanics, respectively. A threshold mobile lattice hydrogen concentration for embrittlement of 2×10sp{-7} mol/cmsp3 was established for bluntly notched and fatigue pre-cracked specimens. Crack initiation occurred by the formation of shear cracks oriented at an angle approaching 45sp° from the tensile axis, as proposed by Miller and Smith (Miller, 1970), in regions where both the longitudinal and shear stresses were maximized (i.e., near the notch root). These Miller cracks then triggered longitudinal splitting which continued until fast fracture of the remaining ligament occurred. Instrumented laboratory scale piles were constructed and partially immersed in ASTM artificial ocean water. With time, localized corrosion (crevicing) was initiated along the reinforcement, and was accompanied by an acidic shift in the pH of the occluded environment due to ferrous ion hydrolysis. Cathodic protection current densities from -0.1 muA/cmsp2 to -3.0 muA/cmsp2 were applied via a skirt anode located at the waterline. Current densities as low as 0.66 muA/cmsp2 were sufficient to deplete the dissolved oxygen concentration at the steel/concrete interface and result in the observance of hydrogen

  14. Evaluation of Hybrid Reinforcement (Fiber-Reinforced-Plastic Rod with Steel Core)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    SR24 Figure A4. K(64/13.0 mm/SBPR8O 85 FIBRA Hybric ( Tenisile Tgst K G4-+PC Rod Figure A5. Photo K64/9.2 mm/SBPR8O Figure A6. Photo K(96/9.2 mm...Curves for Beams with K48/9.0 mm Hybrid Rod 70 Mweore~titcal car 60 50 .40 S30-" 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Deflection Oma) Figure B39

  15. Microanalytical evaluation of a prototype stainless bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinkus, T. J.; Olson, G. B.

    1992-04-01

    A novel bearing steel composition intended for a space shuttle main engine turbopump application has been designed by computer-aided thermodynamic modelling. Property objectives for the martensitic stainless steel are a doubling of KIC toughness and KISCC stress-corrosion resistance relative to existing bearing steels. The composition is designed to achieve sufficient refinement of M 2C carbides to provide the required hardness of RC = 60 at 0.30C, and to achieve a high stability austenite dispersion for transformation toughening. Microanalytical study of the prototype steel of composition Fe-22.5Co-12Cr-8.5Ni- 0.3Mo-0.25V-0.30C has tested key model predictions. STEM microanalysis of extracted Cr and CrMo carbides was used to evaluate solution treatment response between 1100 and 1150°C. Atom-probe microanalysis was employed to measure compositions of fine M 2C carbides in cryogenically-formed martensitic material tempered at 500°C to a slightly c raged condition promoting high toughness. The observed composition of (Cr 0.88Mo 0.03V 0.03Fe 0.06) 2 C 0.92 lies between computed values corresponding to coherent and incoherent equilibrium. The prototype steel exceeds the design toughness objectives, giving a KIC toughness of 47 MPa √ m at RC = 60.4 hardness.

  16. EVALUATION OF SPECIFICATION RANGES FOR CREEP STRENGTH ENHANCED FERRITIC STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P; Santella, Michael L; Wilson, Keely A

    2008-01-01

    Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic Steels (CSEF) such as Gr. 91, 911, 92, and 122 require a fully martensitic structure for optimum properties, mainly good creep strength. However, broad chemical compositional ranges are specified for these steel grades which can strongly influence the microstructures obtained. In this study, we have produced chemical compositions within the specification ranges for these alloys which intentionally cause the formation of ferrite or substantially alter the lower intercritical temperatures (A1) so as to affect the phase transformation behavior during tempering. Thermodynamic modeling, thermo-mechanical simulation, tensile testing, creep testing, and microstructural analysis were used to evaluate these materials. The results show the usefulness of thermodynamic calculations for setting rational chemical composition ranges for CSEF steels to control the critical temperatures, set heat-treatment temperature limits, and eliminate the formation of ferrite.

  17. Evaluation of Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete Panels for Use in Military Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    AD-A158 134 UNCLASSIFIED EVALUATION OF GLASS FIBER REINFORCED CONCRETE PANELS FOR USE IN MILITARY. . (U) CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING RESEARCH LAB...Construction Engineering Research Laboratory i=h-C=iU. TECHNICAL REPORT M-85/15 June 1985 AD-A158 134 0~- 8 Evaluation of Glass Fiber ...Reinforced Concrete Panels for Use in Military Construction by Gilbert R. Williamson Glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) materials are investigated

  18. Effect of Elevated Temperature on Mechanical Assets of Metakaolin Base Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Anand, M.; Ibrahim, Azmi; Patil, Anand A.; Muthu, K. U.

    2017-06-01

    The fact of vast usage of concrete leads to important problems regarding its design and preparation of eco-friendly to obtain an economic cost of the product on varieties of time periods. Conventional ordinary Portland concrete may not able to meet its functional requisites as it found inconsistency in high temperature. The exposing of concrete structure to elevated temperature may be in case of rocket launching space ships, nuclear power plants. In this experiment, to enhance the high temperature resistance, pozzolanic materials and steel fibres are added to preserve the strength characteristics of concrete structure. In this analysis, the pozzolanic admixture MK is used as partial replacement of cementatious materials. The volume fraction of steel fibre is varied 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75% and 1% by preserving MK as stationary for 10% replacement of cement. The strength parameters of concrete such as compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength are studied.

  19. Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, HongYu; Attard, Dr. Thomas L.; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  20. Performance and Characterization of Geopolymer Concrete Reinforced with Short Steel Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. M. A. B.; Faris, M. A.; Tahir, M. F. M.; Kadir, A. A.; Sandu, A. V.; Mat Isa, N. A. A.; Corbu, O.

    2017-06-01

    In the recent years, geopolymer concrete are reporting as the greener construction technology compared to conventional concrete that made up of ordinary Portland cement. Geopolymer concrete is an innovative construction material that utilized fly ash as one of waste material in coal combustion industry as a replacement for ordinary Portland cement in concrete. The uses of fly ash could reduce the carbon dioxide emission to the atmosphere, redundant of fly ash waste and costs compared to ordinary Portland cement concrete. However, the plain geopolymer concrete suffers from numerous drawbacks such as brittleness and low durability. Thus, in this study the addition of steel fiber is introduced in plain geopolymer concrete to improve its mechanical properties especially in compressive and flexural strength. Characterization of raw materials also determined by using chemical composition analysis. Short type of steel fiber is added to the mix in weight percent of 1 wt%, 3 wt%, 5 wt% and 7 wt% with fixed molarity of sodium hydroxide of 12M and solid to liquid ratio as 2.0. The addition of steel fiber showed the excellent improvement in the mechanical properties of geopolymer concrete that are determined by various methods available in the literature and compared with each other.

  1. Study of the Microstructure Evolution of Low-pH Cements Based on Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) by Mid- and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, and Their Influence on Corrosion of Steel Reinforcement.

    PubMed

    García Calvo, José Luis; Sánchez Moreno, Mercedes; Alonso Alonso, María Cruz; Hidalgo López, Ana; García Olmo, Juan

    2013-06-18

    Low-pH cements are designed to be used in underground repositories for high level waste. When they are based on Ordinary Portland Cements (OPC), high mineral admixture contents must be used which significantly modify their microstructure properties and performance. This paper evaluates the microstructure evolution of low-pH cement pastes based on OPC plus silica fume and/or fly ashes, using Mid-Infrared and Near-Infrared spectroscopy to detect cement pastes mainly composed of high polymerized C-A-S-H gels with low C/S ratios. In addition, the lower pore solution pH of these special cementitious materials have been monitored with embedded metallic sensors. Besides, as the use of reinforced concrete can be required in underground repositories, the influence of low-pH cementitious materials on steel reinforcement corrosion was analysed. Due to their lower pore solution pH and their different pore solution chemical composition a clear influence on steel reinforcement corrosion was detected.

  2. 1993 Evaluation of steel ring standards for magnetic particle inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, B.; Hagemaier, D.; Petty, J.; Armstrong, C.

    1996-10-01

    The Ketos ring standard manufactured from AISI Type 01 (.90 carbon) tool steel has become part of certain US magnetic particle standards such as MIL-STD-1949. The rings are used to verify system performance and for sensitivity evaluation for magnetic particle materials. Some controversy exists concerning the use of the steel ring as a reference standard for the following reasons: inconsistencies in hole detectability have been noted between various rings caused by differences in magnetic permeability as a result of variations in annealing; the use of magnetic particle indication evaluation for ring standard certification is subject to variations in particle concentration, sensitivity, and visual subjectivity; and the proposed introduction of new materials in the manufacture of ring standards. This report describes an evaluation of rings manufactured of different materials and different annealed states. A suggested method for qualifying a newly manufactured ring as a certified reference standard is also described.

  3. An evaluation of methylphenidate as a potential establishing operation for some common classroom reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Northup, J; Fusilier, I; Swanson, V; Roane, H; Borrero, J

    1997-01-01

    We conducted reinforcer assessments for 3 boys with a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who alternately received either placebo or previously prescribed methylphenidate. Our purpose was to evaluate whether methylphenidate altered the relative reinforcing effectiveness of various stimuli that are often used in classroom-based behavioral treatment programs (e.g., activities, tangible items). Results showed clear differences for some stimuli between reinforcer assessments conducted when participants had received methylphenidate compared to placebo. Results suggest that methylphenidate might act as an establishing operation for some common classroom reinforcers. Implications for the development and evaluation of behavioral treatments are discussed.

  4. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite inlay FPDs.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco; Miceli, Gian Paolo; Scotti, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    This clinical study evaluated the behavior of inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPD) with conventional and modified framework designs over a period of 12 to 48 months. Forty-one glass fiber-reinforced composite IFPDs were made to replace one missing maxillary or mandibular tooth. The frameworks were made only with parallel fibers in 19 restorations (group 1) and built with parallel and woven fibers modifying the design of the pontic element in 22 IFPDs (group 2) according to the manufacturer's instructions. All restorations were evaluated by color match, marginal discoloration, secondary caries, surface texture, marginal adaptation, fracture, and postoperative sensitivity. Three partial adhesive-cohesive veneering composite fractures occurred in the pontic element in group 1 after 3, 4, and 8 months, respectively. One cohesive fracture occurred in an abutment in group 2 after 46 months. Group 1 showed a 16% fracture failure rate; group 2 showed a 5% failure rate. However, no statistical difference was detected between the groups. IFPDs received the highest score at the following rates: color match 71%, marginal discoloration 96%, secondary caries 99%, surface texture 88%, marginal adaptation 98%, fracture 90%, and postoperative sensitivity 100%. Statistical analysis indicated significant deterioration of color match from baseline to last recall. There were nonsignificantly fewer fractures of the veneering composite with the modified design of the framework than with the conventional design. Repair of the fractured veneer of IFPDs may lengthen the lifespan of the restorations, but it is advisable only for slight damage.

  5. Evaluating the effects of discriminability on behavioral persistence during and following time-based reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Saini, Valdeep; Fisher, Wayne W

    2016-11-01

    With four children with autism we evaluated a refinement to time-based reinforcement designed to reduce response persistence when we simultaneously introduced time-based reinforcement and extinction. We further evaluated whether this refinement mitigated response recurrence when all reinforcer deliveries ceased during an extinction-only disruptor phase. The refinement involved increasing the saliency of the contingency change from contingent reinforcement (during baseline) to time-based reinforcement by delivering different colored reinforcers during time-based reinforcement. Behavioral momentum theory predicts that increasing the discriminability of the change from variable-interval to variable-time reinforcement should lead to faster reductions in responding. We present data on four participants, three of whom displayed response patterns consistent with the predictions of behavioral momentum theory during time-based reinforcement. However, the participants showed more varied patterns of recurrent behavior during extinction. We discuss these results within a translational research framework focusing on strategies used to mitigate treatment relapse for severe destructive behavior, as time-based reinforcement is one of the most commonly prescribed interventions for destructive behavior displayed by individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

  6. Flexural Upgrading of Steel-Concrete Composite Girders Using Externally Bonded CFRP Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Eshaghian, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study focuses on the flexural performance of composite steel-concrete beam girders retrofitted with CFRP. The current work is a numerical study of the load carrying capacity of a section which is strengthened by externally bonding of CFRP to the tension flange. At the primarily stage of the work, the model is verified by published experimental data. The three dimensional interactive failure Tsai-Wu criteria was implemented to retrofitted composite girder in order to identify the failure mode. Then a detailed parametric study is carried out to investigate the effects of geometry parameters and material characteristics on flexural performance of a composite section.

  7. Strength, and Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete and Soil Structures Interaction Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    AUTHOR(S) Hon-Yim Ko 13&. TYPE OF REPORT 1 3b, IFIMI COVk:RE%. 14. DATE OF REPORT (k’r.. Mo.. Day) j 5. PAGE COUNT Final F RO 1/15/I81 TO 8/31/84j 6/29/87...GR. Fiber-Reinforced Concrete; Biaxial Tension -Compression; ___________________________ SolStucture Interaction, Numerical Modeling, Centrifuge...compression- tension loadings. A new piece of direct tension loading apparatus was designed and assembled for this study. Load history effects on the

  8. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured...

  9. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 § 176.110 Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and... cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being unreasonable, in accordance with...

  10. Kinetic evaluation of intergranular fracture in austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, E.P.; Bruemmer, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    A second, higher-dose threshold exists for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in non-oxidizing environments. The data supporting this concept have stimulated interest in the mechanical aspects of intergranular (IG) fracture. Cracking in a non-oxidizing environment suggests that mechanically-induced IG fracture may play an important role in the IASCC mechanism under these conditions. Radiation alters deformation processes in austenitic alloys and may influence the fracture mode during either in-situ or post-irradiation straining. Radiation effects that must be considered include radiation strengthening, radiation creep and radiation-induced flow localization. The present evaluation relates these radiation-induced phenomena to IG fracture relevant to IASCC. The evaluation indicates that radiation strengthening retards matrix deformation and allows intergranular fracture to occur at higher stresses and lower temperatures than expected for unirradiated stainless steel.

  11. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W.; Brown, Anthony W.; DeMerchant, Michael D.; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Georgiades, Anastasis V.

    2002-08-01

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon (mum/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and plus-or-minus5 mu][epsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are plus-or-minus7 and plus-or-minus15 mu][epsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is plus-or-minus20 mu][epsilon for the two-point loading case.

  12. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D. ); Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D. )

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 [times] 6l0 [times] 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m[sup 2] of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 [mu]m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO[sub 2] aerosols. We used a 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m[sup 3]/hr exhaust system.

  13. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D.; Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 {times} 6l0 {times} 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m{sup 2} of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 {mu}m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO{sub 2} aerosols. We used a 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m{sup 3}/hr exhaust system.

  14. Reinforced wind turbine blades--an environmental life cycle evaluation.

    PubMed

    Merugula, Laura; Khanna, Vikas; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2012-09-04

    A fiberglass composite reinforced with carbon nanofibers (CNF) at the resin-fiber interface is being developed for potential use in wind turbine blades. An energy and midpoint impact assessment was performed to gauge impacts of scaling production to blades 40 m and longer. Higher loadings force trade-offs in energy return on investment and midpoint impacts relative to the base case while remaining superior to thermoelectric power generation in these indicators. Energy-intensive production of CNFs forces impacts disproportionate to mass contribution. The polymer nanocomposite increases a 2 MW plant's global warming potential nearly 100% per kWh electricity generated with 5% CNF by mass in the blades if no increase in electrical output is realized. The relative scale of impact must be compensated by systematic improvements whether by deployment in higher potential zones or by increased life span; the trade-offs are expected to be significantly lessened with CNF manufacturing maturity. Significant challenges are faced in evaluating emerging technologies including uncertainty in future scenarios and process scaling. Inventories available for raw materials and monte carlos analysis have been used to gain insight to impacts of this development.

  15. Evaluating the presence versus absence of the reinforcer during extinction.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Mariana I; Borrero, John C; Mendres-Smith, Amber E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extinction when the reinforcer was present versus absent. These effects were examined with 2 human operant procedures (i.e., a computer program and a mechanical apparatus) with college students as participants. Discriminable properties of the apparatus appeared to influence responding during extinction. In general, responding during extinction was less likely with the mechanical apparatus when the reinforcer was absent and more likely with the computer program.

  16. An evaluation of two differential reinforcement procedures with escape extinction to treat food refusal.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Meeta R; Piazza, Cathleen C; Martinez, Cheryl J; Volkert, Valerie M; Christine, M Santana

    2002-01-01

    Consumption of solids and liquids occurs as a chain of behaviors that may include accepting, swallowing, and retaining the food or drink. In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effectiveness of differential reinforcement of the first behavior in the chain (acceptance) versus differential reinforcement for the terminal behavior in the chain (mouth clean). Three children who had been diagnosed with a feeding disorder participated. Acceptance remained at zero when differential reinforcement contingencies were implemented for acceptance or mouth clean. Acceptance and mouth clean increased for all 3 participants once escape extinction was added to the differential reinforcement procedures, independent of whether reinforcement was provided for acceptance or for mouth clean. Maintenance was observed in 2 children when escape extinction was removed from the treatment package. The mechanism by which consumption increased is discussed in relation to positive and negative reinforcement contingencies. PMID:12555908

  17. An evaluation of two differential reinforcement procedures with escape extinction to treat food refusal.

    PubMed

    Patel, Meeta R; Piazza, Cathleen C; Martinez, Cheryl J; Volkert, Valerie M; Christine, M Santana

    2002-01-01

    Consumption of solids and liquids occurs as a chain of behaviors that may include accepting, swallowing, and retaining the food or drink. In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effectiveness of differential reinforcement of the first behavior in the chain (acceptance) versus differential reinforcement for the terminal behavior in the chain (mouth clean). Three children who had been diagnosed with a feeding disorder participated. Acceptance remained at zero when differential reinforcement contingencies were implemented for acceptance or mouth clean. Acceptance and mouth clean increased for all 3 participants once escape extinction was added to the differential reinforcement procedures, independent of whether reinforcement was provided for acceptance or for mouth clean. Maintenance was observed in 2 children when escape extinction was removed from the treatment package. The mechanism by which consumption increased is discussed in relation to positive and negative reinforcement contingencies.

  18. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced fixed bridges.

    PubMed

    Freilich, Martin A; Meiers, Jonathan C; Duncan, Jacqueline P; Eckrote, Kimberly A; Goldberg, A Jon

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluated the clinical performance of 39 light and heat polymerized fixed partial bridges made with a substructure of preimpregnated, unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite, or FRC, veneered with a hybrid particu late composite. The authors evaluated 22 extracoronal, full-coverage retainer prostheses and 17 intracoronal, partial-coverage retainer prostheses placed over a 37-month period. All substructures initially were fabricated with a low-volume FRC. The authors reevaluated this design after early failures occurred, leading to a substructure with a higher volume of FRC. All prostheses were assessed for surface integrity, anatomical contour, marginal integrity and structural integrity at several intervals. The data show that survival was associated primarily with substructure design volume. When patients with severe parafunctional habits were excluded, the survival rate was 95 percent for prostheses made with a high-volume substructure (survival range, 2.77 to 4.30 years; mean +/- standard deviation survival, 3.75 +/- 0.4 years). Retainer configuration did not have a statistically significant influence on clinical survival. For all surviving prostheses, the authors observed few changes in any clinical parameters from baseline to 48 months. A loss of surface luster was observed in the majority of cases. Repairable surface defects were detected on two prostheses at 24 months. Scanning electron microscopic analyses indicated no exposed fibers on the occlusal surface and minimal wear. This study shows that a unidirectional, preimpregnated FRC can be used successfully to make bridges of variable retainer designs that last up to four or more years when a high-volume substructure is used. Short-span polymer prostheses made with particulate composite and unidirectional glass FRC can be used in certain clinical situations in which a metal substructure is not desired.

  19. The Strength and Behavior of Steel Fiber-Reinforced Concrete under Combined Tension-Compression Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    4 m 040 4O -1 La. 00t - . - - k - 4 4- ) 4 Ui 140- 4 -4o0 :c-% oL >. 0 -C nW0 o - C : mt -2 o 4)CI V t CA -0-- a *a -cn o A C- 0C 00 a . L- 4 $A = L...stresses assumed from the applied 26 CD -OR 8 SAM -OP No -DP NMU -OP K RIOIDITY:OO N.M L -LP U C -OP -- CL -L, cu DP ;’- • N ou -LP on UCD -LP ~0 0 -, o- 4-8...07 Z; Plain mortar, no fiber Steel percentage 2.0 volume percent 0 K 0.2 0 Calculated Fiber Spacing. in. Fig. 1.15 Relationships Between Flexural

  20. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  1. Evaluating the Separate and Combined Effects of Positive and Negative Reinforcement on Task Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouxsein, Kelly J.; Roane, Henry S.; Harper, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Positive and negative reinforcement are effective for treating escape-maintained destructive behavior. The current study evaluated the separate and combined effects of these contingencies to increase task compliance. Results showed that a combination of positive and negative reinforcement was most effective for increasing compliance. (Contains 1…

  2. Evaluating the separate and combined effects of positive and negative reinforcement on task compliance.

    PubMed

    Bouxsein, Kelly J; Roane, Henry S; Harper, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Positive and negative reinforcement are effective for treating escape-maintained destructive behavior. The current study evaluated the separate and combined effects of these contingencies to increase task compliance. Results showed that a combination of positive and negative reinforcement was most effective for increasing compliance.

  3. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  4. Optimization of a Hybrid-Fiber-Reinforced High-Strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.; de Hanai, J. B.; Ferrari, V. J.

    2016-07-01

    The fracture performance of a high-strength concrete reinforced with steel fibers was studied. Tests of notched beams subjected to fracture in the three-point bend configuration were conducted in accordance with RILEM recommendations TC 162-TDF. The R-curve concepts based on load-CMOD responses and the RILEM criteria were used for the performance evaluation of concrete beams reinforced with steel fiber mixtures and loaded up to fracture. Steel fibers of different types (regular and microfibers), in different proportions were employed as the reinforcement. The hybrid-fiber-reinforced concrete demonstrated a superior performance regarding their resistance and toughness properties as a result of interaction between the fibers.

