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Sample records for related advocacy group

  1. Electric utility/advocacy group interaction: A case history report on the key outcomes of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M. ); English, M.; Schexnayder, S. . Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Altman, J.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents the findings derived from ten case studies of activities undertaken by energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) to influence the use of cost-effective Demand-Side Management (DSM) by electric utilities and to promote Integrated Resource Planning (IRP). Nine of these ten cases included some form of interactive effort involving utilities and, in almost all cases, other nonutility parties (NUPs) as well. All ten cases also included other EEAG activities. Key findings of the study include the following: interactive efforts had substantially greater effects on utility DSM usage and on relations among the involved parties than on regulatory policy; other EEAG activities had the great effect on regulatory policy and the least direct effect on utility DSM usage; and the discernible overall effects of interactive efforts were somewhat greater than those of the EEAGs' other activities, which often had less tangible and immediate effects.

  2. Making a difference: Ten case studies of DSM/IRP interactive efforts and related advocacy group activities

    SciTech Connect

    English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.; Schweitzer, M.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the activities of organizations that seek to promote integrated resource planning and aggressive, cost-effective demand-side management by utilities. The activities of such groups -- here called energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAGs) -- are examined in ten detailed am studies. Nine of the cases involve some form of interactive effort between investor-owned electric utilities and non-utility to develop policies, plans, or programs cooperatively. Many but not all of the interactive efforts examined are formal collaboratives. In addition, all ten cases include discussion of other EEAG activities, such as coalition-building, research, participation in statewide energy planning, and intervention in regulatory proceedings.

  3. Be Proactive with Parent Advocacy Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…

  4. Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarr, Margaret, Ed.; Varro, Tim, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue presents art advocacy as a necessary means of bringing art and art education to an elevated status in the elementary secondary curriculum and educational system. Articles include: (1) "Editor's View" (Margaret Scarr); (2) "Art Education: Why Is It Important" (Arts Education Partnership Working Group); (3) "Why Art in Education and…

  5. Advocacy on Issues Related to Addictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleff, Michael J.

    Advocating for a population with an addictive disorder holds extraordinary challenges, but it also offers extraordinary rewards. The challenge is to embrace a cause with which most people in the United States hold little sympathy. The primary reward is that once advocacy has begun it can help ignite an addicted person's self-respect. This paper…

  6. Altering State Policy: Interest Group Effectiveness among State-Level Advocacy Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefer, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Because social policy making continues to devolve to the state level, social workers should understand how advocacy and policy making occur at that level. Interest groups active in the human services arena were surveyed and data were used to test a model of interest group effectiveness in four states. The independent variables were amount of…

  7. "Who Did What?": A Participatory Action Research Project to Increase Group Capacity for Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Iriarte, E.; Kramer, J. C.; Kramer, J. M.; Hammel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This participatory action research (PAR) project involved a collaboration with a self-advocacy group of people with intellectual disabilities that sought to build group capacity for advocacy. Materials and Methods: This study used a focus group, sustained participatory engagement and a reflexive process to gather qualitative and…

  8. On the Relationship Between Suicide-Prevention and Suicide-Advocacy Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battin, Margaret Pabst

    Numerous advocacy groups concerned with "death with dignity" have formed in response to medical advances which extend the process of dying. Natural death legislation and the Living Will are but two examples of suicide advocacy for the terminally ill. These groups are emerging world-wide and range from conservative insistence on passive refusal of…

  9. The internal dynamics of environmental organizations: Movement interest groups, communal advocacy groups, and the policy process

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.B.

    1995-12-31

    How do the diverse qualities that movement organizations bring to the policy process affect the representation of particular interests? This question is explored by analyzing environmental organizations across the national, state, and local levels of the American political system. This article suggests that two types of social movement organizations exist: movement interest groups and communal advocacy groups. While this article does not provide direct evidence of the different policy capabilities of the two types of movement organizations, existing research is drawn upon to consider how each type might fare in the policy process. One approach suggests that centralized organizations with incremental goals are better equipped to attain policy success, while the other stresses the need for active member involvement to engage in disruptive politics. To fully assess these divergent views, this article presents a broad review and analysis of the literature.

  10. Expert and Advocacy Group Consensus Findings on the Horizon of Public Health Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Stephen M.; Greendale, Karen; Citrin, Toby; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

    2016-01-01

    Description: Among the two leading causes of death in the United States, each responsible for one in every four deaths, heart disease costs Americans $300 billion, while cancer costs Americans $216 billion per year. They also rank among the top three causes of death in Europe and Asia. In 2012 the University of Michigan Center for Public Health and Community Genomics and Genetic Alliance, with the support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Public Health Genomics, hosted a conference in Atlanta, Georgia to consider related action strategies based on public health genomics. The aim of the conference was consensus building on recommendations to implement genetic screening for three major heritable contributors to these mortality and cost figures: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), and Lynch syndrome (LS). Genetic applications for these three conditions are labeled with a “Tier 1” designation by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because they have been fully validated and clinical practice guidelines based on systematic review support them. Methodology: The conference followed a deliberative sequence starting with nationally recognized clinical and public health presenters for each condition, followed by a Patient and Community Perspectives Panel, working group sessions for each of the conditions, and a final plenary session. The 74 conference participants represented disease research and advocacy, public health, medicine and nursing, genetics, governmental health agencies, and industry. Participants drew on a public health framework interconnecting policy, clinical intervention, surveillance, and educational functions for their deliberations. Results: Participants emphasized the importance of collaboration between clinical, public health, and advocacy groups in implementing Tier 1 genetic screening. Advocacy groups could help with individual and institutional buy-in of Tier 1

  11. A Guide for Developing Self-Help/Advocacy Groups for Parents of Children with Serious Emotional Problems. Workbook Series for Developing Self-Help/Advocacy Groups for Parents of Children with Serious Emotional Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donner, Richard; Fine, Glenda Z.

    This workbook is a guide for the development of self-help/advocacy groups for parents of children and adolescents who have serious emotional problems. The workbook offers background information and then offers guidelines for: (1) creating a beginning plan for the development of a self-help/advocacy group; (2) developing concrete plans for…

  12. The "Gay Comfort Level": Examining a Media Advocacy Group's Efforts to Combat Youth Homophobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachgal, Tara M.

    2011-01-01

    This article scrutinizes the efforts of a media advocacy group to redress the stigma of youth homosexuality among United States youth: a report published in 2003 by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation called, "How Youth Media Can Help Combat Homophobia Among American Teenagers." The report, authored by Rodger Streitmatter, concluded…

  13. Self-Advocacy Groups: 1994-95 Directory for North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, Mary F.; Senese, Dick

    This 1994-95 directory of disability self-advocacy groups contains listings of over 700 organizations in the United States, Mexico, and Canada. The associations are organized by country and state or province. Listings typically contain the following information: the name of a contact (the name of the member who is the chair, president, or…

  14. A History of Music Education Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a history of advocacy in music education discussing when formal advocacy started as well as advocacy with government agencies, the state level, and other types of advocacy. Includes a bibliography of resources related to music advocacy. (CMK)

  15. Advocacy ABC's

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is a continuous process that involves more than simply passing legislation. It is a year-round commitment that involves educating policymakers about the importance of achieving health and wellness in any state. As such, it is important for the advocacy group to have a plan, be organized, and work together toward a unified goal. Success is…

  16. A Survey of Self-Advocacy Groups for People with Learning Disabilities in an English Region: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The second article on a survey of self-advocacy groups for people with learning disabilities in England reports key findings that included the consistency of the issues identified as important and the willingness to engage in research. Key themes were self-advocacy, rights, day service center issues, staffing, personal relationships, complaints,…

  17. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  18. Energy efficiency advocacy groups: A study of selected interactive efforts and independent initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.; English, M.; Schexnayder, S.; Altman, J.

    1994-03-01

    Non-utility groups participate in a myriad of activities--initiated by themselves and others--aimed at influencing the policies and actions of utilities and their regulators related to Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) and Demand-Side Management (DSM). Some of these activities are not directed toward a particular regulatory body or utility but are designed to influence public knowledge and acceptance of IRP and DSM. Other activities involve interaction with a particular utility or regulatory body. The traditional forum for this interaction is an adversarial debate (i.e., litigation or regulatory intervention) over the merits of a utility`s plan or proposed action. However, an increasingly common forum is one in which non-utility groups and utilities cooperatively develop plans, policies, and/or programs. Arrangements of this type are referred to in this report as ``interactive efforts``. This report presents the findings derived from ten case studies of energy efficiency advocacy groups (EEAG) activities to influence the use of cost-effective DSM and to promote IRP; nine of these ten cases involve some form of interactive effort and all of them also include other EEAG activities. The goal of this research is not to measure the success of individual activities of the various groups, but to glean from a collective examination of their activities an understanding of the efficacy of various types of interactive efforts and other EEAG activities and of the contextual and procedural factors that influence their outcomes.

  19. Arts Education Advocacy: The Relative Effects of School-Level Influences on Resources for Arts Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate advocacy influences that may impact school arts programs using data from the 2009-10 National Center for Education Statistics elementary and secondary school surveys on arts education. Regression models were employed to assess the relative effectiveness of variables representing community support,…

  20. Factors Related to Play Therapists' Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Ceballos, Peggy; Post, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    The authors used a correlational research design to examine how belief in a just world, political ideology, socioeconomic status of family of origin, and percentage of racial minority clients were related to social justice advocacy attitudes among play therapists. A multiple regression was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that belief in…

  1. Feminist Relational Advocacy: Processes and Outcomes from the Perspective of Low-Income Women with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Lisa A.; Glenn, Catherine; Bohlig, Amanda; Banyard, Victoria; Borges, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study of how low-income women who are struggling with symptoms of depression experience feminist relational advocacy, a new model that is informed by feminist, multicultural, and community psychology theories. Using qualitative content analysis of participant interviews, the authors describe the processes and…

  2. How We Formed a Parent Advocacy Group and What We've Learned in the Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Michael S.; Georgiades, Stephanie D.; Smith, Linda F.

    2011-01-01

    Advocacy is of central importance in the education of students with gifts and talents due to the great variation in legislated policies protecting the provision of educational services for these learners. The authors present here a descriptive study based on their experiences founding a successful parent advocacy organization in one large school…

  3. Treatments for Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Evidence, Advocacy, and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Pietro, Nina C.; Whiteley, Louise; Mizgalewicz, Ania; Illes, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The Internet is a major source of health-related information for parents of sick children despite concerns surrounding quality. For neurodevelopmental disorders, the websites of advocacy groups are a largely unexamined source of information. We evaluated treatment information posted on nine highly-trafficked advocacy websites for autism, cerebral…

  4. Group Counseling: Health Related.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Johnnie

    1979-01-01

    Diabetes and sickle cell anemia (SCA) are two health-related characteristics that distinguish young people from their peers. This article outlines the problems of children with diabetes and SCA and presents the goals and format for group counseling of these populations and their parents. (Author/BEF)

  5. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Oser, Sean M; Close, Kelly L; Liu, Nancy F; Hood, Korey K; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes.

  6. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Sean M.; Close, Kelly L.; Liu, Nancy F.; Hood, Korey K.; Anderson, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes. PMID:26194156

  7. The views and experiences of learning disability nurses concerning their advocacy education.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Penny; Northway, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    A mixed methods project [Llewellyn, P., 2005. An investigation into the advocacy role of the learning disability nurse. University of Glamorgan, unpublished PhD Thesis] investigated the advocacy role of learning disability nurses. This paper discusses the section concerned with nurses' advocacy education. Focus groups, interviews and a questionnaire survey enabled nurses from a wide range of grades, seniority and experience to explore their received education in advocacy and their educational requirements concerning their advocacy role. Findings revealed that nurses' received education in advocacy varied according to the syllabus under which they qualified, with those whose education was influenced by the 1979 Jay Report having the highest incidence of advocacy training. Many learning disability nurses who had received theoretical education did not feel confident to advocate for their clients. Many were also unsure of their ability to access independent advocacy services and when it was permissible to do this. Nurse informants expressed a need for ongoing support and training in advocacy relating to The Human Rights Act (1998) and The Disability Discrimination Act (1995); and also specifically in relation to advocacy for clients within their own work area. Most nurses had definite ideas regarding how and by whom their advocacy education and training should be provided.

  8. The views and experiences of learning disability nurses concerning their advocacy education.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Penny; Northway, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    A mixed methods project [Llewellyn, P., 2005. An investigation into the advocacy role of the learning disability nurse. University of Glamorgan, unpublished PhD Thesis] investigated the advocacy role of learning disability nurses. This paper discusses the section concerned with nurses' advocacy education. Focus groups, interviews and a questionnaire survey enabled nurses from a wide range of grades, seniority and experience to explore their received education in advocacy and their educational requirements concerning their advocacy role. Findings revealed that nurses' received education in advocacy varied according to the syllabus under which they qualified, with those whose education was influenced by the 1979 Jay Report having the highest incidence of advocacy training. Many learning disability nurses who had received theoretical education did not feel confident to advocate for their clients. Many were also unsure of their ability to access independent advocacy services and when it was permissible to do this. Nurse informants expressed a need for ongoing support and training in advocacy relating to The Human Rights Act (1998) and The Disability Discrimination Act (1995); and also specifically in relation to advocacy for clients within their own work area. Most nurses had definite ideas regarding how and by whom their advocacy education and training should be provided. PMID:17574711

  9. Nurses Practice Beyond Simple Advocacy to Engage in Relational Narratives: Expanding Opportunities for Persons to Influence the Public Space

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, N; Aquino-Russell, C

    2008-01-01

    In practicing existential and human advocacy, or engaging in a relational narrative, nurses may assist persons who experience health inequalities to clarify their values, and, in becoming more fully their authentic selves, community members who ordinarily feel powerless in the public space may act with confidence in influencing the distribution of health-care resources. In this paper, the writers describe research characterizing nurses’ advocacy practices and review the concepts of respect and self-interpretation as a foundation for arguing that nurses who engage in relational narratives with the persons they serve may encourage continuing acts of self-understanding. Investigators indicated that nurses characterized their practices as a therapeutic endeavor, and that their practices were grounded in respect. Practicing nurses may need self-awareness to habitually convey respect for human dignity, in addition, nurse educators ought to attend to the professional development of student nurses, providing opportunities for the formation of character traits or qualities. PMID:19319219

  10. Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plunkett, Kate

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about the issue of advocacy. Standing at the vanguard of literacy, library media specialists have a unique role. However, it is time for media specialists to advocate their services in a proactive way. If library media specialists cannot, both individually and collectively, put advocacy at the forefront, then students will suffer the…

  11. Advocacy Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen J.; Curva, Fely

    2008-01-01

    Most state professional associations promote and fund at some level, an advocacy program. These advocacy programs usually aim to support or plead for a program, policy, or proposal. They can range from simple communication to complex strategies, from daily interactions to annual productions, and from position papers to onsite, legislative visits.…

  12. Inadvertent advocacy.

    PubMed

    Wilhere, George F

    2012-02-01

    Policy advocacy is an issue regularly debated among conservation scientists. These debates have focused on intentional policy advocacy by scientists, but advocacy can also be unintentional. I define inadvertent policy advocacy as the act of unintentionally expressing personal policy preferences or ethical judgments in a way that is nearly indistinguishable from scientific judgments. A scientist may be well intentioned and intellectually honest but still inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. There are two ways to inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. First, a scientist expresses an opinion that she or he believes is a scientific judgment but it is actually an ethical judgment or personal policy preference. Second, a scientist expresses an opinion that he or she knows is an ethical judgment or personal policy preference but inadvertently fails to effectively communicate the nature of the opinion to policy makers or the public. I illustrate inadvertent advocacy with three examples: recovery criteria in recovery plans for species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a scientific peer review of a recovery plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's definition of threatened. In each example, scientists expressed ethical judgments or policy preferences, but their value judgments were not identified as such, and, hence, their value judgments were opaque to policy makers and the public. Circumstances suggest their advocacy was inadvertent. I believe conservation scientists must become acutely aware of the line between science and policy and avoid inadvertent policy advocacy because it is professional negligence, erodes trust in scientists and science, and perpetuates an ethical vacuum that undermines the rational political discourse necessary for the evolution of society's values. The principal remedy for inadvertent advocacy is education of conservation scientists in an effort to

  13. Resident guide to advocacy in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Park, Kelly K

    2015-12-01

    Many opportunities exist for residents to get involved in advocacy in dermatology, from national to grassroots levels. Residents also should be aware of opportunities to get involved in patient advocacy and become familiar with the myriad of patient advocacy groups that exist. These groups offer support and education for patients and initiate research efforts for specific dermatologic conditions that provide support for patients beyond what can be offered during a standard office visit. The value of resident involvement in advocacy also is discussed.

