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Sample records for relapsing polychondritis involving

  1. Vascular involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Esdaile, J.; Hawkins, D.; Gold, P.; Freedman, S. O.; Duguid, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Review of four cases of relapsing polychondritis (RP) seen at one hospital in the 12-year period 1963 to 1974 revealed that one patient had aortic insufficiency with large artery involvement, two others had involvement of medium and large arteries and the fourth may have had mucocutaneous vasculitis. Valvular disease has occurred in 9% of all cases of RP reported in the literature and, if vasculitis beyong the aortic root is included, 25% of cases of RP manifested inflammatory vascular disease. The frequency of pseudotumour of the orbit and cochlear-labyrinthine dysfunction is also high and may be a manifestation of vasculitis. PMID:870159

  2. Aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Arnaud, Laurent; Boutémy, Jonathan; Bienvenu, Boris; Lévesque, Hervé; Amoura, Zahir; Marie, Isabelle

    2017-05-17

    To assess prevalence of aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) patients; to evaluate clinical features and long-term outcome of RP patients exhibiting aortitis, aortic ectasia and/or aneurysm. One hundred and seventy-two RP patients underwent aortic computed tomography (CT)-scan; they were seen in 3 medical centers. Eleven patients (6.4%) had aortic involvement, occurring within a median time of 2 years after RP diagnosis. CT-scan showed isolated aortitis (n=2); the 9 other patients exhibited: aortitis and aortic aneurysm (n=2) or ectasia (n=1), isolated aortic aneurysm (n=4) or ectasia (n=2); aortic localizations were as follows: thoracic (n=6), abdominal (n=2), thoracic and abdominal (n=4) aorta. Patients exhibited: resolution (n=3) improvement (n=3), stabilization (n=4) or deterioration (n=1) of aortic localization. Five patients experienced recurrence of aortic localization; one patient died of aortic abdominal aneurysm rupture. Predictive factors of death related to aortic complications were: aortitis on CT-scan, higher median levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Predictive parameters of aortic relapses were: aortitis on CT-scan and involvement of the abdominal aorta. This study underlines that aortic involvement is severe in RP. Furthermore, we suggest that RP patients exhibiting poor prognostic factors, including panaortitis and higher values of ESR, may require more aggressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Relapsing Polychondritis with Central Nervous System Involvement: Experience of Three Different Cases in a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan Hong

    2016-11-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation in cartilaginous structures including the ears, noses, peripheral joints, and tracheobronchial tree. It rarely involves the central nervous system (CNS) but diagnosis of CNS complication of RP is challenging because it can present with varying clinical features. Herein we report 3 cases of relapsing polychondritis involving CNS with distinct manifestations and clinical courses. The first patient presented with rhombencephalitis resulting in brain edema and death. The second patient had acute cognitive dysfunction due to limbic encephalitis. He was treated with steroid pulse therapy and recovered without sequelae. The third patient suffered aseptic meningitis that presented as dementia, which was refractory to steroid and immune suppressive agents. We also reviewed literature on CNS complications of RP.

  4. Relapsing Polychondritis with Central Nervous System Involvement: Experience of Three Different Cases in a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation in cartilaginous structures including the ears, noses, peripheral joints, and tracheobronchial tree. It rarely involves the central nervous system (CNS) but diagnosis of CNS complication of RP is challenging because it can present with varying clinical features. Herein we report 3 cases of relapsing polychondritis involving CNS with distinct manifestations and clinical courses. The first patient presented with rhombencephalitis resulting in brain edema and death. The second patient had acute cognitive dysfunction due to limbic encephalitis. He was treated with steroid pulse therapy and recovered without sequelae. The third patient suffered aseptic meningitis that presented as dementia, which was refractory to steroid and immune suppressive agents. We also reviewed literature on CNS complications of RP. PMID:27709866

  5. Respiratory complications of relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G. J.; Davis, P.

    1974-01-01

    Gibson, G. J. and Davis, P. (1974).Thorax, 29, 726-731. Respiratory complications of relapsing polychondritis. The respiratory function of a patient with relapsing polychondritis is described. He had severe airflow obstruction due to disease of both the extra and intrathoracic large airways. Evidence of small airways disease was lacking. The airflow obstruction was probably due to a combination of structural narrowing and an enhanced dynamic effect. Despite the severity of his disease the patient's exercise capacity was only slightly reduced but he developed carbon dioxide retention on exercise. Involvement of the airways is a common feature of this rare disease and demands full physiological and radiographic assessment if tracheostomy or other surgical procedure is contemplated. Images PMID:4450183

  6. Relapsing polychondritis with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Monica; Hu, Mengjun; Zussman, Jamie; Worswick, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of the cartilaginous structures of the body with many systemic manifestations including meningoencephalitis (ME). We present a case of a man with RP-associated ME that was responsive to steroid treatment. An updated literature review of 7 cases of RP-associated ME also is provided. Early diagnosis of this condition may be of benefit to this select population of patients, and further research regarding the prognosis, mechanisms, and treatment of RP may be necessary in the future.

  7. Active aortitis in relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Selim, A; Fulford, L; Mohiaddin, R; Sheppard, M

    2001-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare inflammatory multiorgan disorder affecting cartilaginous structures and other connective tissues. Serious cardiovascular complications have been reported in patients with RP, the most frequent being aortic or mitral regurgitation and aortic aneurysms. Aortitis is a very rare complication. An unusual case of active aortitis in a patient with RP, despite intensive immunosupressive treatment, is described with a special emphasis on the pathological findings. Key Words: relapsing polychondritis • aortitis • aortic regurgitation PMID:11684729

  8. [Relapsing polychondritis: report of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Olival Costa, H; Alcantara Maia, R; Sakano, Y

    1989-01-01

    Four cases of Relapsing Polychondritis followed in the Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual de Sao Paulo, since 1985, are reported and discussed. Relapsing Polychondritis, an auto-immune disease that destroys the pinnal and nasal cartilage has been observed occasionally around the world. Since it was first defined and described, in 1923, about 250 cases have been reported.

  9. Leprosy with Atypical Skin Lesions Masquerading as Relapsing Polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Munganda, Hariharan; Bangia, Amit; Rani, Uma; Budhiraja, Rajesh; Brajpuriya, Swapnil

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy can present with a variety of clinical manifestations depending on the immune status of the individual. After dermatological and neurological involvement, rheumatic features specially various forms of arthritis are the third most common manifestation of the disease. We describe a unique case of a 22-year-old patient presenting with external ear involvement mimicking relapsing polychondritis along with inflammatory joint symptoms and skin lesions. Ear involvement in relapsing polychondritis characteristically is painful and spares the noncartilaginous ear lobules, in contrast to painless ear involvement in leprosy affecting the lobules as well. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis, although the ear and skin lesions were not classical of leprosy. Such a presentation of leprosy closely mimicking relapsing polychondritis has not been described previously. Tissue diagnosis should always be attempted whenever possible in patients presenting with autoimmune features, so that inappropriate therapy with immunosuppressants is avoided. PMID:28116186

  10. Immunopathologic Studies in Relapsing Polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Jerome H.; Dennis, Marie V.

    1973-01-01

    Serial studies have been performed on three patients with relapsing polychondritis in an attempt to define a potential immunopathologic role for degradation constituents of cartilage in the causation and/or perpetuation of the inflammation observed. Crude proteoglycan preparations derived by disruptive and differential centrifugation techniques from human costal cartilage, intact chondrocytes grown as monolayers, their homogenates and products of synthesis provided antigenic material for investigation. Circulating antibody to such antigens could not be detected by immunodiffusion, hemagglutination, immunofluorescence or complement mediated chondrocyte cytotoxicity as assessed by 51Cr release. Similarly, radiolabeled incorporation studies attempting to detect de novo synthesis of such antibody by circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes as assessed by radioimmunodiffusion, immune absorption to neuraminidase treated and untreated chondrocytes and immune coprecipitation were negative. Delayed hypersensitivity to cartilage constituents was studied by peripheral lymphocyte transformation employing [3H]thymidine incorporation and the release of macrophage aggregation factor. Positive results were obtained which correlated with periods of overt disease activity. Similar results were observed in patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis manifesting destructive articular changes. This study suggests that cartilage antigenic components may facilitate perpetuation of cartilage inflammation by cellular immune mechanisms. Images PMID:4265382

  11. Relapsing Polychondritis Presented with Encephalitis Followed by Brain Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moo-Seok; Jeong, Hae-Bong; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Kim, Hee Sung; Choi, Sang Tae

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease that is characterized by inflammatory reaction of unknown etiology and destruction of cartilaginous structures. Characteristic symptoms of this disease include cartilage inflammation of the ear, nose, larynx, trachea, bronchi, joints, eyes, heart and skin. Concomitance with neurologic symptom is very rare in RP, and the detailed underlying mechanism of neurological involvement associated with RP is not fully understood. We herein described an unusual recurrent case of inflammatory brain lesions associated with RP, with attention to clinical manifestations, autoimmune disease involvement, and therapeutic effects. PMID:28243168

  12. Early aortic valve cusp rupture in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A

    1992-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp rupture with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp rupture with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1575597

  13. Hypertrophic Pachymeningitis as an Early Manifestation of Relapsing Polychondritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ushiyama, Satoru; Kinoshita, Tomomi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Ohashi, Nobuhiko; Kishida, Dai; Miyazaki, Daigo; Nakamura, Katsuya; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Neurological involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) is relatively rare. We describe the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) together with arthritis as the first manifestation of RP. Auricular chondritis, which subsequently determined the diagnosis of RP, occurred a few weeks after the detection of HP. The neurological symptoms, as well as arthritis, were promptly improved by treatment with corticosteroids. It is generally difficult to diagnose RP in the absence of typical cartilaginous involvement; however, the present case suggests that HP may occur as an early clinical manifestation of RP. PMID:27920712

  14. A nationwide study of the epidemiology of relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Anna; Páll, Nóra; Molnár, Katalin; Kováts, Tamás; Surján, György; Vicsek, Tamás; Pollner, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune inflammatory disease that attacks mainly cartilaginous structures or causes serious damage in proteoglycan-rich structures (the eyes, heart, blood vessels, inner ear). This study shows results regarding the epidemiology, progression, and associations of this highly variable disease by collecting all cases from a 124-million-person-year Central European nationwide cohort. Methods We used the Hungarian Health Care Database to identify all persons with possible RP infection. We followed patients who had International Classification of Diseases 10th edition code M94.1 at least once in their inpatient or outpatient records between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013 in Hungary. We classified these patients into disease severity groups by their drug consumption patterns between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. We analyzed the regional distribution of RP incidences as well. Overall maps of comorbidity are presented with network layouts. Results We identified 256 patients with RP among cumulatively 11.5 million registered inhabitants. We classified these patients into four severity classes as “extremely mild” (n=144), “mild” (n=22), “moderate” (n=41), and “severe” (n=4). Two additional groups were defined for patients without available drug data as “suspected only” (n=23) and “confirmed but unknown treatment” (n=22). The age and sex distributions of patients were similar to worldwide statistics. Indeed, the overall survival was good (95% confidence interval for 5 years was 83.6%–92.9% and for 10 years was 75.0%–88.3% which corresponds to the overall survival of the general population in Hungary), and the associations with other autoimmune disorders were high (56%) in Hungary. Almost any disease can occur with RP; however, the symptoms of chromosomal abnormalities are only incidental. Spondylosis can be a sign of the activation of RP, while Sjögren syndrome is the most frequent

  15. Relapsing polychondritis: prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors, and general disease features according to gender.

    PubMed

    Pallo, Pablo Arturo Olivo; Levy-Neto, Maurício; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    The comorbidities in relapsing polychondritis have been scarcely described in the literature. Moreover, apart from a few relapsing polychondritis epidemiological studies, no studies specifically addressing relapsing polychondritis distribution according to gender are available. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were: (a) to analyze the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors in a series of patients with relapsing polychondritis; (b) to determine the influence of gender on relapsing polychondritis. A cross-sectional tertiary single center study evaluating 30 relapsing polychondritis cases from 1990 to 2016 was carried out. To compare comorbidities, 60 healthy individuals matched for age-, gender-, ethnicity- and body mass index were recruited. The mean age of relapsing polychondritis patients was 49.0±12.4 years, the median disease duration 6.0 years, and 70% were women. A higher frequency of arterial hypertension (53.3% vs. 23.3%; p=0.008) and diabetes mellitus (16.7% vs. 3.3%; p=0.039) was found in the relapsing polychondritis group, compared to the control group. As an additional analysis, patients were compared according to gender distribution (9 men vs. 21 women). The clinical disease onset features were comparable in both genders. However, over the follow-up period, male patients had a greater prevalence of hearing loss, vestibular disorder and uveitis events, and also received more cyclophosphamide therapy (p<0.05). There was a high prevalence of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and the male patients seemed to have worse prognosis than the female patients in the follow up. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  16. Refractory relapsing polychondritis in a child treated with antiCD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab): first case report.

    PubMed

    Abdwani, Reem; Kolethekkat, Arif Ali; Al Abri, Rashid

    2012-07-01

    To report the first case of refractory relapsing polychondritis in a child who was treated with the biological agent, rituximab, an antiCD20 monoclonal antibody. The case is reported with a review of the literature on the use of biological agents in the treatment of refractory relapsing polychondritis. A 10-year-old boy presented with relapsing polychondritis who was treated initially with prednisolone and methotrexate. As there was no response to the treatment, anti TNF antagonist infliximab was given but with a failed response. A subsequent therapy with rituximab produced significant clinical remission with no recurrence at 1 year. Relapsing polychondritis unresponsive to primary treatment modalities but treated with various biological agents in adult have been well described in adults but not reported in children age below 13 yrs. Hence we present this case report. Biological agents such as rituximab has promising role in children when primary treatment fails as reported in our case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fever of unknown origin in a patient with red ears: relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Avila, Juliana Nunes; Carvalho, Susana Bonacho; Tavares, Graça; Garcia, Ruben

    2014-02-07

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease that affects cartilage and multiple organ system. We describe a case of RP presenting with fever, conjunctivitis and inflammatory signs of the right knee. Infectious and neoplastic diseases were excluded by imaging and laboratory examinations. After 17 days of admission the patient reported coughing and odynophagia, and, a physical examination showed red ears. Otorhinolaryngological examination demonstrated arytenoid chondritis. RP was diagnosed based on four McAdam's criteria. The patient was medicated with oral prednisone, and a positive clinical response was noted. Severe disease may require high doses of corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents and the biological treatment may be beneficial. Beginning manifestations, such as fever, are often unspecific, leading to RP misdiagnosis. In this case, close attention to the patient's clinical history and a detailed physical examination were fundamental in concluding the correct diagnosis, and consequently beginning the appropriate medication.

  18. [Placement of an ultraflex nitinol stent for severe tracheobronchial obstruction in a case of relapsing polychondritis].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroo; Shimane, Shoko; Morita, Sumihito; Yamada, Takashi; Ida, Masaaki; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Nagayama, Masaharu; Iwakiri, Shotaro; Chihara, Koji; Hirata, Takeo

    2005-05-01

    A 59-year-old man, who had been treated for bronchial asthma since 2000, was hospitalized with high fever and productive cough in November 2003. Chest radiography on admission showed consolidations in both lower lung fields, and computed tomography demonstrated anteroposterior narrowing of both main bronchi. A physical examination revealed deformity of auricular cartilage and saddle nose, and we diagnosed him relapsing polychondritis (RP). When he was readmitted 4 months later because of severe tracheobronchial stenosis and respiratory failure he required mechanical ventilation, but it was difficult to wean him from the ventilator. Self-expandable metallic stents were placed in the left main bronchus and the trachea. After the procedure, he was successfully weared from mechanical ventilation. Since airway complications of RP can be fatal, stent implantation should be considered in the management of RP with airway manifestations.

  19. Relapsing polychondritis associated with psoriasis vulgaris successfully treated with adalimumab: A case report with published work review.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Haruka; Asahina, Akihiko; Fukuda, Takeshi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2017-03-07

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune-mediated disease characterized by inflammation involving cartilaginous tissues. We report here a case of RP in a 38-year-old Japanese man with 13-year duration of psoriasis vulgaris treated with topical steroids and vitamin D3 . The patient presented with tender swelling and erythema of both auricles, and the antibody to type II collagen was detected. The biopsy specimen revealed a dense mixed cell infiltration over the auricular cartilage. We reviewed eight cases with the association of RP and psoriasis, and in all cases the clinical course of psoriasis did not correlate with that of RP. The severity of RP was mild in the majority of cases, and our case was unique in that the patient had no joint symptoms. Adalimumab treatment was effective for both RP and psoriasis. Fat-suppressed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was beneficial, not only to demonstrate subclinical inflammation in the nasal septum, but also to subjectively assess the improvement of RP.

  20. Serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) level is a marker of disease activity in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Kempta Lekpa, F; Piette, J C; Bastuji-Garin, S; Kraus, V B; Stabler, T V; Poole, A R; Marini-Portugal, A; Chevalier, X

    2010-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare and severe disease which may lead to destruction of elastic cartilages. Until now, no reliable biomarker of disease activity in RP has been available. This study was designed to measure serum levels of cartilage biomarkers during both active and inactive phases of the disease. Serum levels of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope (CS846) of proteoglycan aggrecan and collagen type II collagenase cleavage neoepitope (C2C) were measured retrospectively in 21 subjects with RP. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test was used for statistical comparisons of biomarker levels in active and inactive phases of RP. Only the serum level of COMP was significantly increased during disease flares. Steroids did not alter the serum cartilage-related biomarker levels. However, during the active phase, C2C levels were significantly higher in steroid treated patients compared with non-steroid treated patients. This study suggests that serum COMP level may be useful for monitoring disease activity of RP. Further prospective studies are required to confirm this result.

  1. Relapsing polychondritis with p-ANCA associated vasculitis: Which triggers the other?

    PubMed Central

    File, Ibolya; Trinn, Csilla; Mátyus, Zsolt; Ujhelyi, László; Balla, József; Mátyus, János

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease with chronic inflammatory/destructive lesions of the cartilaginous tissues. In one third of the cases it is associated with other autoimmune disorders, mostly with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV). We report three cases of RP with p-ANCA positive AAV. In the first patient RP developed 1.5 years after the onset of AAV. In the others the signs of RP were present before the onset of severe crescent glomerulonephritis. Patients responded well on steroid and cyclophosphamide. In dialysis dependent cases plasmapheresis was also used successfully. During the 2 and 1.5 years of follow up, they were symptom-free, and had stable glomerular filtration rate. The first patient died after four years of follow-up due to the complications of sudden unset pancytopenia, which raises the possibility of associated hemophagocytic syndrome. In the setting of RP or AAV physicians should always be aware of the possibility of sudden or insidious appearance of the other disease. PMID:25516870

  2. Local Cartilage Trauma as a Pathogenic Factor in Autoimmunity (One Hypothesis Based on Patients with Relapsing Polychondritis Triggered by Cartilage Trauma)

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Carlos A.; Bonilla Abadía, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, it has been of great interest to study the binding mechanism between the innate and adaptive immune responses as interrelated processes for the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. Infection has been a well-known trigger of autoimmunity and trauma has been related as well too. Cryptogenic antigens release, recognition of pathogenic structure, and metabolic changes generated by both stimuli begin an inflammatory process which in turn activates the immune system amplifying T and B cell responses. The development of relapsing polychondritis after trauma may have a direct association with these events and in turn probably trigger autoimmune phenomena. PMID:22110903

  3. Relapsing polychondritis: prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors, and general disease features according to gender.

    PubMed

    Pallo, Pablo Arturo Olivo; Levy-Neto, Maurício; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2017-02-20

    The comorbidities in relapsing polychondritis (RP) have been scarcely described in the literature. Moreover, apart from a few RP epidemiological studies, no studies specifically addressing RP distribution according to gender are available. Therefore, the objetives of the present study were: (a) to analyse the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and its risk factors in a series of patients with RP; (b) to determine the influence of gender on RP. A cross-sectional tertiary single center study evaluating 30 RP cases from 1990 to 2016 was carried out. To compare comorbidities, 60 healthy individuals matched for age-, gender-, ethnicity- and body mass index were recruted. The mean age of RP patientes was 49.0±12.4 years, the median disease duration 6.0 years, and 70% were women. A higher frequency of arterial hypertension (53.3% vs. 23.3%; p=0.008) and diabetes mellitus (16.7% vs. 3.3%; p=0.039) was found in the RP group, compared to the control group. As an additional analysis, patients were compared according to gender distribution (9 men vs. 21 women). The clinical disease onset features were comparable in both genders. However, over the follow-up period, male patients had a greater prevalence of hearing loss, vestibular disorder and uveitis events, and also received more cyclophosphamide therapy (p<0.05). There was a high prevalence of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus, and the male patients seemed to have worse prognosis than the female patients in the follow up.

  4. 3-D printouts of the tracheobronchial tree generated from CT images as an aid to management in a case of tracheobronchial chondromalacia caused by relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Matthew David; Laycock, Stephen David; Jayne, David; Babar, Judith; Noble, Brendon

    2013-08-01

    This report concerns a 67 year old male patient with known advanced relapsing polychondritis complicated by tracheobronchial chondromalacia who is increasingly symptomatic and therapeutic options such as tracheostomy and stenting procedures are being considered. The DICOM files from the patient's dynamic chest CT in its inspiratory and expiratory phases were used to generate stereolithography (STL) files and hence print out 3-D models of the patient's trachea and central airways. The 4 full-sized models allowed better understanding of the extent and location of any stenosis or malacic change and should aid any planned future stenting procedures. The future possibility of using the models as scaffolding to generate a new cartilaginous upper airway using regenerative medical techniques is also discussed.

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT is an ideal imaging modality for the early diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, JianJie; Liu, XiaoFei; Pu, Chaoyu; Chen, Yan

    2017-07-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that may affect multiple cartilage throughout the body. We report on a middle-aged man presented with cough, chest tightness, and fever of unknown origin, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-FDG PET/CT) was performed. And the imaging shows multiple increased FDG accumulation in tracheobronchial tree and all intercostal cartilages, as well as in nasal, right auricule, laryngeal cartilage. Based on the findings, the diagnosis of RP was made. Our case demonstrates that FDG PET/CT is an useful diagnostic tool to accurately determine the extent of inflammation throughout the body and to guiding the selection of a biopsy site.

  6. 3-D printouts of the tracheobronchial tree generated from CT images as an aid to management in a case of tracheobronchial chondromalacia caused by relapsing polychondritis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Matthew David; Laycock, Stephen David; Jayne, David; Babar, Judith; Noble, Brendon

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns a 67 year old male patient with known advanced relapsing polychondritis complicated by tracheobronchial chondromalacia who is increasingly symptomatic and therapeutic options such as tracheostomy and stenting procedures are being considered. The DICOM files from the patient’s dynamic chest CT in its inspiratory and expiratory phases were used to generate stereolithography (STL) files and hence print out 3-D models of the patient’s trachea and central airways. The 4 full-sized models allowed better understanding of the extent and location of any stenosis or malacic change and should aid any planned future stenting procedures. The future possibility of using the models as scaffolding to generate a new cartilaginous upper airway using regenerative medical techniques is also discussed. PMID:24421951

  7. LIMBIC ENCEPHALITIS ASSOCIATED WITH RELAPSING POLYCHONDRITIS RESPONDED TO INFLIXIMAB AND MAINTAINED ITS CONDITION WITHOUT RECURRENCE AFTER DISCONTINUATION: A CASE REPORT AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    KONDO, TAKESHI; FUKUTA, MAMIKO; TAKEMOTO, AYUMU; TAKAMI, YUICHIRO; SATO, MOTOKI; TAKAHASHI, NORIYUKI; SUZUKI, TOMIO; SATO, JUICHI; ATSUTA, NAOKI; SOBUE, GEN; TAKAHASHI, YUKITOSHI; BAN, NOBUTARO

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Central nervous system (CNS) manifestations are rare complications of relapsing polychondritis (RP). The majority of patients respond well to glucocorticoid therapy, but need to maintain it. Some patients are refractory to initial glucocorticoid therapy and to additional immunosuppressants, and end up with an outcome worse than at therapy initiation. The standardized therapeutic protocol for this condition has not been established. The effects of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α agents have been reported recently. We experienced a patient with RP and limbic encephalitis who was refractory to initial high-dose glucocorticoid, but subsequently responded to infliximab and did not show deterioration of signs and symptoms after stopping therapy. We report this case together with a systematic literature review. This is the first case report of RP with CNS manifestations successfully treated by an anti-TNF-α agent without recurrence after discontinuation. PMID:25741046

  8. A 66-Year-Old Man With a Past History of Relapsing Polychondritis Presented With Right Upper Lobe Consolidation, Nodular Airway Lesions, and a Corticosteroid-Responsive Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Balzano, Carlos D; Sosa, Andres; O'Reilly, Sean; Gong, Yuna; Irwin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    A 66-year-old male nonsmoker from Arizona was referred to our practice for evaluation of chronic cough. He had a history of biopsy-proven relapsing polychondritis manifesting as right auricular and nasal pain and swelling 9 months prior to presentation. The onset of his cough coincided with the diagnosis of relapsing polychondritis, and he was prescribed prednisone 90 mg/d, which promptly relieved his rheumatologic and respiratory symptoms. A chest radiograph, obtained prior to the initiation of therapy, was normal. Any attempts at decreasing the dose of the glucocorticoid to < 30 mg/d resulted in recurrence of the cough but not of the auricular or nasal symptoms. A second chest radiograph done 6 months before presentation, while the patient was receiving prednisone 20 mg/d, was normal as well. In anticipation of our evaluation, he stopped all glucocorticoids for 7 days. He was not receiving any other medications, and he had no history of an atopic diathesis.

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. PMID:27668104

  10. Refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: optimizing involved-field radiotherapy in transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Shannon T; Flowers, Christopher R; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed efficacy, optimal dosage and timing, and toxicity of involved-field radiotherapy used in conjunction with high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation for patients with refractory/relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. 306 patients with refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were analyzed. Forty-one patients underwent involved-field radiotherapy in conjunction with high-dose chemotherapy and bone marrow or peripheral stem cell transplantation. Thirty-three patients received involved-field radiotherapy prior to stem cell transplantation directed at symptomatic and/or bulky sites; eight patients received involved-field radiotherapy after stem cell transplantation directed at sites of persistent disease. The other 265 patients with refractory/relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease received high-dose chemotherapy/stem cell transplantation, but not involved-field radiotherapy. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression to determine the risk of death among patients treated with stem cell transplantation compared with that among patients treated with stem cell transplantation and involved-field radiotherapy. There were 124 deaths during the follow-up period, including 17% of the patients treated with involved-field radiotherapy and 44.2% of the patients receiving chemotherapy without involved-field radiotherapy. Multivariate analysis found that patients who did not receive involved-field radiotherapy were 2.09 times more likely to die during the follow-up period than patients who received involved-field radiotherapy (P = 0.066; adjusted for age, stem cell transplantation type, stage I/II vs stage III/IV, refractory vs relapsed, and Hodgkin's disease vs non-Hodgkin's lymphoma). When patients were treated with involved-field radiotherapy prior to stem cell transplantation, 27 (79.4%) of the 34 patients achieved local control; when involved-field radiotherapy followed

  11. Relapse and relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Litvin, Erika B

    2007-01-01

    Most psychological disorders and problem behaviors are characterized by very high rates of postremittance relapse. Thus, advances in the long-term efficacy of psychological interventions require understanding the causes and processes of relapse, with the ultimate goal of developing strategies that reduce the probability of relapse. Existing psychological theory and interventions relevant to relapse and relapse prevention (RP) are reviewed, with a focus on addictive behaviors. The past two decades have produced increased attention toward the relapse problem and important advances in the conceptualization of relapse (i.e., as a process rather than a discrete event). Further progress will require the translation of basic theory into applied theory, the development of integrative theories of relapse, and the design and testing of theory-based, multimodal RP interventions.

  12. [Chronic atrophic polychondritis and renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis: a case report and literature review (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lambrozo, J; Baubion, D; Brodaty, Y; Leclerc, J P

    1981-01-01

    Glomerular lesions with a nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function developed secondary to a chronic atrophic polychondritis confirmed by auricular biopsy. In the absence of renal histology data, the possibility of an iatrogenic complication or a renal lesion specific to the affection itself were successively eliminated. Pos-mortem histological examination demonstrated renal and cardiopulmonary amylosis, the latter being clinically asymptomatic. The probable autoimmune origin of the chronic atrophic polychondritis has to be discussed in parallel with the dysimmunity mechanism responsible for the amyloid lesions, but no relationship between them was demonstrated.

  13. Central nervous system involvement in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia at diagnosis and/or at first relapse: results from the GET-LALA group.

    PubMed

    Reman, Oumedaly; Pigneux, Arnaud; Huguet, Françoise; Vey, Norbert; Delannoy, André; Fegueux, Nathalie; de Botton, Stéphane; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Tournilhac, Olivier; Buzyn, Agnès; Charrin, Christiane; Boucheix, Claude; Gabert, Jean; Lhéritier, Véronique; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Fière, Denis; Dombret, Hervé; Thomas, Xavier

    2008-11-01

    Outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with central nervous system (CNS) involvement is not clearly defined. We studied 104 patients presenting with CNS involvement at diagnosis among 1493 patients (7%) included into the LALA trials, and 109 patients presenting CNS disease at the time of first relapse among the 709 relapsing patients (15%). Eighty-seven patients (84%) with CNS leukemia at diagnosis achieved complete remission (CR). Fifty-three patients underwent stem cell transplantation (SCT): 25 allogeneic SCT, 28 autologous SCT, while 34 continued with chemotherapy alone. Seven-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 34% and 35%, respectively. There were no significant differences in terms of CR, OS and DFS among patients with CNS involvement at diagnosis and those without CNS disease. There were also no differences among the two groups regarding T lineage ALL, B lineage ALL, and among those who underwent SCT. After a first relapse, 38 patients with CNS recurrence (35%) achieved a second CR. The median OS was 6.3 months. Outcome was similar to that of relapsing patients without CNS disease. CNS leukemia in adult ALL is uncommon at diagnosis as well as at the time of first relapse. With intensification therapy, patients with CNS leukemia at diagnosis have a similar outcome than those who did not present with CNS involvement. CNS leukemia at first relapse remains of similar poor prognosis than all other adult ALL in first relapse.

  14. The Involvement of Oxytocin in the Subthalamic Nucleus on Relapse to Methamphetamine-Seeking Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Baracz, Sarah Jane; Everett, Nicholas Adams; Cornish, Jennifer Louise

    2015-01-01

    The psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive drug of abuse. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to modulate METH-related reward and METH-seeking behaviour. Recent findings implicated the subthalamic nucleus (STh) as a key brain region in oxytocin modulation of METH-induced reward. However, it is unclear if oxytocin acts in this region to attenuate relapse to METH-seeking behaviour, and if this action is through the oxytocin receptor. We aimed to determine whether oxytocin pretreatment administered into the STh would reduce reinstatement to METH use in rats experienced at METH self-administration, and if this could be reversed by the co-administration of the oxytocin receptor antagonist desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent surgery to implant an intravenous jugular vein catheter and bilateral microinjection cannulae into the STh under isoflourane anaesthesia. Rats were then trained to self-administer intravenous METH (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) by lever press during 2-hour sessions under a fixed ratio 1 schedule for 20 days. Following extinction of lever press activity, the effect of microinjecting saline, oxytocin (0.2 pmol, 0.6 pmol, 1.8 pmol, 3.6 pmol) or co-administration of oxytocin (3.6 pmol) and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT (3 nmol) into the STh (200 nl/side) was examined on METH-primed reinstatement (1 mg/kg; i.p.). We found that local administration of the highest oxytocin dose (3.6 pmol) into the STh decreased METH-induced reinstatement and desGly-NH2,d(CH2)5[D-Tyr2,Thr4]OVT had a non-specific effect on lever press activity. These findings highlight that oxytocin modulation of the STh is an important modulator of relapse to METH abuse. PMID:26284529

  15. Features of extramedullary myeloma relapse: high proliferation, minimal marrow involvement, adverse cytogenetics: a retrospective single-center study of 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Leo; Bernard, Corinna; Topp, Max S; Kapp, Markus; Duell, Johannes; Wesemeier, Carmen; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Maeder, Uwe; Einsele, Hermann; Knop, Stefan

    2012-07-01

    Extramedullary (e) relapse in multiple myeloma(MM) has an adverse prognosis, but knowledge concerning biological features and preferred treatment is scarce. We screened the myeloma registry of our institution for eMM relapses and identified 24 cases among 357 patients (pts).Only 8% of eMM relapses occurred after initial therapy, but 54% occurred after third-line or subsequent therapy. Baseline molecular cytogenetics revealed high-risk features in 10 of 19 evaluable patients. Most frequently, eMM presented as soft tissue (67%) and organ involvement (25%) or malignant effusion (12.5%). Incidence of leptomeningeal/CNS involvement was 21%. At eMM relapse, bone marrow infiltration was absent in 46% and low in 21%. Ten eMM biopsies were available showing increased proliferation, i.e., Ki-67 of 67%(range, 30–90%) of all cancer cells. Pts received radiation therapy, dose-intense chemotherapy, novel agents, and allogeneic SCT resulting in an overall response rate of 54%. Median progression-free survival was 2 (95% CI 0.08–3.92) and median overall survival 7 months (95% CI 3.56–10.43), respectively,with only three patients being alive at 12 months from diagnosis. EMM relapse may present at any anatomical site with frequent CNS involvement. Biological features include increased proliferation and low rate of marrow involvement.Prognosis remains poor despite intensive treatment.

  16. Comparative proteomic profiling of refractory/relapsed multiple myeloma reveals biomarkers involved in resistance to bortezomib-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Tomasz; Usnarska-Zubkiewicz, Lidia; Brzezniakiewicz, Katarzyna; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof; Przybylowicz-Chalecka, Anna; Ratajczak, Blazej; Czerwinska-Rybak, Joanna; Nowicki, Adam; Joks, Monika; Czechowska, Elzbieta; Zawartko, Magdalena; Szczepaniak, Tomasz; Grzasko, Norbert; Morawska, Marta; Bochenek, Maciej; Kubicki, Tadeusz; Morawska, Michalina; Tusznio, Katarzyna; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers of the resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) is a key research challenge. We aimed to identify proteins that differentiate plasma cells in patients with refractory/relapsed MM (RRMM) who achieved at least very good partial response (VGPR) and in those with reduced response to PAD chemotherapy (bortezomib, doxorubicin and dexamethasone). Comparative proteomic analysis was conducted on pretreatment plasma cells from 77 proteasome inhibitor naïve patients treated subsequently with PAD due to RRMM. To increase data confidence we used two independent proteomic platforms: isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) and label free (LF). Proteins were considered as differentially expressed when their accumulation between groups differed by at least 50% in iTRAQ and LF. The proteomic signature revealed 118 proteins (35 up-regulated and 83 down-regulated in ≥ VGPR group). Proteins were classified into four classes: (1) involved in proteasome function; (2) involved in the response to oxidative stress; (3) related to defense response; and (4) regulating the apoptotic process. We confirmed the differential expression of proteasome activator complex subunit 1 (PSME1) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Increased expression of proteasomes and proteins involved in protection from oxidative stress (eg., TXN, TXNDC5) plays a major role in bortezomib resistance. PMID:27527861

  17. Extended-Release Naltrexone To Prevent Relapse Among Opioid Dependent, Criminal Justice System Involved Adults: Rationale and Design of a Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua D.; Friedmann, Peter D.; Boney, Tamara Y.; Hoskinson, Randall A.; McDonald, Ryan; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T.; Bonnie, Richard J.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Nunes, Edward V.; Cornish, James W.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX, Vivitrol® Alkermes Inc.) is an injectable monthly sustained-release mu opioid receptor antagonist. XR-NTX is a potentially effective intervention for opioid use disorders and as relapse prevention among criminal justice system (CJS) populations. Methods This 5-site open-label randomized controlled effectiveness trial examines whether XR-NTX reduces opioid relapse compared with treatment as usual (TAU) among community dwelling, non-incarcerated volunteers with current or recent CJS involvement. The XR-NTX arm receives 6 monthly XR-NTX injections at Medical Management visits; the TAU group receives referrals to available community treatment options. Assessments occur every 2 weeks during a 24-week treatment phase and at 12- and 18-month follow-ups. The primary outcome is a relapse event, defined as either self-report or urine toxicology evidence of ≥10 days of opioid use in a 28-day (4 week) period, with a positive or missing urine test counted as 5 days of opioid use. Results We describe the rationale, specific aims, and design of the study. Alternative design considerations and extensive secondary aims and outcomes are discussed. Conclusions XR-NTX is a potentially important treatment and relapse prevention option among persons with opioid dependence and CJS involvement. PMID:25602580

  18. Extended-release naltrexone to prevent relapse among opioid dependent, criminal justice system involved adults: rationale and design of a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Boney, Tamara Y; Hoskinson, Randall A; McDonald, Ryan; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T; Bonnie, Richard J; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Cornish, James W; O'Brien, Charles P

    2015-03-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX, Vivitrol; Alkermes Inc.) is an injectable monthly sustained-release mu opioid receptor antagonist. XR-NTX is a potentially effective intervention for opioid use disorders and as relapse prevention among criminal justice system (CJS) populations. This 5-site open-label randomized controlled effectiveness trial examines whether XR-NTX reduces opioid relapse compared with treatment as usual (TAU) among community dwelling, non-incarcerated volunteers with current or recent CJS involvement. The XR-NTX arm receives 6 monthly XR-NTX injections at Medical Management visits; the TAU group receives referrals to available community treatment options. Assessments occur every 2 weeks during a 24-week treatment phase and at 12- and 18-month follow-ups. The primary outcome is a relapse event, defined as either self-report or urine toxicology evidence of ≥10 days of opioid use in a 28-day (4 week) period, with a positive or missing urine test counted as 5 days of opioid use. We describe the rationale, specific aims, and design of the study. Alternative design considerations and extensive secondary aims and outcomes are discussed. XR-NTX is a potentially important treatment and relapse prevention option among persons with opioid dependence and CJS involvement. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00781898. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  20. Does the addition of involved field radiotherapy to high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation improve outcomes for patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu, Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p=0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p=0.032) and 0.383 (p=0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p<0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative chemotherapy conditioning regimens should be considered

  1. Family member involvement in relapse prevention improves alcohol dependence outcomes: a prospective study at an addiction treatment facility in India.

    PubMed

    Nattala, Prasanthi; Leung, Kit Sang; Nagarajaiah; Murthy, Pratima

    2010-07-01

    The aims of this study were to test if outcomes would be different when family members of alcohol-dependent individuals were included in intervention and to examine the factors associated with relapse during a 6-month follow-up period. Ninety male participants admitted for 3 weeks at an inpatient facility in India were randomly assigned to individual relapse prevention (IRP), dyadic relapse prevention (DRP), and treatment as usual (TAU), with 30 participants in each group. In IRP, intervention was administered to the individual participant. In DRP, both the participant and a family member were included in intervention. In all three conditions, family members stayed in the facility with participants. Participants were followed up for 6 months after discharge from the treatment center. DRP consistently performed better than TAU on all of the outcomes (reduction in quantity of alcohol, drinking days, and number of days with dysfunction in family, occupational, and financial dimensions). DRP participants also reported a significant reduction in the quantity of alcohol, drinking days, and family problems, compared with IRP. Results of Cox regression showed that being in IRP/TAU groups, early-onset dependence (<25 years), and paternal history of alcohol dependence were associated with relapse after adjusting for baseline alcohol use and other covariates. Findings provide evidence for the effectiveness of Western-based family-oriented intervention for alcohol-dependent patients in India; also, findings might help to alert treatment providers that some subsets of alcohol users might need more tailored interventions and rigorous monitoring during follow-up.

  2. Elevated Serum IgG4 Levels in Diagnosis, Treatment Response, Organ Involvement, and Relapse in a Prospective IgG4-Related Disease UK Cohort.

    PubMed

    Culver, Emma L; Sadler, Ross; Simpson, Dawn; Cargill, Tamsin; Makuch, Mateusz; Bateman, Adrian C; Ellis, Anthony J; Collier, Jane; Chapman, Roger W; Klenerman, P; Barnes, Eleanor; Ferry, Berne

    2016-05-01

    Elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) levels have been associated with autoimmune pancreatitis and IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) for over a decade. However, an elevated serum IgG4 is not specific for the disease. There have been inconsistent reports of its use in diagnosis, as a marker of disease relapse, and its relationship to organ involvement in retrospective cohorts. The aims of this study were to ascertain conditions that are associated with an elevated serum IgG4 and to investigate the role of IgG4 in diagnosis, relapse, and organ involvement in a prospective cohort of patients with IgG4-RD. We evaluated serum IgG4 measurements in the Oxford Immunology Laboratory over 6 years. Patients in whom serum IgG4 was requested to differentiate IgG4-RD from other diseases were recruited into a longitudinal follow-up study to determine final diagnosis. In a prospective cohort of IgG4-RD patients, organ involvement, response to therapy, and disease relapse were determined. Two thousand and sixty-seven samples from 1,510 patients had serum IgG4 measured. Of these, IgG4 was elevated (≥1.4 g l(-1)) in 243 (16.1%) patients. The main indication (85.6%) was to distinguish between IgG4-RD and non-IgG4-RD conditions. Only 5.1% of patients who had serum IgG4 measured for this purpose had a final diagnosis of IgG4-RD. Of those with an elevated serum IgG4, 22.4% met IgG4-RD diagnostic criteria. Serum IgG4 was elevated in 48 (82.8%) of IgG4-RD patients. An IgG4 cutoff of 1.4 g l(-1) gave a sensitivity of 82.8% and specificity of 84.7% to diagnose IgG4-RD. Increasing this to 2.8 g l(-1) increased specificity to 96.2% and negative predictive value to 97.7%, with a lower sensitivity of 56.9% and positive predictive value of 44.5%. Serum IgG4 levels fell with corticosteroid therapy, but this was not disease-specific. A serum IgG4 of ≥2.8 g l(-1) at diagnosis was associated with multi-organ involvement and risk of relapse. Serum IgG4 levels are elevated in

  3. Louse-Borne Relapsing Fever with Meningeal Involvement in an Immigrant from Somalia to Italy, October 2015.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Antonelli, Alberto; Bartolini, Laura; Pecile, Patrizia; Trotta, Michele; Rogasi, Pier Giorgio; Santini, Maria Grazia; Dilaghi, Beatrice; Grifoni, Stefano; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Borrelia recurrentis, transmitted by Pediculus humanus humanus, is the etiological agent of louse-borne relapsing fever (LBRF). Currently the main focus of endemicity of LBRF is localized in East African countries. From July 2015 to October 2015, 36 cases of LBRF have been diagnosed in Europe in immigrants from the Horn of Africa. Here we report a case of LBRF with meningitis diagnosed in Florence, Italy, in an immigrant arrived from Somalia. In October 2015, a 19-year-old Somali male presented to the emergency department of the Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy, with a 3-day history of high fever. The patient had disembarked in Sicily 10 days before admission after a long migration trip from his country of origin. On clinical examination, neck stiffness was found. Main laboratory findings were thrombocytopenia, increased procalcitonin, and increased polymorphonucleates in the cerebrospinal fluid. Suspecting a possible meningitis, the patient was treated with ceftriaxone, pending results of laboratory testing for malaria, and developed severe hypotension that was treated with fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone. Hemoscopic testing revealed the presence of spirochetes and no malaria parasites. The patient rapidly improved with doxycycline for 7 days and ceftriaxone for 11 days, then was lost to follow-up. Total DNA from blood was extracted, and amplification and sequencing with universal 16S rDNA primers D88 and E94 revealed a 100% identity with B. recurrentis A1. LBRF is a rare but emerging infectious disease among vulnerable displaced immigrants from the Horn of Africa. Since immigrants from endemic areas can carry the vector with them, the infection should be suspected even in subjects with compatible clinical features living in the same place where new arrival immigrants are hosted. Healthcare providers should be aware of this condition to implement adequate diagnostic, therapeutic, and public health measures.

  4. Upfront Chemotherapy and Involved-Field Radiotherapy Results in More Relapses Than Extended Radiotherapy for Intracranial Germinomas: Modification in Radiotherapy Volume Might Be Needed

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Kim, Il Han Park, Charn Il; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jin Ho.; Kim, Kyubo; Kim, Seung Ki; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Cho, Byung-Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won; Heo, Dae Seog; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the outcome of upfront chemotherapy plus radiotherapy (CRT) and the outcome of the use of extended radiotherapy (RT) only for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: Of 81 patients with tissue-confirmed intracranial germinoma, 42 underwent CRT and 39 underwent RT only. For CRT, one to five cycles of upfront chemotherapy was followed by involved-field or extended-field RT, for which the dose was dependent on the M stage. For RT only, all 39 patients underwent craniospinal RT alone. The median follow-up was 68 months. Results: The 5- and 10-year overall survival rate was 100% and 92.5% for RT alone and 92.9% and 92.9% for CRT, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 100.0% for RT and 88.1% for CRT (p = 0.0279). No recurrences developed in patients given RT, but four relapses developed in patients who had received CRT-three in the brain and one in the spine. Only one patient achieved complete remission from salvage treatment. The proportion of patients requiring hormonal replacement was greater for patients who received RT than for those who had received CRT (p = 0.0106). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that the better quality of life provided by CRT was compensated for by the greater rate of relapse. The possible benefit of including the ventricles in involved-field RT after upfront chemotherapy, specifically for patients with initial negative seeding, should be addressed in a prospective study.

  5. Central nervous system involvement at first relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline monochemotherapy without intrathecal prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos, Pau; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquín; Debén, Guillermo; Prates, Virginia; Tormo, Mar; Rubio, Vicente; Pérez, Inmaculada; Fernández, Isolda; Viguria, Maricruz; Rayón, Chelo; González, José; de la Serna, Javier; Esteve, Jordi; Bergua, Juan M.; Rivas, Concha; González, Marcos; González, Jose D.; Negri, Silvia; Brunet, Salut; Lowenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The prevalence of and risk factors for central nervous system recurrence in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia are not well established and remain a controversial matter. Design and Methods Between 1996 and 2005, 739 patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia enrolled in two consecutive trials (PETHEMA LPA96 and LPA99) received induction therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and idarubicin. Consolidation therapy comprised three courses of anthracycline monochemotherapy (LPA96), with all-trans retinoic acid and reinforced doses of idarubicin in patients with an intermediate or high risk of relapse (LPA99). Central nervous system prophylaxis was not given. Results Central nervous system relapse was documented in 11 patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of central nervous system relapse was 1.7% (LPA96 3.2% and LPA99 1.2%; p=0.09). The cumulative incidence was 0%, 0.8%, and 5.5% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Relapse risk score (p=0.0001) and the occurrence of central nervous system hemorrhage during induction (5-year cumulative incidence 18.7%, p=0.006) were independent risk factors for central nervous system relapse. Conclusions This study shows a low incidence of central nervous system relapse in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia following therapy with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline without specific central nervous system prophylaxis. Central nervous system relapse was significantly associated with high white blood cell counts and prior central nervous system hemorrhage, which emerged as independent prognostic factors. PMID:19608685

  6. The DARE study of relapse prevention in depression: design for a phase 1/2 translational randomised controlled trial involving mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and supported self monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Depression is a common condition that typically has a relapsing course. Effective interventions targeting relapse have the potential to dramatically reduce the point prevalence of the condition. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based intervention that has shown efficacy in reducing depressive relapse. While trials of MBCT to date have met the core requirements of phase 1 translational research, there is a need now to move to phase 2 translational research - the application of MBCT within real-world settings with a view to informing policy and clinical practice. The aim of this trial is to examine the clinical impact and health economics of MBCT under real-world conditions and where efforts have been made to assess for and prevent resentful demoralization among the control group. Secondary aims of the project involve extending the phase 1 agenda to an examination of the effects of co-morbidity and mechanisms of action. Methods/Design This study is designed as a prospective, multi-site, single-blind, randomised controlled trial using a group comparison design between involving the intervention, MBCT, and a self-monitoring comparison condition, Depression Relapse Active Monitoring (DRAM). Follow-up is over 2 years. The design of the study indicates recruitment from primary and secondary care of 204 participants who have a history of 3 or more episodes of Major Depression but who are currently well. Measures assessing depressive relapse/recurrence, time to first clinical intervention, treatment expectancy and a range of secondary outcomes and process variables are included. A health economics evaluation will be undertaken to assess the incremental cost of MBCT. Discussion The results of this trial, including an examination of clinical, functional and health economic outcomes, will be used to assess the role that this treatment approach may have in recommendations for treatment of depression in Australia and elsewhere. If the

  7. Psychological and environmental determinants of relapse in crack cocaine smokers.

    PubMed

    Wallace, B C

    1989-01-01

    The paper reviews approaches to relapse in the treatment of cocaine abusers. Approaches reveal a common mechanism underlying relapse that involves drug craving, recall of euphoria, environmental cues, denial, myths of being able to sell or use drugs, and painful affect states necessitating use of a multifaceted clinical technique. Empirical validation of a common mechanism underlying relapse establishes a typology of psychological and environmental determinants of relapse for crack cocaine smokers (N = 35) who relapse after hospital detoxification and return a second time. Major findings are that relapse follows a painful emotional state (40%), failure to enter arranged aftercare treatment (37%), or encounters with conditioned environmental stimuli (34%), and involves narcissistic psychopathology and denial (28.5%) and interpersonal stress (24%); 85.7% involve multideterminants. Case examples illustrate the role of multideterminants in relapse. The paper educates clinicians to the integrated theory and multifaceted clinical technique necessary for efficacious treatment of cocaine patients, while the typology predicts probable relapse situations.

  8. Isotretinoin and acne--a study of relapses.

    PubMed

    Chivot, M; Midoun, H

    1990-01-01

    A study was carried out involving 172 patients with acne which warranted treatment with isotretinoin. Patients were followed up for between 12 and 41 months after discontinuation of treatment and the number of relapses was assessed. 37 patients (21%) relapsed. These relapses were correlated with patients' age, length of disease progression prior to treatment, total dose received, daily dose, duration of treatment and severity of acne. It appeared that only young age and severity of acne influenced the percentage of relapse.

  9. Relapses in Patients With Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Marco A.; García-Martínez, Ana; Prieto-González, Sergio; Tavera-Bahillo, Itziar; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; Planas-Rigol, Ester; Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Butjosa, Montserrat; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a relapsing disease. However, the nature, chronology, therapeutic impact, and clinical consequences of relapses have been scarcely addressed. We conducted the present study to investigate the prevalence, timing, and characteristics of relapses in patients with GCA and to analyze whether a relapsing course is associated with disease-related complications, increased glucocorticoid (GC) doses, and GC-related adverse effects. The study cohort included 106 patients, longitudinally followed by the authors for 7.8 ± 3.3 years. Relapses were defined as reappearance of disease-related symptoms requiring treatment adjustment. Relapses were classified into 4 categories: polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), cranial symptoms (including ischemic complications), systemic disease, or symptomatic large vessel involvement. Cumulated GC dose during the first year of treatment, time required to achieve a maintenance prednisone dose <10 mg/d (T10), <5 mg/d (T5), or complete prednisone discontinuation (T0), and GC-related side effects were recorded. Sixty-eight patients (64%) experienced at least 1 relapse, and 38 (36%) experienced 2 or more. First relapse consisted of PMR in 51%, cranial symptoms in 31%, and systemic complaints in 18%. Relapses appeared predominantly, but not exclusively, within the first 2 years of treatment, and only 1 patient developed visual loss. T10, T5, and T0 were significantly longer in patients with relapses than in patients without relapse (median, 40 vs 27 wk, p  < 0.0001; 163 vs 89.5 wk, p = 0.004; and 340 vs 190 wk, p = 0.001, respectively). Cumulated prednisone dose during the first year was significantly higher in relapsing patients (6.2 ± 1.7 g vs 5.4 ± 0.78 g, p = 0.015). Osteoporosis was more common in patients with relapses compared to those without (65% vs 32%, p = 0.001). In conclusion, the results of the present study provide evidence that a relapsing course is associated

  10. Relapsing catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome potential role of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia in disease relapses.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Gerard; Rodríguez-Pintó, Ignasi; Gomez-Puerta, José A; Pons-Estel, Guillermo; Cervera, Ricard

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who suffer relapses. We analyzed the Web site--based international registry of patients with catastrophic APS ("CAPS Registry") http://infmed.fcrb.es/es/web/caps and selected those cases that relapsed. Relapses were reported in 9 of 282 (3.2%) patients with catastrophic APS. A total of 35 episodes of catastrophic APS were found: 6 patients presented 2 relapses, 2 patients suffered 3 relapses, and 1 patient developed 17 relapses. However, the last patient was not included in the statistical analysis because his clinical and immunologic characteristics were not fully described. Therefore, a total of 18 episodes were analyzed. In 9 (50%) episodes, a precipitating factor was identified. The most frequent precipitating factor, found in 5 (28%) episodes, was infection. Brain, kidney, heart, and lung were the most common organs involved. Laboratory features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MHA) were present in 13 of 18 (72%) episodes (definitive in 9, corresponding to 4 patients, and probable in 4, corresponding to 2 patients). Three relapses did not present with features of MHA and in the remaining 2 these data were not reported. The mortality rate was 38%. Although relapses are rare in patients with catastrophic APS, these results support the hypothesis that an association between MHA and relapsing of catastrophic APS could be present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Very delayed smoking relapse warrants research attention.

    PubMed

    Brandon, T H; Lazev, A B; Juliano, L M

    1998-08-01

    Recent findings suggest that former smokers remain at risk for relapse well beyond the traditional treatment follow-up period of one year. Although progress has been made in understanding factors involved in smoking cessation and short-term maintenance, very little attention has been paid to research on the process, predictors, and treatment implications of very delayed relapse. Possible research questions are offered to stimulate further investigation in this area.

  12. Animal models of fear relapse.

    PubMed

    Goode, Travis D; Maren, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fear memories are rapidly acquired and enduring over time, extinction memories are slow to form and are susceptible to disruption. Consequently, behavioral therapies that involve extinction learning (e.g., exposure therapy) often produce only temporary suppression of fear and anxiety. This review focuses on the factors that are known to influence the relapse of extinguished fear. Several phenomena associated with the return of fear after extinction are discussed, including renewal, spontaneous recovery, reacquisition, and reinstatement. Additionally, this review describes recent work, which has focused on the role of psychological stress in the relapse of extinguished fear. Recent developments in behavioral and pharmacological research are examined in light of treatment of pathological fear in humans. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Animal Models of Fear Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Travis D.; Maren, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fear memories are rapidly acquired and enduring over time, extinction memories are slow to form and are susceptible to disruption. Consequently, behavioral therapies that involve extinction learning (e.g., exposure therapy) often produce only temporary suppression of fear and anxiety. This review focuses on the factors that are known to influence the relapse of extinguished fear. Several phenomena associated with the return of fear after extinction are discussed, including renewal, spontaneous recovery, reacquisition, and reinstatement. Additionally, this review describes recent work, which has focused on the role of psychological stress in the relapse of extinguished fear. Recent developments in behavioral and pharmacological research are examined in light of treatment of pathological fear in humans. PMID:25225304

  14. [Relapse: causes and consequences].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2013-09-01

    Relapse after a first episode of schizophrenia is the recurrence of acute symptoms after a period of partial or complete remission. Due to its variable aspects, there is no operational definition of relapse able to modelise the outcome of schizophrenia and measure how the treatment modifies the disease. Follow-up studies based on proxys such as hospital admission revealed that 7 of 10 patients relapsed after a first episode of schizophrenia. The effectiveness of antipsychotic medications on relapse prevention has been widely demonstrated. Recent studies claim for the advantages of atypical over first generation antipsychotic medication. Non-adherence to antipsychotic represents with addictions the main causes of relapse long before some non-consensual factors such as premorbid functioning, duration of untreated psychosis and associated personality disorders. The consequences of relapse are multiple, psychological, biological and social. Pharmaco-clinical studies have demonstrated that the treatment response decreases with each relapse. Relapse, even the first one, will contribute to worsen the outcome of the disease and reduce the capacity in general functionning. Accepting the idea of continuing treatment is a complex decision in which the psychiatrist plays a central role besides patients and their families. The development of integrated actions on modifiable risk factors such as psychosocial support, addictive comorbidities, access to care and the therapeutic alliance should be promoted. Relapse prevention is a major goal of the treatment of first-episode schizophrenia. It is based on adherence to the maintenance treatment, identification of prodromes, family active information and patient therapeutical education. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  15. ANCA-Associated Glomerulonephritis: Risk Factors for Renal Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Göçeroğlu, Arda; Berden, Annelies E.; Fiocco, Marta; Floßmann, Oliver; Westman, Kerstin W.; Ferrario, Franco; Gaskin, Gill; Pusey, Charles D.; Hagen, E. Christiaan; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Rasmussen, Niels; Waldherr, Rüdiger; Walsh, Michael; Bruijn, Jan A.; Jayne, David R. W.; Bajema, Ingeborg M.

    2016-01-01

    Relapse in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) has been studied previously, but there are few studies on renal relapse in particular. Identifying patients at high risk of renal relapse may aid in optimizing clinical management. We investigated which clinical and histological parameters are risk factors for renal relapse in ANCA-associated glomerulonephritis (AAGN). Patients (n = 174) were newly diagnosed and had mild–moderate or severe renal involvement. Data were derived from two trials of the European Vasculitis Society: MEPEX and CYCAZAREM. The Cox regression model was used to identify parameters increasing the instantaneous risk (= rate) of renal relapse (useful for instant clinical decisions). For identifying predictors of renal relapse during follow-up, we used Fine & Gray’s regression model. Competing events were end-stage renal failure and death. The cumulative incidence of renal relapse at 5 years was 9.5% (95% CI: 4.8–14.3%). In the Cox model, sclerotic class AAGN increased the instantaneous risk of renal relapse. In Fine & Gray’s model, the absence of interstitial infiltrates at diagnosis was predictive for renal relapse. In this study we used two different models to identify possible relationships between clinical and histopathological parameters at time of diagnosis of AAV with the risk of experiencing renal relapse. Sclerotic class AAGN increased the instantaneous risk of renal relapse. This association is most likely due to the high proportion of sclerosed glomeruli reducing the compensatory capacity. The absence of interstitial infiltrates increased the risk of renal relapse which is a warning sign that patients with a relatively benign onset of disease may also be prone to renal relapse. Renal relapses occurring in patients with sclerotic class AAGN and renal relapses occurring in patients without interstitial infiltrates were mutually exclusive, which may indicate that they are essentially different. PMID:27973575

  16. Relapsing pityriasis rosea.

    PubMed

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Rebora, Alfredo; Parodi, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of relapses of pityriasis rosea (PR), a retrospective cohort study investigated all PR cases diagnosed in Genoa between 2000 and 2013 and followed them up to today. Of 570 cases, 21 (3.7%) relapsed. Most of them had a single episode, but 4 had two episodes and 2 had three episodes. The herald patch was always absent, size and number of the lesions were reduced, and duration was shorter than that of the primary episodes. Constitutional symptoms were present, though less severe than in the primary eruption. Most recurrences occurred within 1 year (16/21, 76.2%). Men outnumbered women and the mean age of the relapsing patients (20.3 years) was higher than that for the primary episode. A pathogenetic hypothesis is provided: since PR is associated with reactivation of human herpesvirus 6/7, a parallelism with other typical reactivating human herpesviruses (varicella zoster virus and Epstein-Barr virus) has been established.

  17. Understanding Recovery Barriers: Youth Perceptions About Substance Use Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Beattie, Rebecca; Ong, Chris Angelo; Glik, Deborah C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To qualitatively explore how treatment-involved youth retrospectively contextualize relapse from substance use. Methods Fourteen focus groups were conducted with 118 youth (78.3% male; 66.1% Latino) enrolled in participating substance abuse treatment programs (4 young adult and 10 adolescent) throughout Los Angeles County. Transcripts were analyzed for relapse perception themes. Results Dominant relapse themes include emotional reasons (90%), life stressors (85%), cognitive factors (75%), socialization processes (65%), and environmental issues (55%). Conclusions Youth perceptions about relapse during treatment should be used to better inform clinical approaches and shape early-intervention recovery agendas for substance-abusing youth. PMID:22584088

  18. Impact of Life Events on the Relapse of Schizophrenic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Jacoob, Shirooq; Sharour, Loai Abu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between stressful life events at the time of relapse in schizophrenic patients at psychiatric hospitals in Baghdad city. Methodology: A purposive (non-probability) sampling of 50 schizophrenic patients who have relapsed was involved in the present study. Data were collected through the use of the…

  19. Relapse to drug seeking following prolonged abstinence: the role of environmental stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, R.A.; Lasseter, H.C.; Ramirez, D.R.; Xie, X.

    2009-01-01

    Successful treatment of drug addiction must involve relapse prevention informed by our understanding of the neurobiological bases of drug relapse. In humans, exposure to drug-associated environmental stimuli can elicit drug craving and relapse. Because exposure to drug-paired stimuli similarly induces drug-seeking behavior in laboratory animals, several animal models of drug relapse have been developed. Here, we review animal models of cue-induced drug relapse and critically evaluate their validity and utility in addressing human relapse behaviors. PMID:20016771

  20. Relapsing fever in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Babudieri, B.

    1957-01-01

    The author reports on a survey carried out by him in 1954 on relapsing fever in Jordan. In that country the disease is largely tick-borne, the main vector being Ornithodoros tholozani. Some of the frequent cases in the town of Nablus and the village of Marda in West Jordan may, however, be caused by O. coniceps. The centres of infection are some of the numerous caves scattered throughout the hilly areas and certain houses in which chickens are kept. It is believed that the vector ticks could be successfully exterminated by the use of insecticides and by the adoption of certain procedures outlined by the author. Arsenobenzol compounds and penicillin have been shown not to be very effective for the treatment of relapsing fever, but good results have been obtained with Aureomycin and Terramycin. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:13472437

  1. Relapse Prevention and the Five Rules of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Melemis, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    There are four main ideas in relapse prevention. First, relapse is a gradual process with distinct stages. The goal of treatment is to help individuals recognize the early stages, in which the chances of success are greatest. Second, recovery is a process of personal growth with developmental milestones. Each stage of recovery has its own risks of relapse. Third, the main tools of relapse prevention are cognitive therapy and mind-body relaxation, which are used to develop healthy coping skills. Fourth, most relapses can be explained in terms of a few basic rules. Educating clients in these rules can help them focus on what is important: 1) change your life (recovery involves creating a new life where it is easier to not use); 2) be completely honest; 3) ask for help; 4) practice self-care; and 5) don’t bend the rules. PMID:26339217

  2. Relapse Prevention and the Five Rules of Recovery.

    PubMed

    Melemis, Steven M

    2015-09-01

    There are four main ideas in relapse prevention. First, relapse is a gradual process with distinct stages. The goal of treatment is to help individuals recognize the early stages, in which the chances of success are greatest. Second, recovery is a process of personal growth with developmental milestones. Each stage of recovery has its own risks of relapse. Third, the main tools of relapse prevention are cognitive therapy and mind-body relaxation, which are used to develop healthy coping skills. Fourth, most relapses can be explained in terms of a few basic rules. Educating clients in these rules can help them focus on what is important: 1) change your life (recovery involves creating a new life where it is easier to not use); 2) be completely honest; 3) ask for help; 4) practice self-care; and 5) don't bend the rules.

  3. Does the Pirani score predict relapse in clubfoot?

    PubMed

    Goriainov, Vitali; Judd, Julia; Uglow, Mike

    2010-10-01

    Presented here is a retrospective clinical audit of clubfoot patients to determine the value of the Pirani clubfoot scoring system at initial presentation in the estimation of subsequent relapse. All clubfoot patients treated by the same surgeon from 2002 to 2006 were included. The treatment adhered to the standard protocol, involving weekly stretching and casting until the foot was corrected, followed by Achilles tenotomy and plasters for 3 weeks. Thereafter, the child was placed in a foot abduction splint. The severity of clubfoot was assessed using the Pirani scoring system, consisting of two sub-scores-the midfoot contracture score (MFCS) and the hindfoot contracture score (HFCS). The MFCS and HFCS can each be 0.0-3.0, giving rise to a total Pirani score (TPS) of 0.0-6.0. Any recurrent deformity was classed as a relapse. Sixty-one clubfoot patients were treated. Five patients were lost to follow-up and six patients were excluded due to the presence of identified syndromes or having had primary treatment elsewhere. A total of 80 clubfeet were included. There were 17 relapses. The average interval between the initiation of foot abduction splint and relapse was 23 months. The median TPS was 3.5 in the no relapse group and 5.0 in the relapse group. The median MFCS was 1.5 in the no relapse group and 2.0 in the relapse group. The median HFCS was 2.0 in the no relapse group and 3.0 in the relapse group. Higher TPS and HFCS were statistically significant when the relapse group was analysed against the no relapse group (P = 0.05 × 10(-4) and 0.02 × 10(-4), respectively). Higher Pirani scores were associated with the late relapse group. The TPS and HFCS were shown to be statistically significant predictors of potential relapse. Closer follow-up is advised for patients at risk of relapse.