  5. A galvanic sensor for monitoring the corrosion condition of the concrete reinforcing steel: relationship between the galvanic and the corrosion currents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elsa Vaz; Figueira, Rita Bacelar; Salta, Maria Manuela Lemos; da Fonseca, Inês Teodora Elias

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a study carried out on the design and performance of galvanic and polarization resistance sensors to be embedded in concrete systems for permanent monitoring of the corrosion condition of reinforcing steel, aiming to establish a correlation between the galvanic currents, I(gal), and the corrosion currents, I(corr), estimated from the polarization resistance, R(p). Sensors have been tested in saturated Ca(OH)(2) aqueous solutions, under a variety of conditions, simulating the most important parameters that can accelerate the corrosion of concrete reinforcing steel, such as carbonation, ingress of chloride ions, presence or absence of O(2). For all the conditions, the influence of temperature (20 to 55 °C) has also been considered. From this study, it could be concluded that the galvanic currents are sensitive to the various parameters following a trend similar to that of the R(p) values. A relationship between the galvanic and the corrosion current densities was obtained and the limiting values of the I(gal), indicative of the state condition of the reinforcing steel for the designed sensor, were established.

  6. A Galvanic Sensor for Monitoring the Corrosion Condition of the Concrete Reinforcing Steel: Relationship Between the Galvanic and the Corrosion Currents

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elsa Vaz; Figueira, Rita Bacelar; Salta, Maria Manuela Lemos; da Fonseca, Inês Teodora Elias

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a study carried out on the design and performance of galvanic and polarization resistance sensors to be embedded in concrete systems for permanent monitoring of the corrosion condition of reinforcing steel, aiming to establish a correlation between the galvanic currents, Igal, and the corrosion currents, Icorr, estimated from the polarization resistance, Rp. Sensors have been tested in saturated Ca(OH)2 aqueous solutions, under a variety of conditions, simulating the most important parameters that can accelerate the corrosion of concrete reinforcing steel, such as carbonation, ingress of chloride ions, presence or absence of O2. For all the conditions, the influence of temperature (20 to 55 °C) has also been considered. From this study, it could be concluded that the galvanic currents are sensitive to the various parameters following a trend similar to that of the Rp values. A relationship between the galvanic and the corrosion current densities was obtained and the limiting values of the Igal, indicative of the state condition of the reinforcing steel for the designed sensor, were established. PMID:22291514

  7. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  8. Evaluation of tantalum 316 stainless steel transition joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular transition joints providing a metallurgically bonded connection between tantalum and 316 stainless steel pipe sections were comparatively evaluated for durability under thermal cycling conditions approximating the operation of a SNAP-8 mercury boiler. Both coextruded and vacuum brazed transition joints of 50mm (2 inch) diameter were tested by thermal cycling 100 times between 730 C and 120 C(1350 F and 250 F) in a high vacuum environment. The twelve evaluated transition joints survived the full test sequence without developing leaks, although liquid penetrant bond line indications eventually developed in all specimens. The brazed transition joints exhibited the best dimensional stability and bond line durability.

  9. Application of microwave 3D SAR imaging technique for evaluation of corrosion in steel rebars embedded in cement-based structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Case, J. T.; Ghasr, M. T.; Zoughi, R.; Bae, S. W.; Belarbi, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents and discusses the attributes and results of using wideband microwave 3D SAR-based imaging technique for evaluation of reinforced cement-based structures. The technique was used to detect corrosion and thinning of reinforcing steel bars and its potential was demonstrated through experiments for different bar sizes, depth of rebar locations, and spacing between rebars. The results of a limited and preliminary investigation in which thinning of rebars with and without rust in two mortar samples were obtained at three frequency bands covering the frequency range from 8.2 GHz-26.5 GHz.

  10. An evaluation of stimulant medication on the reinforcing effects of play.

    PubMed

    Larue, Robert H; Northup, John; Baumeister, Alan A; Hawkins, Mike F; Seale, Lauren; Williams, Tara; Ridgway, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although a vast literature has indicated that stimulant medications are effective for reducing inappropriate behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the effects of stimulant medication on ancillary behaviors (e.g., play) have yet to be investigated with the same rigor. We used a reinforcer assessment procedure to evaluate the effects of medication on the play and social behavior of 5 preschool children who had been diagnosed with ADHD. Conditions included (a) social reinforcement (i.e., playing with friends), (b) alone play, and (c) quiet time (i.e., resting). Results indicated that 1 of the 5 participants selected fewer social reinforcers and more nonsocial reinforcers (alone play or quiet time) while on medication. The findings indicate that the reinforcer assessment procedure may be a viable way to evaluate medication effects on an ongoing basis and to inform treatment decisions.

  11. Multiple determinants of transfer of evaluative function after conditioning with free-operant schedules of reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil; McHugh, Louise

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the four present experiments was to explore how different schedules of reinforcement influence schedule-induced behavior, their impact on evaluative ratings given to conditioned stimuli associated with each schedule through evaluative conditioning, and the transfer of these evaluations through derived stimulus networks. Experiment 1 compared two contrasting response reinforcement rules (variable ratio [VR], variable interval [VI]). Experiment 2 varied the response to reinforcement rule between two schedules but equated the outcome to response rate (differential reinforcement of high rate [DRH] vs. VR). Experiment 3 compared molar and molecular aspects of contingencies of reinforcement (tandem VIVR vs. tandem VRVI). Finally, Experiment 4 employed schedules that induced low rates of responding to determine whether, under these circumstances, responses were more sensitive to the molecular aspects of a schedule (differential reinforcement of low rate [DRL] vs. VI). The findings suggest that the transfer of evaluative functions is determined mainly by differences in response rate between the schedules and the molar aspects of the schedules. However, when neither schedule was based on a strong response reinforcement rule, the transfer of evaluative judgments came under the control of the molecular aspects of the schedule.

  12. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being...

  13. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being...

  14. 2 CFR 176.110 - Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluating proposals of foreign iron, steel... iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods. (a) If the award official receives a request for an exception based on the cost of certain domestic iron, steel, and/or manufactured goods being unreasonable, in...

  15. Evaluation of Contextual Variability in Prediction of Reinforcer Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pino, Olimpia; Dazzi, Carla

    2005-01-01

    Previous research has shown that stimulus preference assessments based on caregiver-opinion did not coincide with results of a more systematic method of assessing reinforcing value unless stimuli that were assessed to represent preferences were also preferred on paired stimulus presentation format, and that the relative preference based on the…

  16. Finite element analysis of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC): validation of experimental tensile capacity of dog-bone specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Sayeed, Md. Abu; Hossain, Elsha Al; Ahmed, Sheikh Saleh; Siddique, Ashfia

    2014-09-01

    Finite element analyses are conducted to model the tensile capacity of steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC). For this purpose dog-bone specimens are casted and tested under direct and uniaxial tension. Two types of aggregates (brick and stone) are used to cast the SFRC and plain concrete. The fiber volume ratio is maintained 1.5 %. Total 8 numbers of dog-bone specimens are made and tested in a 1000-kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM). The strain data are gathered employing digital image correlation technique from high-definition images and high-speed video clips. Then, the strain data are synthesized with the load data obtained from the load cell of the UTM. The tensile capacity enhancement is found 182-253 % compared to control specimen to brick SFRC and in case of stone SFRC the enhancement is 157-268 %. Fibers are found to enhance the tensile capacity as well as ductile properties of concrete that ensures to prevent sudden brittle failure. The dog-bone specimens are modeled in the ANSYS 10.0 finite element platform and analyzed to model the tensile capacity of brick and stone SFRC. The SOLID65 element is used to model the SFRC as well as plain concretes by optimizing the Poisson's ratio, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and stress-strain relationships and also failure pattern as well as failure locations. This research provides information of the tensile capacity enhancement of SFRC made of both brick and stone which will be helpful for the construction industry of Bangladesh to introduce this engineering material in earthquake design. Last of all, the finite element outputs are found to hold good agreement with the experimental tensile capacity which validates the FE modeling.

  17. Phyllanthus muellerianus and C6H15NO3 synergistic effects on 0.5 M H2SO4-immersed steel-reinforced concrete: Implication for clean corrosion-protection of wind energy structures in industrial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okeniyi, Joshua Olusegun; Omotosho, Olugbenga Adeshola; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Loto, Cleophas Akintoye

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 (triethanolamine: TEA) synergistic effects on reinforcing-steel corrosion-inhibition and the compressive-strength of steel-reinforced concrete immersed in 0.5 M H2SO4. This is to assess suitability of the synergistic admixture usage for wind-energy steel-reinforced concrete structures designed for industrial environments. Steel-reinforced concrete specimens were admixed with individual and synergistic designs of Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures and immersed in the 0.5 M H2SO4. Electrochemical monitoring of corrosion potential, as per ASTM C876-91 R99, and corrosion current were obtained and statistically analysed, as per ASTM G16-95 R04, for modelling noise resistance. Post-immersion compressive-strength testing then followed, as per ASTM C39/C39M-03, for detailing the admixture effect on load-bearing strength of the steel-reinforced concrete specimens. Results showed that while individual Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract concentrations exhibited better inhibition-efficiency performance than C6H15NO3, synergistic additions of C6H15NO3 to Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract improved steel-rebar corrosion-inhibition. Thus, 6 g Phyllanthus muellerianus + 2 g C6H15NO3 synergistically improved inhibition-efficiency to η = 84.17%, from η = 55.28% by the optimal chemical or from η = 74.72% by the optimal plant-extract admixtures. The study also established that improved compressive strength of steel-reinforced concrete with acceptable inhibition of the steel-rebar corrosion could be attained through optimal combination of the Phyllanthus muellerianus leaf-extract and C6H15NO3 admixtures.

  18. Damage evaluation of reinforced concrete frame based on a combined fiber beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Bing; Liu, ZhanLi; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2014-04-01

    In order to analyze and simulate the impact collapse or seismic response of the reinforced concrete (RC) structures, a combined fiber beam model is proposed by dividing the cross section of RC beam into concrete fiber and steel fiber. The stress-strain relationship of concrete fiber is based on a model proposed by concrete codes for concrete structures. The stress-strain behavior of steel fiber is based on a model suggested by others. These constitutive models are implemented into a general finite element program ABAQUS through the user defined subroutines to provide effective computational tools for the inelastic analysis of RC frame structures. The fiber model proposed in this paper is validated by comparing with experiment data of the RC column under cyclical lateral loading. The damage evolution of a three-dimension frame subjected to impact loading is also investigated.

  19. Evaluation of ion release, cytotoxicity, and platelet adhesion of electrochemical anodized 316 L stainless steel cardiovascular stents.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M; Sevilla, P; Galán, A M; Escolar, G; Engel, E; Gil, F J

    2008-11-01

    316L Stainless steel is one of the most used metallic material in orthopedical prosthesis, osteosinthesis plates, and cardiovascular stents. One of the main problems this material presents is the nickel and chromium release, specially the Ni ion release that provokes allergy in a high number of patients. Recently, experimental applications in vitro and in vivo seem to indicate that the thickness of the nature oxide of the stainless steel results in very strong reinforcement of the biological response and reduce the ion release due to the thicker surface oxide. It is possible to grow the natural chromium oxide layer by electrolytic method such anodization. In this study, two main anodization methods to grow chromium oxide on the 316L stainless steel have been evaluated. Nickel and Chromium ions release in human blood at 37 degrees C were detected at times of 1, 6, 11, and 15 days by means of atomic absorption in a graphite furnace (GAAF). Moreover, cytocompatibility tests were carried out. Perfusion experiments were performed to evaluate morphometrically platelet interaction with the material and to explore the potential thrombogenicity. The results showed a good cytocompatibility between the material and the osteoblast-like cells. However, these anodization methods released between 2 and 10 times more nickel and chromium than the original stainless steel, depending on the method used. Besides, anodized samples shown an increase of the percentage of surface covered by platelets. Consequently, the anodization methods studied do not improve the long-term behavior of the stainless steel for its application as cardiovascular stents.

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  1. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  2. Do Children Prefer Contingencies? An Evaluation of the Efficacy of and Preference for Contingent versus Noncontingent Social Reinforcement during Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczynski, Kevin C.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2009-01-01

    Discovering whether children prefer reinforcement via a contingency or independent of their behavior is important considering the ubiquity of these programmed schedules of reinforcement. The current study evaluated the efficacy of and preference for social interaction within differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) and…

  3. A trapped field of 17.6 T in melt-processed, bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O reinforced with shrink-fit steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrell, J. H.; Dennis, A. R.; Jaroszynski, J.; Ainslie, M. D.; Palmer, K. G. B.; Shi, Y.-H.; Campbell, A. M.; Hull, J.; Strasik, M.; Hellstrom, E. E.; Cardwell, D. A.

    2014-08-01

    The ability of large-grain (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-δ ((RE)BCO; RE = rare earth) bulk superconductors to trap magnetic fields is determined by their critical current. With high trapped fields, however, bulk samples are subject to a relatively large Lorentz force, and their performance is limited primarily by their tensile strength. Consequently, sample reinforcement is the key to performance improvement in these technologically important materials. In this work, we report a trapped field of 17.6 T, the largest reported to date, in a stack of two silver-doped GdBCO superconducting bulk samples, each 25 mm in diameter, fabricated by top-seeded melt growth and reinforced with shrink-fit stainless steel. This sample preparation technique has the advantage of being relatively straightforward and inexpensive to implement, and offers the prospect of easy access to portable, high magnetic fields without any requirement for a sustaining current source.

  4. Characterization and Evaluation of Aged Chromium Nickel Niobium Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Matthew

    20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steel alloys are commonly used in hydrogen reformer manifolds for transporting hot hydrogen by-products at 750-950°C. After long periods of exposure, embrittling secondary carbides and intermetallic phases can precipitate at the grain boundaries which can drastically reduce the ductility, and the repair weldability of the alloy. The intermetallic silicide, G-phase, is commonly observed in 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steels, and is prone to liquation cracking during welding operations. G-phase is deleterious to the material, where a high degree of G-phase coarsening will render the material unweldable. The present work will investigate various methods in mitigating G-phase precipitation. Variations in casting methods, wall thickness, homogenization treatments, and alloy chemistry will be examined by evaluating their microstructure after periodically aging the samples. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using computational thermodynamic tools will be used to optimize the 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb chemistry following ASTM specifications.

  5. REVERSAL CYCLIC LOADING TEST OF REINFORCED CONCRETE COLUMN WITH HIGH DENSITY LONGITUDINAL REINFORCEMENT CONFINED BY SPIRAL REINFORCEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohba, Mitsuaki; Sato, Akiko; Ishibashi, Tadayoshi

    In case of that column diameter is restricted by the narrow construction space, Concrete filled steel tube column is used. Authors developed new arrangement of bars that the range of longitudinal reinforcement ratio is from 14.8% to 24.7% and the longitudinal reinforcements are reinforced by spiral reinforcement. For the confirmation of the damage form and the deformation performance of the column with new bar arrangement at the earthquake, static reversal cyclic loading test was carried out. The parameters are longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and strength ratio. As the result, the damage form showed different trends due to longitudinal reinforcement ratio, shear span ratio and flexural strength and shear strength ratio. And specimens with the new bar arrangement had a good ductility with rotation angle of the column more than 1/10 and no rapid decline of strength. And, it is possible to evaluate ultimate bending capacity by considering the damage situation at maximum load.

  6. Development of reinforced in-situ anti-corrosion and wear Zn-TiO2/ZnTiB2 coatings on mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.; Kanyane, L. R.; Monyai, T.

    The development of reinforced composite coating has resulted into advanced engineering application because of the exceptional properties and increase service life. In this study, we investigated the effect of Solanum tuberosum (ST) as additive to Zn-TiO2/Zn-TiB2 sulphate bath coating by co-deposition route on mild steel. The structural characteristics and surface profile of the produced coating were examined using scanning electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) and PosiTector (SPG) respectively. The anti-corrosion resistance activities of the deposited coatings were evaluated on a 101 AUTOLAB potentiostat/galvanostat device in a 3.65 wt% NaCl. The wear characteristics of the Zn-TiO2/TiB2 composite coatings were examined on a dry abrasive MTR-300 test rig. The thermal stability of the produced coatings was studied in an isothermal furnace at 600 °C and further characterized using a high tech optical microscope. From the results, it was found that Zn-TiO2/Zn-TiB2 were compassed with needle like pattern and perhaps a compact and distinctive structure was found with Zn-TiO2/Zn-TiB2/ST coatings. The microhardness deposited coatings increased with TiO2 and TiB2 interference in the plating bath, more significant improvement was noticed in the presence of natural bath-additive and the addition of ST lead to changes in the morphologies of the composite coatings. A massive decrease in corrosion and wear rate in all coatings produced as against the control sample was noticed. This was attributed to the dispersive strengthening activities of the embedded TiO2/TiB2/ST additive on the bath formed.

  7. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Simon, K.; Frye, L.

    1994-11-01

    The authors have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2{prime} x 2{prime} {times} l{prime} HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to the authors specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. The authors suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  8. Preliminary field evaluation of high efficiency steel filters

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.

    1995-02-01

    We have conducted an evaluation of two high efficiency steel filters in the exhaust of an uranium oxide grit blaster at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge Tennessee. The filters were installed in a specially designed filter housing with a reverse air-pulse cleaning system for automatically cleaning the filters in-place. Previous tests conducted on the same filters and housing at LLNL under controlled conditions using Arizona road dust showed good cleanability with reverse air pulses. Two high efficiency steel filters, containing 64 pleated cartridge elements housed in the standard 2` x 2` x 1` HEPA frame, were evaluated in the filter test housing using a 1,000 cfm slip stream containing a high concentration of depleted uranium oxide dust. One filter had the pleated cartridges manufactured to our specifications by the Pall Corporation and the other by Memtec Corporation. Test results showed both filters had a rapid increase in pressure drop with time, and reverse air pulses could not decrease the pressure drop. We suspected moisture accumulation in the filters was the problem since there were heavy rains during the evaluations, and the pressure drop of the Memtec filter decreased dramatically after passing clean, dry air through the filter and after the filter sat idle for one week. Subsequent laboratory tests on a single filter cartridge confirmed that water accumulation in the filter was responsible for the increase in filter pressure drop and the inability to lower the pressure drop by reverse air pulses. No effort was made to identify the source of the water accumulation and correct the problem because the available funds were exhausted.

  9. Corrosion of reinforcing steel in mortar of cement with CaF[sub 2] as a minor component

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, M.L. ); Macias, A. )

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports on the corrosion behavior of steel embedded in mortar of cement manufactured using CaF[sub 2] as a mineralizer and flux agent. Corrosion rates of steel in this new cement measured with electrochemical techniques are compared with the corrosion rates of steel in contact with a traditional cement of similar characteristics in the same conditions. It was confirmed that the new cement does not lead to pitting corrosion and corrosion rates of steel are similar to traditional cement even in presence of corrosive agents such as chlorides or carbonation of cement.

  10. Effect of zinc phosphate chemical conversion coating on corrosion behaviour of mild steel in alkaline medium: protection of rebars in reinforced concrete.

    PubMed

    Simescu, Florica; Idrissi, Hassane

    2008-12-01

    We outline the ability of zinc phosphate coatings, obtained by chemical conversion, to protect mild steel rebars against localized corrosion, generated by chloride ions in alkaline media. The corrosion resistance of coated steel, in comparison with uncoated rebars and coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar, were evaluated by open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, cronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The coated surfaces were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. First, coated mild steel rebars were studied in an alkaline solution with and without chloride simulating a concrete pore solution. The results showed that the slow dissolution of the coating generates hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. After a long immersion, the coating became dense and provided an effective corrosion resistance compared with the mild steel rebar. Secondly, the coated and uncoated steel rebars embedded in mortar and immersed in chloride solution showed no corrosion or deterioration of the coated steel. Corrosion rate is considerably lowered by this phosphate coating.

  11. Evaluation of Alternate Stainless Steel Surface Passivation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2005-05-31

    Stainless steel containers were assembled from parts passivated by four commercial vendors using three passivation methods. The performance of these containers in storing hydrogen isotope mixtures was evaluated by monitoring the composition of initially 50% H{sub 2} 50% D{sub 2} gas with time using mass spectroscopy. Commercial passivation by electropolishing appears to result in surfaces that do not catalyze hydrogen isotope exchange. This method of surface passivation shows promise for tritium service, and should be studied further and considered for use. On the other hand, nitric acid passivation and citric acid passivation may not result in surfaces that do not catalyze the isotope exchange reaction H{sub 2} + D{sub 2} {yields} 2HD. These methods should not be considered to replace the proprietary passivation processes of the two current vendors used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facility.

  12. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  13. Objective Surface Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Stuart; Hall, Wayne

    2013-08-01

    The mechanical properties of advanced composites are essential for their structural performance, but the surface finish on exterior composite panels is of critical importance for customer satisfaction. This paper describes the application of wavelet texture analysis (WTA) to the task of automatically classifying the surface finish properties of two fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite construction types (clear resin and gel-coat) into three quality grades. Samples were imaged and wavelet multi-scale decomposition was used to create a visual texture representation of the sample, capturing image features at different scales and orientations. Principal components analysis was used to reduce the dimensionality of the texture feature vector, permitting successful classification of the samples using only the first principal component. This work extends and further validates the feasibility of this approach as the basis for automated non-contact classification of composite surface finish using image analysis.

  14. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  15. PILOT-SCALE EVALUATION OF NEW RESIN APPLICATION EQUIPMENT FOR FIBER- REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a pilot-scale evaluation of new resin application equipment for fiber- reinforced plastics. The study, an evaluation and comparison of styrene emissions, utilized Magnum's FIT(TM) nozzle with conventional spray guns and flow coaters (operated at both ...