  14. Advocacy for Health Equity: A Synthesis Review

    PubMed Central

    Farrer, Linden; Marinetti, Claudia; Cavaco, Yoline Kuipers; Costongs, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Context Health inequalities are systematic differences in health among social groups that are caused by unequal exposure to—and distributions of—the social determinants of health (SDH). They are persistent between and within countries despite action to reduce them. Advocacy is a means of promoting policies that improve health equity, but the literature on how to do so effectively is dispersed. The aim of this review is to synthesize the evidence in the academic and gray literature and to provide a body of knowledge for advocates to draw on to inform their efforts. Methods This article is a systematic review of the academic literature and a fixed-length systematic search of the gray literature. After applying our inclusion criteria, we analyzed our findings according to our predefined dimensions of advocacy for health equity. Last, we synthesized our findings and made a critical appraisal of the literature. Findings The policy world is complex, and scientific evidence is unlikely to be conclusive in making decisions. Timely qualitative, interdisciplinary, and mixed-methods research may be valuable in advocacy efforts. The potential impact of evidence can be increased by “packaging” it as part of knowledge transfer and translation. Increased contact between researchers and policymakers could improve the uptake of research in policy processes. Researchers can play a role in advocacy efforts, although health professionals and disadvantaged people, who have direct contact with or experience of hardship, can be particularly persuasive in advocacy efforts. Different types of advocacy messages can accompany evidence, but messages should be tailored to advocacy target. Several barriers hamper advocacy efforts. The most frequently cited in the academic literature are the current political and economic zeitgeist and related public opinion, which tend to blame disadvantaged people for their ill health, even though biomedical approaches to health and political short

  15. The story of FiZZ: an advocacy group to end the sale of sugar sweetened beverages in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Thornley, S; Sundborn, G

    2014-03-01

    FIZZ (which stands for fighting sugar in soft-drinks) is a new advocacy group started to reduce population consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in New Zealand. The vision of FIZZ is for New Zealand to be sugary drink free by 2025. This means that sugar sweetened beverages will comprise < or = 5% of the total beverage market, and sugar free drinks will be the norm. In this paper, we outline the story of FIZZ: to reiterate why we believe the group is needed, reflect on what the group has achieved to date, consider what it aims to accomplish, and outline what methods it will seek to achieve these aims. Put simply, we believe that the epidemiological evidence that sugar intake, particularly in liquid form, causes poor physical and mental health is overwhelming. Swapping sugar sweetened drinks for sugar free alternatives, water or milk, is, in our view, an urgently needed and important step which is likely to reduce the epidemic of unhealthy weight (obesity) and its sequelae. The nutrition environment in New Zealand is now out of step with scientific evidence, with virtually unrestricted access to, and sales and marketing of, sugary drinks to both children and adults. FIZZ is seeking the implementation of local and nationwide policy, similar to those implemented for tobacco, to limit advertising, restrict marketing, raise purchase prices and ultimately curb the sales of sugary drinks in New Zealand. FIZZ is also working in communities to raise people's awareness of the harms sugary drinks pose to health. We at FIZZ also acknowledge that the beverage industry may play an important role in accomplishing this vision, and have established that there is common ground upon which FIZZ and industry can engage to reduce the sugary drink intake.

  16. The story of FiZZ: an advocacy group to end the sale of sugar sweetened beverages in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Thornley, S; Sundborn, G

    2014-03-01

    FIZZ (which stands for fighting sugar in soft-drinks) is a new advocacy group started to reduce population consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks in New Zealand. The vision of FIZZ is for New Zealand to be sugary drink free by 2025. This means that sugar sweetened beverages will comprise < or = 5% of the total beverage market, and sugar free drinks will be the norm. In this paper, we outline the story of FIZZ: to reiterate why we believe the group is needed, reflect on what the group has achieved to date, consider what it aims to accomplish, and outline what methods it will seek to achieve these aims. Put simply, we believe that the epidemiological evidence that sugar intake, particularly in liquid form, causes poor physical and mental health is overwhelming. Swapping sugar sweetened drinks for sugar free alternatives, water or milk, is, in our view, an urgently needed and important step which is likely to reduce the epidemic of unhealthy weight (obesity) and its sequelae. The nutrition environment in New Zealand is now out of step with scientific evidence, with virtually unrestricted access to, and sales and marketing of, sugary drinks to both children and adults. FIZZ is seeking the implementation of local and nationwide policy, similar to those implemented for tobacco, to limit advertising, restrict marketing, raise purchase prices and ultimately curb the sales of sugary drinks in New Zealand. FIZZ is also working in communities to raise people's awareness of the harms sugary drinks pose to health. We at FIZZ also acknowledge that the beverage industry may play an important role in accomplishing this vision, and have established that there is common ground upon which FIZZ and industry can engage to reduce the sugary drink intake. PMID:25929004

  17. Advocacy Groups Deliver Guidelines for Schools Facing Sexual-Orientation Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Groups that often find themselves on opposing sides of the cultural war over gay rights have bridged their divide to draft consensus guidelines designed to help public schools address sexual-orientation issues with sensitivity and respect. Representatives from the Christian Educators Association International and the Gay, Lesbian and Straight…

  18. Five Ingredients for Success: Two Case Studies of Advocacy at the State Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcourt, Marcia A. B.

    2003-01-01

    A study investigated the people and actions related to two successful gifted advocacy events that included state legislative changes. Five ingredients of success represented the key characteristics common to the leaders in each advocacy group: passion, preparation, inspiration, perseverance, and the ability to take advantage of serendipity.…

  19. Building Trust: The History and Ongoing Relationships Amongst DSD Clinicians, Researchers, and Patient Advocacy Groups.

    PubMed

    Lossie, A C; Green, J

    2015-05-01

    Individuals born with differences or disorders of sex development (DSD) have been marginalized by society and the health care system. Standards of care in the mid-20(th) century were based on fixing the child with a DSD, using hormonal and surgical interventions; these treatments and the diagnoses were almost never disclosed to the child, and sometimes they were not disclosed to the parents. This led to secrecy, shame, and stigma. When these children became adults and demanded access to their medical records, the realization of the depth of secrecy led to the formation of activism groups that shook the medical community. Despite precarious beginnings, advocates, health care professionals, and researchers were able to elicit changes in the standard of care. The 2006 Consensus Statement on Management of Intersex Disorders called for a multidisciplinary approach to care and questioned the evidence for many of the standard procedures. Standard of care moved from a concealment model to a patient-centered paradigm, and funding agencies put resources into determining the future paths of research on DSD. Recognition of the need to address patient priorities led to changing international standards for including patients in research design. Some challenges that remain include: the findings from the Institute of Medicine that sexual and gender minorities experience poor health outcomes; establishing trust across all parties; developing a common language and creating venues where individuals can participate in dialogue that addresses personal experiences, research design, clinical practices and intervention strategies. PMID:25868122

  20. Eugenics, genetics, and the minority group model of disabilities: implications for social work advocacy.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Gerald V

    2011-10-01

    In the United States, genetic research, as well as policy and practice innovations based on this research, has expanded greatly over the past few decades. This expansion is indicated, for example, by the mapping of the human genome, an expansion of genetic counseling, and other biogenetic research. Also, a disability rights movement that in many ways parallels other "minority" rights campaigns has expanded. The coexistence of these developments poses intriguing challenges for social work that the profession has yet to address in a meaningful way. These issues are especially pertinent for social work professionals in the crucial role as advocates for marginalized populations. This article describes some ofthe concerns of disability rights activists relative to genetic innovations and goals as well as the instrumental role of the social work community in this important debate.

  1. Websites and Advocacy Campaigns: Decision Making, Implementation, and Audience in an Environmental Advocacy Group's Use of Websites as Part of Its Communication Campaigns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sehmel, Heather

    2002-01-01

    Explores the planning processes a grassroots environmental group used to determine its goals for its Websites; examines the rhetoric of two of the group's Websites; and studies the reactions of audiences of the Websites to their Web rhetoric. Provides people working in small organizations with information about how they might improve the…

  2. The state of advocacy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, G Larry

    2015-12-01

    Non-profit advocacy organizations have been important in raising public awareness, promoting education, and enhancing political activism for issues related to cancer. Grassroots efforts aimed at fund-raising have substantially augmented federal funding for community outreach and research. The objective of this review was to evaluate successful accomplishments of several major non-profit organizations that are focused on cancer. A review of news media, medical literature, and financial records (using GuideStar) was performed to access the organizational structure and productivity of several successful cancer advocacy organizations. Compared to other cancer advocacy groups, the American Cancer Society is the oldest (>100years old) and worth the most with net assets of over $1.25 billion dollars and an annual total revenue of over $900 million dollars. The ACS also has the highest overhead at 41%. Most of the gynecologic cancer advocacy groups are approximately 20years old and have collective total annual revenue of over $17M dollars. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the most successful at raising funds and building net assets to date while maintaining an overhead of <10%. The most active and financially successful cancer organizations tend to be older, have higher overhead, spend less on total administration, spend more on fund-raising, have more events (rather than a limited number), and use aggressive social media strategies.

  3. Advocacy in disability policy: parents and consumers as advocates.

    PubMed

    Cunconan-Lahr, R; Brotherson, M J

    1996-12-01

    Advocacy for change, which stems from commitment and vision, should be a collaborative process among parents and consumers in partnership with professionals. Using surveys, interactive focus groups, and telephone interviews, we explored the concept and activities of advocacy experienced by parents and individuals with disabilities. Participants were identified through an advocacy and leadership training program, Partners in Policymaking. Advocacy activities and supports and barriers to successful advocacy both for parents and consumers were identified. Suggestions for further research and action were proposed.

  4. Autonomy, Self-Realization, and Self-Advocacy and the School- and Career-Related Adjustment of Adolescent Girls with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doren, Bonnie; Kang, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify component elements of self-determination that may promote positive or buffer negative school- and career-related adjustment of adolescent girls with disabilities or with multiple risk factors. Autonomy, self-realization, and self-advocacy were examined together to ascertain both their cumulative and…

  5. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  6. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  7. Evaluation of Advocacy Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Valerie J.

    The paper describes approaches and findings of an evaluation of 10 advocacy projects providing services to developmentally disabled and mentally ill persons across the country. The projects included internal rights protection organizations, independent legal advocacy mechanisms, self-advocacy training centers, and legal advocacy providers in…

  8. Critical analysis of science-related texts in a breastfeeding information, support, and advocacy community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottero-Perdue, Pamela S.

    This study examines the way in which women in a breastfeeding information, support, and advocacy (BISA) community of practice critically engage with written/oral science-related texts. The range of texts that these participants encounter is explored and two critical reading approaches are investigated: (1) critical science reading, or reading to assess text validity; and (2) critical science-related text analysis (CSTA), or reading to determine the way in which a text positions subjects or reality, is indicative of particular interests, or leaves out particular voices. The former has been addressed by science education research; the latter is based upon feminist poststructuralism and critical literacy literature. Participants in BISA encounter a wide range of science-related texts, and, to varying degrees, assess the validity of these texts based upon what they know about science, their own and others' experiences, and practical knowledge. Participants also engage in CSTA to greater and lesser extents. Also, experts in BISA are entrusted by participants in the organization to identify valid and trustworthy texts. Differences in critical science reading across participants and texts are discussed, as are the purposes for critical science reading and conditions in BISA that support these critical practices. This study informs both science education and critical literacy research, argues that critical science reading and CSTA are worthwhile practices of both everyday folks and students, and suggests that educators encourage engagement in these practices by presenting students with conflicting science-related texts, encouraging doubt in and epistemic distancing from science-related texts, and modeling critical engagement with science-related texts for students.

  9. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  10. Advocacy in Counseling: Counselors, Clients, & Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Judy, Ed.; Bradley, Loretta, Ed.

    The sixteen chapters in this volume were selected from advocacy theme papers written by members of the American Counseling Association. They examine the role of the counselor as advocate for different groups of people, as follows: (1) "Developing a Common Language and Framework for Understanding Advocacy in Counseling," (R. L. Toporek); (2)…

  11. Explaining variation in gun control policy advocacy tactics among local organizations.

    PubMed

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Earp, Jo Anne L

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how well four organizational characteristics (structure, resources, motivation, or political capacity) explained local organizations' use of a variety of advocacy tactics aimed at promoting state gun control laws. In 1998, 679 local organizations were identified as potentially active on state gun control issues; a questionnaire was mailed to each group's leader. Seventy-nine percent (n = 538) responded to the survey, with 81% (n = 207) of eligible organizations completing questionnaires. The four organizational characteristics explained approximately half the variation in local groups' use of a wide range of advocacy tactics. Organizations with stronger motivation to address the gun control issue and greater political capacity engaged in more diverse gun control advocacy tactics; the authors found organizational structure and resources unlikely to be related. Leaders of advocacy organizations should consider ways to encourage members' motivations on the issue while fostering greater capacity for political action. PMID:19731501

  12. Explaining variation in gun control policy advocacy tactics among local organizations.

    PubMed

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Earp, Jo Anne L

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how well four organizational characteristics (structure, resources, motivation, or political capacity) explained local organizations' use of a variety of advocacy tactics aimed at promoting state gun control laws. In 1998, 679 local organizations were identified as potentially active on state gun control issues; a questionnaire was mailed to each group's leader. Seventy-nine percent (n = 538) responded to the survey, with 81% (n = 207) of eligible organizations completing questionnaires. The four organizational characteristics explained approximately half the variation in local groups' use of a wide range of advocacy tactics. Organizations with stronger motivation to address the gun control issue and greater political capacity engaged in more diverse gun control advocacy tactics; the authors found organizational structure and resources unlikely to be related. Leaders of advocacy organizations should consider ways to encourage members' motivations on the issue while fostering greater capacity for political action.