  4. Periodontal tissue reaction during orthodontic relapse in rat molars.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Tanya J; Brudvik, Pongsri; Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska

    2013-04-01

    Relapse after orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is an undesirable outcome that involves a number of factors. This study investigated the remodelling of the alveolar bone and related periodontal structures during orthodontic relapse in rat molars. The maxillary right first molars of 35 Wistar rats were moved mesially by a fixed orthodontic appliance for 10 days and the contralateral molars served as controls. The appliances were removed and six animals killed. The molars were allowed to relapse, and the remaining animals were sacrificed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 21 days. The jaws were sectioned and stained with haematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). One day after appliance removal, the molars relapsed to a mean 62.5 per cent of the achieved OTM and then steadily relapsed to 86.1 per cent at 21 days. The number of osteoclasts situated along the alveolar bone of the first molars was highest at the end of active treatment and significantly decreased during the relapse period. In the OTM group, osteoclasts were most numerous in the pressure side of the periodontal ligament (PDL). As the molars relapsed over time, the osteoclast distribution shifted, and after 7 days of relapse, TRAP-positive cells were registered in previous pressure and tension sides of the first molars. After 21 days, these cells were concentrated in the distal parts of the PDL of all three maxillary right molars. These results indicate that orthodontic relapse in the rat model occurs rapidly and remodelling of the alveolar bone and PDL plays a central role in the relapse processes of both actively moved and adjacent teeth.

  5. Possibilities for Relapsing Fever Reemergence

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Relapsing fever Borrelia infections have attracted little attention in recent years; however, where endemic, these infections still result in considerable illness and death. Despite the marked antimicrobial drug susceptibility of these organisms, therapy is often delayed through lack of clinical suspicion. With increasing travel, infections may be imported, through exotic relapsing fever infection or through resurgence of infected disease vectors. Although louseborne relapsing fever is now geographically limited, it was once of global importance. The possibility for reemergence was recently highlighted by the probable reemergence of louseborne relapsing fever in homeless persons from France. Host limitations enforced through louseborne transmission are less applicable for the tickborne forms of relapsing fever. Although the latter have reduced potential for epidemic spread, they have the ability to infect diverse hosts, thus establishing reservoirs of infection and presenting greater challenges for their control. PMID:16704771

  6. Teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis: therapeutic utility.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Teriflunomide is an oral, once-daily disease-modifying therapy (DMT) approved in the USA, Australia, and Argentina for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS). Teriflunomide reversibly limits the expansion of activated T and B cells associated with the inflammatory process purportedly involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, while preserving lymphocytes for routine immune surveillance. In an extensive clinical development program, teriflunomide demonstrated consistent benefits on both clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes. In long-term studies, teriflunomide treatment was associated with low rates of relapse and disability progression for up to 8 years. The safety profile of teriflunomide has been well characterized, with adverse events generally mild to moderate in nature and infrequently leading to permanent treatment discontinuation. The evidence reviewed here indicates that teriflunomide is an effective addition to the current DMTs used to treat RMS.

  7. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  8. Extinction, Relapse, and Behavioral Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral-momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior. PMID:20152889

  9. Does rumination mediate the relationship between mindfulness and depressive relapse?

    PubMed

    Kearns, Nicole P; Shawyer, Frances; Brooker, Joanne E; Graham, Annette L; Enticott, Joanne C; Martin, Paul R; Meadows, Graham N

    2016-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is a significant mental illness that is highly likely to recur, particularly after three or more previous episodes. Increased mindfulness and decreased rumination have both been associated with decreased depressive relapse. The aim of this study was to investigate whether rumination mediates the relationship between mindfulness and depressive relapse. This prospective design involved a secondary data analysis for identifying causal mechanisms using mediation analysis. This study was embedded in a pragmatic randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in which 203 participants (165 females, 38 males; mean age: 48 years), with a history of at least three previous episodes of depression, completed measures of mindfulness, rumination, and depressive relapse over a 2-year follow-up period. Specific components of mindfulness and rumination, being nonjudging and brooding, respectively, were also explored. While higher mindfulness scores predicted reductions in rumination and depressive relapse, the relationship between mindfulness and relapse was not found to be mediated by rumination, although there appeared to be a trend. Our results strengthen the argument that mindfulness may be important in preventing relapse but that rumination is not a significant mediator of its effects. The study was adequately powered to detect medium mediation effects, but it is possible that smaller effects were present but not detected. Mindfulness may be one of several components of MBCT contributing to prevention of depressive relapse. Although the original rationale for MBCT rested largely on a model of relapse causally linked to rumination, our findings suggest that the mechanism by which mindfulness impacts relapse is more complex than a simple effect on rumination. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Relapse in schizophrenia: Definitively not a bolt from the blue.

    PubMed

    Spaniel, Filip; Bakstein, Eduard; Anyz, Jiri; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Sieger, Tomas; Hrdlicka, Jan; Görnerová, Natálie; Höschl, Cyril

    2016-04-22

    Detailed study of the period before schizophrenic relapse when early warning signs (EWS) are present is crucial to effective pre-emptive strategies. To investigate the temporal properties of EWS self-reported weekly via a telemedicine system. EWS history was obtained for 61 relapses resulting in hospitalization involving 51 patients with schizophrenia. Up to 20 weeks of EWS history per case were evaluated using a non-parametric bootstrap test and generalized mixed-effects model to test the significance and homogeneity of the findings. A statistically significant increase in EWS sum score was detectable 5 weeks before hospitalization. However, analysis of EWS dynamics revealed a gradual, monotonic increase in EWS score across during the 8 weeks before a relapse. The findings-in contrast to earlier studies-suggest that relapse is preceded by a lengthy period during which pathophysiological processes unfold; these changes are reflected in subjective EWS.

  11. Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... and Wellness Diet & Nutrition Exercise Emotional Health Smoking Sleep Alcohol Heat & Temperature Sensitivity Travel and Recreation Managing ... well as worsening (a confirmed increase in disability over a specified period of time following a relapse) ...

  12. Long-Term Update of US GI Intergroup RTOG 98-11 Phase III Trial for Anal Carcinoma: Survival, Relapse, and Colostomy Failure With Concurrent Chemoradiation Involving Fluorouracil/Mitomycin Versus Fluorouracil/Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Leonard L.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Pedersen, John E.; Moughan, Jennifer; Benson, Al B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Mayer, Robert J.; Haddock, Michael G.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose On initial publication of GI Intergroup Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 98-11 [A Phase III Randomized Study of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), Mitomycin, and Radiotherapy Versus 5-Fluorouracil, Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Carcinoma of the Anal Canal], concurrent chemoradiation (CCR) with fluorouracil (FU) plus mitomycin (MMC) decreased colostomy failure (CF) when compared with induction plus concurrent FU plus cisplatin (CDDP), but did not significantly impact disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS) for anal canal carcinoma. The intent of the updated analysis was to determine the long-term impact of treatment on survival (DFS, OS, colostomy-free survival [CFS]), CF, and relapse (locoregional failure [LRF], distant metastasis) in this patient group. Patients and Methods Stratification factors included sex, clinical node status, and primary size. DFS and OS were estimated univariately by the Kaplan-Meier method, and treatment arms were compared by log-rank test. Time to relapse and CF were estimated by the cumulative incidence method and treatment arms were compared by using Gray's test. Multivariate analyses used Cox proportional hazard models to test for treatment differences after adjusting for stratification factors. Results Of 682 patients accrued, 649 were analyzable for outcomes. DFS and OS were statistically better for RT + FU/MMC versus RT + FU/CDDP (5-year DFS, 67.8% v 57.8%; P = .006; 5-year OS, 78.3% v 70.7%; P = .026). There was a trend toward statistical significance for CFS (P = .05), LRF (P = .087), and CF (P = .074). Multivariate analysis was statistically significant for treatment and clinical node status for both DFS and OS, for tumor diameter for DFS, and for sex for OS. Conclusion CCR with FU/MMC has a statistically significant, clinically meaningful impact on DFS and OS versus induction plus concurrent FU/CDDP, and it has borderline significance for CFS, CF, and LRF. Therefore, RT + FU/MMC remains the preferred standard of

  13. Relapse revisited--again.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Kenneth C; Vaden, James L; Harris, Edward F

    2012-08-01

    Long-term changes in the dentitions of orthodontic patients have been studied. However, most studies in the literature report findings after only a few years posttreatment. In this study, we examined records an average of 24 years after active treatment. The purpose was to answer 2 questions: (1) does irregularity increase with time after treatment, and (2) how much relapse can be expected if a conservatively treated sample is recalled 2.5 decades after active treatment? The sample consisted of dental casts of 52 women who were treated in the mid-1970s to the early 1980s with 0.022 × 0.028-in standard edgewise appliances. Each was given a maxillary Hawley retainer and either a mandibular Hawley or a banded canine-to-canine retainer at debanding. Retention lasted 24 to 32 months. The same practitioner treated all the patients. The sample is one of convenience; specifically, inclusion depended only on each patient's willingness to return for a recall examination. Records were collected at 3 examinations for each patient: start of treatment, end of the active phase of treatment, and long-term retention recall. The long-term maxillary and mandibular casts were measured and occluded in maximum intercuspation. Variables were measured, including incisor overjet and overbite, buccal segment relationship of the first molars and canines, and incisor irregularity in each arch. Variables were measured on the casts with digital readout sliding calipers precise to 0.001 mm. Mandibular incisor irregularity at recall was less than 3.5 mm in 77% of the patients examined. Correction of the maxillary incisor irregularity remained relatively stable over the time interval studied. Buccal segment Class II correction remained stable at the recall examination. Orthodontic treatment can yield reasonably good long-term stability in both occlusal correction and tooth alignment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Relapses in patients with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Hernández, José Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; González-Vela, Maria C.; González-Lamuño, Domingo; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To further investigate into the relapses of Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), we analyzed the frequency, clinical features, and predictors of relapses in series of 417 unselected patients from a single center. After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range [IQR]: 2–38) years, almost one-third of the 417 patients (n = 133; 32%; 85 men/48 women) had experienced at least 1 relapse. At the time of disease diagnosis, patients who later experienced relapses had less commonly infections than those who never suffered flares (30.8% vs 41.9%; P = 0.03). In contrast, patients who experienced relapses had a longer duration of the first episode of palpable purpura than those without relapses (palpable purpura lasting >7 days; 80.0% vs 68.1%; P = 0.04). Abdominal pain (72.3% vs 62.3%; P = 0.03) and joint manifestations (27.8% vs 15.5%; P = 0.005) were also more common in patients who later developed relapses. In contrast, patients who never suffered relapses had a slightly higher frequency of fever at the time of disease diagnosis (9.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.06). At the time of disease diagnosis, corticosteroids were more frequently given to patients who later had relapses of the disease (44% vs 32% in nonrelapsing patients; P = 0.03). Relapses generally occurred soon after the first episode of vasculitis. The median time from the diagnosis of HSP to the first relapse was 1 (IQR: 1–2) month. The median number of relapses was 1 (IQR 1–3). The main clinical features at the time of the relapse were cutaneous (88.7%), gastrointestinal (27.1%), renal (24.8%), and joint (16.5%) manifestations. After a mean ± standard deviation follow-up of 18.9 ± 9.8 years, complete recovery was observed in 110 (82.7%) of the 133 patients who had relapses. Renal sequelae (persistent renal involvement) was found in 11 (8.3%) of the patients with relapses. The best predictive factors for relapse were joint and gastrointestinal manifestations at HSP diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2

  15. Use of a Relapse Monitoring Board

    PubMed Central

    MacFadden, Wayne; Anand, Ravi; Khanna, Sumant; Rapaport, Mark H.; Haskins, J. Thomas; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Alphs, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Independent review boards can provide an objective appraisal of investigators' decisions and may be useful for determining complex primary outcomes, such as bipolar disorder relapse, in crossnational studies. This article describes the use of an independent, blinded relapse monitoring board to assess the primary outcome (relapse) in an international clinical trial of risperidone long-acting therapy adjunctive to standard-care pharmacotherapy for patients with bipolar disorder. Design: The fully autonomous relapse monitoring board was composed of a chair and two additional members—all psychiatrists and experts in the diagnostic, clinical, and therapeutic management of bipolar disorder. The relapse monitoring board met six times during the study to review patient relapse data and was charged with the responsibility of determining if the events described by investigators qualified as relapses. Additionally, the relapse monitoring board reviewed data for all randomized patients to identify any relapse events not recognized by investigators. Results: Primary efficacy results were similar and significant for investigator- and relapse monitoring board-determined relapses. Ten discrepancies were noted: two of the 42 investigator-determined relapses did not meet the intended clinical relapse threshold as determined by the relapse monitoring board; conversely, the relapse monitoring board confirmed eight relapse events not identified by investigators. The relapse monitoring board had no direct interactions with patients and had to rely on the accuracy of investigator assessments. Also, once an investigator determined a relapse and the patients discontinued the study, less information was available to the relapse monitoring board for relapse assessment. Conclusions: Use of the relapse monitoring board supported the validity of the study by incorporating a level of standardization to mitigate the risk that local practice in different cultures and medical systems

  16. Novel therapies for relapsed myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A Keith

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of myeloma relapse needs to be individualized to reflect the effectiveness and toxicities of prior therapies, with consideration given to pragmatic issues such as the tempo of relapse, age of the patient, access to drugs and patient preference. In general, combination therapies have been associated with higher response rates and improved progression-free survival and may be preferable when a rapid response is required. Nevertheless, in a slower-tempo relapse it is unclear at this juncture whether sequencing of drugs or multi-agent combinations offer superior overall survival results. Fortunately, active novel agents that offer further possibilities for some myeloma patients have become available in clinical trials. In this review we will describe the various classes of novel drugs being tested and the pros and cons of preclinical testing, and will particularly focus on two agents with single-agent activity in myeloma: carfilzomib, a proteasome inhibitor, and pomalidomide, a member of the immunomodulatory class of drugs.

  17. Relapsing Fever Borreliae in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The study of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa has long suffered from the use of non-specific laboratory tools for the direct detection of these spirochetes in clinical and vector specimens. Accordingly, Borrelia hispanica, Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, and Borrelia recurrentis have traditionally been distinguished on the basis of geography and vector and the unproven hypothesis that each species was exclusive to one vector. The recent sequencing of three relapsing fever Borrelia genomes in our laboratory prompted the development of more specific tools and a reappraisal of the epidemiology in Africa. Five additional potential species still need to be cultured from clinical and vector sources in East Africa to further assess their uniqueness. Here, we review the molecular evidence of relapsing fever borreliae in hosts and ectoparasites in Africa and explore the diversity, geographical distribution, and vector association of these pathogens for Africans and travelers to Africa. PMID:23926141

  18. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  19. Resistance to change and relapse of observing.

    PubMed

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2012-05-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI schedule (i.e., S+). The components differed in the rate of food arranged (Rich  = VI 30 s; Lean  =  VI 120 s). In Experiment 1, following baseline training, extinction of observing involved removal of both food and S+ deliveries, and reinstatement was examined by presenting either response-independent food or S+ deliveries. In Experiment 2, extinction involved removal of only food deliveries while observing responses continued to produce S+. Reinstatement was examined by delivering food contingent upon the first two food-key responses occurring in the presence of the S+. Experiment 3 assessed ABA renewal of observing by extinguishing food-key and observing responses in the presence of one contextual stimulus (i.e., B) and then returning to the original training context (i.e., A) during continued extinction. Experiment 4 examined resurgence by introducing food reinforcement for an alternative response during extinction, and subsequently removing that alternative source of food. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse of observing tended to be greater in the component previously associated with the higher rate of primary reinforcement. Relapse of observing or attending to stimuli associated with primary reinforcement appears to be impacted by frequency of primary reinforcement in a manner similar to responding maintained directly by primary reinforcement.

  20. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    PubMed Central

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI schedule (i.e., S+). The components differed in the rate of food arranged (Rich  = VI 30 s; Lean  =  VI 120 s). In Experiment 1, following baseline training, extinction of observing involved removal of both food and S+ deliveries, and reinstatement was examined by presenting either response-independent food or S+ deliveries. In Experiment 2, extinction involved removal of only food deliveries while observing responses continued to produce S+. Reinstatement was examined by delivering food contingent upon the first two food-key responses occurring in the presence of the S+. Experiment 3 assessed ABA renewal of observing by extinguishing food-key and observing responses in the presence of one contextual stimulus (i.e., B) and then returning to the original training context (i.e., A) during continued extinction. Experiment 4 examined resurgence by introducing food reinforcement for an alternative response during extinction, and subsequently removing that alternative source of food. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse of observing tended to be greater in the component previously associated with the higher rate of primary reinforcement. Relapse of observing or attending to stimuli associated with primary reinforcement appears to be impacted by frequency of primary reinforcement in a manner similar to responding maintained directly by primary reinforcement. PMID:22693359

  1. Periplasmic flagellar export apparatus protein, FliH, is involved in post-transcriptional regulation of FlaB, motility and virulence of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed

    Guyard, Cyril; Raffel, Sandra J; Schrumpf, Merry E; Dahlstrom, Eric; Sturdevant, Daniel; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Martens, Craig; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Hansen, Bryan T; Porcella, Stephen F; Schwan, Tom G

    2013-01-01

    Spirochetes are bacteria characterized in part by rotating periplasmic flagella that impart their helical or flat-wave morphology and motility. While most other bacteria rely on a transcriptional cascade to regulate the expression of motility genes, spirochetes employ post-transcriptional mechanism(s) that are only partially known. In the present study, we characterize a spontaneous non-motile mutant of the relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia hermsii that was straight, non-motile and deficient in periplasmic flagella. We used next generation DNA sequencing of the mutant's genome, which when compared to the wild-type genome identified a 142 bp deletion in the chromosomal gene encoding the flagellar export apparatus protein FliH. Immunoblot and transcription analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was linked to the posttranscriptional deficiency in the synthesis of the major periplasmic flagellar filament core protein FlaB. Despite the lack of FlaB, the amount of FlaA produced by the fliH mutant was similar to the wild-type level. The turnover of the residual pool of FlaB produced by the fliH mutant was comparable to the wild-type spirochete. The non-motile mutant was not infectious in mice and its inoculation did not induce an antibody response. Trans-complementation of the mutant with an intact fliH gene restored the synthesis of FlaB, a normal morphology, motility and infectivity in mice. Therefore, we propose that the flagellar export apparatus protein regulates motility of B. hermsii at the post-transcriptional level by influencing the synthesis of FlaB.

  2. Modeling relapse in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    van den Driessche, P; Zou, Xingfu

    2007-05-01

    An integro-differential equation is proposed to model a general relapse phenomenon in infectious diseases including herpes. The basic reproduction number R(0) for the model is identified and the threshold property of R(0) established. For the case of a constant relapse period (giving a delay differential equation), this is achieved by conducting a linear stability analysis of the model, and employing the Lyapunov-Razumikhin technique and monotone dynamical systems theory for global results. Numerical simulations, with parameters relevant for herpes, are presented to complement the theoretical results, and no evidence of sustained oscillatory solutions is found.

  3. Early relapse after rituximab chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Flora; Buslig, Julia; Szegedi, Istvan; Scholtz, Beata; Kappelmayer, Janos; Kiss, Csongor

    2008-02-01

    In relapsed/refractory childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of the B-cell lineage rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody was used successfully in some cases. We report on a 15-year-old female with relapsed CD20-positive B-cell progenitor ALL treated with rituximab because of positive minimal residual disease signals after chemotherapy, as checked by flow cytometry and real time quantitative-PCR. Rituximab eliminated the CD20-positive subpopulation, but not the more immature leukemic cells. The patient died with fulminant aspergillosis before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation could be performed.

  4. Clinicopathologic features associated with relapse in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Michiya; Mathai, Susan K; Schoenfeld, David; Digumarthy, Subba R; Kradin, Richard L

    2014-02-01

    Organizing pneumonia (OP) is a histopathologic pattern of response to lung injury. Fibrin is a marker of acute microvascular injury, and variable amounts of intraalveolar fibrin are seen in OP; however, its relevance to clinical outcomes is unclear. We examined lung wedge biopsies of 26 patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), assessed the amount of fibrin associated with airspace organization, and correlated fibrin levels with other histologic, clinical, and radiographic findings. Seven patients with COP had disease relapse. Patients with multifocal fibrin deposits or acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (collectively, "high fibrin") showed a higher rate of OP relapse compared to those with no or focal fibrin (60% versus 6%, P < .05). Patients with radiographic evidence of disease involving all three lung zones (upper, middle, and lower) also showed higher rates of relapse compared to those in whom disease was limited to one or two zones (41% versus 0%, P = .055). In patients with both pathologic evidence of high fibrin and radiographic evidence of three-zone disease, OP relapse could be predicted with a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 84% (positive predictive value of 67% and negative predictive value of 94%). The presence of high levels of intraalveolar fibrin in lung biopsies and radiographic evidence of disease involving all three lung zones is associated with increased risk of relapse in patients with COP, and these features may help identify patients who may benefit from more intensive steroid therapy. © 2014.

  5. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL

    PubMed Central

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S.

    2015-01-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in the backbone of ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 (PRPS1), a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapse B-ALL cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early on-treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially prior to clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol can effectively abrogate PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. Overall these results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of de novo purine pathway in thiopurine resistance, and offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and resistant ALL. PMID:25962120

  6. Understanding Recovery Barriers: Youth Perceptions about Substance Use Relapse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Rachel; Anglin, M. Douglas; Beattie, Rebecca; Ong, Chris Angelo; Glik, Deborah C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To qualitatively explore how treatment-involved youth retrospectively contextualize relapse from substance use. Methods: Fourteen focus groups were conducted with 118 youth (78.3% male; 66.1% Latino) enrolled in participating substance abuse treatment programs (4 young adult and 10 adolescent) throughout Los Angeles County. Transcripts…

  7. Determinants of Relapse Following Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul M.

    Although research has been conducted on who will relapse after having quit smoking in clinics, little has been done to determine the immediate precipitants of recidivism. A telephone hotline, manned by four experienced interviewers, was set up to receive calls from ex-smokers who had relapsed or who felt at high risk for relapse. A structured…

  8. Classification of relapse pattern in clubfoot treated with Ponseti technique

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Atul; Patni, Piyush

    2013-01-01

    Background: Relapse of clubfoot deformity following correction by Ponseti technique is not uncommon. The relapsed feet progress from flexible to rigid if left untreated and can become as severe as the initial deformity. No definitive classification exists to assess a relapsed clubfoot. Some authors have used the Pirani score to rate the relapse while others have used descriptive terms. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relapse pattern in clubfeet that have undergone treatment with the Ponseti method and propose a simple classification for relapsed clubfeet. Materials and Methods: Ninety-one children (164 feet) with idiopathic clubfeet who underwent treatment with Ponseti technique presented with relapse of the deformity. There were 68 boys and 23 girls. Mean age at presentation for casting was 10.71 days (range 7-22 days). Seventy three children (146 feet, 80%) had bilateral involvement and 18 (20%) had unilateral clubfeet. The mean Pirani Score was 5.6 and 5.5 in bilateral and unilateral groups respectively. Percutaneous heel cord tenotomy was done in 65 children (130 feet, 89%) in the bilateral group and in 12 children (66%) with unilateral clubfoot. Results: Five relapse patterns were identified at a mean followup of 4.5 years (range 3-5 years) which forms the basis of this study. These relapse patterns were classified as: Grade IA: decrease in ankle dorsiflexion from15 degrees to neutral, Grade IB: dynamic forefoot adduction or supination, Grade IIA – rigid equinus, Grade IIB – rigid adduction of forefoot/midfoot complex and Grade III: combination of two or more deformities: Fixed equinus, varus and forefoot adduction. In the bilateral group, 21 children (38 feet, 28%) had Grade IA relapse. Twenty four children (46 feet, 34%) had dynamic intoeing (Grade IB) on walking. Thirteen children (22 feet, 16%) had true ankle equinus of varying degress (Grade IIA); eight children (13 feet, 9.7%) had fixed adduction deformity of the forefoot (Grade IIB) and

  9. Randomized trial comparing mindfulness-based relapse prevention with relapse prevention for women offenders at a residential addiction treatment center.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Warner, Kaitlin; Sully, Betsy; Barricks, Adria; Stauffer, Connie; Thompson, Brian L; Luoma, Jason B

    2014-04-01

    Reincarceration rates are high among substance-involved criminal offenders. This study (conducted during 2010-2011 in an urban area and funded by a Washington State University-Vancouver mini-grant) used a randomized design to examine the effectiveness of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) as compared to relapse prevention (RP), as part of a residential addictions treatment program for women referred by the criminal-justice system (N = 105). At 15-week follow up, regression analyses found women in MBRP, compared to RP, reported significantly fewer drug use days and fewer legal and medical problems. Study limitations and future research directions for studying the efficacy of MBRP are discussed.

  10. Unilateral Migratory Relapsing Orbital Myositis While on Immunosuppressant Therapy: An Uncommon Entity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Swati; Mittal, Ruchi; Padhan, Prasanta; Tripathy, Devjyoti

    A young healthy female presented with acute onset left ocular pain, restricted ocular motility, and binocular diplopia. CT imaging showed left lateral rectus myositis that resolved with oral corticosteroids. Two sequential relapses occurred subsequently involving the superior rectus-levator complex followed by the medial rectus. Biopsy revealed orbital inflammatory disease with lymphocytic vasculitis. Detailed systemic work up was normal. The second relapse was seen while on long-term oral methotrexate although initial disease remission had been achieved with the same drug. A changeover to oral azathioprine was able to achieve disease remission after the second relapse. All relapses involved the same side and the contralateral orbit was not affected. This report presents the curious phenomenon of unilateral migratory relapsing orbital myositis of unknown cause that recurred even while on immunosuppressant therapy. It highlights the unpredictable nature of this uncommon entity and the challenges faced in managing such cases.

  11. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Sarah E. S.; Wozniak, Amy W.; Billups, Catherine A.; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D.; Rao, Bhaskar N.; Daw, Najat C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. Methods We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Post-relapse event-free survival (PREFS) and post-relapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using the exact log-rank test. Results The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (p=0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules (≤3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (p≤0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% CI, 2.1-5.2) and median PRS 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.2-15.1). Conclusions Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. PMID:23625626

  12. Natalizumab reduces relapse clinical severity and improves relapse recovery in MS.

    PubMed

    Lublin, Fred D; Cutter, Gary; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pace, Amy; Campbell, Nolan R; Belachew, Shibeshih

    2014-11-01

    Compare relapse clinical severity, post-relapse residual disability, and the probability of confirmed complete recovery from relapse between patients who relapsed during natalizumab (n=183/627 [29%]) and placebo (n=176/315 [56%]) treatments in the AFFIRM trial. In this post-hoc analysis, relapse clinical severity and residual disability were defined by change in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score occurring between pre-relapse and at-relapse assessment and between pre-relapse and post-relapse assessment, respectively. Patients were considered completely recovered from relapse when their post-relapse EDSS score was less than or equal to their pre-relapse EDSS score, and this was maintained for 12 or 24 weeks. At relapse, an increase in EDSS score of ≥0.5 points occurred in 71% of natalizumab and 84% of placebo patients (P=0.0088); an increase of ≥1.0 point occurred in 49% of natalizumab and 61% of placebo patients (P=0.0349) (mean increase in EDSS at relapse: natalizumab=0.77; placebo=1.09; P=0.0044). After relapse, residual disability of ≥0.5 EDSS points remained in 31% of natalizumab and 45% of placebo patients (P=0.0136) (mean post-relapse residual EDSS increase: natalizumab=0.06; placebo=0.28; P=0.0170). In patients with an increase in EDSS of ≥0.5 or ≥1.0 during relapse, natalizumab increased the probability of 12-week confirmed complete recovery from relapse by 55% (hazard ratio [HR]=1.554; P=0.0161) and 67% (HR=1.673; P=0.0319) compared to placebo, respectively. In AFFIRM, natalizumab treatment decreased the clinical severity of relapses and improved recovery from disability induced by relapses. These beneficial effects would limit the step-wise accumulation of disability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Very late relapse of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cieślak, Ewa; Kepka, Lucyna; Fijuth, Jacek; Marchel, Andrzej; Kroh, Halina

    2004-01-01

    A case of 47-year-old woman with a local relapse of medulloblastoma 23 years after initial presentation is reported. At the age of 24, the patient underwent resection of medulloblastoma of the right cerebellar lobe, followed by the craniospinal orthovoltage irradiation (3600 R to the brain, and 3000 R to the spinal cord). At the 21st year of follow-up, a second cancer originating in the thyroid gland was diagnosed. Thyroidectomy followed by 131-iodotherapy for the papillary cancer was performed. Two years later she was operated for the recurrence of medulloblastoma at the former site. The patient was unfit for chemotherapy due to poor bone marrow reserve following the previous treatment. The reirradiation of the posterior cranial fossa was performed postoperatively. The patient was given 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the recurred tumour volume with 2 cm margin within 41 days. The treatment was performed by 6 MV photons with conformal technique and noncoplanar beams arrangement. The patient is disease free 15 months after relapse of medulloblastoma. The following problems are discussed: late relapse of medulloblastoma, secondary cancers after craniospinal irradiation, and retreatment of CNS tumours.

  14. Helping Adults to Stay Physically Fit: Preventing Relapse Following Aerobic Exercise Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodrick, G. Ken; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Long-term adherence to an aerobic exercise regime is a major problem among exercise program graduates. This article discusses the steps involved in developing relapse prevention treatment strategies for aerobic exercise programs. (JMK)

  15. Central nervous system relapse in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: a Swedish Lymphoma Registry study.

    PubMed

    Ellin, Fredrik; Landström, Jenny; Jerkeman, Mats; Relander, Thomas

    2015-07-02

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) carries a very poor prognosis. Risk factors and outcome have been studied in aggressive B-cell lymphomas, but very little is known about the risk in peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). We aimed at analyzing risk factors for CNS involvement at first relapse or progression, as well as the outcome of these patients, in a large population-based cohort of patients with PTCL. Twenty-eight out of 625 patients (4.5%) developed CNS disease over time. In multivariable analysis, disease characteristics at diagnosis independently associated with an increased risk for later CNS involvement were involvement of more than 1 extranodal site (hazard ratio [HR], 2.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-6.29; P = .035) and skin (HR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.26-9.74; P = .016) and gastrointestinal involvement (HR, 3.06; 95% CI, 1.30-7.18; P = .010). The outcome of relapsed/refractory patients was very poor, and CNS involvement was not associated with a significantly worse outcome compared with relapsed/refractory patients without CNS involvement in multivariable analysis (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.96-2.6; P = .074). The results from the present study indicate that CNS relapse in PTCL occurs at a frequency similar to what is seen in aggressive B-cell lymphomas, but the poor outcomes in relapse are largely driven by systemic rather than CNS disease.

  16. Multiple Myeloma Relapse Following Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Presenting With Diffuse Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sumrall, Bradley; Diethelm, Lisa; Brown, Archie

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a common disease, accounting for about 10% of hematologic malignancies in the United States. For eligible patients, the treatment of choice includes induction therapy (usually involving newer biologic agents) followed by autologous stem cell transplant; however, this treatment is generally not considered curative, and relapses usually occur. However, extramedullary relapse is an uncommon presentation, and relapses that involve the lungs have only rarely been described. Case Report We report the case of a patient who underwent an autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma and subsequently relapsed with diffuse pulmonary nodules. She then had a rapid clinical and serologic response following initiation of salvage therapy. Conclusion This case is remarkable for both the radiographic appearance of the pulmonary involvement, as well as the rapid resolution of these findings after 2 cycles of treatment with bortezomib, dexamethasone, and lenalidomide. PMID:24358007

  17. The nature of relapse in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple relapses characterise the course of illness in most patients with schizophrenia, yet the nature of these episodes has not been extensively researched and clinicians may not always be aware of important implications. Methods We critically review selected literature regarding the nature and underlying neurobiology of relapse. Results Relapse rates are very high when treatment is discontinued, even after a single psychotic episode; a longer treatment period prior to discontinuation does not reduce the risk of relapse; many patients relapse soon after treatment reduction and discontinuation; transition from remission to relapse may be abrupt and with few or no early warning signs; once illness recurrence occurs symptoms rapidly return to levels similar to the initial psychotic episode; while most patients respond promptly to re-introduction of antipsychotic treatment after relapse, the response time is variable and notably, treatment failure appears to emerge in about 1 in 6 patients. These observations are consistent with contemporary thinking on the dopamine hypothesis, including the aberrant salience hypothesis. Conclusions Given the difficulties in identifying those at risk of relapse, the ineffectiveness of rescue medications in preventing full-blown psychotic recurrence and the potentially serious consequences, adherence and other factors predisposing to relapse should be a major focus of attention in managing schizophrenia. The place of antipsychotic treatment discontinuation in clinical practice and in placebo-controlled clinical trials needs to be carefully reconsidered. PMID:23394123

  18. Extramedullary relapses after allogeneic non-myeloablative stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma patients do not negatively affect treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Minnema, M C; van de Donk, N W C J; Zweegman, S; Hegenbart, U; Schonland, S; Raymakers, R; Zijlmans, J M J M; Kersten, M J; Bos, G M J; Lokhorst, H M

    2008-05-01

    Recent literature suggests that after non-myeloablative allogeneic (NMA) stem cell transplantation (SCT), the incidence of extramedullary (EM) relapse in multiple myeloma (MM) patients is increased and that these relapses have a poor prognosis. However, numbers on incidence and treatment outcome are scarce. We collected data from 54 relapsed MM patients from a total group of 172 treated with sequential autologous and allogeneic NMA SCT at seven transplantation centres. There were 43 (79.6%) systemic relapses, including 6 with concurrent EM localisation. Five patients had a local EM relapse only. Six patients relapsed with only bone involvement. Patients with deletion of chromosome 13 had a higher incidence of EM relapse (30.8 versus 5.6%, P=0.06). EM relapses were treated with donor lymphocyte infusion, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy, especially with novel agents. The response rate was 45.5%, which was not different when compared to patients without EM disease (54.1%). Overall survival and progression-free survival were not significantly different in patients with EM disease, when compared to those without EM disease. In conclusion, the incidence of relapse with EM disease following allogeneic NMA SCT was 20.4%. There was no negative impact of EM relapse on response rate, overall survival and progression-free survival.

  19. The neurobiology of relapse in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Remington, Gary; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Fervaha, Gagan; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Hahn, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Dopamine's proposed role in psychosis proved a starting point in our understanding of the neurobiology of relapse, fitting given the central role positive symptoms play. This link is reflected in early work examining neurotransmitter metabolite and drug (e.g. amphetamine, methylphenidate) challenge studies as a means of better understanding relapse and predictors. Since, lines of investigation have expanded (e.g. electrophysiological, immunological, hormonal, stress), an important step forward if relapse per se is the question. Arguably, perturbations in dopamine represent the final common pathway in psychosis but it is evident that, like schizophrenia, relapse is heterogeneous and multidimensional. In understanding the neurobiology of relapse, greater gains are likely to be made if these distinctions are acknowledged; for example, efforts to identify trait markers might better be served by distinguishing primary (i.e. idiopathic) and secondary (e.g. substance abuse, medication nonadherence) forms of relapse. Similarly, it has been suggested that relapse is 'neurotoxic', yet individuals do very well on clozapine after multiple relapses and the designation of treatment resistance. An alternative explanation holds that schizophrenia is characterized by different trajectories, at least to some extent biologically and/or structurally distinguishable from the outset, with differential patterns of response and relapse. Just as with schizophrenia, it seems naïve to conceptualize the neurobiology of relapse as a singular process. We propose that it is shaped by the form of illness and in place from the outset, modified by constitutional factors like resilience, as well as treatment, and confounded by secondary forms of relapse. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary breast lymphoma sequentially relapsed in the peripheral and central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tzung-Chih; Chang, Hung; Chuang, Wen-Yu

    2012-09-01

    Primary breast lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon extranodal type of lymphoma, exhibiting more aggressive behavior and poorer prognosis. Patients with PBL have a higher incidence to relapse in central nervous system (CNS), which is always leading to a dismal outcome even treating with high intensity chemotherapy plus radiotherapy. Lymphoma involving the peripheral nervous system (PNS), either primarily or secondarily, is also rare. But no PBL with PNS relapse has been reported before. Herein, we reported a case of PBL who presented with subsequent relapse in two discrete sites of the PNS followed by the CNS.

  1. [Central nervous system relapse in diffuse large B cell lymphoma: Risk factors].

    PubMed

    Sancho, Juan-Manuel; Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2016-01-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma is a complication associated, almost invariably, with a poor prognosis. The knowledge of the risk factors for CNS relapse is important to determine which patients could benefit from prophylaxis. Thus, patients with very aggressive lymphomas (such as lymphoblastic lymphoma or Burkitt's lymphoma) must systematically receive CNS prophylaxis due to a high CNS relapse rate (25-30%), while in patients with indolent lymphoma (such as follicular lymphoma or marginal lymphoma) prophylaxis is unnecessary. However, the question about CNS prophylaxis in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of lymphoma, remains controversial. The information available is extensive, mainly based on retrospective and heterogeneous studies. There seems that immunochemotherapy based on rituximab reduces the CNS relapse rate. On the other hand, patients with increased serum lactate dehydrogenase plus more than one extranodal involvement seem to have a higher risk of CNS relapse, but a prophylaxis strategy based only on the presence of these 2 factors does not prevent all CNS relapses. Patients with involvement of testes or breast have high risk of CNS relapse and prophylaxis is mandatory. Finally, CNS prophylaxis could be considered in patients with DLBCL and renal or epidural space involvement, as well as in those cases with MYC rearrangements, although additional studies are necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Survival of pediatric patients after relapsed osteosarcoma: the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Leary, Sarah E S; Wozniak, Amy W; Billups, Catherine A; Wu, Jianrong; McPherson, Valerie; Neel, Michael D; Rao, Bhaskar N; Daw, Najat C

    2013-07-15

    Chemotherapy has improved the outcome of patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, but its role in relapsed disease is unclear. We reviewed the records of all patients who were treated for relapsed high-grade osteosarcoma at our institution between 1970 and 2004. Postrelapse event-free survival (PREFS) and postrelapse survival (PRS) were estimated, and outcome comparisons were made using an exact log-rank test. The 10-year PREFS and PRS of the 110 patients were 11.8% ± 3.5% and 17.0% ± 4.3%, respectively. Metastasis at initial diagnosis (14%), and relapse in lung only (75%) were not significantly associated with PREFS or PRS. Time from initial diagnosis to first relapse (RL1) ≥18 months (43%), surgery at RL1 (76%), and ability to achieve second complete remission (CR2, 56%) were favorably associated with PREFS and PRS (P  ≤  0.0002). In patients without CR2, chemotherapy at RL1 was favorably associated with PREFS (P = 0.01) but not with PRS. In patients with lung relapse only, unilateral relapse and number of nodules ( ≤ 3) were associated with better PREFS and PRS (P  ≤  0.0005); no patients with bilateral relapse survived 10 years. The median PREFS after treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, methotrexate, and ifosfamide was 3.5 months (95% confidence interval, 2.1-5.2), and the median PRS was 8.2 months (95% confidence interval, 5.2-15.1). Late relapse, surgical resection, and unilateral involvement (in lung relapse only) favorably impact outcome after relapse. Surgery is essential for survival; chemotherapy may slow disease progression in patients without CR2. These data are useful for designing clinical trials that evaluate novel agents. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  3. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  4. Preventing Adolescent Relapse: Concepts, Theories and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Shitala P.; Ressler, Robert A.

    This chapter discusses adolescent drug abuse relapse prevention. It presents the following four conclusions regarding the efficacy of prevention programs. First, more controlled studies are needed to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of relapse prevention strategies with adolescents in reducing factors such as cravings and increasing their…

  5. Prodromal Signs and Symptoms of Schizophrenic Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Kenneth L.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.

    Increasing evidence that decompensation into acute psychosis by schizophrenics can often be avoided with active pharmacological and psychosocial intervention at the early signs of relapse has stimulated research into the signs and symptoms prodromal to acute psychosis. In this study, 6-week periods prior to 17 psychotic relapses and to 11 relapses…

  6. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  7. Primaquine treatment and relapse in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relapsing peculiarity of Plasmodium vivax is one of the prime reasons for sustained global malaria transmission. Global containment of P. vivax is more challenging and crucial compared to other species for achieving total malaria control/elimination. Primaquine (PQ) failure and P. vivax relapse is a major global public health concern. Identification and characterization of different relapse strains of P. vivax prevalent across the globe should be one of the thrust areas in malaria research. Despite renewed and rising global concern by researchers on this once ‘neglected’ species, research and development on the very topic of P. vivax reappearance remains inadequate. Many malaria endemic countries have not mandated routine glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) testing before initiating PQ radical cure in P. vivax malaria. This results in either no PQ prescription or thoughtless prescription and administration of PQ to P. vivax patients by healthcare providers without being concerned about patients’ G6PD status and associated complications. It is imperative to ascertain the G6PD status and optimum dissemination of PQ radical cure in all cases of P. vivax malaria across the globe. There persists a compelling need to develop/validate a rapid, easy-to-perform, easy-to-interpret, quality controllable, robust, and cost-effective G6PD assay. High-dose PQ of both standard and short duration appears to be safe and more effective for preventing relapses and should be practiced among patients with normal G6PD activity. Multicentric studies involving adequately representative populations across the globe with reference PQ dose must be carried out to determine the true distribution of PQ failure. Study proving role of cytochrome P450-2D6 gene in PQ metabolism and association of CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes and P. vivax relapse is of prime importance and should be carried forward in multicentric systems across the globe. PMID:27077309

  8. Primaquine treatment and relapse in Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Rishikesh, Kumar; Saravu, Kavitha

    2016-01-01

    The relapsing peculiarity of Plasmodium vivax is one of the prime reasons for sustained global malaria transmission. Global containment of P. vivax is more challenging and crucial compared to other species for achieving total malaria control/elimination. Primaquine (PQ) failure and P. vivax relapse is a major global public health concern. Identification and characterization of different relapse strains of P. vivax prevalent across the globe should be one of the thrust areas in malaria research. Despite renewed and rising global concern by researchers on this once 'neglected' species, research and development on the very topic of P. vivax reappearance remains inadequate. Many malaria endemic countries have not mandated routine glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) testing before initiating PQ radical cure in P. vivax malaria. This results in either no PQ prescription or thoughtless prescription and administration of PQ to P. vivax patients by healthcare providers without being concerned about patients' G6PD status and associated complications. It is imperative to ascertain the G6PD status and optimum dissemination of PQ radical cure in all cases of P. vivax malaria across the globe. There persists a compelling need to develop/validate a rapid, easy-to-perform, easy-to-interpret, quality controllable, robust, and cost-effective G6PD assay. High-dose PQ of both standard and short duration appears to be safe and more effective for preventing relapses and should be practiced among patients with normal G6PD activity. Multicentric studies involving adequately representative populations across the globe with reference PQ dose must be carried out to determine the true distribution of PQ failure. Study proving role of cytochrome P450-2D6 gene in PQ metabolism and association of CYP2D6 metabolizer phenotypes and P. vivax relapse is of prime importance and should be carried forward in multicentric systems across the globe.

  9. Predicting relapse among young adults: psychometric validation of the Advanced WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John F; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Urbanoski, Karen A; Slaymaker, Valerie

    2011-10-01

    Failure to maintain abstinence despite incurring severe harm is perhaps the key defining feature of addiction. Relapse prevention strategies have been developed to attenuate this propensity to relapse, but predicting who will, and who will not, relapse has stymied attempts to more efficiently tailor treatments according to relapse risk profile. Here we examine the psychometric properties of a promising relapse risk measure-the Advance WArning of RElapse (AWARE) scale (Miller & Harris, 2000) in an understudied but clinically important sample of young adults. Inpatient youth (N=303; Ages 18-24; 26% female) completed the AWARE scale and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI) at the end of residential treatment, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-months following discharge. Internal and convergent validity was tested for each of these four timepoints using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations (with BSI scores). Predictive validity was tested for relapse 1, 3, and 6 months following discharge, as was incremental utility, where AWARE scores were used as predictors of any substance use while controlling for treatment entry substance use severity and having spent time in a controlled environment following treatment. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a single, internally consistent, 25-item factor that demonstrated convergent validity and predicted subsequent relapse alone and when controlling for other important relapse risk predictors. The AWARE scale may be a useful and efficient clinical tool for assessing short-term relapse risk among young people and, thus, could serve to enhance the effectiveness of relapse prevention efforts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Menstrual phase effects on smoking relapse

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sharon S.; Bade, Tracy; Center, Bruce; Finstad, Deborah; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine if menstrual phase affects relapse in women attempting to quit smoking. Design An intent-to-treat randomized smoking cessation trial where women were assigned to quit smoking in either the follicular (F) or luteal (L) menstrual phase and were followed for up to 26 weeks. They were assessed for relapse by days to relapse and relapse phase to determine if those who begin a quit attempt during the F phase were more successful than those who begin during the L phase. Setting Tobacco Use Research Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Participants A total of 202 women. Measurements Latency to relapse from continuous and prolonged abstinence, point prevalence, phase of relapse, first slip within the first 3 and 5 days post-quit date, subject completion rates and symptomatology (i.e. withdrawal and craving). Findings The mean days to relapse from continuous abstinence and relapse from prolonged abstinence for the F group were 13.9 and 20.6 days, respectively, and 21.5 and 39.2 days, respectively, for the L group. Using point prevalence analysis at 14 days, 84% of the F group had relapsed compared with 65% of the L group [χ2 = 10.024, P = 0.002; odds ratio (OR) = 2.871, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.474– 5.590]. At 30 days, 86% of the F group relapsed, compared with 66% of the L group (χ2 = 11.076, P = 0.001; OR = 3.178, 95% CI, 1.594–6.334). Conclusion Women attempting to quit smoking in the F phase had less favorable outcomes than those attempting to quit in the L phase. This could relate to ovarian hormones, which may play a role in smoking cessation for women. PMID:18412759

  11. Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia in remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff's-like encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Piffer, Silvio; Turri, Giulia; Acler, Michele; Richelli, Silvia; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Monaco, Salvatore; Bonetti, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia is a rare neurological condition due to ephaptic transmission, generally appearing in multiple sclerosis patients characterized by stereotyped attacks of slurred speech usually accompanied by ataxia, appearing many times a day. Here we describe a patient with an unusual remitting-relapsing form of Bickerstaff's-like brainstem encephalitis who manifested PDA after a relapse with the involvement of a peculiar region below the red nuclei and benefited from lamotrigine.

  12. [Research and control of relapse tuberculosis cases].

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Fumio; Toyota, Makoto

    2009-12-01

    With this symposium, we focused on the relapse of tuberculosis in Japan. Out of 19,893 tuberculosis patients registered in 2007 in Japan, 7.48% were classified as relapse cases. Relapse cases have the risk of acquired drug resistance. But we have few analyses of the proportion of relapse tuberculosis cases with standard short course regimens for six months, factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse and the proportion of drug resistance among relapse TB cases in Japan. Therefore we analyzed the relapse tuberculosis cases in two rural areas and three urban areas. We also analyzed the proportion of drug resistance among relapse cases with the data of drug susceptibility survey of Ryoken. 1. Research of relapse tuberculosis cases: Makoto TOYOTA (Kochi City Public Health Center). To clarify the relapse rate and factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse, we investigated the relapse tuberculosis cases in the municipality where the proportion of elderly tuberculosis patients was high. Out of 902 tuberculosis patients registered in Kochi City Public Health Center during 10 years, 20 pulmonary tuberculosis patients were confirmed relapse cases with initial registered records. Pretreatment cavitations, sputum culture positivity at 2 months, medical miss-management (e.g. number of doses, duration of therapy) and poor adherence were considered to be factors contributing to tuberculosis relapse. Out of 20 relapse cases, 12 cases were detected with symptoms, while only 3 cases were detected by examination in law. 2. A clinical study on relapse cases of pulmonary tuberculosis: Shuichi TAKIKAWA (National Hospital Organization Nishibeppu National Hospital). The relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis was investigated. In the cases with a treatment history before short course chemotherapy, drug resistance rate was high, and thus it needs to be cautious of drug resistance at the time of the retreatment. In the cases with a treatment history of short course chemotherapy, relapse cases

  13. Mutations driving CLL and their evolution in progression and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Dan A.; Tausch, Eugen; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro N; Stewart, Chip; Reiter, Johannes G.; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Bozic, Ivana; Lawrence, Mike; Böttcher, Sebastian; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Mertens, Daniel; Sougnez, Carrie; Rosenberg, Mara; Hess, Julian M.; Edelmann, Jennifer; Kless, Sabrina; Kneba, Michael; Ritgen, Matthias; Fink, Anna; Fischer, Kirsten; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric; Nowak, Martin A.; Döhner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Neuberg, Donna; Getz, Gad; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Wu, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Which genetic alterations drive tumorigenesis and how they evolve over the course of disease and therapy are central questions in cancer biology. We identify 44 recurrently mutated genes and 11 recurrent somatic copy number variations through whole-exome sequencing of 538 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and matched germline DNA samples, 278 of which were collected in a prospective clinical trial. These include previously unrecognized cancer drivers (RPS15, IKZF3) and collectively identify RNA processing and export, MYC activity and MAPK signaling as central pathways involved in CLL. Clonality analysis of this large dataset further enabled reconstruction of temporal relationships between driver events. Direct comparison between matched pre-treatment and relapse samples from 59 patients demonstrated highly frequent clonal evolution. Thus, large sequencing datasets of clinically informative samples enable the discovery of novel cancer genes and the network of relationships between the driver events and their impact on disease relapse and clinical outcome. PMID:26466571

  14. Management of relapsing Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Cindy S; White, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Relapses are important contributors to illness and morbidity in Plasmodium vivax and P. ovale infections. Relapse prevention (radical cure) with primaquine is required for optimal management, control and ultimately elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria. A review was conducted with publications in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish using the search terms ‘P. vivax’ and ‘relapse’. Areas covered: Hypnozoites causing relapses may be activated weeks or months after initial infection. Incidence and temporal patterns of relapse varies geographically. Relapses derive from parasites either genetically similar or different from the primary infection indicating that some derive from previous infections. Malaria illness itself may activate relapse. Primaquine is the only widely available treatment for radical cure. However, it is often not given because of uncertainty over the risks of primaquine induced haemolysis when G6PD deficiency testing is unavailable. Recommended dosing of primaquine for radical cure in East Asia and Oceania is 0.5 mg base/kg/day and elsewhere is 0.25 mg base/kg/day. Alternative treatments are under investigation. Expert commentary: Geographic heterogeneity in relapse patterns and chloroquine susceptibility of P. vivax, and G6PD deficiency epidemiology mean that radical treatment should be given much more than it is today. G6PD testing should be made widely available so primaquine can be given more safely. PMID:27530139

  15. Patterns and Timing of Initial Relapse in Patients Subsequently Undergoing Transplantation for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Sughosh; Biswas, Tithi; Liesveld, Jane L.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Phillips, Gordon L.; Constine, Louis S.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the patterns and timing of initial recurrence in patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) who subsequently underwent high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation to enhance our understanding of the natural history of this disease and its modern treatment strategies and to direct approaches to disease surveillance. Methods and Materials: The records of 69 patients with HL who had undergone high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in our center between May 1992 and June 2006 were analyzed. The initial diagnosis had been made between April 1982 and January 2005 at a median patient age of 33 years (range, 19-65). The patients were segregated according to the initial stage (Stage I-II vs. III-IV). Results: Early-stage HL patients developed a relapse at a median of 2.1 years (range, 0.5-10.3), with 91% of relapses at the initial disease site, 71% of which (65% overall) were only in previously involved sites. Advanced-stage HL patients developed a relapse at a median of 1.5 years (range, 0.6-10.5), with 97% at the initial site, 71% of which (69% overall) were only in previously involved sites. Single-site relapses occurred in 47% of early- vs. 26% of advanced-stage patients, and extranodal relapses occurred in 12% of early- vs. 31% of advanced-stage patients. Conclusions: Almost all patients with HL who develop relapse and subsequently undergo high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation initially developed recurrence in previously involved disease sites. Early-stage HL relapses often occurred in single sites, and advanced-stage disease relapses were more likely in multiple and extranodal sites. The interval to recurrence was brief, suggesting that the frequency of screening should be the greatest in the early post-therapy years.

  16. The Wisconsin Predicting Patients' Relapse questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Daniel M.; McCarthy, Danielle E.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Fiore, Michael C.; Smith, Stevens S.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Relapse is the most common smoking cessation outcome. Accurate prediction of relapse likelihood could be an important clinical tool used to influence treatment selection or duration. The aim of this research was to develop a brief clinical relapse proneness questionnaire to be used with smokers interested in quitting in a clinical setting where time is at a premium. Methods: Diverse items assessing constructs shown in previous research to be related to relapse risk, such as nicotine dependence and self-efficacy, were evaluated to determine their independent contributions to relapse prediction. In an exploratory dataset, candidate items were assessed among smokers motivated to quit smoking who enrolled in one of three randomized controlled smoking cessation trials. A cross-validation dataset was used to compare the relative predictive power of the new instrument against the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) at 1-week, 8-week, and 6-month postquit assessments. Results: We selected seven items with relatively nonoverlapping content for the Wisconsin Predicting Patient's Relapse (WI-PREPARE) measure, a brief, seven-item questionnaire that taps physical dependence, environmental factors, and individual difference characteristics. Cross-validation analyses suggested that the WI-PREPARE demonstrated a stronger prediction of relapse at 1-week and 8-week postquit assessments than the FTND and comparable prediction to the FTND at a 6-month postquit assessment. Discussion: The WI-PREPARE is easy to score, suggests the nature of a patient's relapse risk, and predicts short- and medium-term relapse better than the FTND. PMID:19372573

  17. Stress enhancement of craving during sobriety: a risk for relapse.

    PubMed

    Breese, George R; Chu, Kathleen; Dayas, Christopher V; Funk, Douglas; Knapp, Darin J; Koob, George F; Lê, Dzung Anh; O'Dell, Laura E; Overstreet, David H; Roberts, Amanda J; Sinha, Rajita; Valdez, Glenn R; Weiss, Friedbert

    2005-02-01

    This report of the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 2004 Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting provides evidence linking stress during sobriety to craving that increases the risk for relapse. The initial presentation by Rajita Sinha summarized clinical evidence for the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity to stress-induced craving in alcoholics. During early abstinence, alcoholics who were confronted with stressful circumstances showed increased susceptibility for relapse. George Breese presented data demonstrating that stress could substitute for repeated withdrawals from chronic ethanol to induce anxiety-like behavior. This persistent adaptive change induced by multiple withdrawals allowed stress to induce an anxiety-like response that was absent in animals that were not previously exposed to chronic ethanol. Subsequently, Amanda Roberts reviewed evidence that increased drinking induced by stress was dependent on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). In addition, rats that were stressed during protracted abstinence exhibited anxiety-like behavior that was also dependent on CRF. Christopher Dayas indicated that stress increases the reinstatement of an alcohol-related cue. Moreover, this effect was enhanced by previous alcohol dependence. These interactive effects between stress and alcohol-related environmental stimuli depended on concurrent activation of endogenous opioid and CRF systems. A.D. Lê covered information that indicated that stress facilitated reinstatement to alcohol responding and summarized the influence of multiple deprivations on this interaction. David Overstreet provided evidence that restraint stress during repeated alcohol deprivations increases voluntary drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats that results in withdrawal-induced anxiety that is not observed in the absence of stress. Testing of drugs on the stress-induced voluntary drinking implicated serotonin and CRF involvement in the sensitized response

  18. Stress Enhancement of Craving During Sobriety: A Risk for Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Breese, George R.; Chu, Kathleen; Dayas, Christopher V.; Funk, Douglas; Knapp, Darin J.; Koob, George F.; Lê, Dzung Anh; O'Dell, Laura E.; Overstreet, David H.; Roberts, Amanda J.; Sinha, Rajita; Valdez, Glenn R.; Weiss, Friedbert

    2010-01-01

    This report of the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 2004 Research Society on Alcoholism Meeting provides evidence linking stress during sobriety to craving that increases the risk for relapse. The initial presentation by Rajita Sinha summarized clinical evidence for the hypothesis that there is an increased sensitivity to stress-induced craving in alcoholics. During early abstinence, alcoholics who were confronted with stressful circumstances showed increased susceptibility for relapse. George Breese presented data demonstrating that stress could substitute for repeated withdrawals from chronic ethanol to induce anxiety-like behavior. This persistent adaptive change induced by multiple withdrawals allowed stress to induce an anxiety-like response that was absent in animals that were not previously exposed to chronic ethanol. Subsequently, Amanda Roberts reviewed evidence that increased drinking induced by stress was dependent on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). In addition, rats that were stressed during protracted abstinence exhibited anxiety-like behavior that was also dependent on CRF. Christopher Dayas indicated that stress increases the reinstatement of an alcohol-related cue. Moreover, this effect was enhanced by previous alcohol dependence. These interactive effects between stress and alcohol-related environmental stimuli depended on concurrent activation of endogenous opioid and CRF systems. A.D. Lê covered information that indicated that stress facilitated reinstatement to alcohol responding and summarized the influence of multiple deprivations on this interaction. David Overstreet provided evidence that restraint stress during repeated alcohol deprivations increases voluntary drinking in alcohol-preferring (P) rats that results in withdrawal-induced anxiety that is not observed in the absence of stress. Testing of drugs on the stress-induced voluntary drinking implicated serotonin and CRF involvement in the sensitized response

  19. [Management of relapses in smoking dehabituation].

    PubMed

    Sanz Pozo, B; Camarelles Guillem, F; de Miguel Díez, J

    2006-03-01

    Due to the recurrent chronic nature of tobacco dependence, health care professionals should know the most common reasons for relapses and offer smokers who have stopped smoking a preventive treatment. In our setting, some authors state that the main causes for which smokers relapse are the negative emotional states and social pressures. Among the prevention strategies of relapse are providing the patient information, reinforcing his/her decision to stop smoking and helping the patient identify and face the danger situations for the maintenance of abstinence.

  20. A conflict rat model of cue-induced relapse to cocaine seeking.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ayelet; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Levy, Dino; Shaham, Yavin; Zangen, Abraham

    2007-09-01

    Relapse to drug use in humans can be induced by exposure to drug-associated cues. The ability of drug cues to provoke 'relapse' has been studied in laboratory animals using a reinstatement model in which resumption of drug seeking is assessed after extinction of drug-reinforced responding. In this model, there are no adverse consequences of drug-seeking behavior. However, in humans, abstinence is often self-imposed, and relapse episodes likely involve making a choice between the desire for the drug and the negative consequences of pursuing it (a conflict situation). In this paper, we describe a conflict model of cue-induced relapse in rats that approximate the human condition. Rats were trained to lever press for cocaine; infusions were paired with a discrete light cue. An 'electric barrier' was then introduced by electrifying the floor area near the levers. Responding decreased over days with increasing shock intensities, until the rats did not approach the levers for 3 days. Subsequently, the effect of intermittent noncontingent light-cue presentations on resumption of lever responding (relapse) was assessed in extinction tests, with the electric barrier remaining activated; during testing, lever presses led to contingent light-cue presentations. Noncontingent cue exposure led to resumption of lever presses during the relapse tests in 14 of the 24 rats. Surprisingly, 24 h later, 11 of the 24 rats resumed lever responding in a subsequent post-noncontingent cue test under similar extinction conditions. Large individual differences in responding were observed during both tests. At its current stage of development, the conflict relapse model appears particularly suitable for studying individual differences in cue-induced relapse to cocaine seeking or factors that promote this relapse.

  1. Ceftriaxone attenuates cocaine relapse after abstinence through modulation of nucleus accumbens AMPA subunit expression.

    PubMed

    LaCrosse, Amber L; Hill, Kristine; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-02-01

    Using the extinction-reinstatement model of cocaine relapse, we and others have demonstrated that the antibiotic ceftriaxone attenuates cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking. Reinstatement is contingent on the release of glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) and manipulations that reduce glutamate efflux or block post-synaptic glutamate receptors attenuate reinstatement. We have demonstrated that the mechanism of action by which ceftriaxone attenuates reinstatement involves increased NAc GLT-1 expression and a reduction in NAc glutamate efflux during reinstatement. Here we investigated the effects of ceftriaxone (100 and 200 mg/kg) on context-primed relapse following abstinence without extinction training and examined the effects of ceftriaxone on GluA1, GluA2 and GLT-1 expression. We conducted microdialysis during relapse to determine if an increase in NAc glutamate accompanies relapse after abstinence and whether ceftriaxone blunts glutamate efflux. We found that both doses of ceftriaxone attenuated relapse. While relapse was accompanied by an increase in NAc glutamate, ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg) was unable to significantly reduce NAc glutamate efflux during relapse despite its ability to upregulate GLT-1. GluA1 was reduced in the NAc by both doses of ceftriaxone while GluA2 expression was unchanged, indicating that ceftriaxone altered AMPA subunit composition following cocaine. Finally, GLT-1 was not altered in the PFC by ceftriaxone. These results indicate that it is possible to attenuate context-primed relapse to cocaine-seeking through modification of post-synaptic receptor properties without attenuating glutamate efflux during relapse. Furthermore, increasing NAc GLT-1 protein expression is not sufficient to attenuate glutamate efflux. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  2. Binary logistic regression modelling: Measuring the probability of relapse cases among drug addict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Alias, Siti Nor Shadila

    2014-07-01

    For many years Malaysia faced the drug addiction issues. The most serious case is relapse phenomenon among treated drug addict (drug addict who have under gone the rehabilitation programme at Narcotic Addiction Rehabilitation Centre, PUSPEN). Thus, the main objective of this study is to find the most significant factor that contributes to relapse to happen. The binary logistic regression analysis was employed to model the relationship between independent variables (predictors) and dependent variable. The dependent variable is the status of the drug addict either relapse, (Yes coded as 1) or not, (No coded as 0). Meanwhile the predictors involved are age, age at first taking drug, family history, education level, family crisis, community support and self motivation. The total of the sample is 200 which the data are provided by AADK (National Antidrug Agency). The finding of the study revealed that age and self motivation are statistically significant towards the relapse cases..