  16. Stress state evaluation in low carbon and TRIP steels by magnetic permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouli, M.-E.; Giannakis, M.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic permeability is an indicative factor for the steel health monitoring. The measurements of magnetic permeability lead to the evaluation of the stress state of any ferromagnetic steel. The magnetic permeability measurements were conducted on low carbon and TRIP steel samples, which were subjected to both tensile and compressive stresses. The results indicated a direct correlation of the magnetic permeability with the mechanical properties, the stress state and the microstructural features of the examined samples.

  17. Evaluation of stainless steel cladding for use in current design LWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, A.; Santucci, J.; Lindquist, K.; Yario, W.; Stern, G.; Goldstein, L.; Joseph, L.

    1982-12-01

    The design of stainless steel-clad LWR fuel and its performance at steady-state, transient, and accident conditions were reviewed. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits and disadvantages of substituting stainless steel-clad fuel for the currently used Zircaloy-clad fuel. For a large, modern PWR, the technology and the fuel-cycle costs of stainless steel- and Zircaloy-clad fuels were compared.

  18. Processing of Hybrid Structures Consisting of Al-Based Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) With Metallic Reinforcement of Steel or Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    titanium - and steel-based metals, high specific stiffness, high specific strength , tailorable coefficient of thermal...to titanium and steel- based metals, high specific stiffuess, high specific strength , tailorable coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and high ...hollow, periodic cellular structures are of interest due to their very high stiffness to weight ratio and high damage tolerance (e.g., very high

  19. Filament-reinforced metal composite pressure vessel evaluation and performance demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Two different Kevlar-49 filament-reinforced metal sphere designs were developed, and six vessels of each type were fabricated and subjected to fatigue cycling, sustained loading, and hydrostatic burst. The 61 cm (24 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/cryoformed 301 stainless steel pressure vessels demonstrated the required pressure cycle capability, burst factor of safety, and a maximum pressure times volume divided by weight (pV/W) performance of 210 J/g (834 000 in-lb/lbm) at burst; this represented a 25 to 30% weight saving over the lightest weight comparable, 6A1-4V Ti, homogeneous pressure vessel. Both the Kevlar/stainless steel design and the 97 cm (38 inch) diameter Kevlar-49/2219-T62 aluminum sphere design demonstrated nonfragmentation and controlled failure mode features when pressure cycled to failure at operating pressure. When failure occurred during pressure cycling, the mode was localized leakage and not catastrophic. Kevlar/stainless steel vessels utilized a unique conical boss design, and Kevlar/aluminum vessels incorporated a tie-rod to carry port loads; both styles of polar fittings performed as designed during operational testing of the vessels.

  20. The effect of zeolite and diatomite on the corrosion of reinforcement steel in 1 M HCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerengi, Husnu; Kurtay, Mine; Durgun, Hatice

    The greatest disadvantage of reinforced concrete structures is the corrosion occurring in the reinforcement which, over time, causes a reduction in the reinforcement-concrete adherence and eventual sectional loss. The purpose of this study was to reveal the corrosion mechanism of ribbed reinforcement inside additive-free (reference), 20% zeolite-doped and 20% diatomite-doped concrete samples after exposure to 1 M HCl over 240 days. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were made every 10 days. Consequently, it was determined that the 20% zeolite-doped concrete samples had higher concrete and reinforcement resistance compared to the 20% diatomite-doped and the reference concrete, i.e. they exhibited less corrosion.

  1. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  2. Evaluation of the reactor pressure vessel steels by positron annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slugeň, V.; Hein, H.; Sojak, S.; Simeg Veterníková, J.; Petriska, M.; Sabelová, V.; Pavúk, M.; Hinca, R.; Stacho, M.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a comparison of commercially used German and Russian reactor pressure vessel steels from the positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) point of view, having in mind knowledge obtained also from other techniques from the last decades. The second generation of Russian RPV steels seems to be fully comparable with German steels and their quality allows prolongation of NPP operating lifetime over projected 40 years. The embrittlement of CrMoV steels is relatively low due to effect of higher temperature which implies partial in situ annealing of primary microstructural point defects and therefore delays the degradation processes caused by neutron irradiation.

  3. Evaluating the Marginal Integrity of Bulk Fill Fibre Reinforced Composites in Bio-mimetically Restored Tooth.

    PubMed

    Patnana, Arun Kumar; Vanga, V Narsimha Rao; Chandrabhatla, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Over the past years, composites in aesthetic dentistry are showing a considerable progress, but mechanical strength and polymerization shrinkage are the two main drawbacks, which limit their use in high stress bearing areas. To evaluate the marginal integrity of short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations, fibre reinforced composites with composite superficial layer, and fibre reinforced composites with underlying flowable composite layer. This study was done on twenty eight sound premolar teeth with standardized class V cavities restored under four groups as Group I: Particulate filler composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE); Group II: Short glass fibre reinforced composite (everX Posterior, GC); Group III: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an overlying layer of particulate filler composite; Group IV: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an underlying layer of flowable composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE). Test samples were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 24 hours at 37°C and each tooth was sectioned bucco-lingually. Staining along the tooth restoration interface was recorded and results were analysed statistically using Independent sample t-test and Tukey's post-hoc one-way ANOVA. The results showed significant difference in the dye penetration between the restorative materials in the occlusal and gingival margins (p=0.02). Short fibre reinforced composites showed a statistically significant difference in the microleakage scores when compared with the particulate filler composites (p=0.01). Short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations showed an improved marginal integrity when compared to the traditional particulate filler composite restorations.

  4. Evaluation of a metal fuselage frame selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites as a weight saving feature of the space shuttle components is discussed. A frame was selected for study that was representative of the type of construction used in the bulk frames of the orbiter vehicle. Theoretical and experimental investigations were conducted. Component tests were performed to evaluate the critical details used in the designs and to provide credibility to the weight saving results. A model frame was constructed of the reinforced metal material to provide a final evaluation of the construction under realistic load conditions.

  5. [Evaluation of biological safety of continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyolefin as hard tissue repair].

    PubMed

    Hou, Chunlin; Feng, Xue; Cen, Qingquan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Guisheng; Sun, Jiao

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the biological safety of continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyolefin as hard tissue repair material. Biocompatibility of the material was evaluated through hemolysis test, pyrogen test, skin irritation test, cytotoxicity test, ames test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and bone marrow cells Micronuclei test. No obvious hemolysis, pyrogenic characteristics, sensitivity, cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity were observed. The continuous carbon-fiber reinforced polyolefin composite material is of good biological safety. It meets all the demand made by biological safety as hard tissue repair material.

  6. Do children prefer contingencies? An evaluation of the efficacy of and preference for contingent versus noncontingent social reinforcement during play.

    PubMed

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2009-01-01

    Discovering whether children prefer reinforcement via a contingency or independent of their behavior is important considering the ubiquity of these programmed schedules of reinforcement. The current study evaluated the efficacy of and preference for social interaction within differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) and noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules with typically developing children. Results showed that 7 of the 8 children preferred the DRA schedule; 1 child was indifferent. We also demonstrated a high degree of procedural fidelity, which suggested that preference is influenced by the presence of a contingency under which reinforcement can be obtained. These findings are discussed in terms of (a) the selection of reinforcement schedules in practice, (b) variables that influence children's preferences for contexts, and (c) the selection of experimental control procedures when evaluating the effects of reinforcement.

  7. DO CHILDREN PREFER CONTINGENCIES? AN EVALUATION OF THE EFFICACY OF AND PREFERENCE FOR CONTINGENT VERSUS NONCONTINGENT SOCIAL REINFORCEMENT DURING PLAY

    PubMed Central

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2009-01-01

    Discovering whether children prefer reinforcement via a contingency or independent of their behavior is important considering the ubiquity of these programmed schedules of reinforcement. The current study evaluated the efficacy of and preference for social interaction within differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) and noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) schedules with typically developing children. Results showed that 7 of the 8 children preferred the DRA schedule; 1 child was indifferent. We also demonstrated a high degree of procedural fidelity, which suggested that preference is influenced by the presence of a contingency under which reinforcement can be obtained. These findings are discussed in terms of (a) the selection of reinforcement schedules in practice, (b) variables that influence children's preferences for contexts, and (c) the selection of experimental control procedures when evaluating the effects of reinforcement. PMID:20190915

  8. Laser resistant stainless steel endotracheal tube: experimental and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fried, M P; Mallampati, S R; Liu, F C; Kaplan, S; Caminear, D S; Samonte, B R

    1991-01-01

    A fire due to endotracheal tube (ET) ignition is a catastrophic event that may occur during laser surgery of the upper airway, regardless of the wavelength utilized. Although methods exist that permit laser surgery without an ET, this is frequently not feasible. The current investigation was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of a double-cuffed stainless steel ET, first in the laboratory and subsequently in a clinical setting. Bench testing was performed using CO2 (both standard and milliwatt) and KTP/532 lasers. Only the distal polyvinyl chloride cuffed end of the tube was potentially ignitable, however, the appropriate use of saline to fill the cuffs allowed only for cuff perforation without ignition. Canine testing was performed in 10 animals: 4 dogs were intubated from 3 to 4.5 hours with the laser resistant stainless steel endotracheal tube (LRSS-ET) (Laser-Flex Tracheal Tube; Mallinckrodt Anesthesia Products, St. Louis, MO) and 2 with an aluminum tape wrapped red rubber ET. Visual and histological examination were performed in both groups at 3 and 7 days. Four dogs underwent CO2 laser laryngeal surgery with visual and histological examination performed at 7 days postoperatively. No untoward effects could be demonstrated due to the LRSS-ET. A clinical study was then performed in 24 patients who underwent laser surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract with either a CO2 or KTP/532 laser. In all cases ventilation was adequate, the shaft of the LRSS-ET proved impervious to the laser, and the distal end of the tube protected the tracheobronchial tree safely.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The effect of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, strain sensitivity and crack sensitivity of steel fiber reinforced smart cement composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teomete, Egemen

    2016-07-01

    Earthquakes, material degradations and other environmental factors necessitate structural health monitoring (SHM). Metal foil strain gages used for SHM have low durability and low sensitivity. These factors motivated researchers to work on cement based strain sensors. In this study, the effects of temperature and moisture on electrical resistance, compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivity) and crack sensitivity were determined for steel fiber reinforced cement based composite. A rapid increase of electrical resistance at 200 °C was observed due to damage occurring between cement paste, aggregates and steel fibers. The moisture—electrical resistance relationship was investigated. The specimens taken out of the cure were saturated with water and had a moisture content of 9.49%. The minimum electrical resistance was obtained at 9% moisture at which fiber-fiber and fiber-matrix contact was maximum and the water in micro voids was acting as an electrolyte, conducting electrons. The variation of compressive and tensile strain gage factors (strain sensitivities) and crack sensitivity were investigated by conducting compression, split tensile and notched bending tests with different moisture contents. The highest gage factor for the compression test was obtained at optimal moisture content, at which electrical resistance was minimum. The tensile strain gage factor for split tensile test and crack sensitivity increased by decreasing moisture content. The mechanisms between moisture content, electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivity were elucidated. The relations of moisture content with electrical resistance, gage factors and crack sensitivities have been presented for the first time in this study for steel fiber reinforced cement based composites. The results are important for the development of self sensing cement based smart materials.

  10. An in vitro comparative evaluation of fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth.

    PubMed

    Sonkesriya, Subhash; Olekar, Santosh T; Saravanan, V; Somasunderam, P; Chauhan, Rashmi Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap

    2015-05-01

    Posts are used to enhance crown buildup in pulpless teeth with destructed crown portion. Different types of post are used in endodontically treated teeth. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth. An in vitro study was carried out on extracted 40 human maxillary central incisor teeth, which was divided into four groups with 10 samples in each group with custom made, metal post, glass fiber reinforced, and carbon reinforced posts. The samples were decoronated at cemento-enamel junction and endodontically treated. Post space was prepared and selected posts were cemented. The composite cores were prepared at the height of 5 mm and samples mounted on acrylic blocks. Later fracture resistance to the compressive force of samples was measured using Universal Testing Machine. The maximum resistance to the compressive force was observed in carbon reinforced and glass fiber reinforced posts compared others which is statistically significant (P > 0.001) and least was seen in custom fabricated post. It is concluded that carbon reinforced fiber post and glass fiber posts showed good fracture resistance compared to custom made and metal posts.

  11. An In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Custom Made, Metal, Glass Fiber Reinforced and Carbon Reinforced Posts in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Sonkesriya, Subhash; Olekar, Santosh T; Saravanan, V; Somasunderam, P; Chauhan, Rashmi Singh; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posts are used to enhance crown buildup in pulpless teeth with destructed crown portion. Different types of post are used in endodontically treated teeth. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate fracture resistance of custom made, metal, glass fiber reinforced and carbon reinforced posts in endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: An in vitro study was carried out on extracted 40 human maxillary central incisor teeth, which was divided into four groups with 10 samples in each group with custom made, metal post, glass fiber reinforced, and carbon reinforced posts. The samples were decoronated at cemento-enamel junction and endodontically treated. Post space was prepared and selected posts were cemented. The composite cores were prepared at the height of 5 mm and samples mounted on acrylic blocks. Later fracture resistance to the compressive force of samples was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Results: The maximum resistance to the compressive force was observed in carbon reinforced and glass fiber reinforced posts compared others which is statistically significant (P > 0.001) and least was seen in custom fabricated post. Conclusion: It is concluded that carbon reinforced fiber post and glass fiber posts showed good fracture resistance compared to custom made and metal posts. PMID:26028904

  12. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique.

  13. Evaluation and control of environmental corrosion for aluminum and steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion protection systems for aerospace application and the effects of surface treatments and methods of controlling stress corrosion are evaluated. Chromate pigmented systems were found to be most effective for aluminum alloys; zinc-rich coatings gave the greatest protection to steel alloys. Various steel and aluminum alloys are rated for stress corrosion resistance.

  14. Electrochemical Evaluation of Stainless Steels in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; MacDowell, L. G.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation in which several 300-series stainless steels (SS): AISI S30403 SS (UNS S30403), AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603), and AISI 317L SS (LINS S31703), as well as highly-alloyed: SS 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C (UNS S44735), were evaluated using DC electrochemical techniques in three different electrolyte solutions. The solutions consisted of neutral 3.55% NaCl, 3.55% NaCl in 0.1N HCl, and 3.55% NaCl in 1.0N HCl. These solutions were chosen to simulate environments that are less, similar, and more aggressive, respectively, than the conditions at the Space Shuttle launch pads. The electrochemical test results were compared to atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the subject alloys. The electrochemical measurements for the six alloys indicated that the higher-alloyed SS 254-SMO, AL29-4C, and AL-6XN exhibited significantly higher resistance to localized corrosion than the 300-series SS. There was a correlation between the corrosion performance of the alloys during a two-year atmospheric exposure and the corrosion rates calculated from electrochemical (polarization resistance) measurements.

  15. Evaluation of the Rate of Problem Behavior Maintained by Different Reinforcers across Preference Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Soyeon; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Fragale, Christina L.; Aguilar, Jeannie M.; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem…

  16. An Evaluation of Simultaneous Presentation and Differential Reinforcement with Response Cost to Reduce Packing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Scott D.; Newchok, Debra K.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of multiple treatment procedures, including simultaneous presentation of preferred foods, on the packing behavior of a 9-year-old girl with autism. A reversal design was used to assess the effects of differential reinforcement with response cost alone and with simultaneous presentation. In addition, simultaneous…

  17. Influencing Preschoolers' Free-Play Activity Preferences: An Evaluation of Satiation and Embedded Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanley, Gregory P.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.; Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Cammilleri, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of classwide satiation and embedded reinforcement procedures on preschoolers' activity preferences during scheduled free-play periods. The goal of the study was to increase time allocation to originally nonpreferred, but important, activities (instructional zone, library, and science) while continuing to…

  18. The Role of Context in the Evaluation of Reinforcer Efficacy: Implications for the Preference Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, Aphrodite; Fredrick, Laura; Pabico, Robert; Roane, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Highly preferred stimuli were identified via two preference assessments (based on Fisher et al., 1992), the second of which included stimuli that were ranked low in the initial preference assessment. Following the preference assessments, a subset of stimuli was evaluated as reinforcers in single- and concurrent-operant arrangements. In general,…

  19. Methods for evaluating tensile and compressive properties of plastic laminates reinforced with unwoven glass fibers

    Treesearch

    Karl Romstad

    1964-01-01

    Methods of obtaining strength and elastic properties of plastic laminates reinforced with unwoven glass fibers were evaluated using the criteria of the strength values obtained and the failure characteristics observed. Variables investigated were specimen configuration and the manner of supporting and loading the specimens. Results of this investigation indicate that...

  20. Studies on Geometries for Inducing Homogeneous Magnetic Fields in the Application of Real Time Imaging of Steel Reinforcing Bars Embedded Within Pre-Stressed and Reinforced Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Quek, S.; Benitez, D.; Gaydecki, P.; Torres, V.

    2006-03-06

    This paper addresses fundamental issues associated with the development of a real time inductive scanning system for non-destructive testing of pre-stressed and reinforced concrete. Simulated results has indicated that given a coil dimension of 300mmx300mmx2.5mm, 10mm rebars can be imaged down to a depth of 100 mm. Studies also indicate that the vertical component of the induced magnetic field is most favourable as it can be readily reconstructed to yield geometry and dimensional information pertaining to the rebar structure.

  1. Strength Evaluation and Failure Prediction of Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Nylon Spur Gears by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhong; Hossan, Mohammad Robiul

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, short carbon fiber reinforced nylon spur gear pairs, and steel and unreinforced nylon spur gear pairs have been selected for study and comparison. A 3D finite element model was developed to simulate the multi-axial stress-strain behaviors of the gear tooth. Failure prediction has been conducted based on the different failure criteria, including Tsai-Wu criterion. The tooth roots, where has stress concentration and the potential for failure, have been carefully investigated. The modeling results show that the short carbon fiber reinforced nylon gear fabricated by properly controlled injection molding processes can provide higher strength and better performance.

  2. Evaluation of Mand-Reinforcer Relations Following Long-Term Functional Communication Training

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, David P.; Harding, Jay W.; Berg, Wendy K.

    2008-01-01

    The investigators evaluated the relation between mands and positive reinforcement in the form of parent attention following long-term in-home treatment with functional communication training (FCT) for destructive behavior. Participants were 3 five-year-old children (2 boys, 1 girl) with developmental disabilities who manded to obtain different levels of parent attention (Phase 1). To determine whether the children's rate of manding would vary based on the amount of reinforcement received, the investigators adjusted the duration of parent attention (12 s vs. 30 s) provided to each child for manding on an FR1 schedule (Phase 2) using a reversal design. All 3 children changed their rates of manding so that each child maintained consistent levels of reinforcement across Phase 2 conditions. PMID:19043601

  3. An expert system for the evaluation of reinforced concrete structure durability

    SciTech Connect

    Berra, M.; Bertolini, L.; Briglia, M.C.; Lazzari, L.; Pastore, T.

    1999-11-01

    A user-friendly expert system has been developed to evaluate primarily the durability of reinforced concrete structures, either in the design phase or during service life related to reinforcement corrosion. Besides the durability module, the ES has been provided with three other expert modules in order to support the user during the following activities: inspections, corrosion diagnosis and repair strategy (of concrete and reinforcement). Corrosion induced by carbonation and chlorides penetration and caused by concrete degradation such as sulfate attack, freeze/thaw cycles, alkali silica reaction are considered. The knowledge used for the expert system is based both on open literature and international standards as well as on specific experiences and proprietary databases. The paper describes main features of the system, including the modeling of the knowledge, input data, the algorithms, the rules and the outputs for each module.

  4. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Workman, Gary; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography inspection is an optic based technology that can reduce the time and cost required to inspect propellant tanks or aero structures fabricated from composite materials. Usually areas identified as suspect in the thermography inspection are examined with ultrasonic methods to better define depth, orientation and the nature of the anomaly. This combination of nondestructive evaluation techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of precipitation-hardening stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1970-01-01

    Accelerated test program results show which precipitation hardening stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. In certain cases stress corrosion susceptibility was found to be associated with the process procedure.

  6. Experimental investigations on steel-concrete composite columns for varying parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparna, V.; Vivek, D.; Neelima, Kancharla; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the experimental investigations on steel tubes filled with different types of concrete are presented. Steel tubes filled with fibre reinforced concrete using lathe waste and steel tube with concerned confined with steel mesh were investigated. The combinations were compared with steel tubes with conventional concrete. A total of 4 concrete filled steel tube (CFST) combinations were made with tubes of diameter 100 mm with wall thickness 1.6 mm and a height of 300 mm. Axial compression test to examine the resisting capacity of the columns and push-out test for noting the bond strength were performed. Coupon tests were also conducted to determine the mechanical properties of steel. The structural behaviour of the composite columns was evaluated from on the test results. It was observed that steel tube filled fibre reinforced possessed better bond strength and resistance to axial load.

  7. Corrosion Evaluation of Carbon Steels Using Nondestructive Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Kyung; Lee, Sang Pill; Lee, Moon Hee; Lee, Joon Hyun; Park, Jun Young

    Primary water stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) in the piping used at the nuclear power plant has been one of the major issues for the safety of plant. The major objective in this paper is to clarify the corrosion degree and damage by the PWSCC using nondestructive technique. The instrument of the tube typed reactor with the internal conditions of the temperature of 473K under pressure of 10 MPa was designed for corrosion of the material. The tensile specimens of the same material with the reactor were corroded in the reactor for evaluation of mechanical properties according to the corrosion. The corrosion of the specimen was maintained over one year, and an acoustic emission technique was applied to inspect the corrosion damage of the specimen periodically. A tensile test was performed for the corroded specimen, and then the elastic waves caused the deformation of the corroded specimen were analyzed. With the increase of the corrosion time the elastic waves generated in the specimen due to the tensile load showed a little difference, and these differences of the waves work as a cause of the change of acoustic emission (AE) parameters. The number of AE events at the beginning of the load increased with the corrosion time. AE parameters of amplitude and energy decreased as the corrosion times increased, while the level of duration time and count were increased with the corrosion periods. The velocity and attenuation of the elastic wave were also analyzed for the specimen, and these factors showed a close relation with the corrosion times. In addition, SEM and XRD analysis were performed to evaluate the damage behavior of the carbon steel due to corrosion.