  13. [Self-Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Theresa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This theme issue presents personal perspectives and approaches to self-advocacy from individuals who are deaf-blind. Individual articles are: (1) "Self-Advocacy: Attaining Personal Stature" by Michelle J. Smithdas; (2) "The American Association of the Deaf-Blind: A National Consumer Advocacy Organization" by Jeffrey S. Bohrman; (3) a description…

  14. Front-Line Advocacy: Advocacy Based on Effective Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooden, Benny L.

    2012-01-01

    When American Association of School Administrators (AASA) and other membership organizations try to engage individuals in advocacy, a frequent exhortation is "Contact your representatives in Congress." Professional membership groups also stress that written communication is more powerful than phone calls to a representative's office, and they…

  15. Factors for success in mental health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Hann, Katrina; Pearson, Heather; Campbell, Doris; Sesay, Daniel; Eaton, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Background Mental health advocacy groups are an effective way of pushing the mental health agenda and putting pressure on national governments to observe the right to health; however, there is limited research that highlights best practices for such groups in low-resource settings. In an effort to improve the scaling up of mental health in Sierra Leone, stakeholders came together to form the country's first mental health advocacy group: the Mental Health Coalition – Sierra Leone. Since its inception, the group has worked towards raising the profile of mental health in Sierra Leone and developing as an advocacy organisation. Design The study's aim was to investigate views on enabling factors and barriers associated with mental health advocacy in a low-income country using a community-based participatory approach and qualitative methodology. Focus groups (N=9) were held with mental health stakeholders, and key informant interviews (N=15) were conducted with advocacy targets. Investigators analysed the data collaboratively using coding techniques informed by grounded theory. Results Investigators reveal viewpoints on key factors in networking, interacting with government actors, and awareness raising that enabled mental health advocacy aims of supporting policy, service delivery, service user rights, training for service delivery, and awareness raising. The investigators outline viewpoints on barriers for advocacy aims in framing the issue of mental health, networking, interacting with government actors, resource mobilization, and awareness raising. Conclusions The findings outline enabling factors, such as networking with key stakeholders, and barriers, such as lack of political will, for achieving mental health advocacy aims within a low-resource setting, Sierra Leone. Stakeholder coalitions can further key policy development aims that are essential to strengthen mental health systems in low-resource settings. PMID:26689456

  16. Businesses and advocacy groups create a road map for safer chemicals: the BizNGO Principles for Chemicals Policy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mark S; Thorpe, Beverley; Peele, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    This paper details how businesses and environmental organizations are collaborating to define and implement a visionary agenda for integrating safer chemicals into products, describing the challenges they confront and how they are overcoming those challenges. The framework for this assessment is the Principles for Chemicals Policy developed by the Business-NGO Working Group for Safer Chemicals and Sustainable Materials (BizNGO). The four principles--1) knowing and disclosing chemicals in products, 2) assessing and avoiding hazards, 3) committing to continuous improvement, and 4) supporting public policies and industry standards--while appearing to be straightforward, are, in fact, very complex to implement in practice. Together businesses and environmental organizations are charting a path to safer chemicals by sharing best practices, addressing technical aspects of safer chemicals substitution, and analyzing and supporting public policies that advance the rapid development and diffusion of greener chemicals in the economy.

  17. Community health advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Loue, Sana

    2006-01-01

    Competing health needs of diverse populations and ever shrinking resources available to support these needs often serve as the impetus for the initiation of advocacy efforts to improve community health. However, perceptions of what constitutes a community differ, as do approaches to advocacy itself. This glossary addresses five key questions: (1) What is advocacy?; (2) What is meant by community?; (3) What are the different approaches to community health advocacy?; (4) How are priorities established in the face of competing health advocacy goals?; (5) How can community health advocacy efforts be evaluated?; and (6) What challenges may be encountered in advocating for community health? Each of these issues could serve as the basis for a text on that subject alone. Accordingly, this article is not meant to be comprehensive text on these issues but is, instead, intended to highlight key foundational issues. And, although advocacy efforts can be conducted by individuals, this article focuses specifically on advocacy efforts of communities, however they may be defined and characterised. PMID:16698972

  18. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  19. Advocacy and Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brophy, Michael C.; And Others

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on advocacy and advocate counseling for participants in the University of Maryland Sixth Annual Community-Clinical Workshop, 1976. It attempts to define relevant terms and outline a method of self-advocacy which can, if utilized properly, lessen the impact of institutional racism. The terms,…

  20. Arts Advocacy Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Ann Marie; Green, Sharon; Haedicke, Susan; Mardirosian, Gail Humphries; Martin, Deborah; Schildcrout, Jordan; Spencer, Jenny; Weinberg, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Records discussion of an arts advocacy roundtable began at the August 2000 meeting of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education and continued online. Explains how theatre departments have found themselves defending their very existence in the past decade. Includes discussions of the meaning of arts advocacy; how to incorporate arts advocacy…

  1. Advocacy & Lobbying: Influencing Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASPBAE Courier, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This issue contains nine papers dealing with influencing public policy through advocacy and lobbying. "Influencing Public Policy" (Rajesh Tandon) looks at opportunities nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) have for influencing public policy and constraints to advocacy. "Recent Changes in the Global Aid Environment" (Sunimal Fernando) considers…

  2. Handbook for Rehabilitation Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Rehabilitation Association, Alexandria, VA.

    This handbook is intended to help advocates for persons with disabilities organize for advocacy, build effective coalitions, frame key issues, package critical information, and use the media to advance the cause. Individual sections address the following topics: how to change public policy; myths about advocacy; what makes politicians tick;…

  3. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    PubMed

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy. PMID:14744505

  4. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    PubMed

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy.

  5. The myth of advocacy.

    PubMed

    Stone, A A

    1979-12-01

    In an era in which advocacy has become a buzzword, both psychiatry and the legal profession have climbed aboard the advocacy bandwagon. Yet the American Psychiatric Association's notion of advocacy--championing the medical needs of patients--is often in direct conflict with the lawyers' notion of advocacy--championing the legal rights of their clients. The author observes that psychiatry has proved to be a weak adversary for patients' legal advocates; the result has been a one-sided advocacy system that has advanced patients' rights at the expense of their needs. He believes that if the APA is to become an effective advocate for patients, it must hire lawyers and work with them to reverse the trend of turning rights into needs.

  6. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    PubMed

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked. PMID:8974516

  7. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    PubMed

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked.

  8. Readings in Minority-Group Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, David L., Jr., Ed.

    The primary objectives of this book are to provide a background on how minority group members adapt and accommodate to various types of organizational circumstances, and to help the reader understand the differences in behaviors and job-related outcomes for white and nonwhite group members. The book is stated to be designed for present and…

  9. Using Focus Group Research in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunig, Larissa A.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes a recent instance of focus group research applied to a public relations case (rather than a marketing case). Reviews the advantages and disadvantages of this qualitative method, and describes the case of a county department of mental health relying on focus group research to help plan a program aimed at reducing the stigma of mental…

  10. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  11. Effects of a promotor training on local school wellness advocacy capacity.

    PubMed

    Jara, Eddy A; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Clifton-Hawkins, Nancy; Martinez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    There is gap between the enactment and implementation of local school wellness policies. Building the capacity of promotores to engage parents in strengthening local school wellness policy implementation is an innovative strategy. This evaluation study examines the effects of 6 hours of promotor advocacy training to improve local school wellness policy implementation. Consistent with psychological empowerment theory, the training and the related toolkit were designed to increase promotores' knowledge and self-efficacy to engage parents in advocating for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Pre-post training questionnaires (n = 74), five posttraining participant focus groups, and four staff member focus groups explored changes in promotor and participating organization capacity. Findings show increased participant self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes to advocate for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Participating organizations reported intention to continue supporting promotor local school wellness policy advocacy. Findings illuminate strategies to strengthen promotor capacity to engage parents in local school wellness policy advocacy. PMID:23182862

  12. Advocacy and technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  13. Effective citizen advocacy of beneficial nuclear technologies

    SciTech Connect

    McKibben, J. Malvyn; Wood, Susan

    2007-07-01

    In 1991, a small group of citizens from communities near the Savannah River Site (SRS) formed a pro-nuclear education and advocacy group, Citizens for Nuclear Technology Awareness (CNTA). Their purpose was to: (1) counter nuclear misinformation that dominated the nation's news outlets, (2) provide education on nuclear subjects to area citizens, students, elected officials, and (3) provide informed citizen support for potential new missions for SRS when needed. To effectively accomplish these objectives it is also essential to establish and maintain good relations with community leaders and reporters that cover energy and nuclear subjects. The organization has grown considerably since its inception and has expanded its sphere of influence. We believe that our experiences over these fifteen years are a good model for effectively communicating nuclear subjects with the public. This paper describes the structure, operation and some of the results of CNTA. (authors)

  14. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O’Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health. PMID:21867956

  15. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O'Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health.

  16. Relation between fingerprints and different blood groups.

    PubMed

    Fayrouz, I Noor Eldin; Farida, Noor; Irshad, A H

    2012-01-01

    Fingerprint is one of the oldest, reliable and mature biometric technologies and is considered one of the best, cheapest and legitimate proofs of identification. A correlation between physical characteristics like fingerprints and blood group was demonstrated in previous studies. This study was carried out in 2010 on 305 Libyan medical students of Al-Jabal Al-Gharbi, University, Zawia, Libya and were selected randomly having different ABO blood groups, with the objective to a) Study distribution of fingerprint pattern among the subjects having different ABO and Rh blood group b) Correlate any relation between their characters and blood group. The data from the study showed that male: female ratio was 1.2:1. Majority of subjects (48.9%) in this study were of blood group O followed by blood group A (33.1%), B (12.8%) and AB (5.2%). Rh-positive cases constitute about 87.2% of all studied cases. The general distribution of pattern of finger showed high frequency of Loops registering 50.5%; followed by whorls (35.1%) and arches (14.4%). In Rh+ve cases of blood group A and O loops incidences were the highest (52% and 54.3% respectively) then whorls (33.4% and 30.6% respectively), while in blood group B whorls were predominance in both Rh+ve and Rh-ve cases. In all blood groups there were high frequency of loops in thumb, index and little fingers.

  17. What Is Self-Advocacy? NRC Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Mair

    2010-01-01

    Self-advocacy is about independent groups of people with disabilities working together for justice by helping each other take charge of their lives and fight discrimination. The seeds of the self-advocacy movement go back to 1968 when a Swedish parent's organization held a meeting for people with developmental disabilities. Today, the…

  18. Working for Change in Education: A Handbook for Planning Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Save the Children, London (England).

    This handbook is for those seeking to improve children's education, especially those organizations that work closely with children, parents, and teachers. It sets out a way of approaching advocacy work with the understanding that advocacy groups have a greater impact on the direction of educational change if they have a well-thought-out advocacy…

  19. Community stakeholder responses to advocacy advertising

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.; Sinclair, J.

    2009-07-01

    Focus group research was used to examine how community stakeholders, a group with local industry experience, responded to coal industry advocacy messages. The stakeholders expressed beliefs about both the advertiser and the coal industry, and while their knowledge led to critical consideration of the industry campaign, they also expressed a desire to identify with positive messages about their community. Applying a postpositivist research perspective, a new model is introduced to integrate these beliefs in terms of advertiser trust and industry accountability under the existing theoretical framework of persuasion knowledge. Agent and topic knowledge are combined in this model based on responses to the industry advocacy campaign. In doing so, this study integrates a priori theory within a new context, extending the current theoretical framework to include an understanding of how community stakeholders - a common target for marketplace advocacy - interpret industry messages.

  20. Advocacy and Accessibility Standards in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldmann, Ashley K.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" as they relate to Section C: Advocacy and Accessibility. Ethical issues are identified and discussed in relation to advocacy skills and to advocacy with, and on behalf of, the client; to…

  1. Social Justice Advocacy: Community Collaboration and Systems Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.; Paylo, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the community collaboration and systems advocacy domains of the ACA (American Counseling Association) Advocacy Competencies (J. A. Lewis, M. S. Arnold, R. House, & R. L. Toporek, 2002). A case illustration is presented, and the 8 Advocacy Competencies within each domain are applied to the case study.

  2. Social Justice Advocacy in Rural Communities: Practical Issues and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Joshua M.; Werth, James L., Jr.; Hastings, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    The professional literature related to social justice has increased, but there has been little discussion of the practical issues and implications associated with social advocacy. However, adding new roles will result in new considerations for counseling psychologists. The need to be attuned to how the practical aspects of advocacy intersect with…

  3. From Preservice Leaders to Advocacy Leaders: Exploring Intersections in Standards for Advocacy in Educational Leadership and School Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Emily R.; Arnold, Noelle Witherspoon; Brown, Andre

    2014-01-01

    In this empirically based paper, we discuss educational leadership preparation as it relates to social justice, the concept of advocacy and the standards that guide leadership and counselling, respectively. To reveal how preservice leaders conceptualize advocacy as understood in professional standards, we draw on our research with 11 preservice…

  4. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  5. 45 CFR 1386.21 - Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.21 Section 1386.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.21 Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) In order for a State to receive...

  6. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  7. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  8. Public health and media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  9. Advocacy for eye care

    PubMed Central

    Ravilla, Thulasiraj D; Ramasamy, Dhivya

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services – such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support – either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy. PMID:22944745

  10. Higher Education Alumni Associations and Political Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchli, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Political advocacy is comprised of speaking on the behalf of a cause or participating as part of a political action group (Weerts, Cabrera, & Sanford, 2010). Because state financial support for public higher education has not been maintained at previous levels, higher education (HE) institutions have been recruiting alumni in an attempt to win…

  11. New focus on advocacy in South Asia. Advocacy for reproductive health: South Asia.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, I

    1996-01-01

    Initiatives like Vision 2000, the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, and the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing have focused attention on the activities of regional family planning associations (FPAs) in South Asia. These activities include male acceptance of the responsibility for family life, youth involvement in program design and implementation, the promotion of gender equality, and increased public awareness about the value of the female child. The Beijing conference also directed attention to the problem of not allocating resources to problems recognized by governments. In the South Asia region funding levels have been falling, which impacts the maintenance of current programs. The South Asia Regional Bureau began to coordinate an information, education, and communication (IEC) and Advocacy Working Group in the region with the participation of IEC officers from all regional FPAs. The group will be planning IEC and advocacy activities based on the regional FPAs' goals and aspirations. The IEC and advocacy activities will be examined to identify existing skills and experiences of group participants. The group will also try to identify the activities of each FPA. The information gathered will point out the similarities in IEC and advocacy activities serving as a common ground for the region. Problems of IEC and advocacy comprise their subordinate structure and the failure to evaluate to show the impact of the activities. Better planning and organization and more holistic evaluation of program components should be achieved. The group will be self-directed responding to the IEC and advocacy needs, while also developing the professional and personal capacity of FPA staff to meet these needs.