  3. Randomized trial of oral teriflunomide for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Paul; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Confavreux, Christian; Comi, Giancarlo; Kappos, Ludwig; Olsson, Tomas P; Benzerdjeb, Hadj; Truffinet, Philippe; Wang, Lin; Miller, Aaron; Freedman, Mark S

    2011-10-06

    Teriflunomide is a new oral disease-modifying therapy for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. We concluded a randomized trial involving 1088 patients with multiple sclerosis, 18 to 55 years of age, with a score of 0 to 5.5 on the Expanded Disability Status Scale and at least one relapse in the previous year or at least two relapses in the previous 2 years. Patients were randomly assigned (in a 1:1:1 ratio) to placebo, 7 mg of teriflunomide, or 14 mg of teriflunomide once daily for 108 weeks. The primary end point was the annualized relapse rate, and the key secondary end point was confirmed progression of disability for at least 12 weeks. Teriflunomide reduced the annualized relapse rate (0.54 for placebo vs. 0.37 for teriflunomide at either 7 or 14 mg), with relative risk reductions of 31.2% and 31.5%, respectively (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). The proportion of patients with confirmed disability progression was 27.3% with placebo, 21.7% with teriflunomide at 7 mg (P=0.08), and 20.2% with teriflunomide at 14 mg (P=0.03). Both teriflunomide doses were superior to placebo on a range of end points measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diarrhea, nausea, and hair thinning were more common with teriflunomide than with placebo. The incidence of elevated alanine aminotransferase levels (≥1 times the upper limit of the normal range) was higher with teriflunomide at 7 mg and 14 mg (54.0% and 57.3%, respectively) than with placebo (35.9%); the incidence of levels that were at least 3 times the upper limit of the normal range was similar in the lower- and higher-dose teriflunomide groups and the placebo group (6.3%, 6.7%, and 6.7%, respectively). Serious infections were reported in 1.6%, 2.5%, and 2.2% of patients in the three groups, respectively. No deaths occurred. Teriflunomide significantly reduced relapse rates, disability progression (at the higher dose), and MRI evidence of disease activity, as compared with placebo. (Funded by Sanofi

  4. Predictors of rapid relapse in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, Marion P; MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci; Trottier, Kathryn; Colton, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Relapse remains a significant concern in bulimia nervosa, with some patients relapsing within months of treatment completion. The purpose of the study was to identify predictors of relapse within the first 6 months following treatment. The 116 participants were bingeing and/or vomiting ≥ 8 times per month before day hospital (DH), and had ≤ 2 episodes per month in the last month of DH and the first month after DH. Rapid relapse was defined as ≥ 8 episodes per month for 3 months starting within 6 months. The rate of rapid relapse was 27.6%. Patients who relapsed soon after DH had higher frequencies of bingeing and vomiting before treatment, engaged in less body avoidance before treatment and were more likely to be slow responders to treatment. Weight and shape concerns and body checking were not significant predictors. More frequent bulimic symptoms accompanied by less body avoidance may indicate an entrenchment in the illness which in turn augurs a labored and transient response to DH treatment that is difficult to sustain after intensive treatment ends. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Modeling relapse situations in the human laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that alcoholism is a chronic relapsing illness. While stress significantly impacts alcoholism risk, there is also evidence that increasing levels of alcohol use affect peripheral and central stress and reward pathways thereby setting up a reciprocal relationship among the effects of alcohol consumption of the development, course of and recovery from alcoholism. This chapter reviews our efforts in assessing the integrity of stress pathways in alcoholism by examining whether altered responses of the stress pathways play a role in relapse risk. Using validated human laboratory procedures to model two of the most common situations that contribute to relapse risk, we review how such models in the laboratory can predict subsequent alcohol relapse. Empirical findings from human laboratory and brain imaging studies are reviewed to show that specific stress-related dysregulation accompanies the alcohol craving state in alcohol-dependent individuals, and such dysregulation along with increases in alcohol seeking are predictive of increased alcohol relapse risk. Finally, the significant implications of these findings for the development of novel treatment interventions that target stress processes and alcohol craving to improve alcoholism relapse outcomes are discussed.

  6. Norepinephrine at the nexus of arousal, motivation and relapse.

    PubMed

    España, Rodrigo A; Schmeichel, Brooke E; Berridge, Craig W

    2016-06-15

    Arousal plays a critical role in cognitive, affective and motivational processes. Consistent with this, the dysregulation of arousal-related neural systems is implicated in a variety of psychiatric disorders, including addiction. Noradrenergic systems exert potent arousal-enhancing actions that involve signaling at α1- and β-noradrenergic receptors within a distributed network of subcortical regions. The majority of research into noradrenergic modulation of arousal has focused on the nucleus locus coeruleus. Nevertheless, anatomical studies demonstrate that multiple noradrenergic nuclei innervate subcortical arousal-related regions, providing a substrate for differential regulation of arousal across these distinct noradrenergic nuclei. The arousal-promoting actions of psychostimulants and other drugs of abuse contribute to their widespread abuse. Moreover, relapse can be triggered by a variety of arousal-promoting events, including stress and re-exposure to drugs of abuse. Evidence has long-indicated that norepinephrine plays an important role in relapse. Recent observations suggest that noradrenergic signaling elicits affectively-neutral arousal that is sufficient to reinstate drug seeking. Collectively, these observations indicate that norepinephrine plays a key role in the interaction between arousal, motivation, and relapse. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A parametric estimation procedure for relapse time distributions.

    PubMed

    Ahlström, L; Olsson, M; Nerman, O

    1999-06-01

    In a relapse clinical trial patients who have recovered from some recurrent disease (e.g., ulcer or cancer) are examined at a number of predetermined times. A relapse can be detected either at one of these planned inspections or at a spontaneous visit initiated by the patient because of symptoms. In the first case the observations of the time to relapse, X, is interval-censored by two predetermined time-points. In the second case the upper endpoint of the interval is an observation of the time to symptoms, Y. To model the progression of the disease we use a partially observable Markov process. This approach results in a bivariate phase-type distribution for the joint distribution of (X, Y). It is a flexible model which contains several natural distributions for X, and allows the conditional distributions of the marginals to smoothly depend on each other. To estimate the distributions involved we develop an EM-algorithm. The estimation procedure is evaluated and compared with a non-parametric method in a couple of example based on simulated data.

  8. Relapse Prevention with Substance Abusers: Clinical Issues and Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daley, Dennis C.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems of relapse with alcoholics and other drug abusers from three perspectives: client-related variables, common erroneous beliefs and myths held by professionals regarding relapse, and treatment system problems that may contribute to relapse. Offers proposed solutions and describes a relapse prevention model. (Author/ABB)

  9. Synaptic plasticity mediating cocaine relapse requires matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander C W; Kupchik, Yonatan M; Scofield, Michael D; Gipson, Cassandra D; Wiggins, Armina; Thomas, Charles A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-12-01

    Relapse to cocaine use necessitates remodeling excitatory synapses in the nucleus accumbens and synaptic reorganization requires matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) degradation of the extracellular matrix proteins. We found enduring increases in MMP-2 activity in rats after withdrawal from self-administered cocaine and transient increases in MMP-9 during cue-induced cocaine relapse. Cue-induced heroin and nicotine relapse increased MMP activity, and increased MMP activity was required for both cocaine relapse and relapse-associated synaptic plasticity.

  10. Does providing extended relapse prevention bibliotherapy to problem gamblers improve outcome?

    PubMed

    Hodgins, David C; Currie, Shawn R; el-Guebaly, Nady; Diskin, Katherine M

    2007-03-01

    Relapse rates among pathological gamblers are high with as many as 75% of gamblers returning to gambling shortly after a serious attempt to quit. The present study focused on providing a low cost, easy to access relapse prevention program to such individuals. Based on information collected in our ongoing study of the process of relapse, a series of relapse prevention booklets were developed and evaluated. Individuals who had recently quit gambling (N = 169) were recruited (through media announcements) and randomly assigned to a single mailing condition in which they received one booklet summarizing all of the relapse prevention information or a repeated mailing condition in which they received the summary booklet plus 7 additional booklets mailed to them at regular intervals over the course of a year period. Gambling involvement over the course of the 12-month follow-up period, confirmed by family or friends, was compared between the two groups. Results indicated that participants receiving the repeated mailings were more likely to meet their goal, but they did not differ from participants receiving the single mailing in frequency of gambling or extent of gambling losses. The results of this project suggest that providing extended relapse prevention bibliotherapy to problem gamblers does not improve outcome. However, providing the overview booklet may be a low cost, easy to access alternative for individuals who have quit gambling.

  11. Negative feedback-defective PRPS1 mutants drive thiopurine resistance in relapsed childhood ALL.

    PubMed

    Li, Benshang; Li, Hui; Bai, Yun; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Yang, Jun J; Chen, Yao; Lu, Gang; Tzoneva, Gannie; Ma, Xiaotu; Wu, Tongmin; Li, Wenjing; Lu, Haisong; Ding, Lixia; Liang, Huanhuan; Huang, Xiaohang; Yang, Minjun; Jin, Lei; Kang, Hui; Chen, Shuting; Du, Alicia; Shen, Shuhong; Ding, Jianping; Chen, Hongzhuan; Chen, Jing; von Stackelberg, Arend; Gu, Longjun; Zhang, Jinghui; Ferrando, Adolfo; Tang, Jingyan; Wang, Shengyue; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2015-06-01

    Relapse is the leading cause of mortality in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Among chemotherapeutics, thiopurines are key drugs in ALL combination therapy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified relapse-specific mutations in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase 1 gene (PRPS1), which encodes a rate-limiting purine biosynthesis enzyme, in 24/358 (6.7%) relapsed childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL) cases. All individuals who harbored PRPS1 mutations relapsed early during treatment, and mutated ALL clones expanded exponentially before clinical relapse. Our functional analyses of PRPS1 mutants uncovered a new chemotherapy-resistance mechanism involving reduced feedback inhibition of de novo purine biosynthesis and competitive inhibition of thiopurine activation. Notably, the de novo purine synthesis inhibitor lometrexol effectively abrogated PRPS1 mutant-driven drug resistance. These results highlight the importance of constitutive activation of the de novo purine synthesis pathway in thiopurine resistance, and they offer therapeutic strategies for the treatment of relapsed and thiopurine-resistant ALL.

  12. Living with hope and fear--the uncertainty of childhood cancer after relapse.

    PubMed

    De Graves, Sharon; Aranda, Sanchia

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the experiences of families when a child with cancer relapses. The aim was to develop an understanding of the human actions and emotions that shape the experience of relapse, to question what influences the care provided at relapse, and to challenge current practices. Twelve families were involved in a critical ethnography exploring their child's relapse. Each family participated in an average of 4 in-depth interviews (46 in total) over a period of 6(1/2) to 13 months. The most significant finding from this study was the profound impact of uncertainty. The families fluctuated between 2 states of reality-hoping for a cure and contemplating death-as they faced the uncertainty that surrounded their child's prognosis. A conceptual model of uncertainty at relapse is presented, demonstrating how uncertainty is significant to the child and family's experience, impacting the pursuit for cure, treatment-related decision making, and prognostic communications. Acknowledging the uncertainty of relapse and developing an awareness of the child and family's hopes and fears may lead to a greater understanding of the challenges faced and promote more open and honest communications at this critical period.

  13. Direct resin composite approach to orthodontic relapse. Case report.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Camila

    2012-03-01

    The treatment of malaligned teeth represents a challenge, especially in the presence of root resorption. Options to improve aesthetics are limited and often involve high costs. Direct composite restorations offer an alternative for the realignment of orthodontic-relapsed teeth where orthodontic retreatment is not indicated. Their reasonable cost, conservativeness and excellent aesthetics have allowed resin composites to gain popularity in recent years. This report describes a direct composite approach to the realignment of teeth with anterior root resorption. Furthermore, the article describes the use of a "silicon lingual matrix" to facilitate the polychromatic layering of composite and the manipulation of illusions to improve perception of tooth alignment.

  14. BRAIN MORPHOLOGY AT ENTRY INTO TREATMENT FOR ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE IS RELATED TO RELAPSE PROPENSITY

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas, VA; Durazzo, TC; Gazdzinski, S; Mon, A; Studholme, C; Meyerhoff, DJ

    2011-01-01

    Background We examined whether any differences in brain volumes at entry into alcohol dependence treatment differentiate subsequent Abstainers from Relapsers. Methods Individuals in alcohol dependence treatment (N=75) underwent magnetic resonance imaging approximately 6 ± 4 days after their last alcoholic drink, and 40 age-matched non-smoking light drinkers were studied as controls. At follow-up 7.8 ± 2.6 months later, 23 alcoholics (31%) had abstained from drinking and 52 (69%) had relapsed. Deformation morphometry compared Relapsers, Abstainers, and light drinkers. Results Compared to light drinkers, future Abstainers had smaller brain tissue volumes in the left amygdala, hippocampal head, and entorhinal cortex, and bilaterally in the thalamus and adjacent subcortical white matter (WM), and had larger volume in the left lateral orbitofrontal region. Compared to light drinkers, future Relapsers had smaller brain tissue volumes in the right middle temporal, occipital, and superior frontal WM. Compared to future Abstainers, future Relapsers had smaller tissue volumes primarily in bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and surrounding WM. Results were virtually unaffected after controlling for common comorbidities. Conclusion At entry into alcohol dependence treatment, the brain structure of future Relapsers differs from that of future Abstainers. Future Relapsers have smaller brain volumes in regions of the mesocorticolimbic reward system that are critically involved in impulse control, emotional regulation, craving, and evaluation and anticipation of stimulus salience and hedonics. Structural abnormalities of this circuitry may confer greater risk for resumption of hazardous drinking after treatment and may contribute to the definition of a neurobiological relapse risk profile in alcohol dependence. PMID:21601177

  15. Breast cancer in women using digoxin: tumor characteristics and relapse risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Digoxin use is associated with increased incidence of breast and uterus cancers. We postulated that digoxin use might affect tumor characteristics and increase relapse risk in women with breast cancer. Methods Incident breast cancer cases in Danish women (n = 49,312; 1995 to 2008) were identified. Analyses were conducted in women 20 to 74 years old. Relapse hazard ratios (HR) were compared in women using and not using digoxin, adjusting for age, calendar period, protocol, tumor size, nodal involvement, histology grade, estrogen-receptor (ER) status, and anti-estrogen therapy in Cox regression models. Results At diagnosis, tumors in digoxin users were more likely ER+ (85.4% vs. 78.6%: P = 0.002) and have grade 1 ductal histology (37.2% vs. 25.7%; P = 0.004), compared to non-users. 45 relapses occurred in women already using digoxin at breast cancer diagnosis (1,487 person-years); 24 relapses occurred in women later starting digoxin (384 person-years). Overall relapse risk HR in digoxin users was 1.13 (95% confidence interval: 0.88, 1.46) compared to non-users. Relapse risk in digoxin users was significantly increased in the first year (2.19; 1.26, 3.78) but not thereafter (0.99; 0.74, 1.32) (P = 0.02 for difference in HRs). First-year relapse hazard was high in digoxin-using women with ER+ tumors (2.51; 1.39, 4.55) but not ER- tumors (0.72; 0.10, 5.27). Recurrence hazard was not significantly changed among digoxin-using women also using tamoxifen. Conclusions Breast cancers arising in digoxin-using women had better prognostic features. After adjustment for markers, overall breast cancer relapse risk in digoxin users was not increased significantly, although recurrence hazards for ER+ tumors were higher in the first year following diagnosis. PMID:23421975

  16. A conflict rat model of cue-induced relapse to cocaine seeking

    PubMed Central

    Katzir, Ayelet; Barnea-Ygael, Noam; Levy, Dino; Shaham, Yavin; Zangen, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Rationale and objective Relapse to drug use in humans can be induced by exposure to drug-associated cues. The ability of drug cues to provoke ‘relapse’ has been studied in laboratory animals using a reinstatement model in which resumption of drug seeking is assessed after extinction of drug-reinforced responding. In this model, there are no adverse consequences of drug-seeking behavior. However, in humans abstinence is often self-imposed, and relapse episodes likely involve making a choice between the desire for the drug and the negative consequences of pursuing it (a conflict situation). Here, we describe a conflict model of cue-induced relapse in rats that approximate the human condition. Methods Rats were trained to lever-press for cocaine; infusions were paired with a discrete light-cue. An ‘electric barrier’ was then introduced by electrifying the floor area near the levers. Responding decreased over days with increasing shock intensities, until the rats did not approach the levers for 3 days. Subsequently, the effect of intermittent non-contingent-light-cue presentations on resumption of lever responding (relapse) was assessed in extinction tests, with the electric barrier remaining activated; during testing lever-presses led to contingent light-cue presentations. Results Non-contingent cue exposure led to resumption of lever presses during the relapse tests in 14 of the 24 rats. Surprisingly, 24 h later, 11 of the 24 rats resumed lever responding in a subsequent post non-contingent cue test under similar extinction conditions. Large individual differences in responding were observed during both tests. Conclusions At its current stage of development, the conflict relapse model appears particularly suitable for studying individual differences in cue-induced relapse to cocaine seeking or factors that promote this relapse. PMID:17558499

  17. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse

    PubMed Central

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A.; García, Juan L.; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M.; Martín, Ana A.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.; García-Sanz, Ramón; Miguel, Jesús F. San; Gutiérrez, Norma C.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse. PMID:27811368

  18. Integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression in multiple myeloma reveals alterations related to relapse.

    PubMed

    Krzeminski, Patryk; Corchete, Luis A; García, Juan L; López-Corral, Lucía; Fermiñán, Encarna; García, Eva M; Martín, Ana A; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; García-Sanz, Ramón; San Miguel, Jesús F; Gutiérrez, Norma C

    2016-12-06

    Multiple myeloma (MM) remains incurable despite the introduction of novel agents, and a relapsing course is observed in most patients. Although the development of genomic technologies has greatly improved our understanding of MM pathogenesis, the mechanisms underlying relapse have been less thoroughly investigated. In this study, an integrative analysis of DNA copy number, DNA methylation and gene expression was conducted in matched diagnosis and relapse samples from MM patients. Overall, the acquisition of abnormalities at relapse was much more frequent than the loss of lesions present at diagnosis, and DNA losses were significantly more frequent in relapse than in diagnosis samples. Interestingly, copy number abnormalities involving more than 100 Mb of DNA at relapse significantly affect the gene expression of these samples, provoking a particular deregulation of the IL-8 pathway. On the other hand, no significant modifications of gene expression were observed in those samples with less than 100 Mb affected by chromosomal changes. Although several statistical approaches were used to identify genes whose abnormal expression at relapse was regulated by methylation, only two genes that were significantly deregulated in relapse samples (SORL1 and GLT1D1) showed a negative correlation between methylation and expression. Further analysis revealed that DNA methylation was involved in regulating SORL1 expression in MM. Finally, relevant changes in gene expression observed in relapse samples, such us downregulation of CD27 and P2RY8, were most likely not preceded by alterations in the corresponding DNA. Taken together, these results suggest that the genomic heterogeneity described at diagnosis remains at relapse.

  19. Integrins Modulate Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Armina; Smith, Rachel J; Shen, Haowei; Kalivas, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    Relapse to cocaine seeking involves impairments in plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that bind to the extracellular matrix and regulate aspects of synaptic plasticity, including glutamate receptor trafficking. To determine a role for integrins in cocaine-seeking, rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, the operant response extinguished, and cocaine-seeking induced by a conditioned cue or noncontingent cocaine injection. This cocaine self-administration protocol reduced the content of the beta3 integrin subunit in postsynaptic density (PSD) of the accumbens core at 24 hr after the last self-administration session. However, by 3 wks of forced abstinence plus extinction training the level of beta3 was elevated, and was further regulated over 120 min during cocaine-induced drug-seeking. A small peptide ligand (RGD) that mimics extracellular matrix protein binding to integrins was microinjected into the accumbens core during self-administration or extinction training, or just prior to cocaine-reinstated drug seeking. The daily RGD injections during self-administration or just prior to a reinstatement session inhibited cocaine-induced drug-seeking, while RGD microinjection during extinction training was without consequence on reinstated cocaine-seeking. Daily RGD during self-administration also prevented the enduring changes in beta3 levels. Finally, reduced surface expression of the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor is associated with cocaine-seeking, and daily RGD microinjections during self-administration training normalized the surface expression of GluR2. Together these data indicate that the regulation integrins may contribute to cocaine-reinstated drug-seeking, in part by promoting reduced GluR2 surface expression. PMID:22072669

  20. Integrins modulate relapse to cocaine-seeking.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Armina; Smith, Rachel J; Shen, Hao-Wei; Kalivas, Peter W

    2011-11-09

    Relapse to cocaine-seeking involves impairments in plasticity at glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus accumbens. Integrins are cell adhesion molecules that bind to the extracellular matrix and regulate aspects of synaptic plasticity, including glutamate receptor trafficking. To determine a role for integrins in cocaine-seeking, rats were trained to self-administer cocaine, the operant response extinguished, and cocaine-seeking induced by a conditioned cue or noncontingent cocaine injection. This cocaine self-administration protocol reduced the content of the β3 integrin subunit in postsynaptic density of the accumbens core at 24 h after the last self-administration session. However, after 3 weeks of forced abstinence plus extinction training, the level of β3 was elevated and was further regulated over 120 min during cocaine-induced drug-seeking. A small peptide ligand [arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)] that mimics extracellular matrix protein binding to integrins was microinjected into the accumbens core during self-administration or extinction training, or just before cocaine-reinstated drug seeking. The daily RGD injections during self-administration or just before a reinstatement session inhibited cocaine-induced drug-seeking, while RGD microinjection during extinction training was without consequence on reinstated cocaine-seeking. Daily RGD during self-administration also prevented the enduring changes in β3 levels. Finally, reduced surface expression of the GluR2 subunit of the AMPA receptor is associated with cocaine-seeking, and daily RGD microinjections during self-administration training normalized the surface expression of GluR2. Together, these data indicate that the regulation integrins may contribute to cocaine-reinstated drug-seeking, in part by promoting reduced GluR2 surface expression.

  1. Medical treatment for biochemical relapse after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Quero, L; Hennequin, C

    2014-10-01

    This article's purpose was to review the medical data justifying the use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched to identify relevant information with the following medical subject headings: "prostate cancer", "radiotherapy" and "biochemical relapse". Prognostic factors affecting the overall survival of patients with a biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy have been identified: short prostate specific antigen (PSA)-doubling time (< 12 months), high PSA value (> 10 ng/mL) and short interval between treatment and biochemical relapse (< 18 months). If a second local treatment is not feasible, timing to initiate a salvage medical treatment is not defined. Particularly, randomized trials did not demonstrate a significant benefit of an early initiation of androgen deprivation treatment. Some retrospective studies suggest that an early androgen deprivation is justified if poor prognostic factors are found. However, if an androgen deprivation treatment is prescribed, intermittent schedule is non-inferior to a continuous administration and seems to offer a better quality of life. Many non-hormonal treatments have also been evaluated in this setting: only 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors could be proposed in some specific situations. In conclusion, the judicious use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse is still debated. Given the natural history of this clinical situation, a simple surveillance is justified in many cases.

  2. Pathological gambling: understanding relapses and dropouts.

    PubMed

    Aragay, Núria; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Ramos-Grille, Irene; Cardona, Sara; Garrido, Gemma; Anisul Islam, Mohammed; Menchón, José M; Vallès, Vicenç

    2015-02-01

    There is little available information on the factors that influence relapses and dropouts during therapy for pathological gambling (PG). The aim of this study was to determine socio-demographic, clinical, personality, and psychopathological predictors of relapse and dropout in a sample of pathological gamblers seeking treatment. A total of 566 consecutive outpatients diagnosed with PG according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were included. All patients underwent an individualized cognitive-behavioral treatment program. We analyzed predictors of relapse during 6months of treatment and during the subsequent 6months of follow-up, and predictors of dropout over the entire therapeutic program. Eighty patients (14.1%) experienced at least one relapse during the entire follow-up of the study: 50 (8.8%) within the treatment period and 12 (2.1%) during the subsequent 6-month follow-up period. The main predictors of relapse were single marital status, spending less than 100euros/week on gambling, active gambling behavior at treatment inclusion, and high scores on the TCI-R Harm Avoidance personality dimension. One hundred fifty-seven patients (27.8%) missed 3 or more therapeutic sessions over the entire therapeutic program. The main predictors of dropout were single marital status, younger age, and high scores on the TCI-R Novelty Seeking personality dimension. The presence of these factors at inclusion should be taken into account by physicians dealing with PG patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk Factors for Relapse of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasanjani Roushan, Mohammad Reza; Moulana, Zahra; Afshar, Zeinab Mohseni; Ebrahimpour, Soheil

    2016-01-01

    Background & Propose: Brucellosis is serious disease around the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. Relapse is major problem in therapy of brucellosis. This study aimed to evaluate risk factors of relapse after treatment in patients. Methods: It is a descriptive-analytic study from 1990 to 2014, in Ayatolla Rohani hospital in Babol, Iran. We studied 980 patients with brucellosis. The studied community included patients infected with brucellosis and the required information was gathered based on their hospital files. The base for recognizing Malta fever were clinical symptoms and Para-clinical sign congruent with infection like as, titer SAT>1:320 and 2-ME>1:160. Patients with relapse and patients without relapse were placed separately in two groups. The data were statistically compared with Spss 16, by Chi-square and Cox–regression tests. Results: Based on this study, treatment regimen is a preventive factor (P=0.000). Moreover, Based on some statistical methods, regimens no. 3 and 4 were introduce preventive factors (P=0.001) and (P=0.004). It should also be noted that findings the same statistical model, factors like gender, age, residence, professional contacts, complications and delay in treatment were also analyzed but none of them are considered as preventive factors. Conclusion: Based our finding, we suggest aminoglycosides (gentamicin or streptomycin with doxycycline) are associated with lower rate of relapse in brucellosis. PMID:26925907

  4. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (<0.33), intermediate (0.34–0.67), and high (>0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  5. Retention and relapse in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, S J; Kandasamy, S; Huang, G

    2017-03-01

    Maintaining teeth in their corrected positions following orthodontic treatment can be extremely challenging. Teeth have a tendency to move back towards the original malocclusion as a result of periodontal, gingival, occlusal and growth related factors. However, tooth movement can also occur as a result of normal age changes. Because orthodontics is unable to predict which patients are at risk of relapse, those which will remain stable and the extent of relapse that will occur in the long-term, clinicians need to treat all patients as if they have a high potential to relapse. To reduce this risk, long term retention is advocated. This can be a significant commitment for patients, and so retention and the potential for relapse must form a key part of the informed consent process prior to orthodontic treatment. It is vital that patients are made fully aware of their responsibilities in committing to wear retainers as prescribed in order to reduce the chance of relapse. If patients are unable or unwilling to comply as prescribed, they must be prepared to accept that there will be tooth positional changes following treatment. There is currently insufficient high quality evidence regarding the best type of retention or retention regimen, and so each clinician's approach will be affected by their personal, clinical experience and expertise, and guided by their patients' expectations and circumstances.

  6. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  7. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. Aim: This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. Results: The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Conclusions: Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis. PMID:27688443

  8. Relapse after Oral Terbinafine Therapy in Dermatophytosis: A Clinical and Mycological Study.

    PubMed

    Majid, Imran; Sheikh, Gousia; Kanth, Farhath; Hakak, Rubeena

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of recurrent tinea infections after oral terbinafine therapy is on the rise. This study aims to identify the appearance of incomplete cure and relapse after 2-week oral terbinafine therapy in tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris. A total of 100 consecutive patients clinically and mycologically diagnosed to have tinea corporis and/or tinea cruris were included in the study. The enrolled patients were administered oral terbinafine 250 mg once daily for 2 weeks. All clinically cured patients were then followed up for 12 weeks to look for any relapse/cure. The common dermatophytes grown on culture were Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans in 55% and 20% patients, respectively. At the end of 2-week oral terbinafine therapy, 30% patients showed a persistent disease on clinical examination while 35% patients showed a persistent positive fungal culture (persisters) at this time. These culture positive patients included all the clinically positive cases. Rest of the patients (65/100) demonstrated both clinical and mycological cure at this time (cured). Over the 12-week follow-up, clinical relapse was seen in 22 more patients (relapse) among those who had shown clinical and mycological cure at the end of terbinafine therapy. Thus, only 43% patients could achieve a long-term clinical and mycological cure after 2 weeks of oral terbinafine treatment. Majority of the relapses (16/22) were seen after 8 weeks of completion of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in the body surface area involvement or the causative organism involved between the cured, persister, or relapse groups. Incomplete mycological cure as well as relapse is very common after standard (2-week) terbinafine therapy in our patients of tinea cruris/corporis.

  9. Neuromyelitis optica relapses: Race and rate, immunosuppression and impairment.

    PubMed

    Tackley, George; O'Brien, Fanny; Rocha, João; Woodhall, Mark; Waters, Patrick; Chandratre, Saleel; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hemingway, Cheryl; Wassmer, Evangeline; Wasiewski, Warren; Leite, Maria Isabel; Palace, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare antibody-mediated CNS disease characterised by disabling relapses leading to high morbidity and mortality. Understanding relapse activity and severity is important for treatment decisions and clinical trial design. We assessed (1) whether clinical and demographic factors associate with different relapse rates and (2) the relative impact of immunosuppressive treatments on relapse rates and on attack-related residual disability. Clinical, demographic and treatment data were prospectively collected from 79 consecutive aquaporin 4 antibody positive patients seen in the nationally commissioned Oxford NMO service. The influence of clinical features on annualised relapse rates (using multiple regression) and the effect of immunosuppression on relapse-associated residual disability for transverse myelitis and optic neuritis attacks (using a mixed effect model) were analysed. The mean annualised relapse rate was 0.93. Relapse rates were significantly higher in Afro-Caribbeans, children and in those of shorter disease duration. Relapse rates reduced on treatment (from 0.87 to 0.42). Delay to first treatment did not influence eventual on-treatment relapse rate. Immunosuppressive treatment significantly reduced the residual disability from ON (p<0.01), and TM (p=0.029) attacks. Relapse rates in NMO are influenced by multiple factors, including age, ethnicity and disease duration. Current immunosuppressive treatments reduce but do not abolish relapses, however, they appear to additionally lessen the chronic disabling effect of a relapse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The neurobiology of alcohol craving and relapse.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongju; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    A major block to recovery from alcoholism is substantial alcohol craving and the chronic relapsing nature of the illness. This chapter reviews relevant structural and functional neuroimaging studies and discusses neural mechanisms underlying alcohol craving and relapse in the context of influential risk factors (i.e., alcohol, alcohol cue, and stress). Review of neuroimaging studies suggests that neuroadaptations in the cortico-striatal-limbic circuit encompassing the medial prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and amygdala significantly contribute to overwhelming alcohol craving and early relapse after a period of abstinence. The cortico-striatal-limbic circuit plays an important role in the modulation of emotion, reward, and decision making. As functional and structural chronic alcohol-related neuroadaptations are consistently reported in this circuit, it is likely that sensitization of this circuit from continued alcohol abuse may contribute to high alcohol craving and early relapse via impairments in the prefrontal executive function related to emotion regulation and decision making. This vulnerable neurobiologic state may be manifested as compulsive craving and intense urge to resume alcohol drinking in the face of environmental risk factors, including alcohol, alcohol cue, or stressful live events. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Typology of Relapse Promoting Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiffman, Saul

    Outcome data on smoking cessation has emphasized that most people have difficulty not in quitting smoking, but in maintaining cessation. An attempt was made to develop a more meaningful typology of relapse-promoting situations using a sample of 183 exsmokers who called a telephone hotline seeking help to stay away from cigarettes. Two higher order…

  12. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  13. Attributions and Relapse in Opiate Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Brendan P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated whether attributions of opiate addicts would predict abstinence and reactions to abstinence violations. Found that addicts who at admission attributed to themselves greater responsibility for negative outcomes and who attributed relapse episodes to more personally controllable factors were subsequently more likely either to be…

  14. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  15. Resistance to Change and Relapse of Observing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrailkill, Eric A.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Four experiments examined relapse of extinguished observing behavior of pigeons using a two-component multiple schedule of observing-response procedures. In both components, unsignaled periods of variable-interval (VI) food reinforcement alternated with extinction and observing responses produced stimuli associated with the availability of the VI…

  16. A brief dyadic group based psychoeducation program improves relapse rates in recently remitted bipolar disorder: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Russell; Piskulic, Danijela; Sundram, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Various adjunctive psychotherapies assist in decreasing relapse and improving outcomes for people with bipolar disorder (BD). Psychoeducation programs involving patient-only or caregiver-only groups have demonstrated some efficacy. We tested in recently remitted BD if a combined group based psychoeducation program involving patient-companion dyads decreased relapse. 58 recently remitted BD out-patients were randomised to receive either treatment as usual (TAU, n=31) or 12 x 90 minute psychoeducation sessions delivered weekly in a group program to the patient and companion (SIMSEP, n=27). After 12 weeks SIMSEP patients reverted to TAU and all patients were followed until week 60 or relapse. The primary outcome measure was relapse requiring hospital or intensive community intervention. 45 patients completed the study. 29 patients remained well at week 60 (SIMSEP n=17, TAU n=12), whilst 16 had relapsed (SIMSEP n=3, TAU n=13). The SIMSEP group were less likely to relapse (Fisher's exact test p=0.013; OR=0.16; 95% CI 0.04-0.70) and had an 11 week longer time to relapse compared to the TAU group (chi-square (1)=8.48, p<0.01). At study completion SIMSEP compared to TAU patients had lower Young Mania Rating Scale scores (Mann-Whitney U=255, p<0.01). The study was limited by a small sample size. A brief group psychoeducation program with recently remitted BD patients and their companions resulted in a decreased relapse rate, longer time to relapse, decreased manic symptoms and improved medication adherence suggesting utility in the adjunctive psychotherapeutic treatment of BD.

  17. "Worried about relapse": Family members' experiences and perspectives of relapse in first-episode psychosis.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shalini; Malla, Ashok; Marandola, Gina; Thériault, Joanie; Tibbo, Phil; Manchanda, Rahul; Williams, Richard; Joober, Ridha; Banks, Nicola

    2017-05-19

    The purpose of this study was to gain an in-depth understanding on the subject of relapse from the perspectives of family members of young people receiving services for a first-episode psychosis (FEP). A qualitative descriptive approach, using focus group methods, was used to elicit experiences, understandings, and knowledge of relapse in FEP. Family members were recruited from 4 specialized early intervention programmes for psychosis in Canada. A total of 24 (6 male, 18 female) family members participated in the study. Thematic analysis was used to examine the data. The core underlying theme in all focus groups was worrying about relapse, which was often accompanied by significant levels of fear and anxiety, and was influenced by: (1) impact of an episode of psychosis; (2) limited confidence in recognizing and coping with relapse; (3) unmet needs for coping skills and emotional support and (4) unmet needs regarding frequency and continuity of communication with clinicians. Family members' unmet needs for relapse-focused education, support and communication with service providers and peers, can have a negative impact on relapse prevention. Addressing family members' education and support needs in a tailored manner (including preferences for types of peer support) can contribute positively to their confidence and ability to recognize and respond to relapse. This can help reduce fear and anxieties about relapse, and positively influence the ability to function as caregivers. Future research should focus on best approaches for providing education, sustained contact with the clinical team and family peer support. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Placebo-controlled phase 3 study of oral BG-12 for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ralf; Kappos, Ludwig; Arnold, Douglas L; Bar-Or, Amit; Giovannoni, Gavin; Selmaj, Krzysztof; Tornatore, Carlo; Sweetser, Marianne T; Yang, Minhua; Sheikh, Sarah I; Dawson, Katherine T

    2012-09-20

    BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) was shown to have antiinflammatory and cytoprotective properties in preclinical experiments and to result in significant reductions in disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a phase 2, placebo-controlled study involving patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 study involving patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Patients were randomly assigned to receive oral BG-12 at a dose of 240 mg twice daily, BG-12 at a dose of 240 mg three times daily, or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of patients who had a relapse by 2 years. Other end points included the annualized relapse rate, the time to confirmed progression of disability, and findings on MRI. The estimated proportion of patients who had a relapse was significantly lower in the two BG-12 groups than in the placebo group (27% with BG-12 twice daily and 26% with BG-12 thrice daily vs. 46% with placebo, P<0.001 for both comparisons). The annualized relapse rate at 2 years was 0.17 in the twice-daily BG-12 group and 0.19 in the thrice-daily BG-12 group, as compared with 0.36 in the placebo group, representing relative reductions of 53% and 48% with the two BG-12 regimens, respectively (P<0.001 for the comparison of each BG-12 regimen with placebo). The estimated proportion of patients with confirmed progression of disability was 16% in the twice-daily BG-12 group, 18% in the thrice-daily BG-12 group, and 27% in the placebo group, with significant relative risk reductions of 38% with BG-12 twice daily (P=0.005) and 34% with BG-12 thrice daily (P=0.01). BG-12 also significantly reduced the number of gadolinium-enhancing lesions and of new or enlarging T(2)-weighted hyperintense lesions (P<0.001 for the comparison of each BG-12 regimen with placebo). Adverse events associated with BG-12 included flushing and gastrointestinal events, such as diarrhea, nausea, and upper

  19. Unusual Parsonage-Turner syndrome with relapses and bilateral simultaneous anterior interosseous neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Squintani, Giovanna; Mezzina, Corrado; Lettieri, Christian; Critelli, Adriana; Eleopra, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    We report an unusual case of Parsonage-Turner syndrome with relapses and simultaneous bilateral anterior interosseous neuropathy (AIN). A 66-year-old man, after a typical right brachial amyotrophic neuralgia few months previously, underwent surgery for left carpal tunnel syndrome. The day following surgery, wrist aching and bilateral weakness, even if prevalent on the right side, on thumb and index finger flexion appeared. Neurophysiology was consistent with bilateral AIN neuropathy and serology revealed anti-nucleus antibody positivity. Association of relapses with bilateral acute AIN involvement in the subject with autoantibody detection can suggest an immunological pathogenesis.

  20. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  1. Developing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Stewart, Sunita M.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jarrett, Robin B.; Emslie, Graham J.

    2008-01-01

    Relapse rates for children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) range from 30% to 40% within 1 to 2 years after acute treatment. Although relapse rates are high, there have been relatively few studies on the prevention of relapse in youth. While acute phase pharmacotherapy has been shown to reduce symptoms rapidly in depressed…

  2. Preventing relapse among former smokers: a comparison of minimal interventions through telephone and mail.

    PubMed

    Brandon, T H; Collins, B N; Juliano, L M; Lazev, A B

    2000-02-01

    This study compared 2 minimal interventions for reducing relapse in ex-smokers. One intervention involved 12-month access to a telephone hot line. In the other intervention, 8 relapse-prevention booklets were mailed to participants over 1 year. The 2 interventions were crossed in a 2 x 2 factorial design, yielding control, hot-line-only, mailings-only, and combined conditions. The criterion of at least 1 week of abstinence at baseline was met by 584 participants, 446 of whom also completed a 12-month assessment. Repeated mailings, but not the hot line, reduced relapse for those participants who had been abstinent for less than 3 months at baseline. At follow-up, 12% of those in the mailings conditions were smoking again compared with 35% in the nonmailing conditions. As predicted, both interventions were effective at attenuating the association between depressive symptoms and poor outcome found in the control condition.

  3. Ocular rosacea: an underdiagnosed cause of relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    De Marchi, Sergio Umberto; Cecchin, Emanuela; De Marchi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis are among the most common ocular disease in elderly patients. In these cases the search for causes is difficult and frustrating. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with a long history of red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis caused by ocular rosacea. In this patient the proper diagnosis was performed after 10 years of ocular disease, and repeated evaluations by general practitioners and clinical specialists, only after the appearance of facial signs of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Adequate therapy with oral doxycycline led to the improvement of the clinical picture that previously had shown a poor response to several topical treatments. The possibility of ocular rosacea should be considered in evaluating an elderly patient with persistent red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis. Making the proper diagnosis is crucial because ocular rosacea does not respond as expected to topical therapy and may lead to severe corneal involvement. PMID:25239991

  4. Psychosocial factors related to gambling abstinence and relapse in members of gamblers anonymous.

    PubMed

    Oei, Tian P S; Gordon, Leon M

    2008-03-01

    Problem gamblers account for almost one-third of the industry's total revenue with the adverse effects of problem gambling including significant financial loss, legal and occupational difficulties, family problems, psychological distress and suicide. As such, it is important to understand the influential factors in gambling abstinence and relapse, which will assist in the development of relapse prevention methods in therapeutic treatment regimes. This paper reported the role of a set of seven predictors in distinguishing between abstinent and relapsed gamblers among 75 Gambling Anonymous (GA) members (55 males; 20 females; Mean age 45 years) in Southeast Queensland. The measures taken were meeting Attendance and Participation, Social Support, God Belief, Belief in a Higher Power, Working the 12-steps of Recovery, Gambling Urges and Erroneous Cognitions. Discriminant analysis revealed that the variables separating the two groups were significant, suggesting that GA members achieving abstinence could be distinguished from those who relapsed, with Attendance and Participation, and Social Support contributing the greatest influence on member's ability to abstain from gambling. The findings suggested that GA member's involvement in meetings, and support from family and friends had significant impact on their gambling abstinence. In contrast, increased gambling urges and erroneous cognitions increased the chance of relapse.

  5. The Role of Family Atmosphere in the Relapse Behavior of Iranian Opiate Users: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Peyrovi, Hamid; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Jalali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many Iranian opiate users live with family members and family atmosphere can be influential on reducing such social behaviors of opiate users as substance use and relapses. This paper reports the impact of family atmosphere on relapse behavior as a part of the findings of a larger study that explored the relapse process among Iranian opiate users. Methods: In this qualitative research, we selected 17 participants (5 women and 12 men). The questions were been asked through semi-structured interviews. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using content analysis method. Results: "Family atmosphere" with three sub-themes (family and tribes' interaction, family challenges and family structure) was been found as determinants of relapse behavior. The quality of the family atmosphere could be in harmony with or against the willingness or motivation of the opiate user towards the relapse. Conclusion Health care providers should reinforce involvement of the family members in the treatment and rehabilitation of opiate users. The opiate user's family and even relatives may benefit from learning how to manage their own feelings and attitude towards the client and being supportive during interactions. PMID:26464835

  6. Prospective associations between brain activation to cocaine and no-go cues and cocaine relapse.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, James J; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Brady, Kathleen T

    2013-07-01

    The ability to predict potential for relapse to substance use following treatment could be very useful in targeting aftercare strategies. Recently, a number of investigators have focused on using neural activity measured by fMRI to predict relapse propensity. The purpose of the present study was to use fMRI to investigate prospective associations between brain reactivity to cocaine and response inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use. Thirty cocaine-dependent participants with clean cocaine urine drug screens (UDS) completed a baseline fMRI scan, including a cocaine-cue reactivity task and a go no-go response inhibition task. After participating in a brief clinical trial of d-cycloserine for the facilitation of cocaine-cue extinction, they returned for a one-week follow-up UDS. Associations between baseline activation to cocaine and inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use were explored. Positive cocaine UDS was significantly associated with cocaine-cue activation in the right putamen and insula, as well as bilateral occipital regions. Associations between positive cocaine UDS and activation to no-go cues were concentrated in the postcentral gyri, a region involved in response execution. Although preliminary, these results suggest that brain imaging may be a useful tool for predicting risk for relapse in cocaine-dependent individuals. Further, larger-scale naturalistic studies are needed to corroborate and extend these findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prospective associations between brain activation to cocaine and no-go cues and cocaine relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, James J.; Myrick, Hugh; Henderson, Scott; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to predict potential for relapse to substance use following treatment could be very useful in targeting aftercare strategies. Recently, a number of investigators have focused on using neural activity measured by fMRI to predict relapse propensity. The purpose of the present study was to use fMRI to investigate prospective associations between brain reactivity to cocaine and response inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use. Methods Thirty cocaine-dependent participants with clean cocaine urine drug screens (UDS) completed a baseline fMRI scan, including a cocaine-cue reactivity task and a go/no-go response inhibition task. After participating in a brief clinical trial of D-cycloserine for the facilitation of cocaine cue extinction, they returned for a one-week follow-up UDS. Associations between baseline activation to cocaine and inhibition cues and relapse to cocaine use were explored. Results Positive cocaine UDS was significantly associated with cocaine cue activation in the right putamen and insula, as well as bilateral occipital regions. Associations between positive cocaine UDS and activation to no-go cues were concentrated in the postcentral gyri, a region involved in response execution. Conclusions Although preliminary, these results suggest that brain imaging may be a useful tool for predicting risk for relapse in cocaine-dependent individuals. Further, larger-scale naturalistic studies are needed to corroborate and extend these findings. PMID:23683790

  8. Accumbens nNOS Interneurons Regulate Cocaine Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexander C.W.; Scofield, Michael D.; Heinsbroek, Jasper A.; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Neuhofer, Daniela; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug J.; Spencer, Sade; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Stankeviciute, Neringa M.; Smith, Rachel J.; Allen, Nicholas P.; Lorang, Melissa R.; Griffin, William C.; Boger, Heather A.

    2017-01-01

    Relapse to drug use can be initiated by drug-associated cues. The intensity of cue-induced relapse is correlated with the induction of transient synaptic potentiation (t-SP) at glutamatergic synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) and requires spillover of glutamate from prefrontal cortical afferents. We used a rodent self-administration/reinstatement model of relapse to show that cue-induced t-SP and reinstated cocaine seeking result from glutamate spillover, initiating a metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-dependent increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. Pharmacological stimulation of mGluR5 in NAcore recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of drug-associated cues. Using NO-sensitive electrodes, mGluR5 activation by glutamate was shown to stimulate NO production that depended on activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS is expressed in ∼1% of NAcore neurons. Using a transgene strategy to express and stimulate designer receptors that mimicked mGluR5 signaling through Gq in nNOS interneurons, we recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of cues. Conversely, using a transgenic caspase strategy, the intensity of cue-induced reinstatement was correlated with the extent of selective elimination of nNOS interneurons. The induction of t-SP during cued reinstatement depends on activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and selective chemogenetic stimulation of nNOS interneurons recapitulated MMP activation and t-SP induction (increase in AMPA currents in MSNs). These data demonstrate critical involvement of a sparse population of nNOS-expressing interneurons in cue-induced cocaine seeking, revealing a bottleneck in brain processing of drug-associated cues where therapeutic interventions could be effective in treating drug addiction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapse to cocaine use in a rat model is associated with transient increases in synaptic strength at prefrontal cortex

  9. Leptin Influence in Craving and Relapse of Alcoholics and Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar-Nemer, Aline S.; Toffolo, Mayla C. F.; da Silva, Claudio Jeronimo; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Silva-Fonseca, Vilma A.

    2013-01-01

    Leptin inhibits signaling of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, suggesting its role in regulating stress and its possible involvement in the neurobiology of reward system. The aim of this study was to review of the literature on the influence of leptin in the craving for alcohol and tobacco and whether there is already evidence that leptin may be a biomarker to indicate risk for craving and relapse. The review used as data bases Medline, LILACS and SciElo in the period between 2000 and 2012. Keywords were leptin, substance use disorders, craving and withdrawal, in Portuguese and English. Only 12 articles were met the inclusion criteria, relating leptin with craving in alcoholics (n = 10) and smokers (n = 2). No studies were found in the LILACS database. Leptin levels increase during abstinence and this may be related to a reduction of dopaminergic action in mesolimbic system, resulting in a greater intensity of craving and maintenance of addictive behavior. Although there are few studies, the most recent results indicate the usefulness of leptin as a marker of risk for relapse among smokers and alcoholics in abstinence. PMID:23671541

  10. Targeting heparanase overcomes chemoresistance and diminishes relapse in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Vishnu C.; Zhan, Fenghuang; He, Jianbo; Barbieri, Paola; Noseda, Alessandro; Tricot, Guido; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    In most myeloma patients, even after several rounds of intensive therapy, drug resistant tumor cells survive and proliferate aggressively leading to relapse. In the present study, gene expression profiling of tumor cells isolated from myeloma patients after sequential rounds of chemotherapy, revealed for the first time that heparanase, a potent promoter of myeloma growth and progression, was elevated in myeloma cells that survived therapy. Based on this clinical data, we hypothesized that heparanase was involved in myeloma resistance to drug therapy. In several survival and viability assays, elevated heparanase expression promoted resistance of myeloma tumor cells to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, this enhanced survival was due to heparanase-mediated ERK signaling. Importantly, use of the heparanase inhibitor Roneparstat in combination with chemotherapy clearly diminished the growth of disseminated myeloma tumors in vivo. Moreover, use of Roneparstat either during or after chemotherapy diminished regrowth of myeloma tumors in vivo following therapy. These results provide compelling evidence that heparanase is a promising, novel target for overcoming myeloma resistance to therapy and that targeting heparanase has the potential to prevent relapse in myeloma and possibly other cancers. PMID:26624982

  11. Leptin influence in craving and relapse of alcoholics and smokers.

    PubMed

    Aguiar-Nemer, Aline S; Toffolo, Mayla C F; da Silva, Claudio Jeronimo; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Silva-Fonseca, Vilma A

    2013-06-01

    Leptin inhibits signaling of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, suggesting its role in regulating stress and its possible involvement in the neurobiology of reward system. The aim of this study was to review of the literature on the influence of leptin in the craving for alcohol and tobacco and whether there is already evidence that leptin may be a biomarker to indicate risk for craving and relapse. The review used as data bases Medline, LILACS and SciElo in the period between 2000 and 2012. Keywords were leptin, substance use disorders, craving and withdrawal, in Portuguese and English. Only 12 articles were met the inclusion criteria, relating leptin with craving in alcoholics (n = 10) and smokers (n = 2). No studies were found in the LILACS database. Leptin levels increase during abstinence and this may be related to a reduction of dopaminergic action in mesolimbic system, resulting in a greater intensity of craving and maintenance of addictive behavior. Although there are few studies, the most recent results indicate the usefulness of leptin as a marker of risk for relapse among smokers and alcoholics in abstinence.

  12. Predicting Post-External Beam Radiation Therapy PSA Relapse of Prostate Cancer Using Pretreatment MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchsjaeger, Michael H.; Pucar, Darko; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Zhang Zhigang; Mo Qianxing; Ben-Porat, Leah S.; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wang Liang; Reuter, Victor E.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pretreatment endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings can predict biochemical relapse in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and January 2002, 224 patients (median age, 69 years; age range, 45-82 years) with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent endorectal MRI before high-dose ({>=}81Gy) EBRT. The value of multiple clinical and MRI variables in predicting prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse at 5 years was determined by use of univariate and multivariate stepwise Cox regression. Clinical variables included pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, Gleason score, use of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, and radiation dose. Magnetic resonance imaging variables, derived from retrospective consensus readings by two radiologists, were used to measure intraprostatic and extraprostatic tumor burden. Results: After a median follow-up of 67 months, PSA relapse developed in 37 patients (16.5%). The significant predictors of PSA relapse on univariate analysis were pretreatment PSA, clinical T stage, and multiple MRI variables, including MRI TN stage score; extracapsular extension (ECE) status; number of sextants involved by ECE, all lesions, or index (dominant) lesion; apical involvement; and diameter and volume of index lesion. Pretreatment PSA and ECE status were the only significant independent predictors on multivariate analysis (p < 0.05 for both). Extracapsular extension status was associated with the highest hazard ratio, 3.04; 5-year PSA relapse rates were 7% for no ECE, 20% for unilateral ECE, and 48% for bilateral ECE. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging findings can be used to predict post-EBRT PSA relapse, with ECE status on MRI and pretreatment PSA being significant independent predictors of this endpoint.

  13. Melioidosis with a Pericardial Effusion, which Relapsed as a Chest Wall Abscess: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mathai K., Rashmi Teresa; Bhat, K. Sundara; Ashraf, Mohammed; Sarawag, Mayank; K.P., Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis, which is caused by a soil saprophyte, Burkholderia pseudomallei, is most prevalent in the south–west coast of India. Although it is frequently seen in immunocompromised patients, melioidosis can occur in apparently normal individuals. Melioidosis can involve almost any organ. A relapse of melioidosis is usually associated with a poor adherence to the eradication therapy, a multifocal involvement and bacteraemia. A relapsing melioidosis is usually known to follow a similar pattern of organ involvement in the first and second episodes of the infection. We are discussing here, a rare case of melioidosis in a 38-year-old construction-worker, with no risk factors, who presented initially with a pericardial effusion. It relapsed 6 months after he completed the prescribed eradication therapy for 3 months, as an anterior chest wall abscess. The author recommends a high index of suspicion for the relapsed melioidosis cases, inspite of the primary episode being non-bacteraemic and compliant with the recommended therapy, in order to avoid further complications. PMID:23730667

  14. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with rapid multiorgan relapse

    PubMed Central

    Vanoli, Jennifer; Riva, Marta; Vergnano, Beatrice; D’Andrea, Gabriele; L’Imperio, Vincenzo; Pozzi, Maria Rosa; Grassi, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an antineutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis affecting small- and medium-sized blood vessels, mostly involving lung and kidney. Patient concerns: We report the case of a 33-year-old man that presented with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by alveolar hemorrhage. Diagnoses: Aggressive GPA presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and multiorgan involvement. Inteventions: Immunosuppressive therapy, plasma exchange, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Outcomes: Relapse occurred very early, despite immunosuppressive treatment, with a rare involvement of genital system (epididymitis) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis difficult to treat. Lessons: GPA is a challenging, multifaceted disease that can require aggressive supportive therapy and is associated with a high rate of relapse that may present with uncommon site of involvement. PMID:28353556

  15. Tickborne Relapsing Fever, Bitterroot Valley, Montana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua; Fischer, Robert J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Raffel, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    In July 2013, a resident of the Bitterroot Valley in western Montana, USA, contracted tickborne relapsing fever caused by an infection with the spirochete Borrelia hermsii. The patient’s travel history and activities before onset of illness indicated a possible exposure on his residential property on the eastern side of the valley. An onsite investigation of the potential exposure site found the vector, Ornithodoros hermsi ticks, and 1 chipmunk infected with spirochetes, which on the basis of multilocus sequence typing were identical to the spirochete isolated from the patient. Field studies in other locations found additional serologic evidence and an infected tick that demonstrated a wider distribution of spirochetes circulating among the small mammal populations. Our study demonstrates that this area of Montana represents a previously unrecognized focus of relapsing fever and poses a risk for persons of acquiring this tickborne disease. PMID:25625502

  16. Relapses in multiple sclerosis: Relationship to disability.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Douglas S; Reder, Anthony T; Bermel, Robert A; Cutter, Gary R; Fox, Robert J; John, Gareth R; Lublin, Fred D; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Miller, Aaron E; Pelletier, Daniel; Racke, Michael K; Trapp, Bruce D; Vartanian, Timothy; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a recurrent inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, which ultimately causes substantial disability in many patients. A key clinical feature of this disease is the occurrence of relapses, consisting of episodes of neurological dysfunction followed by periods of remission. This review considers in detail the importance of the occurrence of relapses to the ultimate course of MS and the impact of relap setreatment (both acutely and prophylactically) on the long-term outcome for individuals. The ultimate goal of therapy in MS is the reduction of long-term disability. Clinical trials in MS, however, typically only extend for a very short time period compared to the time it takes for disability to evolve. Consequently, short-term outcome measures that are associated with, and predict, future disability need to be identified. In this regard, not only are relapses a characteristic feature of MS, they have also been proven to be associated with the occurrence of long-term disability. Moreover, treatments that reduce the number and severity of these attacks improve the long-term prognosis.

  17. Natalizumab for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Horga, A; Tintoré, M

    2011-01-01

    Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier and has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. To provide a review and update of the pharmacological and therapeutic characteristics of natalizumab, with special emphasis on the most recently published data on the efficacy, effectiveness and safety of this drug. Several randomized clinical trials in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis have demonstrated that natalizumab substantially reduces clinical and radiological disease activity. Post hoc analysis of phase III clinical trials and the results of post-approval observational studies indicate that natalizumab significantly increases the proportion of patients with complete clinical and radiological response and is effective in patients with highly active forms of multiple sclerosis and suboptimal response to other treatments. Like other monoclonal antibodies, natalizumab can cause hypersensitivity reactions, which are severe in 1% of patients. Other adverse effects are generally mild or infrequent. Nevertheless, several cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have been detected in patients treated with natalizumab monotherapy. The risk of this severe complication seems to increase with the number of doses administered. Natalizumab has a favorable risk-benefit ratio in the treatment of relapsing -remitting multiple sclerosis. However, because of the potential risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, patients must be carefully selected and specific protocols must be followed during the drug's administration. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathways Linking Socioeconomic Status and Postpartum Smoking Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Businelle, Michael S.; Kendzor, Darla E.; Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Castro, Yessenia; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Velasquez, Mary M.; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Cinciripini, Paul M.; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Wetter, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Low socioeconomic status (SES) exacerbates the high rate of smoking relapse in women following childbirth. Purpose This study examined multiple models of potential mechanisms linking SES and postpartum smoking relapse among women who quit smoking due to pregnancy. Methods Participants were 251 women enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of a new postpartum smoking relapse prevention intervention. Four models of the prepartum mechanisms linking SES and postpartum smoking relapse were evaluated using a latent variable modeling approach. Results Each of the hypothesized models were a good fit for the data. As hypothesized, SES indirectly influenced postpartum smoking relapse through increased prepartum negative affect/stress, reduced sense of agency, and increased craving for cigarettes. However, the model that included craving as the sole final pathway between SES and relapse demonstrated superior fit when compared with all other models. Conclusions Findings have implications for future interventions that aim to reduce postpartum relapse. PMID:23086590

  19. Predictors of Relapse and Dropout During a 12-Week Relapse Prevention Program for Methamphetamine Users.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chih; Chen, Chih-Ken; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the possible neuropsychological predictors of relapse and dropout of group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for methamphetamine (MA) users were explored. Participants were 42 MA users sentenced by the judicial system to take part in an out-patient relapse prevention program for MA abuse and dependence that employs a CBT model once a week over the course of 12 weeks. Baseline neuropsychological functions were evaluated with the Conners' Continuous Performance Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Iowa Gambling Task, and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. All participants had to submit to urine drug tests every week. Of the 42 participants, 69.0% had a MA positive urine screening result at least once throughout the program (relapse), while 40.5% dropped out of the treatment program prior to its completion. Short duration of MA abstinence at baseline and poor attention predicted relapse. Predictors of dropout included being unmarried and having risky decision making. Findings may be helpful for clinicians, who can screen for the aforementioned risk factors and provide strategies for high-risk patients to help prevent relapse and dropout among MA users in treatment programs.

  20. Impact of multiple sclerosis relapse: The NARCOMS participant perspective.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Molly; Cofield, Stacey S; Tyry, Tuula; Salter, Amber R; Cutter, Gary R; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2015-05-01

    Acute relapses continue to be a significant aspect of multiple sclerosis (MS) on both the epidemiologic level and the individual patient level. Past work demonstrates residual disability from relapses as well as high patient-reported rates of ineffective relapse treatment. To better characterize the impact of MS relapses on the patient, a relapse-specific survey was administered through the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry to 1000 registry participants who had reported at least one relapse in the past 12 months. Thirty percent of respondents confirmed lack of relapse treatment efficacy at one month and at three months. Relapses also impacted socioeconomic measures; for individuals still going to school or working, more than half missed days and their average loss of school or work was 12.7 days. An impact on household tasks was reported by 68% of respondents. A healthcare facility such as a hospital, emergency room or urgent care center was utilized by 20.4% of respondents. The most common relapse symptoms were fatigue, weakness of the lower extremity, sensory symptoms, problems walking, and weakness of the upper extremity. Of the respondents who reported receiving corticosteroid treatment (53.3%), over half reported an adverse event. However, this was not a significant factor in dictating whether or not respondents would seek a different treatment on their next relapse, although 31% would choose a different treatment for their next relapse. Relapses continue to be an impactful experience that requires continued clinical attention. Improved follow-up from relapses and relapse treatment might be beneficial.

  1. Factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from the emergency department following acute asthma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jesse; Arrotta, Nicholas; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Dennett, Liz; Rowe, Brian H

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients discharged from the emergency department (ED) with asthma exacerbations will relapse within 4 weeks. This systematic review summarises the evidence regarding relapses and factors associated with relapse in adult patients discharged from EDs after being treated for acute asthma. Following a registered protocol, comprehensive literature searches were conducted. Studies tracking outcomes for adults after ED management and discharge were included if they involved adjusted analyses. Methodological quality was assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) and the Risk of Bias (RoB) Tool. Results were summarised using medians and IQRs or mean and SD, as appropriate. 178 articles underwent full-text review and 10 studies, of various methodologies, involving 32 923 patients were included. The majority of the studies were of high quality according to NOS and RoB Tool. Relapse proportions were 8±3%, 12±4% and 14±6% at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, respectively. Female sex was the most commonly reported and statistically significant factor associated with an increased risk of relapse within 4 weeks of ED discharge for acute asthma. Other factors significantly associated with relapse were past healthcare usage and previous inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) usage. A median of 17% of patients who are discharged from the ED will relapse within the first 4 weeks. Factors such as female sex, past healthcare usage and ICS use at presentation were commonly and significantly associated with relapse occurrence. Identifying patients with these features could provide clinicians with guidance during their ED discharge decision-making. PMID:28176972

  2. Adversity-induced relapse of fear: neural mechanisms and implications for relapse prevention from a study on experimentally induced return-of-fear following fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Scharfenort, R; Menz, M; Lonsdorf, T B

    2016-07-19

    The efficacy of current treatments for anxiety disorders is limited by high relapse rates. Relapse of anxiety disorders and addiction can be triggered by exposure to life adversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Seventy-six healthy adults were a priori selected for the presence or absence of adverse experiences during childhood (CA) and recent past (RA; that is, past 12 months). Participants underwent fear conditioning (day 1) and fear extinction and experimental return-of-fear (ROF) induction through reinstatement (a model for adversity-induced relapse; day 2). Ratings, autonomic (skin conductance response) and neuronal activation measures (functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) were acquired. Individuals exposed to RA showed a generalized (that is, not CS- specific) fear recall and ROF, whereas unexposed individuals showed differential (that is, CS+ specific) fear recall and ROF on an autonomic level despite no group differences during fear acquisition and extinction learning. These group differences in ROF were accompanied by corresponding activation differences in brain areas known to be involved in fear processing and differentiability/generalization of ROF (that is, hippocampus). In addition, dimensional measures of RA, CA and lifetime adversity were negatively correlated with differential skin conductance responses (SCRs) during ROF and hippocampal activation. As discriminating signals of danger and safety, as well as a tendency for overgeneralization, are core features in clinically anxious populations, these deficits may specifically contribute to relapse risk following exposure to adversity, in particular to recent adversity. Hence, our results may provide first and novel insights into the possible mechanisms mediating enhanced relapse risk following exposure to (recent) adversity, which may guide the development of effective pre- and intervention programs.

  3. Trends and tenets in relapsing and progressive opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D

    2016-05-01

    Despite advances in inducing remission in pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS), relapse remains a challenge. By definition, relapse is not a characteristic of monophasic OMS, but occurs at any time in the course of multiphasic OMS. Due to variability and heterogeneity, patients are best approached and treated on a case-by-case basis, using precepts derived from clinical and scientific studies. Treatment of provocations, such as infection or immunotherapy tapering, is the short-term goal, but discovering unresolved neuroinflammation and re-configuring disease-modifying agents is crucial in the long-term. The working hypothesis is that much of the injury in OMS results from neuroinflammation involving dysregulated B cells, which may cause loss of tolerance and autoantibody production. Biomarkers of disease activity include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) B cell frequency, oligoclonal bands (OCB), B cell attractants (CXCL13) and activating factors (BAFF). Measuring these markers comprises modern detection and characterization of neuroinflammation or verifies 'no evidence of disease activity'. The decision making process is three-tiered: deciding if the relapse is bone fide, identifying its etiology, and formulating a therapeutic plan. Relapsing-remitting OMS is treatable, and combination multimodal/multi-mechanistic immunotherapy is improving the outcome. However, some patients progress to a refractory state with cognitive impairment and disability from failure to go into remission, multiple relapses, or more aggressive disease. This report provides new insights on underappreciated risks and pitfalls inherent in relapse, pro-active efforts to avoid progression, the need for early and sufficient treatment beyond corticosteroids and immunoglobulins, and utilization of disease activity biomarkers to identify high-risk patients and safely withdraw immunotherapy.

  4. Whole-exome sequencing in relapsing chronic lymphocytic leukemia: clinical impact of recurrent RPS15 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ljungström, Viktor; Cortese, Diego; Young, Emma; Pandzic, Tatjana; Mansouri, Larry; Plevova, Karla; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Clifford, Ruth; Sutton, Lesley-Ann; Blakemore, Stuart J.; Stavroyianni, Niki; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Rossi, Davide; Höglund, Martin; Kotaskova, Jana; Juliusson, Gunnar; Belessi, Chrysoula; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Panagiotidis, Panagiotis; Langerak, Anton W.; Smedby, Karin E.; Oscier, David; Gaidano, Gianluca; Schuh, Anna; Davi, Frederic; Pott, Christiane; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Trentin, Livio; Pospisilova, Sarka; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR) is first-line treatment of medically fit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients; however, despite good response rates, many patients eventually relapse. Although recent high-throughput studies have identified novel recurrent genetic lesions in adverse prognostic CLL, the mechanisms leading to relapse after FCR therapy are not completely understood. To gain insight into this issue, we performed whole-exome sequencing of sequential samples from 41 CLL patients who were uniformly treated with FCR but relapsed after a median of 2 years. In addition to mutations with known adverse-prognostic impact (TP53, NOTCH1, ATM, SF3B1, NFKBIE, and BIRC3), a large proportion of cases (19.5%) harbored mutations in RPS15, a gene encoding a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. Extended screening, totaling 1119 patients, supported a role for RPS15 mutations in aggressive CLL, with one-third of RPS15-mutant cases also carrying TP53 aberrations. In most cases, selection of dominant, relapse-specific subclones was observed over time. However, RPS15 mutations were clonal before treatment and remained stable at relapse. Notably, all RPS15 mutations represented somatic missense variants and resided within a 7 amino-acid, evolutionarily conserved region. We confirmed the recently postulated direct interaction between RPS15 and MDM2/MDMX and transient expression of mutant RPS15 revealed defective regulation of endogenous p53 compared with wild-type RPS15. In summary, we provide novel insights into the heterogeneous genetic landscape of CLL relapsing after FCR treatment and highlight a novel mechanism underlying clinical aggressiveness involving a mutated ribosomal protein, potentially representing an early genetic lesion in CLL pathobiology. PMID:26675346

  5. Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: Epidemiology, Outcomes and Management. A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Relapses (episodic exacerbations of neurological signs or symptoms) are a defining feature of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the most prevalent MS phenotype. While their diagnostic value relates predominantly to the definition of clinically definite MS, their prognostic value is determined by their relatively high associated risk of incomplete remission resulting in residual disability. The mechanisms governing a relapse incidence are unknown, but numerous modifiers of relapse risk have been described, including demographic and clinical characteristics, many of which represent opportunities for improved disease management. Also relapse phenotypes have been associated with patient and disease characteristics and an individual predisposition to certain phenotypic presentations may imply individual neuroanatomical disease patterns. While immunomodulatory therapies and corticosteroids represent the mainstay of relapse prevention and acute management, respectively, their effect has only been partial and further search for more efficient relapse therapies is warranted. Other areas of research include pathophysiology and determinants of relapse incidence, recurrence and phenotypes, including the characteristics of the relapsing and non-relapsing multiple sclerosis variants and their responsiveness to therapies.