  8. Influence of fiber interconnections on the thermomechanical behavior of metal matrix composites consisting of Zn-Al alloy reinforced with steel fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, L.; Delannay, F.

    1998-11-20

    Interconnected fiber networks presenting transverse isotropic symmetry with variable fiber interconnectivity were prepared by sintering assemblies of low carbon steel fibers. The strength and stiffness of these fiber preforms was found to increase very much when increasing sintering temperature or sintering time. Squeeze cast composites were prepared by infiltrating these preforms with alloy ZA8. Creep tests and tensile tests were carried out at 150 C. Both the creep strength and the back-flow strains at unloading drastically increase with increasing preform sintering temperature or time. Also thermal expansion is much affected by fiber interconnectivity. Especially, during cooling, the matrix dilatation strains brought about by thermal mismatches increase with increasing fiber interconnectivity. These results demonstrate that plastic and viscoplastic behaviors of network reinforced composites depend on the mechanical properties of the network as a whole.

  9. Efficient Nondestructive Evaluation of Prototype Carbon Fiber Reinforced Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermography and shearography methods of inspection rely on optic based technologies and can reduce the time and cost required to inspect composite tanks or aerostructures. Usually areas identified as suspect in the initial inspection results are reexamined with ultrasonic methods. This combination of techniques results in a rapid and comprehensive inspection of composite structures. Development of useful defect standards will be discussed. Examples of application of this inspection philosophy to prototype, GSE, and flight hardware will be presented. Methods organizing the inspection and evaluating the results will be considered.

  10. Evaluation of the Steel Creek ecosystem in relation to the proposed restart of L reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.; Sharitz, R.R.; Gladden, J.B.

    1981-10-01

    Information is presented on the following subjects: habitat and vegetation, the avifauna, semi-aquatic and terrestrial vertebrates, and aquatic communities of Steel Creek, species of special concern, and radiocesium in Steel Creek. Two main goals of the study were the compilation of a current inventory of the flora and fauna of the Steel Creek ecosystem and an assessment of the probable impacts of radionuclides, primarily /sup 137/Cs, that were released into Steel Creek during earlier reactor operations. Although a thorough evaluation of the impacts of the L reactor restart is impossible at this time, it is concluded that the effects on the Steel Creek ecosystem will be substantial if no mitigative measures are taken. (JGB)

  11. The experimental evaluation of FBG sensors for strain measurement of prestressed steel strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Xi, Jiangtao; Chicharo, Joe F.; Liu, Tiegen; Li, Xin; Jiang, Junfeng; Li, Lina; Wang, Yunxin; Zhang, Yimo

    2005-02-01

    Multi-wire steel strands have been widely used in various prestressed concrete structures. In this study, experimental evaluation of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors for strain measurements in a seven-wire prestressed steel strand has been carried out. An installation technique of FBG sensors has been developed to fulfill the special requirements of the prestressed steel strand. The experiment results show that fiber Bragg gratings can represent the overall stress of the prestressed steel strand without being affected by the specific structure of the strand when it is only fixed on one wire. It is also demonstrated that the maximum strain that the FBG sensor can measure is 6260 μɛ, while the prestressed steel strand usually endures the strain greater than 10000 μɛ. This means that an offset of about 4000 μɛ is necessary to measure the maximum strain that the strand could experience in its applications.

  12. 77 FR 18973 - Reinforced Concrete in Construction, and Preventing Backover Injuries and Fatalities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... the literature on the rates of incidents caused by reinforcing steel and post-tensioning activities... reinforcing steel), requires fall protection for workers exposed to heights over six feet when working on reinforcing steel. D. Standards From Other Jurisdictions In its research on reinforced steel and...

  13. Mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahlami, C. S.; Pan, X.

    2017-07-01

    Austenitic manganese steel has a high toughness, high ductility, high strain hardening capacity and excellent wear resistance, the material is mostly used in the mining industry for crushing and loading equipment. High manganese steel shows superior wear resistance when used under primary crushing system than when used under secondary and tertiary modes of crushing. This work presents the effect of vanadium content on the mechanical properties and microstructure evaluation of high manganese steel. The addition of vanadium to high manganese steels has a direct increase on the hardness and wear resistance. Impact testing for alloys containing vanadium showed low impact energies compared to the standard manganese steel. The increase in hardness and the wear resistance of the alloys was explained based on the vanadium carbide which had formed on the austenitic matrix. It was observed that the carbon and vanadium content will influence the mechanical properties of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium. Microstructural examination showed that the size and distribution of vanadium carbidesinfluences the mechanical properties and the wear behaviour. Therefore, this work showsthat the addition of vanadium to high manganese steel will increase the hardness and wear resistance while decreasing the impact energy of high manganese steel alloyed with vanadium.

  14. In situ measurement of Cl- concentrations and pH at the reinforcing steel/concrete interface by combination sensors.

    PubMed

    Du, Rong-Gui; Hu, Rong-Gang; Huang, Ruo-Shuang; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents an in situ, nondestructive method of monitoring Cl- concentrations and pH values at the steel/concrete interface. The Ag/AgCl electrodes prepared by the electrochemical anodization and the Ir/IrO2 electrodes prepared by thermal oxidation in carbonate served as Cl- concentration and pH sensors, respectively. The potentiometric response of the Ag/AgCl electrode to the logarithm of Cl- concentrations ranging from 1 x 10(-4) to 2 M in saturated Ca(OH)2 solution simulating the inner electrolytic medium of concrete shows good linearity. The Ir/IrO2 electrode also exhibits an ideal Nernstian response in the range of pH 1-14. The Ag/AgCl and Ir/IrO2 electrodes were combined into a multiplex Cl-/pH sensor, and the sensor was embedded in concrete close to the steel/concrete interface to realize an in situ and long-term measurement of Cl- concentrations and pH values. The results indicate that the combined sensor is robust and sensitive enough to in situ measure Cl- concentrations and pH quantitatively at the steel/concrete interface, which is of indispensable importance to the study of corrosion and protection of the steel in concrete.

  15. Clinical evaluation of bond failures and survival between mandibular canine-to-canine retainers made of flexible spiral wire and fiber-reinforced composite

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria F.; Fraticelli, Danilo; Castellazzi, Linda; Gandini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the clinical reliability of two different types of postorthodontic treatment retainers: a silanised-treated glass fibers-reinforced resin composite (FRC) and a directly bonded multistranded stainless steel wire. The hypothesis of the study was to assess if significant differences are present between failure rates of the two retainers. Study Design: This prospective study was based on an assessment of 87 patients (35 men and 52 women),with an average age of 24 years who required a lower arch fixed retainer after orthodontic treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Assignment was carried out with random tables. A follow-up examination was carried out once a month. The number, cause, and date of single bond adhesive failures were recorded for both retainers over 12 months. Teeth that were rebonded after failure were not included in the success analysis. Statistical analysis was performed by means of a Fisher’s exact test, Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, and log rank test. Results: Bond failure rate was significantly higher (P=0.0392) for multistranded metallic wire than for FRC. Conclusions: Glass fiber-reinforced resin composite retainers and multistranded metallic wires showed no significant difference in single bond failure rates over a one-year follow up. Key words:Fiber reinforced composite, fixed retention, multistranded wire, orthodontics, retainer, splint. PMID:24790714

  16. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-09-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  17. Mechanical characterization of a short fiber-reinforced polymer at room temperature: experimental setups evaluated by an optical measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhrig, C.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2017-02-01

    Composite materials are of great interest for industrial applications because of their outstanding properties. Each composite material has its own characteristics due to the large number of possible combinations of matrix and filler. As a result of their compounding, composites usually show a complex material behavior. This work is focused on the experimental testing of a short fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composite at room temperature. The characteristic behavior of this material class is often based on a superposition of typical material effects. The predicted characteristic material properties such as elasto-plasticity, damage and anisotropy of the investigated material are obtained from results of cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at constant strain rate. Concerning the manufacturing process as well as industrial applications, the experimental investigations are extended to multiaxial loading situations. Therefore, the composite material is examined with a setup close to a deep-drawing process, the Nakajima test (Nakazima et al. in Study on the formability of steel sheets. Yawate Technical Report No. 264, pp 8517-8530, 1968). The evaluation of the experimental investigations is provided by an optical analysis system using a digital image correlation software. Finally, based on the results of the uniaxial tensile tests, a one-dimensional macroscopic model is introduced and first results of the simulation are provided.

  18. Crack Propagation Resistance of α-Al2O3 Reinforced Pulsed Laser-Deposited Hydroxyapatite Coating on 316 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajpai, Shubhra; Gupta, Ankur; Pradhan, Siddhartha Kumar; Mandal, Tapendu; Balani, Kantesh

    2014-09-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a widely used bioceramic known for its chemical similarity with that of bone and teeth (Ca/P ratio of 1.67). But, owing to its extreme brittleness, α-Al2O3 is reinforced with HA and processed as a coating via pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Reinforcement of α-Al2O3 (50 wt.%) in HA via PLD on 316L steel substrate has shown modulus increase by 4% and hardness increase by 78%, and an improved adhesion strength of 14.2 N (improvement by 118%). Micro-scratching has shown an increase in the coefficient-of-friction from 0.05 (pure HA) to 0.17 (with 50 wt.% Al2O3) with enhancement in the crack propagation resistance (CPR) up to 4.5 times. Strong adherence of PLD HA-Al2O3 coatings (~4.5 times than that of HA coating) is attributed to efficient release of stored tensile strain energy (~17 × 10-3 J/m2) in HA-Al2O3 composites, making it a potential damage-tolerant bone-replacement surface coating.

  19. A Methodology to Assess the Degradation in the Structural Response of the Deck of a Reinforced Concrete Road Bridge due to Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Soumendra; Sengupta, Amlan K.

    2012-02-01

    The present paper provides a methodology to analyse the effect of corrosion on the strength and stiffness of the slab-and-girder deck of a road bridge. A linear finite element model of a typical medium span deck of an existing bridge was developed as per the as-built drawings. The vehicular loadings were as per the recommendations of the Indian Roads Congress specifications and the design rating of the bridge. Based on the phenomenon of corrosion, a time-dependent reduction in the area of flexural reinforcement near the soffits of the girders, was considered in the model. The effects of flexural cracking, creep and spalling of concrete were incorporated in the model with non-prismatic section properties and their stage-wise variations. From the analyses of a girder section and the computational model, it was observed that due to corrosion, the allowable moment capacity of a girder falls below the demand under dead load plus the rated live load, within the target service life of the bridge. However, the effect of corrosion on the stiffness of the deck is not substantial to be accurately measured by a conventional sensor. It is recommended that the procedure adopted in the paper can be used by the practicing professionals for numerically assessing longer span decks, to have a'priori estimates of the quantities that can be measured in a field test.

  20. Evaluation of the wear properties of high interstitial stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, J.H.; Rawers, J.C.; Alman, D.E.

    2007-04-01

    Adding carbon to high nitrogen steels increases interstitial concentrations over what can be obtained with nitrogen addition alone. This can results in an increase in hardness, strength, and wear resistance. The alloys produced for this study were all based on commercially available high-nitrogen Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steel. This study is the first significant wear study of these new high interstitial nitrogen-carbon stainless steel alloys. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk abrasion, dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion, impeller impact, and jet erosion. Increasing interstitial concentration increased strength and hardness and improved wear resistance under all test conditions. The results are discussed in terms of overall interstitial alloy concentration.

  1. Evaluation of a Shape Memory Alloy Reinforced Annuloplasty Band for Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Purser, Molly F.; Richards, Andrew L.; Cook, Richard C.; Osborne, Jason A.; Cormier, Denis R.; Buckner, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An in vitro study using explanted porcine hearts was conducted to evaluate a novel annuloplasty band, reinforced with a two-phase, shape memory alloy, designed specifically for minimally invasive mitral valve repair. Description In its rigid (austenitic) phase, this band provides the same mechanical properties as the commercial semi-rigid bands. In its compliant (martensitic) phase, this band is flexible enough to be introduced through an 8-mm trocar and is easily manipulated within the heart. Evaluation In its rigid phase, the prototype band displayed similar mechanical properties to commercially available semi-rigid rings. Dynamic flow testing demonstrated no statistical differences in the reduction of mitral valve regurgitation. In its flexible phase, the band was easily deployed through an 8-mm trocar, robotically manipulated and sutured into place. Conclusions Experimental results suggest that the shape memory alloy reinforced band could be a viable alternative to flexible and semi-rigid bands in minimally invasive mitral valve repair. PMID:19766827

  2. Local hardening evaluation of carbon steels by using frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Yuji; Kudo, Yuki; Enokizono, Masato

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents our proposed frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method (FSES method) by a magnetic sensor for non-destructive testing of hardened low carbon steels. This method can evaluate the magnetic properties of low carbon steels which were changed after induction heating treatment. It was examined by our proposed method that the degrees of yield strength of low carbon steels were varied depending on hardened conditions. Moreover, it was made clear that the maximum magnetic field strength, Hmax, derived from the measured B-H loops was very sensitive to the hardening if the surface of the samples were flat.

  3. Evaluation of metal landing gear door assembly selectively reinforced with filamentary composite for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, S. J.; Freeman, V. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development and evaluation of a main landing gear door for space shuttle applications are discussed. The door is constructed on composite materials using a rib-stiffened titanium panel selectively reinforced with boron/epoxy composite. A weight comparison between the hybrid design and the all-titanium baseline design showed a weight saving of approximately fifteen percent. Detailed descriptions of the door structure and method of manufacture are presented.

  4. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  5. Electrochemical characterization of the steel wire used as reinforcement in the conductors transmission networks electricity nitride by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Maldonado, J. J.; Dulcé Moreno, H. J.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    The power company feature infrastructure, which are generally shaped so the transmission and distribution lines, here is why it is necessary to characterize the process of electrochemical corrosion of these components. In this case the steel wire coated with zinc or aluminium, as it is undergoes the rigor of corrosive environments. Given the geographical diversity and different climatic environments, atmospheric corrosion carried affecting service life of structures. For example in very humid environments such as coasts and high altitudes, wetting time (TOW), parameter that meets the conditions of temperature and relative humidity, it affects large proportion, accelerating the corrosion of ferrous materials. Given the importance of establishing mechanisms that lessen the impact on degradation in transmission and distribution lines of both the reliability and the availability of the same. This paper presents the implementation in nitride steels as an alternative or complement to zinc coating.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in low-carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the preferred orientation on the temperature dependence of ultrasonic velocity in low carbon steels are investigated. The sensitivity of the acousto-elastic constant to changes in microstructure is assessed as well as the possibility of determining some mechanical properties of a material by measuring the acousto-elastic constant.

  7. An Experimental Study on the Shear Hysteresis and Energy Dissipation of the Steel Frame with a Trapezoidal-Corrugated Steel Plate

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Sudeok; Yoo, Mina; Lee, Seungjae

    2017-01-01

    The steel frame reinforced with steel shear wall is a lateral load resisting system and has higher strength and shear performance than the concrete shear wall system. Especially, using corrugated steel plates in these shear wall systems improves out-of-plane stiffness and flexibility in the deformation along the corrugation. In this paper, a cyclic loading test of this steel frame reinforced with trapezoidal-corrugated steel plate was performed to evaluate the structural performance. The hysteresis behavior and the energy dissipation capacity of the steel frame were also compared according to the corrugated direction of the plate. For the test, one simple frame model without the wall and two frame models reinforced with the plate are considered and designed. The test results showed that the model reinforced with the corrugated steel plate had a greater accumulated energy dissipation capacity than the experimental result of the non-reinforced model. Furthermore, the energy dissipation curves of two reinforced frame models, which have different corrugated directions, produced similar results. PMID:28772624

  8. Further evaluations of functional communication training and chained schedules of reinforcement to treat multiple functions of challenging behavior.

    PubMed

    Falcomata, Terry S; Muething, Colin S; Gainey, Summer; Hoffman, Katherine; Fragale, Christina

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated functional communication training (FCT) combined with a chained schedule of reinforcement procedure for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism. Following functional analyses that suggested that challenging behavior served multiple functions for both participants, we implemented FCT in which mands for a discriminative stimulus (S(D); wristband) were reinforced with access to the S(D) and all three functional reinforcers. Next, we modified the procedure by incorporating delays to increase ease of implementation and promote toleration of delays to reinforcement. Last, we made additional modifications to the procedure by incorporating a chained schedule of reinforcement such that (a) mands for the wristband were reinforced with access to the wristband and (b) specific mands for respective functional reinforcers were reinforced in the presence of the wristband. The results showed that the procedure successfully treated challenging behavior with multiple functions. Future directions in the evaluation and development of treatments that simultaneously address multiple functions are discussed.

  9. Study on evaluation of corrosion condition of reinforcing bar embedded concrete using infrared thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiko, Watanabe; Toshiaki, Mizobuchi

    2017-04-01

    Rapid aging of many concrete structures, which have been developed during rapid economic growth period in Japan, has become a serious problem for us these days. And thus, there is an urgent need to prolong their service life expectancies. For this purpose, the deterioration of reinforcing bars in the concrete structures should be detected quickly and correctly at the early stages. Nevertheless, conventional testing methods such as destructive and nondestructive testing have disadvantages: partial damages on concrete structures; difficulty with quantitative evaluation, etc. Many preceding studies have examined to estimate the deterioration of reinforcing bars based on the temperature of the concrete specimen surfaces. According to those papers, the differences in corrosion degree of reinforcing bars have a certain effect on the temperature of concrete specimen surfaces. In this study, firstly, the quantitative evaluation of the corrosion degree was conducted with 3D scanner which could measure the volume, coverage area and cross-sectional area. Secondly, the surface of the concrete specimen was cooled down with liquid nitrogen, and thirdly, thermographic change was observed up until the air temperature. Finally, the surface of the concrete specimen was detected clearly by the thermal images. As a result, this study shows that the corrosion thickness tends to get bigger, following the uprising temperature of the concrete specimen surfaces. The same kind of tendency can be observed by the thermal images, too.

  10. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  11. Evaluation of in-situ deformation experiments of TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, J.; Kučerová, L.; Bystrianský, M.

    2017-02-01

    The paper reports on the behaviour of low alloyed TRIP (transformation induced plasticity) steel with Niobium during tensile test. The structures were analysed using in-situ tensile testing coupled with electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis carried out in scanning electron microscope (SEM). Steel specimens were of same chemical composition; however three different annealing temperatures, 800 °C, 850 °C and 950 °C, were applied to the material during the heat treatment. The treatment consisted of annealing for 20 minutes in the furnace; cooling in salt bath after the heating and holding at 425 °C for 20 minutes for all the samples. Untreated bar was used as reference material. Flat samples for deformation stage were cut out of the heat-treated bars. In situ documentation of microstructure and crystallography development were carried out during the deformation experiments. High deformation lead to significant degradation of EBSD signal.

  12. Evaluation of steel corrosion products in tropical climates

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, A.; Rincon, O.T. de; Haces, C.; Furet, N.R.; Corvo, F.

    1997-11-01

    Phase variations occurring in corrosion products obtained in steels exposed to different zones of tropical climate in Cuba and Venezuela were determined to establish their relationship to corrosion phenomena. Steel corrosion products were obtained at four test stations in both countries with marine, industrial, and rural characteristics. Phase composition was determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the rural climate of both countries, the predominant phase was lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), which was in agreement with reported corrosion rates. In the marine environments, corrosion products varied in composition. In Adicora, Venezuela, akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH) was found, but in Cuba, this phase was nonexistent. Results were discussed in light of the contamination present and meteorological parameters recorded in the test zones.

  13. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  14. Evaluation of Thrust force in Drilling Woven roving Glass fibre reinforced Aluminium Sandwich laminates with TiAlN coated drill using Taguchi analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya Devi, G.; Palanikumar, K.

    2017-05-01

    TiAlN is a high-performance coating which outshines in coarse and hard-to-machine materials like cast iron, aluminium alloys, tool steels, and nickel alloys. This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of thrust force and Torque in drilling of Woven roving Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic and Aluminium sandwich laminate. The Prediction is based on Taguchi method. The experimental results specify that the feed rate and the drill diameter are the most significant factors affecting the thrust force, while the feed rate and spindle speed contribute the most to the surface roughness. In this study, the objective was to establish a correlation between the feed rate, spindle speed and drill diameter with the induced thrust force and Torque in drilling sandwich laminate.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  16. Evaluation of silver-coated stainless steel bipolar plates for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ing-Bang

    In this study, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology were applied to develop and produce stainless steel bipolar plates for DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell). Effect of surface modification on the cell performance of DMFC was investigated. Surface modifications of the stainless steel bipolar plates were made by the electroless plating method. A DMFC consisting of silver coated stainless steel as anode and uncoated stainless steel as cathode was assembled and evaluated. The methanol crossover rate (R c) of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) was decreased by about 52.8%, the efficiency (E f) of DMFC increased about 7.1% and amounts of methanol electro-oxidation at the cathode side (M co) were decreased by about 28.6%, as compared to uncoated anode polar plates. These measurements were determined by the transient current and mathematical analysis.

  17. Evaluation of steel slag coarse aggregate in hot mix asphalt concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmedzade, Perviz; Sengoz, Burak

    2009-06-15

    This paper presents the influences of the utilization of steel slag as a coarse aggregate on the properties of hot mix asphalt. Four different asphalt mixtures containing two types of asphalt cement (AC-5; AC-10) and coarse aggregate (limestone; steel slag) were used to prepare Marshall specimens and to determine optimum bitumen content. Mechanical characteristics of all mixtures were evaluated by Marshall stability, indirect tensile stiffness modulus, creep stiffness, and indirect tensile strength tests. The electrical sensitivity of the specimens were also investigated in accordance with ASTM D257-91. It was observed that steel slag used as a coarse aggregate improved the mechanical properties of asphalt mixtures. Moreover, volume resistivity values demonstrated that the electrical conductivity of steel slag mixtures were better than that of limestone mixtures.