  12. Self-Advocacy Skills: A Portfolio Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Cathryn S.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes how an educator used a portfolio approach to teach self-advocacy skills to four middle school students with visual impairments. Students wrote about their visual impairment and learning needs, compiled lists of specific words and definitions related to their individual impairments, and wrote letters to their ninth-grade…

  13. Japanese Culture and the Philosophy of Self-Advocacy: The Importance of Interdependence in Community Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsuda, Eiji

    2006-01-01

    In Japan, there is a growing network of self-advocacy groups. Some groups are involved in campaigning. Other groups are involved in social events and education. The age of de-institutionalization is gradually arriving and community living for people with learning difficulties is becoming an urgent political issue. Self-advocacy groups can help…

  14. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  15. Self-Advocacy and Cancer: A Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Teresa L.; Donovan, Heidi S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept of self-advocacy among individuals with cancer to clarify its meaning, to differentiate this meaning with related concepts and to unify understanding of the concept in cancer research and practice. Background Cancer survivors are increasingly required to assume an active role in their healthcare. A thorough analysis of how survivors advocate for themselves is a crucial aspect in supporting survivors’ ability to engage and manage their care throughout all stages of cancer survivorship. Design Walker and Avant’s eight-step process of conducting a concept analysis was used. Data Sources PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched for articles, reviews, editorials and gray literature directly addressing self-advocacy. Review Methods A broad inquiry into the literature from 1960 – 2012 that produces a definition of self-advocacy. Model and contrary cases of self-advocacy demonstrate the concept’s application and intricacies. Results Antecedents to self-advocacy include particular personal characteristics, learned skills and attainable support. The essential element of self-advocacy and what differentiates it from related concepts, is the internalization of these antecedent resources into self-advocacy thoughts and actions while incorporating personal values and priorities in a way that upholds the survivors’ goals and beliefs. A full realization of self-advocacy facilitates a cancer survivor attaining a strong self-concept, sense of control and adaptation to a life with cancer. Conclusions Self-advocacy is a process of internalizing skills and resources to act in a way that supports survivors’ needs and goals. PMID:23347224

  16. Nuclear power and legal advocacy: the environmentalists and the courts

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    The US nuclear power industry began to stop growing in 1977, two years before the accident at Three Mile Island. This book examines the regulatory and judicial policymaking associated with nuclear power, with special attention given to the role of legal advocacy by interest groups. Research for the study had three goals: (1) a comparative analysis of the antinuclear environmental groups and the nuclear industry; (2) a determination of the policital strategy used by each interest group and the reasons for its choice of strategy in the course of litigation; and (3) an analysis of the role of the judiciary in the nuclear power controversy. The study focuses on the controversy surrounding the construction of a nuclear plant in Midland, Michigan as a representative case study to illustrate the role of interest groups, regulators, and the courts. The appendix lists related court cases. 170 references.

  17. Media Advocacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Media advocacy is an environmental strategy that can be used to support alcohol and other drug prevention and policy development efforts. It helps shift the focus from understanding public health issues as individual problems to understanding them as social conditions that require collective behavior changes. Successful media advocacy uses the…

  18. Discovering social groups without having relational data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salerno, John; Zhang, Zhongfei; Lewin, Ronny; Decker, Michael

    2004-04-01

    Who is associated with whom? Who communicates with whom? When two or more individuals get together is there an intended purpose? Who are the leaders/important individuals of the group? What is the organizational structure of the group? These are just a few of the questions that are covered under the topic of social network analysis. Data mining, specifically community generation, attempts to automatically discover and learn these social models. In this paper we present one class of problems which we have called the uni-party data community generation paradigm. We discuss various applications, a methodology and results from two problem domains.

  19. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  20. Group Learning as Relational Economic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Eisuke; Atencio, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss group learning in line with economic perspectives of embeddedness and integration emanating from the work of Karl Polanyi. Polanyi's work defines economy as a necessary interaction among human beings for survival; the economy is considered inextricably linked from broader society and social relations…

  1. Continuity of care in addictions treatment: the role of advocacy and coordination in case management.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Timney, C B; Bois, C; Wedgerfield, K

    1995-11-01

    Although advocacy and coordination are recognized as important aspects of the addictions treatment process, little research has been done in these areas. The present study examined advocacy and coordination at two programs where the mandate was assessment, referral, and case management. Both programs spent a similar proportion of client-related effort on advocacy and/or coordination (about 25% of contact time, accounting for about half of contacts made regarding clients). The majority of advocacy and coordination contacts were with other agencies about clients (the remainder with family and friends of clients). A framework for advocacy and coordination was developed that allowed contacts to be categorized into mutually exclusive advocacy or coordination activities. Advocacy was defined as any activity undertaken to obtain something for clients; coordination involved the giving or receiving of information regarding specific clients. Sources of variability in the provision of advocacy and coordination were found between the programs that could be attributed to differences between the systems within which the programs operated, as well as differences in program clientele. In terms of client characteristics, it was found that females were more likely than males to receive advocacy; those over 65 years were most likely to receive both advocacy and coordination; those who were referred by school or employer or by corrections were most likely to receive coordination; those with no prior treatment were most likely to receive advocacy; and self-referrals and those who had had prior treatment were most likely to receive neither advocacy nor coordination. Receiving advocacy or coordination was not found to reduce the need by clients for other case management services, such as supportive counseling. The findings are discussed in terms of the need for knowledge regarding highly variable aspects of treatment such as advocacy and coordination. New research approaches (as taken in

  2. The Effects of Advocacy Advertising and Situational Crisis on Perceptions of Social Responsibility, Potential Supportive Behavior and Attitudes Toward Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cozby, Jeanie G.; And Others

    Data were collected from 176 college students in a study of the effects of corporate advocacy advertising in crisis situations. The subjects read one of two sets of oil company advertisements, one set using a low advocacy and the other set using a high advocacy approach to explain company activities in relation to current events and social issues.…

  3. When are emotions related to group-based appraisals? A comparison between group-based emotions and general group emotions.

    PubMed

    Kuppens, Toon; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2014-12-01

    In the literature on emotions in intergroup relations, it is not always clear how exactly emotions are group-related. Here, we distinguish between emotions that involve appraisals of immediate group concerns (i.e., group-based emotions) and emotions that do not. Recently, general group emotions, measured by asking people how they feel "as a group member" but without specifying an object for these emotions, have been conceptualized as reflecting appraisals of group concerns. In contrast, we propose that general group emotions are best seen as emotions about belonging to a group. In two studies, general group emotions were closely related to emotions that are explicitly measured as belonging emotions. Two further studies showed that general group emotions were not related to appraisals of immediate group concerns, whereas group-based emotions were. We argue for more specificity regarding the group-level aspects of emotion that are tapped by emotion measures.

  4. Nursing advocacy during a military operation.

    PubMed

    Foley, B J; Minick, P; Kee, C

    2000-06-01

    Advocacy is an essential component of the registered nurse's professional role, yet experts provide no consistent definition of advocacy. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of military nurses as they engage in advocating practices and to describe their shared practices and common meanings. Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology, provided the framework and method for this study. Twenty-four U.S. Army nurses were individually interviewed and the researcher kept interview observational notes. The constant comparative method of analysis was used. The stories of these nurses revealed one constitutive pattern--safeguarding--and four related themes. The themes were advocating as protecting, advocating as attending the whole person, advocating as being the patient's voice, and advocating as preserving personhood. One conclusion was that military nurses must be prepared for the important safe-guarding role. They must be coached in how to deal with other members of the health team on the patient's behalf. PMID:10826256

  5. Interpersonal Perception in Group Therapy: A Social Relations Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, David K.; Holahan, William

    1994-01-01

    Describes investigation in which participants in time-limited group therapy reported impressions of fellow group members via Impact Message Inventory. Social relations analysis of data indicated that subjects' perceptions included both assimilation and consensus. Suggests results demonstrate utility of social relations model for group therapy…

  6. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy.

  7. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy. PMID:26058653

  8. Management, Leadership, and User Control in Self-Advocacy: An English Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive…

  9. Using women advocacy groups to enhance knowledge and home management of febrile convulsion amongst mothers in a rural community of Sokoto State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oche, Oche Mansur; Onankpa, Oloche Ben

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Febrile convulsions (FC) are a common paediatric problem worldwide. Between 1 and 4% of children will have a febrile convulsion with about 4% of cases arising before the age of six months. Although FC is benign and does not cause death, brain damage or learning disorders, it is quite frightening to observers and parents who witness an episode of FC, would think the child is going to die. Methods This was a quasi-experimental study (a pre and post-test interventional, one group), aimed at assessing the impact of health education on knowledge and home management of febrile convulsion amongst mothers in a rural community in North Western Nigeria. A one in three samples of fifty mothers that met the eligibility criteria where selected using systematic random sampling. Structured interviewer administered questionnaire with close and open-ended questions was administered to obtain data at pre- and post intervention. Results The ages of the mothers ranged from 18-47 with a mean age of 33 ± 7.14years. The perceived causes of febrile convulsion included fever (28%), witch craft (80%) with majority (98%) of the mothers administering traditional medications. Proportion of study subjects with adequate knowledge of febrile convulsion at baseline and post intervention were 4% (mean knowledge score of 35.3± 9.48) and 96.0% (mean knowledge score of 77.69 ± 10.75) respectively (P < 0.0001). Conclusion Although inadequate knowledge and inappropriate home practices about FC were rampant in the study community, using community members to teach and sensitize the mothers on FC improved their knowledge base significantly. The use of effective educational intervention programmes and parental support groups will go a long way in reducing the incidence of FC among children in our communities. PMID:23560132

  10. Between-group competition, intra-group cooperation and relative performance

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Juan C.; Mantilla, César

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a new public goods experiment with an intra-group cooperation dilemma and inter-group competition. In our design subjects receive information about their relative individual and group performance after each round with non-incentivized and then incentivized group competition. We found that, on average, individuals with low relative performance reduce their contributions to the public good, but groups with low performance increase theirs. With incentivized competition, where the relative ranking of the group increases individual payoffs, the reaction to relative performance is larger with individuals contributing more to the group; further, we observe that the variance of strategies decreases as individual and group rankings increase. These results offer new insights on how social comparison shapes similar reactions in games with different incentives for group performance and how competition and cooperation can influence each other. PMID:25741258

  11. An approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Wang, Z.; Li, J.

    2013-06-01

    Direction relations between object groups play an important role in qualitative spatial reasoning, spatial computation and spatial recognition. However, none of existing models can be used to compute direction relations between object groups. To fill this gap, an approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups is proposed in this paper, which is theoretically based on Gestalt principles and the idea of multi-directions. The approach firstly triangulates the two object groups; and then it constructs the Voronoi Diagram between the two groups using the triangular network; after this, the normal of each Vornoi edge is calculated, and the quantitative expression of the direction relations is constructed; finally, the quantitative direction relations are transformed into qualitative ones. The psychological experiments show that the proposed approach can obtain direction relations both between two single objects and between two object groups, and the results are correct from the point of view of spatial cognition.

  12. An approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Wang, Z.; Li, J.

    2013-09-01

    Direction relations between object groups play an important role in qualitative spatial reasoning, spatial computation and spatial recognition. However, none of existing models can be used to compute direction relations between object groups. To fill this gap, an approach to computing direction relations between separated object groups is proposed in this paper, which is theoretically based on gestalt principles and the idea of multi-directions. The approach firstly triangulates the two object groups, and then it constructs the Voronoi diagram between the two groups using the triangular network. After this, the normal of each Voronoi edge is calculated, and the quantitative expression of the direction relations is constructed. Finally, the quantitative direction relations are transformed into qualitative ones. The psychological experiments show that the proposed approach can obtain direction relations both between two single objects and between two object groups, and the results are correct from the point of view of spatial cognition.

  13. Morbidity Related Groups (MRG) for Epidemiological Analysis in Outpatient Treatment.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Reinhard; Emcke, Timo; von Arnstedt, Eva; Heidbreder, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Each patient in outpatient treatment is assigned per quarter and corresponding physician to a case group that is strongly related to the morbidity (Morbidity Related Group, MRG). MRG is defined by the drug group on a four character level in the international anatomic-therapeutic-chemical (ATC) classification with the largest costs as an indicator for the severity of the drug treatment. Using severity levels we get a risk adjustment with respect to age and polypharmacy as an indicator for multimorbidity and treatment intensity. By application of MRG groups we generate a patient type classification in relation to physicians and a distance structure of the medical disciplines. PMID:27577493

  14. Advocacy and Age: Issues, Experiences, Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Paul A., Ed.

    This monograph seeks to bring understanding to one component of the advocacy field, that of advocacy and the aged, by overviewing this component through a series of articles. (Advocacy is an activity by which changes can be effected in a power structure to improve a subgroup's situation.) There are four parts to the document: part 1, entitled…

  15. Practitioner Perceptions of School Library Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School library advocacy is increasingly important due to decreases in funding and staff. National organizations attempt to engage school librarians in advocacy and have developed resources and tools to assist with this task. However, there is little research examining how practicing school librarians engage in advocacy and how their advocacy…

  16. Approaches to Advocacy for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Beverly Saxton, Ed.; Brown, Kelli McCormack, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This monograph provides a collection of articles on health educators' approaches to advocacy: "The Role of Health Education Advocacy in Removing Disparities in Health Care" (John P. Allegrante, Donald E. Morisky, and Behjat A. Sharif); "The Role of Health Education Associations in Advocacy" (M. Elaine Auld and Eleanor Dixon-Terry); "What…

  17. Every Voice Matters: The Importance of Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royea, Amber J.; Appl, Dolores J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the years parents, professionals, and politicians have come together to advocate on behalf of children's rights. Advocacy can occur individually, collectively, or a combination of both. Although some advocacy efforts are more successful than others, it is the process of the advocacy and voices behind it that matter most. In this guest…

  18. Intonation Grouping and Related Words in Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanzer, Murray

    1976-01-01

    Two studies were carried out demonstrating the interaction of intonation grouping and meaning relations between words in free recall. When the intonation grouping is in phase with the word relations, recall is facilitated. When it is out of phase, recall is lowered. (Author/RM)

  19. College Student Narratives about Learning and Using Self-Advocacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly-Cano, Meada; Vaccaro, Annemarie; Newman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Self-advocacy is the ability to communicate one's needs and wants and to make decisions about the supports needed to achieve them (Stodden, Conway, & Chang, 2003). Research shows self-advocacy skills are related to academic performance and successful adaptation to college (Adams & Proctor, 2010; Getzel & Thoma, 2008; Hadley, 2006;…

  20. The Perceived Status of the Professional School Counselor's Advocacy Role, Training, and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmberg, Darla Janene

    2012-01-01

    Although professionals and organizations in counseling and related fields have identified advocacy as an important role of the professional school counselor, researchers have failed to provide data on how practicing school counselors actually perceive and practice advocacy. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to address how school…

  1. Whistle-Blowing as a Form of Advocacy: Guidelines for the Practitioner and Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Annette D.; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-01-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using…

  2. Weber's Critique of Advocacy in the Classroom: Critical Thinking and Civic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the four aspects of Max Weber's argument against including advocacy in the political science classroom. Believes that Weber's critique is a useful starting point for considering the issue in relation to contemporary education. Describes two models, critical thinking and civic education, that present advocacy in the political science…

  3. Applying Buddhist Practices to Advocacy: The Advocacy-Serving Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane; Klepper, Konja K.; Lambert, Serena; Nunez, Johnna; Williams, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Creating and retaining empathic connections with the most disenfranchised among us can take a toll on the wellness of counselor advocates. The Advocacy-Serving Model is introduced as a creative approach to strengthening the ability of advocates to serve through enhancing awareness, focusing actions, and connecting to community. The model…

  4. Evaluating Human Rights Advocacy on Criminal Justice and Sex Work.

    PubMed

    Amon, Joseph; Wurth, Margaret; McLemore, Megan

    2015-06-11

    Between October 2011 and September 2013, we conducted research on the use, by police and/or prosecutors, of condom possession as evidence of intent to engage in prostitution-related offenses. We studied the practice in five large, geographically diverse cities in the U.S. To facilitate our advocacy on this issue, conducted concurrent to and following our research, we developed an advocacy framework consisting of six dimensions: (1) raising awareness, (2) building and engaging coalitions, (3) framing debate, (4) securing rhetorical commitments, (5) reforming law and policy, and (6) changing practice. Using a case study approach, we describe how this framework also provided a basis for the evaluation of our work, and discuss additional considerations and values related to the measurement and evaluation of human rights advocacy.