  6. New findings on biological factors predicting addiction relapse vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita

    2011-10-01

    Relapse is a highly prevalent phenomenon in addiction. This paper examines the new research on identifying biological factors that contribute to addiction relapse risk. Prospective studies examining relapse risk are reviewed, and clinical, biological, and neural factors that predict relapse risk are identified. Clinical factors, patient-related factors, and subjective and behavioral measures such as depressive symptoms, stress, and drug craving all predict future relapse risk. Among biological measures, endocrine measures such as cortisol and cortisol/corticotropin (ACTH) ratio as a measure of adrenal sensitivity and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also predictive of future relapse risk. Among neural measures, brain atrophy in the medial frontal regions and hyperreactivity of the anterior cingulate during withdrawal were identified as important in drug withdrawal and relapse risk. Caveats pertaining to specific drug abuse type and phase of addiction are discussed. Finally, significant implications of these findings for clinical practice are presented, with a specific focus on determining biological markers of relapse risk that may be used to identify those individuals who are most at risk of relapse in the clinic. Such markers may then be used to assess treatment response and develop specific treatments that will normalize these neural and biological sequelae so as to significantly improve relapse outcomes.

  7. [Relapse and insomnia in unipolar major depression].

    PubMed

    Falussy, Linda; Balla, Petra; Frecska, Ede

    2014-09-01

    The connection between mood and sleep disorders is highly complex and can be studied and interpreted in many respects. Epidemiologic data show that the co-occurrence of the two disorders is quite frequent. Thus an approach regarding them as a unit promotes biological psychiatric research by revealing new pathophysiological and therapeutic conclusions. Chronobiological results related to mood disorders have recently been described in excellent reviews including Hungarian ones. In the present review, the necessity of treatment of sleep disorders is evaluated in the context of relapse/remission/recurrence. Scientific data suggest that patients with insomnia have a ten-fold risk of developing depression, and insomnia plays an important role in depression relapses, recurrence of depressive episodes and becoming depression chronic. From neurobiological point of view, mood and sleep disorders have many features in common. Research has revealed decreased levels of melatonin and advanced sleep phases (shifted earlier) in depression, and altered and imbalanced monoaminergic pathways, and REM abnormalities in sleep disorders. Some authors suggest that REM abnormalities disappear along with the mood improvement, and the sleep structure can completely restore after remission. However, persistent abnormalities of REM sleep and slow wave sleep have also been found in remission, which increased the risk of the relapse and recurrence. Recently, there is an agreement as to the early treatment of insomnia can prevent the development of mood abnormalities. Alterations of cascades related to neural plasticity can also be a link between sleep and mood disorders. Neural plasticity is closely related to learning, sleeping, and cortisol regulation (coping with stress), and this draws the attention to comorbidity with further disorders (anxiety, dementia).

  8. Effects of anhedonia on days to relapse among smokers with a history of depression: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jessica; Spring, Bonnie; McChargue, Dennis; Doran, Neal

    2010-09-01

    Despite the strong co-occurrence between lifetime prevalence of depression and smoking, a history of major depressive disorder (MDD history) does not reliably predict smoking cessation outcomes. However, depression is a heterogeneous syndrome comprising several dimensions (e.g., anhedonia, vegetative symptoms, negative affect), and each symptom expression may differentially influence cessation failure. Measuring proximal depressive dimensions may provide a more reliable way of identifying MDD history smokers most at risk for smoking relapse. Anhedonia, in particular, is a core feature of depression that may increase risk for smoking relapse among MDD history smokers. The primary goal of the present study was to investigate the relation between anhedonia and relapse latency among MDD history smokers following a brief smoking cessation workshop. Participants (N = 45, 48.9% female), who were euthymic regular smokers with a history of MDD, were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment groups that all involved participation in a daylong group workshop. Workshops were followed by 48 hr of bioverified abstinence and weekly follow-up visits for 1 month. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate the effect of anhedonia on relapse latency 30 days following quitting smoking. Results showed that higher levels of anhedonia predicted reduced relapse latencies, both with and without prequit depressive symptom severity included in the model. Results suggest that anhedonia may constitute a proximal risk factor identifying depressive history smokers more likely to relapse to smoking.

  9. Investigation of a Correlation between Thoracic Vertebra Hyperplasia and Relapse in Paroxysmal Atrial FIbrillation Patients Following Extended Pulmonary Vein Isolation.

    PubMed

    Hashida, Tadashi; Yoshioka, Koichiro; Kanda, Shigetaka; Fujibayashi, Daisuke; Amino, Mari; Ikari, Yuji

    2016-09-20

    Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is effective therapy for the patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (pAF). However, it is not easy to predict relapse of pAF. Approximately 70% pAF patients were maintained sinus rhythm for 1 year after PVI in Japan. In this study, all of the cases were underwent chest computed tomography (CT) to check for the morphology and positional relationship of the left atrium. We detected relapse cases that exhibited spur formation in the thoracic vertebrae. Therefore, we conducted an investigation based on the hypothesis that, "Because hyperostosis involves proliferative changes in the synovium or pia mater cells with an inflammatory basis, it is related to the onset of atrial fibrillation." The study sample consisted of 24 sequential cases (males: 20, mean age: 66.2 ± 6.9 years) of drug-resistant pAF that underwent PVI at our hospital between January and May, 2015. When subjects were divided into a relapse group and a non-relapse group and 21 background factors were compared, it was found that the relapse group subjects were older than the non-relapse group subjects (70.3 ± 7.2 vs 64.1 ± 5.7, p = 0.04). The proportion of cases with thoracic vertebra hyperplasia was markedly high in the relapse group (6 cases [75%] vs. 3 cases [18%], p = 0.007). No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for any other background factors. Our results suggested that thoracic vertebra hyperplasia could be a marker for predicting relapse after PVI in pAF patients.

  10. Time to relapse following treatment for methamphetamine use: a long-term perspective on patterns and predictors.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes methamphetamine (MA) use patterns, specifically the duration of continuing abstinence ("time to relapse") for periods averaging 5 years post-discharge from treatment for MA use, and the relationship with selected user and treatment characteristics. A sample of 350 treatment admissions from a large county substance use disorder (SUD) treatment system was randomly selected (within gender, race/ethnicity, treatment modality strata). Retrospective self-report data are from natural history interviews (NHI) conducted approximately 3 years after treatment and a follow-up of 2-3 years later. Relapse is defined as any use of MA with time as the number of months of continuous MA abstinence after treatment discharge until relapse. This outcome was constructed from a monthly MA use timeline using NHI data. A Cox model was used to examine time to relapse and predictors. Sixty-one percent of the sample relapsed to MA use within 1 year after treatment discharge and 14% during years 2-5. Significant protective factors predicting longer time to relapse included having experienced serious MA-related psychiatric/behavioral problems (hazard ratio [HR]=0.75, p=0.027), longer duration of the index treatment episode (HR=0.93, p=0.001), and participating in self-help or other treatment during the post-treatment abstinence period (HR=0.29, p<0.001); risk factors for shorter time to relapse included having a parent with alcohol and/or drug use problems (HR=1.35, p=0.020) and involvement in MA sales (HR=1.48, p=0.002). Results contribute a long-term perspective on patterns of MA use following treatment and support a need for early post-treatment and long-term continuing care and relapse-prevention services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Who Will Relapse? Symptoms of Nicotine Dependence Predict Long-Term Relapse after Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killen, Joel D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Conducted prospective examination of factors associated with smoking relapse. Findings from 618 subjects revealed that, at year 1, signal detection analysis (SDA) produced one subgroup with 25 percent nonrelapse rate and another with 9 percent nonrelapse rate. At year two, SDA produced one subgroup with 19 percent nonrelapse rate and another with…

  12. Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis resulting in Kluver-Bucy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bon D; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-01-01

    Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) rarely occurs after acyclovir treatment. We treated a patient with relapsing HSE of the contralateral temporal lobe, resulting in Klüver-Bucy syndrome, after a full-dose acyclovir treatment. This case suggests that physicians should consider sudden behavioral and emotional changes after HSE treatment as a possible indication of relapsing HSE, as well as possible temporal lobe epilepsy, and the need to administer longer acyclovir treatment for select patients.

  13. Treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Seema; Mehta, Jayesh

    2003-06-01

    The definition of relapsed and refractory myeloma was straightforward when melphalan-prednisone constituted the mainstay of treatment and high-dose therapy with transplantation was rarely used in myeloma. However, several advances have occurred in the treatment of myeloma over the past decade. Most notably, high-dose therapy and transplantation have become broadly applicable, thalidomide has become available as effective salvage therapy, and several investigational agents with novel mechanisms of action appear to be very promising. Because of the differing properties of some of these agents, it is often possible to control the disease with an alternative treatment approach after the failure of one therapy. Some data indicate that combinations of these agents work when the drugs have failed individually. Therefore, refractory myeloma indicates disease unresponsive to the most recent therapy administered. Broadly, the salvage approaches that are used in patients with refractory or relapsed disease include high-dose dexamethasone, high-dose chemotherapy with autotransplantation, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thalidomide-based therapies, and novel/investigational agents. The appropriate therapy for a given situation depends on the nature of the disease, age, organ function, bone marrow function, prior treatment, the availability of stem cell donors, and access to novel agents. A therapeutic trial of thalidomide is essential at some stage of the disease in all patients. High-dose therapy with autotransplantation is needed at some stage of the disease in most patients younger than 65 to 70 years.

  14. Risk of relapse after natalizumab withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, Sandra; Casey, Romain; Debard, Nadine; Stankoff, Bruno; Mrejen, Serge; Uhry, Zoe; Van Ganse, Eric; Castot, Anne; Clanet, Michel; Lubetzki, Catherine; Confavreux, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess disease activity within 12 months after natalizumab (NZ) discontinuation in a large French postmarketing cohort. Methods: In France, patients exposed at least once to NZ were included in the TYSEDMUS observational and multicenter cohort, part of the French NZ Risk Management Plan. Clinical disease activity during the year following NZ discontinuation was assessed in this cohort. Time to first relapse after NZ stop was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier method and potentially associated factors were studied using a multivariate Cox model. Results: Out of the 4,055 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) included in TYSEDMUS, 1,253 discontinued NZ and 715 of them had relevant data for our study. The probability of relapse within the year after NZ stop was estimated at 45% (95% confidence interval 0.41–0.49). Conclusions: This large and systematic survey of patients with MS after NZ withdrawal allows quantifying the risk of increased disease activity following treatment discontinuation. This study provides large-scale, multicenter, systematic data after NZ cessation in real-life settings. PMID:27844037

  15. Relapse situations according to Marlatt's taxonomy in smokers.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Bárbara; Becoña, Elisardo

    2013-01-01

    Relapse is common during the process of giving up smoking. The aim of the present study is to explore the relapse situations, according to Marlatt's relapse taxonomy, in a sample of 428 smokers (43.9% men and 56.1% women) who participated in a cognitive-behavior psychological treatment for quitting smoking. At the end of the treatment, 221 participants were abstinent, of whom 119 (41.2% men and 58.8% women) relapsed in the course of the 12-month follow-up, the majority in the first 3 months (69.74%). Most of the relapses were attributed to intrapersonal and environmental determinants (61.33%), the most common of which were "coping with negative emotional states" (38.65%), followed by "giving in to temptations or urges" (9.24%) and "testing personal control" (8.40%). Interpersonal determinants occurred in 38.66% of relapses, this percentage being made up mostly of "social pressure", which was the relapse situation in 34.46% of all relapses. These results, similar to those of Marlatt's original studies and others, contribute to improving our knowledge of the relapse situations process, with a view to interventions that may help to avoid it.

  16. Prospective noninterventional study on peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in patients with relapsed lymphomas.

    PubMed

    van Gorkom, Gwendolyn; Finel, Herve; Giebel, Sebastian; Pohlreich, David; Shimoni, Avichai; Ringhoffer, Mark; Sucak, Gülsan; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dreger, Peter; Sureda, Anna; Schouten, Harry C

    2016-09-10

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) to rescue hematopoiesis is considered standard care for patients with a relapsed chemosensitive lymphoma, but diagnosis of lymphoma has been a risk factor for poor mobilization in several studies. The aim of this prospective noninterventional clinical audit was to review the mobilization strategies used by EBMT centers in relapsed lymphoma and to evaluate their efficacy. Between 2010 and 2014, 275 patients with relapsed lymphoma from 30 EBMT centers were prospectively registered. Almost all patients were mobilized with chemotherapy plus G-CSF (96%), but there was a large variation in chemotherapy schedules. Thirty (11%) of them were poor mobilizers (<2 × 10(6) CD 34+ cells/kg body weight) at the first mobilization. Poor mobilization was not associated with gender, age, bone marrow involvement at diagnosis, primary diagnosis, number of previous chemotherapy lines, previous radiotherapy or mobilization with G-CSF alone. The use of high dose cyclophosphamide alone was associated with mobilization failure (P = 0.0006), whereas the use of a platinum-containing regimen was associated with a good mobilization outcome (P = 0.013). Because failure rate is low, we can conclude from this study that PBSC mobilization failure in relapsed lymphomas is not an important problem in the EBMT centers.

  17. Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis Presenting as a Sole Sign of Relapsed Paediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kshitij; Panchal, Harsha; Parikh, Sonia; Modi, Gaurang; Talele, Avinash; Anand, Asha; Uparkar, Urmila; Joshi, Nitin; Khatawani, Itesh

    2016-06-01

    The author describes paediatric case of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) presented as aleukemic leukaemia cutis (ALC). A 2 year old child was admitted in tertiary oncology centre. He suffered from pre B cell ALL with absent Philadelphia chromosome. This patient received multiagent induction chemotherapy as per Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) protocol for ALL. He achieved remission after 28 days of treatment. Subsequently he presented with multiple skin lesions in the form of multiple small erythematous violaceous macules, papules, plaques and nodules on face, chest and back regions. Histopathological examination of biopsy of skin revealed diffuse infiltration of tumor cells with prominent nucleoli, scant eosinophilic cytoplasm and numerous mitotic figures consistent with LC. Immunohistochemistry was positive for CD 10, CD 19, CD 22, CD 24, CD 79-a and TdT while negative for surface immunoglobulin. At the time of presentation his peripheral blood smear and bone marrow examination was negative for malignant cells. Sanctuary sites including central nervous system and testicles were not involved. So patient was diagnosed as ALC. He was managed as per BFM relapse protocol for ALL. Skin lesions disappeared completely after 2 weeks of treatment. Unfortunately patient developed bone marrow and testicular relapse after 2 months. He was given testicular radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for relapsed ALL. But his marrow was showing persistent activity and he expired after 4 months.

  18. Drug Wanting: Behavioral Sensitization and Relapse to Drug-Seeking Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kalivas, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse enhances the motor-stimulant response to these drugs, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. Animals that are extinguished from self-administration training readily relapse to drug, conditioned cue, or stress priming. The involvement of sensitization in reinstated drug-seeking behavior remains controversial. This review describes sensitization and reinstated drug seeking as behavioral events, and the neural circuitry, neurochemistry, and neuropharmacology underlying both behavioral models will be described, compared, and contrasted. It seems that although sensitization and reinstatement involve overlapping circuitry and neurotransmitter and receptor systems, the role of sensitization in reinstatement remains ill-defined. Nevertheless, it is argued that sensitization remains a useful model for determining the neural basis of addiction, and an example is provided in which data from sensitization studies led to potential pharmacotherapies that have been tested in animal models of relapse and in human addicts. PMID:21490129

  19. Assessment of neuroactive steroids in cerebrospinal fluid comparing acute relapse and stable disease in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orefice, Ns; Carotenuto, A; Mangone, G; Bues, B; Rehm, R; Cerillo, I; Saccà, F; Calignano, A; Orefice, G

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have reported an involvement of neuroactive steroids as neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis (MS); an analysis of their profile during a specific clinical phase of MS is largely unknown. The pregnenolone (PREG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and allopregnanolone (ALLO) profile was evaluated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR-MS) patients as well as those in patients affected by non-inflammatory neurological (control group I) and without neurological disorders (control group II). An increase of PREG and DHEA values was shown in CSF of male and female RR-MS patients compared to those observed in both control groups. The ALLO values were significantly lower in female RR-MS patients than those found in male RR-MS patients and in female without neurological disorder. During the clinical relapse, we observed female RR-MS patients showing significantly increased PREG values compared to female RR-MS patients in stable phase, while their ALLO values showed a significant decrease compared to male RR-MS patients of the same group. Male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Similary, male RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed PREG and DHEA values higher than male without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed DHEA values higher than those found in female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Male and female RR-MS patients with gadolinium-enhanced lesions showed ALLO values higher than those found in respective gender groups without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. ALLO values were lower in male than in female RR-MS patients without gadolinium-enhanced lesions. Considering the pharmacological properties of neuroactive steroids and the observation that neurological

  20. An evaluation of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in chronic and relapsing acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liguory, C I; Caletti, G

    1977-05-01

    The results of ERP carried out in a series of cases of established and suspected chronic and acute relapsing pancreatitis are presented. Radiological findings are divided into major and minor alterations of the pancreatic secretory system. X-ray findings are easy to interprete in chronic pancreatitis with major alterations. Minor anomalies of the pancreas are difficult to interprete in the absence of supporting evidence. Biliary tract involvement is useful for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Accumbens nNOS Interneurons Regulate Cocaine Relapse.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander C W; Scofield, Michael D; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Gipson, Cassandra D; Neuhofer, Daniela; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug J; Spencer, Sade; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Stankeviciute, Neringa M; Smith, Rachel J; Allen, Nicholas P; Lorang, Melissa R; Griffin, William C; Boger, Heather A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2017-01-25

    Relapse to drug use can be initiated by drug-associated cues. The intensity of cue-induced relapse is correlated with the induction of transient synaptic potentiation (t-SP) at glutamatergic synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) and requires spillover of glutamate from prefrontal cortical afferents. We used a rodent self-administration/reinstatement model of relapse to show that cue-induced t-SP and reinstated cocaine seeking result from glutamate spillover, initiating a metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-dependent increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. Pharmacological stimulation of mGluR5 in NAcore recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of drug-associated cues. Using NO-sensitive electrodes, mGluR5 activation by glutamate was shown to stimulate NO production that depended on activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS is expressed in ∼1% of NAcore neurons. Using a transgene strategy to express and stimulate designer receptors that mimicked mGluR5 signaling through Gq in nNOS interneurons, we recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of cues. Conversely, using a transgenic caspase strategy, the intensity of cue-induced reinstatement was correlated with the extent of selective elimination of nNOS interneurons. The induction of t-SP during cued reinstatement depends on activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and selective chemogenetic stimulation of nNOS interneurons recapitulated MMP activation and t-SP induction (increase in AMPA currents in MSNs). These data demonstrate critical involvement of a sparse population of nNOS-expressing interneurons in cue-induced cocaine seeking, revealing a bottleneck in brain processing of drug-associated cues where therapeutic interventions could be effective in treating drug addiction. Relapse to cocaine use in a rat model is associated with transient increases in synaptic strength at prefrontal cortex synapses in the nucleus

  2. Tick-borne relapsing fever in children.

    PubMed

    Le, C T

    1980-12-01

    Three cases of tick-borne fever diagnosed during the summer of 1979 are reported and the ecoepidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of this infection are reviewed. Although challenging, the diagnosis can be made easily if specific historical clues are sought and the patient's blood smear is carefully examined. The diagnosis of this condition early in its course can save clinicians and patients the anxiety and cost of the work-up of a "fever of unknown origin." Since vacationing in the national parks and forests has become increasingly popular among many American families, tick-borne relapsing fever should be considered in any patient with an acute or recurrent fever of unknown origin who exhibits nonspecific symptoms of an undifferentiated "viral illness," and who gives a history of sleeping overnight in log cabins in the coniferous forests of the Western mountains of the United States.

  3. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiologic mechanism of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor blockers, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic. PMID:27242697

  4. Pemphigus erythematosus relapse associated with atorvastatin intake

    PubMed Central

    Lo Schiavo, Ada; Puca, Rosa Valentina; Romano, Francesca; Cozzi, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Statins, also known as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaril-CoA reductase inhibitors, are well-tolerated drugs used for prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Although they are generally considered safe, some serious adverse effects, such as myositis, myopathy, and rhabdomyolysis can rarely occur. Furthermore, recent data from long-term follow-up on patients who have been taking statins for a long period of time suggest that prolonged exposure to statins may trigger autoimmune reactions. The exact mechanism of statin-induced autoimmune reactions is unclear. Statins, as proapoptotic agents, release nuclear antigen into the circulation and may induce the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Herein we report the case of a 70 year-old man who developed a relapse of pemphigus erythematosus, a syndrome with features of both lupus erythematosus and pemphigus, after atorvastatin intake. PMID:25258514

  5. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    During June 9–September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever. PMID:26812354

  6. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  7. Maintenance, Generalization, and Treatment Relapse: A Behavioral Momentum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mace, F. Charles; Nevin, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance and generalization have been inconsistently defined in the behavior analytic literature. The term "treatment relapse" is used commonly in the medical and mental health literature to refer to the return of a condition that was previously considered successfully treated. Basic behavioral researchers have studied relapse related…

  8. Relapse Prevention Needs More Emphasis on Interpersonal Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This article presents comments on "Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao," by Katie Witkiewitz and G.A. Marlatt. Stanton notes that the recent reconceptualization of relapse prevention by Witkiewitz and Marlatt enhances the model by "synthesizing recent empirical findings into a unified theory", but it does…

  9. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  10. Louseborne Relapsing Fever among East African Refugees, Italy, 2015.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, Anna; Lipani, Filippo; Costa, Cecilia; Scarvaglieri, Mariaelisabetta; Balbiano, Rosanna; Carosella, Sinibaldo; Calcagno, Andrea; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Barbui, Anna Maria; Brossa, Silvia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Dal Conte, Ivano; Caramello, Pietro; Di Perri, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    During June 9-September 30, 2015, five cases of louseborne relapsing fever were identified in Turin, Italy. All 5 cases were in young refugees from Somalia, 2 of whom had lived in Italy since 2011. Our report seems to confirm the possibility of local transmission of louse-borne relapsing fever.

  11. Predictors of Exercise Relapse in a College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullum, Julie; Clark, Matthew M.; King, Teresa K.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated factors that predicted exercise relapse among college students. Physically active undergraduates completed questionnaires measuring Prochaska's 10 processes for change of exercise, self-efficacy, and decisional balance. Exercise levels were assessed at baseline and 8 weeks later. At baseline, relapsers had significantly lower…

  12. A case of late herpes simplex encephalitis relapse.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Andrea; Lauria, Giuseppe; Mantero, Vittorio; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Late relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis, defined as recurrence more than 3 months after the first initial encephalitic episode, is a rare condition. We describe the case of an adult patient who presented a relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis 8 years after the first episode occurred at the age of 57 years and review the literature of this topic.

  13. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  14. Polysubstance Use and Heroin Relapse among Adolescents following Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branson, Christopher E.; Clemmey, Philip; Harrell, Paul; Subramaniam, Geetha; Fishman, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study examined posttreatment patterns of polysubstance use and heroin relapse in a sample of 43 adolescents (ages 14-20) entering short-term residential treatment for primary heroin use. At 12-month follow-up, youths that achieved heroin abstinence (N = 19) were significantly less likely than youths that relapsed to heroin (N = 24) to endorse…

  15. Regional Relapse After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duprez, Frederic; Bonte, Katrien; De Neve, Wilfried; Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Madani, Indira

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the regional relapse rate in the elective neck using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the data from 285 patients treated with IMRT between 2000 and 2008. The median dose prescription to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes was 69 Gy in 32 fractions. The elective neck was treated simultaneously according to Protocol 1 (multiple dose prescription levels of 56-69 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51-70 Gy; 222 patients) or Protocol 2 (one dose prescription level of 56 Gy; 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose, 51 Gy; 63 patients). Primary surgery or lymph node dissection was performed before IMRT in 72 (25%) and 157 (55%) patients, respectively. Also, 92 patients (32%) received concomitant chemotherapy. The median follow-up of living patients was 27.4 months (range, 0.3-99). Results: Regional, local, and distant relapse were observed in 16 (5.6%), 35 (12.3%), and 47 (16.5%) patients, respectively. The 2- and 5-year rate of regional relapse was 7% and 10%, respectively, with a trend favoring Protocol 2 (p = 0.06). Seven isolated regional relapses were detected at a median follow-up of 7.3 months in patients treated with Protocol 1 and none in those treated with Protocol 2. Percutaneous gastrostomy was required more frequently in patients who received Protocol 1 (p = 0.079). Conclusion: Isolated regional relapse is rare after IMRT for head-and-neck cancer. Elective neck node doses >51 Gy for a 2-Gy normalized isoeffective dose do not seem to improve regional control.

  16. Predicting smoking relapse with a multidimensional versus a single-item tobacco craving measure.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Ivan; Singleton, Edward G; Heishman, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    Research suggests that craving is a predictor of smoking relapse. Craving can be assessed by multiple item or multifactorial scales or by single items. However, no systematic comparisons of their prognostic validity or accuracy have been published. The French versions of the 12-item Tobacco Craving Questionnaire (FTCQ-12) and the single craving item on the Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (MNWS) are brief, valid, and reliable self-report measures of tobacco craving. In this secondary study, we analyzed data from French smokers with health-related problems enrolled in the Adjustment of DOses of NIcotine in Smoking (ADONIS) cessation trial. We estimated prediction models for each measure and compared their ability to distinguish correctly participants who relapsed from those who did not at 1-8 weeks after their quit date. Adjusted for all potential confounders FTCQ-12 risk score (RS; Factor 2, Expectancy plus Factor 4, Purposefulness) and MNWS craving were valid predictors of smoking relapse at endpoints measured 1-7 weeks apart. Prognostic accuracy of FTCQ-12 RS was greatest at 1-2 weeks follow-up compared to only 1 week for MNWS craving. Sensitivity for FTCQ-12 RS and MNWS craving was 85% and 53%, respectively. FTCQ-12 RS suggests a relapse process involving urges and desires in anticipation of the positive benefits of smoking linked with intent and planning to smoke. Findings also suggest that FTCQ-12 RS may be a better predictor instrument for smoking relapse than MNWS craving. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  18. Determinants of relapse periodicity in Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is a major cause of febrile illness in endemic areas of Asia, Central and South America, and the horn of Africa. Plasmodium vivax infections are characterized by relapses of malaria arising from persistent liver stages of the parasite (hypnozoites) which can be prevented only by 8-aminoquinoline anti-malarials. Tropical P. vivax relapses at three week intervals if rapidly eliminated anti-malarials are given for treatment, whereas in temperate regions and parts of the sub-tropics P. vivax infections are characterized either by a long incubation or a long-latency period between illness and relapse - in both cases approximating 8-10 months. The epidemiology of the different relapse phenotypes has not been defined adequately despite obvious relevance to malaria control and elimination. The number of sporozoites inoculated by the anopheline mosquito is an important determinant of both the timing and the number of relapses. The intervals between relapses display a remarkable periodicity which has not been explained. Evidence is presented that the proportion of patients who have successive relapses is relatively constant and that the factor which activates hypnozoites and leads to regular interval relapse in vivax malaria is the systemic febrile illness itself. It is proposed that in endemic areas a large proportion of the population harbours latent hypnozoites which can be activated by a systemic illness such as vivax or falciparum malaria. This explains the high rates of vivax following falciparum malaria, the high proportion of heterologous genotypes in relapses, the higher rates of relapse in people living in endemic areas compared with artificial infection studies, and, by facilitating recombination between different genotypes, contributes to P. vivax genetic diversity particularly in low transmission settings. Long-latency P. vivax phenotypes may be more widespread and more prevalent than currently thought. These observations have important

  19. Alcoholics Anonymous and Relapse Prevention as Maintenance Strategies After Conjoint Behavioral Alcohol Treatment for Men: 18-Month Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Barbara S.; Epstein, Elizabeth E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2004-01-01

    Ninety men with alcohol problems and their female partners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 outpatient conjoint treatments: alcohol behavioral couples therapy (ABCT), ABCT with relapse prevention techniques (RP/ABCT), or ABCT with interventions encouraging Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) involvement (AA/ABCT). Couples were followed for 18 months after…

  20. Time to relapse following treatment for methamphetamine use: a long-term perspective on patterns and predictors*

    PubMed Central

    Brecht, Mary-Lynn; Herbeck, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This paper describes methamphetamine (MA) use patterns, specifically duration of continuing abstinence (“time to relapse”) for periods averaging 5 years post-discharge from treatment for MA use, and the relationship with selected user and treatment characteristics. Methods A sample of 350 treatment admissions from a large county substance use disorder (SUD) treatment system was randomly selected (within gender, race/ethnicity, treatment modality strata). Retrospective self-report data are from natural history interviews (NHI) conducted approximately 3 years after treatment and a follow-up 2-3 years later. Relapse is defined as any use of MA with time as the number of months of continuous MA abstinence after treatment discharge until relapse. This outcome was constructed from a monthly MA use timeline using NHI data. A Cox model was used to examine time to relapse and predictors. Results Sixty-one percent of the sample relapsed to MA use within 1 year after treatment discharge and 25% during years 2-5. Significant protective factors predicting longer time to relapse included having experienced serious MA-related psychiatric/behavioral problems (hazard ratio [HR]=0.75, p=0.027), longer duration of the index treatment episode (HR=0.93, p=0.001), and participating in self-help or other treatment during the post-treatment abstinence period(HR=0.29, p<0.001); risk factors for shorter time to relapse included having a parent with alcohol and/or drug use problems (HR =1.35, p=0.020) and involvement in MA sales (HR=1.48, p=0.002). Conclusions Results contribute a long-term perspective on patterns of MA use following treatment and support a need for early post-treatment and long-term continuing care and relapse- prevention services. PMID:24685563

  1. A solitary uterine relapse in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: CT features and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, M A; Bettini, G; Pozzessere, C; Guerrini, S; Defina, M; Ambrosio, M R; Aprile, L; Bocchia, M; Volterrani, L

    2016-01-01

    T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-cell ALL) is a rare haematological neoplasia, that affects children and less commonly adults. Female genital tract and particularly uterus involvement in acute ALL is rare. This report presents the CT features of a 64-year-old woman with uterine relapse of T-cell ALL, occurring 11 months after the diagnosis, as a second, unique relapse of disease. The patient was asymptomatic when a CT examination showed a homogenous thickness of the uterine wall in comparison with the previous CT examination. Histology from biopsy specimens, obtained through hysteroscopy, confirmed T-cell ALL localisation (TdT+, CD10+, CD3c+ and CD2+). The uterus could be a site of relapse in patients suffering from ALL. Even though an MRI examination could better demonstrate the disease in cases of suspected female genital tract involvement by ALL, the comparison of differences between a present and a previous CT examination is sufficient to suspect the diagnosis.

  2. Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia with unusual multiple bone invasions: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HANGAI, MAYUMI; WATANABE, KENTARO; SHIOZAWA, RYOSUKE; HIWATARI, MITSUTERU; IDA, KOHMEI; TAKITA, JUNKO

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes a unique pediatric case with multiple bone invasions of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) during remission. An eight-year-old male with a history of ALL was admitted complaining of intermittent and migrating pain in the limb 2 years following complete remission. Magnetic resonance imaging and whole-body positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose revealed abnormal multifocal involvement in the bones and corresponding soft tissues. Repeated bone marrow (BM) aspiration indicated normal cellular marrow without leukemic cells, and marked leukemic cell infiltration in different sections of the ilium, respectively. These findings suggested isolated bone relapse, and it is probable that systematic BM relapse occurred as a consequence. PMID:24944655

  3. IL-12Rβ2 has a protective role in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chong; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yu, Shuo; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2016-01-01

    IL-12Rβ2 participates in the receptors of IL-12 and IL-35, two cytokines that are involved in a variety of immune responses. In this study we evaluate the role of IL-12Rβ2 in relapsing-remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE). We found that the IL-12Rβ2 deficient SJL/J EAE mice presented more severe symptoms and had more frequent, more severe relapses compared with wild type controls. IL-12Rβ2 deficient EAE mice also had more infiltrating mononuclear cells in the central nervous system, as well as higher splenic proliferative capacity and decreased IFN-γ production at the periphery. These findings suggest a protective role of IL-12Rβ2 in RR-EAE, an animal model of RR-MS, the most prevalent form of MS. PMID:26857496

  4. Glioblastoma following treatment with fingolimod for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sharim, Justin; Tashjian, Randy; Golzy, Nima; Pouratian, Nader

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma is an uncommon and aggressive primary brain tumor with incidence of 3 per 100,000 annually. We report a 50-year-old woman diagnosed with glioblastoma within threeyears of induction of fingolimod therapy for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Fingolimod, an immunomodulating agent used in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, has also been suggested to impart a cardioprotective role in heart failure and arrhythmia via activation of P21-activated kinase-1 (Pak1). In the brain, Pak1 activation has been shown to correlate with decreased survival time amongst patients with glioblastoma. A molecular mechanism underlying a link between fingolimod use and glioblastoma development may involve activation of Pak1. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a potential association between fingolimod use and glioblastoma development.

  5. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years.

  6. Prognostic factors affecting long-term outcome after stem cell transplantation in Hodgkin's lymphoma autografted after a first relapse.

    PubMed

    Sureda, A; Constans, M; Iriondo, A; Arranz, R; Caballero, M D; Vidal, M J; Petit, J; López, A; Lahuerta, J J; Carreras, E; García-Conde, J; García-Laraña, J; Cabrera, R; Jarque, I; Carrera, D; García-Ruiz, J C; Pascual, M J; Rifón, J; Moraleda, J M; Pérez-Equiza, K; Albó, C; Díaz-Mediavilla, J; Torres, A; Torres, P; Besalduch, J; Marín, J; Mateos, M V; Fernández-Rañada, J M; Sierra, J; Conde, E

    2005-04-01

    To analyse outcome and prognostic factors for overall survival (OS) and time to treatment failure (TTF) in 357 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) undergoing an autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) after a first relapse and reported to the The Grupo Espanol de Linfomas/Trasplante Autologo de Medula Osea (GEL/TAMO) Cooperative Group. Two hundred and twenty males and 137 females with a median age of 29 years were autografted in second remission (n=181), first sensitive relapse (n=148) and first resistant relapse (n=28). Five-year actuarial TTF and OS were of 49% +/- 3% and 57% +/- 3%. Advanced stage at diagnosis, complementary radiotherapy before ASCT, a short first complete response (CR) and detectable disease at ASCT adversely influenced TTF. Year of transplant < or =1995, bulky disease at diagnosis, a short first CR, detectable disease at ASCT and > or =1 extranodal areas involved at ASCT were adverse factors for OS. ASCT constitutes a therapeutic option for HL patients after a first relapse. Promising results are observed in patients with low tumour burden at diagnosis, autografted after a long CR and without detectable disease at ASCT. Innovative approaches should be pursued for patients with risk factors at relapse.

  7. [Novel treatment options in relapsed and refracter Hodgkin lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Illés, Árpád; Jóna, Ádám; Simon, Zsófia; Udvardy, Miklós; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2015-11-08

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a curable lymphoma with an 80-90% long-term survival, however, 30% of the patients develop relapse. Only half of relapsed patients can be cured with autologous stem cell transplantation. The aim of the authors was to analyze survival rates and incidence of relapses among Hodgkin lymphoma patients who were treated between January 1, 1980 and December 31, 2014. Novel therapeutic options are also summarized. Retrospective analysis of data was performed. A total of 715 patients were treated (382 men and 333 women; median age at the time of diagnosis was 38 years). During the studied period the frequency of relapsed patients was reduced from 24.87% to 8.04%. The numbers of autologous stem cell transplantations was increased among refracter/relapsed patients, and 75% of the patients underwent transplantation since 2000. The 5-year overall survival improved significantly (between 1980 and 1989 64.4%, between 1990 and 1999 82.4%, between 2000 and 2009 88.4%, and between 2010 and 2014 87.1%). Relapse-free survival did not change significantly. During the study period treatment outcomes improved. For relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma patients novel treatment options may offer better chance for cure.

  8. Relapse Experience in Iranian Opiate Users: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Peyrovi, Hamid; Jalali, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the relapse process, it is required to notice the clients learned behaviors and environmental contexts. We aimed to explore and describe relapse experiences of Iranian drug users. Methods: This is a grounded theory study and twenty two participants were selected using purposive sampling, snowball and theoretical sampling. After obtaining written informed consent, data gathering was done by means of in-depth semi-structured interviews. According to Strauss and Corbin three phases of open coding, axial coding and selection coding were done for qualitative analysis and continuous comparison. During the research period Guba and Lincoln criteria were used to be reassured of the accuracy and rigor of the study findings. Results: The main categories of this study were craving and conflict, family stress and psychological indicators of relapse that emerged in three phases including recovery, tension and pre-relapse. High anxiety, withdrawal, rationalization and lying were the most common symptoms. Conclusion: Family reactions and social conditions play a key role in relapse. Relapse process is an active and multidimensional event in which the clients experience a psychosocial status continuum from recovery to relapse. Most psychological problems are seen in the tension phase. PMID:25349849

  9. Approaches to relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Nicolaus

    2011-03-01

    Relapse has become the leading cause of death following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Despite improved understanding of the biology that underlies the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect the relapse rate did not decrease over the past 20 years. In general, prognosis is poor for patients who relapsed to an allograft since effective treatment options are limited. Here, we review the available and upcoming treatment approaches for relapse. Treatment of relapse after allogeneic HSCT has been rarely investigated systematically and results differ substantially from diseases. Withdrawal of immunosuppressive medication, donor lymphocyte infusions with or without chemotherapy and/or second allogeneic HSCT are the most used options. New specific cellular approaches such as disease-specific T-cells, alloreactive natural killer cells or vaccination strategies are under investigation. Novel agents such as tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, hypomethylating agents, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulating drugs, or proteasome-inhibitors either alone or in combination with adoptive immunotherapy are upcoming promising options, but valid data are lacking so far. With some exceptions (chronic myeloid leukemia), treatment options for patients who relapse are limited. The results are poor and the majority of patients ultimately die of their disease. More effort and research is needed to prevent and treat relapse after allogeneic HSCT.

  10. Outcome following late marrow relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Chessells, J.; Leiper, A.; Rogers, D.

    1984-10-01

    Thirty-four children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed bone marrow relapse after treatment was electively stopped, received reinduction, consolidation, continuing therapy, and intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX). Sixteen children who relapsed within six months of stopping treatment had a median second-remission duration of 26 weeks; all next relapses occurred in the bone marrow. In 18 children who relapsed later, the median duration of second remission was in excess of two years, but after a minimum of four years follow-up, 16 patients have so far relapsed again (six in the CNS). CNS relapse occurred as a next event in four of 17 children who received five IT MTX injections only and in two of 14 children who received additional regular IT MTX. Although children with late marrow relapses may achieve long second remissions, their long-term out-look is poor, and regular IT MTX does not afford adequate CNS prophylaxis. It remains to be seen whether more intensive chemotherapy, including high-dose chemoradiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation, will improve the prognosis in this group of patients.

  11. Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Analysis of Late Relapse Using Comparative Karyotype and Chromosome Genome Array Testing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Min; Scott, Bart L.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Gooley, Ted; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Relapse is a major cause of failure after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We analyzed the relapse pattern in 1007 patients who underwent transplantation for MDS to identify factors that may determine the timing of relapse. Overall, 254 patients relapsed: 213 before 18 months and 41 later than 18 months after HCT, a time point frequently used in clinical trials. The hazard of relapse declined progressively with time since transplantation. A higher proportion of patients with early relapse had high-risk cytogenetics compared with patients with late relapse (P =.009). Patients with late relapse had suggestively longer postrelapse survival than patients who relapsed early, although the difference was not statistically significant (P =.07). Among 41 late relapsing patients, sequential cytogenetic data were available in 36. In 41% of these, new clonal abnormalities in addition to pre-HCT findings were identified at relapse; in 30% pre-HCT abnormalities were replaced by new clones, in 17.3% the same clone was present before HCT and at relapse, and in 9.7%, no abnormalities were present either before HCT or at relapse. Comparative chromosomal genomic array testing in 3 patients with late relapse showed molecular differences not detectable by cytogenetics between the pre-HCT clones and the clones at relapse. These data show that late relapses are not infrequent in patients who undergo transplantation for MDS. The pattern of new cytogenetic alterations at late relapse is similar to that observed in patients with early relapse and supports the concept that MDS relapse early and late after HCT is frequently due to the emergence of clones not detectable before HCT. PMID:25953732

  12. Treatment-Induced Autophagy Associated with Tumor Dormancy and Relapse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0087 TITLE: Treatment-Induced Autophagy Associated with Tumor Dormancy and Relapse PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Masoud...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treatment-Induced Autophagy Associated with Tumor Dormancy and Relapse 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0087 5c. PROGRAM...expedited tumor relapse. The purpose of the study  was to determine if transient blockade of autophagy by CQ was  associated  with anti‐inflammatory function

  13. Modeling diseases with latency and relapse.

    PubMed

    van den Driessche, P; Wang, Lin; Zou, Xingfu

    2007-04-01

    A general mathematical model for a disease with an exposed (la tent) period and relapse is proposed. Such a model is appropriate for tuberculosis, including bovine tuberculosis in cattle and wildlife, and for herpes. For this model with a general probability of remaining in the exposed class, the basic reproduction number R(0) is identified and its threshold property is discussed. In particular, the disease-free equilibrium is proved to be globally asymptotically stable if R(0) < 1. If the probability of remaining in the exposed class is assumed to be negatively exponentially distributed, then R(0) = 1 is a sharp threshold between disease extinction and endemic disease. A delay differential equation system is obtained if the probability function is assumed to be a step-function. For this system, the endemic equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable if R(0) > 1, and the disease is shown to be uniformly persistent with the infective population size either approaching or oscillating about the endemic level. Numerical simulations (for parameters appropriate for bovine tuberculosis in cattle) with R(0) > 1 indicate that solutions tend to this endemic state.

  14. A Motion Videogame for Opioid Relapse Prevention.

    PubMed

    Abroms, Lorien C; Leavitt, Leah E; Van Alstyne, Judy M; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M; Fishman, Marc J; Greenberg, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a body motion-activated videogame, targeting the prevention of opioid relapse among youth in the context of outpatient treatment. Participants attended four weekly gameplay sessions. Surveys were conducted at baseline and following each week's gameplay and assessed satisfaction with gameplay, craving intensity, and self-efficacy to refuse opioids. Participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the videogame throughout the 4 weeks and agreed with the statement that they would be more likely to attend treatment sessions if the game was present (mean=4.6; standard deviation [SD]=0.7) and would recommend the videogame to other people in treatment (mean=4.2; SD=0.8). All participants recommended playing the videogame as part of treatment at least weekly, with a third recommending playing daily. Self-reported cravings declined over the 4-week period from baseline (mean=12.7; SD=8.4) to Week 4 (mean=9.8; SD=8.3), although the decline was not significant. Although participants stated that they liked the game, one-third of participants had dropped out of the study by the fourth session of gameplay. Preliminary evidence indicates that a motion videogame for addiction recovery may be feasible and acceptable within the context of outpatient treatment, although additional efforts are needed to keep youth in treatment. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the game on long-term abstinence, treatment adherence, and engagement.

  15. Phylogenesis of relapsing fever Borrelia spp.

    PubMed

    Ras, N M; Lascola, B; Postic, D; Cutler, S J; Rodhain, F; Baranton, G; Raoult, D

    1996-10-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of 20 relapsing fever (RF) Borrelia spp. were estimated on the basis of the sequences of rrs genes. Complete sequences were aligned and compared with previously published sequences, and the similarity values were found to be 97.7 to 99.9%. Phylogenetic trees were constructed by using the three neighbor-joining, maximum-parsimony, and maximum-likelihood methods. The results of the comparative phylogenetic analysis divided the RF Borrelia spp. into three major clusters. One cluster included Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia duttonii, Borrelia recurrentis, and Borrelia hispanica. Another cluster comprised tow main branches with Borrelia coriaceae, Borrelia lonestari, and Borrelia miyamotoi on one side and Borrelia parkeri, Borrelia turicatae, and Borrelia hermsii on the other side. Borrelia anserina constituted the third cluster. The phylogenetic position of Borrelia persica was more uncertain. These results suggested that the taxonomy of these spirochetes should be revised. To overcome the problems of culturing the spirochetes, RF Borrelia primers were defined. Following PCR amplification of the rrs gene, restriction length fragment polymorphism could be used to distinguish between RF Borrelia strains.

  16. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation with rapid multiorgan relapse: A case report.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Jennifer; Riva, Marta; Vergnano, Beatrice; D'Andrea, Gabriele; L'Imperio, Vincenzo; Pozzi, Maria Rosa; Grassi, Guido

    2017-03-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is an antineutrophil cytoplasmatic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis affecting small- and medium-sized blood vessels, mostly involving lung and kidney. We report the case of a 33-year-old man that presented with acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by alveolar hemorrhage. Aggressive GPA presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and multiorgan involvement. Immunosuppressive therapy, plasma exchange, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Relapse occurred very early, despite immunosuppressive treatment, with a rare involvement of genital system (epididymitis) and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis difficult to treat. GPA is a challenging, multifaceted disease that can require aggressive supportive therapy and is associated with a high rate of relapse that may present with uncommon site of involvement.

  17. Pure Testicular Seminoma Relapsing Late with Somatic Type Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Anheuser, Petra; Gehrckens, Ralf; Wilczak, Waldemar; Sauter, Guido; Höflmayer, Doris

    2017-01-01

    Background. Somatic type malignancy (STM) occurs in 2% of all germ cell tumours (GCTs). The prognosis is unfavourable and the origin is poorly understood. Pathogenetic hypotheses involve direct transformation of teratoma, origin from totipotent cancer cells, or derivation from yolk sac tumour elements. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old patient was cured from testicular seminoma clinical stage IIc by orchiectomy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Nine years later, he experienced a late relapse with a mass sized 5 × 6 cm located at the former metastatic site. As no remission occurred after chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin, ifosfamide and etoposide, the mass was surgically resected. Histologically, the specimen consisted of neurofibroma with areas of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour and spots with mature bone formation. FISH analysis disclosed isochromosome 12p in the majority of evaluated cells suggesting somatic type malignancy (STM) of GCT. The patient is well 1 year after surgery. Conclusion. The pathogenesis of this STM remains enigmatic. The origin from GCT was evidenced by documentation of isochromosome 12p. Unrecognized teratomatous elements in the primary and totipotent cancer cells surviving the first chemotherapy could be hypothesized to represent the origin. STM developing from seminoma cells would be another novel hypothesis. PMID:28367345

  18. Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Patients' Experience with Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Colleen E.; Jezewski, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological investigation was undertaken to gain a better understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients' experience with natalizumab (Tysabri; Biogen Idec Inc, Cambridge, MA) treatment and its impact on their quality of life (QOL). Twenty MS patients who were receiving natalizumab treatment were recruited by the physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and social worker of the William C. Baird Multiple Sclerosis Center in Buffalo, New York, between March 2009 and November 2009. Patients were invited to participate if they had relapsing-remitting MS, had received at least six treatments of natalizumab, and could articulate their experience. An interviewer obtained informed consent, gathered basic demographic information, and then tape-recorded the participants' accounts of their experience with natalizumab. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and de-identified before being submitted to the investigators for analysis. The Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis program (Scolari, Berlin, Germany) was used to manage the data. Patients found natalizumab easy to tolerate and effective; moreover, they described improvement in their QOL. Patients must weigh the benefits of control of their MS against the increased risk of developing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with natalizumab treatment. Information from this study will be used to educate professionals involved in MS patient care as well as patients and families considering treatment with natalizumab. PMID:24453731

  19. Treatment outcome in children and adolescents with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma--results of the UK HD3 relapse treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth; Hayward, Janis; Kirkwood, Amy; McCarthy, Keith; Hewitt, Martin; Morland, Bruce; Daw, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this national retrospective study was to evaluate the outcome in children with relapsed or primary refractory Hodgkin lymphoma [HL] after a primary chemotherapy alone treatment strategy. Between 2000 and 2005, 80 children with relapsed [n = 69] or primary refractory [n = 11] HL were treated on a standardized treatment protocol of 4-6 cycles of EPIC [etoposide, prednisolone, ifosfamide and cisplatin] chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was recommended to all relapsed sites. High dose therapy with stem cell rescue [SCT] was recommended for patients with poor response. The 5-year overall survival [OS] and progression-free survival from relapse was 75·8% [64·8-83·9] and 59·9% [48·3-69·7] respectively. Duration of first remission was strongly associated with OS; risk of death was decreased by 53% [Hazard ratio (HR): 0·47, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·19-1·18] for those with a time from end of treatment to relapse of 3-12 months (compared to <3 months) and reduced by 80% (HR 0·20, 95% CI: 0·04-0·90) for those >12 months after end of treatment. Other poor prognostic factors included advanced stage disease at relapse and B symptoms at first diagnosis. The most important factor associated with salvage failure was time to relapse. Survival outcome in children with primary refractory HL is poor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Circulating IL-17 levels during the peri-transplant period as a predictor for early leukemia relapse after myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Sik; Lim, Ji-Young; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Lee, Sung-Eun; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Jeong, Dae-Chul; Lee, Seok; Kim, Hee-Je; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Min, Chang-Ki

    2012-03-01

    IL-17 is involved in inducing and mediating pro-inflammatory responses. The association of IL-17 with tumor growth or graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has become a subject of controversy. We hypothesized that serum IL-17 (sIL-17) levels during the peri-transplant period may affect alloreactive responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). sIL-17 levels of 95 patients with leukemia who had undergone myeloablative allogeneic SCT were measured using ELISA before conditioning and on day 0, +7, and +14 after transplantation. With a median follow-up of 17 months, the overall survival, disease-free survival, non-relapse mortality, and relapse incidence were 70.9%, 66.3%, 10.3%, and 23.4%, respectively. Ten patients relapsed within 180 days (early relapse, 10.5%) post-transplant. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD over grade II and chronic GVHD was 55.8% and 69.0%, respectively. Analyses using repeated measures of ANOVA and mean values of sIL-17 revealed that patients relapsed within 180 days had higher sIL-17 levels, whereas no association existed between sIL-17 levels and other clinical outcomes, including acute GVHD. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses also revealed that sIL-17 levels were available for the prediction of early relapse and that patients with higher sIL-17 levels at each time point had a significantly higher early relapse. Multivariate analyses and subgroup analyses with only standard disease status suggest the association of sIL-17 levels with subsequent early relapse independent of disease status at transplantation. This study is the first one demonstrating the early change in sIL-17 during the peri-transplant period and the association with early relapse in humans.

  1. [A case of anti-aquaporin 4 antibody-positive Sjögren syndrome associated with a relapsed myelitis in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Jun; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Inoue, Hirosato; Baba, Yasuhiko; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2010-01-01

    It is known that pregnancy influences the relapsing rate of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, interaction between pregnancy and relapse of neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a distinct disease from MS, remains unclear. A 34-year-old woman who 1 year previously had clinical history of Sjögren syndrome complicated by myelitis with the presence of anti-AQP4 antibody in her serum, although there was no optic neuritis involvement, was neurologically normal at time of becoming pregnant. In the 22nd week of her pregnancy, however, she developed abdominal belt-shaped numbness and sensory impairment followed by weakness of bilateral lower limb leading to difficulty of her gait. MR imaging revealed hyperintense lesions within the spinal cord extending from C2 to T2 vertebral level with marked spinal cord swelling, indicating relapse of myelitis associated with anti-AQP4 antibody. She was treated with intravenous corticosteroid with marked benefits for her neurological status; she was able to walk without assistance after the treatment. However, in the 30th week she relapsed with myelitis at T2 to T9 vertebral level on MR imaging. Intravenous steroid administration again elicited improvement. She delivered a baby via Caesarean section at 34 weeks of pregnancy. After delivery, she started taking oral corticosteroid as preventive therapy for further relapse of myelitis; thus far she has had no relapse at 7 months of follow-up. There are few reports regarding the influence of pregnancy on anti-AQP4 antibody-positive myelitis. Although further investigation should be done to clarify the difference of immunological changes during pregnancy between NMO and conventional MS, our case together with previous reports indicate increased risk of relapse during pregnancy in NMO. It is necessary to remain vigilant against possible risk of relapse during pregnancy in patients with NMO and/or positive anti-AQP4 antibody. Intravenous steroid administration seems safe and effective against relapse of

  2. Relapse dynamics during smoking cessation: Recurrent abstinence violation effects and lapse-relapse progression

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Thomas R.; Shiffman, Saul; Wileyto, E. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Smoking cessation is a process that unfolds over time and is characterized by intermittent lapses. Behavioral relapse prevention interventions commonly assume that lapse-relapse progression is driven by a set of psychological responses known as the Abstinence Violation Effect (AVE; Marlatt & Gordon, 1985), yet efforts to reduce the AVE have generally failed to affect clinical outcomes. We used parametric recurrent event survival analyses to better understand the dynamic relationship between a set of AVE responses to lapsing and subsequent lapse-relapse progression. Participants were 203 smokers who achieved abstinence and subsequently lapsed on one or more separate occasions. Using electronic diaries for ecological momentary assessment, participants responded to items assessing three core components of the AVE (internal attribution of self-blame for the lapse, abstinence self-efficacy and guilt) following a total of 1,001 smoking episodes in near real time. Contrary to hypothesis, neither self-blame, self-efficacy nor guilt following participants’ first lapse predicted relapse, and all three were overshadowed by responses to recurrent lapses that followed. Controlling for responses to their first lapse, responses to each additional lapse did prospectively predict lapse progression, such that drops in self-efficacy were associated with accelerated progression to a subsequent lapse (HR=1.09, CI=1.02–1.15), while increases in internal attributions of blame actually protected against lapsing (HR=0.98, CI=0.97–0.99). Treatment with nicotine patches slowed recurrent lapse progression (HR=0.58, CI=0.48–0.70), but this effect dissipated over multiple lapses, and was moderated by elevated ratings of post-lapse guilt (HR=1.08, CI=1.01–1.18), which predicted accelerated progression within the active patch group, while protecting against lapse in the placebo group. Results highlight the dynamic nature of lapse responses during smoking cessation, indicating that self

  3. Individualized relapse prediction: personality measures and striatal and insular activity during reward-processing robustly predict relapse*

    PubMed Central

    Gowin, Joshua L.; Ball, Tali M.; Wittmann, Marc; Tapert, Susan F.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nearly half of individuals with substance use disorders relapse in the year after treatment. A diagnostic tool to help clinicians make decisions regarding treatment does not exist for psychiatric conditions. Identifying individuals with high risk for relapse to substance use following abstinence has profound clinical consequences. This study aimed to develop neuroimaging as a robust tool to predict relapse. Methods 68 methamphetamine-dependent adults (15 female) were recruited from 28-day inpatient treatment. During treatment, participants completed a functional MRI scan that examined brain activation during reward processing. Patients were followed 1 year later to assess abstinence. We examined brain activation during reward processing between relapsing and abstaining individuals and employed three random forest prediction models (clinical and personality measures, neuroimaging measures, a combined model) to generate predictions for each participant regarding their relapse likelihood. Results 18 individuals relapsed. There were significant group by reward-size interactions for neural activation in the left insula and right striatum for rewards. Abstaining individuals showed increased activation for large, risky relative to small, safe rewards, whereas relapsing individuals failed to show differential activation between reward types. All three random forest models yielded good test characteristics such that a positive test for relapse yielded a likelihood ratio 2.63, whereas a negative test had a likelihood ratio of 0.48. Conclusions These findings suggest that neuroimaging can be developed in combination with other measures as an instrument to predict relapse, advancing tools providers can use to make decisions about individualized treatment of substance use disorders. PMID:25977206

  4. SncRNA (microRNA &snoRNA) opposite expression pattern found in multiple sclerosis relapse and remission is sex dependent.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Sepúlveda, Lucía; López de Munain, Adolfo; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common inflammatory and degenerative disease that causes neurological disability. It affects young adults and its prevalence is higher in women. The most common form is manifested as a series of acute episodes of neurological disability (relapses) followed by a recovery phase (remission). Recently, non-coding RNAs have emerged as new players in transcriptome regulation, and in turn, they could have a significant role in MS pathogenesis. In this context, our aim was to investigate the involvement of microRNAs and snoRNAs in the relapse-remission dynamics of MS in peripheral blood leucocytes, to shed light on the molecular and regulatory mechanisms that underlie this complex process. With this approach, we found that a subset of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) is altered in relapse and remission, revealing unexpected opposite changes that are sex dependent. Furthermore, we found that a relapse-related miRNA signature regulated general metabolism processes in leucocytes, and miRNA altered in remission are involved in the regulation of innate immunity. We observed that sncRNA dysregulation is different in relapse and remission leading to differences in transcriptome regulation, and that this process is sex dependent. In conclusion, relapse and remission have a different molecular background in men and women.

  5. SncRNA (microRNA & snoRNA) opposite expression pattern found in multiple sclerosis relapse and remission is sex dependent

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Irizar, Haritz; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Osorio-Querejeta, Iñaki; Sepúlveda, Lucía; López de Munain, Adolfo; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common inflammatory and degenerative disease that causes neurological disability. It affects young adults and its prevalence is higher in women. The most common form is manifested as a series of acute episodes of neurological disability (relapses) followed by a recovery phase (remission). Recently, non-coding RNAs have emerged as new players in transcriptome regulation, and in turn, they could have a significant role in MS pathogenesis. In this context, our aim was to investigate the involvement of microRNAs and snoRNAs in the relapse-remission dynamics of MS in peripheral blood leucocytes, to shed light on the molecular and regulatory mechanisms that underlie this complex process. With this approach, we found that a subset of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) is altered in relapse and remission, revealing unexpected opposite changes that are sex dependent. Furthermore, we found that a relapse-related miRNA signature regulated general metabolism processes in leucocytes, and miRNA altered in remission are involved in the regulation of innate immunity. We observed that sncRNA dysregulation is different in relapse and remission leading to differences in transcriptome regulation, and that this process is sex dependent. In conclusion, relapse and remission have a different molecular background in men and women. PMID:26831009

  6. Endometrial carcinoma--relative effectiveness of adjuvant irradiation vs therapy reserved for relapse.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, I; Malone, S; Thomas, G; Franssen, E; Balogh, J; Dembo, A

    1996-02-01

    Fifty-four patients with recurrent endometrial carcinoma were identified from a retrospective review of charts of 304 endometrial cancer patients seen between 1983 and 1989 at our center. A review was undertaken to identify the patterns of relapse, to determine the outcome of salvage treatment, to examine the factors predictive of effective salvage, and, if salvage is effective, to assess an alternative strategy to routine adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Forty percent of the entire recurrent population are long-term survivors. Of the 54 relapsing patients, primary therapy had been surgery alone in 32 and surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (rt) in 22. Isolated pelvic recurrence was the predominate relapse site in those who had not received adjuvant pelvic RT as primary therapy (23 of 32 or 72%). Distant relapse predominated in those who received adjuvant RT (17 or 22 or 77%). Twenty-eight (54%) failed in the pelvis alone, and 26 (46%) had a component of distant failure. Of the 28 with isolated pelvic relapse, 16 had vaginal mucosal disease involvement only and 12 had disease in the parametrium and/or the pelvic sidewall. With a minimum follow-up for the survivors of 5 years, 21 of the 28 with isolated pelvic relapse received radical radiotherapy and 14 or 67% had maintained pelvic control until death or last follow-up. Eleven of 14 (79%) with disease confined to the mucosa had pelvic control, whereas only 3 of 7 (43%) with extramucosal disease were controlled. No patient experienced major treatment-related toxicity. Tumor size, anatomic extent of pelvic recurrence, RT dose, and disease-free interval were examined for prognostic significance for pelvic control and survival by univariate analysis. Only anatomic extent of pelvic recurrence showed a nonstatistically significant trend as a predictor for control with P = 0.08. In conclusion, a significant proportion of patients with disease recurrence confined to the pelvis can be rendered disease-free long

  7. Three-Drug Combination for Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of Interim results from an international, randomized phase III trial that suggest that adding carfilzomib (Kyprolis®) to a standard treatment improves outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma whose cancer has relapsed.

  8. Novel therapeutic options for relapsed hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Preetesh; Polliack, Aaron; Ravandi, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) achieve a response to therapy with cladribine or pentostatin with or without rituximab. However, late relapses can occur. Treatment of relapsed HCL can be difficult due to a poor tolerance to chemotherapy, increased risk of infections and decreased responsiveness to chemotherapy. The identification of BRAFV600E mutations and the role of aberrant MEK kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) pathways in the pathogenesis of HCL have helped to develop novel targeted therapies for these patients. Currently, the most promising therapeutic strategies for relapsed or refractory HCL include recombinant immunoconjugates targeting CD22 (e.g. moxetumomab pasudotox), BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib and B cell receptor signaling kinase inhibitors such as ibrutinib. Furthermore, the VH4-34 molecular variant of classic HCL has been identified to be less responsive to chemotherapy. Herein, we review the results of the ongoing clinical trials and potential future therapies for relapsed/refractory HCL.

  9. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  10. The effect of relapse on cognition in abstinent methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sara L; Dacey, Jennifer; Glynn, Susan; Rawson, Richard; Ling, Walter

    2004-07-01

    Data from 75 participants in a longitudinal study of methamphetamine (MA) abuse were used to differentiate the cognitive performance of those who remained abstinent, relapsed, or continued to use during treatment. Participants were divided into three groups: continuous abstinence, initial abstinence but relapse, and continuous use. Groups did not differ on age, education, gender or ethnicity. Participants in the longitudinal study completed a battery of cognitive tests within 7 days of their last use of MA, then were re-tested monthly for up to 6 months (average time for this analysis was 92 days). For episodic memory, the relapse groups performance was worse than the abstinent and significantly worse than that of the continued use group who had the best performance on all measures. Relapse to methamphetamine use may affect episodic memory differently than it affects the other cognitive functions measured.