  18. Clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite crowns in pulp-treated primary molars: 12-month results

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Zahra; Parisay, Iman; Mehrabkhani, Maryam; Madani, Azam Sadat; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of tooth-colored fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) crowns in pulp-treated second primary mandibular teeth. Materials and Methods: This split-mouth randomized, clinical trial performed on 67 children between 3 and 6 years with two primary mandibular second molars requiring pulp treatment. After pulp therapy, the teeth were randomly assigned to stainless steel crown (SSC) or FRC crown groups. Modified United States Public Health Service criteria were used to evaluate marginal integrity, marginal discoloration, and secondary caries in FRC crowns at intervals of 3, 6, and 12 months. Retention rate and gingival health were also compared between the two groups. The data were analyzed using Friedman, Cochran, and McNemar's tests at a significance level of 0.05. Results: Intact marginal integrity in FRC crowns at 3, 6, and 12 months were 93.2%, 94.8%, and 94.2%, respectively. Marginal discoloration and secondary caries were not found at any of the FRC crowns. The retention rates of the FRC crowns were 100%, 98.3%, and 89.7% at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively, whereas all the SSCs were found to be present and intact after 12 months (P = 0.016). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in gingival health. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it seems that when esthetics is a concern, in cooperative patients with good oral hygiene, FRC crowns can be considered as a valuable procedure. PMID:28042269

  19. Non-vacuum sintering process of WC/W2C reinforced Ni-based coating on steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Yezhe; Sun, Yufu; Yang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Ni-based composite coatings containing varied contents of tungsten carbides on low carbon steel were fabricated. Effects of sintering temperature and tungsten carbides contents on the surface, interface, microstructure and wear resistance of the coatings were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Vickers microhardness tester, bulk hardness tester and pin-on-disc tribometer. The results indicated that with appropriate sintering temperature (1230 °C), smooth coating surfaces can be achieved. Favorable interfaces about 200 μm can be got that both the chemical composition and property of the interfacial region showed gradual transitions from the substrates to the coatings. Microstructure of the coatings consists of tungsten carbides and M7C3/M23C6 in the matrix. With excessive sintering temperature, tungsten carbides tend to dissolve. Ni-based coatings containing tungsten carbides showed much higher level of bulk hardness and wear resistance than ISO Fe360A and ASTM 1566 steels. With increasing contents of tungsten carbides from 25% to 40%, bulk hardness of Ni-based coatings gradually increased. Ni-based coating with 35% tungsten carbides performed the best wear resistance.

  20. COMMERCIAL SUPERSONIC TRANSPORT PROGRAM. PHASE II-C REPORT. HIGH STRENGTH STEEL EVALUATION FOR SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    following types of tests: tensile, precracked charpy impact , plane strain fracture toughness, stress corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility...heats of 300M were evaluated to provide high strength steel alloy selection data for heavy section aircraft components. The evaluation included the

  1. Evaluating the influence of residual stresses on the magnetic properties of electrical steel

    SciTech Connect

    Korzunin, G.S.; Chistyakov, V.K.

    1995-04-01

    The method described for evaluating the influence of residual stresses on the magnetic properties of coiled cold-rolled electrical steel consists in measuring the ratio of the magnetic characteristics that are and are not sensitive to the effect of residual stresses. The evaluation is made from the value of the ratio, using the correlations between its value and the magnetic characteristics studied.

  2. In vitro evaluation of carbon-nanotube-reinforced bioprintable vascular conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M.; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-04-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication.

  3. In Vitro Evaluation of Carbon-Nanotube-Reinforced Bioprintable Vascular Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Farzaneh; Yu, Yin; Zhang, Yahui; De Jesus, Aribet M; Sander, Edward A.; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T.

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of thick engineered tissue and organ constructs like the heart, liver, pancreas or kidney remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Vascularization is needed to supply oxygen and nutrients and remove waste in living tissues and organs through a network that should possess high perfusion ability and significant mechanical strength and elasticity. In this paper, we introduce a fabrication process to print vascular conduits directly, where conduits were reinforced with carbon-nanotubes (CNTs) to enhance their mechanical properties and bioprintability. In vitro evaluation of printed conduits encapsulated in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) was performed to characterize the effects of CNT reinforcement on the mechanical, perfusion and biological performance of the conduits. Perfusion and permeability, cell viability, extracellular matrix formation and tissue histology were assessed and discussed, and it was concluded that CNT-reinforced vascular conduits provided a foundation for mechanically appealing constructs where CNTs could be replaced with natural protein nanofibers for further integration of these conduits in large-scale tissue fabrication. PMID:24632802

  4. Two-year clinical and SEM evaluation of glass-fiber-reinforced inlay fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Göhring, Till N; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Lutz, Felix

    2002-02-01

    To clinically evaluate conservative fiber-reinforced composite inlay fixed partial dentures (IFPDs) bonded to inlay abutments. Forty fiber-reinforced composite IFPDs were made for 29 patients. Restorations were manufactured with the composite Targis reinforced by Vectris prefabricated glass-fiber elements and were inserted with a high viscosity insertion technique. Forty bonded IFPDs were examined clinically after 1 year, and 25 after 2 years, using modified USPHS criteria. Twenty-five abutment inlays and 12 pontics were analyzed quantitatively by scanning electron microscopy SEM. Results were tested for statistical significance with ANOVA. Although most clinical criteria were rated "alpha", four IFPDs had to be replaced: two retainers debonded and two presented total delamination of veneering material from fiber framework. Two partial delaminations were repaired intraorally. No fractures of framework were observed. SEM marginal analysis of tooth-composite interface exhibited 96.5 +/- 3.0% continuous margin at baseline, 91.0 +/- 5.7% at the 1-year and 89.6 +/- 5.2% at the 2-year recall. Decrease of marginal quality was statistically significant between baseline and 1 year (P= 0.001), but not between 1- and 2-year recalls.

  5. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating

    PubMed Central

    Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. Aim To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Materials and Methods Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7th to 21st day using combination ion selective electrode. Results Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Conclusion Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment. PMID:27190957

  6. Invitro Evaluation of Fluoride Release from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer with or without Protective Coating.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shilpi; Nandlal, Bhojraj

    2016-04-01

    Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) is well known for its fluoride releasing property but has its own drawbacks of poor mechanical properties, sensitivity to initial desiccation and moisture contamination. To overcome these, search led to the reinforcement of hydroxyapatite and application of surface coating agent but their effect on fluoride release is still not clear. To evaluate and compare the release of fluoride from Hydroxyapatite Reinforced Glass Ionomer (HA-GIC) with and without protective coating. Specimens were prepared as follows- Eight percent by weight conventional glass ionomer was replaced by hydroxyapatite powder (HA) and an indigenous product was prepared (HA-GIC). This powder was mixed with liquid of conventional GIC and allowed to set, then G coat plus coating agent was applied in surface coated group and light cured. Fluoride release of the sample was measured every 24 hrs for seven days and weekly from 7(th) to 21(st) day using combination ion selective electrode. Mean values clearly reveal a significant decrease in the fluoride release from day 1 to day 21 for both the groups. Results of repeated measure ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference between two groups (p <0.001). Coating the hydroxyapatite reinforced glass ionomer will allow for slow and steady release of fluoride for a long period of time into oral environment.

  7. Steady-State Thermal Performance Evaluation of Steel-Framed Wall Assembly with Local Foam Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W

    2010-01-01

    During January and May, 2009, two configurations of steel-framed walls constructed with conventional 2 4 steel studs insulated with R-19 ~14cm. (5.5-in. thick) and R-13 ~9cm. (3.5-in. thick) fiberglass insulation batts were tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) guarded hot-box using ASTM C1363 test procedure. The first test wall used conventional 2 4 steel studs insulated with 2.5-cm. (1-in.) thick foam profiles, called stud snugglers. These stud snugglers converted the 2 4 wall assembly into a 2 6 assembly allowing application of R-19 fiberglass insulation. The second wall tested for comparison was a conventional 2 4 steel stud wall using R-13 insulation batts. Further, numerical simulations were performed in order to evaluate the steady-state thermal performance of various wood- and steel-framed wall assemblies. The effects of adding the stud-snugglers to the wood and steel studs were also investigated numerically. Different combinations of insulation and framing factor were used in the simulations.

  8. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  9. The effect of the electrochemical chloride extraction treatment on steel-reinforced mortar. Part II: Microstructural characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, T.D.; Hansson, C.M.; Hope, B.B.

    1999-10-01

    A study has been made of the changes in cement composition and microstructures resulting from electrochemical chloride extraction applied to mortar samples in which the chlorides were added with the mixing water, ingressed by ponding with an NaCl solution, or both. After exposure for 1 year, specimens with and without chlorides were subjected to an electrochemical chloride extraction treatment. Microstructural analyses of fracture surfaces through the steel/mortar interface revealed a significant alteration of the cementitious phases. In untreated samples, calcium-silicon-rich phases consistent with Types I and II calcium silicate hydrate were observed. After the extraction treatment, these phases were not detectable and instead, sodium-rich, iron-rich, and calcium-aluminum-rich phases were observed.

  10. Studies on the corrosion resistance of reinforced steel in concrete with ground granulated blast-furnace slag--An overview.

    PubMed

    Song, Ha-Won; Saraswathy, Velu

    2006-11-16

    The partial replacement of clinker, the main constituent of ordinary Portland cement by pozzolanic or latent hydraulic industrial by-products such as ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), effectively lowers the cost of cement by saving energy in the production process. It also reduces CO2 emissions from the cement plant and offers a low priced solution to the environmental problem of depositing industrial wastes. The utilization of GGBFS as partial replacement of Portland cement takes advantage of economic, technical and environmental benefits of this material. Recently offshore, coastal and marine concrete structures were constructed using GGBFS concrete because high volume of GGBFS can contribute to the reduction of chloride ingress. In this paper, the influence of using GGBFS in reinforced concrete structures from the durability aspects such as chloride ingress and corrosion resistance, long term durability, microstructure and porosity of GGBFS concrete has been reviewed and discussed.

  11. Monitoring the fatigue state of steel by evaluating the quasistatic and dynamic magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbossche, Lode; Dupre, Luc; Melkebeek, Jan

    2005-05-15

    For the evaluation of fatigue damage progression the application of quasistatic and dynamic magnetic measurements combined with the Preisach hysteresis model and the statistical loss theory is investigated. Throughout the fatigue lifetime hysteresis and excess magnetic behavior, both known to be sensitive to microstructural variations, are monitored. The magnetic evaluation results for fatigue tests executed on two steels depend on their initial microstructure and chemical composition. In addition the effect of low stress amplitude cyclic loading on the magnetic properties of electrical steel is investigated: after 1000 cycles the excess losses are slightly decreased, while hysteresis properties stay invariant.

  12. Evaluation of Reinforcement and Analysis of Stability of a High-Arch Dam Based on Geomechanical Model Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, Y. R.; Yang, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Reinforcement measures are often used in high-arch dams with complicated geological foundations. The geomechanical model test is an effective method to study the global stability of arch dams and to evaluate the reinforcement effects of foundation treatments. The block masonry technique was developed to simulate the jointed rock mass, tectonic discontinuities, and reinforcement measures. A tailor-made low-strength binder and small blocks were developed to simulate the strength and deformation of the jointed rock mass and discontinuities, respectively. We applied this technique to geomechanical model tests of the Dagangshan arch dam with and without foundation reinforcements. A rupture test was conducted, and the stress and displacement distribution of the dam and abutments were recorded; the failure mechanisms and processes were explored. The reinforcement effects of the foundation treatment were evaluated by comparing the test results of the models with and without foundation reinforcements. Our analysis indicates that foundation reinforcements can improve the stress distribution, decrease deformation, prevent slides, reduce fault movement, and improve the global stability of high-arch dams.

  13. Fracture toughness evaluation of high-strength cold-drawn eutectoid steel wires used in wire ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourladian, Bamdad

    High carbon (eutectoid) steel wires are used in many modern engineering applications which require high strength and durability. The most demanding applications are those for wire ropes, tire reinforcements, engine valve springs, and structural strands used for long span cable stayed bridges. In this study, a test method based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) was used to evaluate fracture toughness, KC, for various grades of wire which were of 0.072″ nominal diameter. An extensive review of literature on mechanical behavior of wire ropes is presented. Also a very thorough review of technical literature on the applications of LEFM in high strength rods and wires is provided. Various stress intensity factor solutions (K-solutions) are evaluated and compared. The most applicable K-solutions for application in KC determination in circular rods and wires with semi-elliptical surface cracks are recommended. Plane-stress K-solutions for straight-edge surface cracks in 0.072″ diameter steel wire were also developed by a 3D FEA model. An experimental fracture toughness test procedure based on principles of LEFM is described in detail. Experimental tensile fracture data is presented for 285 pre-cracked fracture samples. SEM fractographs documenting fracture surface topography of various fracture modes are described and characterized. For each wire grade and condition an average value of KC was determined. Statistical treatment of data and 90% confidence intervals are also provided. Average KC values ranged from 52Ksiin to 60Ksiin for wires ranging in tensile strength from 289 Ksi to 336 Ksi. Delamination toughening phenomenon was observed in some wire fracture samples and documented. As high as 60% increase in KC value was observed for some delaminated wires. The effect of crack aspect ratio in semi-elliptical cracks was considered and found to be very significant.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-06-14

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations.

  15. Evaluation of the rate of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers across preference assessments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soyeon; O'Reilly, Mark F; Fragale, Christina L; Aguilar, Jeannie M; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by attention, tangible items, or escape. Results demonstrated different effects related to the occurrence of problem behavior, suggesting an interaction between function of problem behavior and assessment format. Implications for practitioners are discussed with respect to assessing preferences of individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit problem behavior.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE RATE OF PROBLEM BEHAVIOR MAINTAINED BY DIFFERENT REINFORCERS ACROSS PREFERENCE ASSESSMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soyeon; O'Reilly, Mark F; Fragale, Christina L; Aguilar, Jeannie M; Rispoli, Mandy; Lang, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The rates of problem behavior maintained by different reinforcers were evaluated across 3 preference assessment formats (i.e., paired stimulus, multiple-stimulus without replacement, and free operant). The experimenter administered each assessment format 5 times in a random order for 7 children with developmental disabilities whose problem behavior was maintained by attention, tangible items, or escape. Results demonstrated different effects related to the occurrence of problem behavior, suggesting an interaction between function of problem behavior and assessment format. Implications for practitioners are discussed with respect to assessing preferences of individuals with developmental disabilities who exhibit problem behavior. PMID:22219533

  17. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers.

    PubMed

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-08-31

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors.

  18. A Smart Eddy Current Sensor Dedicated to the Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fibers Reinforced Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Naidjate, Mohammed; Helifa, Bachir; Feliachi, Mouloud; Lefkaier, Iben-Khaldoun; Heuer, Henning; Schulze, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper propose a new concept of an eddy current (EC) multi-element sensor for the characterization of carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) to evaluate the orientations of plies in CFRP and the order of their stacking. The main advantage of the new sensors is the flexible parametrization by electronical switching that reduces the effort for mechanical manipulation. The sensor response was calculated and proved by 3D finite element (FE) modeling. This sensor is dedicated to nondestructive testing (NDT) and can be an alternative for conventional mechanical rotating and rectangular sensors. PMID:28858230

  19. Electrophoretic co-deposition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) reinforced alginate-Bioglass® composite coating on stainless steel: mechanical properties and in-vitro bioactivity assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Cabanas-Polo, Sandra; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-07-01

    PVA reinforced alginate-bioactive glass (BG) composite coatings were produced on stainless steel by a single step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The present paper discusses the co-deposition mechanism of the three components and presents a summary of the relevant properties of the composite coatings deposited from suspensions with different PVA concentrations. Homogeneous composite coatings with compact microstructure and increased thickness, i.e. as high as 10 μm, were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface roughness of coatings with different PVA contents was slightly increased, while a significant increase of water contact angles due to PVA addition was detected and discussed. Improved adhesion strength of coatings containing different amounts of PVA was quantitatively and qualitatively confirmed by pull-off adhesion and cycled bending tests, respectively. In-vitro bioactivity tests were performed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. The decomposition rate of the coatings was reduced with PVA content, and rapid hydroxyapatite forming ability of the composite coatings in SBF was confirmed by FTIR and XRD analyses. According to the results of this study, composite alginate-Bioglass® bioactive coatings combined with PVA are proposed as promising candidates for dental and orthopedic applications.

  20. Evaluation and selection of material handling equipment in iron and steel industry using analytic hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varun, Sajja; Harshita, Raj; Pramod, Sesha; Nagaraju, Dega

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) as a potential decision making method for use in the selection of the most suitable material handling (MH) system in an iron and steel industry. In this study, AHP is used in assessing the various material transportation systems employed in a steel manufacturing industry and to decide the best equipment to be used. Information on the use of AHP in evaluating MH equipment is provided and an AHP model is proposed to guide the management of an iron and steel Industry, i.e., JSW Steel Ltd. Most important factors while selecting material transportation equipment and their relative influence on the objective of decision-making model are found. A total of seven decision criteria and five different alternatives are considered for this purpose. Each alternative is evaluated in terms of the decision criteria and the relative importance (or weight) of each criterion is estimated. From the obtained pairwise comparison matrices, the best alternative is chosen. This paper provides a good insight into a decision-making model to guide managers for assessing the various material transportation equipment that are commonly employed in a steel manufacturing plant.

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of stresses within AISI stainless steel 304 material -- A magnetometric approach

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, V.K.; Vaghmare, R.; Modi, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Stainless steel is widely used industrial material and also used in fabrication of satellite components. The use of optimum section of components calls for Non-Destructive Evaluation of structure to avoid catastrophic failures which are predominantly due to the high stress level. The effect of cold working and/or stress on the magnetic properties of stainless steel was discussed in the past. An attempt is made in present work to correlate the induced magnetic flux density in stainless steel AISI-304 with the stress level. In the present work, various samples of stainless steel were prepared for experiment after confirming the material belongs to AISI-304 by detailed chemical and physical analysis. These samples were also heat treated at 1,066 deg. C. to eliminate presence of initial stresses and obtain austenitic structure. Stresses in identical samples were generated by torsional deformation and induced magnetic flux density were measured in a very well configured test set up which has the resolution of 1 nT (nano-tesla). Finally, a correlation is presented between the induced magnetic flux density and stress level which could be very helpful tool in non-destructive evaluation of stresses in stainless steel AISI-304.

  2. Application of Various NDT Methods for the Evaluation of Building Steel Structures for Reuse

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Masanori; Masuda, Tomoya

    2014-01-01

    The reuse system proposed by the authors is an overall business system for realizing a cyclic reuse flow through the processes of design, fabrication, construction, maintenance, demolition and storage. The reuse system is one of the methods to reduce the environmental burden in the field of building steel structures. These buildings are assumed to be demolished within approximately 30 years or more for physical, architectural, economic and social reasons in Japan. In this paper, focusing on building steel structures used for plants, warehouses and offices without fire protection, the performance of steel structural members for reuse is evaluated by a non-destructive test. First, performance evaluation procedures for a non-destructive test, such as mechanical properties, chemical compositions, dimension and degradation, are shown. Tensile strengths are estimated using Vickers hardness measured by a portable ultrasonic hardness tester, and chemical compositions are measured by a portable optical emission spectrometer. The weldability of steel structural members is estimated by carbon equivalent and weld crack sensitivity composition using chemical compositions. Finally, the material grade of structural members of the building steel structure for reuse is estimated based on the proposed procedures. PMID:28788237

  3. Application of Various NDT Methods for the Evaluation of Building Steel Structures for Reuse.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masanori; Masuda, Tomoya

    2014-10-22

    The reuse system proposed by the authors is an overall business system for realizing a cyclic reuse flow through the processes of design, fabrication, construction, maintenance, demolition and storage. The reuse system is one of the methods to reduce the environmental burden in the field of building steel structures. These buildings are assumed to be demolished within approximately 30 years or more for physical, architectural, economic and social reasons in Japan. In this paper, focusing on building steel structures used for plants, warehouses and offices without fire protection, the performance of steel structural members for reuse is evaluated by a non-destructive test. First, performance evaluation procedures for a non-destructive test, such as mechanical properties, chemical compositions, dimension and degradation, are shown. Tensile strengths are estimated using Vickers hardness measured by a portable ultrasonic hardness tester, and chemical compositions are measured by a portable optical emission spectrometer. The weldability of steel structural members is estimated by carbon equivalent and weld crack sensitivity composition using chemical compositions. Finally, the material grade of structural members of the building steel structure for reuse is estimated based on the proposed procedures.

  4. Behavior of Partially Restrained Reinforced Concrete Slabs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Experimental Deflections and Coupling Forces. ........ 72 3.4 Method of Approximating Support Rotations . . . 76 3.5 Free-Body Diagram Used in Computing...common types of structural elements. Slabs are found in practically every type of structural system, ’ whether steel or concrete, single -story or...Because of the nature of reinforced concrete slabs, accurate evaluations of stresses, strains, and deflections are difficult to make by elasticity

  5. 75 FR 13543 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the Simonds Saw and Steel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the Simonds Saw and... designate a class of employees for Simonds Saw and Steel Co., Lockport, New York, to be included in the... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Simonds Saw and Steel Co. Location: Lockport, New York. Job Titles...