  5. [Significance of expert-guided groups for relatives in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Plessen, U; Postzich, M; Wilkmann, M

    1985-03-01

    Psychiatric interest in relatives of patients was concentrated in the past on their pathogenetic and etiological influence on mental illness. The medical paradigma of mental illness did not account for relatives affliction in psychic disturbance of their family member. Against this a community care oriented approach involves relatives into psychiatric care, particularly under the aspects of coping strategies and rehabilitative sources. Practicability and effects of this approach were explored in expert-guided relative groups at the Psychiatric Hospital Gütersloh (FRG). Results indicated that relatives are concerned with a series of problems. Participating in relative groups facilitates coping with these problems. Expert-guided and relative centered groups were found helpful, discharging and encouraging for relatives. PMID:3991817

  6. [Significance of expert-guided groups for relatives in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Plessen, U; Postzich, M; Wilkmann, M

    1985-03-01

    Psychiatric interest in relatives of patients was concentrated in the past on their pathogenetic and etiological influence on mental illness. The medical paradigma of mental illness did not account for relatives affliction in psychic disturbance of their family member. Against this a community care oriented approach involves relatives into psychiatric care, particularly under the aspects of coping strategies and rehabilitative sources. Practicability and effects of this approach were explored in expert-guided relative groups at the Psychiatric Hospital Gütersloh (FRG). Results indicated that relatives are concerned with a series of problems. Participating in relative groups facilitates coping with these problems. Expert-guided and relative centered groups were found helpful, discharging and encouraging for relatives.

  7. Patient activation and advocacy: which literacy skills matter most?

    PubMed

    Martin, Laurie T; Schonlau, Matthias; Haas, Ann; Derose, Kathryn Pitkin; Rosenfeld, Lindsay; Buka, Stephen L; Rudd, Rima

    2011-01-01

    Attention to the effect of a patient's literacy skills on health care interactions is relatively new. So, too, are studies of either structural or personal factors that inhibit or support a patient's ability to navigate health services and systems and to advocate for their own needs within a service delivery system. Contributions of the structural environment, of interpersonal dynamics, and of a variety of psychological and sociological factors in the relationship between patients and providers have long been under study. Less frequently examined is the advocacy role expected of patients. However, the complex nature of health care in the United States increasingly requires a proactive stance. This study examined whether four literacy skills (reading, numeracy, speaking, and listening) were associated with patient self-advocacy--a component of health literacy itself--when faced with a hypothetical barrier to scheduling a medical appointment. Although all literacy skills were significantly associated with advocacy when examined in isolation, greater speaking and listening skills remained significantly associated with better patient advocacy when all four skills were examined simultaneously. These findings suggest that speaking and listening skills and support for such skills may be important factors to consider when developing patient activation and advocacy skills.

  8. Teacher Advocacy in Bilingual Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubetz, Nancy E.; de Jong, Ester J.

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of changes in federal and state policies in education, educators who believe in the value and importance of bilingualism find themselves in a contested environment where their notions of best practices for emergent bilinguals contradict those espoused in such policies. In this context, acts of advocacy that support bilingual…

  9. CEC Special Education Advocacy Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook, for individuals working with people who have disabilities, is designed to empower them to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work. It is designed to help in channeling one's strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The…

  10. Engaging health professionals in advocacy against gun violence.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andrew D

    2008-01-01

    Health professionals have long been involved with advocacy around the social determinants of health, including protesting against war and mitigating the production, trade and use of specific weapon systems. Small arms and light weapons are a key area on which to focus, as they are responsible for the majority of injuries and deaths in war and their availability is related to increased levels of crime and suicide. Challenges for health professionals hoping to engage in such advocacy include a lack of adequate data, the need to confront political questions and the gun-lobby, and difficulty in measuring the effectiveness of campaigns. This article discusses some examples of successful advocacy and suggests future directions for health professionals in this area.

  11. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership.

  12. The group-as-a-whole-object relations model of group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, D; Stukenberg, K W; Saeks, S

    2001-01-01

    The authors review the theoretical basis of group psychotherapy performed at The Menninger Clinic and demonstrate how the theory has been put into practice on two different types of inpatient units. The fundamental elements of the theory and practice used can be traced to object relations theory as originally proposed by Melanie Klein. Her work with individuals was directly applied to working with groups by Ezriel and Bion, who focused on interpreting group tension. More modern approaches have reintegrated working with individual concerns while also attending to the group-as-a-whole. Historically, these principles have been applied to long-term group treatment. The authors apply the concepts from the group-as-a-whole literature to short- and medium-length inpatient groups with open membership. They offer clinical examples of the application of these principles in short-term inpatient settings in groups with open membership. PMID:11761492

  13. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere.

  14. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    PubMed

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere. PMID:27199148

  15. A pilot study of selected Japanese nurses' ideas on patient advocacy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Anne J; Konishi, Emiko; Tashiro, Marie

    2003-07-01

    This pilot study had two purposes: (1) to review recent Japanese nursing literature nursing advocacy; and (2) to obtain data from nurses on advocacy. For the second purpose, 24 nurses at a nursing college in Japan responded to a questionnaire. The concept of advocacy, taken from the West, has become an ethical ideal for Japanese nurses but one that they do not always understand, or, if they do, they find it difficult to fulfil. They cite nursing leadership support as necessary to enacting this role. Discussion on meaning of and the rationale for advocacy in a society where goodness or badness is relative to social situations and its impact may reveal two parallel but overlapping views of morality. Such a situation would not only influence notions of advocacy but also possibly render them more complex.

  16. Uncertainty relations, zero point energy and the linear canonical group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The close relationship between the zero point energy, the uncertainty relations, coherent states, squeezed states, and correlated states for one mode is investigated. This group-theoretic perspective enables the parametrization and identification of their multimode generalization. In particular the generalized Schroedinger-Robertson uncertainty relations are analyzed. An elementary method of determining the canonical structure of the generalized correlated states is presented.

  17. The Relational-Cultural Model: A Framework for Group Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comstock, Dana L.; Duffey, Thelma; St. George, Holly

    2002-01-01

    The relational-cultural model of psychotherapy has been evolving for the past 20 years. Within this model, difficult group dynamics are conceptualized as the playing out of the central relational paradox. This paradox recognizes that an individual may yearn for connection but, out of a sense of fear, simultaneously employ strategies that restrict…

  18. Corporate Advocacy: A Selected Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    This paper provides a selected review of the literature pertaining to corporate advocacy (non-product advertising by corporations, addressing political or social issues). More specifically, the paper examines research from the communication, business, public relations, and advertising literature dealing with justifications for the practice of…

  19. Mississippi front-line recovery work after Hurricane Katrina: an analysis of the intersections of gender, race, and class in advocacy, power relations, and health.

    PubMed

    Weber, Lynn; Hilfinger Messias, Deanne K

    2012-06-01

    By disrupting the routine practices and social structures that support social hierarchy, disasters provide a unique opportunity to observe how gender, race, and class power relations are enacted and reconstituted to shape health inequities. Using a feminist intersectional framework, we examine the dynamic relationships among a government/corporate alliance, front-line disaster recovery workers, and disadvantaged residents in Mississippi Gulf Coast communities in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which struck in August, 2005. Data were collected between January 2007 and October 2008 through field observations, public document analysis, and in-depth interviews with 32 front-line workers representing 27 non-governmental, nonprofit community-based organizations. Our analysis reveals how power relationships among these groups operated at the macro-level of the political economy as well as in individual lives, increasing health risks among both the disadvantaged and the front-line workers serving and advocating on their behalf. Socially situated as outsiders-within, front-line recovery workers operated in the middle ground between the disadvantaged populations they served and the powerful alliance that controlled access to essential resources. From this location, they both observed and were subject to the processes guiding the allocation of resources and their unequal outcomes. Following a brief period of hope for progressive change, recovery workers became increasingly stressed and fatigued, particularly from lack of communication and coordination, limited resources, insufficient capacity to meet overwhelming demands, and gendered and racialized mechanisms of marginalization and exclusion. The personal and collective health burdens borne by these front-line recovery workers--predominantly women and people of color - exemplify the ways in which the social relations of power and control contribute to health and social inequities.

  20. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    PubMed

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described.

  1. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  2. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Cristi C.; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively. PMID:26041036

  3. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    PubMed

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively. PMID:26041036

  4. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    PubMed

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively.

  5. MADD rates the states: a media advocacy event to advance the agenda against alcohol-impaired driving.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, A; Voas, R B; Dejong, W; Chaloupka, M

    1995-01-01

    The "Rating the States" (RTS) Program of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) is designed to bring public attention to the status of State government efforts to combat alcohol-impaired driving. MADD's 1993 report, which evaluated each State with a grade from A to D, brought renewed visibility to MADD's fight for new prevention policies and helped to advance key State legislation. Because of MADD's national press conference and other media activities, more than 60 million Americans saw or heard a news story related to the program. This article outlines the program's objectives and methodology, efforts to publicize the results, and what was achieved in terms of news media coverage and in advancing public policy change. The RTS Program is a proven media advocacy strategy for prompting State legislatures and Governors to enact new policies. The article concludes with guidelines for other public health advocacy groups that may want to emulate this strategy. PMID:7610210

  6. [Group therapy of bulimia nervosa and other related disorders].

    PubMed

    Torrente, Fernando M; Crispo, Rosina

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a brief group intervention model for the initial phase of the treatment of bulimia nervosa and other related eating disorders. The model combines elements from cognitive-behavioral and psychoeducational approaches. Along the article we will describe the theoretical foundations of the model, a review of the empirical evidence that supports it, and afterwards, the group procedure developed by us in our clinical experience. Later on, the clinical results of an uncontrolled study of a sample of patients who participated in the group will be introduced. Finally, we will discuss the scope and limitations of this experience.

  7. Climate Change: On Scientists and Advocacy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    Last year, I asked a crowd of a few hundred geoscientists from around the world what positions related to climate science and policy they would be comfortable publicly advocating. I presented a list of recommendations that included increased research funding, greater resources for education, and specific emission reduction technologies. In almost every case, a majority of the audience felt comfortable arguing for them. The only clear exceptions were related to geo-engineering research and nuclear power. I had queried the researchers because the relationship between science and advocacy is marked by many assumptions and little clarity. This despite the fact that the basic question of how scientists can be responsible advocates on issues related to their expertise has been discussed for decades most notably in the case of climate change by the late Stephen Schneider.

  8. A comparison of diagnosis related groups and ambulatory visit groups in day-case surgery.

    PubMed

    Parkin, D; Hutchinson, A; Philips, P; Coates, J

    1993-01-01

    Case-mix measurement is a basic requirement of clinical and resource management systems within health care organisations, and offers a potentially useful tool for the setting and monitoring of contracts. Ambulatory care has particular problems in the construction of appropriate case-mix measures, and day-case surgery provides an opportunity to test two existing measures, one inpatient (Diagnosis Related Groups) and one ambulatory (Ambulatory Visit Groups). These grouping systems were applied to the same data to compare the case-mix patterns that they produce. The findings show that Ambulatory Visit Groups appear to have advantages over the Diagnosis Related Groups with respect to their underlying assumptions and labelling of the groups; in particular, they assign greater weight to procedures. However, Diagnosis Related Groups are more developed, easier to use, more familiar and allow direct comparisons with inpatient care. Nevertheless, a proper evaluation of these issues requires further data collection and analysis, together with a fundamental examination of the uses of ambulatory case-mix. PMID:10171758

  9. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    PubMed

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy.

  10. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    PubMed

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy. PMID:27641281

  11. A beginner’s guide to getting involved in science advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Ruppersburg, Chelsey Chandler; York, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Every scientist in the United States likely has a story of how the federal funding crisis for biomedical research has affected him or her personally. The sharing of these powerful anecdotes will enable policy makers to fully grasp the extent to which the decline in federal funding has negatively affected the scientific community. However, many scientists do not know where to begin or are uncertain that their advocacy efforts will have an impact. In an effort to encourage more scientists to become involved in science advocacy, we describe how to form and maintain a student science advocacy group. PMID:27079651

  12. [Group psychoeducational intervention in relatives of patients suffering from schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Palli, A; Kalantzi-Azizi, A; Ploumpidis, D N; Kontoangelos, K; Economou, M

    2015-01-01

    The present research paper aims at assessing the effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention in relatives' groups of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. It examines the possible influence of the intervention on family members as well as on the course of the patient illness. Of a total of 131 relatives, 83 consisted the experimental group and 48 the control group. The relatives of the experimental group were divided into 5 groups and attended 18 psychoeducational sessions. Their patients as well s the patients and the relatives of the control group attended no specific intervention and continued their routine care. The psychoeducational intervention included education about the illness, communication skills training and training in problem-solving. It combined educational and psychotherapeutic techniques. The psychometric tools administered were: The Family Burden Scale, The Family Rituals Scale, The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-28, the Center for Epidemiological studies - Depression Scale (CES-D), the Opinions about Mental Illness Scale OMI, two scales concerning the knowledge about the illness, two questionnaires concerning expectations and feedback about the group process and questionnaires regarding sociodemographic characteristics of the sample and information about the illness. The number of hospitalizations of patients (n=91) during the research year was investigated. An interaction between group and measurement was found. While patient hospitalizations of both research groups did not differ significantly at the year before the study with X2=0.54, p=0.46), they differed when measured a year after the intervention, where patients in the intervention group had statistically significant fewer hospitalizations compared to the patients in the control group (x2=4.58, significant at p=0.032). As to the "compliance" in the medication, two statistical tests were conducted, taking into consideration that "compliance" by patients starting

  13. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  14. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  15. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  16. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  17. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Toll-Free Phone Line Project Committee scheduled for... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  18. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... per quarter per group. (e) Relations with Industry and Labor in the Community (refer to SECNAVINST... affairs officer. (2) Navy commands will cooperate with industry and its representatives in planning and... there is a legitimate need for industrial promotion items, such as scale models, the command...

  19. Relative Deprivation and Health: Which Reference Groups Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangyo, Eiji; Park, Albert

    2011-01-01

    We examine the extent to which self-reported health and psychosocial health are affected by relative economic status in China, for the first time examining the importance of reference groups not defined by geographic location or demographic characteristics. We propose a methodology to address potential bias from subjective reporting biases and…

  20. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership.