  11. Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Depressive Relapse in Adults

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The high prevalence, frequent relapse, and recurrence of major depressive disorder (MDD) increase its personal and societal costs. Cognitive therapy (CT) aims to decrease depressive symptoms and prevent relapse/recurrence. We review prevention evidence for acute, continuation, and maintenance CTs for patients whose depression is active, remitted, and recovered, respectively. Evidence suggests that patients relapse less often after discontinuing acute phase CT versus discontinuing pharmacotherapy. Continuation CT further decreases relapse relative to inactive controls and similarly to active pharmacotherapy. Maintenance CT may decrease recurrence but needs rigorous evaluation. Post-acute CT’s preventive effects appear greater for higher-risk patients (e.g., with residual depressive symptoms, unstable acute-phase treatment response, childhood trauma, more prior depressive episodes), although risks may vary by specific CTs. PMID:25729758

  12. Association between specific plasmids and relapse in typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Gotuzzo, E; Morris, J G; Benavente, L; Wood, P K; Levine, O; Black, R E; Levine, M M

    1987-01-01

    We studied isolates from 73 patients hospitalized with typhoid fever in Lima, Peru. Of these 73 patients, 11 (15%) suffered a clinical relapse, with fever and positive blood cultures, within 3 months of their original illness. Using plasmids as epidemiologic markers, we found that three patients who subsequently relapsed were initially infected with more than one strain of Salmonella typhi. There was a highly significant association between relapse and isolation of a strain containing either a 24- or a 38-kilobase plasmid at the time of the original infection; however, we were unable to show any evidence of homology between these two plasmids. Our data indicate that infection with multiple strains is not uncommon in this endemic area and suggest that relapse may be partly strain dependent. Images PMID:2821064

  13. Intestinal Microbiota and Relapse After Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Peled, Jonathan U; Devlin, Sean M; Staffas, Anna; Lumish, Melissa; Khanin, Raya; Littmann, Eric R; Ling, Lilan; Kosuri, Satyajit; Maloy, Molly; Slingerland, John B; Ahr, Katya F; Porosnicu Rodriguez, Kori A; Shono, Yusuke; Slingerland, Ann E; Docampo, Melissa D; Sung, Anthony D; Weber, Daniela; Alousi, Amin M; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Ponce, Doris M; Barker, Juliet N; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Giralt, Sergio A; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G; Jenq, Robert R; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-03-15

    Purpose The major causes of mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplantation (allo-HCT) are relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infection. We have reported previously that alterations in the intestinal flora are associated with GVHD, bacteremia, and reduced overall survival after allo-HCT. Because intestinal bacteria are potent modulators of systemic immune responses, including antitumor effects, we hypothesized that components of the intestinal flora could be associated with relapse after allo-HCT. Methods The intestinal microbiota of 541 patients admitted for allo-HCT was profiled by means of 16S ribosomal sequencing of prospectively collected stool samples. We examined the relationship between abundance of microbiota species or groups of related species and relapse/progression of disease during 2 years of follow-up time after allo-HCT by using cause-specific proportional hazards in a retrospective discovery-validation cohort study. Results Higher abundance of a bacterial group composed mostly of Eubacterium limosum in the validation set was associated with a decreased risk of relapse/progression of disease (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82 per 10-fold increase in abundance; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.95; P = .009). When the patients were categorized according to presence or absence of this bacterial group, presence also was associated with less relapse/progression of disease (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.87; P = .01). The 2-year cumulative incidences of relapse/progression among patients with and without this group of bacteria were 19.8% and 33.8%, respectively. These associations remained significant in multivariable models and were strongest among recipients of T-cell-replete allografts. Conclusion We found associations between the abundance of a group of bacteria in the intestinal flora and relapse/progression of disease after allo-HCT. These might serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets to prevent relapse and improve survival after allo-HCT.

  14. Assessing changes in relapse rates in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Inusah, Seidu; Sormani, Maria P; Cofield, Stacey S; Aban, Inmaculada B; Musani, Solomon K; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Cutter, Gary R

    2010-12-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) annualized relapse rates (ARRs) in trials may be declining due to changes in diagnostic criteria, MS etiology, study criteria, and selection biases. This review examines if there is a trend in the ARR for relapsing-remitting MS patients (RRMS) over time and if so, why. A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Web of Science(®), and the Cochrane Library using electronic searches, screen scraping for abstracts, and hand searching of references for randomized trials conducted between 1960 and 2008. Out of 72 randomized trials, 56 (77.8%) defined relapse. This study uses 32 placebo relapsing-remitting studies out of the 37 (66.1%) with RRMS. The mean ARR for the treatment arms was 0.68 and the one for the placebo groups was 1.002. The year of publication was negatively associated with the ARR (p = 0.0001). The annual reduction amounts to 0.36 relapses over a 10-year period. Age and duration of symptoms were negatively associated with the ARR. Year of publication was significantly negatively associated with ARR after controlling for covariates. ARRs have fallen with relapse definition, entrance criteria remain important, but time exceeds all these variables and reflects two likely sources, selection of patients for trials by clinicians and rescue of patients truncating the number of multiple relapses. The impact of truncating the number of relapses on the falling rates is important, not only on the ARRs, but also on the impact of informative censoring in drop-outs.

  15. A Motion Videogame for Opioid Relapse Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Leah E.; Van Alstyne, Judy M.; Schindler-Ruwisch, Jennifer M.; Fishman, Marc J.; Greenberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a body motion–activated videogame, targeting the prevention of opioid relapse among youth in the context of outpatient treatment. Materials and Methods: Participants attended four weekly gameplay sessions. Surveys were conducted at baseline and following each week's gameplay and assessed satisfaction with gameplay, craving intensity, and self-efficacy to refuse opioids. Results: Participants expressed a high level of satisfaction with the videogame throughout the 4 weeks and agreed with the statement that they would be more likely to attend treatment sessions if the game was present (mean=4.6; standard deviation [SD]=0.7) and would recommend the videogame to other people in treatment (mean=4.2; SD=0.8). All participants recommended playing the videogame as part of treatment at least weekly, with a third recommending playing daily. Self-reported cravings declined over the 4-week period from baseline (mean=12.7; SD=8.4) to Week 4 (mean=9.8; SD=8.3), although the decline was not significant. Although participants stated that they liked the game, one-third of participants had dropped out of the study by the fourth session of gameplay. Conclusions: Preliminary evidence indicates that a motion videogame for addiction recovery may be feasible and acceptable within the context of outpatient treatment, although additional efforts are needed to keep youth in treatment. Future studies are needed to assess the impact of the game on long-term abstinence, treatment adherence, and engagement. PMID:26213838

  16. The reliability of Marlatt's taxonomy for classifying relapses.

    PubMed

    Longabaugh, R; Rubin, A; Stout, R L; Zywiak, W H; Lowman, C

    1996-12-01

    Marlatt's focus on the relapse situation has had a major impact upon research and clinical practice in treating addictions. One component of his work was the development of a taxonomy for classifying precipitants of relapse. This taxonomy has been incorporated into the nomenclature of clinicians and clinical researchers as part of an explanatory framework for understanding relapses. Despite the taxonomy's influence it has never been examined for the reliability of its use across research studies. The present study compared the reliability of independent classifications of 149 relapse episodes by trained raters at three research laboratories. Despite considerable across-laboratory training, reliability was found to be inconsistent for research purposes. It is concluded that comparability of results based on Marlatt's relapse taxonomy across independent studies must be subject to question, and assumptions necessary for the aggregation of a knowledge base are not supported. Recommendations are offered for improving the reliability of the taxonomy and the methods used to collect taxonomy data. More generally, questions regarding the value of the specific relapse categories, as well as the overall taxonomy, are raised.

  17. Smoking increases the risk of relapse after successful tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    d’Arc Lyra Batista, Joanna; de Fátima Pessoa Militão de Albuquerque, Maria; de Alencar Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent tobacco smoking has been identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis, and two studies which have investigated its association with relapse of tuberculosis after completion of treatment had conflicting results (and did not control for confounding). The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors for tuberculosis relapse, with emphasis on smoking. Methods A cohort of newly diagnosed TB cases was followed up from their discharge after completion of treatment (in 2001–2003) until October 2006 and relapses of tuberculosis ascertained during that period. A case of relapse was defined as a patient who started a second treatment during the follow up. Results Smoking (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.23–5.21) and living in an area where the family health program was not implemented (OR 3.61, 95% CI 1.46–8.93) were found to be independently associated with relapse of tuberculosis. Conclusions Our results establish that smoking is associated with relapse of tuberculosis even after adjustment for the socioeconomic variables. Smoking cessation support should be incorporated in the strategies to improve effectiveness of Tuberculosis Control Programs. PMID:18556729

  18. Mathematical model of Ebola transmission dynamics with relapse and reinfection.

    PubMed

    Agusto, F B

    2017-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease is caused by the Ebola virus which belongs to the filoviridae virus family. The 2014 outbreaks were estimated to have caused over 11,000 fatalities. In this paper, we formulate and analyze a system of ordinary differential equations which incorporates disease relapse and reinfection. The Ebola model with disease relapse and reinfection is locally-asymptotically stable when the basic reproduction number is less than unity. The model exhibits in the presence of disease reinfection, the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where the stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with a stable endemic equilibrium when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. The feasibility of backward bifurcation occurring increases with increasing values of both relapse and reinfection. The total number of new cases of Ebola-infected individuals increases with increasing values of the relapse and reinfection parameters. Further simulations show that Ebola transmission models that do not incorporate relapse and reinfection may under-estimate disease burden in the community. Similar under-estimation is observed in models that include only one infected and recovered classes. Using results obtained from sensitivity analysis indicates that Ebola (given disease relapse and reinfection) can be effectively curtailed in the community by using control measures with a high-effectiveness level. This strategy is more effective than either the moderate- or low-effectiveness levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Female Ex-Offender Perspectives on Drug Initiation, Relapse, and Desire to Remain Drug Free

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Srivastava, Neha; Salem, Benissa E.; Wall, Sarah; Kwon, Jordan; Ekstrand, Maria; Hall, Elizabeth; Turner, Susan F.; Faucette, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently-released homeless women residing in temporary residential drug treatment programs are at a critical juncture in the process of recovery, transition and reentry. The purpose of this study was to explore factors influencing initial use of drugs and relapse triggers among a sample of incarcerated women exiting jails and prisons, and who are residing in a residential drug treatment (RDT) program and preparing for reentry into their communities. Among this population, relapse to drug use and recidivism are common. A qualitative study was conducted utilizing focus groups to understand the perspectives of formerly incarcerated, currently homeless women residing in a RDT program. Content analysis generated the development of three broad categories: a) factors associated with first drug use; b) factors involved in relapse; c) factors influencing desire to remain drug free. A discussion follows highlighting the importance of targeted interventions at RDT sites that integrate physical, psychological and social needs to optimize reentry into communities. This would include a focus on building self-esteem, life skills, and providing access to resources such as housing, employment, and healthcare. PMID:27195929

  20. Glatiramer Acetate 40 mg/mL in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Review.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2015-05-01

    Glatiramer acetate (Copaxone(®)) is a synthetic analogue of myelin basic protein, which is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The therapeutic effects of the drug in the treatment of MS are thought to be via immunomodulation and neuroprotection. Subcutaneous glatiramer acetate 20 mg/mL once daily is approved in several countries for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS. Recently, a high-concentration formulation of glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL administered three times weekly was approved in the USA and several European countries in the same indication. This article reviews the efficacy and tolerability of the high-concentration regimen. In the randomized, phase III GALA study in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL three times weekly reduced annualized relapse rates significantly more than placebo, and indirect comparisons indicate that the efficacy of the three-times-weekly regimen is similar to that of the 20 mg/mL once-daily regimen. Results of the randomized, phase IIIb GLACIER study in patients with RRMS demonstrated that the three-times-weekly regimen reduced the risk of injection-site reactions by 50 % and was associated with numerically greater patient convenience scores than the once-daily regimen. Thus, in the treatment of RRMS, glatiramer acetate 40 mg/mL three times weekly is effective and provides a better tolerated and possibly more convenient option than the once-daily regimen.

  1. Identification of 42 Genes Linked to Stage II Colorectal Cancer Metastatic Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Temaimi, Rabeah A.; Tan, Tuan Zea; Marafie, Makia J.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Quirke, Philip; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Metastasis remains the primary cause of CRC death. Predicting the possibility of metastatic relapse in early-stage CRC is of paramount importance to target therapy for patients who really need it and spare those with low-potential of metastasis. Ninety-six stage II CRC cases were stratified using high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) data based on a predictive survival algorithm and supervised clustering. All genes included within the resultant copy number aberrations were each interrogated independently at mRNA level using CRC expression datasets available from public repositories, which included 1820 colon cancers, and 167 normal colon tissues. Reduced mRNA expression driven by copy number losses and increased expression driven by copy number gains revealed 42 altered transcripts (29 reduced and 13 increased transcripts) associated with metastatic relapse, short disease-free or overall survival, and/or epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Resultant genes were classified based on gene ontology (GO), which identified four functional enrichment groups involved in growth regulation, genomic integrity, metabolism, and signal transduction pathways. The identified 42 genes may be useful for predicting metastatic relapse in stage II CRC. Further studies are necessary to validate these findings. PMID:27136531

  2. Ocular rosacea: an underdiagnosed cause of relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis in the elderly.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Sergio Umberto; Cecchin, Emanuela; De Marchi, Sergio

    2014-09-19

    Red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis are among the most common ocular disease in elderly patients. In these cases the search for causes is difficult and frustrating. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with a long history of red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis caused by ocular rosacea. In this patient the proper diagnosis was performed after 10 years of ocular disease, and repeated evaluations by general practitioners and clinical specialists, only after the appearance of facial signs of erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Adequate therapy with oral doxycycline led to the improvement of the clinical picture that previously had shown a poor response to several topical treatments. The possibility of ocular rosacea should be considered in evaluating an elderly patient with persistent red eye and relapsing conjunctivitis-blepharitis. Making the proper diagnosis is crucial because ocular rosacea does not respond as expected to topical therapy and may lead to severe corneal involvement. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Activation of nuclear factor-κB in human prostate carcinogenesis and association to biochemical relapse

    PubMed Central

    Domingo-Domenech, J; Mellado, B; Ferrer, B; Truan, D; Codony-Servat, J; Sauleda, S; Alcover, J; Campo, E; Gascon, P; Rovira, A; Ross, J S; Fernández, P L; Albanell, J

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB/p65 regulates the transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in cell survival, invasion and metastasis. We characterised by immunohistochemistry the expression of NF-κB/p65 protein in six histologically normal prostate, 13 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and 86 prostate adenocarcinoma specimens. Nuclear localisation of p65 was used as a measure of NF-κB active state. Nuclear localisation of NF-κB was only seen in scattered basal cells in normal prostate glands. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias exhibited diffuse and strong cytoplasmic staining but no nuclear staining. In prostate adenocarcinomas, cytoplasmic NF-κB was detected in 57 (66.3%) specimens, and nuclear NF-κB (activated) in 47 (54.7%). Nuclear and cytoplasmic NF-κB staining was not correlated (P=0.19). By univariate analysis, nuclear localisation of NF-κB was associated with biochemical relapse (P=0.0009; log-rank test) while cytoplasmic expression did not. On multivariate analysis, serum preoperative prostate specific antigen (P=0.02), Gleason score (P=0.03) and nuclear NF-κB (P=0.002) were independent predictors of biochemical relapse. These results provide novel evidence for NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation in the transition from PIN to prostate cancer. Our findings also indicate that nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an independent prognostic factor of biochemical relapse in prostate cancer. PMID:16278667

  4. Relapse processes after the extinction of instrumental learning: Renewal, resurgence, and reacquisition

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Winterbauer, Neil E.; Todd, Travis P.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that extinction (the procedure in which a Pavlovian conditioned stimulus or an instrumental action is repeatedly presented without its reinforcer) weakens behavior without erasing the original learning. Most of the experiments that support this claim have focused on several “relapse” effects that occur after Pavlovian extinction, which collectively suggest that the original learning is saved through extinction. However, although such effects do occur after instrumental extinction, they have not been explored there in as much detail. This article reviews recent research in our laboratory that has investigated three relapse effects that occur after the extinction of instrumental (operant) learning. In renewal, responding returns after extinction when the behavior is tested in a different context; in resurgence, responding recovers when a second response that has been reinforced during extinction of the first is itself put on extinction; and in rapid reacquisition, extinguished responding returns rapidly when the response is reinforced again. The results provide new insights into extinction and relapse, and are consistent with principles that have been developed to explain extinction and relapse as they occur after Pavlovian conditioning. Extinction of instrumental learning, like Pavlovian learning, involves new learning that is relatively dependent on the context for expression. PMID:22450305

  5. The effect of N-acetylcysteine in the nucleus accumbens on neurotransmission and relapse to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Kupchik, Yonatan M; Moussawi, Khaled; Tang, Xing-Chun; Wang, Xiusong; Kalivas, Benjamin C; Kolokithas, Rosalia; Ogburn, Katelyn B; Kalivas, Peter W

    2012-06-01

    Relapse to cocaine seeking has been linked with low glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) causing potentiation of synaptic glutamate transmission from prefrontal cortex (PFC) afferents. Systemic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been shown to restore glutamate homeostasis, reduce relapse to cocaine seeking, and depotentiate PFC-NAcore synapses. Here, we examine the effects of NAC applied directly to the NAcore on relapse and neurotransmission in PFC-NAcore synapses, as well as the involvement of the metabotropic glutamate receptors 2/3 (mGluR2/3) and 5 (mGluR5). Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine for 2 weeks and following extinction received either intra-accumbens NAC or systemic NAC 30 or 120 minutes, respectively, before inducing reinstatement with a conditioned cue or a combined cue and cocaine injection. We also recorded postsynaptic currents using in vitro whole cell recordings in acute slices and measured cystine and glutamate uptake in primary glial cultures. NAC microinjection into the NAcore inhibited the reinstatement of cocaine seeking. In slices, a low concentration of NAC reduced the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic synaptic currents in the NAcore in an mGluR2/3-dependent manner, while high doses of NAC increased amplitude in an mGluR5-dependent manner. Both effects depended on NAC uptake through cysteine transporters and activity of the cysteine/glutamate exchanger. Finally, we showed that by blocking mGluR5 the inhibition of cocaine seeking by NAC was potentiated. The effect of NAC on relapse to cocaine seeking depends on the balance between stimulating mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 in the NAcore, and the efficacy of NAC can be improved by simultaneously inhibiting mGluR5. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Virtual reality cue exposure for the relapse prevention of tobacco consumption: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Giovancarli, Camille; Malbos, Eric; Baumstarck, Karine; Parola, Nathalie; Pélissier, Marie-Florence; Lançon, Christophe; Auquier, Pascal; Boyer, Laurent

    2016-02-19

    Successful interventions have been developed for smoking cessation, but the success of smoking relapse prevention interventions has been limited. In particular, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been hampered by a high relapse rate. Because relapses can be due to the presence of conditions associated with tobacco consumption (such as drinking in bars with friends), virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) can generate synthetic environments that represent risk situations for the patient in the context of relapse prevention. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of CBT coupled with VRET, in comparison to CBT alone, in the prevention of smoking relapse. The secondary objectives are to assess the impact of CBT coupled with VRET on anxiety, depression, quality of life, self-esteem and addictive comorbidities (such as alcohol, cannabis, and gambling). A third objective examines the feasibility and acceptability of VR use considering elements such as presence, cybersickness and number of patients who complete the VRET program. The present study is a 14-month (2 months of therapy followed by 12 months of follow-up), prospective, comparative, randomized and open clinical trial, involving two parallel groups (CBT coupled with VRET versus CBT alone). The primary outcome is the proportion of individuals with tobacco abstinence at 6 months after the end of the therapy. Abstinence is defined by the total absence of tobacco consumption assessed during a post-test interview and with an apparatus that measures the carbon monoxide levels expired. A total of 60 individuals per group will be included. This study is the first to examine the efficacy of CBT coupled with VRET in the prevention of smoking relapse. Because VRET is simple to use and has a low cost, this interactive therapeutic method might be easily implemented in clinical practice if the study confirms its efficacy. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02205060 (registered 25 July 2014).

  7. Cue-induced resumption of heroin and cocaine seeking in rats using a conflict model of abstinence and relapse.

    PubMed

    Peck, Joshua A; Wercberger, Racheli; Kariyeva, Elina; Ranaldi, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Most animal research on drug relapse involves the reinstatement model where abstinence is a result of drug removal (extinction). However, abstinence in humans often results from the aversive consequences that accompany drug seeking (conflict situation). This study was aimed at using a conflict-based animal model of abstinence/relapse in rats self-administering heroin or cocaine. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin (0.05 mg kg(-1) injection(-1)) or cocaine (0.5 mg kg(-1) injection(-1)) with each injection paired with a light cue. After stable responding was demonstrated, the floor near the levers was electrified, creating a barrier, in order to model the negative consequences of continued drug seeking. Shock intensities were increased over sessions until no responses occurred for three consecutive sessions. During a relapse test, where shock was maintained,the capacity of noncontingent drug cue presentations to induce active lever pressing was assessed. Ten of ten heroin animals and three of eight cocaine animals exposed to noncontingent cue presentations resumed responding. During the relapse test, for both drug groups, active lever pressing was significantly higher than during abstinence but only in the heroin group was it significantly higher than inactive lever pressing. The implementation of negative consequences for drug seeking can result in its cessation just as they might in human addicts. Similarly, exposure to drug cues can lead to resumption of drug seeking. This model may be useful for studying the mechanisms underlying abstinence and relapse and for developing strategies to prevent relapse.

  8. Highly Expressed Integrin-α8 Induces Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition-Like Features in Multiple Myeloma with Early Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jiyeon; Koh, Youngil; Park, Hyejoo; Kim, Dae Yoon; Kim, Dong Chan; Byun, Ja Min; Lee, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent groundbreaking advances in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment, most MM patients ultimately experience relapse, and the relapse biology is not entirely understood. To define altered gene expression in MM relapse, gene expression profiles were examined and compared among 16 MM patients grouped by 12 months progression-free survival (PFS) after autologous stem cell transplantation. To maximize the difference between prognostic groups, patients at each end of the PFS spectrum (the four with the shortest PFS and four with the longest PFS) were chosen for additional analyses. We discovered that integrin-α8 (ITGA8) is highly expressed in MM patients with early relapse. The integrin family is well known to be involved in MM progression; however, the role of integrin-α8 is largely unknown. We functionally overexpressed integrin-α8 in MM cell lines, and surprisingly, stemness features including HIF1α, VEGF, OCT4, and Nanog, as well as epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related phenotypes, including N-cadherin, Slug, Snail and CXCR4, were induced. These, consequently, enhanced migration and invasion abilities, which are crucial to MM pathogenesis. Moreover, the gain of integrin-α8 expression mediated drug resistance against melphalan and bortezomib, which are the main therapeutic agents in MM. The cBioPortal genomic database revealed that ITGA8 have significant tendency to co-occur with PDGFRA and PDGFRB and their mRNA expression were up-regulated in ITGA8 overexpressed MM cells. In summary, integrin-α8, which was up-regulated in MM of early relapse, mediates EMT-like phenotype, enhancing migration and invasion; therefore, it could serve as a potential marker of MM relapse and be a new therapeutic target. PMID:28008160

  9. Prevalence and serological diagnosis of relapse in paracoccidioidomycosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Tatiane Fernanda; Franciscone Silva, Luciane Regina; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; Moris, Daniela Vanessa; Venturini, James; Vicentini, Adriana Pardini; de Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio

    2014-05-01

    A review of 400 clinical records of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients, 93 with the acute/subacute (AF) and 307 with the chronic form (CF), attended from 1977 to 2011, selected as to the schedule of release for study by the Office of Medical Records at the University Hospital of the Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu-São Paulo State University--UNESP, was performed to detect cases in relapse. The control of cure was performed by clinical and serological evaluation using the double agar gel immunodiffusion test (DID). In the diagnosis of relapse, DID, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting assay (IBgp70 and IBgp43) were evaluated. Out of 400 patients, 21 (5.2%) went through relapse, 18 of them were male and 3 were female, 6∶1 male/female ratio. Out of the 21 patients in relapse, 15 (4.8%) showed the CF, and 6 (6.4%) the AF (p>0.05). The sensitivity of DID and ELISA before treatment was the same (76.1%). DID presented higher sensitivity in pre-treatment (80%) than at relapse (45%; p = 0.017), while ELISA showed the same sensitivity (80% vs 65%; p = 0.125). The serological methods for identifying PCM patients in relapse showed low rates of sensitivity, from 12.5% in IBgp70 to 65.0% in IBgp43 identification and 68.8% in ELISA. The sensitivity of ELISA in diagnosing PCM relapse showed a strong tendency to be higher than DID (p = 0.06) and is equal to IBgp43 (p = 0.11). In sum, prevalence of relapse was not high in PCM patients whose treatment duration was based on immunological parameters. However, the used methods for serological diagnosis present low sensitivity. While more accurate serological methods are not available, we pay special attention to the mycological and histopathological diagnosis of PCM relapse. Hence, direct mycological, cytopathological, and histopathological examinations and isolation in culture for P. brasiliensis must be appropriately and routinely performed when the hypothesis of relapse is considered.

  10. Prevalence and Serological Diagnosis of Relapse in Paracoccidioidomycosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sylvestre, Tatiane Fernanda; Silva, Luciane Regina Franciscone; Cavalcante, Ricardo de Souza; Moris, Daniela Vanessa; Venturini, James; Vicentini, Adriana Pardini; de Carvalho, Lídia Raquel; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio

    2014-01-01

    A review of 400 clinical records of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) patients, 93 with the acute/subacute (AF) and 307 with the chronic form (CF), attended from 1977 to 2011, selected as to the schedule of release for study by the Office of Medical Records at the University Hospital of the Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu – São Paulo State University – UNESP, was performed to detect cases in relapse. The control of cure was performed by clinical and serological evaluation using the double agar gel immunodiffusion test (DID). In the diagnosis of relapse, DID, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting assay (IBgp70 and IBgp43) were evaluated. Out of 400 patients, 21 (5.2%) went through relapse, 18 of them were male and 3 were female, 6∶1 male/female ratio. Out of the 21 patients in relapse, 15 (4.8%) showed the CF, and 6 (6.4%) the AF (p>0.05). The sensitivity of DID and ELISA before treatment was the same (76.1%). DID presented higher sensitivity in pre-treatment (80%) than at relapse (45%; p = 0.017), while ELISA showed the same sensitivity (80% vs 65%; p = 0.125). The serological methods for identifying PCM patients in relapse showed low rates of sensitivity, from 12.5% in IBgp70 to 65.0% in IBgp43 identification and 68.8% in ELISA. The sensitivity of ELISA in diagnosing PCM relapse showed a strong tendency to be higher than DID (p = 0.06) and is equal to IBgp43 (p = 0.11). In sum, prevalence of relapse was not high in PCM patients whose treatment duration was based on immunological parameters. However, the used methods for serological diagnosis present low sensitivity. While more accurate serological methods are not available, we pay special attention to the mycological and histopathological diagnosis of PCM relapse. Hence, direct mycological, cytopathological, and histopathological examinations and isolation in culture for P. brasiliensis must be appropriately and routinely performed when the hypothesis of relapse is

  11. The neuropharmacology of relapse to food seeking: methodology, main findings, and comparison with relapse to drug seeking

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Sunila G.; Adams-Deutsch, Tristan; Epstein, David H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2009-01-01

    Relapse to old, unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatments. The mechanisms underlying this relapse are unknown. Surprisingly, until recently this clinical problem has not been systematically studied in animal models. Here, we review results from recent studies in which a reinstatement model (commonly used to study relapse to abused drugs) was employed to characterize the effect of pharmacological agents on relapse to food seeking induced by either food priming (non-contingent exposure to small amounts of food), cues previously associated with food, or injections of the pharmacological stressor yohimbine. We also address methodological issues related to the use of the reinstatement model to study relapse to food seeking, similarities and differences in mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking versus drug seeking, and the degree to which the reinstatement procedure provides a suitable model for studying relapse in humans. We conclude by discussing implications for medication development and future research. We offer three tentative conclusions: The neuronal mechanisms of food-priming- and cue-induced reinstatement are likely different from those of reinstatement induced by the pharmacological stressor yohimbine.The neuronal mechanisms of reinstatement of food seeking are possibly different from those of ongoing food-reinforced operant responding.The neuronal mechanisms underlying reinstatement of food seeking overlap to some degree with those of reinstatement of drug seeking. PMID:19497349

  12. Reactivity to laboratory stress provocation predicts relapse to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Back, Sudie E; Hartwell, Karen; DeSantis, Stacia M; Saladin, Michael; McRae-Clark, Aimee L; Price, Kimber L; Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M; Baker, Nathaniel L; Spratt, Eve; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Brady, Kathleen T

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by periods of abstinence and high rates of return to drug using behavior. Elevated levels of stress have been associated with relapse to cocaine; however, the nature of this association is not well understood. The relationship between reactivity to three human laboratory provocations and relapse to cocaine was investigated. Participants were 53 cocaine-dependent individuals who were admitted for a 2-day inpatient stay during which a psychosocial provocation (i.e., the Trier Social Stress Task), a pharmacological provocation (i.e., administration of 1 microg/kg corticotrophin releasing hormone; CRH), and a drug cue exposure paradigm were completed. Adrenocortico-trophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, heart rate, and subjective cocaine craving and stress were assessed at baseline and at multiple time points post-task. Participants' cocaine use was monitored for approximately 1 month following testing. The majority (72.3%) of participants relapsed to cocaine during the follow-up period. In response to the CRH and drug cue exposure, elevated subjective craving and stress were significant predictors of cocaine use during follow-up. In response to the Trier, attenuated neuroendocrine responses were significant predictors of cocaine use. The findings provide further evidence of the ability of laboratory paradigms to predict relapse. The observed associations between stress reactivity and subsequent cocaine use highlight the clinical importance of the findings. Predictors of relapse may vary based on the type of provocation utilized. Interventions aimed at normalizing stress response, as measured using laboratory paradigms, may prove useful in relapse prevention. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Reactivity to Laboratory Stress Provocation Predicts Relapse to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Back, Sudie E.; Hartwell, Karen; DeSantis, Stacia M.; Saladin, Michael; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.; Price, Kimber L.; Maria, Megan M. Moran-Santa; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Spratt, Eve; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Brady, Kathleen T.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cocaine dependence is a chronic relapsing disorder characterized by periods of abstinence and high rates of return to drug using behavior. Elevated levels of stress have been associated with relapse to cocaine; however, the nature of this association is not well understood. Methods The relationship between reactivity to three human laboratory provocations and relapse to cocaine was investigated. Participants were 53 cocaine-dependent individuals who were admitted for a 2-day inpatient stay during which a psychosocial provocation (i.e., the Trier Social Stress Task), a pharmacological provocation (i.e., administration of 1ųg/kg corticotrophin releasing hormone; CRH), and a drug cue exposure paradigm were completed. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, heart rate, and subjective cocaine craving and stress were assessed at baseline and at multiple time points post-task. Participants’ cocaine use was monitored for approximately one month following testing. Results The majority (72.3%) of participants relapsed to cocaine during the follow-up period. In response to the CRH and drug cue exposure, elevated subjective craving and stress were significant predictors of cocaine use during follow-up. In response to the Trier, attenuated neuroendocrine responses were significant predictors of cocaine use. Conclusions The findings provide further evidence of the ability of laboratory paradigms to predict relapse. The observed associations between stress reactivity and subsequent cocaine use highlight the clinical importance of the findings. Predictors of relapse may vary based on the type of provocation utilized. Interventions aimed at normalizing stress response, as measured using laboratory paradigms, may prove useful in relapse prevention. PMID:19726138

  14. Predictors of early relapse among adolescent crack users.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rosa, Ronaldo; Kessler, Félix P; Pianca, Thiago G; Guimarães, Luciano; Ferronato, Pedro; Pagnussat, Esequiel; Moura, Helena; Pechansky, Flavio; von Diemen, Lisia

    2017-01-01

    Relapse is associated with a poor prognosis among drug users. Crack cocaine users are more prone to severe dependence because of the intensity of use. Additionally, initiating drug use during adolescence worsens users' prognosis due to the increased rates of impulsivity and other risk behaviors. This study aimed to identify the predictors of early relapse among adolescent crack users discharged from inpatient treatment. A cohort study was conducted with 89 psychiatric inpatients aged 12-17 years from two different hospitals in southern Brazil who met the criteria for crack abuse or dependence. Demographic data, substance use disorders, psychiatric comorbidities, and crack consumption profile were assessed during hospitalization using the Teen Addiction Severity Index, Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime, and Crack Consumption Profile. Participants were re-assessed at 1 and 3 months after hospital discharge to determine their crack cocaine use based on self-report, family/caregiver information, and urine tests, whenever possible. There were extremely high rates of relapse (valid percent) in the first and third months, 65.9 and 86.4%, respectively. Statistically significant associations were observed between relapse in the first month and length of cocaine/crack cocaine use, and length of hospital stay. Data at 3 months were not analyzed because of the small number of patients who did not relapse. The high rates and significant associations found in this study suggest that intensive outpatient treatment strategies targeting this population should be developed and implemented to prevent early relapse after detoxification. One of the possible approaches, based on recent studies, might explore motivation as a strategy to reduce the rate of early relapse.

  15. Relapse to driving under the influence (DUI): a review.

    PubMed

    Nochajski, Thomas H; Stasiewicz, Paul R

    2006-03-01

    Driving under the influence (DUI) is a major public health problem. In 2003, there were 17,401 alcohol-related crash fatalities. Although there has been a large decrease in the fatality rates over the past two decades, further progress has stalled in recent years. This plateau in the injury and death rates resulting from impaired driving has been attributed, in part, to the persistent or repeat DUI offender. Broadly defined, repeat offenders are those individuals who, following an initial DUI arrest, relapse to driving under the influence of alcohol and other drugs. In this paper, we first provide a brief overview of several models of DUI relapse. We then review the empirical literature on DUI relapse, the data describing characteristics of first-time and repeat DUI offenders, and, especially, studies that have evaluated the impact of legal sanctions and rehabilitation programs on subsequent DUI behavior. The data reveal that DUI offenders are a heterogeneous group, and that simple models relying on only one or two behavioral domains (e.g., driving characteristics, demographics) to explain DUI relapse are insufficient to account for the DUI behavior of offenders. To advance our understanding of DUI relapse, we argue for development and testing of multifactorial models focusing on the interplay of legal, social and psychological factors that describe and explain relapse among DUI offenders. By recognizing the heterogeneity within the offender population it will be easier for researchers and clinicians to identify subgroups that are at high-risk for relapse and which should be targeted by prevention and intervention programs.

  16. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons.

    PubMed

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E; Spence, Katie G; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2015-11-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory.

  17. Voluntary exercise during extinction of auditory fear conditioning reduces the relapse of fear associated with potentiated activity of striatal direct pathway neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Agnieszka; Bouchet, Courtney A.; Bunker, Preston; Hellwinkel, Justin E.; Spence, Katie G.; Day, Heidi E.W.; Campeau, Serge; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Relapse of previously extinguished fear presents a significant, pervasive obstacle to the successful long-term treatment of anxiety and trauma-related disorders. Thus, identification of a novel means to enhance fear extinction to stand the passage of time and generalize across contexts is of the utmost importance. Acute bouts of exercise can be used as inexpensive, noninvasive treatment strategies to reduce anxiety, and have been shown to enhance memory for extinction when performed in close temporal proximity to the extinction session. However, it is unclear whether acute exercise can be used to prevent relapse of fear, and the neural mechanisms underlying this potential effect are unknown. The current study therefore examined whether acute exercise during extinction of auditory fear can protect against the later relapse of fear. Male, F344 rats lacking an extended history of wheel running were conditioned to fear a tone CS and subsequently extinguished within either a freely mobile running wheel, a locked wheel, or a control context lacking a wheel. Rats exposed to fear extinction within a freely mobile wheel ran during fear extinction, and demonstrated reduced fear as well as attenuated corticosterone levels during re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test in a novel context 1 week later. Examination of cfos mRNA patterns elicited by re-exposure to the extinguished CS during the relapse test revealed that acute exercise during extinction decreased activation of brain circuits classically involved in driving fear expression and interestingly, increased activity within neurons of the direct striatal pathway involved in reward signaling. These data suggest that exercise during extinction reduces relapse through a mechanism involving the direct pathway of the striatum. It is suggested that a positive affective state could become associated with the CS during exercise during extinction, thus resulting in a relapse-resistant extinction memory. PMID

  18. Natalizumab for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Eugenio; Giuliani, Giorgio; Solari, Alessandra; Simi, Silvana; Minozzi, Silvia; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo; Galea, Ian

    2011-10-05

    Natalizumab (NTZ) (Tysabri(®)) is a monoclonal antibody that inhibits leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier, thus reducing inflammation in central nervous system, and has been approved worldwide for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of NTZ in the treatment of patients with RRMS. We searched the Cochrane Multiple Sclerosis Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2010, Issue 1), MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE, all up to 19 February 2010, and bibliographies of papers. Handsearching was carried out. Trialists and pharmaceutical companies were contacted. Furthermore, the websites of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Evaluation Agency (EMA) and the National Institute for health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) were also checked. All double-blind, randomised, controlled trials analysing more than a single infusion of NTZ (dosage > 3 mg/kg intravenous infusion every 4 weeks), also including its use as add-on treatment, versus placebo or other drugs in patients with RRMS. No restrictions on the basis of duration of treatment or length of follow up. Three reviewers independently selected articles which met the inclusion criteria. Disagreements were solved by discussion. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the methodological quality of each trial. Missing data was sought by contacting principal authors and Biogen Idec, through Biogen-Dompé Italia. Three studies met the inclusion criteria. These included one placebo-controlled trial (942 patients) and two add-on placebo-controlled trials, i.e. one plus glatiramer acetate (110 patients) and the second plus interferon beta-1a (1171 patients).This review assessed the efficacy, tolerability and safety of NTZ in patients with RRMS. Data was conclusive with respect to efficacy and tolerability, but not safety. As far as

  19. Vitamin D supplementation reduces relapse rate in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Julie Hejgaard; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Sellebjerg, Finn; Oturai, Annette Bang

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency is common among multiple sclerosis patients, and hypovitaminosis D has been associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk and disease activity. To investigate how recommendations on vitamin D3 supplements affect 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and to examine the clinical effects associated with changes in 25(OH)D levels. In this prospective cohort study, baseline blood samples were collected from 170 natalizumab-treated RRMS patients during winter 2009-2010 and were repeated the following winter. Vitamin D supplements were recommended according to standard clinical practice in our clinic to patients with serum 25(OH)D<50nmol/l at baseline. Information was obtained on annualized relapse-rate (ARR) the year prior to baseline and the following year. We found that recommending vitamin D supplements in patients with vitamin D insufficiency was associated with a significant increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations (p=5.1×10(-10)), which was significantly related with decreases in ARR; for each nmol/l increase in Δ25(OH)D a -0.014 (95% CI -0.026 to -0.003) decrease in ΔARR was observed, p=0.02. Correction of hypovitaminosis D in clinical practice by recommending oral D3 supplements resulted in increases in 25(OH)D levels in serum, which were associated with decreases in ARR in RRMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. New cellular markers at diagnosis are associated with isolated central nervous system relapse in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; de Launaij, Daphne; de Vries, Jeltje F; de Haas, Valerie; Sonneveld, Edwin; Voerman, Jane S A; de Bie, Maaike; Revesz, Tamas; Avigad, Smadar; Yeoh, Allen E J; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Eckert, Cornelia; Pieters, Rob; van Dongen, Jacques J M

    2016-03-01

    In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), central nervous system (CNS) involvement is rare at diagnosis (1-4%), but more frequent at relapse (~30%). Because of the significant late sequelae of CNS treatment, early identification of patients at risk of CNS relapse is crucial. Using microarray-analysis, we discovered multiple differentially expressed genes between B-cell precursor (BCP) ALL cells in bone marrow (BM) and BCP-ALL cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at the time of isolated CNS relapse. After confirmation by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, selected genes (including SCD and SPP1) were validated at the protein level by flowcytometric analysis of BCP-ALL cells in CSF. Further flowcytometric validation showed that a subpopulation of BCP-ALL cells (>1%) with a 'CNS protein profile' (SCD positivity and increased SPP1 expression) was present in the BM at diagnosis in patients who later developed an isolated CNS relapse, whereas this subpopulation was <1% or absent in all other patients. These data indicate that the presence of a (small) subpopulation of BCP-ALL cells with a 'CNS protein profile' at diagnosis (particularly SCD-positivity) is associated with isolated CNS relapse. Such information can be used to design new diagnostic and treatment strategies that aim at prevention of CNS relapse with reduced toxicity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis in children with relapsing urinary tract infections: review.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, P; Pizzini, C; Fanos, V

    2000-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are observed in 30-50% of children after the first UTI. Of these, approximately 90% occur within 3 months of the initial episode. The basic aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with malformative uropathy and/or recurrent UTIs, is to reduce the frequency of UTIs. The bacteria most frequently responsible for UTI are gram-negative organisms, with Escherichia coli accounting for 80% of urinary tract pathogens. In children with recurrent UTIs and in those treated with antibiotic prophylaxis there is a greater incidence of UTI due to Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., whereas Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Candida spp. are more frequent in children with urogenital abnormalities and/or undergoing invasive instrumental investigations. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, the main ones being circumcision, periurethral flora, micturition disorders, bowel disorders, local factors and hygienic measures. Several factors facilitate UTI relapse: malformative uropathies, particularly of the obstructive type; vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); previous repeated episodes of cystitis and/or pyelonephritis (3 or more episodes a year), even in the absence of urinary tract abnormalities; a frequently catheterized neurogenic bladder; kidney transplant. The precise mechanism of action of low-dose antibiotics is not yet fully known. The characteristics of the ideal prophylactic agent are presented in this review, as well as indications, dosages, side effects, clinical data of all molecules. While inappropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis encourages the emergence of microbial resistance, its proper use may be of great value in clinical practice, by reducing the frequency and clinical expression of UTIs and, in some cases such as VUR, significantly helping to resolve the underlying pathology.

  2. Quality of life is predictive of relapse in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Laurent; Millier, Aurelie; Perthame, Emeline; Aballea, Samuel; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2013-01-09

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether quality of life (QoL), as measured by the SF36 and the Quality of Life Interview (QoLI), is predictive of relapse for patients with schizophrenia. Using data from a multicenter cohort study conducted in France, Germany, and the United-Kingdom (EuroSC), we performed Cox proportional-hazards models to estimate the associations between QoL at baseline and the occurrence of relapse over a 24-month period, with adjustment for age; gender; positive, negative and general psychopathology PANSS factors; functioning (GAF); medication; side-effects; and compliance measures. Our sample consisted of 1,024 patients; 540 (53%) had at least one period of relapse, and 484 (47%) had no relapse. QoL levels were the most important features predicting relapse. We found that a higher level of QoL predicts a lower rate of relapse at 24 months: HR = 0.82 (0.74; 0.91), p < 0.001 for the SF36-Physical Composite Score; and HR = 0.88 (0.81; 0.96), p = 0.002 for the SF36-Mental Composite Score. These results were not confirmed using the QoLI: HR = 0.91 (0.81; 1.01), p = 0.083. To a lesser extent, older age, better functioning, and a higher compliance score also predict a lower rate of relapse at 24 months (HRs from 0.97 to 0.98; p < 0.05). QoL, as assessed by the SF36, is an independent predictor of relapse at a 24-month follow-up in schizophrenia. This finding may have implications for future use of the QoL in psychiatry. Moreover, our findings may support the development and monitoring of complementary therapeutic approaches, such as 'recovery-oriented' combined with traditional mental health cares to prevent relapse.

  3. Quality of life is predictive of relapse in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate whether quality of life (QoL), as measured by the SF36 and the Quality of Life Interview (QoLI), is predictive of relapse for patients with schizophrenia. Methods Using data from a multicenter cohort study conducted in France, Germany, and the United-Kingdom (EuroSC), we performed Cox proportional-hazards models to estimate the associations between QoL at baseline and the occurrence of relapse over a 24-month period, with adjustment for age; gender; positive, negative and general psychopathology PANSS factors; functioning (GAF); medication; side-effects; and compliance measures. Results Our sample consisted of 1,024 patients; 540 (53%) had at least one period of relapse, and 484 (47%) had no relapse. QoL levels were the most important features predicting relapse. We found that a higher level of QoL predicts a lower rate of relapse at 24 months: HR = 0.82 (0.74; 0.91), p < 0.001 for the SF36-Physical Composite Score; and HR = 0.88 (0.81; 0.96), p = 0.002 for the SF36-Mental Composite Score. These results were not confirmed using the QoLI: HR = 0.91 (0.81; 1.01), p = 0.083. To a lesser extent, older age, better functioning, and a higher compliance score also predict a lower rate of relapse at 24 months (HRs from 0.97 to 0.98; p < 0.05). Conclusions QoL, as assessed by the SF36, is an independent predictor of relapse at a 24-month follow-up in schizophrenia. This finding may have implications for future use of the QoL in psychiatry. Moreover, our findings may support the development and monitoring of complementary therapeutic approaches, such as ‘recovery-oriented’ combined with traditional mental health cares to prevent relapse. PMID:23302219

  4. Postpartum relapse to cigarette smoking in inner city women.

    PubMed Central

    Hymowitz, Norman; Schwab, Maria; McNerney, Christopher; Schwab, Joseph; Eckholdt, Haftan; Haddock, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Past studies suggest that African American women who quit smoking during pregnancy are more likely to relapse during the postpartum period than white women, although it is not intuitively clear why this should be the case. To shed further light on this issue, two studies were carried out to determine factors that influence smoking cessation during pregnancy and postpartum relapse to smoking in a predominantly low-income African American population. In Study 1, the women were asked to fill out a written survey, and in Study 2, women participated in a structured interview. The same variables that influence smoking cessation and postpartum relapse in the general population, such as nicotine addiction levels, smoking by other members of the household, lack of social support, stress, weight gain, behavioral intentions to quit temporarily, and quitting for others, as opposed to one's self, influenced the behavior of low-income inner city residents. These findings suggest that the difference in rates of postpartum relapse to smoking in African American women and the general population is a matter of degree, rather than kind. The implications of these findings for understanding postpartum relapse in general and assisting low-income women in particular were discussed. PMID:12856912

  5. Rationalizations and identity conflict following smoking relapse: a thematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Lei Hum; Binti Ithnin, Azlyn Azmainie; West, Robert; Mohammad, Nihayah; Chan, Caryn Mei Hsien; Hasan Nudin, Siti Saadiah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Little is known about how smokers respond cognitively and emotionally to the experience of “late” relapse after the acute withdrawal phase. This study assessed the kinds of thoughts and feelings that emerge in order to provide a basis for quantitative research assessing prevalence of different types of response and implications for future quit attempts. Methods: Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted among 14 people attending a quit smoking clinic in Malaysia who had relapsed after at least 6 weeks of abstinence. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis to enable emergence of important aspects of the experience. Results: Following relapse, smokers often engaged in rationalizations and activities to minimize worry about the harmful effects of smoking by switching to a lower-tar cigarette, reducing the number of cigarette smoked, attempting to reduce cigarette smoke inhalation, comparing themselves with other smokers, and minimizing the health risks associated with smoking. In some cases, smokers retained a “non-smoker” identity despite having relapsed. Conclusion: Smoking relapsers rationalize their failure to quit and minimize their health risk in order to protect their image as non-smokers while it remains a source of identity conflict. PMID:28217031

  6. Clinical markers of slow healing and relapsing gastric ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, G; Di Mario, F; Piccoli, A; Vianello, F; Farinati, F; Naccarato, R

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the clinical markers useful in characterising slow healing and relapsing gastric ulcer patients. Ninety nine subjects entered the short term and 79 the long term study (12 months). The following parameters were taken into account: therapy, sex, age, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, analgesic intake, peptic ulcer family history and onset of the disease. Results of the studies were analysed by means of chi 2 test and logistic regression, both in stepwise and in specifying models. Cigarette smoking was found to be the most important risk factor of non-healing (p = 0.04). In women with late onset of the disease, cigarette smoking identified the gastric ulcer subjects at higher risk of non-healing with a predictive probability of 0.4679. Age under 50 years was found to be the most important risk factor of relapsing throughout the entire 12 month follow up period (p = 0.025). In those under 50 years, cigarette smoking and negative peptic ulcer family history in combination, identified the gastric ulcer subjects at higher risk of relapsing, the predicted probability being 0.6027. It is concluded that cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for non-healing and those who relapse under the age of 50. The possibility of singling out categories of patients more prone not to heal and to relapse suggests new strategies in the management of gastric ulcer disease. PMID:3557191

  7. INSOMNIA, SELF-MEDICATION, AND RELAPSE TO ALCOHOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Brower, Kirk J.; Aldrich, Michael S.; Robinson, Elizabeth A. R.; Zucker, Robert A.; Greden, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the frequencies of insomnia and its self-medication with alcohol in a sample of alcoholic patients, as well as the relationship of these variables to alcoholic relapse. Method Subjects were 172 men and women receiving treatment for alcohol dependence. They completed a sleep questionnaire, measures of alcohol problem severity and depression severity, and polysomnograpy after at least two weeks of abstinence. Results Using eight items from the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, >60% of subjects were classified as having symptomatic insomnia during the six months prior to treatment entry. Compared to patients without insomnia, patients with insomnia were more likely to report frequent alcohol use for sleep (55% vs. 28%; χ2=12.03, df=1, p=0.001), had significantly worse polysomnographic measures of sleep continuity, and had greater severity scores for both alcohol dependence and depression. Among 74 alcoholics who were followed a mean of five months after treatment, 60% with baseline insomnia vs. 30% without baseline insomnia relapsed to any use of alcohol (χ2=6.16, df=1, p=0.02). Insomnia remained a robust predictor of relapse after applying logistic regression analysis to control for other variables. A history of self-medicating insomnia with alcohol did not significantly predict subsequent relapse. Conclusions The majority of alcoholic patients entering treatment reported insomnia symptoms. Given the potential link between insomnia and relapse, routine questions about sleep in clinical and research settings are warranted. PMID:11229980

  8. Trazodone and alcohol relapse: a retrospective study following residential treatment.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Bhanu Prakash; Schneekloth, Terry D; Biernacka, Joanna M; Frye, Mark A; Mansukhani, Meghna P; Hall-Flavin, Daniel K; Karpyak, Victor M; Loukianova, Larissa L; Lesnick, Timothy G; Mrazek, David

    2011-01-01

    Trazodone is one of the most commonly prescribed hypnotic medications in patients with sleep disturbances in alcohol recovery. A recent study concluded that treating insomnia with trazodone in patients with alcohol dependence might impede improvements in alcohol consumption and lead to increased drinking when trazodone is stopped. We set out to investigate the relationship between trazodone use during alcoholism treatment and relapse rates in patients who were discharged from a residential alcohol treatment program. We retrospectively reviewed records of patients with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in a residential addiction treatment center from 2005 to 2008 and analyzed the association of trazodone use at discharge and alcohol relapse at 6 months. We also assessed the association between trazodone use and relapse at 6 months adjusting for sex, drug dependence, nonsubstance use Axis I psychiatric diagnoses, patient self-report of difficulties with sleep, and anti-dipsotropic medication use at discharge and evaluated pair-wise interactions of trazodone use with the adjustment variables. Of 283 patients eligible for inclusion, 85 (30%) were taking trazodone at discharge. Older age, self-reported sleep problems, and having a nonsubstance use Axis I psychiatric diagnosis were associated with trazodone use. After discharge, 170 (60%) subjects responded to follow-up efforts. Neither intent to treat nor responder only analysis revealed any association between trazodone use and relapse. Our retrospective study of a complex patient population discharged from a residential treatment setting did not find an association between trazodone use at discharge and relapse rates at 6 months.

  9. Suppression of cancer relapse and metastasis by inhibiting cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Li, Youzhi; Rogoff, Harry A; Keates, Sarah; Gao, Yuan; Murikipudi, Sylaja; Mikule, Keith; Leggett, David; Li, Wei; Pardee, Arthur B; Li, Chiang J

    2015-02-10

    Partial or even complete cancer regression can be achieved in some patients with current cancer treatments. However, such initial responses are almost always followed by relapse, with the recurrent cancer being resistant to further treatments. The discovery of therapeutic approaches that counteract relapse is, therefore, essential for advancing cancer medicine. Cancer cells are extremely heterogeneous, even in each individual patient, in terms of their malignant potential, drug sensitivity, and their potential to metastasize and cause relapse. Indeed, hypermalignant cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells or stemness-high cancer cells, that are highly tumorigenic and metastatic have been isolated from cancer patients with a variety of tumor types. Moreover, such stemness-high cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. Here we show that BBI608, a small molecule identified by its ability to inhibit gene transcription driven by Stat3 and cancer stemness properties, can inhibit stemness gene expression and block spherogenesis of or kill stemness-high cancer cells isolated from a variety of cancer types. Moreover, cancer relapse and metastasis were effectively blocked by BBI608 in mice. These data demonstrate targeting cancer stemness as a novel approach to develop the next generation of cancer therapeutics to suppress cancer relapse and metastasis.

  10. Suppression of cancer relapse and metastasis by inhibiting cancer stemness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Rogoff, Harry A.; Keates, Sarah; Gao, Yuan; Murikipudi, Sylaja; Mikule, Keith; Leggett, David; Li, Wei; Pardee, Arthur B.; Li, Chiang J.

    2015-01-01

    Partial or even complete cancer regression can be achieved in some patients with current cancer treatments. However, such initial responses are almost always followed by relapse, with the recurrent cancer being resistant to further treatments. The discovery of therapeutic approaches that counteract relapse is, therefore, essential for advancing cancer medicine. Cancer cells are extremely heterogeneous, even in each individual patient, in terms of their malignant potential, drug sensitivity, and their potential to metastasize and cause relapse. Indeed, hypermalignant cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells or stemness-high cancer cells, that are highly tumorigenic and metastatic have been isolated from cancer patients with a variety of tumor types. Moreover, such stemness-high cancer cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiation. Here we show that BBI608, a small molecule identified by its ability to inhibit gene transcription driven by Stat3 and cancer stemness properties, can inhibit stemness gene expression and block spherogenesis of or kill stemness-high cancer cells isolated from a variety of cancer types. Moreover, cancer relapse and metastasis were effectively blocked by BBI608 in mice. These data demonstrate targeting cancer stemness as a novel approach to develop the next generation of cancer therapeutics to suppress cancer relapse and metastasis. PMID:25605917

  11. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    drugs in development, and it is likely that BG-12 will be licensed this year. This has been licensed for psoriasis so there are good safety data in humans that may also hold true in MS; however, its three times daily dosage will probably impact on patient compliance. Laquinimod has lower efficacy than BG-12 but appears safe and could find a place as a first-line agent. Teriflunomide has just been licensed by the US FDA and may challenge the current injectable first-line therapies as it has a similar efficacy but the advantage of being taken orally. However, risk of teratogenicity may caution against its use in some women of child-bearing potential. This review will examine drugs that have been recently approved as well as those that are in late phase 2 or 3 development as treatment for relapsing MS, highlighting their mechanism of action as well as the clinical trial and safety data before discussing their potential for success in an increasingly florid and complex DMT armamentarium.

  12. Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during abstinence could be associated with relapse in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-Lopez, Lara; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Sanchez-Mora, Cristina; Lopez, Maria Victoria; Ribases, Marta; Casas, Miguel

    2015-02-28

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in cocaine craving in humans and drug seeking in rodents. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore the possible role of serum BDNF in cocaine relapse in abstinent addicts. Forty cocaine dependent subjects (DSM-IV criteria) were included in an inpatient 2 weeks abstinence program. Organic and psychiatric co-morbidities were excluded. Two serum samples were collected for each subject at baseline and at after 14 abstinence days. After discharge, all cocaine addicts underwent a 22 weeks follow-up, after which they were classified into early relapsers (ER) (resumed during the first 14 days after discharge,) or late relapsers (LR) (resumed beyond 14 days after discharge). The only clinical differences between groups were the number of consumption days during the last month before detoxification. Serum BDNF levels increased significantly across the 12 days of abstinence in the LR group (p=0.02), whereas in the ER group BDNF remained unchanged. In the ER group, the change of serum BDNF during abstinence negatively correlated with the improvement in depressive symptoms (p=0.02). These results suggest that BDNF has a role in relapse to cocaine consumption in abstinent addicts, although the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain to be clarified.

  13. Outcome of relapsing Clostridium difficile infections do not correlate with virulence-, spore- and vegetative cell-associated phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Plaza-Garrido, Ángela; Miranda-Cárdenas, Camila; Castro-Córdova, Pablo; Olguín-Araneda, Valeria; Cofré-Araneda, Glenda; Hernández-Rocha, Cristian; Carman, Robert; Ibáñez, Patricio; Fawley, Warren N; Wilcox, Mark H; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Guzmán-Durán, Ana María; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    One of the main clinical challenges of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) is the high rate of relapse episodes. The main determinants involved in relapse of CDI include the presence of antibiotic-resistant C. difficile spores in the colonic environment and a permanent state of dysbiosis of the microbiota caused by antibiotic therapy. A possible scenario is that phenotypes related to the persistence of C. difficile spores might contribute to relapsing infections. In this study, 8 C. difficile isolates recovered from 4 cases with relapsing infection, and 9 isolates recovered from single infection cases were analyzed for PCR ribotyping and the presence of tcdA, tcdB and cdtAB genes. Factors associated to spore persistence, sporulation, spore adherence and biofilm formation and sporulation during biofilm formation were characterized. We also evaluated motility and cytotoxicity. However, we observed no significant difference in the analyzed phenotypes among the different clinical outcomes, most likely due to the high variability observed among strains within clinical backgrounds in each phenotype and the small sample size. It is noteworthy that C. difficile spores adhered to similar extents to undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells. By contrast, spores of all clinical isolates tested had increased germination efficiency in presence of taurocholate, while decreased sporulation rate during biofilm development in the presence of glucose. In conclusion, these results show that, at least in this cohort of patients, the described phenotypes are not detrimental in the clinical outcome of the disease.

  14. Chemokines and relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A role in migration and in resistance to antileukemic drugs.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Ana M; Martínez, Carolina; González, Miguel; Luque, Alfonso; Melen, Gustavo J; Martínez, Jesús; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Lassaletta, Álvaro; Madero, Luís; Ramírez, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We studied whether chemokines may have a role in relapses in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We compared the levels of chemokine receptors in marrow samples from 82 children with ALL at diagnosis versus 15 at relapses, and quantified the levels of chemokines in central system fluid (CSF) samples. The functional role of specific chemokines was studied in vitro and in vivo. The expression of some chemokine receptors was upregulated upon leukemic relapse, both in B- and in T-ALL, and in cases of medullary and extramedullary involvement. CXCL10 induced chemotaxis in leukemic cell lines and in primary leukemic cells, depending upon the levels of CXCR3 expression. CXCL10 specifically diminished chemotherapy-induced apoptosis on ALL cells expressing CXCR3, partially inhibiting caspase activation and maintaining the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Finally, immunodeficient mice engrafted with CXCR3-expressing human leukemic cells showed decreased infiltration of marrow, spleen, and CNS after receiving a CXCR3-antagonist molecule. CXCR3 signaling in ALL may have a dual function: chemotactic for the localisation of leukemic blasts in specific niches, and it may also confer resistance to chemotherapy, enhancing the chances for relapses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Raphael E; Manasanch, Elisabet E

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome, the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome, resulting in the accumulation of proteasome substrates and ultimately growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. The development and ultimate approval of this medication by regulatory agencies has been an important step toward improving clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma. Although initially approved as a single agent for the treatment of multiply relapsed and/or refractory myeloma, in the USA, it is now widely used in the early relapse setting in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Carfilzomib has also been studied in combination with second-generation immunomodulatory drugs, histone deacetylase inhibitors, alkylating agents and other novel medications. In this review article, we will discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and quality of life of carfilzomib-based combination therapies, as well as novel agents, for relapsed multiple myeloma. PMID:28243125

  16. Carfilzomib boosted combination therapy for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Raphael E; Manasanch, Elisabet E

    2017-01-01

    Carfilzomib is a proteasome inhibitor that binds selectively and irreversibly to the 20S proteasome, the proteolytic core particle within the 26S proteasome, resulting in the accumulation of proteasome substrates and ultimately growth arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells. The development and ultimate approval of this medication by regulatory agencies has been an important step toward improving clinical outcomes in multiple myeloma. Although initially approved as a single agent for the treatment of multiply relapsed and/or refractory myeloma, in the USA, it is now widely used in the early relapse setting in combination with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. Carfilzomib has also been studied in combination with second-generation immunomodulatory drugs, histone deacetylase inhibitors, alkylating agents and other novel medications. In this review article, we will discuss the efficacy, safety, tolerability and quality of life of carfilzomib-based combination therapies, as well as novel agents, for relapsed multiple myeloma.

  17. STUDY OF RELAPSES IN SCHIZOPHRENIA USING THE LIFE TABLE METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Thara, R.; Raman, K.J.; Srinivasan, T.N.; Rajkumar, S.; Vijayalakshmi, V.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY The life table has been used to study mortality and survival in a population and also the pattern of course of various chronic medical illnesses. In this study, the life table has been applied to a cohort of well defined Schizophrenic patients undergoing a long term followup. The probability of occurence of relapses, time of maximum risk for occurence of relapses are estimated using the life table technique. The life table shows a steep fall in the percentage of Non-relapsers from 85% at the end of first year to 35% at the end of the third year. Projected survival rate at the end of 5 years, using the second degree parabola curve, is only 2 % which needs to be tested by further followup. PMID:21927250

  18. Relapse of Multiple Myeloma Presenting as Lower Lip Numbness

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Yusra M.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz; Al-Farsi, Khalil; Al-Azri, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an uncommon malignancy characterised by the proliferation of clonal plasma cells. There are few published reports describing the extramedullary presentation of MM manifesting primarily in the head and neck region. In addition, the occurrence of an isolated relapse of MM in these sites is exceedingly rare. We report a 56-year-old female who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in 2010 with sudden-onset numbness of the lower lip. She had a history of MM in remission following chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant. Clinical and radiographic examinations were indicative of a possible relapse of MM, which was subsequently confirmed by bone marrow aspiration and histopathological evaluation. This unique case highlights the unusual site of relapse of a haematolymphoid malignancy. PMID:28003900

  19. [Treatment of relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Illés, Árpád; Simon, Zsófia; Udvardy, Miklós; Magyari, Ferenc; Jóna, Ádám; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 10-30% of Hodgkin lymphoma patients relapses or experience refractory disease after first line treatment. Nowadays, autologous stem cell transplantation can successfully salvage half of these patients, median overall survival is only 2-2.5 years. Several prognostic factors determine success of autologous stem cell transplantation. Result of transplantation can be improved considering these factors and using consolidation treatment, if necessary. Patients who relapse after autologous transplantation had worse prognosis, treatment of this patient population is unmet clinical need. Several new treatment options became available in the recent years (brentuximab vedotin and immuncheckpoint inhibitors). These new treatment options offer more chance for cure in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin patients. Outcome of allogenic stem cell transplantation can be improved by using haploidentical donors. New therapeutic options will be discussed in this review. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1338-1345.

  20. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm(3), despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated.

  1. Relapse of visceral leishmaniasis in an HIV-infected patient successfully treated with a combination of miltefosine and amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    McQuarrie, Shauna; Kasper, Ken; Moffatt, Dana C; Marko, Daniel; Keynan, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The present report documents a 49-year-old HIV-infected man receiving antiretroviral therapy with a suboptimal immune response and a CD4 count of 95 cells/mm3, despite virological suppression. Investigation of bone marrow was conducted and yielded a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. The clinical course was complicated by gastrointestinal involvment and relapse occurred after amphotericin B therapy. With the addition of miltefosine, the patient no longer presented with bone marrow amastigotes, and displayed an increased CD4 count and negative Leishmania polymerase chain reaction results. The present case highlights atypical presentation of visceral leishmaniasis, including poor immune reconstitution and gastrointestinal involvement. The high likelihood of relapse and response to combination therapy are illustrated. PMID:26744591

  2. Variation in relapse frequency and the transmission potential of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    White, Michael T; Shirreff, George; Karl, Stephan; Ghani, Azra C; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-03-30

    There is substantial variation in the relapse frequency of Plasmodium vivax malaria, with fast-relapsing strains in tropical areas, and slow-relapsing strains in temperate areas with seasonal transmission. We hypothesize that much of the phenotypic diversity in P. vivax relapses arises from selection of relapse frequency to optimize transmission potential in a given environment, in a process similar to the virulence trade-off hypothesis. We develop mathematical models of P. vivax transmission and calculate the basic reproduction number R0 to investigate how transmission potential varies with relapse frequency and seasonality. In tropical zones with year-round transmission, transmission potential is optimized at intermediate relapse frequencies of two to three months: slower-relapsing strains increase the opportunity for onward transmission to mosquitoes, but also increase the risk of being outcompeted by faster-relapsing strains. Seasonality is an important driver of relapse frequency for temperate strains, with the time to first relapse predicted to be six to nine months, coinciding with the duration between seasonal transmission peaks. We predict that there is a threshold degree of seasonality, below which fast-relapsing tropical strains are selected for, and above which slow-relapsing temperate strains dominate, providing an explanation for the observed global distribution of relapse phenotypes.

  3. Variation in relapse frequency and the transmission potential of Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael T.; Shirreff, George; Karl, Stephan; Ghani, Azra C.; Mueller, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    There is substantial variation in the relapse frequency of Plasmodium vivax malaria, with fast-relapsing strains in tropical areas, and slow-relapsing strains in temperate areas with seasonal transmission. We hypothesize that much of the phenotypic diversity in P. vivax relapses arises from selection of relapse frequency to optimize transmission potential in a given environment, in a process similar to the virulence trade-off hypothesis. We develop mathematical models of P. vivax transmission and calculate the basic reproduction number R0 to investigate how transmission potential varies with relapse frequency and seasonality. In tropical zones with year-round transmission, transmission potential is optimized at intermediate relapse frequencies of two to three months: slower-relapsing strains increase the opportunity for onward transmission to mosquitoes, but also increase the risk of being outcompeted by faster-relapsing strains. Seasonality is an important driver of relapse frequency for temperate strains, with the time to first relapse predicted to be six to nine months, coinciding with the duration between seasonal transmission peaks. We predict that there is a threshold degree of seasonality, below which fast-relapsing tropical strains are selected for, and above which slow-relapsing temperate strains dominate, providing an explanation for the observed global distribution of relapse phenotypes. PMID:27030414

  4. Social partners prevent alcohol relapse behavior in prairie voles

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Caroline M.; Ryabinin, Andrey E.