  6. Evaluation of a metal shear web selectively reinforced with filamentary composites for space shuttle application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, J. H.; Straayer, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A final program summary is reported for test and evaluation activities that were conducted for space shuttle web selection. Large scale advanced composite shear web components were tested and analyzed to evaluate application of advanced composite shear web construction to a space shuttle orbiter thrust structure. The shear web design concept consisted of a titanium-clad + or - 45 deg boron/epoxy web laminate stiffened with vertical boron-epoxy reinforced aluminum stiffeners and logitudinal aluminum stiffening. The design concept was evaluated to be efficient and practical for the application that was studied. Because of the effects of buckling deflections, a requirement is identified for shear buckling resistant design to maximize the efficiency of highly-loaded advanced composite shear webs.

  7. Flash Thermography to Evaluate Porosity in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRPs)

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Carosena; Toscano, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    It is a fact that the presence of porosity in composites has detrimental effects on their mechanical properties. Then, due to the high probability of void formation during manufacturing processes, it is necessary to have the availability of non-destructive evaluation techniques, which may be able to discover the presence and the distribution of porosity in the final parts. In recent years, flash thermography has emerged as the most valuable method, but it is still not adequately enclosed in the industrial enterprise. The main reason of this is the lack of sufficient quantitative data for a full validation of such a technique. The intention of the present work is to supply an overview on the current state-of-the-art regarding the use of flash thermography to evaluate the porosity percentage in fiber reinforced composite materials and to present the latest results, which are gathered by the authors, on porous carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. To this end, several coupons of two different stacking sequences and including a different amount of porosity are fabricated and inspected with both non-destructive and destructive testing techniques. Data coming from non-destructive testing with either flash thermography or ultrasonics are plotted against the porosity percentage, which was previously estimated with the volumetric method. The new obtained results are a witness to the efficacy of flash thermography. Some key points that need further consideration are also highlighted. PMID:28788527

  8. Three-year clinical evaluation of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures using prefabricated pontics.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Nimet; Belli, Sema

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical performance of surface-retained adhesive composite fixed partial dentures reinforced by an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWP) fiber (Ribbond THM). Twenty-three surface-retained fiber reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) were placed by two operators in 23 patients, each with a single missing tooth. The restorations included prefabricated composite resin pontics, and no preparations were done on the lingual surfaces of the abutment teeth. The patients were recalled for examinations every year for up to 3 years. Restorations were evaluated directly using the modified Ryge criteria. The minimum observation period was 1 year and the maximum observation period was 3 years. At baseline, 23 restorations were graded as Alpha for all parameters. At one year and two years (n = 21), three Bravos for wear resistance and surface texture/gingival inflammation and two Bravos for color match were observed. Twenty-one of 23 restorations were retained at the end of two years (91.3%) and 78.3% were retained after a maximum of 3 years. The results of this clinical study suggestthat UHMWP FRC FPDs are quite acceptable at least forthree years. However, further clinical investigations are still needed for improved long-term clinical performance.

  9. Nanoleakage evaluation of resin luting systems to dental enamel and leucite-reinforced ceramic.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Souza-Júnior, Eduardo José; Araújo, Cíntia Tereza Pimenta; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Dias, Carlos Tadeu; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the nanoleakage patterns between dental enamel and reinforced leucite ceramic, bonded with resin luting systems and a flowable composite resin. Twelve crowns of bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups (n = 3) according to the luting procedure: Excite/Variolink II, Clearfil SE Bond/Panavia F, Scotchbond Multi-PURPOSE Plus/RelyX ARC, and Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350 Flow. To evaluate the nanoleakage patterns, IPS Empress Esthetic disks (5 mm Ø and 1.2-mm thick) were bonded to enamel, and, after 24 h, the specimens were immersed in a 50% (w/v) solution of silver nitrate (24 h), fixed, dehydrated, and processed scanning electron microscopy (SEM). None nanoleakage on interface of the groups that Single Bond 2 followed by the flowable composite were used. The highest percentage of nanoleakage was shown by the Excite/Variolink II protocol. Also, in all conditions tested, none silver nitrate uptake was observed between the leucite-reinforced ceramic and the resin luting cement. The use of a two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive with flowable composite was able to promote an adequate seal of the bond interface at the enamel. Moreover, the conventional dual-cured resin cements associated with simplified and dual-cured adhesives tested are also indicated to bond thin ceramics to enamel, since all presented low silver nitrate uptake. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of Oxidation and Hydrogen Permeation of Al Containing Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Thad M.; Korinko, Paul; Duncan, Andrew

    2005-06-17

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings are typically applied to these steel to retard hydrogen ingress. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate the potential for intentional alloying of commercial 300-series stainless steels to promote hydrogen permeation resistant oxide scales. Previous research on the Cr- and Fe-oxide scales inherent to 300-series stainless steels has proven to be inconsistent in effecting permeation resistance. The approach undertaken in this research was to add aluminum to the 300-series stainless steels in an attempt to promote a pure Al-oxide or and Al-rich oxide scale. Aloxide had been previously demonstrated to be an effective hydrogen permeation barrier. Results for 304L and 347H alloys doped with Al in concentration from 0.5-3.0 wt% with respect to oxidation kinetic studies, cyclic oxidation and characterization of the oxide scale chemistry are reported herein. Gaseous hydrogen permeation testing of the Al-doped alloys in both the unoxidized and oxidized (600 C, 30 mins) conditions are reported. A critical finding from this work is that at concentration as low as 0.5 wt% Al, the Al stabilizes the ferrite phase in these steels thus producing duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructures. As the Al-content increases the amount of measured ferrite increases thus resulting in hydrogen permeabilities more closely resembling ferritic steels.

  11. EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL EFFICACY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL-CONTAINING SEALANT ON DUCT LINER AND GALVANIZED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the potential efficacy of an antimicrobial-containing sealant on fibrous-glass duct liner (FGDL) and galvanized steel (GS) as used in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. HVAC systems become dirty to various degr...

  12. EVALUATING THE POTENTIAL EFFICACY OF AN ANTIMICROBIAL-CONTAINING SEALANT ON DUCT LINER AND GALVANIZED STEEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of an evaluation of the potential efficacy of an antimicrobial-containing sealant on fibrous-glass duct liner (FGDL) and galvanized steel (GS) as used in heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. HVAC systems become dirty to various degr...

  13. Micromagnetic nondestructive evaluation of isochronally tempered 12% CrMoV steel

    SciTech Connect

    Jaekyung Yi; Byongwhi Lee . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Kim, H.C. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-02-01

    The martensitic stainless steels, based on the nominal 12% Cr alloy composition, have been used at temperatures up to about 800 K, because of their non-oxidizing and superior high temperature mechanical properties. Literature established the microstructural evolution of 12% Cr steel during heat treatment and related it to the mechanisms of material degradation due to aging in high temperature environment. The purpose of the present investigation is to evaluate mechanical properties, like hardness and microstructural evolution due to thermal aging, by measuring structure-sensitive magnetic properties and BN.

  14. Electrochemical evaluation of sensitization in austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized specimens*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazumi, T.; Bell, G. E. C.; Kiuchi, K.

    1991-03-01

    An electrochemical testing system was developed to evaluate the sensitization of neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels using miniaturized disk-type specimens, 3 mm in diameter and 0.25 mm thick. The system consists of a specimen holder in which a miniaturized specimen is mounted as the working electrode, a test cell designed to handle radioactive materials and waste, a computer-controlled potentiostat/galvanostat and a surface preparation equipment. Sensitization of a thermally-aged Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel was successfully detected by the single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (SL-EPR) method.

  15. Evaluation of fatigue properties of 316FR stainless steel welded joints at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kaguchi, Hitoshi; Koto, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Terutaka; Taguchi, Kosei; Sukekawa, Masayuki

    1996-12-01

    316FR is an improved version of type 316 stainless steel for elevated temperature use with lower carbon content than conventional type 316 stainless steel. Fatigue properties of GTAW joints of 316FR stainless steel have been investigated. Heat affected zone (HAZ) of 316FR becomes harder than base metal. A method based on the stress-strain relationship of three elements, which are base metal, HAZ and weld portions, has been proposed and applied to the evaluations of fatigue tests. The tri-metal analysis model gives good agreements between experimental results and predicted fatigue lives of the 316FR welded joints. This material is to be used in the DFBR reactor in Japan.

  16. Evaluation of steel shafts for magnetostrictive torque sensors (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, F.; Yoshida, K.; Sasada, I.

    1997-04-01

    Based on the magnetostrictive effect in steel, a robust, noncontacting shaft torque sensor can be obtained. A fundamental problem is compatibility between mechanical strength required for a shaft and a magnetic one needed for a torque sensor. To find shaft material accommodating these two requirements, we investigated basic characteristics, such as hysteresis, linearity, and zero-level fluctuation associated with shaft rotation, of the magnetostrictive torque sensor for various nickel chromium molybdenum steel shafts (SNCM in Japanese Industrial Standard) subjected to case hardening. We prepared three kinds of shafts of 25 mm in diameter: SNCM 420 (Ni=1.69{percent}, C=0.2{percent}), SNCM 616 (Ni=2.91{percent}, C=0.15{percent}), and SNCM 447 (Ni=1.67{percent}, C=0.49{percent}). Shafts of the first two materials were carburized, whereas those of the last one were quenched. We used a magnetic head-type torque sensor consisting of a pair of cross-coupled figure-eight coils (14 turn). The hysteresis in the input{endash}output relationship was measured for the excitation current from 0.1 to 1.0 A at 60 kHz. The hysteresis of the SNCM 420 shaft changes from negative to positive with the increase in excitation current and that of the SNCM 616 shaft decreases monotonically but never reaches zero, whereas that of the SNCM 447 shaft exhibits minimum. The smallest values obtained are nearly zero for the SNCM 420 shaft at 0.3 A, 1.5{percent}/(full scale (FS)=400 Nm) for the SNCM 616 shaft at 1.0 A and 0.7{percent}/FS for the SNCM 447 shaft at 0.8 A, respectively. The linearity measured for the SNCM 420 shaft, which has the smallest hysteresis of the three, at 0.3 A and 60 kHz was virtually straight for the applied torque range {minus}400{endash}400 Nm and 0.8{percent} of nonlinearity error for the range {minus}1000{endash}1000 Nm. The zero-level fluctuation was measured for the SNCM 420 shaft by rotating the shaft without applying torque. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Evaluation of non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete in new full depth pcc pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, V.; Tolmare, N.S.

    1998-12-30

    This final report presents the construction and performance evaluation of a new full depth pavement, constructed with a new type non-metallic fiber reinforced concrete (NMFRC). The mixture proportions used, the quality control tests conducted for the evaluation of the fresh and hardened concrete properties, the procedure used for mixing, transporting, placing, consolidating, finishing, and curing of the concrete are described. Periodic inspection of the full depth pavement was done and this report includes the results of these inspections. The feasibility of using this NMFRC in the construction of highway structures has been discussed. The new NMFRC with enhanced fatigue, impact resistance, modulus of rupture, ductility and toughness properties is suitable for the construction of full depth pavements. However, a life-cycle cost analysis shows that NMFRC is not a favorable choice, because of it`s high initial cost.

  18. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  19. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

    2005-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the

  20. Single-Case Evaluation of a Negative Reinforcement Toilet Training Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.

    2007-01-01

    A negative reinforcement intervention was used to toilet train a child with multiple disabilities. The child appeared to actively withhold urinating in the toilet and was unresponsive to two positive reinforcement training programs. Negative reinforcement required that the child remain in the bathroom during toileting opportunities until he…

  1. An evaluation of response cost in the treatment of inappropriate vocalizations maintained by automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Falcomata, Terry S; Roane, Henry S; Hovanetz, Alyson N; Kettering, Tracy L; Keeney, Kris M

    2004-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the utility of a procedure consisting of noncontingent reinforcement with and without response cost in the treatment of inappropriate vocalizations maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results are discussed in terms of examining the variables that contribute to the effectiveness of response cost as treatment for problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement.

  2. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  3. Evaluation of aging of cast stainless steel components

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.

    1991-02-01

    Cast stainless steel is used extensively in nuclear reactors for primary-pressure-boundary components such as primary coolant pipes, elbows, valves, pumps, and safe ends. These components are, however, susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement in light water reactors because of the segregation of Cr atoms from Fe and Ni by spinodal decomposition in ferrite and the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides on ferrite/austenite boundaries. A recent advance in understanding the aging kinetics is presented. Aging kinetics are strongly influenced by the synergistic effects of other metallurgical reactions that occur in parallel with spinodal decomposition, i.e., clustering of Ni, Mo, and Si solute atoms and the nucleation and growth of G-phase precipitates in the ferrite phase. A number of methods are outlined for estimating aging embrittlement under end-of-life of life-extension conditions, depending on several factors such as degree of permissible conservatism, availability of component archive material, and methods of estimating and verifying the activation energy of aging. 33 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1997-02-01

    In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

  5. Evaluation of misindexing of EBSD patterns in a ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, T; Dash, M K; Saroja, S; Vijayalakshmi, M

    2013-01-01

    The systematic misindexing caused by pseudo-symmetry Kikuchi diffraction patterns in automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction analysis has been studied in a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Grains with its [1 1 1] directed towards detector centre were found to be prone to misindexing, and the solutions exhibit a relative orientation of ±30° and 60° about the common [1 1 1] axis (as compared to the true orientation). Fictitious boundaries were detected within such grains, which satisfy the Σ3 or Σ13b type coincidence site lattice boundary criteria. Misindexing rate was reduced with more than six detected bands, but 30° rotated solution was comparatively more persistent, as the additional bands of (3 1 0)-type exhibited a nearly good pattern match. Increase in detector collection angle to 0.96 sr or number of detected bands to nine were found to be beneficial in preventing the misindexing problem. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Evaluating Pillar Industry's Transformation Capability: A Case Study of Two Chinese Steel-Based Cities.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhidong; Marinova, Dora; Guo, Xiumei; Gao, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Many steel-based cities in China were established between the 1950s and 1960s. After more than half a century of development and boom, these cities are starting to decline and industrial transformation is urgently needed. This paper focuses on evaluating the transformation capability of resource-based cities building an evaluation model. Using Text Mining and the Document Explorer technique as a way of extracting text features, the 200 most frequently used words are derived from 100 publications related to steel- and other resource-based cities. The Expert Evaluation Method (EEM) and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) techniques are then applied to select 53 indicators, determine their weights and establish an index system for evaluating the transformation capability of the pillar industry of China's steel-based cities. Using real data and expert reviews, the improved Fuzzy Relation Matrix (FRM) method is applied to two case studies in China, namely Panzhihua and Daye, and the evaluation model is developed using Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation (FCE). The cities' abilities to carry out industrial transformation are evaluated with concerns expressed for the case of Daye. The findings have policy implications for the potential and required industrial transformation in the two selected cities and other resource-based towns.

  7. The Application of Conjugate Reinforcement Techniques to Evaluate Student Preference for Alternate Media. Special Report Number 742.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Walter H.

    Research evaluated captioned educational films for the deaf for possible use in classes with normal hearing slow learners. Specifically, the project sought to determine the effects of captioning on attention, vocabulary level and reading ability, using conjugate reinforcement as an evaluation procedure. The results indicated that, under certain…

  8. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  9. Clinical evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced carbon endodontic post, glass fiber reinforced post with cast post and core: A one year comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Preethi, GA; Kala, M

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Restoring endodontically treated teeth is one of the major treatments provided by the dental practitioner. Selection and proper use of restorative materials continues to be a source of frustration for many clinicians. There is controversy surrounding the most suitable choice of restorative material and the placement method that will result in the highest probability of successful treatment. This clinical study compares two different varieties of fiber posts and one cast post and core in terms of mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology requiring crown removal over the period of 12months as evaluated by clinical and radiographical examination. Materials and Methods: 30 root canal treated, single rooted maxillary anterior teeth of 25 patients in the age range of 18–60 years where a post retained crown was indicated were selected for the study between January 2007 and August 2007; and prepared in a standard clinical manner. It was divided into 3 groups of 10 teeth in each group. After post space preparation, the Carbon fiber and Glass fiber reinforced posts were cemented with Scotch bond multipurpose plus bonding agent and RelyX adhesive resin cement in the first and second groups respectively. The Cast post and cores were cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement in the third group. Following post- cementation, the preparation was further refined and a rubber base impression was taken for metal-ceramic crowns which was cemented with Zinc Phosphate cement. A baseline periapical radiograph was taken once each crown was cemented. All patients were evaluated after one week (baseline), 3 months, 6 months and one year for following characteristics mobility of crown margin under finger pressure, recurrent caries detected at the crown margin, fracture of the restoration, fracture of the root and periapical and periodontal pathology

  10. Nondestructive Evaluation of Irradiation Embrittlement of SQV2A Steel by Using Magnetic Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Weiying, Cheng; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Komura, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    2006-03-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of SQV2A steel was evaluated by magnetic methods. Thermal aging (TA) and electron irradiation (EI) specimens were prepared to evaluate the thermal aging and the irradiation damage effects separately. B-H loops changed with TA and EI. Higher harmonics of AC magnetization signals were sensitive to micro-structure changing of specimens. The intensity of the 3rd harmonics increased linearly with over 100 years of equivalent operation time by Larson-Miller parameter of nuclear power plants.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Irradiation Embrittlement of SQV2A Steel by Using Magnetic Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Cheng Weiying; Nakahigashi, Shigeo; Komura, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Koji; Takahashi, Norio

    2006-03-06

    Irradiation embrittlement of SQV2A steel was evaluated by magnetic methods. Thermal aging (TA) and electron irradiation (EI) specimens were prepared to evaluate the thermal aging and the irradiation damage effects separately. B-H loops changed with TA and EI. Higher harmonics of AC magnetization signals were sensitive to micro-structure changing of specimens. The intensity of the 3rd harmonics increased linearly with over 100 years of equivalent operation time by Larson-Miller parameter of nuclear power plants.

  12. An evaluation of resistance to change with unconditioned and conditioned reinforcers.

    PubMed

    Vargo, Kristina K; Ringdahl, Joel E

    2015-09-01

    Several reinforcer-related variables influence a response's resistance to change (Nevin, 1974). Reinforcer type (i.e., conditioned or unconditioned) is a reinforcer-related variable that has not been studied with humans but may have clinical implications. In Experiment 1, we identified unconditioned and conditioned reinforcers of equal preference. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we reinforced participants' behavior during a baseline phase using a multiple variable-interval (VI) 30-s VI 30-s schedule with either conditioned (i.e., token) or unconditioned (i.e., food; one type of reinforcement in each component) reinforcement. After equal reinforcement rates across components, we introduced a disruptor. Results of Experiments 2 and 3 showed that behaviors were more resistant to extinction and distraction, respectively, with conditioned than with unconditioned reinforcers. Results of Experiment 4, however, showed that when prefeeding disrupted responding, behaviors were more resistant to change with unconditioned reinforcers than with conditioned reinforcers. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  13. Further evaluation of the high-probability instructional sequence with and without programmed reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Wilder, David A; Majdalany, Lina; Sturkie, Latasha; Smeltz, Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    In 2 experiments, we examined the effects of programmed reinforcement for compliance with high-probability (high-p) instructions on compliance with low-probability (low-p) instructions. In Experiment 1, we compared the high-p sequence with and without programmed reinforcement (i.e., edible items) for compliance with high-p instructions. Results showed that the high-p sequence increased compliance with low-p instructions only when compliance with high-p instructions was followed by reinforcement. In Experiment 2, we examined the role of reinforcer quality by delivering a lower quality reinforcer (praise) for compliance with high-p instructions. Results of Experiment 2 showed that the high-p sequence with lower quality reinforcement did not improve compliance with low-p instructions; the addition of a higher quality reinforcer (i.e., edible items) contingent on compliance with high-p instructions did increase compliance with low-p instructions.

  14. Evaluation of a fiber reinforced drillable bone cement for screw augmentation in a sheep model--mechanical testing.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Benjamin J; Harten, Robert D; Gruskin, Elliott A; Schaer, Thomas P

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the mechanical properties of a novel fiber reinforced calcium phosphate at time zero and after 12 weeks in vivo using a sheep long bone osteotomy model. Time zero data were obtained and compared by pullout testing of 4.5 mm bone screws from bone proper and overdrilled defects of 4.5 and 8 mm diameter. Defects were augmented with: polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), calcium phosphate, and fiber reinforced calcium phosphate using cadaveric sheep tibiae. Twelve-week data were obtained from explanted tibiae of sheep that underwent unilateral tibial osteotomy surgery repaired with a locking compression plate. The most distal hole was overdrilled to 4.5 or 8 mm diameter, filled with fiber reinforced cement, drilled, tapped and a 4.5 mm screw was placed. Screw holding strength at t= 0 was significantly higher for reinforced when compared to nonreinforced cement, but not different from bone or PMMA in 4.5 mm defects. There was no difference in pullout strength for the 8 mm defect data. After 12 weeks fiber reinforced pullout strength increased by 45% and 8.9% for 4.5 and 8 mm defects, respectively, when compared to t= 0 testing. Fiber reinforced calcium phosphate bone cement can be drilled and tapped to support orthopedic hardware for trauma applications.

  15. Evaluation of cast carbon steel and aluminum for rack insert in MCO Mark 1A fuel basket

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, C.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-21

    This document evaluates the effects ofusing a cast carbon steel or aluminum instead of 3O4L stainless steel in the construction ofthe fuel rack insert for the Spent Nuclear Fuel MCO Mark IA fuel baskets. The corrosion, structural, and cost effects are examined.

  16. Evaluation of the fabricability of advanced iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Mohn, W.R.; Topolski, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    Researchers at Babcock & Wilcox Alliance Research Center have investigated methods to produce bimetallic tubing consisting of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel for practical use in fossil fueled energy equipment. In the course of this work, the compatibility of iron aluminide with four candidate austenitic stainless steel substrates was first evaluated using diffusion couples. Based on these results, a combination of iron aluminide and 304 stainless steel was selected for further development. Two composite billets of this combination were then prepared and extruded in separate trails at 2200F and 2000F. Both extrusions yielded 2-inch OD clad tubes, each approximately 18 feet long. Results of the evaluation show that the tube extruded at 2000F had a sound, integrally bonded clad layer throughout its entire length. However, the tube extruded at 2200F exhibited regions of disbonding between the clad layer and the substrate. In supplement to this work, an assessment of the technical and economic merits of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel components in power generation systems was conducted by B&W Fossil Power Division. Future activities should include an investigation of lower extrusion processing temperatures to optimize the fabrication of high quality iron-aluminide clad tubing.