  1. Relative Yetter-Drinfeld modules and comodules over braided groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haixing E-mail: haxing.zhu@njfu.edu.cn

    2015-04-15

    Let H{sub 1} be a quantum group and f : H{sub 1}⟶H{sub 2} a Hopf algebra homomorphism. Assume that B is some braided group obtained by Majid’s transmutation process. We first show that there is a tensor equivalence between the category of comodules over the braided group B and that of relative Yetter-Drinfeld modules. Next, we prove that the Drinfeld centers of the two categories mentioned above are equivalent to the category of modules over some quantum double, namely, the category of ordinary Yetter-Drinfeld modules over some Radford’s biproduct Hopf algebra. Importantly, the above results not only hold for a finite dimensional quantum group but also for an infinite dimensional one.

  2. Infants use relative numerical group size to infer social dominance

    PubMed Central

    Pun, Anthea; Birch, Susan A. J.; Baron, Andrew Scott

    2016-01-01

    Detecting dominance relationships, within and across species, provides a clear fitness advantage because this ability helps individuals assess their potential risk of injury before engaging in a competition. Previous research has demonstrated that 10- to 13-mo-old infants can represent the dominance relationship between two agents in terms of their physical size (larger agent = more dominant), whereas younger infants fail to do so. It is unclear whether infants younger than 10 mo fail to represent dominance relationships in general, or whether they lack sensitivity to physical size as a cue to dominance. Two studies explored whether infants, like many species across the animal kingdom, use numerical group size to assess dominance relationships and whether this capacity emerges before their sensitivity to physical size. A third study ruled out an alternative explanation for our findings. Across these studies, we report that infants 6–12 mo of age use numerical group size to infer dominance relationships. Specifically, preverbal infants expect an agent from a numerically larger group to win in a right-of-way competition against an agent from a numerically smaller group. In addition, this is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate that infants 6–9 mo of age are capable of understanding social dominance relations. These results demonstrate that infants’ understanding of social dominance relations may be based on evolutionarily relevant cues and reveal infants’ early sensitivity to an important adaptive function of social groups. PMID:26884199

  3. Infants use relative numerical group size to infer social dominance.

    PubMed

    Pun, Anthea; Birch, Susan A J; Baron, Andrew Scott

    2016-03-01

    Detecting dominance relationships, within and across species, provides a clear fitness advantage because this ability helps individuals assess their potential risk of injury before engaging in a competition. Previous research has demonstrated that 10- to 13-mo-old infants can represent the dominance relationship between two agents in terms of their physical size (larger agent = more dominant), whereas younger infants fail to do so. It is unclear whether infants younger than 10 mo fail to represent dominance relationships in general, or whether they lack sensitivity to physical size as a cue to dominance. Two studies explored whether infants, like many species across the animal kingdom, use numerical group size to assess dominance relationships and whether this capacity emerges before their sensitivity to physical size. A third study ruled out an alternative explanation for our findings. Across these studies, we report that infants 6-12 mo of age use numerical group size to infer dominance relationships. Specifically, preverbal infants expect an agent from a numerically larger group to win in a right-of-way competition against an agent from a numerically smaller group. In addition, this is, to our knowledge, the first study to demonstrate that infants 6-9 mo of age are capable of understanding social dominance relations. These results demonstrate that infants' understanding of social dominance relations may be based on evolutionarily relevant cues and reveal infants' early sensitivity to an important adaptive function of social groups. PMID:26884199

  4. Engaging students in community health: a public health advocacy curriculum.

    PubMed

    Curran, Nell; Ned, Judith; Winkleby, Marilyn

    2014-03-01

    Individual risk assessment and behavior change dominate the content of high school health education instruction whereas broader social, political, and economic factors that influence health-known as upstream causes-are less commonly considered. With input from instructors and students, we developed a 10-lesson experiential Public Health Advocacy Curriculum that uses classroom-based activities to teach high school students about the upstream causes of health and engages them in community-based health advocacy. The Curriculum, most suitable for health- or advocacy-related elective classes or after-school programs, may be taught in its entirety or as single lessons integrated into existing coursework. Although students at many schools are using the Curriculum, it has been formally evaluated with 110 predominantly Latino students at one urban and one semirural public high school in Northern California (six classes). In pre-post surveys, students showed highly significant and positive changes in the nine questions that covered the three main Curriculum domains (Upstream Causes, Community Exploration, and Public Health Advocacy), p values .02 to <.001. The Curriculum is being widely disseminated without charge to local, national, and international audiences, with the objective of grooming a generation of youth who are committed to the public health perspective to health. PMID:23975798

  5. Conflict of roles: a conflict of ideas? The unsettled relations between care team staff and independent mental health advocates.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Mick; Ridley, Julie; Newbigging, Karen; Machin, Karen; Poursanidou, Konstantina; Cruse, Kaaren

    2014-10-01

    Drawing on a national study of independent mental health advocacy, we explored the social relations of independent advocacy. The study was commissioned by the Department of Health (England), and involved a case study design covering eight different geographies and service configurations, and interviews or focus groups with a total of 289 stakeholders across two phases of inquiry. This paper focused on the analysis of qualitative data relevant to the relationship between mental health-care services and independent advocacy services, drawn from interviews with 214 participants in phase two of the study. Discussion of these particular findings affords insights into the working relations of independent advocacy within mental health services beset by reorganizational change and funding cuts, and increasing levels of legally-sanctioned compulsion and coercion. We offer a matrix, which accounts for the different types of working relationships that can arise, and how these are associated with various levels of understanding of independent advocacy and appreciation for the value of advocacy. The discussion is framed by the wider literature on advocacy and the claims by practitioners, such as nurses, for an advocacy role as part of their professional repertoire.

  6. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority. PMID:26200573

  7. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    PubMed

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority.

  8. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs.

  9. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    PubMed

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  10. Increasing aging and advocacy competency: the intergenerational advocacy pilot project.

    PubMed

    Hermoso, Joyce; Rosen, Anita L; Overly, Libby; Tompkins, Catherine J

    2006-01-01

    The Council on Social Work Education's (CSWE) Strengthening Aging and Gerontology Education for Social Work (SAGE-SW) project, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation partnered with the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare (NCPSSM) to develop an Intergenerational Policy and Advocacy Project (IAP). This curriculum pilot project, based on a community organization model, was conducted with 13 baccalaureate social work (BSW) and master's social work (MSW) programs across the country and 122 students. The project was one method to pursue CSWE SAGE-SW's efforts to infuse aging content into social work foundation curricula, to support intergenerational teaching, to strengthen social work advocacy skills, and to provide social work students with positive experiences working with older adults. Pilot sites were asked to carry out the project as part of an existing course foundation or field practicum course. Project activities included collaboration with a variety of community agencies, holding issues or "town hall" forums in order to educate community members about critical policy issues affecting older adults; making contacts and establishing relationships with local, state and/or federal legislators; and conducting assessments of the service needs of older adults in the students' communities. Questionnaires, feedback, pre-post evaluations as well as brief accounts of each project are presented. Participants considered the IAP to be a successful project in terms of the objectives of increasing awareness and competency among social work students of aging issues and of promoting intergenerational linkages between older people and social work students. PMID:17200078

  11. A comparison of diagnosis related groups and ambulatory visit groups in day-case surgery.

    PubMed

    Parkin, D; Hutchinson, A; Philips, P; Coates, J

    1993-01-01

    Case-mix measurement is a basic requirement of clinical and resource management systems within health care organisations, and offers a potentially useful tool for the setting and monitoring of contracts. Ambulatory care has particular problems in the construction of appropriate case-mix measures, and day-case surgery provides an opportunity to test two existing measures, one inpatient (Diagnostic Related Groups) and one ambulatory (Ambulatory Visit Groups). These grouping systems were applies to the same data to compare the case-mix patterns that they produce. The findings show that the ambulatory visit group appear to have advantages over the diagnostic group with respect to their underlying assumptions and labelling of the groups; in particular, they assign greater weight to procedures. However, diagnostic groups are more developed, easier to use, more familiar and allow direct comparisons with inpatient care. Nevertheless, a proper evaluation of these issues requires further data collection and analysis, together with a fundamental examination of the uses of ambulatory case-mix. PMID:10171429

  12. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  13. Broadening the Discussion about Evaluator Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This issue of "American Journal of Evaluation" presents commentaries by evaluation leaders, George Grob and Rakesh Mohan, which draw upon their wealth of practical experience to address questions about evaluator advocacy, including What is meant by the word "advocacy"? Should evaluators ever advocate? If so, when and how? What…

  14. Health Advocacy--Counting the Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyall, Lorna; Marama, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Access to, and delivery of, safe and culturally appropriate health services is increasingly important in New Zealand. This paper will focus on counting the costs of health advocacy through the experience of a small non government charitable organisation, the Health Advocates Trust, (HAT) which aimed to provide advocacy services for a wide range of…

  15. Corporate Advocacy Advertising and Political Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltzer, Herbert

    1988-01-01

    Offers an operational definition and typology of advocacy and image advertising as complementary forms of institutional advertising. Examines two of the more important forms of advocacy advertising--paid print editorials appearing on the "op-ed" page of the "New York Times" and the "advertorials" in two principal professional journals of the…

  16. School Board Advocacy: Ready, Aim, Inspire!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, Karen

    2010-01-01

    It is said that "all politics are local," and the same can be said about advocacy and school boards. Advocacy is essential for retaining the progress that's been made in the past, and for building a foundation and network for the future. Advocating for preferred programs, curricula and initiatives has always been important. As a starting point,…

  17. Effective Advocacy and Communication with Legislators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, Office of Public Policy and Information, Alexandria, VA.

    This pamphlet attempts to make communicating with legislators easy. Each section includes a brief paragraph and several bullet points that present techniques or advice for simplifying communication. It begins with "Rules for Effective Advocacy," which presents a core set of basic advocacy principles, followed by "What Makes Politicians Tick?" and…

  18. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  19. Building Evidence for Music Education Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorner-Johnson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The economic challenges facing public schools and music education are immense. In this context, music teachers and supporters will need to engage in persuasive advocacy to protect resource allocations to music programs. It is worthwhile to consider the model of music education advocacy that allowed music to be adopted into the Boston Public…

  20. Political Advocacy Handbook: Activating Grassroots Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.; Warger, Cynthia L.

    This handbook is designed to assist special education advocates in developing the capacity to mount an effective advocacy campaign at the state and federal levels. It is divided into the following four separate training modules: (1) "Introduction to Advocacy"; (2) "Understanding the Governmental Process"; (3) "Changing Public Policy"; and (4)…

  1. Extraction of a group-pair relation: problem-solving relation from web-board documents.

    PubMed

    Pechsiri, Chaveevan; Piriyakul, Rapepun

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to extract a group-pair relation as a Problem-Solving relation, for example a DiseaseSymptom-Treatment relation and a CarProblem-Repair relation, between two event-explanation groups, a problem-concept group as a symptom/CarProblem-concept group and a solving-concept group as a treatment-concept/repair concept group from hospital-web-board and car-repair-guru-web-board documents. The Problem-Solving relation (particularly Symptom-Treatment relation) including the graphical representation benefits non-professional persons by supporting knowledge of primarily solving problems. The research contains three problems: how to identify an EDU (an Elementary Discourse Unit, which is a simple sentence) with the event concept of either a problem or a solution; how to determine a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary as two event-explanation groups, and how to determine the Problem-Solving relation between these two event-explanation groups. Therefore, we apply word co-occurrence to identify a problem-concept EDU and a solving-concept EDU, and machine-learning techniques to solve a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary. We propose using k-mean and Naïve Bayes to determine the Problem-Solving relation between the two event-explanation groups involved with clustering features. In contrast to previous works, the proposed approach enables group-pair relation extraction with high accuracy.

  2. Extraction of a group-pair relation: problem-solving relation from web-board documents.

    PubMed

    Pechsiri, Chaveevan; Piriyakul, Rapepun

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to extract a group-pair relation as a Problem-Solving relation, for example a DiseaseSymptom-Treatment relation and a CarProblem-Repair relation, between two event-explanation groups, a problem-concept group as a symptom/CarProblem-concept group and a solving-concept group as a treatment-concept/repair concept group from hospital-web-board and car-repair-guru-web-board documents. The Problem-Solving relation (particularly Symptom-Treatment relation) including the graphical representation benefits non-professional persons by supporting knowledge of primarily solving problems. The research contains three problems: how to identify an EDU (an Elementary Discourse Unit, which is a simple sentence) with the event concept of either a problem or a solution; how to determine a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary as two event-explanation groups, and how to determine the Problem-Solving relation between these two event-explanation groups. Therefore, we apply word co-occurrence to identify a problem-concept EDU and a solving-concept EDU, and machine-learning techniques to solve a problem-concept EDU boundary and a solving-concept EDU boundary. We propose using k-mean and Naïve Bayes to determine the Problem-Solving relation between the two event-explanation groups involved with clustering features. In contrast to previous works, the proposed approach enables group-pair relation extraction with high accuracy. PMID:27540498

  3. Introducing diagnosis-related groups: is the information system ready?

    PubMed

    Jian, Weiyan; Lu, Ming; Han, Wei; Hu, Mu

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis-related group (DRG) system is a classification system widely used in health managements, the foundation of which lies in the medical information system. A large effort had been made to improve the quality of discharge data before the introduction of DRGs in Beijing. We extract discharge data from 108 local hospitals spanning 4 years before and after standardization to evaluate the impact of standardization on DRG grouping performance. The data was grouped on an annual basis in accordance with Beijing's local DRG system. Proportion of ungrouped data, coefficient of variation (CV) and reduction in variance (RIV) were used to measure the performance of the DRG system. Both the descriptive and regression analysis indicate a significant reduction in terms of ungrouped data and CV for expenditure, increase of RIV for expenditure and length of stay. However, when there was no intervention, that is, between 2005 and 2006 and between 2008 and 2009, changes in these indicators were all insignificant. Therefore, the standardization of discharge data did improve data quality and consequently enhanced the performance of DRGs. Developing countries with a relatively weak information infrastructure should strengthen their medical information system before the introduction of the DRG system.

  4. [Why are diagnosis-related groups unpopular in Colombia?].

    PubMed

    Gorbanev, Iouri; Cortés, Ariel; Agudelo, Sandra; Yepes, Francisco J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the determinants of non-implementation of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) by hospitals in Colombia. A qualitative case was carried out to analyze the directors' perceptions in six hospitals with and without DRGs in Bogotá. The interviews are based on the Innovation Diffusion Theory. The directors had similar perceptions of the determinates. DRGs were seen as positive, but encountered organizational and institutional obstacles. Without a targeted public policy, the likelihood of implementing DRGs in Colombia is slight.

  5. Framing of AIDS in Africa: press-state relations, HIV/AIDS news, and journalistic advocacy in four sub-Saharan Anglophone newspapers.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paul; Pollock, John C; Kiernicki, Kristen; Shaw, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This study offers the first systematic analysis of the impact of press-state relations, or media systems, on the HIV/AIDS news agenda in African news coverage. The premise is that media systems play a determining role in the degree to which journalists can independently advocate for social change when covering HIV/AIDS. Drawing on comparative research, four sub-Saharan countries were categorized into two media systems: Contained Democratic (South Africa, Nigeria) and Repressive Autocratic (Zimbabwe, Kenya). A sample of HIV/AIDS stories (n = 393) published from 2002-2007 in each country's leading Anglophone newspaper was content analyzed. Across all coverage, the topic of social costs was framed more for the responsibility borne by nongovernmental agents than governmental agents. In Contained Democratic media systems, however, story emphasis shifted toward government agents taking responsibility for addressing the social costs of HIV/AIDS. Prevention campaigns were framed more as progress than decline across all newspapers; however, campaigns were reported as being more efficacious in Contained Democratic systems than in Repressive Autocratic systems. No impact of media system on framing of medical developments was found. Results show the value of comparative analysis in understanding the agenda-setting process: with greater emphasis on positive efficacy and government initiative, the news agenda in Contained Democratic media systems can facilitate stronger positive societal-level responses than the news agenda in Repressive Autocratic media systems.