    2013-01-01

    There is robust evidence for a protective role of interpersonal factors such as social support on alcohol relapse, but research on the mechanisms that social factors may be acting on to effectively protect individuals against relapse is lacking. Prairie voles are highly social, monogamous rodents that freely self-administer ethanol in high amounts, and are a useful model for understanding social influences on alcohol drinking. Here we investigated whether prairie voles can be used to model social influences on relapse using the alcohol deprivation effect, in which animals show a transient increase in ethanol drinking following deprivation. In Experiment I, subjects were housed alone during four weeks of 24-hour access to 10% ethanol in a two-bottle choice test. Ethanol was then removed from the cage for 72 hours. Animals remained in isolation or were then housed with a familiar same-sex social partner, and ethanol access was resumed. Animals that remained isolated showed an increase in ethanol intake relative to pre-deprivation baseline, indicative of relapse-like behavior. However, animals that were socially housed did not show an increase in ethanol intake, and this was independent of whether the social partner also had access to ethanol. Experiment II replicated the alcohol deprivation effect in a separate cohort of isolated animals. These findings demonstrate that prairie voles display an alcohol deprivation effect and suggest a ‘social buffering’ effect of relapse-like behavior in the prairie vole. This behavioral paradigm provides a novel approach for investigating the behavioral and neurobiological underpinnings of social influences on alcohol relapse. PMID:24275014

  5. Emergence of new ALK mutations at relapse of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Javanmardi, Niloufar; Bernard, Virginie; Leroy, Quentin; Cappo, Julie; Rio Frio, Thomas; Pierron, Gaelle; Lapouble, Eve; Combaret, Valérie; Speleman, Frank; de Wilde, Bram; Djos, Anna; Ora, Ingrid; Hedborg, Fredrik; Träger, Catarina; Holmqvist, Britt-Marie; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Peuchmaur, Michel; Michon, Jean; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Kogner, Per; Delattre, Olivier; Martinsson, Tommy

    2014-09-01

    In neuroblastoma, the ALK receptor tyrosine kinase is activated by point mutations. We investigated the potential role of ALK mutations in neuroblastoma clonal evolution. We analyzed ALK mutations in 54 paired diagnosis-relapse neuroblastoma samples using Sanger sequencing. When an ALK mutation was observed in one paired sample, a minor mutated component in the other sample was searched for by more than 100,000× deep sequencing of the relevant hotspot, with a sensitivity of 0.17%. All nine ALK-mutated cases at diagnosis demonstrated the same mutation at relapse, in one case in only one of several relapse nodules. In five additional cases, the mutation seemed to be relapse specific, four of which were investigated by deep sequencing. In two cases, no mutation evidence was observed at diagnosis. In one case, the mutation was present at a subclonal level (0.798%) at diagnosis, whereas in another case, two different mutations resulting in identical amino acid changes were detected, one only at diagnosis and the other only at relapse. Further evidence of clonal evolution of ALK-mutated cells was provided by establishment of a fully ALK-mutated cell line from a primary sample with an ALK-mutated cell population at subclonal level (6.6%). In neuroblastoma, subclonal ALK mutations can be present at diagnosis with subsequent clonal expansion at relapse. Given the potential of ALK-targeted therapy, the significant spatiotemporal variation of ALK mutations is of utmost importance, highlighting the potential of deep sequencing for detection of subclonal mutations with a sensitivity 100-fold that of Sanger sequencing and the importance of serial samplings for therapeutic decisions. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Relapsed small cell lung cancer: treatment options and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Etsuro; Kubo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    According to recent analyses, there was a modest yet significant improvement in median survival time and 5-year survival rate of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in North America, Europe, Japan and other countries over the last 30 years. The median survival time of limited stage SCLC is 15–20 months and 5-year survival rate is 15% or less. In terms of extensive stage SCLC, a median survival time of 9.4–12.8 months and 2-year survival of 5.2–19.5% are still disappointing. Despite being highly sensitive to first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, most patients with SCLC experience relapse within 2 years and die from systemic metastasis. While several clinical trials of cytotoxic chemotherapies and molecular targeting agents have been investigated in the treatment of relapsed SCLC, none showed a significant clinical activity to be able to exceed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy. There are problematic issues to address for relapsed SCLC, such as standardizing the treatment for third-line chemotherapy. Topotecan alone was the first approved therapy for second-line treatment for relapsed SCLC. Amrubicin is a promising drug and a variety of trials evaluating its efficacy have been carried out. Amrubicin has shown superiority to topotecan in a Japanese population, but was not superior in a study of western patients. There are some controversial issues for relapsed SCLC, such as treatment for older patients, third-line chemotherapy and efficacy of molecular targeting therapy. This article reviews current standard treatment, recent clinical trials and other topics on relapsed SCLC. PMID:24587832

  7. Relapse of Multiple Myeloma Presenting as Extramedullary Plasmacytomas in Multiple Organs

    PubMed Central

    Köse, Murat; Buraniqi, Ersida; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Kayacan, Seyit Mehmet; Tükek, Tufan

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder. It is characterized by collections of abnormal plasma cells accumulating in the bone marrow, where they interfere with the production of normal blood cells. It usually presents as a multisystemic involvement, whose symptoms and signs vary greatly. Some patients have slowly progressive disease while others have aggressive clinical behavior by extramedullary involvement. In addition to renal failure, anemia, hypercalcemia, lytic bone lesions, and immunodeficiency, it also affects multiple organ system, such as pancreas, adrenal glands, kidney, skin, lung, liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone. To raise awareness of the variable presentations of this disease, we report a 53-year-old male patient, with multiple myeloma in his first remission who relapsed with extramedullary plasmacytomas (EMPs) involving multiple organs, such as pancreas, adrenal glands, kidney, skin, lung, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. PMID:25694834

  8. Antigenic variation among Borrelia spp. in relapsing fever.

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, K S; Farmer, S G; Komorowski, R A; Knox, K K

    1986-01-01

    Seven antigens of Borrelia hermsii, B. parkeri, and B. turicatae with isoelectric points in the range of 4.4 to 5.0 and molecular masses of 40 to 43 kilodaltons played a role in the relapse phenomenon of relapsing fever. Based upon location of the antigens in the outer envelope, the molecular weight, and Western blot analysis, the antigens from each phase of spirochetemia appeared to be a mixture of the serotype-specific antigens of cloned B. hermsii. Images PMID:3536750

  9. A simple technique for correction of relapsed overjet.

    PubMed

    Kakkirala, Neelima; Saxena, Ruchi

    2014-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are usually growth related discrepancies, which often become more severe when growth is completed Orthognathic surgery can be a part of the treatment plan, although a good number of cases can be treated non-surgically by camouflage treatment. The purpose of this report is to review the relapse tendency in patients treated non-surgically. A simple technique is described to combat one such post-treatment relapse condition in an adult patient who had undergone orthodontic treatment by extraction of a single lower incisor.

  10. Relapsed Pulmonary Cryptococcosis during Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Treatment.

    PubMed

    Takazono, Takahiro; Sawai, Toyomitsu; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Suyama, Naofumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    A 35-year-old non-HIV patient developed pulmonary cryptococcosis after the initiation of infliximab. He recovered by fluconazole treatment and completed the therapy for a total of 6 months. However, he experienced a relapse 16 months later during retreatment with infliximab, revealing an interesting clinical course contradicting retreatment. This case also represents the first case of relapsed pulmonary cryptococcosis suspected during treatment with a biologic agent. Both of these aspects generated important clinical questions about the length of pulmonary cryptococcosis treatment and the necessity of introducing a second prophylaxis for such patients.

  11. Relapse among substance-abusing women: components and processes.

    PubMed

    Sun, An-Pyng

    2007-01-01

    This article is based on part of a project in which 32 women who experienced substance use-related problems were interviewed. The purpose of the article is to explore factors related to the women's relapse so that practitioners can better understand the nature of women's relapse and more effectively help them. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted, audiotaped (with the exception of three women), and transcribed. The interview was guided by open-ended questions - exploring factors that led to the women's initial substance use, abstinence, and relapse; factors that prompted them to come for treatment; and their experience with the treatment. These open-ended questions were supplemented with follow-up questions probing further critical elements shared by participants initially. The mean age of the sample was 34 years old, with over half being white, followed by Latina/Hispanic, African American, and Native American. Most women reported being poly-drug users, followed by methamphetamine/amphetamines, heroine, cocaine, and alcohol. The average number of years of education was 11 years. Four major themes representing factors contributing to the women's relapse were identified: (1) low self-worth and its connection to intimate relationships with men; (2) interpersonal conflicts and/or negative emotion; (3) less ability to sever the tie with the using network and to establish a tie with the non-using network; and (4) a lack of AOD-related knowledge and relapse prevention coping skills. The qualitative approach enables the study to report not only the four general themes but also the multiple dimensions and building blocks underlying each theme so that the pertinent contexts and specific meanings of women's relapses can be understood. Many of the factors appeared to be related to women's socialization and the gender-role formation process as well as their disadvantageous social reality. The study suggests several topics for inclusion in women's relapse prevention

  12. Relapsing cardial stenosis after laparoscopic nissen treated by esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Courtial, Philippe; Bapin, Catherine; Deixonne, Bernard; Balmès, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Dysphagia after antireflux surgery is often a challenging situation. We report the case of a patient with relapsing cardial stricture and a weight loss of 24 kg following a laparoscopic Nissen procedure. Initial presentation was consistent with the diagnosis of pseudoachalasia and was resistant to endoscopic dilatation. Dysphagia was relieved by surgery, which showed cardial strangulation by tightly sutured diaphragmatic pillars. Symptoms and cardial stricture relapsed after a few months with no significant relief after repeated dilatations. Conservative treatment by endoscopic transcardial prosthesis for six weeks allowed a return to normal diet and a weight gain of 10 kg within a 30-month followup period.

  13. Relapsed Pulmonary Cryptococcosis during Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Takazono, Takahiro; Sawai, Toyomitsu; Tashiro, Masato; Saijo, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Suyama, Naofumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    A 35-year-old non-HIV patient developed pulmonary cryptococcosis after the initiation of infliximab. He recovered by fluconazole treatment and completed the therapy for a total of 6 months. However, he experienced a relapse 16 months later during retreatment with infliximab, revealing an interesting clinical course contradicting retreatment. This case also represents the first case of relapsed pulmonary cryptococcosis suspected during treatment with a biologic agent. Both of these aspects generated important clinical questions about the length of pulmonary cryptococcosis treatment and the necessity of introducing a second prophylaxis for such patients. PMID:27725552

  14. Tick-Borne Relapsing Fever Spirochetes in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Job E.; Krishnavahjala, Aparna; Garcia, Melissa N.; Bermudez, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing fever spirochetes are tick- and louse-borne pathogens that primarily afflict those in impoverished countries. Historically the pathogens have had a significant impact on public health, yet currently they are often overlooked because of the nonspecific display of disease. In this review, we discuss aspects of relapsing fever (RF) spirochete pathogenesis including the: (1) clinical manifestation of disease; (2) ability to diagnose pathogen exposure; (3) the pathogen’s life cycle in the tick and mammal; and (4) ecological factors contributing to the maintenance of RF spirochetes in nature. PMID:28959690

  15. A phase 2 trial of lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and relapsed/refractory myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wanling; Jagannath, Sundar; Jakubowiak, Andrzej; Lonial, Sagar; Raje, Noopur S.; Alsina, Melissa; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Schlossman, Robert L.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Mazumder, Amitabha; Vesole, David H.; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Colson, Kathleen; McKenney, Mary; Lunde, Laura E.; Feather, John; Maglio, Michelle E.; Warren, Diane; Francis, Dixil; Hideshima, Teru; Knight, Robert; Esseltine, Dixie-Lee; Mitsiades, Constantine S.; Weller, Edie; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective, multicenter, phase 2 study, 64 patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) received up to 8 21-day cycles of bortezomib 1.0 mg/m2 (days 1, 4, 8, and 11), lenalidomide 15 mg/day (days 1-14), and dexamethasone 40/20 mg/day (cycles 1-4) and 20/10 mg/day (cycles 5-8) (days of/after bortezomib dosing). Responding patients could receive maintenance therapy. Median age was 65 years; 66% were male, 58% had relapsed and 42% had relapsed and refractory MM, and 53%, 75%, and 6% had received prior bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide, respectively. Forty-eight of 64 patients (75%; 90% confidence interval, 65-84) were alive without progressive disease at 6 months (primary end point). The rate of partial response or better was 64%; median duration of response was 8.7 months. Median progression-free and overall survivals were 9.5 and 30 months, respectively (median follow-up: 44 months). Common treatment-related toxicities included sensory neuropathy (53%), fatigue (50%), and neutropenia (42%); common grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities included neutropenia (30%), thrombocytopenia (22%), and lymphopenia (11%). Grade 3 motor neuropathy was reported in 2 patients. Lenalidomide-bortezomib-dexamethasone appears effective and tolerable in patients with relapsed or relapsed and refractory MM, demonstrating substantial activity among patients with diverse prior therapies and adverse prognostic characteristics. This trial is registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00378209. PMID:24429336

  16. Psychiatrist's adherence: a new factor in relapse prevention of schizophrenia. A randomized controlled study on relapse control through telemedicine system.

    PubMed

    Spaniel, F; Novak, T; Bankovska Motlova, L; Capkova, J; Slovakova, A; Trancik, P; Matejka, M; Höschl, C

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to psychotic states has detrimental effects on the long-term outcome of schizophrenia and brain integrity. Therefore, improving relapse prevention is a key component of long-term management of schizophrenia. Previous studies using continuous monitoring of an individual's early signs of relapse and adopting preventative pharmacological interventions, when early signs are detected, showed promising clinical results in terms of relapse risk reduction. This 18-month multi-centre parallel randomized controlled, open label, trial with telemedicine relapse prevention programme ITAREPS failed to show superiority of maintenance plus prodrome-based targeted medication strategy over treatment as usual. The study, marked by low investigator's adherence, confirmed that absence of pharmacological intervention at early stage of prodrome, critically influenced the risk of relapse. This and previous randomized controlled trials with telemedicine programme ITAREPS suggested that substantial improvement in relapse prevention in schizophrenia is likely to be unattainable under current clinical settings. Future preventive strategies in schizophrenia would require rapid pharmacological intervention upon occurrence of subclinical prodromal symptoms that are undetectable under conventional outpatient practice. Studies with ITAREPS suggested that integration of telemedicine relapse prevention systems and visiting nurse service might together represent practical solution capable to address those requirements. The Information Technology Aided Relapse Prevention Programme in Schizophrenia (ITAREPS) presents a telemedicine solution for weekly monitoring and management of schizophrenia. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the programme in reducing the number of hospitalizations during the 18-month multi-centre parallel randomized controlled, open label, trial. Outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomized to the active (n = 74) or control group

  17. (11)C-choline PET/CT and multiparametric MRI in patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J R; Romera, N; Cozar, M; Soler, M; Moragas, M; Escobar, M

    2015-05-01

    To assess the diagnostic usefulness of (11)C-choline PET/CT vs. multi-parametric MRI in the prostate cancer relapse. A retrospective study of 21 patients with prostate cancer treated initially with surgery (n=12), radiotherapy (n=9). PSA levels were increased (post-surgery: .3-3.6 ng/ml; post-radiotherapy: 2.4-8.8 ng/ml). In an interval of time of 15 days all patients were underwent to: whole-body-dual-modality PET-CT carried out early after (11)C-choline (296 ± 29 MBq) injection, and multiparametric prostate MRI with paramagnetic intravenous contrast (using anatomical imaging sequences, diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging). On the basis of our results, all patients were underwent to directed diagnosis and/or clinical, analytic and imaging follow-up. In 15 patients (71.4%) both procedures showed concordant results: 4 negative and 11 positive cases [7 local recurrences, 3 isolated pelvic lymph nodes (2 infracentimetric), 1 local relapse and only one M1 bone metastases]. The results were discordant in 6 patients (28.6%): 3 local relapses in MRI with no PET significance, 1 local relapse in PET with no MRI significance. 2 bone metastases were identified with PET (out of the field-of-view of MRI). (11)C-choline PET/CT and multi-parametric MRI play a complementary role in the detection of local relapse in prostate cancer patients, with similar sensitivity for the detection of lymph involvement. Whole-body 11C-choline PET/CT technique is also useful for bone staging. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. p66 Shc and tyrosine-phosphorylated Shc in primary breast tumors identify patients likely to relapse despite tamoxifen therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frackelton, A Raymond; Lu, Li; Davol, Pamela A; Bagdasaryan, Robert; Hafer, Laurie J; Sgroi, Dennis C

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shc adapter proteins are secondary messenger proteins involved in various cellular pathways, including those mediating receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and apoptosis in response to stress. We have previously reported that high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated Shc (PY-Shc) and low levels of its inhibitory p66 Shc isoform are strongly prognostic for identifying both early node-negative and more advanced, node-positive, primary breast cancers with high risk for recurrence. Because aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases upstream of Shc signaling proteins has been implicated in resistance to tamoxifen – the most widely prescribed drug for treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer – we hypothesized that Shc isoforms may identify patients at increased risk of relapsing despite tamoxifen treatment. Methods Immunohistochemical analyses of PY-Shc and p66 Shc were performed on archival primary breast cancer tumors from a population-based cohort (60 patients, 9 relapses) and, for validation, an independent external cohort (31 patients, 13 relapses) in which all patients received tamoxifen as a sole systemic adjuvant prior to relapse. Results By univariate and multivariate analyses, the Shc proteins were very strong and independent predictors of treatment failure in both the population-based cohort (interquartile hazard ratio = 8.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8 to 38, P = 0.007) and the validating cohort (interquartile relative risk = 12.1, 95% CI 1.7 to 86, P = 0.013). Conclusion These results suggest that the levels of PY-Shc and p66 Shc proteins in primary tumors identify patients at high risk for relapsing despite treatment with tamoxifen and therefore with further validation may be useful in guiding clinicians to select alternative adjuvant treatment strategies. PMID:17196107

  19. NIDA-Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS) Relapse as a Function of Spirituality/Religiosity.

    PubMed

    Schoenthaler, Stephen J; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R; Giordano, John; Thompson, Ben; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Madigan, Margaret A; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Waite, Roger L; Gold, Mark S

    The connection between religion/spirituality and deviance, like substance abuse, was first made by Durkheim who defined socially expected behaviors as norms. He explained that deviance is due in large part to their absence (called anomie), and concluded that spirituality lowers deviance by preserving norms and social bonds. Impairments in brain reward circuitry, as observed in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), may also result in deviance and as such we wondered if stronger belief in spirituality practice and religious belief could lower relapse from drugs of abuse. The NIDA Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study data set was used to examine post hoc relapse rates among 2,947 clients who were interviewed at 12 months after intake broken down by five spirituality measures. Our main findings strongly indicate, that those with low spirituality have higher relapse rates and those with high spirituality have higher remission rates with crack use being the sole exception. We found significant differences in terms of cocaine, heroin, alcohol, and marijuana relapse as a function of strength of religious beliefs (x(2) = 15.18, p = 0.028; logistic regression = 10.65, p = 0.006); frequency of attending religious services (x(2) = 40.78, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 30.45, p < 0.0005); frequency of reading religious books (x(2) = 27.190, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 17.31, p < 0.0005); frequency of watching religious programs (x(2) = 19.02, p = 0.002; logistic regression = ns); and frequency of meditation/prayer (x(2) = 11.33, p = 0.045; logistic regression = 9.650, p = 0.002). Across the five measures of spirituality, the spiritual participants reported between 7% and 21% less alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana use than the non-spiritual subjects. However, the crack users who reported that religion was not important reported significantly less crack use than the spiritual participants. The strongest association between remission and spirituality involves

  20. NIDA-Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS) Relapse as a Function of Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    Schoenthaler, Stephen J.; Blum, Kenneth; Braverman, Eric R.; Giordano, John; Thompson, Ben; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Madigan, Margaret A.; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Waite, Roger L.; Gold, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The connection between religion/spirituality and deviance, like substance abuse, was first made by Durkheim who defined socially expected behaviors as norms. He explained that deviance is due in large part to their absence (called anomie), and concluded that spirituality lowers deviance by preserving norms and social bonds. Impairments in brain reward circuitry, as observed in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), may also result in deviance and as such we wondered if stronger belief in spirituality practice and religious belief could lower relapse from drugs of abuse. Methods The NIDA Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study data set was used to examine post hoc relapse rates among 2,947 clients who were interviewed at 12 months after intake broken down by five spirituality measures. Results Our main findings strongly indicate, that those with low spirituality have higher relapse rates and those with high spirituality have higher remission rates with crack use being the sole exception. We found significant differences in terms of cocaine, heroin, alcohol, and marijuana relapse as a function of strength of religious beliefs (x2 = 15.18, p = 0.028; logistic regression = 10.65, p = 0.006); frequency of attending religious services (x2 = 40.78, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 30.45, p < 0.0005); frequency of reading religious books (x2 = 27.190, p < 0.0005; logistic regression = 17.31, p < 0.0005); frequency of watching religious programs (x2 = 19.02, p = 0.002; logistic regression = ns); and frequency of meditation/prayer (x2 = 11.33, p = 0.045; logistic regression = 9.650, p = 0.002). Across the five measures of spirituality, the spiritual participants reported between 7% and 21% less alcohol, cocaine, heroin, and marijuana use than the non-spiritual subjects. However, the crack users who reported that religion was not important reported significantly less crack use than the spiritual participants. The strongest association between remission and spirituality

  1. Smoking relapse situations among a community-recruited sample of Spanish daily smokers.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Bárbara; López-Durán, Ana; Martínez-Vispo, Carmela; Fernández Del Río, Elena; Martínez, Úrsula; Rodríguez-Cano, Rubén; Míguez, M Carmen; Becoña, Elisardo

    2017-12-01

    Relapse is a common factor within the behavior change process. However, there is scarce and limited knowledge of smoking relapse situations in population-based samples. The aim of this study was to identify smoking relapse situations among a sample of Spanish relapsers from the general population. A sample of 775 relapsers was recruited among the general population using a snowball method. Participants completed a survey including sociodemographic, smoking-related and psychopathology variables. Smoking relapse situations were identified through specific questions assessing different aspects related to the last relapse episode. The majority of smoking relapse situations were attributed to positive affect (36.6%) and negative affect (34.3%), followed by lack of control (10.1%), smoking habit (6.7%), craving or nicotine withdrawal (6.3%), and social pressure (5.9%). Being unemployed and having a mental disorder in the past increased the likelihood of relapse in situations of negative affect. Being single and having quit smoking to save money were associated with an increased likelihood of relapse in situations of positive affect. Affect plays a significant role in smoking relapse among a community sample of unassisted Spanish smokers. Relapse may be much more of an affective and situational process than a habit, physiological or social pressure. Findings from this study may help develop tailored community smoking relapse prevention strategies or programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lord Byron's death: a case of late malarial relapse?

    PubMed

    Tsiamis, Costas; Piperaki, Evangelia Theophano; Kalantzis, George; Poulakou Rebelakou, Effie; Tompros, Nikolaos; Thalassinou, Eleni; Spilipoulou, Chara; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2015-09-01

    The study examines the pathological circumstances related to Byron's death, the primary issue being malaria. Lord Byron died during the Greek War of Independence against the Ottoman Empire, in Messolonghi on 19 April 1824. Byron's medical profile consists of recurrent onsets of fever, which gave rise to the issue of malaria relapses. According to Byron's letters he reported crises of fever in Greece (1810), Malta (1811), Italy (1817-1819) and England. Evidence from Byron's autopsy, specifically the absence of hepatosplenomegaly, does not support a hypothetical diagnosis of malaria. Nonetheless, the relapsing fevers cannot be ignored and the same applies to the possibility of malaria relapse or re-infection in line with the endemic nature of the Messolonghi area. Our research on the chronologies of Byron's reported fevers found that new attacks occurred at intervals of 540 days on average. Moreover, the most outstanding feature of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale is their ability to form dormant forms of hypnozoites in the liver which, when reactivated (110-777 days), cause true relapses of clinical disease. Of course, an ex post facto diagnosis is under debate, because the diagnosis is not clinical but microscopic. Byron's example raises alarm over a current medical problem, i.e. the diagnosis of unexplained fevers, and the need for a detailed travel or immigration history, which will include malaria in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Social Resource Characteristics and Adolescent Substance Abuse Relapse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vik, Peter W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined social resource network characteristics of adolescent substance abusers (n=19). Perceived similarity to one's social network emerged as important moderator of whether social network provided support to remain abstinent or elevated risk for relapse. Increased perceived support predicted continued posttreatment abstinence when recovering…

  4. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy associated with a relapsing multifocal sensory neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P K; Ormerod, I E

    1993-01-01

    A family with neuralgic amyotrophy (idiopathic brachial plexus neuropathy) associated with a multifocal sensory neuropathy is described. Four members over two generations were affected by neuralgic amyotrophy, inherited as an apparent autosomal dominant trait; two also had a multifocal relapsing sensory neuropathy with the clinical features of Wartenberg's migrant neuropathy. PMID:8429311

  5. Preventing Relapse to Cigarette Smoking by Behavioral Skill Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Sharon M.; And Others

    Although smoking cessation techniques have been effective, few programs have long term results. To investigate the effectiveness of a tobacco dependence relapse prevention program, 123 adult smokers (51 male, 72 female) voluntarily participated in one of four small group treatment conditions (6 or 30 second aversive smoking plus skill training, or…

  6. [Risk factors for persistent and relapsed childhood-onset asthma].

    PubMed

    Tsukioka, Kazuharu; Toyabe, Shin-ichi; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors responsible for childhood-onset persistent asthma and childhood-onset asthma relapsing in adulthood. We compared a number of potential risk factors for asthma among 608 patients with childhood-onset persistent asthma (onset at 15 years of age or younger) and 286 patients with childhood-onset asthma (onset at 20 years or younger) that had relapsed after a period of remission longer than 2 years. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the factors associated with childhood-onset persistent asthma were a past or present history of allergic rhinitis (p=0.001) and high serum total IgE concentration (> or =300 IU/ml; p=0.007). The factors associated with relapse of childhood-onset asthma were female sex (p=0.001), younger onset age (p=0.036), and smoking (current or former; p<0.001). Our findings indicate that a past or present history of allergic rhinitis and high serum IgE level are significant risk factors for childhood-onset persistent asthma, and that female sex and a history of smoking are risk factors for relapse of childhood-onset asthma. Fortunately, exposure to tobacco smoke is a controllable risk factor.

  7. Alcohol relapses associated with September 11, 2001: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zywiak, William H; Stout, Robert L; Trefry, Winston B; LaGrutta, Joy E; Lawson, Constance C; Khan, Nazia; Swift, Robert M; Schneider, Robert J

    2003-06-01

    The timing of the terrible events of September 11, 2001 (9-11), and an ongoing randomized clinical trial of case monitoring have allowed a prospective examination of the effects of trauma upon the relapse rates of a group of clients following alcohol detoxification. The clients studied in this report were enrolled in case monitoring prior to 9-11. Case monitoring consists of telephone contacts on a tapering schedule designed to help clients avoid relapses, reduce the severity of relapses that do occur, and get clients back into treatment, at less intense levels, than would occur without case monitoring. For those clients completing a telephone contact before and a telephone contact after 9-11, none of the clients drank between detox discharge and 9-11, while 42% drank by the first telephone contact after 9-11. Data from another study were analyzed and results counter the rival hypothesis that the case monitoring study results reflect an annual seasonal effect. Results suggest that terrorist events may lead to a greater likelihood of relapse for those in alcohol recovery. These effects may be ameliorated by public education and outreach.

  8. Advances in the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is diagnosed in 20,000 men and women annually in North America and Europe. Despite treatment advancements for HL resulting in an overall survival rate of 80%, patients with advanced stage disease continue to have suboptimal outcomes, with relapse rates of 30%–40%. An additional 10%–15% of patients present with primary refractory disease. For patients who relapse after initial treatment, salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant in those with chemotherapy-sensitive disease is the standard of care. Patients who relapse after second-line therapy have a median survival time in the range of 6–36 months, and the optimal management of these patients remains unclear. Unfortunately, there have been no new agents approved for relapsed HL treatment since the 1970s. Consequently, clinical decision making in this population is difficult. Recently however, several agents have emerged that have shown clinical promise in this poor-risk population. This review discusses the management of these patients and also discusses several newer agents showing clinical promise in the treatment of HL. PMID:22387318

  9. Schizophrenia relapse, patient considerations, and potential role of lurasidone

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    When treating persons with schizophrenia, delaying time to relapse is a main goal. Antipsychotic medication has been the primary treatment approach, and there are a variety of different choices available. Lurasidone is a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agent that is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression. Three long-term studies of lurasidone have examined time to relapse in persons with schizophrenia, including a classic placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal study and two 12-month active comparator studies (vs risperidone and vs quetiapine extended-release). Lurasidone 40–80 mg/d evidenced superiority over placebo (number needed to treat [NNT] vs placebo for relapse, 9). Lurasidone 40–160 mg/d was noninferior to quetiapine extended-release 200–800 mg/d on the outcome of relapse, and was superior on the outcome of avoidance of hospitalization (NNT 8) and the outcome of remission (NNT 7). Lurasidone demonstrated a lower risk for long-term weight gain than the active comparators. Demonstrated differences in tolerability profiles among the different choices of antipsychotics make it possible to attempt to match up an individual patient to the best choice for such patient based on past history of tolerability, comorbidities, and personal preferences, potentially improving adherence. PMID:27563237

  10. A Qualitative Exploration of Drug Abuse Relapse Following Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Manirul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Alam, Faruq; Rabbani, Golam

    2012-01-01

    Drug use is an alarming issue in Bangladesh. Most drug users return to drugs after treatment, in what becomes a vicious cycle of treatment and relapse. This study explored why they return and what pathways they follow. We carried out 5 key informant interviews, 10 in-depth interviews, 2 focus group discussions, 3 case studies, 8 observations, and…

  11. Relapsing fever group Borrelia in Southern California rodents.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Nathan C; Teglas, Mike B

    2014-09-01

    Wild rodent reservoir host species were surveyed prospectively for infection with Borrelia hermsii, the causative agent of tick-borne relapsing fever in the western United States. Trapping occurred during the summer of 2009-2012 at field sites surrounding Big Bear Lake, CA, a region where human infection has been reported for many years. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we tested 207 rodents from 11 species and found chipmunks (Tamias spp.) and a woodrat (Neotoma macrotis) infected. Chipmunks represented the majority of captures at these sites. Sixteen of the 207 (7.7%; CI = 4.6-12.4) animals were qPCR-positive for Borrelia spp. associated with relapsing fever, and of those, we obtained bacterial DNA sequences from eight. The phylogram made from these sequences depict a clear association with B. hermsii genomic group I. In addition, we identified an infection with Borrelia coriaceae in a Tamias merriami, a potentially nonpathogenic member of the tick-borne relapsing fever group. Our findings support the hypothesis that chipmunk species play an important role in the maintenance of Borrelia species that cause tick-borne relapsing fever in the western United States, and therefore the risk of infection to people.

  12. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  13. An Ecological Momentary Assessment of Relapse Crises in Dieting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carels, Robert A.; Douglass, Olivia M.; Cacciapaglia, Holly M.; O'Brien, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the research on relapse crises in dieting has focused on isolated lapse events and relied heavily on retrospective self-report data. The present study sought to overcome these limitations by using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) techniques to examine situations of dietary temptation and lapse with a sample of obese, formerly…

  14. A Qualitative Exploration of Drug Abuse Relapse Following Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Manirul; Hashizume, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Alam, Faruq; Rabbani, Golam

    2012-01-01

    Drug use is an alarming issue in Bangladesh. Most drug users return to drugs after treatment, in what becomes a vicious cycle of treatment and relapse. This study explored why they return and what pathways they follow. We carried out 5 key informant interviews, 10 in-depth interviews, 2 focus group discussions, 3 case studies, 8 observations, and…

  15. Couples Relapse Prevention Sessions as a Maintenance Strategy for Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutter, Henry S. G.; And Others

    This study evaluated whether alcoholics who receive relapse prevention (RP) sessions in the year after a short-term behavioral marital therapy (BMT) do better at long-term follow-up than do those not receiving the additional RP. Sixty couples with an alcoholic husband, after participating in 10 weekly BMT couples group sessions, were assigned…

  16. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma with relapses in the lacrimal glands

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, Rita; Proença, Helena; Pinto, Filomena; Fonseca, Ana; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report an unusual case of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with repeated relapse in the lacrimal glands, in spite of complete remission for several years after treatment. Methods: A 78-year-old male with small lymphocytic B cell NHL, stage IV disease (lung invasion), was submitted to surgery and chemotherapy in 2001, with complete remission of the disease. In 2003 he developed a nodular lesion in the right lacrimal fossa. Pathology results revealed a local relapse of NHL. Radiation and chemotherapy were initiated and complete remission was again achieved. In 2012 the patient developed a new nodular lesion located in the left lacrimal fossa, resulting in diplopia, ptosis and proptosis of the left eye. Orbital computerized tomography (CT), ocular ultrasound and incisional biopsy were performed. Results: Orbital CT revealed a lesion infiltrating the left lacrimal gland and encircling the globe. Biopsy results confirmed a local relapse of B cell NHL. The patient was submitted to local radiation therapy with progressive resolution of ptosis, proptosis and diplopia. Response to treatment was monitored with ocular ultrasound. Conclusions: Patients with NHL diagnosis should be immediately investigated if ophthalmic or orbital symptoms develop. NHL extension to the orbit and adnexa is infrequent (5% of NHL cases) but may occur at any stage of the disease, including as a relapse site. In such cases, radiation and chemotherapy achieve good results, inducing long periods of remission. PMID:27625948

  17. Syndrome In Question*

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Mendes; Gaspardo, Daniela Barros Cortez; Cortez, Tatiana Mimura; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a male 40-year-old patient with established diagnosis of Behçet's disease which had evolved to recurrent bilateral auricular polychondritis crises. MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) is rare and groups together patients with this clinical picture without necessarily fulfilling the clinical criteria for Behçet's disease or relapsing polychondritis, demonstrating an independent disorder. PMID:24626673

  18. Doctors’ views of disulfiram and their response to relapse in alcohol-dependent patients, Free State, 2009

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Disulfiram is the oldest and best known drug to prevent relapse after detoxification from alcohol. Effective use of the drug is dependent on stringent monitoring and high levels of external motivation. Doctors’ perceptions about the drug have not been investigated extensively. Aim We investigated the perceptions and practices of doctors involved in relapse prevention in alcoholics with regard to disulfiram and their response to relapse. Setting The study population consisted of 60 doctors from the Free State Province, involved in the follow-up of alcoholics across various work settings. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study design was used, and data collection involved the use of a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Quantitative results are presented in figures and percentages to provide a background for the qualitative findings that are clustered in themes. Results A quarter of participants did not prescribe disulfiram, another quarter prescribed disulfiram routinely after detoxification, and half of them prescribed it for selected cases only. Subject to affordability, selection of disulfiram was mainly determined by the perceived level of the patient’s motivation. External motivation sometimes took the form of threats of bodily harm or death caused by drinking. Some participants regarded relapse as confirmation of poor motivation and even a valid reason for terminating the doctor-patient relationship. Conclusion Doctors perceive disulfiram as a psychological tool to induce motivation through creating fear of drinking. Failure and success are perceived as related to the level of motivation. These perceptions could be unfair as biological factors in inter-patient variability in response are ignored. PMID:27380787

  19. Extended-Release Naltrexone to Prevent Opioid Relapse in Criminal Justice Offenders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Boney, Tamara Y; Hoskinson, Randall A; Wilson, Donna; McDonald, Ryan; Rotrosen, John; Gourevitch, Marc N; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T; Bonnie, Richard J; Cornish, James W; Murphy, Sean M; O'Brien, Charles P

    2016-03-31

    Extended-release naltrexone, a sustained-release monthly injectable formulation of the full mu-opioid receptor antagonist, is effective for the prevention of relapse to opioid dependence. Data supporting its effectiveness in U.S. criminal justice populations are limited. In this five-site, open-label, randomized trial, we compared a 24-week course of extended-release naltrexone (Vivitrol) with usual treatment, consisting of brief counseling and referrals for community treatment programs, for the prevention of opioid relapse among adult criminal justice offenders (i.e., persons involved in the U.S. criminal justice system) who had a history of opioid dependence and a preference for opioid-free rather than opioid maintenance treatments and who were abstinent from opioids at the time of randomization. The primary outcome was the time to an opioid-relapse event, which was defined as 10 or more days of opioid use in a 28-day period as assessed by self-report or by testing of urine samples obtained every 2 weeks; a positive or missing sample was computed as 5 days of opioid use. Post-treatment follow-up occurred at weeks 27, 52, and 78. A total of 153 participants were assigned to extended-release naltrexone and 155 to usual treatment. During the 24-week treatment phase, participants assigned to extended-release naltrexone had a longer median time to relapse than did those assigned to usual treatment (10.5 vs. 5.0 weeks, P<0.001; hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.68), a lower rate of relapse (43% vs. 64% of participants, P<0.001; odds ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.65), and a higher rate of opioid-negative urine samples (74% vs. 56%, P<0.001; odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.54). At week 78 (approximately 1 year after the end of the treatment phase), rates of opioid-negative urine samples were equal (46% in each group, P=0.91). The rates of other prespecified secondary outcome measures--self-reported cocaine, alcohol, and intravenous drug use

  20. Extended-Release Naltrexone to Prevent Opioid Relapse in Criminal Justice Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua D.; Friedmann, Peter D.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Nunes, Edward V.; Boney, Tamara Y.; Hoskinson, Randall A.; Wilson, Donna; McDonald, Ryan; Rotrosen, John; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Gordon, Michael; Fishman, Marc; Chen, Donna T.; Bonnie, Richard J.; Cornish, James W.; Murphy, Sean M.; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extended-release naltrexone, a sustained-release monthly injectable formulation of the full mu-opioid receptor antagonist, is effective for the prevention of relapse to opioid dependence. Data supporting its effectiveness in U.S. criminal justice populations are limited. METHODS In this five-site, open-label, randomized trial, we compared a 24-week course of extended-release naltrexone (Vivitrol) with usual treatment, consisting of brief counseling and referrals for community treatment programs, for the prevention of opioid relapse among adult criminal justice offenders (i.e., persons involved in the U.S. criminal justice system) who had a history of opioid dependence and a preference for opioid-free rather than opioid maintenance treatments and who were abstinent from opioids at the time of randomization. The primary outcome was the time to an opioid-relapse event, which was defined as 10 or more days of opioid use in a 28-day period as assessed by self-report or by testing of urine samples obtained every 2 weeks; a positive or missing sample was computed as 5 days of opioid use. Post-treatment follow-up occurred at weeks 27, 52, and 78. RESULTS A total of 153 participants were assigned to extended-release naltrexone and 155 to usual treatment. During the 24-week treatment phase, participants assigned to extended-release naltrexone had a longer median time to relapse than did those assigned to usual treatment (10.5 vs. 5.0 weeks, P<0.001; hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.68), a lower rate of relapse (43% vs. 64% of participants, P<0.001; odds ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.28 to 0.65), and a higher rate of opioid-negative urine samples (74% vs. 56%, P<0.001; odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.54). At week 78 (approximately 1 year after the end of the treatment phase), rates of opioid-negative urine samples were equal (46% in each group, P = 0.91). The rates of other prespecified secondary outcome measures — self-reported cocaine

  1. Richter syndrome and brain involvement: low-grade lymphoma relapsing as cerebral high-grade lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Stuplich, Moritz; Mayer, Karin; Kim, Young; Thanendrarajan, Sharmilan; Simon, Matthias; Schäfer, Niklas; Glas, Martin; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H; Herrlinger, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Richter syndrome (RS) describes the development of high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) from low-grade NHL. RS isolated to the brain is very rare and has a poor prognosis. We describe the cases of high-grade large B-cell diffuse NHL in a 56-year-old male with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and in a 71-year-old female with previously unknown low-grade NHL, both with initial appearance of neurological symptoms. This report extends the literature of central nervous system RS and particularly highlights the importance of a thorough diagnostic evaluation of patients with low-grade NHL presenting with neurological symptoms. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Enrichment of Targetable Mutations in the Relapsed Neuroblastoma Genome

    PubMed Central

    Ostrovnaya, Irina; Rubnitz, Kaitlyn R.; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Mossé, Yael P.; Maris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is characterized by a relative paucity of recurrent somatic mutations at diagnosis. However, recent studies have shown that the mutational burden increases at relapse, likely as a result of clonal evolution of mutation-carrying cells during primary treatment. To inform the development of personalized therapies, we sought to further define the frequency of potentially actionable mutations in neuroblastoma, both at diagnosis and after chemotherapy. We performed a retrospective study to determine mutation frequency, the only inclusion criterion being availability of cancer gene panel sequencing data from Foundation Medicine. We analyzed 151 neuroblastoma tumor samples: 44 obtained at diagnosis, 42 at second look surgery or biopsy for stable disease after chemotherapy, and 59 at relapse (6 were obtained at unknown time points). Nine patients had multiple tumor biopsies. ALK was the most commonly mutated gene in this cohort, and we observed a higher frequency of suspected oncogenic ALK mutations in relapsed disease than at diagnosis. Patients with relapsed disease had, on average, a greater number of mutations reported to be recurrent in cancer, and a greater number of mutations in genes that are potentially targetable with available therapeutics. We also observed an enrichment of reported recurrent RAS/MAPK pathway mutations in tumors obtained after chemotherapy. Our data support recent evidence suggesting that neuroblastomas undergo substantial mutational evolution during therapy, and that relapsed disease is more likely to be driven by a targetable oncogenic pathway, highlighting that it is critical to base treatment decisions on the molecular profile of the tumor at the time of treatment. However, it will be necessary to conduct prospective clinical trials that match sequencing results to targeted therapeutic intervention to determine if cancer genomic profiling improves patient outcomes. PMID:27997549

  3. Bone health in patients with multiple sclerosis relapses.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Olwen; Zandi, Michael S; Lindenberg, Nitzan; Murphy, Elaine; Chataway, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the bone health and vitamin D levels of a cohort of patients with relapses of multiple sclerosis (MS) and to propose an algorithm for the management of bone health in this patient group. We prospectively studied 56 consecutive patients from our acute relapse clinic. 3 patients were excluded from analysis as they were not deemed to have experienced an acute MS relapse. Bone health was assessed with vitamin D levels and Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning (10 patients failed to attend for DEXA). Statistical analyses were used to compare groups and identify predictive variables. A review of the literature led to a proposed management protocol. Pre-relapse the baseline EDSS was ≤6.5 in all subjects, and <4.0 in the majority (66%). Most received corticosteroids. 51% had low bone mineral density (BMD) as defined by a T-score less than -1.0 on DEXA scanning. Three were osteoporotic (T-score less than -2.5). Thirty one of fifty (62%) subjects were Vitamin D deficient (25(OH)D less than 50nmol/L). A range of variables, including previous corticosteroid usage, were not significantly predictive of reduced BMD. There was a high frequency of both low BMD and Vitamin D deficiency in this cohort of relatively young and largely ambulatory patients experiencing MS relapses. Current tools, such as the WHO FRAX algorithm, are inadequate in assessing bone status and fracture risk in this patient group, predominantly as they are focused on older age groups. We propose a simple clinical management algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  5. African relapsing Fever borreliae genomospecies revealed by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Elbir, Haitham; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Pontarotti, Pierre; Yoosuf, Niyaz; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae are vector-borne bacteria responsible for febrile infection in humans in North America, Africa, Asia, and in the Iberian Peninsula in Europe. Relapsing fever borreliae are phylogenetically closely related, yet they differ in pathogenicity and vectors. Their long-term taxonomy, based on geography and vector grouping, needs to be re-apprised in a genomic context. We therefore embarked into genomic analyses of relapsing fever borreliae, focusing on species found in Africa. Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses group Old World Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia hispanica, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis in one clade, and New World Borrelia turicatae and Borrelia hermsii in a second clade. Accordingly, average nucleotide identity is 99% among B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, and B. crocidurae and 96% between latter borreliae and B. hispanica while the similarity is 86% between Old World and New World borreliae. Comparative genomics indicates that the Old World relapsing fever B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, B. crocidurae, and B. hispanica have a 2,514-gene pan genome and a 933-gene core genome that includes 788 chromosomal and 145 plasmidic genes. Analyzing the role that natural selection has played in the evolution of Old World borreliae species revealed that 55 loci were under positive diversifying selection, including loci coding for membrane, flagellar, and chemotaxis proteins, three categories associated with adaption to specific niches. Genomic analyses led to a reappraisal of the taxonomy of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa. These analyses suggest that B. crocidurae, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis are ecotypes of a unique genomospecies, while B. hispanica is a distinct species.

  6. African Relapsing Fever Borreliae Genomospecies Revealed by Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Pontarotti, Pierre; Yoosuf, Niyaz; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Relapsing fever borreliae are vector-borne bacteria responsible for febrile infection in humans in North America, Africa, Asia, and in the Iberian Peninsula in Europe. Relapsing fever borreliae are phylogenetically closely related, yet they differ in pathogenicity and vectors. Their long-term taxonomy, based on geography and vector grouping, needs to be re-apprised in a genomic context. We therefore embarked into genomic analyses of relapsing fever borreliae, focusing on species found in Africa. Results: Genome-wide phylogenetic analyses group Old World Borrelia crocidurae, Borrelia hispanica, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis in one clade, and New World Borrelia turicatae and Borrelia hermsii in a second clade. Accordingly, average nucleotide identity is 99% among B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, and B. crocidurae and 96% between latter borreliae and B. hispanica while the similarity is 86% between Old World and New World borreliae. Comparative genomics indicates that the Old World relapsing fever B. duttonii, B. recurrentis, B. crocidurae, and B. hispanica have a 2,514-gene pan genome and a 933-gene core genome that includes 788 chromosomal and 145 plasmidic genes. Analyzing the role that natural selection has played in the evolution of Old World borreliae species revealed that 55 loci were under positive diversifying selection, including loci coding for membrane, flagellar, and chemotaxis proteins, three categories associated with adaption to specific niches. Conclusion: Genomic analyses led to a reappraisal of the taxonomy of relapsing fever borreliae in Africa. These analyses suggest that B. crocidurae, B. duttonii, and B. recurrentis are ecotypes of a unique genomospecies, while B. hispanica is a distinct species. PMID:25229054

  7. Relapsing Whipple's disease presenting with hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Brändle, M; Ammann, P; Spinas, G A; Dutly, F; Galeazzi, R L; Schmid, C; Altwegg, M

    1999-03-01

    A 44-year-old man with a history of Whipple's disease 8 years ago presented with recurrent grand mal seizures and signs of hypopituitarism on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a hypothalamic lesion of 1 cm diameter in the region of the rostral infundibulum. Hypopituitarism was confirmed by low levels of serum cortisol, free testosterone and free thyroxine without an elevated TSH. Whipple encephalitis with hypothalamic involvement was suggested and verified by positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Tropheryma whippelii in the cerebrospinal fluid. PCR for T. whippelii has become an important diagnostic tool for establishing the diagnosis of Whipple's disease especially in patients with unusual presentations and if the diagnosis cannot be confirmed histologically. Whipple's disease should be included in the differential diagnosis in hypopituitarism caused by infectious disease.

  8. Relapse to smoking during unaided cessation: clinical, cognitive and motivational predictors.

    PubMed

    Powell, Jane; Dawkins, Lynne; West, Robert; Powell, John; Pickering, Alan

    2010-12-01

    Neurobiological models of addiction suggest that abnormalities of brain reward circuitry distort salience attribution and inhibitory control processes, which in turn contribute to high relapse rates. The aim of this study is to determine whether impairments of salience attribution and inhibitory control predict relapse in a pharmacologically unaided attempt at smoking cessation. One hundred forty one smokers were assessed on indices of nicotine consumption/dependence (e.g. The Fagerström Test of Nicotine Dependence, cigarettes per day, salivary cotinine) and three trait impulsivity measures. After overnight abstinence, they completed experimental tests of cue reactivity, attentional bias to smoking cues, response to financial reward, motor impulsiveness and response inhibition (antisaccades). They then started a quit attempt with follow-up after 7 days, 1 month and 3 months; abstinence was verified via salivary cotinine levels ≤20 ng/ml. Relapse rates at each point were 52.5%, 64% and 76.3%. The strongest predictor was pre-cessation salivary cotinine; other smoking/dependence indices did not explain additional outcome variance and neither did trait impulsivity. All experimental indices except responsivity to financial reward significantly predicted a 1-week outcome. Salivary cotinine, attentional bias to smoking cues and antisaccade errors explained unique as well as shared variance. At 1 and 3 months, salivary cotinine, motor impulsiveness and cue reactivity were all individually predictive; the effects of salivary cotinine and motor impulsiveness were additive. These data provide some support for the involvement of abnormal cognitive and motivational processes in sustaining smoking dependence and suggest that they might be a focus of interventions, especially in the early stages of cessation.

  9. Allogeneic Transplantation for Relapsed Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Robert F; Bachanova, Veronika; D'Souza, Anita; Woo-Ahn, Kwang; Martens, Michael; Huang, Jiaxing; Al-Homsi, A Samer; Chhabra, Saurabh; Copelan, Edward; Diaz, Miguel-Angel; Freytes, Cesar O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Lazarus, Hillard M; Marks, David I; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F; Saad, Ayman; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H; Yared, Jean; Mark, Tomer; Nieto, Yago; Hari, Parameswaran

    2017-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (WM/LPL) is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic proliferation, lymph node and spleen enlargement, bone marrow involvement, and IgM production. Treatment varies based on the extent and biology of disease. In some patients, the use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) may have curative potential. We evaluated long-term outcomes of 144 patients who received adult alloHCT for WM/LPL. Data were obtained from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database (2001 to 2013). Patients received myeloablative(n = 67) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC; n = 67). Median age at alloHCT was 53 years, and median time from diagnosis to transplantation was 41 months. Thirteen percent (n = 18) failed prior autologous HCT. About half (n = 82, 57%) had chemosensitive disease at the time of transplantation, whereas 22% had progressive disease. Rates of progression-free survival, overall survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 5 years were 46%, 52%, 24%, and 30%, respectively. Patients with chemosensitive disease and better pretransplant disease status experienced significantly superior overall survival. There were no significant differences in progression-free survival based on conditioning (myeloablative, 50%, versus RIC, 41%) or graft source. Conditioning intensity did not impact treatment-related mortality or relapse. The most common causes of death were primary disease and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). AlloHCT yielded durable survival in select patients with WM/LPL. Strategies to reduce mortality from GVHD and post-transplant relapse are necessary to improve this approach.

  10. Neural response to catecholamine depletion in remitted bulimia nervosa: Relation to depression and relapse.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie Verena; Mihov, Yoan; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Hasler, Gregor

    2017-07-01

    Bulimia nervosa has been associated with a dysregulated catecholamine system. Nevertheless, the influence of this dysregulation on bulimic symptoms, on neural activity, and on the course of the illness is not clear yet. An instructive paradigm for directly investigating the relationship between catecholaminergic functioning and bulimia nervosa has involved the behavioral and neural responses to experimental catecholamine depletion. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrate of catecholaminergic dysfunction in bulimia nervosa and its relationship to relapse. In a randomized, double-blind and crossover study design, catecholamine depletion was achieved by using the oral administration of alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (AMPT) over 24 h in 18 remitted bulimic (rBN) and 22 healthy (HC) female participants. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured using a pseudo continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) sequence. In a follow-up telephone interview, bulimic relapse was assessed. Following AMPT, rBN participants revealed an increased vigor reduction and CBF decreases in the pallidum and posterior midcingulate cortex (pMCC) relative to HC participants showing no CBF changes in these regions. These results indicated that the pallidum and the pMCC are the functional neural correlates of the dysregulated catecholamine system in bulimia nervosa. Bulimic relapse was associated with increased depressive symptoms and CBF reduction in the hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus following catecholamine depletion. AMPT-induced increased CBF in this region predicted staying in remission. These findings demonstrated the importance of depressive symptoms and the stress system in the course of bulimia nervosa. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Local involvement of the optic nerve by acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bernardczyk-Meller, Jadwiga; Stefańska, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The leucemias quite commonly involve the eyes and adnexa. In some cases it causes visual complants. Both, the anterior chamber of the eye and the posterior portion of the globe may sites of acute or chronic leukemia and leucemic relapse. We report an unique case of a 14 years old leucemic patient who suffered visual loss and papilloedema, due to a unilateral local involvement within optic nerve, during second relapse of acute lymphocytic leuemia. In spite of typical treatment of main disease, the boy had died. The authors present typical ophthalmic features of the leucemia, too.

  12. Central nervous system relapse of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the rituximab era: results of the UK NCRI R-CHOP-14 versus 21 trial.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M; Counsell, N; Cunningham, D; Chadwick, N; Lawrie, A; Hawkes, E A; McMillan, A; Ardeshna, K M; Jack, A; Smith, P; Mouncey, P; Pocock, C; Radford, J A; Davies, J; Turner, D; Kruger, A; Johnson, P; Gambell, J; Linch, D

    2017-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is associated with a dismal prognosis. Here, we report an analysis of CNS relapse for patients treated within the UK NCRI phase III R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) 14 versus 21 randomised trial. The R-CHOP 14 versus 21 trial compared R-CHOP administered two- versus three weekly in previously untreated patients aged ≥18 years with bulky stage I-IV DLBCL (n = 1080). Details of CNS prophylaxis were retrospectively collected from participating sites. The incidence and risk factors for CNS relapse including application of the CNS-IPI were evaluated. 177/984 patients (18.0%) received prophylaxis (intrathecal (IT) methotrexate (MTX) n = 163, intravenous (IV) MTX n = 2, prophylaxis type unknown n = 11 and IT MTX and cytarabine n = 1). At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 21 cases of CNS relapse (isolated n = 11, with systemic relapse n = 10) were observed, with a cumulative incidence of 1.9%. For patients selected to receive prophylaxis, the incidence was 2.8%. Relapses predominantly involved the brain parenchyma (81.0%) and isolated leptomeningeal involvement was rare (14.3%). Univariable analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CNS relapse: performance status 2, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, IPI, >1 extranodal site of disease and presence of a 'high-risk' extranodal site. Due to the low number of events no factor remained significant in multivariate analysis. Application of the CNS-IPI revealed a high-risk group (4-6 risk factors) with a 2- and 5-year incidence of CNS relapse of 5.2% and 6.8%, respectively. Despite very limited use of IV MTX as prophylaxis, the incidence of CNS relapse following R-CHOP was very low (1.9%) confirming the reduced incidence in the rituximab era. The CNS-IPI identified patients at highest risk for CNS recurrence. ISCRTN number 16017947 (R-CHOP14v21); EudraCT number

  13. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  14. On Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Michael B.

    Involvement Ratings In Settings (IRIS), a multi-dimensional non-verbal scale of involvement adaptable to a time-sampling method of data collection, was constructed with the aid of the videotapes of second-grade Follow Through classrooms made by CCEP. Scales were defined through observations of involved and alienated behavior, and the IRIS was…

  15. Daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion for extramedullary relapse of acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Marco; Caocci, Giovanni; Vacca, Adriana; Piras, Eugenia; Orrù, Federica; La Nasa, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare tumor consisting of myeloid blasts that involve anatomic sites outside the bone marrow. Fatal prognosis is inevitable in patients with extramedullary relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and no standard treatments are available yet. We report the first case of extramedullary relapse after HSCT treated with a combination of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine (DAC) regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). This treatment induced a new and durable remission in our patient. The favorable toxicity profile and the reduced cost make this combination worthy of further investigations.

  16. External auditory canal and middle ear relapse of acute promyelocytic leukemia treated with arsenic trioxide: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lafayette, Thereza Christina Sampaio; Coser, Virginia Maria; Brûlé, Alice Odette; Coser, Pedro Luis; Pereira, Waldir Veiga

    2010-04-01

    Extramedullary involvement occurs infrequently in acute promyelocytic leukemia and is said to be more common after treatment with all-trans retinoic acid. We describe a 9-year-old girl who had an isolated external auditory canal and middle ear relapse after treatment with all-trans retinoic acid and chemotherapy. A patient with cytogenetically and molecularly confirmed acute promyelocytic leukemia developed isolated extramedullary relapse in the auditory canal and middle ear 4 years and 9 months after initial diagnosis, while in hematologic and molecular remission, successfully treated with arsenic trioxide alone.

  17. Sex as a determinant of relapse incidence and progressive course of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Vivek, Vino; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'maison, Francois; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Iuliano, Gerardo; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Amato, Maria Pia; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Fiol, Marcela; Spitaleri, Daniele La; Cristiano, Edgardo; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Herbert, Joseph; Vucic, Steve; Needham, Merilee; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Rio, Maria Edite; Barnett, Michael; Flechter, Shlomo; Moore, Fraser; Singhal, Bhim; Bacile, Elizabeth Alejandra; Saladino, Maria Laura; Shaw, Cameron; Skromne, Eli; Poehlau, Dieter; Vella, Norbert; Spelman, Timothy; Liew, Danny; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of multiple sclerosis relapses; assess the relationship between sex and primary progressive disease course; and compare effects of age and disease duration on relapse incidence. Annualized relapse rates were calculated using the MSBase registry. Patients with incomplete data or <1 year of follow-up were excluded. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis were only included in the sex ratio analysis. Relapse incidences over 40 years of multiple sclerosis or 70 years of age were compared between females and males with Andersen-Gill and Tweedie models. Female-to-male ratios stratified by annual relapse count were evaluated across disease duration and patient age and compared between relapse-onset and primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The study cohort consisted of 11 570 eligible patients with relapse-onset and 881 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Among the relapse-onset patients (82 552 patient-years), 48,362 relapses were recorded. Relapse frequency was 17.7% higher in females compared with males. Within the initial 5 years, the female-to-male ratio increased from 2.3:1 to 3.3:1 in patients with 0 versus ≥4 relapses per year, respectively. The magnitude of this sex effect increased at longer disease duration and older age (P < 10(-12)). However, the female-to-male ratio in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis and zero relapses in any given year was double that of the patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Patient age was a more important determinant of decline in relapse incidence than disease duration (P < 10(-12)). Females are predisposed to higher relapse activity than males. However, this difference does not explain the markedly lower female-to-male sex ratio in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Decline in relapse activity over time is more closely related to patient age than disease duration.

  18. Relapsed neuroblastomas show frequent RAS-MAPK pathway mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The majority of patients with neuroblastoma have tumors that initially respond to chemotherapy, but a large proportion will experience therapy-resistant relapses. The molecular basis of this aggressive phenotype is unknown. Whole-genome sequencing of 23 paired diagnostic and relapse neuroblastomas showed clonal evolution from the diagnostic tumor, with a median of 29 somatic mutations unique to the relapse sample. Eighteen of the 23 relapse tumors (78%) showed mutations predicted to activate the RAS-MAPK pathway.

  19. A comparison of patients relapsing to addictive drug use with non-relapsing patients following residential addiction treatment in Antigua.

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Josiah-Martin, J A; Kosakoski, J; Norton, K; Sinnott, T

    2005-06-01

    The outcome of a 29-day residential addiction treatment programme for persons from Antigua and Barbuda with addiction to drugs or alcohol was assessed. All 100 patients entering the drug and alcohol treatment programme at Crossroads Centre Antigua between November 1998 and October 2002 were included. All patients were assessed with regards to drug or alcohol use or abstinence in November 2002 using telephone and mail follow-up as well as informal follow-up with families and other community contacts. Crossroads Centre Antigua is a 35 bed, 29-day residential treatment centre for drug and alcohol addiction serving patients from developed countries (85%) and from the Caribbean region (15%). Patients records were also reviewed to obtain age, gender, ethnicity, drug of choice, years of problematic use, completion of the 29 day programme, family member participation at Crossroads Centre Antigua (a four-day programme) and acceptance of halfway house placement. Of the 100 Antiguan patients admitted, 46 (46%) were abstinent (non-relapsers) at average 20.7+/-14.7 months after treatment. Abstinence did not have to be continuous. Forty-nine were known to be using drug or alcohol (49%) and five (5%) were lost to follow-up and considered to be using drugs (relapsers). Age (37.5 vs 41.1 years), gender (28% vs 22% female), ethnicity (87% vs 87% Afro-Caribbean), years of harmful use (12.7 vs 12.5 years) did not differ significantly between relapsers and non-relapsers. Crack cocaine use (67% vs 65%) and alcohol use (26% vs 31%) as primary addiction did not differ significantly between relapsers and non-relapsers. Relapsers were significantly less likely to complete the 29- day programme (81% vs 100%, p < 0.01), have family members participate at Crossroads (32% vs 54%, p < 0.05) or accept halfway house placement (4% vs 54%, p < 0.001). In conclusion, abstinence was achieved in 46% of those entering treatment, in 51% completing treatment, in 60% whose families participated and in 92

  20. Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse prevention, based on the cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, has become an adjunct to the treatment of numerous psychological problems, including (but not limited to) substance abuse, depression, sexual offending, and schizophrenia. This article provides an overview of the efficacy and effectiveness of relapse prevention in the…

  1. Relapse Prevention for Alcohol and Drug Problems: That Was Zen, This Is Tao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Marlatt, Alan G.

    2004-01-01

    Relapse prevention, based on the cognitive-behavioral model of relapse, has become an adjunct to the treatment of numerous psychological problems, including (but not limited to) substance abuse, depression, sexual offending, and schizophrenia. This article provides an overview of the efficacy and effectiveness of relapse prevention in the…

  2. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  3. Comparison of PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA Epitope Specificity upon Disease Relapse

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND Relapse is a major clinical problem in ANCA vasculitis that causes increased morbidity and mortality. Compared to MPO-ANCA patients, patients with PR3-ANCA run a significantly increased risk of experiencing relapses. We hypothesized that a relapsing patient is produ...

  4. Retrospective and Prospective Reports of Precipitants to Relapse in Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, David C.; el-Guebaly, Nady

    2004-01-01

    A prospective design was used to explore the precipitants of relapse in a naturalistic sample of pathological gamblers (N = 101) who had recently quit gambling. Relapse rates were high; only 8% were entirely free of gambling during the 12-month follow-up. Relapses were highly variable but occurred most frequently in the evening, when the person…

  5. Integrated genomic analysis of relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Laura E; Meyer, Julia A; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Wong, Nicholas; Yang, Wenjian; Condos, Gregory; Hunger, Stephen P; Raetz, Elizabeth; Saffery, Richard; Relling, Mary V; Bhojwani, Deepa; Morrison, Debra J; Carroll, William L

    2011-11-10

    Despite an increase in survival for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the outcome after relapse is poor. To understand the genetic events that contribute to relapse and chemoresistance and identify novel targets of therapy, 3 high-throughput assays were used to identify genetic and epigenetic changes at relapse. Using matched diagnosis/relapse bone marrow samples from children with relapsed B-precursor ALL, we evaluated gene expression, copy number abnormalities (CNAs), and DNA methylation. Gene expression analysis revealed a signature of differentially expressed genes from diagnosis to relapse that is different for early (< 36 months) and late (≥ 36 months) relapse. CNA analysis discovered CNAs that were shared at diagnosis and relapse and others that were new lesions acquired at relapse. DNA methylation analysis found increased promoter methylation at relapse. There were many genetic alterations that evolved from diagnosis to relapse, and in some cases these genes had previously been associated with chemoresistance. Integration of the results from all 3 platforms identified genes of potential interest, including CDKN2A, COL6A2, PTPRO, and CSMD1. Although our results indicate that a diversity of genetic changes are seen at relapse, integration of gene expression, CNA, and methylation data suggest a possible convergence on the WNT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

  6. Retrospective and Prospective Reports of Precipitants to Relapse in Pathological Gambling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgins, David C.; el-Guebaly, Nady

    2004-01-01

    A prospective design was used to explore the precipitants of relapse in a naturalistic sample of pathological gamblers (N = 101) who had recently quit gambling. Relapse rates were high; only 8% were entirely free of gambling during the 12-month follow-up. Relapses were highly variable but occurred most frequently in the evening, when the person…

  7. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  9. Disseminated Penicillium marneffei mimicking paradoxical response and relapse in a non-HIV patient with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping-Huai; Wang, Hao-Chien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-04-01

    Clinical deterioration during the treatment of tuberculosis remains a diagnostic challenge. We describe the case of a 46-year-old man with a history of oral cancer status after a radical operation who had pulmonary tuberculosis with pleura and neck lymph node involvement. The clinical condition improved after antituberculosis therapy. However, the patient suffered from low-grade fever, progressive dyspnea, and cough after 7 weeks of the therapy. The findings of chest plain films were relapse and progression of left lung haziness. The deterioration was caused by disseminated Penicillium marneffei infection. Disseminated P. marneffei in a non-HIV patient with tuberculosis is rarely seen, and the manifestations are similar to a paradoxical response and relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis, thereby making it difficult to establish a diagnosis.