  17. Evaluation of examination techniques for ferritic stainless steel feedwater heater tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, M.J.; Catapano, M.C.

    1995-12-01

    Ferritic stainless steel has been finding increased application in utility plant feedwater heaters due to good strength and corrosion resistance and absence of potential copper contamination of feedwater system. Ferritic stainless steel is highly magnetic and is generally not inspectable using conventional eddy current testing techniques. A variety of techniques have been developed for inspection of this tubing material used in typical heat exchanger applications. Through a project funded by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO), the evaluation of data generated by four present state of the art NDE testing techniques were evaluated on a controlled mock-up of the heater tubing with service related defects. The primary objective was to determine the strengths and limitations of each method. The testing of two in service feedwater heaters at the Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (Con Edison`s) Arthur Kill Generating Station also allowed further evaluations based on actual field conditions.

  18. Detecting Corrosion Resistance of Coated Steel Rebars by Electrochemical Technique (eis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, J.; Shah, S.

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is one of the electrochemical techniques used in materials science. The present measurements are used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of new types of coated steel rebar used in reinforced concrete. In this study, Si-based coating materials are used and evaluated, because adding Si to metals and alloys, including steel, generally increases their corrosion, oxidation, and erosion resistance. The result suggests that electrochemical impedance spectroscopy may be useful for monitoring corrosion activity on coated steel rebars. Based upon impedance changes, it appears that the silicon powder coating bonds well to the steel, and that the coating has a good performance.

  19. Nondestructive Evaluation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites Using Reflective Terahertz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Li, Wei; Cui, Hong-Liang; Shi, Changcheng; Han, Xiaohui; Ma, Yuting; Chen, Jiandong; Chang, Tianying; Wei, Dongshan; Zhang, Yumin; Zhou, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) imaging is considered a nondestructive evaluation method for composite materials used for examining various defects of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites and fire-retardant coatings in the reflective imaging modality. We demonstrate that hidden defects simulated by Teflon artificial inserts are imaged clearly in the perpendicular polarization mode. The THz TDS technique is also used to measure the thickness of thin fire-retardant coatings on CFRP composites with a typical accuracy of about 10 micrometers. In addition, coating debonding is successfully imaged based on the time-delay difference of the time-domain waveforms between closely adhered and debonded sample locations. PMID:27314352

  20. Further Evaluation of the Use of Multiple Schedules for Behavior Maintained by Negative Reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Campos, Claudia; Leon, Yanerys; Sleiman, Andressa; Urcuyo, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    One potential limitation of functional communication training (FCT) is that after the functional communication response (FCR) is taught, the response may be emitted at high rates or inappropriate times. Thus, schedule thinning is often necessary. Previous research has demonstrated that multiple schedules can facilitate schedule thinning by establishing discriminative control of the communication response while maintaining low rates of problem behavior. To date, most applied research evaluating the clinical utility of multiple schedules has done so in the context of behavior maintained by positive reinforcement (e.g., attention or tangible items). This study examined the use of a multiple schedule with alternating Fixed Ratio (FR 1)/extinction (EXT) components for two individuals with developmental disabilities who emitted escape-maintained problem behavior. Although problem behavior remained low during all FCT and multiple schedule phases, the use of the multiple schedule alone did not result in discriminated manding.

  1. Numerical Evaluation Of Shape Memory Alloy Recentering Braces In Reinforced Concrete Buildings Subjected To Seismic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Winsbert Curt

    Seismic protective techniques utilizing specialized energy dissipation devices within the lateral resisting frames have been successfully used to limit inelastic deformation in reinforced concrete buildings by increasing damping and/or altering the stiffness of these structures. However, there is a need to investigate and develop systems with self-centering capabilities; systems that are able to assist in returning a structure to its original position after an earthquake. In this project, the efficacy of a shape memory alloy (SMA) based device, as a structural recentering device is evaluated through numerical analysis using the OpenSees framework. OpenSees is a software framework for simulating the seismic response of structural and geotechnical systems. OpenSees has been developed as the computational platform for research in performance-based earthquake engineering at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). A non-ductile reinforced concrete building, which is modelled using OpenSees and verified with available experimental data is used for the analysis in this study. The model is fitted with Tension/Compression (TC) SMA devices. The performance of the SMA recentering device is evaluated for a set of near-field and far-field ground motions. Critical performance measures of the analysis include residual displacements, interstory drift and acceleration (horizontal and vertical) for different types of ground motions. The results show that the TC device's performance is unaffected by the type of ground motion. The analysis also shows that the inclusion of the device in the lateral force resisting system of the building resulted in a 50% decrease in peak horizontal displacement, and inter-story drift elimination of residual deformations, acceleration was increased up to 110%.

  2. Evaluation of Stress Loaded Steel Samples Using Selected Electromagnetic Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.

    2004-02-26

    In this paper the magnetic leakage flux and eddy current method were used to evaluate changes of materials' properties caused by stress. Seven samples made of ferromagnetic material with different level of applied stress were prepared. First, the leakage magnetic fields were measured by scanning the surface of the specimens with GMR gradiometer. Next, the same samples were evaluated using an eddy current sensor. A comparison between results obtained from both methods was carried out. Finally, selected parameters of the measured signal were calculated and utilized to evaluate level of the applied stress. A strong coincidence between amount of the applied stress and the maximum amplitude of the derivative was confirmed.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Strain Distribution and Fatigue Distribution from Austenitic Stainless Steel by Using Magnetic Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.; Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.

    2007-03-21

    Austenitic stainless steel transforms from austenitic crystal structure to martensitic crystal structure after applying strain or stress. Because martensitic crystal structures have magnetization, strain evaluation and fatigue evaluation can be performed by measuring magnetic properties. This paper describes the measurement of leakage magnetic flux density of remanent magnetization for the strain evaluation and the fatigue evaluation by a typical Hall element sensor for SUS 304 and SUS 304L and by a high-sensitivity thin-film flux-gate magnetic sensor for SUS 316 and SUS 316L.

  4. High-strength stainless steels for corrosion mitigation in prestressed concrete: Development and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Robert D.

    Corrosion of prestressing reinforcement in concrete structures exposed to marine environments and/or deicing chemicals is a problem of critical concern. While many corrosion mitigation technologies are available for reinforced concrete (RC), those available for use in prestressed concrete (PSC) are limited and in many cases cannot provide the 100+ year service life needed in new construction, particularly when exposed to severe marine environments. The use of stainless steel alloys in RC structures has shown great success in mitigating corrosion in even the most severe of exposures. However, the use of high-strength stainless steels (HSSSs) for corrosion mitigation in PSC structures has received limited attention. To address these deficiencies in knowledge, an experimental study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using HSSSs for corrosion mitigation in PSC. The study examined mechanical behavior, corrosion resistance, and techniques for the production of HSSS prestressing strands. Stainless steel grades 304, 316, 2101, 2205, 2304, and 17-7 were produced as cold drawn wires with diameters of approximately 4 mm (0.16 in). A 1080 prestressing steel was also included to serve as a control. Tensile strengths of 1250 to 1550 MPa (181 to 225 ksi) were achieved in the cold-drawn candidate HSSSs. Non-ductile failure modes with no post-yield strain hardening were observed in all candidate HSSSs. 1000 hr stress relaxation of all candidate HSSSs was predicted to be between 6 and 8 % based on the results of 200 hr tests conducted at 70 % of the ultimate tensile strength. Residual stresses due to the cold drawing had a significant influence on stress vs. strain behavior and stress relaxation. Electrochemical corrosion testing found that in solutions simulating alkaline concrete, all candidate HSSSs showed exceptional corrosion resistance at chloride (Cl-) concentrations from zero to 0.25 M. However, when exposed to solutions simulating carbonated concrete, corrosion

  5. Life cycle CO{sub 2} evaluation on reinforced concrete structures with high-strength concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Tae, Sungho; Baek, Cheonghoon Shin, Sungwoo

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the environment performance of high-strength concrete used in super tall buildings as material of environmental load reduction. To this end, this study proposed a plan for the evaluation of energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission throughout the life cycle of the building, and calculated the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission throughout the life cycle of tall apartment building that was actually constructed using this plan. Then, we evaluated the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission reduction performance for the life cycle of the building by the decrease of concrete and reinforced rebar quantities and the increase of building lifespan obtained through conversion of existing building's concrete compressive strength to 40 MPa high-strength concrete. As a result, the life cycle energy consumption in case 3, a high-strength concrete building, decreased 15.53% and 2.95% respectively compared with cases 1 and 2. The evaluation of the general strength concrete buildings and the life cycle CO{sub 2} emission also decreased 16.70% and 3.37% respectively, compared with cases 1 and 2.

  6. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  11. Histopathologic evaluation following chronic implantation of chromium and steel based metal alloys in the rabbit central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Rauch, H C; Ekstrom, M E; Montgomery, I N; Parada, F; Berke, J

    1986-01-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of three metal alloys for chronic implantation in the central nervous system (CNS) was undertaken in rabbits. Throughout the 8 month evaluation period the inflammatory response to the alloys was bland. Two of the alloys tested (chromium based MP35N, Trademark of the Standard Pressed Steel Company, and a stainless steel alloy, BG42 VacArc, Trademark of Latrobe Steel) appeared suitable as CNS implants. The third alloy (stainless steel 440C, Carpenter Steel Company) showed more corrosion than the other alloys, and may be less suitable for implantation. While E. cuniculi infection was found in four rabbits, the infection did not directly interfere with the assessment of the histologic changes directly due to the implants. Autoantibodies to a brain constituent were not observed.

  12. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  13. In vivo evaluation of a high-strength, high-ductility stainless steel for use in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Syrett, B C; Davis, E E

    1979-07-01

    A high-strength, high-ductility, austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated for use in surgical implants by performing in vivo tests in rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. This stainless steel, a TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steel containing about 4% Mo, was compared with two alloys in current clinical use: Type 316L stainless steel and cast Vitallium. Compared with the other two alloys, cast Vitallium generally had higher resistance to corrosion and superior biocompatibility in all animals. The tests in rats and dogs indicated that the corrosion resistances of the TRIP steel and the Type 316L stainless steel were similar and that the tissue reactions caused by these alloys were also similar. However, in rhesus monkeys, the TRIP steel was shown to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking and much more susceptible to crevice corrosion than Type 316L stainless steel. Limited tests in rabbits supported the observation that the TRIP steel is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking. These inconsistencies in the in vivo tests underline the need for a reevaluation of the popular test techniques and of the animals commonly chosen for assessing the suitability of candidate implant materials. The "worst case" results from the rhesus monkey tests were entirely consistent with previous results obtained from in vitro studies. However, further work must be performed before the behavior of metals in humans, rhesus monkeys, or any other animal, can be predicted with confidence from an in vitro test program.

  14. SCC and corrosion evaluations of the F/M steels for a supercritical water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seong Sik; Lee, Byung Hak; Kim, Jung Gu; Jang, Jinsung

    2008-01-01

    As one of the Generation IV nuclear reactors, a supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) is being considered as a candidate reactor due to its high thermal efficiency and simple reactor design without steam generators and steam separators. For the application of a structural material to a core's internals and a fuel cladding, the material should be evaluated in terms of its corrosion and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. Stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion tests of ferritic-martensitic (F/M) steels, high Ni alloys and an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy were performed. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was not observed on the fractured surface of the T 91 steel in the supercritical water at 500, 550 and 600 °C. As the test temperature increased, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of T 91 decreased, and a high dissolved oxygen level induced corrosion and low ductility. The F/M steels showed a high corrosion rate whereas the Ni base alloys showed a little corrosion at 500 and 550 °C. Corrosion rate of the F/M steels at 600 °C test was up to three times larger than that at 500 °C. A thin layer composed of Mo and Ni seems to retard the Cr diffusion into the out layer of the corrosion product of T 92 and T 122.

  15. EVALUATION REINFORCER MAGNITUDE AND RATE DEPENDENCY OF RESISTANCE TO CHANGE MECHANIMS

    PubMed Central

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs, such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitude, rate dependency is attenuated compared to behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple fixed-interval schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined: all three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine, but those effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. Additionally, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable. PMID:25115595

  16. Reinforcer magnitude and rate dependency: evaluation of resistance-to-change mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Under many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitudes rate dependency is attenuated compared with behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple FI schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined. All three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine; however, these effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. In addition, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest that a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable.

  17. Evaluation of NDE techniques for type 439 stainless steel feedwater heater tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, M.J.; Catapano, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    Ferritic stainless steel has been finding increased application in utility plant feedwater heaters due to good strength and corrosion resistance and absence of potential copper contamination of feedwater system. Ferritic stainless steel is highly magnetic and is generally not inspectable using conventional eddy current testing techniques. A variety of techniques have been developed for inspection of this tubing material used in typical heat exchanger applications. Through a project completely funded by the Empire State Electric Energy Research Corporation (ESEERCO), the data generated by four present state of the art NDE testing techniques was evaluated on a controlled mock-up of the heater tubing with service related defects. The primary objective was to determine the strengths and limitations of each method. The testing of two (2) in service feedwater heaters at the Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (Con Edison`s) Arthur Kill Generating Station also allowed further evaluations based on actual field conditions.

  18. Experimental Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Isolators

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Gaetano; Pauletta, Margherita; Cortesia, Andrea; Dal Bianco, Alberto

    2008-07-08

    This paper describes an investigation on the experimental behavior of innovative elastomeric isolators reinforced by carbon fiber fabrics. These fabrics are very much lighter than steel plates used in conventional isolators and able to transfer to the adjacent elastomer layers tangential stresses adequate to oppose the transversal deformation of rubber under vertical loads. The isolators are not bonded to the sub- and super-structure (elimination of the steel end-plates), hence their weight and cost are reduced. The experimental investigation is carried out on small-scale isolator prototypes reinforced by quadridirectional carbon fiber fabrics. The isolators are subjected to the following qualification tests prescribed by the Italian Code 'Ordinanza 3274' for steel reinforced isolators: 1) 'Static assessment of the compression stiffness'; 2) 'Static assessment of the shear modulus G'; 3) 'Dynamic assessment of the dynamic shear modulus G{sub din} and of the damping coefficient {xi}; 4) 'Assessment of the G{sub din}-{gamma} and {xi}-{gamma} diagrams by means of dynamic tests'; 5) 'Assessment of creep characteristics'; 6) 'Evaluation of the capacity of sustaining at least 10 cycles'. As a result of the tests, the isolators survived large shear strains, comparable to those expected for conventional isolators.

  19. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  20. Acoustic emission evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge beam with graphite composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dan E.; Shen, H. Warren; Finlayson, Richard D.

    2001-07-01

    A test was recently conducted on August 1, 2000 at the FHwA Non-Destructive Evaluation Validation Center, sponsored by The New York State DOT, to evaluate a graphite composite laminate as an effective form of retrofit for reinforced concrete bridge beam. One portion of this testing utilized Acoustic Emission Monitoring for Evaluation of the beam under test. Loading was applied to this beam using a two-point loading scheme at FHwA's facility. This load was applied in several incremental loadings until the failure of the graphite composite laminate took place. Each loading culminated by either visual crack location or large audible emissions from the beam. Between tests external cracks were located visually and highlighted and the graphite epoxy was checked for delamination. Acoustic Emission data was collected to locate cracking areas of the structure during the loading cycles. To collect this Acoustic Emission data, FHwA and NYSDOT utilized a Local Area Monitor, an Acoustic Emission instrument developed in a cooperative effort between FHwA and Physical Acoustics Corporation. Eight Acoustic Emission sensors were attached to the structure, with four on each side, in a symmetrical fashion. As testing progressed and culminated with beam failure, Acoustic Emission data was gathered and correlated against time and test load. This paper will discuss the analysis of this test data.

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  2. Case study on the evaluation of the ground reinforcement with complex resistivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J.; Kim, J.; Park, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recently complex resistivity (CR) method is applied to the various engineering purpose mainly due to the development of measurement instruments, which enables the detection of small IP effect in the subsurface. CR method is one of frequency-domain IP method, and it measures the amplitude and absolute phase with respect to the transmitted current. It is known as a spectral IP (SIP) method. With the recent development of instrument, the modeling and analysis algorithm for the CR method were already developed and nearly completed. In this study, we applied CR method to characterize the effect of ground reinforcement which uses grouting with the injection of cement mortar material. As curing the injected cement mortar, the electric conductivity changes, and average conductivity of it is very high. Because of it, we used the DC resistivity monitoring as the way of evaluating the grouting performance. In addition to this, we applied the CR method after that the ground reinforcement with grouting was completed because we thought that cement mortar may show a strong IP effect. For the DC monitoring, we acquired the surface resistivity data before, during and after grouting. Total six data sets were acquired and processed with the recently developed 4D inversion algorithm. CR data is also processed with the developed two-dimensional inversion algorithm and then inverted sections from CR method were compared to the results of DC monitoring data. The area which was identified by 4D DC monitoring as the region where the cement mortar was injected and infiltrated were well matched the anomalous area shown in the phase section of CR method. Resistivity change was not clear with the injection of cement mortar, but phase change was clearly noticeable in the inverted section. From this, we hoped that CR method could provide a way of the quantitative estimation of ground improvement.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Composites. A State-of-the-Art Survey. Volume 1. NDE of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites. Part 1. Radiography and Ultrasonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    composites (Ref. 1) and by the can be large, and secondary operations can be mini- Army on glass fiber reinforced composites (Ref. 2). This mized. Composites...structural characteristics of ceramic materials, and updates of carbon/carbon com- composites. posites and glass fiber reinforced composites. Because of...the large amount of literature available on graphite While glass fiber reinforced plastic composites fiber reinforced composites, this particular volume

  4. Nondestructive evaluation of the interface between ceramic coating and stainless steel by electromagnetic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, A.; Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Novy, F.; Vizureanu, P.; Craus, M. L.; Fintova, S.

    2016-08-01

    Protecting coatings as thermal barrier coating (TBC) are used for yield improvement of equipment working at high temperature. Zirconia doped with yttria ceramics are considered a good TBC material due of its low thermal conductivity, refractory, chemical inertness and compatible thermal expansion coefficient with metallic support. The paper proposes the use of an electromagnetic method for evaluation of coatings on stainless steel using a sensor with metamaterial lens and comparison of the results with those obtained by complementary methods.

  5. An Evaluation of Antecedent Exercise on Behavior Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement Using a Three-Component Multiple Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Heather; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Atwell, Amy

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated antecedent exercise for treating the automatically reinforced problem behavior of 4 individuals with autism. We conducted preference assessments to identify leisure and exercise items that were associated with high levels of engagement and low levels of problem behavior. Next, we conducted three 3-component multiple-schedule…

  6. The Evaluation of Interactive Learning Modules to Reinforce Helping Skills in a Web-Based Interview Simulation Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Amy B.; Duggan, Molly H.; Perry, Terrell

    2010-01-01

    The research presented in this paper shows the continued evaluation of a web-based interview simulation designed for human services and counseling students. The system allows students to practice empathetic helping skills in their own time. As a possible means to reinforce acquisition and transfer of these skills, interactive learning modules…

  7. Further Evaluations of Functional Communication Training and Chained Schedules of Reinforcement to Treat Multiple Functions of Challenging Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Muething, Colin S.; Gainey, Summer; Hoffman, Katherine; Fragale, Christina

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated functional communication training (FCT) combined with a chained schedule of reinforcement procedure for the treatment of challenging behavior exhibited by two individuals diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and autism. Following functional analyses that suggested that challenging behavior served multiple functions for both participants,…

  8. Comparative evaluation of the crack resistance of tool steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratovich, L. F.

    1984-08-01

    It is recommended to use as parameters for calculating crack resistance the nominal stress intensity factors: KJ, determined by the method of the J-integral, taking crack growth into account, and Kδ, calculated according to the critical crack opening δc using the theoretical values of the rotational factor. The use of Kδ is preferable because of the conservativeness of the evaluation in the range of operating temperatures of heavy-duty hot-forging dies.

  9. Evaluation of a multi-layer microbraided polylactic acid fiber-reinforced conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Chin; Huang, Yen-Ting; Lin, Jia-Horng; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Lou, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    We evaluated peripheral nerve regeneration using a biodegradable multi-layer microbraided polylactic acid (PLA) fiber-reinforced conduit. Biodegradability of the PLA conduit and its effectiveness as a guidance channel were examined as it was used to repair a 10 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. As a result, tube fragmentation was not obvious and successful regeneration through the gap occurred in all the conduits at 8 weeks after operation. These results indicate the superiority of the PLA materials and suggest that the multi-layer microbraided PLA fiber-reinforced conduits provide a promising tool for neuro-regeneration.

  10. Improved Sectional Image Analysis Technique for Evaluating Fiber Orientations in Fiber-Reinforced Cement-Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bang Yeon; Kang, Su-Tae; Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of fiber orientation is an important factor in determining the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete. This study proposes a new image analysis technique for improving the evaluation accuracy of fiber orientation distribution in the sectional image of fiber-reinforced concrete. A series of tests on the accuracy of fiber detection and the estimation performance of fiber orientation was performed on artificial fiber images to assess the validity of the proposed technique. The validation test results showed that the proposed technique estimates the distribution of fiber orientation more accurately than the direct measurement of fiber orientation by image analysis. PMID:28787839

  11. Improved Sectional Image Analysis Technique for Evaluating Fiber Orientations in Fiber-Reinforced Cement-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bang Yeon; Kang, Su-Tae; Yun, Hae-Bum; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-01-12

    The distribution of fiber orientation is an important factor in determining the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced concrete. This study proposes a new image analysis technique for improving the evaluation accuracy of fiber orientation distribution in the sectional image of fiber-reinforced concrete. A series of tests on the accuracy of fiber detection and the estimation performance of fiber orientation was performed on artificial fiber images to assess the validity of the proposed technique. The validation test results showed that the proposed technique estimates the distribution of fiber orientation more accurately than the direct measurement of fiber orientation by image analysis.