  6. Elliptical galaxies kinematics within general relativity with renormalization group effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Davi C.

    2012-09-01

    The renormalization group framework can be applied to Quantum Field Theory on curved space-time, but there is no proof whether the beta-function of the gravitational coupling indeed goes to zero in the far infrared or not. In a recent paper [1] we have shown that the amount of dark matter inside spiral galaxies may be negligible if a small running of the General Relativity coupling G is present (δG/G{sub 0}∼<10{sup −7} across a galaxy). Here we extend the proposed model to elliptical galaxies and present a detailed analysis on the modeling of NGC 4494 (an ordinary elliptical) and NGC 4374 (a giant elliptical). In order to compare our results to a well known alternative model to the standard dark matter picture, we also evaluate NGC 4374 with MOND. In this galaxy MOND leads to a significative discrepancy with the observed velocity dispersion curve and has a significative tendency towards tangential anisotropy. On the other hand, the approach based on the renormalization group and general relativity (RGGR) could be applied with good results to these elliptical galaxies and is compatible with lower mass-to-light ratios (of about the Kroupa IMF type)

  7. Coleman Advocates for Children And Youth: a pioneering child advocacy organization (1974-2008).

    PubMed

    Carnochan, Sarah; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Coleman Advocates for Youth and Children is a pioneering 30-year-old child advocacy organization founded by several affluent community members and children's service professionals to stop housing abused and neglected children in juvenile hall. Today, low-income youth and parents in families of color are now assuming leadership in developing a unique hybrid approach that integrates community organizing with more traditional child advocacy strategies and focuses on increasing affordable housing and improving the city's educational system. The strategies employed by Coleman have also evolved, shifting from insider advocacy with administrative officials to public campaigns targeting the city budget process, to local initiative campaigns, and most recently to electoral politics. This organizational history features the issues mission and structure, leadership, managing issues, advocacy strategies and community relations, and funding.

  8. Community health nursing advocacy: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel C

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an in-depth analysis of the concept of community health nursing (CHN) advocacy. Walker and Avant's (2010) 8-step concept analysis methodology was used. A broad inquiry into the literature between 1994 and 2014 resulted in the identification of the uses, defining attributes, empirical referents, antecedents, and consequences, as well as the articulation of an operational definition of CHN advocacy. Model and contrary cases were identified to demonstrate the concept's application and to clarify its meaning. This analysis contributes to the advancement of knowledge of CHN advocacy and provides nurse clinicians, educators, and researchers with some conceptual clarity to help improve community health outcomes.

  9. Fossil group origins. II. Unveiling the formation of the brightest group galaxies through their scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrena, R.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Boschin, W.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Corsini, E. M.; Del Burgo, C.; D'Onghia, E.; Girardi, M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Napolitano, N.; Vilchez, J. M.; Zarattini, S.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Fossil systems are galaxy associations dominated by a relatively isolated, bright elliptical galaxy, surrounded by a group of smaller galaxies lacking L∗ objects. Because of this extreme environment, fossil groups (FGs) are ideal laboratories for studying the mass assembly of brightest group galaxies (BGGs). Aims: We analyzed the near-infrared photometric and structural properties of a sample of 20 BGGs present in FGs to better understand their formation mechanisms. They represent the largest sample studied to date. Methods.Ks-band deep images were used to study the structural properties of our sample galaxies. Their surface-brightness distribution was fitted to a Sérsic profile using the GASP2D algorithm. Then, the standard scaling relations were derived for the first time for these galaxies and compared with those of normal ellipticals and brightest cluster galaxies in non-fossil systems. Results: The BGGs presented in this study represent a subset of the most massive galaxies in the Universe. We find that their ellipticity profiles are continuously increasing with the galactocentric radius. Our fossil BCGs follow closely the fundamental plane described by normal ellipticals. However, they depart from both the log σ0 vs. log LKs and log re vs. log LKs relations described by intermediate-mass ellipticals. This occurs in the sense that our BGGs have larger effective radii and smaller velocity dispersions than those predicted by these relations. We also find that more elliptical galaxies systematically deviate from the previous relations, while rounder objects do not. No similar correlation was found with the Sérsic index. Conclusions: The derived scaling relations can be interpreted in terms of the formation scenario of the BGGs. Because our BGGs follow the fundamental plane tilt but have larger effective radii than expected for intermediate-mass ellipticals, we suggest that they only went through dissipational mergers in an early stage of their

  10. Community Health Worker Professional Advocacy: Voices of Action from the 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Samantha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Phillips, David; Haywoord, Catherine; Redondo, Floribella; Bell, Melanie L; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores community health worker (CHW) engagement in professional advocacy. Data from the National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (n = 1661) assessed the relationship between CHW professional advocacy and CHW demographics, and work characteristics. Qualitative data articulated the quality of professional advocacy efforts. Approximately, 30% of CHW respondents advocated for professional advancement or collaborated with other CHWs to advance the workforce. Advocacy was more prevalent among CHWs affiliated with a professional network. CHW advocacy targeted recognition of the field, appropriate training and compensation, and sustainable funding. CHW professional advocacy is imperative to advancement of the field.

  11. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  12. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  13. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  14. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  15. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, OLDER AMERICANS PROGRAMS GRANTS TO STATE AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  16. Participatory advocacy: a counter to media imperialism.

    PubMed

    Brown, M

    1996-01-01

    Western media have a history of defining news worldwide, presenting news from a Western perspective which distorts and denies the truth as perceived from developing countries. Western news coverage of developing countries seems to emphasize countries' fragility, instability, and corruption, leading people to believe that the economic problems of developing countries are due to internal failures. That view is then transferred back to indigenous peoples and communities through major Western news agencies and mass media. Participatory communication is based upon the notion that people have the right to decide how they want themselves and their situations to be portrayed, to decide what information is useful to them and their community, and to be integral players in the communication process. With regard to media imperialism, the author discusses implications for advocacy activities, participatory communication approaches, participatory advocacy, participatory advocacy in South Asia, girl child drama in Nepal, drug abuse television drama in Nepal, and the advocacy challenge.

  17. Attachment theory and group processes: the association between attachment style and group-related representations, goals, memories, and functioning.

    PubMed

    Rom, Eldad; Mikulincer, Mario

    2003-06-01

    Four studies examined attachment-style differences in group-related cognitions and behaviors. In Studies 1-2, participants completed scales on group-related cognitions and emotions. In Studies 3-4, participants were divided into small groups, and their performance in group tasks as well as the cohesion of their group were assessed. Both attachment anxiety and avoidance in close relationships were associated with negative group-related cognitions and emotions. Anxiety was also related to the pursuit of closeness goals and impaired instrumental performance in group tasks. Avoidance was related to the pursuit of distance goals and deficits in socioemotional and instrumental performance. Group cohesion significantly moderated the effects of attachment anxiety. The discussion emphasizes the relevance of attachment theory within group contexts. PMID:12793586

  18. Attachment theory and group processes: the association between attachment style and group-related representations, goals, memories, and functioning.

    PubMed

    Rom, Eldad; Mikulincer, Mario

    2003-06-01

    Four studies examined attachment-style differences in group-related cognitions and behaviors. In Studies 1-2, participants completed scales on group-related cognitions and emotions. In Studies 3-4, participants were divided into small groups, and their performance in group tasks as well as the cohesion of their group were assessed. Both attachment anxiety and avoidance in close relationships were associated with negative group-related cognitions and emotions. Anxiety was also related to the pursuit of closeness goals and impaired instrumental performance in group tasks. Avoidance was related to the pursuit of distance goals and deficits in socioemotional and instrumental performance. Group cohesion significantly moderated the effects of attachment anxiety. The discussion emphasizes the relevance of attachment theory within group contexts.

  19. A media advocacy intervention linking health disparities and food insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related food insecurity leads to disparities related to the consumption of a popular food product across Canada (namely, Kraft Dinner®), we launched a media intervention intended to appeal to radio, television, print and Internet journalists. All the media coverage conveyed our intended message that food insecurity is a serious population health problem, confirming that message framing, personal narratives and visual imagery are important in persuading media outlets to carry stories about poverty as a determinant of population health. Among politicians and members of the public (through on-line discussions), the coverage provoked on-message as well as off-message reactions. Population health researchers and health promotion practitioners should anticipate mixed reactions to media advocacy interventions, particularly in light of new Internet technologies. Opposition to media stories regarding the socio-economic determinants of population health can provide new insights into how we might overcome challenges in translating evidence into preventive interventions. PMID:21685402

  20. Validation of the patient advocacy engagement scale for health professionals.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeleine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles; Heidemann, Gretchen; Ananias, Debbie

    2015-04-01

    Codes of ethics of nursing, social work, and medicine, as well as Joint Commission Accreditation Standards, require members of these professions to engage in advocacy on behalf of patients. With use of expert panels, seven categories of patient problems in the healthcare milieu were identified: ethical rights, quality care, preventive care, culturally competent care, affordable/accessible care, mental health care, and care linked to patients' homes and communities. To measure the frequency with which healthcare professionals engage in patient advocacy related to these specific problems, the Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale (Patient-AES) scale was developed and validated through analysis of responses of 297 professionals (94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents) recruited from the personnel rosters of eight acute-care hospitals in Los Angeles County. Hospitals included public, not-for-profit, HMO, and church-affiliated hospitals that served general hospital populations, veterans, cancer patients, and children. Results supported the validity of both the concept and the instrument. Construct validity was supported by testing the hypothesized seven-factor solution through confirmatory factor analysis; 26 items loaded onto seven components. Pearson correlations for the overall scale and seven subscales in two administrations supported their test-retest stability. Cronbach α ranged from .55 to .94 for the seven subscales and .95 for the overall Patient-AES. The Patient-AES is, to our knowledge, the first scale that measures patient advocacy engagement by healthcare professionals in acute-care settings related to a broad range of specific patient problems. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Advocacy evaluation: challenges and emerging trends.

    PubMed

    Devlin-Foltz, David; Fagen, Michael C; Reed, Ehren; Medina, Robert; Neiger, Brad L

    2012-09-01

    Devising, promoting, and implementing changes in policies and regulations are important components of population-level health promotion. Whether advocating for changes in school meal nutrition standards or restrictions on secondhand smoke, policy change can create environments conducive to healthier choices. Such policy changes often result from complex advocacy efforts that do not lend themselves to traditional evaluation approaches. In a challenging fiscal environment, allocating scarce resources to policy advocacy may be particularly difficult. A well-designed evaluation that moves beyond inventorying advocacy activities can help make the case for funding advocacy and policy change efforts. Although it is one thing to catalog meetings held, position papers drafted, and pamphlets distributed, it is quite another to demonstrate that these outputs resulted in useful policy change outcomes. This is where the emerging field of advocacy evaluation fits in by assessing (among other things) strategic learning, capacity building, and community organizing. Based on recent developments, this article highlights several challenges advocacy evaluators are currently facing and provides new resources for addressing them. PMID:22773623

  2. Medical Advocacy and Supportive Environments for African-Americans Following Abnormal Mammograms.

    PubMed

    Molina, Yamile; Hempstead, Bridgette H; Thompson-Dodd, Jacci; Weatherby, Shauna Rae; Dunbar, Claire; Hohl, Sarah D; Malen, Rachel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2015-09-01

    African-American women experience disproportionately adverse outcomes relative to non-Latina White women after an abnormal mammogram result. Research has suggested medical advocacy and staff support may improve outcomes among this population. The purpose of the study was to understand reasons African-American women believe medical advocacy to be important and examine if and how staff can encourage and be supportive of medical advocacy. A convenience-based sample of 30-74-year-old women who self-identified as African-American/Black/of African descent and who had received an abnormal mammogram result was recruited from community-based organizations, mobile mammography services, and the local department of health. This qualitative study included semi-structured interviews. Patients perceived medical advocacy to be particularly important for African-Americans, given mistrust and discrimination present in medical settings and their own familiarity with their bodies and symptoms. Respondents emphasized that staff can encourage medical advocacy through offering information in general in a clear, informative, and empathic style. Cultural competency interventions that train staff how to foster medical advocacy may be a strategy to improve racial disparities following an abnormal mammogram.

  3. Medical Advocacy and Supportive Environments for African Americans following Abnormal Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Yamile; Hempstead, Bridgette H.; Thompson-Dodd, Jacci; Weatherby, Shauna Rae; Dunbar, Claire; Hohl, Sarah D.; Malen, Rachel C.; Ceballos, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    African American women experience disproportionately adverse outcomes relative to non-Latina White women after an abnormal mammogram result. Research has suggested medical advocacy and staff support may improve outcomes among this population. The purpose of the study was to understand reasons African American women believe medical advocacy to be important and examine if and how staff can encourage and be supportive of medical advocacy. A convenience-based sample of 30–74 year old women who self-identified as African American/Black/of African descent and who had received an abnormal mammogram result was recruited from community-based organizations, mobile mammography services, and the local department of health. This qualitative study included semi-structured interviews. Patients perceived medical advocacy to be particularly important for African Americans, given mistrust and discrimination present in medical settings and their own familiarity with their bodies and symptoms. Respondents emphasized staff can encourage medical advocacy through offering information in general in a clear, informative, and empathic style. Cultural competency interventions that train staff how to foster medical advocacy may be a strategy to improve racial disparities following an abnormal mammogram. PMID:25270556

  4. Contributions of object relations theory and self psychology to relational psychology and group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schermer, V L

    2000-04-01

    Object relations theory and self psychology are psychoanalytic perspectives that are especially concerned with interpersonal relations and their mental representations. Object relations theory began as an intrapsychic "singleton" psychology with the work of Freud and Melanie Klein. It subsequently evolved into a multi-person psychology with the work of Bion on groups, as well as the clinical and theoretical contributions of Winnicott and Fairbairn. Kohutian self psychology, which emerged later, has been interested in the relations between the self and significant others as mirroring and idealizing "self-objects." Stolorow's "inter-subjective perspective" emerged from self psychology as a full-fledged multi-person point of view. This article considers the significance of contemporary object relations theory and self psychology as relational, multi-person perspectives in terms of their application to group psychotherapy, focusing upon the group-as-a-whole, projective identification, transitional space and object, and self/self-object relations as particularly useful constructs. A clinical vignette is provided.