  10. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  11. [Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with complete clinical remission with chemotherapy and central nervous system relapse: Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Contreras, Loreto; Mercado, Loreto; Delgado, Carolina; Cabezas, Claudia; Starke, Laksmi; Romero, Mónica; Ibieta, Fernando; Henríquez, Mauricio; Chandia, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, clinically aggressive hematologic malignancy that most commonly manifests as cutaneous lesions with or without bone marrow involvement and leukemic dissemination. The demonstration of tumor cells with the characteristic immunophenotype with expression of CD56, generally CD4 and dendritic cell antigens (CD123, cyTCL-1, HLA-DR), in the absence of myeloid or lymphoid lineage markers is required for the diagnosis. Responses to chemotherapy are initially satisfactory, with frequent systemic and central nervous system relapses. We report a 24 year-old male with BPDCN, initially diagnosed and treated as non-Hodgkin CD4+ T-cell lymphoma, with initial complete remission who evolved with early central nervous system relapse. A second attempt of chemotherapy failed and the patient died two months later.

  12. Mitoxantrone, teniposide, chlorambucil and prednisone (MVLP) for relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The impact of advanced age and performance status.

    PubMed

    Haak, H L; Gerrits, W B; Wijermans, P W; Kerkhofs, H

    1993-04-01

    Fifty-seven patients with relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of low, intermediate and high-grade malignancy were treated with mitoxantrone, teniposide (Vm26), chlorambucil (Leukeran) and prednisone (MVLP). The median age was 71 years; none of the patients was excluded due to poor performance status (PS). Out of 44 patients with PS (according to WHO) < or = 2, 38 responded with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 21.5 months. Of 13 patients with PS > 2, 6 responded with a median PFS of 8.2 months. Haematopoietic toxicity was related to PS rather than to dose intensity or bone marrow involvement. Three patients died within a short time due to toxicity; another two died later as a result of cardiac failure probably due to accumulated toxicity of adriamycin and mitoxantrone. MVLP chemotherapy is effective and feasible and has only moderate toxicity in patients with relapsed NHL and PS < or = 2, despite advanced age.

  13. Deep targeted sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia unveils distinct mutational patterns between genetic subtypes and novel relapse-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, C. Mårten; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Freyhult, Eva; Ekman, Diana; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Raine, Amanda; Övernäs, Elin; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Frost, Britt-Marie; Grandér, Dan; Heyman, Mats; Palle, Josefine; Forestier, Erik; Lönnerholm, Gudmar

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the mutational patterns of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we performed deep next generation sequencing of 872 cancer genes in 172 diagnostic and 24 relapse samples from 172 pediatric ALL patients. We found an overall greater mutational burden and more driver mutations in T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients compared to B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) patients. In addition, the majority of the mutations in T-ALL had occurred in the original leukemic clone, while most of the mutations in BCP-ALL were subclonal. BCP-ALL patients carrying any of the recurrent translocations ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL or TCF3-PBX1 harbored few mutations in driver genes compared to other BCP-ALL patients. Specifically in BCP-ALL, we identified ATRX as a novel putative driver gene and uncovered an association between somatic mutations in the Notch signaling pathway at ALL diagnosis and increased risk of relapse. Furthermore, we identified EP300, ARID1A and SH2B3 as relapse-associated genes. The genes highlighted in our study were frequently involved in epigenetic regulation, associated with germline susceptibility to ALL, and present in minor subclones at diagnosis that became dominant at relapse. We observed a high degree of clonal heterogeneity and evolution between diagnosis and relapse in both BCP-ALL and T-ALL, which could have implications for the treatment efficiency. PMID:27590521

  14. A content analysis of self-reported barriers and facilitators to preventing postpartum smoking relapse among a sample of current and former smokers in an underserved population

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Kuang-Yi; Miller, Suzanne M.; Roussi, Pagona; Belton, Tanisha D.; Baman, Jayson; Kilby, Linda; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the barriers and facilitators thatprevent postpartum relapse and maintain smoking abstinence among a socioeconomically underserved population, recruited through Philadelphia-area women, infants, and children clinics, in-person interviews were conducted with 30 women who had quit smoking for one or more pregnancies in the past 3 years to retrospectively describe their attempts to remain abstinent during the postpartum period. Responses were analysed using the constructs from the Cognitive-Social Health Information Processing model, which identifies the cognitive, affective and behavioral factors involved in goal-oriented self-regulatory actions, in the context of a vulnerable population of women. Motherhood demands were a significant source of relapse stress. Stresses associated with partner and family relationships also contributed to relapse. The presence of other smokers in the environment was mentioned by many women in our sample as affecting their ability to remain smoke-free postpartum. Participants reported four main strategies that helped them to successfully cope with postpartum cravings and relapses, including being informed of smoking risks, maintaining goal-oriented thoughts, focusing on their concerns about the baby’s health and receiving positive social support from families and friends. Results provide guidance for the design of smoking relapse interventions that may address the unique stressors reported by underserved postpartum women. PMID:25099776

  15. Identification of relapse predictors in IgG4-related disease using multivariate analysis of clinical data at the first visit and initial treatment.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Nojima, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Yoshihiro; Ishigami, Keisuke; Yajima, Hidetaka; Shimizu, Yui; Tabeya, Tetsuya; Matsui, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Takano, Ken-ichi; Himi, Tetsuo; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Inducting clinical remission by glucocorticoid treatment is relatively easy in IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD), but relapse also occurs easily with tapering of the steroid dose. The present study tried to analyse the cases to extract predictors of relapse present at the diagnosis of IgG4-RD. Subjects comprised 79 patients with IgG4-related dacryoadenitis and sialadenitis, known as Mikulicz's disease, who were diagnosed between April 1997 and October 2013 and followed-up for >2 years from the initial induction treatment. They were applied to Cox proportional hazard modelling, based on the outcome of interval to relapse. We performed multivariate analysis for the clinical factors of these cases and identified predictors of relapse. Identified factors were male sex and younger onset in cases without organ involvement at diagnosis and low levels of serum IgG4 in cases with organ dysfunction at diagnosis. Complication with autoimmune pancreatitis and low steroid dose at initial treatment also tended to be associated with recurrence. Follow-up is important in cases with recognized risk factors for relapse, including male sex and younger onset in cases without organ damage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Acquisition, Maintenance and Relapse-Like Alcohol Drinking: Lessons from the UChB Rat Line

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Yedy; Karahanian, Eduardo; Ezquer, Fernando; Morales, Paola; Ezquer, Marcelo; Rivera-Meza, Mario; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Quintanilla, María E.

    2017-01-01

    This review article addresses the biological factors that influence: (i) the acquisition of alcohol intake; (ii) the maintenance of chronic alcohol intake; and (iii) alcohol relapse-like drinking behavior in animals bred for their high-ethanol intake. Data from several rat strains/lines strongly suggest that catalase-mediated brain oxidation of ethanol into acetaldehyde is an absolute requirement (up 80%–95%) for rats to display ethanol’s reinforcing effects and to initiate chronic ethanol intake. Acetaldehyde binds non-enzymatically to dopamine forming salsolinol, a compound that is self-administered. In UChB rats, salsolinol: (a) generates marked sensitization to the motivational effects of ethanol; and (b) strongly promotes binge-like drinking. The specificity of salsolinol actions is shown by the finding that only the R-salsolinol enantiomer but not S-salsolinol accounted for the latter effects. Inhibition of brain acetaldehyde synthesis does not influence the maintenance of chronic ethanol intake. However, a prolonged ethanol withdrawal partly returns the requirement for acetaldehyde synthesis/levels both on chronic ethanol intake and on alcohol relapse-like drinking. Chronic ethanol intake, involving the action of lipopolysaccharide diffusing from the gut, and likely oxygen radical generated upon catechol/salsolinol oxidation, leads to oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, known to potentiate each other. Data show that the administration of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) a strong antioxidant inhibits chronic ethanol maintenance by 60%–70%, without inhibiting its initial intake. Intra-cerebroventricular administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), known to release anti-inflammatory cytokines, to elevate superoxide dismutase levels and to reverse ethanol-induced hippocampal injury and cognitive deficits, also inhibited chronic ethanol maintenance; further, relapse-like ethanol drinking was inhibited up to 85% for 40 days following intracerebral stem cell

  17. A focus group study of predictors of relapse in electronic gaming machine problem gambling, part 2: factors that 'pull' the gambler away from relapse.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J; Pols, R; Battersby, M; Lawn, S; Pulvirenti, M; Smith, D

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to develop an empirically based description of relapse in Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) problem gambling (PG) by describing the processes and factors that 'pull' the problem gambler away from relapse contrasted with the 'push' towards relapse. These conceptualisations describe two opposing, interacting emotional processes occurring within the problem gambler during any relapse episode. Each relapse episode comprises a complex set of psychological and social behaviours where many factors interact sequentially and simultaneously within the problem gambler to produce a series of mental and behaviour events that end (1) with relapse where 'push' overcomes 'pull' or (2) continued abstinence where 'pull' overcomes 'push'. Four focus groups comprising thirty participants who were EGM problem gamblers, gamblers' significant others, therapists and counsellors described their experiences and understanding of relapse. The groups were recorded, recordings were then transcribed and analysed using thematic textual analysis. It was established that vigilance, motivation to commit to change, positive social support, cognitive strategies such as remembering past gambling harms or distraction techniques to avoid thinking about gambling to enable gamblers to manage the urge to gamble and urge extinction were key factors that protected against relapse. Three complementary theories emerged from the analysis. Firstly, a process of reappraisal of personal gambling behaviour pulls the gambler away from relapse. This results in a commitment to change that develops over time and affects but is independent of each episode of relapse. Secondly, relapse may be halted by interacting factors that 'pull' the problem gambler away from the sequence of mental and behavioural events, which follow the triggering of the urge and cognitions to gamble. Thirdly, urge extinction and apparent 'cure' is possible for EGM gambling. This study provides a qualitative, empirical model for

  18. The anxiogenic drug yohimbine reinstates methamphetamine seeking in a rat model of drug relapse.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Jack D; Bossert, Jennifer M; Liu, Shirley Y; Shaham, Yavin

    2004-06-01

    Brain noradrenaline is involved in footshock stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in a rat relapse model. We studied whether yohimbine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that increases noradrenaline release and induces anxiety-like responses in human and nonhuman subjects, would reinstate methamphetamine seeking in rats. In experiment 1, the effect of yohimbine (1.25-2.5 mg/kg) on reinstatement was compared with that of intermittent footshock (5 min;.2-.6 mA) in rats that were trained to lever press for intravenous methamphetamine (9-11 days) and subsequently underwent 7 days of extinction training. In experiment 2, the effect of yohimbine on reinstatement of drug seeking was determined during early (1 day) and late (21 or 51 days) withdrawal periods. On the test days, rats were first given 3-hour extinction sessions and were then tested for reinstatement induced by yohimbine. In experiment 1, both yohimbine and footshock stress reinstated methamphetamine seeking after extinction. In experiment 2, extinction responding was higher after 21 or 51 withdrawal days than after 1 withdrawal day. In contrast, no significant time-dependent changes in yohimbine-induced reinstatement were observed. Results indicate that yohimbine is a potent stimulus for reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking in a rat relapse model.

  19. Pregnane X-receptor promotes stem cell-mediated colon cancer relapse.

    PubMed

    Planque, Chris; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Grillet, Fanny; Finetti, Pascal; Bertucci, François; Gironella, Meritxell; Lozano, Juan José; Beucher, Bertrand; Giraud, Julie; Garambois, Véronique; Vincent, Charles; Brown, Daniel; Caillo, Ludovic; Kantar, Jovana; Pelegrin, André; Prudhomme, Michel; Ripoche, Jérémie; Bourgaux, Jean François; Ginestier, Christophe; Castells, Antoni; Hollande, Frédéric; Pannequin, Julie; Pascussi, Jean Marc

    2016-08-30

    Colorectal cancer lethality usually results from post-treatment relapse in the majority of stage II-IV patients, due to the enhanced resistance of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs). Here, we show that the nuclear receptor Pregnane X Receptor (PXR, NR1I2), behaves as a key driver of CSC-mediated tumor recurrence. First, PXR is specifically expressed in CSCs, where it drives the expression of genes involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Clinically, high levels of PXR correlate with poor recurrence-free survival in a cohort of >200 stage II/III colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, for whom finding biomarkers of treatment outcome is an urgent clinical need. shRNA silencing of PXR increased the chemo-sensitivity of human colon CSCs, reduced their self-renewal and tumor-initiating potential, and drastically delayed tumor recurrence in mice following chemotherapy. This study uncovers PXR as a key factor for CSC self-renewal and chemoresistance and targeting PXR thus represents a promising strategy to minimize colorectal cancer relapse by selectively sensitizing CSCs to chemotherapy.

  20. Pregnane X-receptor promotes stem cell-mediated colon cancer relapse

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Fanny; Finetti, Pascal; Bertucci, François; Gironella, Meritxell; Lozano, Juan José; Beucher, Bertrand; Giraud, Julie; Garambois, Véronique; Vincent, Charles; Brown, Daniel; Caillo, Ludovic; Kantar, Jovana; Pelegrin, André; Prudhomme, Michel; Ripoche, Jérémie; Bourgaux, Jean François; Ginestier, Christophe; Castells, Antoni; Hollande, Frédéric; Pannequin, Julie; Pascussi, Jean Marc

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer lethality usually results from post-treatment relapse in the majority of stage II-IV patients, due to the enhanced resistance of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs). Here, we show that the nuclear receptor Pregnane X Receptor (PXR, NR1I2), behaves as a key driver of CSC-mediated tumor recurrence. First, PXR is specifically expressed in CSCs, where it drives the expression of genes involved in self-renewal and chemoresistance. Clinically, high levels of PXR correlate with poor recurrence-free survival in a cohort of >200 stage II/III colorectal cancer patients treated with chemotherapy, for whom finding biomarkers of treatment outcome is an urgent clinical need. shRNA silencing of PXR increased the chemo-sensitivity of human colon CSCs, reduced their self-renewal and tumor-initiating potential, and drastically delayed tumor recurrence in mice following chemotherapy. This study uncovers PXR as a key factor for CSC self-renewal and chemoresistance and targeting PXR thus represents a promising strategy to minimize colorectal cancer relapse by selectively sensitizing CSCs to chemotherapy. PMID:27448961

  1. Protective factors against relapse for practicing nurse anesthetists in recovery from anesthetic opiate dependency.

    PubMed

    Wright, E Laura; McGuinness, Teena; Schumacher, Joseph E; Zwerling, Arthur; Moneyham, Linda D

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative inquiry explored factors that protect recovering anesthetic opioid-dependent nurse anesthetists from relapse after their return to anesthesia practice. Practicing nurse anesthetists in recovery from potent opioids were recruited through online advertising and individually interviewed over the telephone. The interview consisted of open-ended questions that aided description of personal experience of individual factors. Content analysis of the interviews revealed an overarching theme of a commitment to the recovery process, which provided the foundational protective element against relapse. Within this context, two major thematic factors emerged: personal factors and external factors. Personal factors came from within the individual and included such features as removing the obsession to use, self-realization, inner strength, and seeing the future. External factors were external to the individual and described as time away from practice, state regulatory agency involvement, and talking with significant others. Although the Twelve-Step process was not a factor per se, it was credited by all participants as the structure on which their recovery was built. This process provided mechanisms for developing the motivation and learning the tools necessary to maintain their sobriety.

  2. Genetic and epigenetic heterogeneity and the impact on cancer relapse.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ciaran; Afshinnekoo, Ebrahim; Li, Sheng; Wu, Shixiu; Mason, Christopher E

    2017-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematopoietic malignancy with an exceedingly poor prognosis: a 5-year overall survival rate of 40%-45% in the young and a 5-year survival rate of less than 10% in the elderly (>60 years of age). Although a high percentage of patients enters complete remission after chemotherapeutic intervention, the majority of patients relapse within 3 years. Such stark prognostic outcomes highlight the need for additional clinical research, basic discovery, and molecular delineation of the etiologies and mechanisms behind responses to therapy that lead to relapse. Here, we summarize recent discoveries in tumor heterogeneity at the genetic and epigenetic levels and their independent molecular trajectories and dynamics in response to therapy. These new discoveries may have significant implications for understanding, monitoring, and treating leukemia and other cancers. Copyright © 2017 ISEH – Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Using conditioned place preference to identify relapse prevention medications.

    PubMed

    Napier, T Celeste; Herrold, Amy A; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-11-01

    Stimuli, including contexts, which predict the availability or onset of a drug effect, can acquire conditioned incentive motivational properties. These conditioned properties endure after withdrawal, and can promote drug-seeking which may result in relapse. Conditioned place preference (CPP) assesses the associations between drugs and the context in which they are experienced. Here, we review the potential utility of CPP procedures in rodents and humans to evaluate medications that target conditioned drug-seeking responses. We discuss the translational potential of the CPP procedure from rodents to humans, and review findings with FDA-approved treatments that support the use of CPP to develop relapse-reduction medications. We also discuss challenges and methodological questions in applying the CPP procedure to this purpose. We argue that an efficient and valid CPP procedure in humans may reduce the burden of full clinical trials with drug-abusing patients that are currently required for testing promising treatments.

  4. Relapsing Fever: Diagnosis Thanks to a Vigilant Hematology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Inbal; Tarabin, Salman; Kafka, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Three cases of relapsing fever from southern Israel were diagnosed promptly thanks to vigilance of the hematology laboratory technicians. In this region of Israel, patients presenting with prolonged fever and leukopenia without localizing symptoms are generally suspected of having brucellosis or a rickettsial disease. Pediatric patients with prolonged fever, cytopenias, and negative aforementioned serologies are often hospitalized for further work-up. Because of the policy of performing a manual blood smear when results of the automated blood count demonstrate severe anemia and abnormal platelet and/or white blood cell counts, a diagnosis of tick-borne relapsing fever was confirmed and promptly relayed to the physician. This routine prevented unnecessary examinations and hospitalization days and provided important information to regional epidemiology and public health authorities.

  5. Genomic Evolution of Breast Cancer Metastasis and Relapse

    DOE PAGES

    Yates, Lucy R.; Knappskog, Stian; Wedge, David; ...

    2017-08-14

    Patterns of genomic evolution between primary and metastatic breast cancer have not been studied in large numbers, despite patients with metastatic breast cancer having dismal survival. We sequenced whole genomes or a panel of 365 genes on 299 samples from 170 patients with locally relapsed or metastatic breast cancer. Several lines of analysis indicate that clones seeding metastasis or relapse disseminate late from primary tumors, but continue to acquire mutations, mostly accessing the same mutational processes active in the primary tumor. Most distant metastases acquired driver mutations not seen in the primary tumor, drawing from a wider repertoire of cancermore » genes than early drivers. Lastly, these include a number of clinically actionable alterations and mutations inactivating SWI-SNF and JAK2-STAT3 pathways.« less

  6. Effectiveness of adding relapse prevention materials to telephone counseling

    PubMed Central

    Sheffer, Christine E.; Stitzer, Maxine; Brandon, Thomas; Bursac, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of adding the Forever Free relapse prevention materials to telephone counseling provided by the Arkansas quitline. Results suggest that the addition of Forever Free materials to telephone counseling does not improve abstinence rates for those participants who receive at least one session of counseling and nicotine patches; however, for those participants unwilling or unable to receive nicotine patches, the addition of the Forever Free relapse prevention materials doubled the abstinence rate and increased the odds of abstinence by nearly 70% 6 months after treatment (20.9% versus 10.6%; OR=1.69; CI=1.02–2.78; p=0.04). Given the recent proliferation of quitline services and the variety of services provided, these results can address concerns about enhancing treatment outcomes for certain groups. PMID:20682187

  7. Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in Relapse and Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Fung

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy that remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Although the treatments have improved, the major problem in MM is resistance to therapy. Clonal evolution of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. Some mechanisms affect both MM cells and microenvironment, including the up- and downregulation of microRNAs and programmed death factor 1 (PD-1)/PD-L1 interaction. Here, we review the pathogenesis of MM cells and bone marrow microenvironment and highlight possible drug resistance mechanisms. We also review a potential molecular targeting treatment and immunotherapy for patients with refractory or relapse MM. PMID:26649299

  8. Ocular involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Akhyani, Maryam; Keshtkar-Jafari, Alireza; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Lajevardi, Vahide; Beigi, Sara; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Rayati Damavandi, Maede; Arami, Shabnam

    2014-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes. Ocular involvement in PV has been reported but its prevalence and clinical characteristics are not well defined. This prospective cross-sectional study of 103 PV patients was designed to determine the prevalence, clinical types and epidemiological trends of ocular involvement in a population of Iranian patients with PV. Ocular involvement was present in 17 (16.5%) patients. Conjunctivitis was the most prevalent type of ocular involvement (9/17, 52.9%), followed by erosion of the palpebral conjunctiva (7/17, 41.2%). Erosion of the bulbar conjunctiva was noted in only one patient (5.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms were eye irritation (76.5%) and redness (76.5%). No significant relation was found between ocular involvement and disease activity (partial remission or relapse). Mucoid discharge was significantly more common in patients with conjunctival erosions as compared to patients with conjunctivitis (P = 0.038). We conclude that ocular involvement is not rare in PV; 16.5% of PV patients develop ocular disease independent of the disease activity and extension. Conjunctivitis is the most common type of involvement, however, palpebral conjunctival erosion is more frequent than previously realized.

  9. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Late Relapse in Stage I Testicular Seminoma.

    PubMed

    Hosni, A; Warde, P; Jewett, M; Bedard, P; Hamilton, R; Moore, M; Nayan, M; Huang, R; Atenafu, E G; O'Malley, M; Sweet, J; Chung, P

    2016-10-01

    To identify the characteristics and outcomes associated with late relapse in stage I seminoma. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients with stage I seminoma managed at our institution between 1981 and 2011. Data were obtained from a prospectively maintained database. Late relapse was defined as tumour recurrence > 2 years after orchiectomy. Overall, 1060 stage I seminoma patients were managed with active surveillance (n=766) or adjuvant radiotherapy (n=294). At a median follow-up of 10.6 years (range 1.2-30), 142 patients relapsed at a median (range) of 14 (3-129) months; 128 on active surveillance and 14 after adjuvant radiotherapy. The late relapse rate for the active surveillance and adjuvant radiotherapy groups was 4% and 1%, respectively. There was no specific clinicopathological factor associated with late relapse. Isolated para-aortic node(s) was the most common relapse site in active surveillance patients either in late (88%) or early relapse (82%). Among the active surveillance group, no patients with late relapse subsequently developed a second relapse after either salvage radiotherapy (n=25) or chemotherapy (n=6), whereas in early relapse patients a second relapse was reported in seven (10%) of 72 patients treated with salvage radiotherapy and one (4%) of 23 patients who received chemotherapy; all second relapses were subsequently salvaged with chemotherapy. No patient in the adjuvant radiotherapy group developed a second relapse after salvage chemotherapy (n=10) or inguinal radiotherapy/surgery (n=4). Of seven deaths, only one was related to seminoma. Among active surveillance patients, the 10 year overall survival for late and early relapse groups were 100% and 96% (P = 0.2), whereas the 10 year cancer-specific survival rates were 100% and 99% (P = 0.3), respectively. In stage I seminoma, the extent and pattern of late relapse is similar to that for early relapse. For active surveillance patients, selective use of salvage

  10. Saccharomyces boulardii does not prevent relapse of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bourreille, Arnaud; Cadiot, Guillaume; Le Dreau, Gérard; Laharie, David; Beaugerie, Laurent; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Marteau, Philippe; Rampal, Patrick; Moyse, Dominique; Saleh, Ashraf; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Galmiche, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a probiotic yeast that has been shown to have beneficial effects on the intestinal epithelial barrier and digestive immune system. There is preliminary evidence that S boulardii could be used to treat patients with Crohn's disease (CD). We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of S boulardii in patients with CD who underwent remission during therapy with steroids or aminosalicylates. We performed a prospective study of 165 patients who achieved remission after treatment with steroids or salicylates; they were randomly assigned to groups given S boulardii (1 g/day) or placebo for 52 weeks. The primary end point was the percentage of patients in remission at week 52. Time to relapse, Crohn's disease activity index scores, and changes in parameters of inflammation were secondary end points. CD relapsed in 80 patients, 38 in the S boulardii group (47.5%) and 42 in the placebo group (53.2%, a nonsignificant difference). The median time to relapse did not differ significantly between patients given S boulardii (40.7 weeks) vs placebo (39.0 weeks). There were no significant differences between groups in mean Crohn's disease activity index scores or erythrocyte sedimentation rates or in median levels of C-reactive protein. In a post hoc analysis, nonsmokers given S boulardii were less likely to experience a relapse of CD than nonsmokers given placebo, but this finding requires confirmation. Although the probiotic yeast S boulardii is safe and well tolerated, it does not appear to have any beneficial effects for patients with CD in remission after steroid or salicylate therapies. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relapses in bipolar patients: changes in social rhythm?

    PubMed

    Kadri, Nadia; Mouchtaq, Nadia; Hakkou, Farid; Moussaoui, Driss

    2000-03-01

    The Ramadan month represents a valuable opportunity to test the hypothesis that the course of the illness of bipolar patients can be disrupted by the change in social rhythm which usually occurs during this month. The objectives of this study were to follow up the mood state and blood lithium level of fasting Muslim bipolar patients who had been on lithium therapy for at least 3 months, and were clinically stable before being included in the study. Twenty bipolar patients were enrolled during the month of Ramadan in 1997. Diagnosis of bipolar disorder was according to ICD-10 criteria. Patients were assessed during the week before Ramadan, the second and the fourth weeks of the fasting month and the first week after its end, with the Hamilton Depression and Bech-Rafaelsen scales. The plasma concentration of lithium was also assessed. The main finding of the study was that 45% of the patients relapsed, 70% during the second week and the remaining patients at the end of Ramadan. These relapses were not related to plasma concentration of lithium. Most of the relapses were manic (71.4 %). Patients who did not relapse had insomnia and anxiety during the second and third weeks of the study. Side-effects of lithium increased and were observed in 48% of the sample, mostly dryness of the mouth with thirst and tremor. The result of this pilot study indicates that the Ramadan month may disrupt the mood state of bipolar patients. More studies are needed to confirm this observation and to evaluate the validity of the Ramadan model to study the impact of social rhythms on bipolar patients.

  12. Cannabidiol reduces ethanol consumption, motivation and relapse in mice.

    PubMed

    Viudez-Martínez, Adrián; García-Gutiérrez, María S; Navarrón, Carmen María; Morales-Calero, María Isabel; Navarrete, Francisco; Torres-Suárez, Ana Isabel; Manzanares, Jorge

    2017-02-13

    This study evaluated the effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on ethanol reinforcement, motivation and relapse in C57BL/6 J mice. The effects of CBD (60 mg/kg, i.p.) on blood ethanol concentration, hypothermia and handling-induced convulsions associated to acute ethanol administration were evaluated. The two-bottle choice paradigm was performed to assess the effects of CBD (30, 60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol intake and preference. In addition, an oral ethanol self-administration experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of CBD [a single s.c. administration of a microparticle formulation providing CBD continuous controlled release (30 mg/kg/day)] on the reinforcement and motivation for ethanol. The effects of CBD (60 and 120 mg/kg/day, i.p.) on ethanol-induced relapse were also evaluated. Gene expression analyses of tyrosine hydroxylase in ventral tegmental area and μ-opioid (Oprm1), cannabinoid (CB1 r and CB2 r) and GPR55 receptors in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) were carried out by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cannabidiol reduced the ethanol-induced hypothermia and handling-induced convulsion but failed to modify blood ethanol concentration. CBD reduced ethanol consumption and preference in the two-bottle choice, significantly decreased ethanol intake and the number of effective responses in the oral ethanol self-administration, and reduced ethanol-induced relapse. Furthermore, the administration of CBD significantly reduced relative gene expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area, Oprm1, CB1 r and GPR55 in the NAcc and significantly increased CB2 r in the NAcc. Taken together, these results reveal that the administration of CBD reduced the reinforcing properties, motivation and relapse for ethanol. These findings strongly suggest that CBD may result useful for the treatment of alcohol use disorders.

  13. Carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone for relapsed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A Keith; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Masszi, Tamás; Špička, Ivan; Oriol, Albert; Hájek, Roman; Rosiñol, Laura; Siegel, David S; Mihaylov, Georgi G; Goranova-Marinova, Vesselina; Rajnics, Péter; Suvorov, Aleksandr; Niesvizky, Ruben; Jakubowiak, Andrzej J; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Ludwig, Heinz; Wang, Michael; Maisnar, Vladimír; Minarik, Jiri; Bensinger, William I; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Ben-Yehuda, Dina; Kukreti, Vishal; Zojwalla, Naseem; Tonda, Margaret E; Yang, Xinqun; Xing, Biao; Moreau, Philippe; Palumbo, Antonio

    2015-01-08

    Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone is a reference treatment for relapsed multiple myeloma. The combination of the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone has shown efficacy in a phase 1 and 2 study in relapsed multiple myeloma. We randomly assigned 792 patients with relapsed multiple myeloma to carfilzomib with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (carfilzomib group) or lenalidomide and dexamethasone alone (control group). The primary end point was progression-free survival. Progression-free survival was significantly improved with carfilzomib (median, 26.3 months, vs. 17.6 months in the control group; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57 to 0.83; P=0.0001). The median overall survival was not reached in either group at the interim analysis. The Kaplan-Meier 24-month overall survival rates were 73.3% and 65.0% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (hazard ratio for death, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.63 to 0.99; P=0.04). The rates of overall response (partial response or better) were 87.1% and 66.7% in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively (P<0.001; 31.8% and 9.3% of patients in the respective groups had a complete response or better; 14.1% and 4.3% had a stringent complete response). Adverse events of grade 3 or higher were reported in 83.7% and 80.7% of patients in the carfilzomib and control groups, respectively; 15.3% and 17.7% of patients discontinued treatment owing to adverse events. Patients in the carfilzomib group reported superior health-related quality of life. In patients with relapsed multiple myeloma, the addition of carfilzomib to lenalidomide and dexamethasone resulted in significantly improved progression-free survival at the interim analysis and had a favorable risk-benefit profile. (Funded by Onyx Pharmaceuticals; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01080391.).

  14. Relapse of Yellow Nail Syndrome with Pulmonary Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kozo; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Atsuko; Yano, Ryozo; Sasaki, Yuka; Osawa, Takeshi; Kudoh, Shoji; Goto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is a rare disorder characterized by the triad of yellow, thickened nails, lymphedema, and respiratory manifestations such as pleural effusions, bronchiectasis, and recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. We report a case of YNS showing pulmonary interlobular septal thickening on thoracic computed tomography, implying the presence of lymphatic edema. The patient showed both the remission and relapse of yellow nail with different lung treatments over a long clinical course.

  15. Patient with antibody-negative relapse of Goodpasture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benz, K; Amann, K; Dittrich, K; Hugo, C; Schnur, K; Dötsch, J

    2007-04-01

    Smoking in young men may trigger anti-GBM disease manifesting with hemoptysis. We present a male adolescent in whom hemoptysis was mistaken to be a sign of airway infection for several months and who later on underwent an unusual antibody-negative relapse. The 16-year-old patient had a history of smoking and therapy-refractant hemoptysis and, later, acute macrohematuria with renal insufficiency necessitating hemodialysis (initial creatinine 4.2 mg/ dl). Chest X-ray showed diffuse lung infiltration. Renal biopsy revealed linear IgG deposits along the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) and cellular crescents in 13/16 glomeruli, simultaneously increased anti-GBM antibodies were detected. Thus, anti-GBM glomerulonephritis was diagnosed. After treatment with prednisone, oral cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis, chest X-ray and hemoptysis improved, but renal failure persisted. Anti-GBM antibodies were negative. 4 weeks later, the patient presented again with a clinical relapse of severe hemoptysis and respiratory insufficiency after smoke exposition. Despite negative anti-GBM antibodies, he was treated similarly to a relapse and after the second course of plasmapheresis the patients' general condition improved and hemoptysis subsided. During the next 10 months the patient was stable with negative antibodies. He was under intermittent hemodialysis until laboratory measurements showed improved renal function. Now, 30 months after the acute episode, the patient is off dialysis for 17 months with stable creatinine values of 1.9 - 2.4 mg/dl, and is currently being treated with antihypertensive medicaments, calcitriol, calciumacetate, natriumhydrogencarbonate and allopurinol. The prognosis of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis depends on serum creatinine and the need of dialysis at initial presentation. In these patients, one-year survival rate is 67% and 5% for kidney function. Of note, despite the unfavorable prognosis in our patient, renal function recovered after 1 year of

  16. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  17. Improving service delivery for relapse management in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Warner, Richard; Thomas, Del; Martin, Roswell

    This action research study was conducted over an 18 month period within a district general hospital. The study has improved the quality of the service provided to people experiencing a relapse of multiple sclerosis. The authors now identify and treat a three-fold increase in relapse patients. At least 85% of these patients are treated within 10 days of reporting symptoms to a specialist nurse. Before the study, only 12% of patients received treatment within this time. The authors' data identify what patients valued about this service and also inform debate around distress associated with relapse and how services should develop to respond to this. The study is of particular importance to the UK because the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) has published guidance to the NHS about the management of this specific patient group (NICE, 2003). This study also clearly demonstrates how specialist nursing services can combine a substantial clinical role with instigating and managing change in service delivery that results in improvements in patient care.

  18. Relapsed/refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2011-01-01

    Despite overall improvements in outcomes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), approximately one-third of patients will develop relapsed/refractory disease that remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Novel insights from gene-expression analyses have increased our understanding of chemotherapy resistance and yielded rational targets for therapeutic intervention to both prevent and treat relapsed/refractory DLBCL. The clinical approach to relapsed/refractory DLBCL should include high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-ASCT) with curative intent in patients without comorbidities. Results from the recently reported CORAL study suggest that patients refractory to rituximab-containing regimens have inferior outcomes with HD-ASCT. Ongoing efforts to improve ASCT include novel conditioning regimens and evaluation of maintenance approaches after ASCT. Unfortunately, because the majority of patients are not eligible for ASCT due to refractory disease or age/comorbidities, these approaches have limited impact. The large group of patients not eligible for ASCT have incurable disease and should be referred for clinical trials of rationally targeted agents.

  19. Menarche Increases Relapse Risk in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lulu, Sabeen; Graves, Jennifer; Waubant, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) predominantly affects women with a sex ratio of 3:1 in contrast with a 1:1 sex ratio seen in pre-pubertal onset. Thus, puberty may influence MS risk differentially in males and females. How puberty may be associated with MS clinical features and disease course remains unknown. Objective To determine the association of menarche with disease course in girls with MS. Methods This is a longitudinal retrospective study from the UCSF Regional Pediatric MS Center database. We categorized patients by time of disease onset: pre-menarche, peri-menarche and post-menarche. Poisson regression models were used for within subject relapse analyses offset by follow-up time. Results Seventy six girls were included (pre-menarche onset=17; peri-menarche onset=9; post-menarche onset=50). Age of menarche was similar in all groups (Kruskal-Wallis p=0.19). Relapse rate was the same in all three groups during first 2 years of follow-up. In girls with follow-up overlapping at least two time periods, within-subject analyses showed increased relapses during peri-menarche compared to post-menarche period (adjusted IRR=8.5, 95%CI 2.5–28.7, p=0.001). Conclusion Pubertal status may influence MS course at least in female patients. Understanding how puberty influences MS clinical features may offer new insights in important factors regulating disease processes. PMID:25948626

  20. Rituximab treatment for relapsed opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Daisaku; Morisada, Naoya; Takami, Yuichi; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Taku; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Nozu, Kandai; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takada, Satoshi; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-03-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder that is associated with paraneoplastic diseases. Because OMS can frequently relapse, patients may be inflicted with neurological problems for a long time. Recently, rituximab (RTX) was introduced as a drug to treat OMS. To assess RTX treatment, we studied a patient who experienced recurrence of OMS. A 2-year-old Japanese boy, who had left adrenal neuroblastoma, suddenly showed OMS symptoms, including ataxia and opsoclonus. Surgical resection of the tumor and subsequent steroid therapy ameliorated his symptoms. When OMS relapsed during the time when prednisolone was reduced, he was treated with full-dose RTX therapy (375 mg/m2/week) for 4 consecutive weeks. However, 1year later, he presented again with OMS symptoms. This time, we only administered an additional single dose of RTX treatment (375 mg/m2), allowing remission of OMS symptoms. During 2 years after the additional RTX treatment, OMS symptoms did not appear, even when prednisolone was reduced. He had no adverse events associated with RTX during the whole treatment period. An additional single-dose RTX therapy might be effective for relapsed OMS patients who were previously treated with full-dose RTX therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ancestry and pharmacogenomics of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun J; Cheng, Cheng; Devidas, Meenakshi; Cao, Xueyuan; Fan, Yiping; Campana, Dario; Yang, Wenjian; Neale, Geoff; Cox, Nancy J; Scheet, Paul; Borowitz, Michael J; Winick, Naomi J; Martin, Paul L; Willman, Cheryl L; Bowman, W Paul; Camitta, Bruce M; Carroll, Andrew; Reaman, Gregory H; Carroll, William L; Loh, Mignon; Hunger, Stephen P; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2011-03-01

    Although five-year survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are now over 80% in most industrialized countries, not all children have benefited equally from this progress. Ethnic differences in survival after childhood ALL have been reported in many clinical studies, with poorer survival observed among African Americans or those with Hispanic ethnicity when compared with European Americans or Asians. The causes of ethnic differences remain uncertain, although both genetic and non-genetic factors are likely important. Interrogating genome-wide germline SNP genotypes in an unselected large cohort of children with ALL, we observed that the component of genomic variation that co-segregated with Native American ancestry was associated with risk of relapse (P = 0.0029) even after adjusting for known prognostic factors (P = 0.017). Ancestry-related differences in relapse risk were abrogated by the addition of a single extra phase of chemotherapy, indicating that modifications to therapy can mitigate the ancestry-related risk of relapse.

  2. Cortical hypometabolism demonstrated by PET in relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sekhar C; Gill, Deepak; Webster, Richard; Howman-Giles, Robert; Dale, Russell C

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly defined type of autoimmune encephalitis. Two girls (age 3 years, case 1, and 7 years, case 2) with relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis each had the classic clinical features of encephalopathy, movement disorders, psychiatric symptoms, seizures, insomnia, and mild autonomic dysfunction. Both patients had persistent neuropsychiatric disability, despite immune therapies. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed during clinical relapse at 6 weeks (case 1) and 5 months (case 2). In both cases, the scans demonstrated reduced fluorodeoxyglucose metabolism in the cerebral cortex, with the temporal regions being most affected. PET imaging was more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. In contrast, the one previous report of acute NMDA receptor encephalitis indicated cortical hypermetabolism. Thus, NMDA receptor encephalitis may be associated with variable PET findings, possibly dependent upon the timing of the study, or other factors. Future studies should investigate whether cortical hypometabolism is associated with a relapsing course, and whether it is predictive of a poorer outcome in NMDA receptor encephalitis.

  3. Second auto-SCT for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, W I; Gertz, M A; Lacy, M Q; Dispenzieri, A; Hayman, S R; Buadi, F K; Dingli, D; Hogan, W J; Kumar, S K

    2013-04-01

    High-dose therapy and auto-SCT remain integral in the initial treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), and are increasingly being applied for management of relapsed disease. We examined the outcomes in 98 patients undergoing salvage auto-SCT (auto-SCT2) for relapsed MM after receiving an initial transplant (auto-SCT1) between 1994 and 2009. The median age at auto-SCT2 was 60 years (range: 35-74). The median time between auto-SCT1 and auto-SCT2 was 46 months (range: 10-130). Treatment-related mortality was seen in 4%. The median PFS from auto-SCT2 was 10.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 7-14) months and the median OS from auto-SCT2 was 33 months (95% CI: 28-51). In a multivariable analysis, shorter time to progression (TTP) after auto-SCT1, not achieving a CR after auto-SCT2, higher number of treatment regimens before auto-SCT2 and a higher plasma cell labeling index at auto-SCT2 predicted for shorter PFS. However, only a shorter TTP after auto-SCT1 predicted for a shorter OS post auto-SCT2. Hence, auto-SCT2 is an effective and feasible therapeutic option for MM patients relapsing after other treatments, especially in patients who had a TTP of at least 12 months after their auto-SCT1.

  4. Changes in urinary metabolomic profile during relapsing renal vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ani, Bahjat; Fitzpatrick, Martin; Al-Nuaimi, Hamad; Coughlan, Alice M.; Hickey, Fionnuala B.; Pusey, Charles D.; Savage, Caroline; Benton, Christopher M.; O’Brien, Eóin C.; O’Toole, Declan; Mok, Ken H.; Young, Stephen P.; Little, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Current biomarkers of renal disease in systemic vasculitis lack predictive value and are insensitive to early damage. To identify novel biomarkers of renal vasculitis flare, we analysed the longitudinal urinary metabolomic profile of a rat model of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis. Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were immunised with human myeloperoxidase (MPO). Urine was obtained at regular intervals for 181 days, after which relapse was induced by re-challenge with MPO. Urinary metabolites were assessed in an unbiased fashion using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and analysed using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and partial least squares regression (PLS-R). At 56 days post-immunisation, we found that rats with vasculitis had a significantly different urinary metabolite profile than control animals; the observed PLS-DA clusters dissipated between 56 and 181 days, and re-emerged with relapse. The metabolites most altered in rats with active or relapsing vasculitis were trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), citrate and 2-oxoglutarate. Myo-inositol was also moderately predictive. The key urine metabolites identified in rats were confirmed in a large cohort of patients using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Hypocitraturia and elevated urinary myo-inositol remained associated with active disease, with the urine myo-inositol:citrate ratio being tightly correlated with active renal vasculitis. PMID:27905491

  5. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three…

  6. Smoking relapse prevention during pregnancy. A trial of coordinated advice from physicians and individual counseling.

    PubMed

    Secker-Walker, R H; Solomon, L J; Flynn, B S; Skelly, J M; Mead, P B

    1998-07-01

    Our objective was to examine the efficacy of physicians' advice and referral to individual counseling in preventing relapse to smoking among women who were smokers early in pregnancy, but quit prior to their first prenatal visit. A randomized controlled trial of prompted physician's advice and individual relapse prevention counseling during pregnancy compared to usual physician advice. Smoking status was assessed by self-report, exhaled carbon monoxide, and urinary cotinine during pregnancy and by self-report 1 year postpartum. There were no significant differences in relapse rates between the intervention and usual-care groups during pregnancy, nor at 1 year postpartum. Relapse rates were 23% in both groups at the 36-week visit, and 32% and 22%, respectively, 1 year postpartum. Younger age, higher motivation to resume smoking, and higher levels of exhaled carbon monoxide at the first prenatal visit were predictive of relapse to smoking during pregnancy. With the conservative assumption that all those lost to follow-up relapsed, the combined 1-year postpartum relapse rate, 51%, was 17 percentage points lower than we observed in an earlier relapse prevention trial, and 15 percentage points lower than that observed nationally a decade earlier. Prompting physicians to provide supportive advice combined with referral to individual relapse prevention counseling did not reduce smoking relapse rates during pregnancy, or postpartum. However, the level of attention paid to smoking by physicians in both intervention and usual-care groups during pregnancy may have contributed to the relatively low relapse rates seen 1-year postpartum.

  7. Clonal origins of relapse in ETV6-RUNX1 acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    van Delft, Frederik W; Horsley, Sharon; Colman, Sue; Anderson, Kristina; Bateman, Caroline; Kempski, Helena; Zuna, Jan; Eckert, Cornelia; Saha, Vaskar; Kearney, Lyndal; Ford, Anthony; Greaves, Mel

    2011-06-09

    B-cell precursor childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia with ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion has an overall good prognosis, but relapses occur, usually after cessation of treatment and occasionally many years later. We have investigated the clonal origins of relapse by comparing the profiles of genomewide copy number alterations at presentation in 21 patients with those in matched relapse (12-119 months). We identified, in total, 159 copy number alterations at presentation and 231 at relapse (excluding Ig/TCR). Deletions of CDKN2A/B or CCNC (6q16.2-3) or both increased from 38% at presentation to 76% in relapse, suggesting that cell-cycle deregulation contributed to emergence of relapse. A novel observation was recurrent gain of chromosome 16 (2 patients at presentation, 4 at relapse) and deletion of plasmocytoma variant translocation 1 in 3 patients. The data indicate that, irrespective of time to relapse, the relapse clone was derived from either a major or minor clone at presentation. Backtracking analysis by FISH identified a minor subclone at diagnosis whose genotype matched that observed in relapse ∼ 10 years later. These data indicate subclonal diversity at diagnosis, providing a variable basis for intraclonal origins of relapse and extended periods (years) of dormancy, possibly by quiescence, for stem cells in ETV6-RUNX1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  8. American cutaneous leishmaniasis: use of a skin test as a predictor of relapse after treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Passos, V. M.; Barreto, S. M.; Romanha, A. J.; Krettli, A. U.; Volpini, A. C.; Lima e Costa, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    While relapses following clinical cure of American cutaneous leishmaniasis are frequent, no test has been described until now to predict such relapses. A cohort of 318 American cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was followed up for two years after treatment with meglumine antimoniate, during which time 32 relapses occurred, 30 in the first year and two in the second (accumulated risk: 10.5%). No association was found between these relapses and the parasite-specific antibody response before and after treatment, or between the relapses and stratification by sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. However when Leishmania was used as antigen, patients with a negative skin test at the time of diagnosis presented a 3.4-fold higher risk (hazard risk = 3.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.0) of American cutaneous leishmaniasis relapse, compared with patients with a positive response. This result shows that the skin test can be a predictor of American cutaneous leishmaniasis relapse after treatment. PMID:10994280

  9. NCI First International Workshop on the Biology, Prevention and Treatment of Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Report from the Committee on Prevention of Relapse Following Allogeneic Cell Transplantation for Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Alyea, Edwin P.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Moldrem, Jeffrey; Pagel, John M.; Przepiorka, Donna; Riddell, Stan; Sadelin, Michel; Young, James W.; Giralt, Sergio; Bishop, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prevention of relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most likely approach to improve survival of patients treated for hematologic malignancies. Herein we review the limits of currently available transplant therapies and the innovative strategies being developed to overcome resistance to therapy or to fill therapeutic modalities not currently available. These novel strategies include nonimmunologic therapies, such as targeted preparative regimens and posttransplant drug therapy, as well as immunologic interventions, including graft engineering, donor lymphocyte infusions, T cell engineering, vaccination and dendritic cell-based approaches. Several aspects of the biology of the malignant cells as well as the host have been identified that obviate success of even these newer strategies. To maximize the potential for success, we recommend pursuing research to develop additional targeted therapies to be used in the preparative regimen or as maintenance post-transplant, better characterize the T-cell and dendritic cells subsets involved in graft-versus-host disease and the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect, identify strategies for timing immunologic or nonimmunologic therapies to eliminate the noncycling cancer stem cell, identify more targets for immunotherapies, develop new vaccines that will not be limited by HLA, and develop methods to identify population at very high risk for relapse in order to accelerate clinical development and avoid toxicity in patients not at risk for relapse. PMID:20580849

  10. Extramedullary Relapse Following Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Stein, Anthony; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Palmer, Joycelynne; Liu, An; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Approximately 5% to 20% of patients who undergo total body irradiation (TBI) in preparation for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can develop extramedullary (EM) relapse. Whereas total marrow and lymphoid irradiation (TMLI) provides a more conformally targeted radiation therapy for patients, organ sparing has the potential to place the patient at a higher risk for EM relapse than TBI. This study evaluated EM relapse in patients treated with TMLI at our institution. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for analysis had been enrolled in 1 of 3 prospective TMLI trials between 2006 and 2012. The TMLI targeted bones, major lymph node chains, liver, spleen, testes, and brain, using image-guided tomotherapy with total dose ranging from 12 to 15 Gy. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 47 years were studied. The median follow-up was 12.8 months. Incidence of EM relapse and bone marrow (BM) relapse were 12.9% and 25.7%, respectively. Of the 13 patients who had EM relapse, 4 also had BM relapse, and 7 had EM disease prior to HCT. There were a total of 19 EM relapse sites as the site of initial recurrence: 11 soft tissue, 6 lymph node, 2 skin. Nine of these sites were within the target region and received ≥12 Gy. Ten initial EM relapse sites were outside of the target region: 5 sites received 10.1 to 11.4 Gy while 5 sites received <10 Gy. Pretransplantation EM was the only significant predictor of subsequent EM relapse. The cumulative incidence of EM relapse was 4% at 1 year and 11.4% at 2 years. Conclusions: EM relapse incidence was as frequent in regions receiving ≥10 Gy as those receiving <10 Gy. EM relapse rates following TMLI that included HCT regimens were comparable to published results with regimens including TBI and suggest that TMLI is not associated with an increased EM relapse risk.

  11. What happens after treatment? A systematic review of relapse, remission, and recovery in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Sahib S; Portnoff, Larissa C; McCurdy-McKinnon, Danyale; Feusner, Jamie D

    2017-01-01

    Relapse after treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN) is a significant clinical problem. Given the level of chronicity, morbidity, and mortality experienced by this population, it is imperative to understand the driving forces behind apparently high relapse rates. However, there is a lack of consensus in the field on an operational definition of relapse, which hinders precise and reliable estimates of the severity of this issue. The primary goal of this paper was to review prior studies of AN addressing definitions of relapse, as well as relapse rates. Data sources included PubMed and PsychINFO through March 19th, 2016. A systematic review was performed following the PRISMA guidelines. A total of (N = 27) peer-reviewed English language studies addressing relapse, remission, and recovery in AN were included. Definitions of relapse in AN as well as definitions of remission or recovery, on which relapse is predicated, varied substantially in the literature. Reported relapse rates ranged between 9 and 52%, and tended to increase with increasing duration of follow-up. There was consensus that risk for relapse in persons with AN is especially high within the first year following treatment. Standardized definitions of relapse, as well as remission and recovery, are needed in AN to accelerate clinical and research progress. This should improve the ability of future longitudinal studies to identify clinical, demographic, and biological characteristics in AN that predict relapse versus resilience, and to comparatively evaluate relapse prevention strategies. We propose standardized criteria for relapse, remission, and recovery, for further consideration.

  12. Highly elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase is associated with central nervous system relapse in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: Results of a multicenter prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Jin; Hong, Jun Sik; Chang, Myung Hee; Kim, Jeong-A; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jin Seok; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Won Sik; Do, Young Rok; Kang, Hye Jin; Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Park, Yong; Won, Jong-Ho; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kwon, Jung Hye; Kong, Jee Hyun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Sunah; Bae, Sung Hwa; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Jun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Yang Soo; Yun, Hwan Jung; Lee, Soon Il; Kim, Min Kyoung; Park, Eun Kyung; Kim, Won Seog; Suh, Cheolwon

    2016-11-01

    Central nervous system involvement remains a challenging issue in the treatment of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We conducted a prospective cohort study with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients receiving rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone to identify incidence and risk factors for central nervous system involvement. Among 595 patients, 279 patients received pre-treatment central nervous system evaluation, and 14 patients had central nervous system involvement at diagnosis (2.3% out of entire patients and 5.0% out of the 279 patients). For those patients, median follow-up duration was 38.2 months and some of them achieved long-term survival. Out of 581 patients who did not have central nervous system involvement at diagnosis, 26 patients underwent secondary central nervous system relapse with a median follow-up of 35 months, and the median time to central nervous system involvement was 10.4 months (range: 3.4-29.2). Serum lactate dehydrogenase > ×3 upper limit of normal range, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥ 2, and involvement of sinonasal tract or testis, were independent risk factors for central nervous system relapse in multivariate analysis. Our study suggests that enhanced stratification of serum lactate dehydrogenase according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-International Prognostic Index may contribute to better prediction for central nervous system relapse in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01202448.

  13. Etiologies and prognostic factors of leukocytoclastic vasculitis with skin involvement

    PubMed Central

    Bouiller, Kévin; Audia, Sylvain; Devilliers, Hervé; Collet, Evelyne; Aubriot, Marie Hélène; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Berthier, Sabine; Bonniaud, Philippe; Chavanet, Pascal; Besancenot, Jean-François; Vabres, Pierre; Martin, Laurent; Samson, Maxime; Bonnotte, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, outcomes of patients with leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) were analyzed focusing on clinical, histopathology and laboratory findings, relapses, and survival. Data from patients with cutaneous vasculitis diagnosed between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010, at Dijon University Hospital (France) were retrospectively reviewed. LCV was defined as perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate, endothelial cell nuclear swelling, extravasation of red blood cells, and/or fibrin deposition in vessels. Patients were classified according to the 2012 Chapel Hill Consensus Conference. Relapses were defined as the recurrence of vasculitis symptoms after a period of remission >1 month. Time to relapse and/or death was calculated from the date of diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate (Cox model) analyses were performed. A total of 112 patients (57 males and 55 females), with a mean age of 60 ± 19 (18–98) years, were analyzed. Overall follow-up was 61 ± 38 months. At diagnosis, all patients had skin lesions, purpura being the most common (n = 83). Lesions were associated with systemic involvement in 55 (51%) patients. Only 41 (36.6%) patients received specific treatment: glucocorticoids in 29 of 41 (70.7%) and immunosuppressants in 9 of 41 (22%). Sixty-two patients (55%) had LCV due to underlying causes, 29 (25.9%) had single-organ cutaneous small vessel vasculitis (SoCSVV), and 21 (18.8%) had unclassifiable LCV. Twenty patients of the cohort (18%) experienced relapse, 14 ± 13 (1–40) months after the diagnosis of LCV. None of the 29 patients with SoCSVV relapsed. Independent risk factors for relapse were vascular thrombosis in the biopsy [hazard ratio (HR) = 4.9; P = 0.017], peripheral neuropathy (HR = 9.8; P = 0.001), hepatitis (HR = 3.1; P = 0.004), and positive antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA, HR = 5.9 P = 0.005). In contrast, SoCSVV was a protective factor for relapse (HR = 0.12; P = 0.043). The 1-, 3-, and 6-year overall

  14. CTLA-4 genotype and relapse incidence in patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission after induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, A; Brunet, S; Berlanga, J J; Tormo, M; Nomdedeu, J; Guardia, R; Ribera, J M; Heras, I; Llorente, A; Hoyos, M; Esteve, J; Besalduch, J; Bueno, J; Sierra, J; Gallardo, D

    2009-03-01

    The recently described single-nucleotide polymorphism CT60, located in the 3'-untranslated region of the CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 ) gene, has been associated with susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases and has also been shown to be involved in immune responses following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, the contribution of the CTLA4 genotype to the control of minimal residual disease in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has yet to be explored. We investigated the association between the CTLA4 CT60 A/G genotype and the incidence of leukemic relapse in 143 adult patients with AML in first complete remission after the same chemotherapy protocol (CETLAM LAM'03). The CT60 AA genotype was associated with a higher rate of leukemic relapse (56.4 vs 35.6%, P=0.004; hazard ratio (HR)=2.64, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.36-5.14) and lower overall survival at 3 years (39.4 vs 68.4%, P=0.004; HR=2.80, 95% CI=1.39-5.64). This is the first study to report an association between polymorphisms at CTLA-4 and AML relapse.

  15. Prognostic significance of host immune status in patients with late relapsing renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Buti, Sebastiano; Conti, Alessandro; Porta, Camillo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Sternberg, Cora N; Bracarda, Sergio; Basso, Umberto; De Giorgi, Ugo; Rizzo, Mimma; Derosa, Lisa; Ortega, Cinzia; Massari, Francesco; Milella, Michele; Bersanelli, Melissa; Cerbone, Linda; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Burattini, Luciano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Santini, Daniele; Cascinu, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to assess the prognostic role of pretreatment neutrophilia, lymphocytopenia, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in patients treated with vascular endothelial growth factor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR-TKIs) for late relapsing (>5 years) metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Data were collected from 13 Italian centers involved in the treatment of metastatic RCC. Late relapse was defined as >5 years after initial radical nephrectomy. One hundred fifty-one patients were included in this analysis. Among them, MSKCC risk score was favorable in 68 %, intermediate in 29 %, and poor in 3 %. Fifty-six patients (37 %) had NLR ≥3 at the start of VEGFR-TKI therapy (group A), while 95 had lower NLR (63 %, group B). The median overall survival (OS) was 28.8 months in group A and 68.7 months (95 % confidence interval (CI) 45.3-NA) in group B (p < 0.001). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 15.8 months in group A and 25.1 months in group B (p = 0.03). At multivariate analysis, MSKCC risk group and NLR were independent prognostic factors for both OS and PFS. Pretreatment NLR is an independent prognostic factor for patients with late relapsing mRCC treated with first-line VEGFR-TKIs. A better characterization of baseline immunological impairment may optimize the management of this RCC subpopulation.

  16. Relapsing macrophage activating syndrome in a 15-year-old girl with Still's disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Macrophage activating syndrome is a severe, potentially life-threatening condition that may accompany Still's disease. It is characterized by fever, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, severe cytopenia, serious liver dysfunction, coagulopathy and neurologic involvement. The principal treatment for patients with this syndrome includes etoposide 150 mg/2 M twice a week for two weeks, dexamethasone 10 mg/2 M for two weeks and cyclosporine 3 mg/kg to 5 mg/kg for a longer period. Cases of relapse of macrophage activating syndrome are relatively rare. Case presentation We describe the case of a 15-year-old Iraqi girl with Still's disease who developed macrophage activating syndrome with acute respiratory distress syndrome that required resuscitation and mechanical ventilation. Following intensive treatment, including high dose steroids and cyclosporine, the patient improved significantly. Two weeks after cyclosporine was discontinued, however, she was readmitted with an acute relapse of macrophage activating syndrome manifested by spiking fever, arthralgias, maculopapular rash and leukocytosis. This time the patient recovered following the reintroduction of treatment with cyclosporine and the addition of mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept). Conclusion We believe that cyclosporine is a cornerstone for the treatment of Still's disease. We recommend continuing this medication for several weeks following the patient's clinical recovery in order to prevent macrophage activating syndrome relapses. PMID:20062775

  17. [Psychosocial approach of the speech of women in metastatic relapse of a breast cancer: the question of temporality].

    PubMed

    Pelard, Julie; Apostolidis, Thémis; Ben Soussan, Patrick; Gonçalves, Antony

    2008-09-01

    The "relapse", this word so much dreaded by the patients reached of a cancer because it symbolizes the return of the disease and the treatments in the person's life and his entourage. This diagnosis once established mark the entry into a chronic phase of the cancerous disease, involving the future of people and their report at time. In this context, we believe it is important to identify the subjective and social aspects of the experience of this difficult moment in the course of the disease, by taking account the report at the time of the patients. In this article, we propose a study of these different aspects through a double analysis (lexical thematic manual and with a computer) of semi-structured interviews conducted with patients in metastatic relapse of a breast cancer. The report at time was operationalized at the same time as a variable of personality by using the scale of temporal prospect (PT) Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory ZTPI and through the different linguistic markers, indicators of meaning in the stories of patients. The results of this double analysis highlight different aspects of the speech of the patients, reflecting investments different in the disease at the time of the relapse and and, depending on age and time profiles of patients. However, these results illustrate the links between some aspects of time focusing on the stories of patients and the strategies of adjustments which result from this, allowing an articulation of these concepts around the notion of control.

  18. Bilateral peripheral facial palsy and mastoid infiltration as symptoms of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Leite da Silveira, P; Gonçalves Silva, V; Rizzato Paschoal, J; Nizam Pfeilsticker, L

    2015-02-01

    Although Bell's palsy (BP) is the most common cause of peripheral facial palsy (PFP), other etiologies merit investigation. A 60-year-old female patient presented with recurrent bilateral PFP. Although the patient had a history of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), she had initially been diagnosed with BP-related PFP and had been treated accordingly. When the PFP recurred, additional diagnostic tests were performed. The resulting immunohistochemical profile included CD3 positivity in a few reactive T lymphocytes; positivity for myeloperoxidase in atypical cells; and focal positivity for CD34 and proto-oncogene c-kit proteins in neoplastic cells, thus confirming the suspicion of mastoid infiltration caused by relapsed AML. In patients with neoplastic disease, a finding of PFP calls for extensive investigation in order to rule out the involvement of the temporal bone. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. T lymphocyte-derived demyelinating activity in multiple sclerosis patients in relapse.

    PubMed Central

    Selmaj, K; Alam, R; Perkin, G D; Rose, F C

    1987-01-01

    Supernatants of cultured T lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients were tested for a demyelinating activity in rat cerebellum explant cultures. Supernatants of unstimulated T lymphocytes in seven out of 10 multiple sclerosis patients in relapse produced demyelination when checked by phase contrast microscopy. Supernatants of unstimulated T lymphocytes from healthy subjects did not produce demyelination, but when T cells were stimulated by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), 50% of tested supernatants produced demyelination, which was, however, never as advanced as in multiple sclerosis supernatant treated cerebellum cultures. The demyelinating activity proved to be heat labile. Gel filtration study revealed two fractions of the demyelinating activity 12.5-29.0 kD and 43.0-66.0 kD. The results suggest that lymphokines can be directly involved in the pathogenesis of demyelination in multiple sclerosis. Images PMID:3495638

  20. Glatiramer Acetate Treatment Normalizes Deregulated microRNA Expression in Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Waschbisch, Anne; Atiya, Monika; Linker, Ralf A.; Potapov, Sergej; Schwab, Stefan; Derfuss, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The expression of selected microRNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in the regulation of immune responses was analyzed in 74 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and 32 healthy controls. Four miRNAs (miR-326, miR-155, miR-146a, miR-142-3p) were aberrantly expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from RRMS patients compared to controls. Although expression of these selected miRNAs did not differ between treatment-naïve (n = 36) and interferon-beta treated RRMS patients (n = 18), expression of miR-146a and miR-142-3p was significantly lower in glatiramer acetate (GA) treated RRMS patients (n = 20) suggesting that GA, at least in part, restores the expression of deregulated miRNAs in MS. PMID:21949733

  1. NEURAL SUBSTRATES OF CUE-REACTIVITY: ASSOCIATION WITH TREATMENT OUTCOMES AND RELAPSE

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Schacht, Joseph P.; Hutchison, Kent; Roche, Daniel J.O.; Ray, Lara A.