  12. Wear Behaviour of Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Nanocrystalline AA 4032 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthil Saravanari, M. S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Sivaprasad, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper emphasizes the friction and wear properties of Carbon Nanotubes reinforced AA 4032 nanocomposites prepared by powder metallurgy technique. CNTs are multi-wall in nature and prepared by electric arc discharge method. Multi-walled CNTs are blended with AA 4032 elemental powders and compaction followed by sintering to get bulk nanocomposites. The strength of the composites has been evaluated by microhardness and the surface contact between the nanocomposites and EN 32 steel has been evaluated by Pin on disk tester. The results are proven that reinforcement of CNTs play a major role in the enhancement of hardness and wear.

  13. Evaluating the displacement amplification factors of concentrically braced steel frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Mussa; Zaree, Mahdi

    2013-12-01

    According to seismic design codes, nonlinear performance of structures is considered during strong earthquakes. Seismic design provisions estimate the maximum roof and story drifts occurring during major earthquakes by amplifying the drifts computed from elastic analysis at the prescribed seismic force level with a displacement amplification factor. The present study tries to evaluate the displacement amplification factors of conventional concentric braced frames (CBFs) and buckling restrained braced frames (BRBFs). As such, static nonlinear (pushover) analysis and nonlinear dynamic time history analysis have been performed on the model buildings with single and double bracing bays, and different stories and brace configurations (chevron V, invert V, and X bracing). It is observed that the displacement amplification factors for BRBFs are higher than that of CBFs. Also, the number of bracing bays and height of buildings have a profound effect on the displacement amplification factors. The evaluated ratios between displacement amplification factors and response modification factors are from 1 to 1.12 for CBFs and from 1 to 1.4 for BRBFs.

  14. An Evaluation of Methylphenidate as a Potential Establishing Operation for Some Common Classroom Reinforcers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northup, John; Fusilier, Iantha; Swanson, Victoria; Roane, Henry; Borrero, John

    1997-01-01

    A study conducted reinforcer assessments for three boys (ages 7-9) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder who alternately received either a placebo or methylphenidate. Methylphenidate altered the relative reinforcing effectiveness of various stimuli that are often used in classroom-based behavioral treatment programs, particularly coupons…

  15. An Evaluation of Response Cost in the Treatment of Inappropriate Vocalizations Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falcomata, Terry S.; Roane, Henry S.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.; Kettering, Tracy L.; Keeney, Kris M.

    2004-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the utility of a procedure consisting of noncontingent reinforcement with and without response cost in the treatment of inappropriate vocalizations maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results are discussed in terms of examining the variables that contribute to the effectiveness of response cost as treatment for…

  16. Evaluation of Fatigue Life of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Relationship to Dynamic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture. PMID:25050406

  17. Evaluation of fatigue life of CRM-reinforced SMA and its relationship to dynamic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Abdel Aziz, Mahrez; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herda Yati; Koting, Suhana

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue cracking is an essential problem of asphalt concrete that contributes to pavement damage. Although stone matrix asphalt (SMA) has significantly provided resistance to rutting failure, its resistance to fatigue failure is yet to be fully addressed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of crumb rubber modifier (CRM) on stiffness and fatigue properties of SMA mixtures at optimum binder content, using four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% CRM by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the dynamic stiffness (indirect tensile test), dynamic creep (repeated load creep), and fatigue test (indirect tensile fatigue test) at temperature of 25°C. The indirect tensile fatigue test was conducted at three different stress levels (200, 300, and 400 kPa). Experimental results indicate that CRM-reinforced SMA mixtures exhibit significantly higher fatigue life compared to the mixtures without CRM. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the fatigue life and resilient modulus as compared to permanent strain; thus resilient modulus might be a more reliable indicator in evaluating the fatigue life of asphalt mixture.

  18. Evaluation of polyaryl adhesives in elastomer-stainless steel joints

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Carciello, N.; Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1992-10-01

    Polyaryl thermoplastic adhesives (polyetheretherketone, PEEK, polyphenylene sulfide PPS, polyphenylethersulfone, PES) were evaluated for ability to bond elastomer to metal for use in geothermal environments. Strength of elastomer-to-metal joints adhesives blends (such as in drill pipe or casing protectors) were determined using peel tests. Parameters involved in making the joints were temperature, time and atmosphere, in addition to type of adhesive. Physical chemical analyses have aided endeavors to determine the cause of adhesion failure in the joint: differential thermal analyses, thermal gravimetric analyses, infrared spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Tests showed that joints made of adhesive blends which contained greater than 50% PES survived simulated geothermal conditions (200C, water vapor pressure 200 psi) for weeks without significant decrease in peel strength. Chemical components of the adhesive appear to be highly stable under the conditions required to make the joints and in subsequent exposure to the simulated geothermal environment.

  19. Behavior of reinforced concrete at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Freskakis, G.N.

    1984-09-01

    A study is presented concerning the behavior of reinforced concrete sections at elevated temperatures. Material properties of concrete and reinforcing steel are discussed. Behavior studies are made by means of moment-curvature-axial force relationships. Particular attention is given to the load carrying capacity, thermal forces and moments, and deformation capacity. The effects on these properties of variations in the strength properties, the temperature level and distribution, the amount of reinforcing steel, and limiting values of strains are considered.

  20. Development of the magnescope as an instrument for in situ evaluation of steel components of nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jiles, D.C.; Bi, Y.; Biner, S.B.

    1997-08-01

    Fatigue damage causes continuous, cumulative microstructural changes in materials and the magnetic properties of steels are sensitive to these microstructural changes. The work therefore focused on the relationship between fatigue damage and the measured magnetic properties of different steels under a variety of fatigue conditions. The project also investigated the feasibility and applicability of magnetic inspection techniques for non-destructive evaluation of fatigue damage. From the results of a series of fatigue tests, conducted on different steels under both low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue conditions, the magnetic properties, such as coercivity, remanence and Barkhausen effect, were found to change systematically with fatigue damage. The magnetic properties showed significant changes, especially during early stage of the fatigue and also at the end of the fatigue lifetime. An approximately linear relationship between the mechanical modulus and magnetic remanence was observed and was explained by a model developed in this study to describe the dynamic changes in magnetic and mechanical properties. The results of this research demonstrated that magnetic measurements are suitable for non-destructive evaluation of fatigue damage in steels such as A533B steel and Cr-Mo steels. The magnetic measurement techniques have been incorporated into instrumentation for in-situ evaluation of steel structures and components.

  1. Development and evaluation of a reinforced polymeric biomaterial for use as an orthodontic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zufall, Scott William

    Composite archwires have the potential to provide esthetic and functional improvements over conventional wires. As part of an ongoing effort to bring these materials into general use, composite wires were fabricated using a photo-pultrusion manufacturing technique, and subsequently coated with a 10 mum layer of poly(chloro-p-xylylene). Coated and uncoated composites were subjected to several different evaluations to assess their ability to perform the functions of an orthodontic archwire. An investigation of the viscoelastic behavior of uncoated composite wires was conducted at a physiological temperature of 37°C using a bend stress relaxation test. Over 90 day testing periods, energy losses increased with decreasing reinforcement levels from to 8% of the initial wire stress. Final viscous losses were 1% for all reinforcement levels. Relaxed elastic moduli for the composite wires were comparable to the reported elastic moduli of conventional orthodontic wires that are typically used for initial and intermediate alignment procedures. Frictional characteristics were evaluated in passive and active configurations for uncoated composite wires against three contemporary orthodontic brackets. Kinetic coefficients of friction were the same for all wire-bracket combinations tested and were slightly lower than the reported coefficients of other initial and intermediate alignment wires. Wear patterns on the wires, which were largely caused by sharp leading edges of the bracket slots, were characteristic of plowing and cutting wear behaviors. This wear caused glass fibers to be released from the surface of the wires, presenting a potential irritant. Coated composite wires were subjected to the same frictional analysis as the uncoated wires. A mathematical model of the archwire-bracket system was derived using engineering mechanics, and used to define a coefficient of binding. The coating increased the frictional coefficients of the wires by 72%, yet the binding coefficient

  2. In vitro evaluation for potential calcification of biomaterials used for staple line reinforcement in lung surgery.

    PubMed

    Mavrilas, Dimosthenis; Koutsoukos, Petros G; Koletsis, Efstratios N; Apostolakis, Efstratios; Dougenis, Dimitrios

    2006-12-01

    Bovine pericardium (BPC) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) have been widely used to reinforce staple lines in lung resection. Since limited information regarding the calcification of these biomaterials is available, we undertook an in vitro study to evaluate their calcification potential. Commercially available BPC and PTFE biomaterials were evaluated and compared with custom-prepared BPC tissue. In vitro calcification was performed via submersion in supersaturated solution in a double-walled glass reactor at 37.0 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C, pH 7.4 +/- 0.1, mimicking most ion concentrations of human blood plasma. In processing of calcification, the pH decrease of the solution simulated the addition of consumed H(+), Ca(2+), and PO(4)(3-) ions from titrant solutions, the concentrations of which were based on the stoichiometry of octacalcium phosphate. The molar ion addition with time was recorded, and the initial slope of the curve was computed for each experiment. The rate of calcification developed (molar calcium phosphate ion addition rate per time and total surface area) (R) was computed after that with respect to the relative supersaturation (sigma) used in each experiment. R for custom-prepared BPC tissues was found to be in the range of 0.19 +/- 0.08 to 0.52 +/- 0.19 (n = 17) in sigma range of 0.72 to 1.42. Commercial BPC was found to be 0.016 to 0.052 (n = 4), and PTFE was 0.005 to 0.05 (n = 8) in the same sigma range. Both clinically applied biomaterials, BPC and PTFE, seemed to be calcified with rates of at least one order of magnitude lower than the custom-prepared BPC tissue. This data suggested that BPC and PTFE biomaterials showed a similar, relatively very low tendency for calcification compared with custom-prepared BPC tissue. Although further studies are necessary, staple line reinforcement by these two biomaterials should be considered safe from the calcification point of view.

  3. Evaluation model of susceptibility to Cu hot shortness of Cu-containing LC steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yinghua; Xie, Chunqian

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that copper causes the hot shortness problem when in the scrap based steelmaking process. Hot shortness occurs because of selective oxidation of the iron whereby the more noble copper is enriched at the steel-oxide interface and embrittlement take places during hot working. In this paper, in order to control the Cu hot shortness, the evaluation model of susceptibility to Cu hot shortness was investigated. We found that Cu hot shortness susceptibility is related to the oxidation rate, the copper equivalence and the scale-steel interface length ratio. Also, it is founded to exist a fairly nice correlation between the oxidation rate and other factors such as chemistry elements, oxidation conditions, especially the Ni content.

  4. [In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of antibacterial stainless steel containing copper].

    PubMed

    Guan, Junlin; Guo, Lei; Fu, Yuping; Chai, Hongwei

    2013-04-01

    To study the in vitro antibacterial activity and biocompatibility of 317L stainless steel containing 4.5% copper alloy (317L-Cu), we produced 317L-Cu stainless steel with epsilon-Cu phase. The cell proliferation of osteoblasts on material surface was detected in vitro. Escherichia coli was cultured with 317L-Cu for evaluating the antibacterial activity. We found that the 317L-Cu could effectively kill the Escherichia coli on material surface. The cell proliferation of osteoblasts on material surface was not different significantly, compared with titanium material. Our study clearly demonstrated that the 317L-Cu alloys had a significant antimicrobial activity and was biocompatible in vitro, so it would be suitable to be used as a new medical material with antibacterial activity.

  5. In Vivo Evaluation of Immediately Loaded Stainless Steel and Titanium Orthodontic Screws in a Growing Bone

    PubMed Central

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of “bone-to-implant contact” and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of “bone-to-implant contact” (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of “bone-to-implant contact” was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading. PMID:24124540

  6. In vivo evaluation of immediately loaded stainless steel and titanium orthodontic screws in a growing bone.

    PubMed

    Gritsch, Kerstin; Laroche, Norbert; Bonnet, Jeanne-Marie; Exbrayat, Patrick; Morgon, Laurent; Rabilloud, Muriel; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The present work intends to evaluate the use of immediate loaded orthodontic screws in a growing model, and to study the specific bone response. Thirty-two screws (half of stainless steel and half of titanium) were inserted in the alveolar bone of 8 growing pigs. The devices were immediately loaded with a 100 g orthodontic force. Two loading periods were assessed: 4 and 12 weeks. Both systems of screws were clinically assessed. Histological observations and histomorphometric analysis evaluated the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" and static and dynamic bone parameters in the vicinity of the devices (test zone) and in a bone area located 1.5 cm posterior to the devices (control zone). Both systems exhibit similar responses for the survival rate; 87.5% and 81.3% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.64; 4-week period), and 62.5% and 50.0% for stainless steel and titanium respectively (p = 0.09; 12-week period). No significant differences between the devices were found regarding the percent of "bone-to-implant contact" (p = 0.1) or the static and dynamic bone parameters. However, the 5% threshold of "bone-to-implant contact" was obtained after 4 weeks with the stainless steel devices, leading to increased survival rate values. Bone in the vicinity of the miniscrew implants showed evidence of a significant increase in bone trabecular thickness when compared to bone in the control zone (p = 0.05). In our study, it is likely that increased trabecular thickness is a way for low density bone to respond to the stress induced by loading.

  7. Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Evaluation of Corrosion Under Paint in Steel Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-03-06

    Millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation techniques have shown great potential for detection of corrosion under paint in steel structures. They may also provide for detection of other anomalies associated with the corrosion process such as precursor pitting. This paper presents the results of an extensive investigation spanning a frequency range of 30-100 GHz and using magnitude- and phase-sensitive reflectometers. Using 2D automated scanning mechanisms, raster images of two corrosion patches are produced showing the spatial resolution capabilities of these systems as well as their potential for evaluating localized corrosion severity.

  8. Evaluation of IAEA Coordinated Program Steels and Welds for 288 C radiation Embrittlement Resistance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    NRC-IN-B5528 UNCLASSIFIED NRL-MR-4655 NUREG -CR-2487T NL SMENEEEh EhhhhmmhhGIG AD -A .1 z4 Cq NUREG /CR-2487 NRL Memo Rpt 4655 m Evaluation of IAEA...3.00 and Na" al Tech 1 Infor on Servi e ingfi Id, irgi ia 1 NUREG /CR-2487 NRL Memo Rpt 4655 R5 Evaluation of IAEA Coordinated Program Steels and...reports and correspondence; Commission papers; and applicant and licensee documents and correspondence. The following documents in the NUREG series are

  9. Evaluation of Mechanical Properties and Morphological Studies of Rice Husk (Treated/Untreated)-CaCO3 Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Deepak; Joshi, Garvit; Gupta, Ayush

    2016-10-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites are a very popular area of research because of the easy availability and biodegradability of these fibers. The manufacturing of natural fiber composite is done by reinforcing fibers in the particulate form, fiber form or in woven mat form. Natural fiber composites also utilize industrial wastes as a secondary reinforcements like fly ash, sludge etc. By keeping all these point of views in the present investigation the effect of rice husk flour (chemically treated/untreated) and micro sized calcium carbonate with epoxy resin have been evaluated. The diameter of rice husk flour was maintained at 600 µm through mechanical sieving machine. The husk flour was chemically treated with NaOH (5 % w/v). Mechanical properties like hardness, flexural impact and compression strength were evaluated and found to be superior in modified or chemically treated flour as compared to unmodified or untreated flour reinforced composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study was also undertaken for the developed composites. SEM study shows the distribution of the rice husk flour and calcium carbonate over the matrix.

  10. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  11. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  12. The application of strain field intensity method in the steel bridge fatigue life evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanhong; Cui, Yanjun; Cao, Kaisheng

    2012-04-01

    Asce's survey shows that 80%--90% bridge damage were associated with fatigue and fracture problems. With the operation of vehicle weight and traffic volume increases constantly, the fatigue of welded steel bridge is becoming more and more serious in recent years. A large number of studies show that most prone to fatigue damage of steel bridge is part of the welding position. Thus, it's important to find a more precise method to assess the fatigue life of steel bridge. Three kinds of fatigue analysis method is commonly used in engineering practice, such as nominal stress method, the local stress strain method and field intensity method. The first two methods frequently used for fatigue life assessment of steel bridge, but field intensity method uses less ,and it widely used in fatigue life assessment of aerospace and mechanical. Nominal stress method and the local stress strain method in engineering has been widely applied, but not considering stress gradient and multiaxial stress effects, the accuracy of calculation stability is relatively poor, so it's difficult to fully explain the fatigue damage mechanism. Therefore, it used strain field intensity method to evaluate the fatigue life of steel bridge. The fatigue life research of the steel bridge based on the strain field method and the fatigue life of the I-section plate girder was analyzed. Using Ansys on the elastoplastic finite element analysis determined the dangerous part of the structure and got the stress-strain history of the dangerous point. At the same time, in order to divide the unit more elaborate introduced the sub-structure technology. Finally, it applies K.N. Smith damage equation to calculate the fatigue life of the dangerous point. In order to better simulating the actual welding defects, it dug a small hole in the welding parts. It dug different holds from different view in the welding parts and plused the same load to calculate its fatigue life. Comparing the results found that the welding

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Rauser, Richard W.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 C and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used because they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with X-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  15. Evaluation of the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in combination with dextromethorphan and quinidine

    PubMed Central

    Vosburg, Suzanne K.; Sullivan, Maria A.; Comer, Sandra D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studies have suggested that the N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist dextromethorphan may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence. Design This double-blinded, placebo-controlled inpatient study evaluated the effects of 0, 30, and 60 mg of dextromethorphan and quinidine (DMQ) on the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in recently detoxified heroin abusers. Participants Nine heroin-dependent participants were admitted and then detoxified from heroin over the course of several days. Interventions Participants were subsequently stabilized on 0, 30, or 60 mg of DMQ. Each dose of DMQ was administered for two consecutive weeks, and the effects of heroin (0, 12.5, and 50 mg) were studied under each DMQ maintenance dose condition. DMQ and heroin dose were administered in random order both within and between participants. Results Planned comparisons revealed statistically significant increases in progressive ratio breakpoint values and positive subjective ratings as a function of heroin dose. There were no consistent changes in any of the responses as a function of DMQ maintenance dose, other than a modest reduction in craving. Conclusions In summary, results from this study suggest that maintenance on dextromethorphan in combination with quinidine has a limited role in the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:22320027

  16. Evaluation of the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in combination with dextromethorphan and quinidine.

    PubMed

    Vosburg, Suzanne K; Sullivan, Maria A; Comer, Sandra D

    2011-01-01

    Studies have suggested that the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dextromethorphan may be useful in the treatment of opioid dependence. This double-blinded, placebo-controlled inpatient study evaluated the effects of 0, 30, and 60 mg of dextromethorphan and quinidine (DMQ) on the reinforcing and subjective effects of heroin in recently detoxified heroin abusers. Nine heroin-dependent participants were admitted and then detoxified from heroin over the course of several days. Participants were subsequently stabilized on 0, 30, or 60 mg of DMQ. Each dose of DMQ was administered for two consecutive weeks, and the effects of heroin (0, 12.5, and 50 mg) were studied under each DMQ maintenance dose condition. DMQ and heroin dose were administered in random order both within and between participants. Planned comparisons revealed statistically significant increases in progressive ratio breakpoint values and positive subjective ratings as a function of heroin dose. There were no consistent changes in any of the responses as a function of DMQ maintenance dose, other than a modest reduction in craving. In summary, results from this study suggest that maintenance on dextromethorphan in combination with quinidine has a limited role in the treatment of opioid dependence.

  17. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Reinforced Concrete Frames Subjected to Seismic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zameeruddin, Mohd.; Sangle, Keshav K.

    2017-06-01

    Ten storied-3 bays reinforced concrete bare frame designed for gravity loads following the guidelines of IS 456 and IS 13920 for ductility is subjected to seismic loads. The seismic demands on this building were calculated by following IS 1893 for response spectra of 5% damping (for hard soil type). Plastic hinges were assigned to the beam and column at both ends to represent the failure mode, when member yields. Non-linear static (pushover) analysis was performed to evaluate the performance of the building in reference to first (ATC 40), second (FEMA 356) and next-generation (FEMA 440) performance based seismic design procedures. Base shear against top displacement curve of structure, known as pushover curve was obtained for two actions of plastic hinge behavior, force-controlled (brittle) and deformation-controlled (ductile) actions. Lateral deformation corresponding to performance point proves the building capability to sustain a certain level of seismic loads. The failure is represented by a sequence of formation of plastic hinges. Deformation-controlled action of hinges showed that building behaves like strong-column-weak-beam mechanism, whereas force-controlled action showed formation of hinges in the column. The study aims to understand the first, second and next generation performance based design procedure in prediction of actual building responses and their conservatism into the acceptance criteria.

  18. Micromechanics Solution for the Elastic Moduli of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Yu Jia; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yu; Guang, Jia Lian; Ming, Liu

    2014-09-01

    The overall elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are investigated by employing the theory of micromechanics. A method based on the Mori-Tanaka theory and triple inhomogeneities is found to provide a sufficiently accurate evaluation of the average elastic properties of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials. The inhomogeneities of the materials are divided into three groups: a fine aggregate, a coarse aggregate, and fibers (steel or polymer). The elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete composite materials are determined as functions of the physical properties and volume fraction of sand, gravel, fibers (steel or polymer), and cement paste as a matrix. The theoretical results obtained are compared with published experimental data. The parameters affecting the elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced concrete are discussed in detail.

  19. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

    2012-02-29

    There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

  20. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.