    2016-01-01

    Given the strong evidence for neurological alterations at the basis of drug dependence, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) represents an important tool in the clinical neuroscience of addiction. fMRI cue-reactivity paradigms represent an ideal platform to probe the involvement of neurobiological pathways subserving the reward/motivation system in addiction and potentially offer a translational mechanism by which interventions and behavioral predictions can be tested. Thus, this review summarizes the research that has applied fMRI cue-reactivity paradigms to the study of adult substance use disorder treatment responses. Studies utilizing fMRI cue-reactivity paradigms for the prediction of relapse, and as a means to investigate psychosocial and pharmacological treatment effects on cue-elicited brain activation are presented within four primary categories of substances: alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, and opioids. Lastly, suggestions for how to leverage fMRI technology to advance addiction science and treatment development are provided. PMID:26435524

  2. Single high-dose etoposide and melphalan with non-cryopreserved autologous marrow rescue as primary therapy for relapsed, refractory and poor-prognosis Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, L. K.; Dansey, R. D.; Bezwoda, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    A simplified schedule of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) consisting of melphalan (140 mg m-2) plus VP16 (2.5 g m-2) given over 12-18 h together with autologous non-cryopreserved autologous bone marrow transplant (ABMT) was used for treatment of relapsed (37 patients) and refractory (seven patients) patients and as first-line treatment (four patients) for poor-prognosis Hodgkin's disease. Two patients had a second HDC-ABMT after relapse following prior HDC-ABMT, giving a total of 50 procedures among 48 patients. The haematological recovery rate was 98% with a complete response rate of the Hodgkin's disease of > 90%. Factors significantly influencing response rate were performance status and the presence of liver involvement. Thirty-nine patients are alive, with 37 in continuous complete remission. The median duration of survival and median duration of remission have not been reached at a median follow-up time of 45 months. Adverse prognostic factors for survival were disease status at the time of HDC-ABMT (refractory versus relapse, with primarily refractory patients showing significantly poor survival) and the presence of liver involvement. High-dose chemotherapy with short-duration chemotherapy and non-cryopreserved bone marrow is an effective and safe treatment modality for patients with relapsed and poor-prognosis Hodgkin's disease. PMID:8080741

  3. Autoimmune-related nasal septum perforation: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Guntupalli, Lohitha; Patel, Kunjan; Faraji, Farhoud

    2017-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory injury of nasal respiratory mucosa is a common feature of multisystem autoimmune disease. Certain autoimmune disorders are associated with nasal septum perforation (NSP). We performed a systematic review of the literature to better understand the association of NSP with specific autoimmune disorders. This is a case report of a 29-year-old woman with a history of arthralgia, autoreactive antibody titers, platelet dysfunction, and NSP. The constellation of symptoms and potential familial involvement indicated that the NSP in this patient was an early sign of an autoimmune disorder, an unknown autoimmune disorder, or a known disease with incomplete penetrance. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed by two independent reviewers. Relevant articles were reviewed, and data that pertained to autoimmune-related NSP were extracted and analyzed. Results: Overall, 140 cases of autoimmune-associated NSPs were reported. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (48%), relapsing polychondritis (26%), and cocaine-induced midline lesions (15%) constituted 89.3% of the reported cases. Conclusion: NSP is a potential sign of systemic disease. The identification of an NSP, especially in the context of other unexplained symptoms or workup suggestive of an autoimmune disorder, should prompt clinical evaluation for multisystem autoimmune disease with consideration of granulomatosis with polyangiitis, relapsing polychondritis, or cocaine-induced midline lesions. PMID:28381327

  4. Phase I Trial of the Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export, KPT-330, in Relapsed Childhood ALL and AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-21

    Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Relapsed Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Refractory Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Relapsed Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Refractory Mixed Lineage Leukemia; Relapsed Biphenotypic Leukemia; Refractory Biphenotypic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in Blast Crisis

  5. Histoplasmosis in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS): multicenter study of outcomes and factors associated with relapse.

    PubMed

    Myint, Thein; Anderson, Albert M; Sanchez, Alejandro; Farabi, Alireza; Hage, Chadi; Baddley, John W; Jhaveri, Malhar; Greenberg, Richard N; Bamberger, David M; Rodgers, Mark; Crawford, Timothy N; Wheat, L Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Although discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated histoplasmosis is accepted for patients with immunologic recovery, there have been no published studies of this approach in clinical practice, and minimal characterization of individuals who relapse with this disease. We performed a multicenter retrospective cohort study to determine the outcome in AIDS patients following discontinuation of suppressive antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis. Ninety-seven patients were divided into a physician-discontinued suppressive therapy group (PD) (38 patients) and a physician-continued suppressive therapy group (PC) (59 patients). The 2 groups were not statistically different at baseline, but at discontinuation of therapy and at the most recent follow-up there were significant differences in adherence to therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RNA, and urinary Histoplasma antigen concentration. There was no relapse or death attributed to histoplasmosis in the PD group compared with 36% relapse (p < 0.0001) and 5% death (p = 0.28) in the PC group. Relapse occurred in 53% of the nonadherent patients but not in the adherent patients (p < 0.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients with initial central nervous system (CNS) histoplasmosis relapsed compared to 15% of patients without CNS involvement (p = 0.0004), which may be accounted for by nonadherence. In addition, patients with antigenuria above 2.0 ng/mL at 1-year follow-up were 12.82 times (95% confidence interval, 2.91-55.56) more likely to relapse compared to those with antigenuria below 2.0 ng/mL. Discontinuation of antifungal therapy was safe in adherent patients who completed at least 1 year of antifungal treatment, and had CD4 counts >150 cells/mL, HIV RNA <400 c/mL, Histoplasma antigenuria <2 ng/mL (equivalent to <4.0 units in second-generation method), and no CNS histoplasmosis.

  6. Change in Pattern of Relapse After Antiangiogenic Therapy in High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha; Kunnakkat, Saroj D.; Medabalmi, Praveen; Golfinos, John; Parker, Erik; Knopp, Edmond; Zagzag, David; Eagan, Patricia; Gruber, Deborah; Gruber, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is the dominant pattern of relapse in high-grade glioma (HGG) after conventional therapy. The recent use of antiangiogenic therapy has shown impressive radiologic and clinical responses in adult HGG. The preclinical data suggesting increased invasiveness after angiogenic blockade have necessitated a detailed analysis of the pattern of recurrence after therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 162 consecutive patients with HGG, either newly diagnosed (n = 58) or with recurrent disease (n = 104) underwent therapy with bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks and conventional chemotherapy with or without involved field radiotherapy until disease progression. The pattern of recurrence and interval to progression were the primary aims of the present study. Diffuse invasive recurrence (DIR) was defined as the involvement of multiple lobes with or without crossing the midline. Results: At a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 1-37), 105 patients had recurrence, and 79 patients ultimately developed DIR. The interval to progression was similar in the DIR and local recurrence groups (6.5 and 6.3 months, p = .296). The hazard risk of DIR increased exponentially with time and was similar in those with newly diagnosed and recurrent HGG (R{sup 2} = 0.957). The duration of bevacizumab therapy increased the interval to recurrence (p < .0001) and improved overall survival (p < .0001). However, the pattern of relapse did not affect overall survival (p = .253). Conclusion: Along with an increase in median progression-free survival, bevacizumab therapy increased the risk of DIR in HGG patients. The risk of increased invasion with prolonged angiogenic blockade should be addressed in future clinical trials.

  7. Definitions and drivers of relapse in patients with schizophrenia: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Relapse in patients with schizophrenia has devastating repercussions, including worsening symptoms, impaired functioning, cognitive deterioration and reduced quality of life. This progressive decline exacerbates the burden of illness on patients and their families. Relapse prevention is identified as a key therapeutic aim; however, the absence of widely accepted relapse definition criteria considerably hampers achieving this goal. We conducted a literature review in order to investigate the reporting of relapses and the validity of hospitalization as a proxy for relapse in patients with schizophrenia. The primary aim was to assess the range and validity of methods used to define relapse in observational or naturalistic settings. The secondary aim was to capture information on factors that predicted or influenced the risk of relapse. A structured search of the PubMed database identified articles that discussed relapse, and hospitalization as a proxy of relapse, in patients with schizophrenia. National and international guidelines were also reviewed. Of the 150 publications and guidelines identified, 87 defined relapse and 62% of these discussed hospitalization. Where hospitalization was discussed, this was as a proxy for, or a component of, relapse in the majority of cases. However, hospitalization duration and type varied and were not always well defined. Scales were used to define relapse in 53 instances; 10 different scales were used and multiple scales often appeared within the same definition. There were 95 references to factors that may drive relapse, including non-adherence to antipsychotic medication (21/95), stress/depression (11/95) and substance abuse (9/95). Twenty-five publications discussed the potential of antipsychotic therapy to reduce relapse rates—continuous antipsychotic therapy was associated with reduced frequency and duration of hospitalization. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as psychoeducation and cognitive behavioural therapy

  8. Pattern of relapse in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in a tertiary care unit.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Emad Uddin; Kazi, Sayyeda Ghazala; Habib, Muhammad Irfan; Ahmed Khan, Khalid Mehmood; Zia, Nukhba

    2016-08-01

    To determine the frequency, site and time to relapse from diagnosis, and to see the relationship of relapse with important prognostic factors. The prospective descriptive observational study was conducted at the National Institute of Child Health, Karachi, June 2005 to May 2007, and comprised newly-diagnosed cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Bone marrow aspiration was done on reappearance of blast cells in peripheral smear and cerebrospinal fluid. Detailed report was done each time when intra-thecal chemotherapy was given or there were signs and symptoms suggestive of central nervous system relapse. SPSS 12 was used for data analysis. Of the 60 patients enrolled, 4(6.6%) expired and 1(1.7%) was lost to follow-up. Of the 55(91.6%) who comprised the study sample, 35(58%) were males and 25(42%) females. Mean age of relapse was 6.8±3.27 years. Mean time to relapse from diagnosis was 1.3±0.54 years; 12(20%) patients suffered relapse, and of them 5(14%) were boys. Central nervous system relapse in 8(67%) patients was the most common site, with 3(25%) bone-marrow relapses. Out of 12 patient with relapses, 9(75%) had white blood cell count less than 50,000/cm. Relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was common, although treatment modalities are improving day by day.

  9. [Clinical and biological prognostic factors in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    PubMed

    Yébenes-Ramírez, Manuel; Serrano, Josefina; Martínez-Losada, Carmen; Sánchez-García, Joaquín

    2016-09-02

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most frequent type of acute leukemia in adults. Despite recent advances in the characterization of pathogenesis of AML, the cure rates are under 40%, being leukemia relapse the most common cause of treatment failure. Leukaemia relapse occurs due to clonal evolution or clonal escape. In this study, we aimed to analyze the clinical and biological factors influencing outcomes in patients with AML relapse. We included a total of 75 AML patients who experienced leukaemia relapse after achieving complete remission. We performed complete immunophenotyping and conventional karyotyping in bone marrow aspirates obtained at diagnosis and at leukemia relapse. Overall survival (OS) of the series was 3.7%±2.3, leukaemia progression being the most common cause of death. Patients relapsing before 12 months and those with adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk had statistically significant worse outcomes. A percentage of 52.5 of patients showed phenotypic changes and 50% cytogenetic changes at relapse. We did not find significant clinical factors predicting clonal evolution. The presence of clonal evolution at relapse did not have a significant impact on outcome. Patients with relapsed AML have a dismal prognosis, especially those with early relapse and adverse cytogenetic-molecular risk. Clonal evolution with phenotypic and cytogenetic changes occurred in half of the patients without predictive clinical factors or impact on outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Relapse of tuberculosis versus primary tuberculosis; course, pathogenesis and therapy in mice.

    PubMed

    de Steenwinkel, Jurriaan E M; de Knegt, Gerjo J; ten Kate, Marian T; Verbrugh, Henri A; Hernandez-Pando, R; Leenen, Pieter J M; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2013-03-01

    Relapse of tuberculosis (TB) is defined as re-emergence of clinical symptoms after stopping anti-TB treatment, while this treatment appeared effective initially. Relapse of TB can occur in patients that are therapy-compliant, but the risk of relapse is dramatically increased when patients are non-compliant. Additionally, the probability of antibiotic resistance is higher in those patients who have a relapse of TB and thus longer treatment is recommended. Further insight in the pathogenesis of relapsing TB could provide a basis for future treatment improvement. In the present study, using a murine TB model, we assessed the differences between primary TB and relapse of TB in terms of mycobacterial load in infected organs, (immuno-) histopathology, and plasma cytokine concentrations. Compared to primary TB, in relapse of TB we observed a lower mycobacterial load in lung, spleen and liver at the phase of established infection. Also the levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, MIG/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10 and IL-17 were significantly lower. It was observed that in relapse of TB memory Th-1 cells were locally and systemically expanded and congregated in the lung, permitting an efficient control of Mtb growth. Treatment response in relapse of TB is as good as the treatment response in primary TB; thereby no supportive evidence could be given for the recommended longer treatment duration in case of relapse of TB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tracing the origins of relapse in acute myeloid leukaemia to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shlush, Liran I; Mitchell, Amanda; Heisler, Lawrence; Abelson, Sagi; Ng, Stanley W K; Trotman-Grant, Aaron; Medeiros, Jessie J F; Rao-Bhatia, Abilasha; Jaciw-Zurakowsky, Ivana; Marke, Rene; McLeod, Jessica L; Doedens, Monica; Bader, Gary; Voisin, Veronique; Xu, ChangJiang; McPherson, John D; Hudson, Thomas J; Wang, Jean C Y; Minden, Mark D; Dick, John E

    2017-07-06

    In acute myeloid leukaemia, long-term survival is poor as most patients relapse despite achieving remission. Historically, the failure of therapy has been thought to be due to mutations that produce drug resistance, possibly arising as a consequence of the mutagenic properties of chemotherapy drugs. However, other lines of evidence have pointed to the pre-existence of drug-resistant cells. For example, deep sequencing of paired diagnosis and relapse acute myeloid leukaemia samples has provided direct evidence that relapse in some cases is generated from minor genetic subclones present at diagnosis that survive chemotherapy, suggesting that resistant cells are generated by evolutionary processes before treatment and are selected by therapy. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of therapy failure and capacity for leukaemic regeneration remain obscure, as sequence analysis alone does not provide insight into the cell types that are fated to drive relapse. Although leukaemia stem cells have been linked to relapse owing to their dormancy and self-renewal properties, and leukaemia stem cell gene expression signatures are highly predictive of therapy failure, experimental studies have been primarily correlative and a role for leukaemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukaemia relapse has not been directly proved. Here, through combined genetic and functional analysis of purified subpopulations and xenografts from paired diagnosis/relapse samples, we identify therapy-resistant cells already present at diagnosis and two major patterns of relapse. In some cases, relapse originated from rare leukaemia stem cells with a haematopoietic stem/progenitor cell phenotype, while in other instances relapse developed from larger subclones of immunophenotypically committed leukaemia cells that retained strong stemness transcriptional signatures. The identification of distinct patterns of relapse should lead to improved methods for disease management and monitoring in acute myeloid leukaemia

  12. [Effect of cerebrolysin on remyelination processes in multiple sclerosis patients in stage of relapse regression].

    PubMed

    Khabirov, F A; Khaybullin, T I; Granatov, E V; Shakirzianova, S R

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin (EVER Neuro Pharma GmbH, Austria) in the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in stage of relapse regression. The study involved 40 patients with remitting MS (McDonald criteria 2010) in stage of MS relapse regression after pulse therapy with methylprednisolone 1000 mg/day 5. Patients randomized into 2 groups: group 1 (G1, n=20) received cerebrolysin 20 ml per 200 ml of 0.9% NaCl solution 1 times per day 10; Group 2 (G2, n=20) - only 200 ml 0.9% NaCl solution on analogical scheme. All patients before and 3-4 weeks after the treatment were carried out assessment of vital signs, routine laboratory tests, tests of cognitive-motor functions (SDMT), visual acuity (LCAT), a comprehensive neurophysiological examinations (CNE). 4 patients in the G1 with presence of previously identified G+ lesions (G+L) were conducted MRI of brain after 3-4 weeks after treatment. In G1 the average age of the patients was 27.35 (5.65) years, the ratio of M/F - 40/60%, the duration of the disease 29.9 (11.01) months, the EDSS in relapse stage - 3.5 [2.0; 4.5] points. The average age of patients in G2 was 26.65 (4.93) years, the ratio of M/F - 35/65%, the duration of the disease - 30.25 (11.98) months, the EDSS in relapse stage - 3.0 [1.5; 4.5] points. Clinical relapse of MS was categorized into groups as follows: optic neuritis (15% vs. 30%; p=0.26), stem dysfunction (15% vs. 25%; p=0.43), hemispheric dysfunction (50% vs. 35%; p=0.34), transverse myelitis (20% vs. 10%; p=0.38). 17 patients (85%) in G1 and 18 patients (90%) in G2 completed a full course of treatment. In both groups showed significant regression estimation EDSS (2.0 [1.75; 2.5] vs. 2.5 [1.75; 2.5]), while significant intergroup differences were not found (p=0.665). In G1 was noted more pronounced dynamics of performance improved in testing MSFC and SDMT (p=0.038 and p=0.026, respectively). Significant intergroup differences in the dynamics of improvement VCAT

  13. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone for relapsed or refractory myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Abonour, Rafat; Cohen, Adam D.; Bensinger, William I.; Gasparetto, Cristina; Kaufman, Jonathan L.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Vogl, Dan T.; Gomes, Christina L.; Pascucci, Natalia; Smith, David D.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Durie, Brian G. M.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with heavily pretreated relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma remain limited. We evaluated a novel therapeutic regimen consisting of carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone (CPD) in an open-label, multicenter, phase 1, dose-escalation study. Patients who relapsed after prior therapy or were refractory to the most recently received therapy were eligible. All patients were refractory to prior lenalidomide. Patients received carfilzomib IV on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 (starting dose of 20/27 mg/m2), pomalidomide once daily on days 1 to 21 (4 mg as the initial dose level), and dexamethasone (40 mg oral or IV) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of 28-day cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the regimen. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. The MTD of the regimen was dose level 1 (carfilzomib 20/27 mg/m2, pomalidomide 4 mg, dexamethasone 40 mg). Hematologic adverse events (AEs) occurred in ≥60% of all patients, including 11 patients with grade ≥3 anemia. Dyspnea was limited to grade 1/2 in 10 patients. Peripheral neuropathy was uncommon and limited to grade 1/2. Eight patients had dose reductions during therapy, and 7 patients discontinued treatment due to AEs. Two deaths were noted on study due to pneumonia and pulmonary embolism (n = 1 each). The combination of CPD is well-tolerated and highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01464034. PMID:26384354

  14. Carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone for relapsed or refractory myeloma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jatin J; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Abonour, Rafat; Cohen, Adam D; Bensinger, William I; Gasparetto, Cristina; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Vogl, Dan T; Gomes, Christina L; Pascucci, Natalia; Smith, David D; Orlowski, Robert Z; Durie, Brian G M

    2015-11-12

    Treatment options for patients with heavily pretreated relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma remain limited. We evaluated a novel therapeutic regimen consisting of carfilzomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone (CPD) in an open-label, multicenter, phase 1, dose-escalation study. Patients who relapsed after prior therapy or were refractory to the most recently received therapy were eligible. All patients were refractory to prior lenalidomide. Patients received carfilzomib IV on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 (starting dose of 20/27 mg/m(2)), pomalidomide once daily on days 1 to 21 (4 mg as the initial dose level), and dexamethasone (40 mg oral or IV) on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of 28-day cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the safety and determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the regimen. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. The MTD of the regimen was dose level 1 (carfilzomib 20/27 mg/m(2), pomalidomide 4 mg, dexamethasone 40 mg). Hematologic adverse events (AEs) occurred in ≥60% of all patients, including 11 patients with grade ≥3 anemia. Dyspnea was limited to grade 1/2 in 10 patients. Peripheral neuropathy was uncommon and limited to grade 1/2. Eight patients had dose reductions during therapy, and 7 patients discontinued treatment due to AEs. Two deaths were noted on study due to pneumonia and pulmonary embolism (n = 1 each). The combination of CPD is well-tolerated and highly active in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01464034.

  15. Targeting BTK with Ibrutinib in Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, John C.; Furman, Richard R.; Coutre, Steven E.; Flinn, Ian W.; Burger, Jan A.; Blum, Kristie A.; Grant, Barbara; Sharman, Jeff P.; Coleman, Morton; Wierda, William G.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Heerema, Nyla A.; Johnson, Amy J.; Sukbuntherng, Juthamas; Chang, Betty Y.; Clow, Fong; Hedrick, Eric; Buggy, Joseph J.; James, Danelle F.; O'Brien, Susan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has resulted in few durable remissions. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), an essential component of B-cell–receptor signaling, mediates interactions with the tumor microenvironment and promotes the survival and proliferation of CLL cells. METHODS We conducted a phase 1b–2 multicenter study to assess the safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of ibrutinib (PCI-32765), a first-in-class, oral covalent inhibitor of BTK designed for treatment of B-cell cancers, in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma. A total of 85 patients, the majority of whom were considered to have high-risk disease, received ibrutinib orally once daily; 51 received 420 mg, and 34 received 840 mg. RESULTS Toxic effects were predominantly grade 1 or 2 and included transient diarrhea, fatigue, and upper respiratory tract infection; thus, patients could receive extended treatment with minimal hematologic toxic effects. The overall response rate was the same in the group that received 420 mg and the group that received 840 mg (71%), and an additional 20% and 15% of patients in the respective groups had a partial response with lymphocytosis. The response was independent of clinical and genomic risk factors present before treatment, including advanced-stage disease, the number of previous therapies, and the 17p13.1 deletion. At 26 months, the estimated progression-free survival rate was 75% and the rate of overall survival was 83%. CONCLUSIONS Ibrutinib was associated with a high frequency of durable remissions in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL and small lymphocytic lymphoma, including patients with high-risk genetic lesions. (Funded by Pharmacyclics and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01105247.) PMID:23782158

  16. Activation of Melatonin Receptors Reduces Relapse-Like Alcohol Consumption.

    PubMed

    Vengeliene, Valentina; Noori, Hamid R; Spanagel, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Melatonin is an endogenous synchronizer of biological rhythms and a modulator of physiological functions and behaviors of all mammals. Reduced levels of melatonin and a delay of its nocturnal peak concentration have been found in alcohol-dependent patients and rats. Here we investigated whether the melatonergic system is a novel target to treat alcohol addiction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to long-term voluntary alcohol consumption with repeated abstinence phases. Circadian drinking rhythmicity and patterns were registered with high temporal resolution by a drinkometer system and analyzed by Fourier analysis. We examined potential antirelapse effect of the novel antidepressant drug agomelatine. Given that agomelatine is a potent MT1 and MT2 receptor agonist and a 5-HT2C antagonist we also tested the effects of melatonin itself and the 5-HT2C antagonist SB242084. All drugs reduced relapse-like drinking. Agomelatine and melatonin administered at the end of the light phase led to very similar changes on all measures of the post-abstinence drinking behavior, suggesting that effects of agomelatine on relapse-like behavior are mostly driven by its melatonergic activity. Both drugs caused a clear phase advance in the diurnal drinking pattern when compared with the control vehicle-treated group and a reduced frequency of approaches to alcohol bottles. Melatonin given at the onset of the light phase had no effect on the circadian phase and very small effects on alcohol consumption. We conclude that targeting the melatonergic system in alcohol-dependent individuals can induce a circadian phase advance, which may restore normal sleep architecture and reduce relapse behavior.

  17. Acamprosate Produces Its Anti-Relapse Effects Via Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Spanagel, Rainer; Vengeliene, Valentina; Jandeleit, Bernd; Fischer, Wolf-Nicolas; Grindstaff, Kent; Zhang, Xuexiang; Gallop, Mark A; Krstew, Elena V; Lawrence, Andrew J; Kiefer, Falk

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholism is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric diseases, having an enormous health and socioeconomic impact. Along with a few other medications, acamprosate (Campral—calcium-bis (N-acetylhomotaurinate)) is clinically used in many countries for relapse prevention. Although there is accumulated evidence suggesting that acamprosate interferes with the glutamate system, the molecular mode of action still remains undefined. Here we show that acamprosate does not interact with proposed glutamate receptor mechanisms. In particular, acamprosate does not interact with NMDA receptors or metabotropic glutamate receptor group I. In three different preclinical animal models of either excessive alcohol drinking, alcohol-seeking, or relapse-like drinking behavior, we demonstrate that N-acetylhomotaurinate by itself is not an active psychotropic molecule. Hence, the sodium salt of N-acetylhomotaurinate (i) is ineffective in alcohol-preferring rats to reduce operant responding for ethanol, (ii) is ineffective in alcohol-seeking rats in a cue-induced reinstatement paradigm, (iii) and is ineffective in rats with an alcohol deprivation effect. Surprisingly, calcium salts produce acamprosate-like effects in all three animal models. We conclude that calcium is the active moiety of acamprosate. Indeed, when translating these findings to the human situation, we found that patients with high plasma calcium levels due to acamprosate treatment showed better primary efficacy parameters such as time to relapse and cumulative abstinence. We conclude that N-acetylhomotaurinate is a biologically inactive molecule and that the effects of acamprosate described in more than 450 published original investigations and clinical trials and 1.5 million treated patients can possibly be attributed to calcium. PMID:24081303

  18. Diagnostic algorithm for relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes in children.

    PubMed

    Hacohen, Yael; Mankad, Kshitij; Chong, W K; Barkhof, Frederik; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Ciccarelli, Olga; Hemingway, Cheryl

    2017-07-18

    To establish whether children with relapsing acquired demyelinating syndromes (RDS) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Ab) show distinctive clinical and radiologic features and to generate a diagnostic algorithm for the main RDS for clinical use. A panel reviewed the clinical characteristics, MOG-Ab and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) Ab, intrathecal oligoclonal bands, and Epstein-Barr virus serology results of 110 children with RDS. A neuroradiologist blinded to the diagnosis scored the MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and serologic tests results were compared. The findings showed that 56.4% of children were diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), 25.4% with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 12.7% with multiphasic disseminated encephalomyelitis (MDEM), and 5.5% with relapsing optic neuritis (RON). Blinded analysis defined baseline MRI as typical of MS in 93.5% of children with MS. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presentation was seen only in the non-MS group. Of NMOSD cases, 30.7% were AQP4-Ab positive. MOG-Ab were found in 83.3% of AQP4-Ab-negative NMOSD, 100% of MDEM, and 33.3% of RON. Children with MOG-Ab were younger, were less likely to present with area postrema syndrome, and had lower disability, longer time to relapse, and more cerebellar peduncle lesions than children with AQP4-Ab NMOSD. A diagnostic algorithm applicable to any episode of CNS demyelination leads to 4 main phenotypes: MS, AQP4-Ab NMOSD, MOG-Ab-associated disease, and antibody-negative RDS. Children with MS and AQP4-Ab NMOSD showed features typical of adult cases. Because MOG-Ab-positive children showed notable and distinctive clinical and MRI features, they were grouped into a unified phenotype (MOG-Ab-associated disease), included in a new diagnostic algorithm. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Mindfulness Meditation for Alcohol Relapse Prevention: A Feasibility Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Zuelsdorff, Megan; Coe, Christopher; Miller, Michael; Fleming, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Meditation is a promising treatment for alcohol dependence. This 16-week prospective case series was designed to gather preliminary data about the efficacy of meditation for relapse prevention and to evaluate study methods feasibility. Methods Nineteen adult alcohol-dependent graduates of an intensive outpatient program were enrolled. Fifteen subjects completed the 8-week meditation course supplemented by at-home meditation and “standard of care” therapy. Outcome measures included surveys and 2 stress-responsive biomarkers. Results Subjects (N = 19, 38.4 standard deviation [SD] = 8.6-year-old) were abstinent for 30.9 (SD = 22.2) days at enrollment. Completers (N = 15) attended 82% of meditation course sessions and meditated on average 4.6 (SD = 1.1) days per week; they were abstinent on 94.5% (SD = 7.4) of study days, with 47% reporting complete abstinence and 47% reporting 1 or more heavy drinking days. Their severity of depression, anxiety, stress (P < 0.05), and craving (P < 0.08), documented relapse triggers, decreased, and the degree of mindfulness increased (P < 0.05). The meditation course was rated as a “very important” (8.7/10, SD = 1.8) and “useful relapse prevention tool” (8.5/10, SD = 2.1); participants reported being “very likely” to continue meditating (9.0/10, SD = 1.5). “Gaining skills to reduce stress,” “coping with craving,” and “good group support” were the most common qualitative comments about the course value. Compared with baseline, at 16 weeks, interleukin-6 levels decreased (N = 12, P = 0.05); cortisol levels (N = 10) were reduced but not significantly. There were no adverse events or side effects. Conclusions Meditation may be an effective adjunctive therapy for relapse prevention in alcohol dependence, worthy of investigation in a larger trial. The study methods are appropriate for such a trial. PMID:21768988

  20. Relapsing thrombotic microangiopathy and intravenous sustained-release oxycodone

    PubMed Central

    Nataatmadja, Melissa; Divi, Dakshinamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) associated with injecting sustained-release oxymorphone, an opioid intended for oral use, has previously been reported. We report a case of TMA secondary to intravenous use of sustained-release oxycodone, and the first case to demonstrate relapsing disease due to persistent intravenous opioid use. In cases such as these, TMA is suspected to be due to a polyethylene oxide (PEO) coating found on these drugs, and the disease is likely due to a directly toxic effect of PEO to endothelial cells. We hypothesize that there are unidentified genetic predispositions causing some persons to be susceptible to developing this disease. PMID:27478601

  1. [A relapse of multiple sclerosis manifesting as acute delirium].

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Pinedo, F; Galindo, R; Adeva-Bartolomé, M T; Zurdo, M

    2004-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms are infrequent in multiple sclerosis (MS) and their relationship to cerebral lesions has not been clearly documented. The case of a 58 year old woman with secondary progressive MS is presented. She had acute delirium with persecutory delusions associated to paresis of her left leg. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed an active lesion in the left hippocampus. The patient was treated with risperidone and megadoses of methylprednisolone, with dramatic improvement. Clinical and radiological data in this patient suggest that psychotic disorders can be symptomatic of a relapse in MS and, therefore, susceptible to be treated with steroids.

  2. Late Ebola virus relapse causing meningoencephalitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Michael; Rodger, Alison; Bell, David J; Bhagani, Sanjay; Cropley, Ian; Filipe, Ana; Gifford, Robert J; Hopkins, Susan; Hughes, Joseph; Jabeen, Farrah; Johannessen, Ingolfur; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos; Lackenby, Angie; Lester, Rebecca; Liu, Rebecca S N; MacConnachie, Alisdair; Mahungu, Tabitha; Martin, Daniel; Marshall, Neal; Mepham, Stephen; Orton, Richard; Palmarini, Massimo; Patel, Monika; Perry, Colin; Peters, S Erica; Porter, Duncan; Ritchie, David; Ritchie, Neil D; Seaton, R Andrew; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Templeton, Kate; Warren, Simon; Wilkie, Gavin S; Zambon, Maria; Gopal, Robin; Thomson, Emma C

    2016-07-30

    There are thousands of survivors of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in west Africa. Ebola virus can persist in survivors for months in immune-privileged sites; however, viral relapse causing life-threatening and potentially transmissible disease has not been described. We report a case of late relapse in a patient who had been treated for severe Ebola virus disease with high viral load (peak cycle threshold value 13.2). A 39-year-old female nurse from Scotland, who had assisted the humanitarian effort in Sierra Leone, had received intensive supportive treatment and experimental antiviral therapies, and had been discharged with undetectable Ebola virus RNA in peripheral blood. The patient was readmitted to hospital 9 months after discharge with symptoms of acute meningitis, and was found to have Ebola virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). She was treated with supportive therapy and experimental antiviral drug GS-5734 (Gilead Sciences, San Francisco, Foster City, CA, USA). We monitored Ebola virus RNA in CSF and plasma, and sequenced the viral genome using an unbiased metagenomic approach. On admission, reverse transcriptase PCR identified Ebola virus RNA at a higher level in CSF (cycle threshold value 23.7) than plasma (31.3); infectious virus was only recovered from CSF. The patient developed progressive meningoencephalitis with cranial neuropathies and radiculopathy. Clinical recovery was associated with addition of high-dose corticosteroids during GS-5734 treatment. CSF Ebola virus RNA slowly declined and was undetectable following 14 days of treatment with GS-5734. Sequencing of plasma and CSF viral genome revealed only two non-coding changes compared with the original infecting virus. Our report shows that previously unanticipated, late, severe relapses of Ebola virus can occur, in this case in the CNS. This finding fundamentally redefines what is known about the natural history of Ebola virus infection. Vigilance should be maintained in the thousands of Ebola survivors

  3. Borrelia miyamotoi: a widespread tick-borne relapsing fever spirochete.

    PubMed

    Wagemakers, Alex; Staarink, Pieter J; Sprong, Hein; Hovius, Joppe W R

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever spirochete that has only recently been identified as a human pathogen. Borrelia miyamotoi is genetically and ecologically distinct from Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, while both are present in Ixodes ticks. Over 50 patients with an acute febrile illness have been described with a B. miyamotoi infection, and two infected immunocompromised patients developed a meningoencephalitis. Seroprevalence studies indicate exposure in the general population and in specific risk groups, such as patients initially suspected of having human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Here, we review the available literature on B. miyamotoi, describing its presence in ticks, reservoir hosts, and humans, and discussing its potential impact on public health.

  4. Gastric ulcer healing with tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate and subsequent relapse.

    PubMed

    Sutton, D R

    1982-07-01

    Fifty patients with endoscopically proven gastric ulcers completed a one month double-blind randomised trial of tripotassium dicitrato bismuthate (TBD) (DeNol) compared with an identical placebo. Ulcer healing occurred in 18 (72%) of the 25 patients given TDB and in nine (36%) of the patients given placebo. The TDB group experienced significantly less pain than the placebo group. During a follow-up of 29 patients with healed ulcers for up to 44 months, relapse occurred in 13 (45%). It was highest in the first three months (27%) and had risen to 41% at two years.

  5. Treatment of chronic relapsing inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy by plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Server, A C; Lefkowith, J; Braine, H; McKhann, G M

    1979-09-01

    A 58-year-old man developed recurrent episodes of symmetrical motor weakness associated with acroparesthesias and areflexia. The cerebrospinal fluid protein was elevated and nerve conduction velocities were slowed. There was no evidence of systemic disease or toxic exposure, and a diagnosis of chronic relapsing inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy was made. The patient improved during treatment with corticosteroids, but steroid-induced complications necessitated discontinuance. A recrudescence of symptoms prompted a search for alternative therapy, and plasma exchange was tried. A marked improvement in strength was noted following each course of plasma exchange, suggesting that further similar trials are justified.

  6. Cutaneous metastasis revealing a relapse of gastric linitis: Another case

    PubMed Central

    Kairouani, Mouna; Perrin, Julie; Dietemann-Barabinot, Anne; Diab, Rafiq; Ruck, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cutaneous metastasis from gastric cancer is a rare occurrence. The linitis gastric carcinoma accounts only 8.7% of all gastric cancers. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of female patient who was followed for linits cancer with peritoneal metastasis treated by six cycles of chemotherapy. After seventeen months of control, the relapse of the disease revealed by occurrence of cutaneous metastatsis. DISCUSSION Cutaneous metastasis from linit gastric is rare and the prognostic remains poor. The treatment is palliative. CONCLUSION This rare presentation should encourage the practitioners to biopsy any suspicion skin lesion. PMID:23276763

  7. Cutaneous metastasis revealing a relapse of gastric linitis: Another case.

    PubMed

    Kairouani, Mouna; Perrin, Julie; Dietemann-Barabinot, Anne; Diab, Rafiq; Ruck, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from gastric cancer is a rare occurrence. The linitis gastric carcinoma accounts only 8.7% of all gastric cancers. We report a case of female patient who was followed for linits cancer with peritoneal metastasis treated by six cycles of chemotherapy. After seventeen months of control, the relapse of the disease revealed by occurrence of cutaneous metastatsis. Cutaneous metastasis from linit gastric is rare and the prognostic remains poor. The treatment is palliative. This rare presentation should encourage the practitioners to biopsy any suspicion skin lesion. Copyright © 2012 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tafenoquine for preventing relapse in people with Plasmodium vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax malaria is widespread, and the persistent liver stage causes relapse of the disease which contributes to continued P. vivax transmission. Primaquine is currently the only drug that cures the parasite liver stage, but requires 14 days to be effective and can cause haemolysis in people with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In addition, there is some evidence of parasite resistance to the drug. Tafenoquine is a new alternative with a longer half-life. Objectives To assess the effects of tafenoquine in people with P. vivax infection. Search methods We searched the following databases up to 13 April 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; SCOPUS; and LILACS. We also searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trial Registry Platform and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) for ongoing trials using "tafenoquine" and "malaria" as search terms up to 13 April 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in people with P. vivax malaria. Adverse effects of tafenoquine are assessed in populations where people with G6PD deficiency have been excluded, and in populations without screening for G6PD deficiency. Data collection and analysis All review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Meta-analysis was carried out where appropriate, and estimates given as relative risk with 95% confidence intervals. We assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Main results Three RCTs met our inclusion criteria, with the asexual infection in both the tafenoquine and comparator arm treated with chloroquine, and in all trials G6PD deficiency patients were excluded. Tafenoquine dose comparisons Three of the included trials compared eight different dosing regimens. Tafenoquine doses of 300 mg and above resulted

  9. Oncological outcomes in patients with stage I testicular seminoma and nonseminoma: pathological risk factors for relapse and feasibility of surveillance after orchiectomy.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Saito, Toshihiro; Kitamura, Yasuo; Nobushita, Tomohiro; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hara, Noboru; Takahashi, Kota

    2013-04-08

    Surveillance after orchiectomy has recently been a management option in patients with stage I seminoma, while it remains controversial in those with stage I nonseminoma, and the risk factor associated with relapse is still a matter of concern in both entities. This study was performed to explore pathological risk factors for post-orchiectomy relapse in patients with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma, and to assess oncological outcomes in those managed with surveillance. In this single institution study, 118 and 40 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma were reviewed, respectively. Of the 118 patients with stage I seminoma, 56 and one received adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, respectively, and 61 were managed with surveillance. Of the 40 men with stage I nonseminoma, 4 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and 36 were managed with surveillance. No patient had cause-specific death during the mean observation period of 104 and 99 months in men with seminoma and nonseminoma, respectively. In men with stage I seminoma, 1 (1.7%) receiving radiotherapy and 4 (6.6%) men managed with surveillance had disease relapse; the 10-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was 93.4% in men managed with surveillance, and their RFS was not different from that in patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (log rank P=0.15). Patients with tunica albuginea involvement showed a poorer RFS than those without (10-year RFS rate 80.0% vs. 94.1%), although the difference was of borderline significance (P=0.09). In men with stage I nonseminoma, 9 (22.5%) patients experienced relapse. Patients with lymphovascular invasion seemingly had a poorer RFS than those without; 40.0% and 18.7% of the patients with and without lymphovascular invasion had disease relapse, respectively, although the difference was not significant (log rank P=0.17). In both men with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma, surveillance after orchiectomy is a feasible option. However, disease extension through tunica

  10. Oncological outcomes in patients with stage I testicular seminoma and nonseminoma: pathological risk factors for relapse and feasibility of surveillance after orchiectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surveillance after orchiectomy has recently been a management option in patients with stage I seminoma, while it remains controversial in those with stage I nonseminoma, and the risk factor associated with relapse is still a matter of concern in both entities. This study was performed to explore pathological risk factors for post-orchiectomy relapse in patients with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma, and to assess oncological outcomes in those managed with surveillance. Methods In this single institution study, 118 and 40 consecutive patients with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma were reviewed, respectively. Of the 118 patients with stage I seminoma, 56 and one received adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy, respectively, and 61 were managed with surveillance. Of the 40 men with stage I nonseminoma, 4 underwent adjuvant chemotherapy and 36 were managed with surveillance. Results No patient had cause-specific death during the mean observation period of 104 and 99 months in men with seminoma and nonseminoma, respectively. In men with stage I seminoma, 1 (1.7%) receiving radiotherapy and 4 (6.6%) men managed with surveillance had disease relapse; the 10-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was 93.4% in men managed with surveillance, and their RFS was not different from that in patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (logrank P=0.15). Patients with tunica albuginea involvement showed a poorer RFS than those without (10-year RFS rate 80.0% vs. 94.1%), although the difference was of borderline significance (P=0.09). In men with stage I nonseminoma, 9 (22.5%) patients experienced relapse. Patients with lymphovascular invasion seemingly had a poorer RFS than those without; 40.0% and 18.7% of the patients with and without lymphovascular invasion had disease relapse, respectively, although the difference was not significant (logrank P=0.17). Conclusion In both men with stage I seminoma and nonseminoma, surveillance after orchiectomy is a feasible option

  11. Cognitive reactions to smoking relapse: the reciprocal relation between dissonance and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, F X; Eggleston, T J; Benthin, A C

    1997-01-01

    Perceptions of health risk associated with smoking, commitment to quitting, and self-concept were assessed among smokers before, during, and after their participation in cessation clinics. Consistent with expectations derived from cognitive dissonance theory, results indicated that relapsers' perception of risk declined after they resumed smoking, although the decline was significant only for relapsers with high self-esteem; high self-esteem relapsers experienced a significantly greater decline in commitment to quitting than did low self-esteem relapsers; and decline in risk perception among relapsers was associated with maintenance of self-esteem. The implications of these results for dissonance theory and the study of smoking relapse and cessation are discussed.

  12. Predictors of relapse in the year after hospital discharge among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schennach, Rebecca; Obermeier, Michael; Meyer, Sebastian; Jäger, Markus; Schmauss, Max; Laux, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Herbert; Naber, Dieter; Schmidt, Lutz G; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Heuser, Isabella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lemke, Matthias R; Rüther, Eckart; Klingberg, Stefan; Gastpar, Markus; Seemüller, Florian; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Relapse and its predictors were examined among patients with schizophrenia in the year after hospital discharge. The sample included 200 patients with schizophrenia participating in a German multicenter study. Relapse was defined as a worsening of psychopathological symptoms or rehospitalization in the year after hospital discharge. Predictors examined were variables related to course of illness and to response and remission at discharge. Fifty-two percent of participants had a relapse. Patients whose symptoms were not in remission at discharge were more likely to have a relapse, as were those who had more severe symptoms and more side effects at discharge. Those who experienced a relapse were less likely to be taking a second-generation antipsychotic at discharge, less likely to have a positive attitude toward treatment adherence, and less likely to be employed. The high rate of relapse among patients with schizophrenia highlights the need to improve current treatment strategies.

  13. Margin involvement at prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer: does a low-risk group exist?

    PubMed

    Watkins, John M; Laszewski, Michael; Watkins, Patricia L; Dufan, Tarek A; Adducci, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether additional pathology details may provide risk stratification for patients with involved surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). Eligible patients underwent RP between 2003 and 2010. Patients with preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≥20, follow-up <12 months, lymph node or seminal vesicle involvement, or who received radiation therapy or hormone therapy prior to PSA relapse were excluded. Surgical specimens were reviewed by a study pathologist, blinded to outcomes. Survival analysis methods were employed to assess disease control and survival rates, as well as association of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-specific factors for endpoints. Of 355 RP cases, 279 patients were eligible for the present analysis. At a median follow-up of 53 months (range, 16-127), 31/114 (27%) of patients with involved surgical margins experienced PSA relapse, as compared with 7/165 (4%) for negative margins (hazard ratio, 4.997; 95% confidence interval, 2.425-10.296; P < .0001). Detailed pathology review demonstrated associations between PSA relapse and Gleason score at RP, extent of margin involvement (width), capsule penetration, and perineural invasion. Subgroup analysis identified low risk (4%) of 5-year PSA relapse for patients with Gleason ≤6 mm and margin width ≤4 mm (single maximal or cumulative). All subgroups with higher Gleason score or wider margin were associated with >20% risk of PSA relapse at 5 years. Within the present study, Gleason score, 6 patients with margin width ≤4 mm appear to have low rates of early PSA relapse following RP. Low-grade cases with larger extent of margin involvement or higher risk Gleason score patients with any margin involvement have high rates of early PSA relapse. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fear of recurrence: results of a randomized trial of relapse detection in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gumley, Andrew I; MacBeth, Angus; Reilly, James D; O'Grady, Margaret; White, Ross G; McLeod, Hamish; Schwannauer, Matthias; Power, Kevin G

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to develop and establish the reliability and validity of a measure of Fear of Recurrence, measuring cognitive appraisals of relapse rather than standard early signs of relapse. We also aimed to establish the sensitivity and specificity to relapse. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder were randomized to one of two early signs monitoring conditions, using either the Early Signs Scale or the Fear of Recurrence Scale (FoRSe). Participants were followed up for 6-months or until relapse. A total of 169 participants were randomized to Standard (n = 86) or FoRSe (n = 83) monitoring. We found good evidence supporting reliability and validity of the FoRSe. In addition, a cut-off point of ≥ 5 was associated with an optimal sensitivity in both Standard (n = 26:79%, 95% CI = 62-89) and FoRSe (n = 18:72%, 95% CI = 52-86) monitoring. However, this degree of sensitivity was associated with a lower specificity in Standard (n = 30:35%, 96% CI = 23-50) and FoRSe (n = 25:46%, 95% CI = 32-60). Finally, Fear of Relapse was a significant predictor of time to relapse [Exp(β) = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.01-1.42, p < .05]. The study provides evidence that Fear of Recurrence may be an important clinical construct linked to increased risk of relapse and poorer emotional recovery in people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Monitoring Fear of Recurrence is as sensitive to relapse detection as monitoring early signs alone. Greater Fear of Relapse was associated with shorter duration to actual relapse. Fear of recurrence may be an important clinical feature linked to poorer emotional recovery and increased risk of relapse. Fear of Recurrence may be an important focus of psychological therapy to promote emotional recovery and prevention of relapse. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Overjet, overbite, and anterior crowding relapses in extraction and nonextraction patients, and their correlations.

    PubMed

    Francisconi, Manoela Fávaro; Janson, Guilherme; Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore; Oliveira, Renata Cristina Gobbi de; Oliveira, Ricardo César Gobbi de; Freitas, Marcos Roberto de; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the relapse of maxillary and mandibular anterior crowding, overjet, and overbite 5 years after treatment in subjects with Class I and Class II malocclusions treated with and without extractions, and also to evaluate the correlations among these factors. The sample comprised 84 subjects with Class I and Class II malocclusions, treated with and without extractions. Group 1 comprised 44 subjects with an initial mean age of 12.96 years treated without extractions. Group 2 included 40 subjects with an initial mean age of 13.01 years treated with 4 premolar extractions. Data were obtained from dental casts at the pretreatment, posttreatment, and long-term posttreatment stages. Intergroup comparisons were performed with t tests. To verify the correlations among the relapse of overjet, overbite, and anterior crowding, the Pearson correlation test was used. Maxillary incisor irregularity and its relapse in the nonextraction group were significantly greater at the long-term posttreatment stage and the long-term posttreatment period, respectively. Long-term postreatment overjet changes were similar in the groups. Overbite and its relapse were significantly greater in the extraction group in the long-term posttreatment stage and period, respectively. There was a positive correlation of the relapse of mandibular incisor crowding with the relapse of overjet and overbite, and also a correlation of overjet and overbite relapses. There was greater maxillary crowding relapse in the nonextraction group and greater overbite relapse in the extraction group. There were significant and positive correlations of overjet and overbite relapses with mandibular anterior crowding relapse and consequently between overjet and overbite relapses. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-hypnosis relapse prevention training with chronic drug/alcohol users: effects on self-esteem, affect, and relapse.

    PubMed

    Pekala, Ronald J; Maurer, Ronald; Kumar, V K; Elliott, Nancy C; Masten, Ellsworth; Moon, Edward; Salinger, Margaret

    2004-04-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a self-hypnosis protocol with chronic drug and alcohol patients in increasing self-esteem, improving affect, and preventing relapse against a control, a transtheoretical cognitive-behavioral (TCB), and a stress management (attention-placebo) group. Participants were 261 veterans admitted to Substance Abuse Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Programs (SARRTPs). Participants were assessed pre- and postintervention, and at 7-week follow-up. Relapse rates did not significantly differ across the 4 groups at follow-up; 87% of those contacted reported abstinence. At follow-up, the participants in the 3 treatment conditions were asked how often they practiced the intervention materials provided them. Practicing and minimal-practicing participants were compared against the control group for each of the 3 interventions via MANOVAs/ANOVAs. Results revealed a significant Time by Groups interaction for the hypnosis intervention, with individuals who played the self-hypnosis audiotapes "at least 3 to 5 times a week" at 7-week follow-up reporting the highest levels of self-esteem and serenity, and the least anger/impulsivity, in comparison to the minimal-practice and control groups. No significant effects were found for the transtheoretical or stress management interventions. Regression analyses predicted almost two-thirds of the variance of who relapsed and who did not in the hypnosis intervention group. Hypnotic susceptibility predicted who practiced the self-hypnosis audiotapes. The results suggest that hypnosis can be a useful adjunct in helping chronic substance abuse individuals with their reported self-esteem, serenity, and anger/impulsivity.

  17. [A preliminary study on outpatient relapse prevention program for methamphetamine dependent patients: Serigaya Methamphetamine Relapse Prevention Program (SMARPP)].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ohji; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Otsuki, Masaki; Endo, Keiko; Okudaira, Kenichi; Harai, Hiroaki; Wada, Kiyoshi

    2007-10-01

    Although methamphetamine use disorder has been prevalent in Japan for more than fifty years, there have been hardly any effective medical treatment modalities other than improving methamphetamine-induced psychosis through hospitalization and/or participation in self help groups and private rehabilitation centers. As such limited social resources for recovering methamphetamine dependents are insufficient to prevent patients from relapse, there are growing needs for developing effective outpatient treatment program based on a chronic care perspective. We have developed a relapse prevention program for Japanese methamphetamine abusers, modifying "Matrix" model and incorporating other treatment materials. Then a preliminary study on implementing the program was conducted in an outpatient setting at Kanagawa Psychiatric Center, Serigaya Hospital. Of sixty eight methamphetamine dependent patients who visited the hospital for the first time between September 2006 and February 2007, four agreed to participate in the study. The program was manual- and workbook-based, and we suggested participants to attend to the session three-times per week for two months. Also participants were asked randomly to turn in urine samples once a week. The participants consisted of a female and three males, with an average age of thirty. The length of abstinent period since the last use varied substantially, from five days to more than four years. Three had the experience of serving in prison for violating the Stimulant Drugs Control Law. The results of the present study were that all four completed the program, and presented with negative urine samples throughout the period. However, in terms of treatment retention, two out of the four dropped out of the outpatient treatment within a month after the program termination. These outcomes suggest that a relapse prevention program may successfully be provided for Japanese methamphetamine abusers in an outpatient setting, with a favorable, treatment

  18. Radioprotectant and Cytotoxic Effects of Spirulina in Relapsed Verrucous Vulvar Cancer: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kiziltan, Huriye Senay; Gunes Bayir, Ayse; Taspinar, Ozgur; Yucesan, Gul; Tastekin, Didem; Sonmez, Fatma Cavide; Coban, Ganime; Kilic, Gokhan; Eris, Ali Hikmet; Aydin, Teoman; Akcakaya, Adem; Mayadagli, Alpaslan

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of relapsed verrucous vulvar cancer (VVC) is difficult. When vulvar cancer relapses, the treatment response is low for second-line treatments. Conversely, toxicity is high. Therefore, scientists need to identify different treatment methods. The case study was intended to examine the benefits of combining treatment with microalgae and metronidazole with radiotherapy to increase the response to treatment. The study took place in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Bezmialem Vakif University, in Istanbul, Turkey. The case study involved an 81-y-old female patient whose vulvar tumor was excised and who came to the research team's radiation oncology service for postoperative radiation. She had 2 comorbid disorders: Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular disease. A relapse had occurred in the 15-d postoperative period. Because of the patient's age and comorbid disorders, the research team decided to treat the new tumor only with concurrent radiochemotherapy and a weekly dose of cisplatin that contained chemoradiotherapy, for a total of 25 mg. At the 52.2 Gy dose level, grade 3 radiation skin toxicity occurred in the radiated area, although the research team had obtained an 80% response to the radiochemotherapy. The treatment was interrupted because of toxicity but also due to a deterioration in the patient's general health. Progression of the tumor continued, and the tumor's diameter increased to 7 cm after a 4-mo period. The research team then initiated radiotherapy again, combining it with spirulina in a 750 mg/dose at 2 doses/d and metronidazole in a 500 mg/dose at 3 doses/d, to decrease radiation toxicity and increase radiosensitivity. Radiotherapy was applied at 200 cGy per fraction with a total dose of 2400 cGy, with only 1 anterior local-tumor field. The patient showed a complete response to radiotherapy, and the tumor disappeared at the 2400 cGy radiation dose. No toxicity occurred related to the skin or the woman's general health. Her Karnofsky

  19. Direct and indirect cost burden associated with multiple sclerosis relapses: excess costs of persons with MS and their spouse caregivers.

    PubMed

    Parisé, Hélène; Laliberté, François; Lefebvre, Patrick; Duh, Mei Sheng; Kim, Edward; Agashivala, Neetu; Abouzaid, Safiya; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2013-07-15

    MS relapses are unpredictable and can be concerning to patients and their caregivers. To assess the direct and indirect cost burden associated with relapses of different severities in MS patients and with MS relapse frequency on spouse caregivers. Using a U.S. insurance claims and employee disability database (1999-2011), we studied adult MS patients (ICD-9-CM: 340.x) and their spouse caregivers. A previously published algorithm to identify relapses was used to stratify: (1) MS patients into cohorts of no, low/moderate, and high severity relapse based on the most severe relapse within one year of follow-up (if any); (2) caregivers into cohorts of no, less, and more frequent relapses based on the overall frequency of relapses of their spouse. Adjusted cost differences and 95% confidence intervals evaluating the yearly incremental costs at 12 months of follow-up (MS patients) and overall (caregivers) associated with relapses are reported. Among the 9421 MS patients (N: no relapse=7686; low/moderate severity relapse=1220; high severity relapse=515) identified, both relapse cohorts incurred significantly higher annual incremental direct costs than the no relapse cohort (low/moderate severity=$8269 [6565-10,115]; high severity=$24,180 [20,263-28,482]) and indirect costs (low/moderate severity=$1429 [759-2147]; high severity=$2714 [1468-4035]). More frequent relapses versus no relapse also translated into a significantly greater cost burden for caregivers (direct+indirect=$1725 [376-2885]) but less frequent relapses did not. Relapse severity was significantly and increasingly associated with greater direct and indirect costs in MS patients. More frequent relapses also translated into a significant cost burden in spouse caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiopulmonary involvement in Takayasu's arteritis.

    PubMed

    Brennan, David N; Warrington, Kenneth J; Crowson, Cynthia S; Schmidt, Jean; Koster, Matthew J

    2017-06-12

    To evaluate cardiopulmonary (CP) involvement in patients with Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) and assess the impact on disease outcomes. A retrospective cohort of patients with newly diagnosed TAK from 1984 to 2009 was assembled. Demographics, baseline disease characteristics, relapse events, surgeries and mortality were abstracted from direct medical record review. Angiograms, advanced imaging and cardiac studies were reviewed for evidence of CP involvement. Cox models with time-dependent covariates were used to assess the association between CP involvement and outcomes. A total of 124 patients with TAK were identified. Forty-five (36%) patients had at least one objective CP abnormality observed within 6 months of TAK diagnosis. Age at diagnosis was higher in those with CP involvement than those without (34.6 vs 30.1 yrs; p=0.04). Baseline characteristics and symptoms were similar, except shortness of breath, which was more frequently observed at TAK diagnosis in patients with CP involvement compared to those without (53% vs 21%; p=0.001). Composite CP involvement was not associated with risk of first surgery [Hazard ratio (95% CI): 1.21 (0.64-2.30); p=0.56]. However, pulmonary hypertension (PH) on echocardiogram was significantly associated with risk of first surgery [HR (95% CI): 12.9 (1.86- 89.14); p=0.01]. CP involvement was not significantly associated with mortality [HR (95% CI): 2.51 (0.45- 14.02); p=0.29]. Cardiopulmonary abnormalities in TAK are common at the time of initial presentation. In this population, the presence of PH predicted a 13-fold increased risk for vascular or valvular surgery. In this cohort, the presence of CP involvement did not increase mortality.

  1. Minor clone provides a reservoir for relapse in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Magrangeas, F; Avet-Loiseau, H; Gouraud, W; Lodé, L; Decaux, O; Godmer, P; Garderet, L; Voillat, L; Facon, T; Stoppa, A M; Marit, G; Hulin, C; Casassus, P; Tiab, M; Voog, E; Randriamalala, E; Anderson, K C; Moreau, P; Munshi, N C; Minvielle, S

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have provided direct evidence for genetic variegation in subclones for various cancer types. However, little is known about subclonal evolutionary processes according to treatment and subsequent relapse in multiple myeloma (MM). This issue was addressed in a cohort of 24 MM patients treated either with conventional chemotherapy or with the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib. As MM is a highly heterogeneous disease associated with a large number of chromosomal abnormalities, a subset of secondary genetic events that seem to reflect progression, 1q21 gain, NF-κB-activating mutations, RB1 and TP53 deletions, was examined. By using high-resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, subclones were identified with nonlinear complex evolutionary histories. Such reordering of the spectrum of genetic lesions, identified in a third of MM patients during therapy, is likely to reflect the selection of genetically distinct subclones, not initially competitive against the dominant population but which survived chemotherapy, thrived and acquired new anomalies. In addition, the emergence of minor subclones at relapse appeared to be significantly associated with bortezomib treatment. These data support the idea that new strategies for future clinical trials in MM should combine targeted therapy and subpopulations' control to eradicate all myeloma subclones in order to obtain long-term remission.

  2. Hypnosis for Smoking Relapse Prevention: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Carmody, Timothy P; Duncan, Carol L; Solkowitz, Sharon N; Huggins, Joy; Simon, Joel A

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypnosis would be more effective than standard behavioral counseling in helping smokers to remain abstinent. A total of 140 current smokers were enrolled in a randomized controlled smoking cessation trial at an urban Veterans Affairs medical center. Participants (n = 102) who were able to quit for at least 3 days received either a hypnosis or behavioral relapse prevention intervention. Both relapse prevention interventions consisted of two 60 min face-to-face sessions and four 20 min follow-up phone calls (two phone calls per week). At 26 weeks, the validate\\d point-prevalence quit rate was 35% for the hypnosis group and 42% for the behavioral counseling group (relative risk = 0.85; 95% confidence interval: 0.52-1.40). At 52 weeks, the validated quit rate was 29% for the hypnosis group and 28% for the behavioral group (relative risk  = 1.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.91). It was concluded that hypnosis warrants further investigation as an intervention for facilitating maintenance of quitting.

  3. Beyond the Ubiquitous Relapse Curve: A Data-Informed Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zywiak, William H.; Kenna, George A.; Westerberg, Verner S.

    2011-01-01

    Relapse to alcohol and other substances has generally been described by curves that resemble one another. However, these curves have been generated from the time to first use after a period of abstinence without regard to the movement of individuals into and out of drug use. Instead of measuring continuous abstinence, we considered post-treatment functioning as a more complicated phenomenon, describing how people move in and out of drinking states on a monthly basis over the course of a year. When we looked at time to first drink we observed the ubiquitous relapse curve. When we classified clients (N = 550) according to drinking state however, they frequently moved from one state to another with both abstinent and very heavy drinking states as being rather stable, and light or moderate drinking and heavy drinking being unstable. We found that clients with a family history of alcoholism were less likely to experience these unstable states. When we examined the distribution of cases crossed by the number of times clients switched states we found that a power function explained 83% of that relationship. Some of the remainder of the variance seems to be explained by the stable states of very heavy drinking and abstinence acting as attractors. PMID:21556282

  4. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in relapsing clostridium difficile colitis].

    PubMed

    Ramsauer, Bernhard; König, Christel; Sabelhaus, Tobias; Ockenga, Johann; Otte, Jan-Michel

    2016-05-25

    Since the turn of the millennium there has been an alarming increase in the incidence and severity of clostridium difficile infections. Stopping medication with the triggering antibiotic and switching to a recommended antibiotic leads to healing up in 80%. However, patients who relapse have a 40% risk of an additional relapse and those with 2 or more episodes face a 60% risk. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a new therapeutic option. Up to now there only exist two randomized studies (University of Amsterdam and the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston). Data from 16 patients with recurrent clostridium difficile infection who had undergone FMT at a local hospital in the city of Bremen, Germany, were reviewed and compared to the results of the 2 randomized studies. 11 out of 16 patients got cured after the first FMT (68.75%). The remaining 5 patients received a second FMT, with cure in 3 patients. The overall response rate was 14 from 16 patients (87.5%). In comparison to the response rates of the University of Amsterdam (81.3% after the first and 93.8% after the second FMT) and of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston (70% after the first and 90% after the second FMT) we received slightly worse results. But, treatment of notably older patients and intensive care patients in our group explain these findings well. Therefore, we advocate a wide use of FMT for the treatment of recurrent clostridium difficile colitis in non-university hospitals.

  5. Prolyl oligopeptidase is inhibited in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system leading to long-term disability. Recent studies indicate a close association between inflammation and neurodegeneration in all lesions and disease stages of MS. Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a proline-specific serine protease that cleaves several neuroactive peptides. This peptidase has been implicated in neurodegeneration, as well as in the modulation of the inflammatory response. Methods We examined plasma POP and the levels of an endogenous POP inhibitor from relapsing remitting MS patients and compared these with healthy controls, by monitoring the fluorescent changes due to standard fluorescently labelled substrate cleavage. We analysed the data in relationship to patient age and disease disability status. Results We observed a significant decrease in POP activity in plasma of relapsing remitting MS patients relative to healthy controls, coupled with an increase of POP endogenous inhibitor. The POP activity was also correlated with patient age and disability status. The lowered POP activity from plasma of MS patients could be rescued by reductants Conclusions The decrease in circulating POP activity measured in MS is reverted by reductants. This suggests that POP inactivation in MS might be a result of the oxidative conditions prevailing in the plasma of the diseased patients. Plasma levels of POP activity as well as those of their endogenous inhibitor are suggested as biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in MS. PMID:20370893

  6. Late relapse of imported Plasmodium ovale malaria: a case report.

    PubMed

    Siala, Emna; Gastli, Mondher; Essid, Rym; Jemal, Sana; Ben Abdallah, Rym; Ben Abda, Imène; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aida

    2015-06-01

    We report the first case of an imported Plasmodium ovale relapse in a Tunisian man who developed malaria three years after leaving sub- Saharan Africa. A 29-year-old Tunisian man consulted in September 2011 because of a fever, myalgia, and headache that had begun eight days earlier and persisted despite treatment with oral antibiotics. On questioning, the patient stated that he had resided three years ago for six months in Ivory Coast, where he acquired malaria. He was treated with artemether-lumefantrine. The patient said he had no recent travel to any other malaria-endemic area and had not received a blood transfusion. A first microscopy of peripheral blood smears was negative for malaria parasites. The diagnosis was established 17 days after onset of symptoms. A repeat microscopic examination of blood smears confirmed the presence of Plasmodium ovale with a parasitemia lower than 0.1%. The patient was treated with artemether lumefantrine, followed by primaquine. This case emphasizes the possibility of relapse of some plasmodial species. It highlights the importance of repeating microscopic examination of blood when the diagnosis of malaria is suspected.

  7. Relapse following mandibular advancement with dental plus skeletal maxillomandibular fixation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E; Gallo, W J

    1986-07-01

    This study examines the short-term stability of the mandible following mandibular advancement surgery in which skeletal suspension wires were used in addition to dental maxillomandibular fixation. Twenty adults underwent sagittal ramus osteotomies. No concomitant surgical procedures were performed. Maxillomandibular fixation consisted of wiring between the upper and lower orthodontic brackets and circummandibular wires connected to the piriform aperture or anterior nasal spine wires for eight weeks. Cephalograms were analyzed during this period to evaluate skeletal stability. A statistically insignificant mean horizontal relapse of 8.9% was found at pogonion during the period of fixation. Significant vertical intrusion of the anterior mandible occurred, however, with a mean superior movement of pogonion of 0.83 mm (P less than or equal to 0.05). Dental changes noted were uprighting of the maxillary incisors and flaring of the mandibular incisors. In comparison with the results of other studies in which dental maxillomandibular fixation was used alone, the results of this study indicate that the use of skeletal suspension wires is advantageous in the prevention of horizontal skeletal relapse.

  8. Clinical translation of animal models of treatment relapse.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Mace, F Charles; Penney, Heather; Harris, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Behavioral Momentum Theory (BMT) has inspired animal models of treatment relapse. We translated the models of reinstatement and resurgence into clinical procedures to test whether relapse tests would replicate behavior pattern found in basic research. Following multiple schedule baseline reinforcement of a 16-year-old male's problem behavior at equal rates by two therapists, treatment was introduced using a variable-interval, variable-time (VI VT) schedule arrangement with therapists delivering reinforcers at different rates. Despite the differing rates of VI VT reinforcers, the treatment produced comparable reductions in problem behavior. Following successful treatment, the two therapists discontinued treatment and resumed reinforcement of problem behavior at equal rates that constituted a reinstatement of baseline conditions. As predicted by BMT, reinstatement resulted in an immediate return of high rates of problem behavior but was 2.6 times higher for the therapist using the higher rate VI VT treatment. A second treatment phase was implemented followed by a test of resurgence in a single extended extinction session conducted separately for each therapist. The unequal VI VT treatment rates by therapists resulted in 2.1 times greater responding in the resurgence test for the therapist who implemented the higher rate VI VT procedure. These results are consistent with basic research studies and BMT.

  9. Behavioral momentum and relapse of extinguished operant responding.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a stimulus depends on the rate of reinforcement associated with that stimulus, even if some of those reinforcers occur independently of the behavior. We present three experiments examining whether the rate of reinforcement in the presence of a stimulus similarly modulates the relative