  5. Contributions of object relations theory and self psychology to relational psychology and group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schermer, V L

    2000-04-01

    Object relations theory and self psychology are psychoanalytic perspectives that are especially concerned with interpersonal relations and their mental representations. Object relations theory began as an intrapsychic "singleton" psychology with the work of Freud and Melanie Klein. It subsequently evolved into a multi-person psychology with the work of Bion on groups, as well as the clinical and theoretical contributions of Winnicott and Fairbairn. Kohutian self psychology, which emerged later, has been interested in the relations between the self and significant others as mirroring and idealizing "self-objects." Stolorow's "inter-subjective perspective" emerged from self psychology as a full-fledged multi-person point of view. This article considers the significance of contemporary object relations theory and self psychology as relational, multi-person perspectives in terms of their application to group psychotherapy, focusing upon the group-as-a-whole, projective identification, transitional space and object, and self/self-object relations as particularly useful constructs. A clinical vignette is provided. PMID:10778012

  6. Classroom Segregation: Where Do Students Sit and How Is This Related to Group Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Shelley; Stringer, Maurice; Cairns, Ed

    2016-01-01

    With increasing ethnic and racial diversity in the classroom, understanding classroom dynamics and the use of space has become increasingly important. In particular, when theoretical perspectives, such as that offered by intergroup contact research, promotes the importance of contact between competing groups to improve relations. Adopting a…

  7. The Effect of Group Projects on Content-Related Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    Business schools often assign student group projects to enhance student learning of course content and to build teamwork skills. However, the characteristics of effective collaborative learning tasks, including group goals and individual accountability, are often not found in student group projects assigned in business classes. The current…

  8. Intergroup Discrimination in Positive and Negative Outcome Allocations: Impact of Stimulus Valence, Relative Group Status, and Relative Group Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Sabine; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Three studies investigated the determination of social discrimination by the valence of stimuli that are allocated between groups. The studies were based on either the minimal group paradigm or a more reality-based laboratory intergroup setting, with stimulus valence, group status, and group size as factors and with pull scores on Tajfel matrices…

  9. Diagnosis-related Groups and Hospital Inpatient Federal Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Rimler, Simcha B; Gale, Brian D; Reede, Deborah L

    2015-10-01

    To understand the complex system of reimbursement for health care services, it is helpful to have a working knowledge of the historic context of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs), as well as their utility and increasing relevance. Congress implemented the DRG system in 1983 in response to rapidly increasing health care costs. The DRG system was designed to control hospital reimbursements by replacing retrospective payments with prospective payments for hospital charges. This article explains how these payments are calculated. Every inpatient admission is classified into one of several hundred DRGs that are based on the diagnosis, complications, and comorbidities. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) assigns each DRG a weight that the CMS uses in conjunction with hospital-specific data to determine reimbursement. A population's DRGs represent the resources needed to treat the medical disorders of that population. Hospital administrators use this information to budget and plan for the future. The Affordable Care Act and other recent legislation affect medical reimbursement by altering the DRG system. Radiologic procedures in particular are affected. This legislation will give DRGs an even larger role in determining reimbursements in the coming years. PMID:26466189

  10. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  11. Gluten Intolerance Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG) empowers the gluten-free community through consumer support, advocacy, and education. • SUPPORT GIG • ... about the events taking place in your gluten-free community. Find >> Products From breads and pastas to pet ...

  12. Characterizing conserved structural contacts by pair-wise relative contacts and relative packing groups.

    PubMed

    Holmes, J Bradley; Tsai, Jerry

    2005-12-01

    To adequately deal with the inherent complexity of interactions between protein side-chains, we develop and describe here a novel method for characterizing protein packing within a fold family. Instead of approaching side-chain interactions absolutely from one residue to another, we instead consider the relative interactions of contacting residue pairs. The basic element, the pair-wise relative contact, is constructed from a sequence alignment and contact analysis of a set of structures and consists of a cluster of similarly oriented, interacting, side-chain pairs. To demonstrate this construct's usefulness in analyzing protein structure, we used the pair-wise relative contacts to analyze two sets of protein structures as defined by SCOP: the diverse globin-like superfamily (126 structures) and the more uniform heme binding globin family (a 94 structure subset of the globin-like superfamily). The superfamily structure set produced 1266 unique pair-wise relative contacts, whereas the family structure subset gave 1001 unique pair-wise relative contacts. For both sets, we show that these constructs can be used to accurately and automatically differentiate between fold classes. Furthermore, these pair-wise relative contacts correlate well with sequence identity and thus provide a direct relationship between changes in sequence and changes in structure. To capture the complexity of protein packing, these pair-wise relative contacts can be superimposed around a single residue to create a multi-body construct called a relative packing group. Construction of convex hulls around the individual packing groups provides a measure of the variation in packing around a residue and defines an approximate volume of space occupied by the groups interacting with a residue. We find that these relative packing groups are useful in understanding the structural quality of sequence or structure alignments. Moreover, they provide context to calculate a value for structural randomness

  13. Relative Costs and Statistical Power in the Extreme Groups Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahams, Norman M.; Alf, Edward F., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between variables in applied and experimental research is often investigated by the use of extreme groups. Recent analytical work has provided an extreme group procedure that is more powerful than the standard correlational approach. The present article provides procedures to optimize power and thusly resources in such studies.…

  14. The future of the cancer prevention workforce: why health literacy, advocacy, and stakeholder collaborations matter.

    PubMed

    Sulik, Gayle A; Cameron, Carrie; Chamberlain, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    In considering the role of the cancer prevention workforce in meeting the nation's future health care needs, it is vital to address the considerable gaps in information, communication, training, professional development, roles, and levels of collaboration among diverse disciplines, stakeholders, and constituencies. As part of an October 2009 symposium at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center entitled "Future Directions in Cancer Prevention and Control: Workforce Implications for Training, Practice, and Policy," the Health Policy and Advocacy Working Group was convened to discuss barriers to closing these gaps. Three major themes emerged from the group's deliberations and are discussed here: (1) the role of critical health literacy and evidence-based collaborations in cancer prevention education, research, and practice; (2) the implications of health advocacy for policy development and clinical and public health practice; and (3) culturally and linguistically appropriate cancer prevention programs and information within advocacy/workforce collaborations. Mechanisms for addressing these gaps are presented. PMID:22311694

  15. The Northland fluoridation advocacy programme: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Sunitha; Thomas, David R

    2008-12-01

    On 20 July 2006, the Far North District Council resolved to fluoridate Kaitaia and Kaikohe. This was the first such initiative by any Territorial Local Authority (TLA) in New Zealand for 23 years, and resulted from a fluoridation advocacy programme. This paper describes the programme implementation, assesses its consistency with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi, and critically examines the collaboration between the fluoride advocate and the key stakeholders. Process evaluation identified three main categories of programme implementation: policy advocacy, community action projects, and media advocacy. The collaboration of iwi, Maori health providers and the community suggests that the programme was consistent with the principles (partnership, participation and protection) ofthe Treaty ofWaitangi. Media advocacy played an important role in reflecting and engaging community views on fluoridation, and it influenced decision-making by the Far North District Council. The simultaneous, combined 'top-down and bottom-up' approach was an effective and successful strategy for fluoridation advocacy in the community. Less integrated approaches implemented on their own (such as the 'top down' approach in Whangarei and the 'bottom-up' approach in Dargaville) were not effective. PMID:19180864

  16. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia. PMID:12292791

  17. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... professional or technical seminars or civic groups meeting in connection with an official visit to the activity... seminar is of principal importance and the use of mess facilities is incidental thereto. (2) Because...

  18. 32 CFR 705.22 - Relations with community groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... professional or technical seminars or civic groups meeting in connection with an official visit to the activity... seminar is of principal importance and the use of mess facilities is incidental thereto. (2) Because...

  19. Advocacy Evaluation: A Model for Internal Evaluation Offices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    As evaluations are more often implemented by internal staff, internal evaluators must begin to assume decision-making and advocacy tasks. This advocacy evaluation concept is described using the Federal Bureau of Investigation evaluation staff as a model. (TJH)

  20. Towards a global framework for capacity building for non-communicable disease advocacy in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Trevor; Champagne, Beatriz; Blanchard, Claire; Ibarra, Lorena; Kasesmup, Vijj

    2013-12-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent an increasing proportion of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Sustained advocacy, carried out by a skilled workforce, is an important strategy to realize the political will and implement the policy changes necessary to reduce the global burden of NCDs. Competencies for effective advocacy include a combination of scientific and technical as well as communication-based skills. Recognizing the need to build local capacity for NCD advocacy in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the InterAmerican Heart Foundation joined efforts to conduct two pilot advocacy courses, one in Thailand and one in Colombia. A Global Advisory Group engaged a Local Organizing Committee in each country to ensure the courses would meet the needs of the local stakeholders. While both courses contained a set of key competencies and helped participants develop joint strategies for moving forward with consensus advocacy targets, the courses differed in content and participant background depending on the local context. A key goal of the courses was to determine and describe the lessons learned and make recommendations for a framework to be used for future advocacy capacity-building activities in LMIC. The planning and execution of each course generated lessons in the following five areas that informed the development of a global framework for capacity building for NCD advocacy: 1) using a comprehensive theoretical framework to teach advocacy competencies, 2) engaging key stakeholders, 3) meeting local needs and priorities, 4) planning local logistics, and 5) ensuring the skills obtained through training are applied to sustained advocacy for NCDs. PMID:24722739

  1. Towards a global framework for capacity building for non-communicable disease advocacy in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Shilton, Trevor; Champagne, Beatriz; Blanchard, Claire; Ibarra, Lorena; Kasesmup, Vijj

    2013-12-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent an increasing proportion of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Sustained advocacy, carried out by a skilled workforce, is an important strategy to realize the political will and implement the policy changes necessary to reduce the global burden of NCDs. Competencies for effective advocacy include a combination of scientific and technical as well as communication-based skills. Recognizing the need to build local capacity for NCD advocacy in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Heart Foundation of Australia and the InterAmerican Heart Foundation joined efforts to conduct two pilot advocacy courses, one in Thailand and one in Colombia. A Global Advisory Group engaged a Local Organizing Committee in each country to ensure the courses would meet the needs of the local stakeholders. While both courses contained a set of key competencies and helped participants develop joint strategies for moving forward with consensus advocacy targets, the courses differed in content and participant background depending on the local context. A key goal of the courses was to determine and describe the lessons learned and make recommendations for a framework to be used for future advocacy capacity-building activities in LMIC. The planning and execution of each course generated lessons in the following five areas that informed the development of a global framework for capacity building for NCD advocacy: 1) using a comprehensive theoretical framework to teach advocacy competencies, 2) engaging key stakeholders, 3) meeting local needs and priorities, 4) planning local logistics, and 5) ensuring the skills obtained through training are applied to sustained advocacy for NCDs.

  2. Public health advocacy to change corporate practices: implications for health education practice and research.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2005-06-01

    Corporate practices, such as advertising, public relations, lobbying, litigation, and sponsoring scientific research, have a significant impact on the health of the people in the United States. Recently, health professionals and advocates have created a new scope of practice that aims to modify corporate practices that harm health. This article describes how corporate policies influence health and reviews recent health campaigns aimed at changing corporate behavior in six industries selected for their central role in the U.S. economy and their influence on major causes of mortality and morbidity. These are the alcohol, automobile, food, gun, pharmaceutical, and tobacco industries. The article defines corporate disease promotion and illustrates the range of public health activities that have emerged to counter such corporate behaviors. It analyzes the role of health professionals, government, and advocacy groups in these campaigns and assesses the implications of this domain for health education practice and research.

  3. A Pharmacy Political Advocacy Elective Course

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Patricia H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To develop and implement an elective course to increase pharmacy students’ awareness of legislation that might affect the pharmacy profession and to promote advocacy for the profession. Design. Students participated in class discussions regarding current legislative issues and methods to advocate for the pharmacy profession. Assignments included a student-led presentation of the advocacy agendas for various pharmacy organizations, a take-home examination, participation in class debates, and a legislative presentation. Assessment. Forty-eight students enrolled in the elective course over 3 years. Assignments and class participation were assessed using grading rubrics. At the end of the semester, students completed a questionnaire to assess the overall benefit of the course. Conclusions. Participation in an elective course devoted to pharmacy political advocacy increased awareness of legislation and the desire to become involved in pharmacy organizations to promote the pharmacy profession. PMID:21969723

  4. Political advocacy in pharmacy: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Dorie E

    2015-01-01

    Many pharmacists have expressed a desire to become more involved in patient care, in part by being compensated for patient counseling, as well as by providing services traditionally offered by physicians and nurse practitioners. Recent efforts to develop collaborative care models, as well as major restructurings of US health insurance coverage, provide a unique opportunity for pharmacists to become recognized as independent health care providers and be reimbursed as primary care providers. Achieving that goal would require addressing advocacy challenges familiar to other health care professionals who have achieved provider status under existing reimbursement rules. Historically, political advocacy has not been a major part of pharmacy practice, or even viewed as necessary. However, pharmacists would be more politically effective with a single organization to speak for them as a profession, and with further education in advocacy. PMID:26301185

  5. Predictors and a Framework for Fostering Community Advocacy as a Community Health Worker Core Function to Eliminate Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Maia; Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Schachter, Kenneth; Jacobs, Laurel; Guernsey de Zapien, Jill; Robinson, Laurie; Carvajal, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Using a mixed-method, participatory research approach, we investigated factors related to community health worker (CHW) community advocacy that affect social determinants of health. Methods. We used cross-sectional survey data for 371 CHWs to assess demographics, training, work environment, and leadership qualities on civic, political, and organizational advocacy. We present advocacy stories to further articulate CHW activities. The data reported are from the recently completed National Community Health Workers Advocacy Study. Results. CHWs are involved in advocacy that is community-focused, although advocacy differs by intrinsic leadership, experience, training, and work environment. We propose a framework to conceptualize, support, and evaluate CHW advocacy and the iterative processes they engage in. These processes create opportunities for community voice and action to affect social and structural conditions that are known to have wide-ranging health effects on communities. Conclusions. The framework presented may have utility for CHWs, their training programs, and their employers as well as funders and policymakers aiming to promote health equity. PMID:23678904

  6. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Instrument: Attitudes Towards Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS)

    PubMed Central

    Flodén, Anne; Lennerling, Annette; Fridh, Isabell; Rizell, Magnus; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The consequences of advocacy in nursing are critical when caring for a potential organ donor. No specific instrument has been available to measure attitudes toward organ donor advocacy. The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an instrument for measuring intensive and critical care (ICU) nurses’ attitudes toward organ donor advocacy. The study was conducted in two stages: instrument development and instrument evaluation and refinement. A questionnaire was developed (Attitude Toward Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS)), which was sent to half of all nurses working in ICUs (general-, neuro-, thoracic- or paediatric-) in Sweden (n=1180). The final response rate was 42.5% (n=502). In order to explore validity and reliability, the expected scale dimensionality of the questionnaire was examined both by explorative principal component analysis (with oblique, varimax rotation) and by confirmatory multi-trait analysis. The confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the ATODAS could best be explained by five factors; Attitudes toward championing organ donation at a structural hospital level; Attitudes toward championing organ donation at a political and research level; Attitudes toward actively and personally safeguarding the will and wishes of the potential organ donor, Attitudes toward safeguarding the potential donor’s will and wishes by a professional approach and Attitudes toward safeguarding the will and wishes of the relatives. This initial testing indicated that the ATODAS has good psychometric properties and can be used in future research to explore if interventions may influence attitudes and behaviors related to organ donor advocacy. PMID:22046210

  7. 77 FR 13390 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 19, 2012 through April 27, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  8. Promoting Self-Advocacy among Minority Students in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Harris, Katrina R.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents self-advocacy competencies developed to promote the academic, career, and personal/social success of minority students. The authors discuss challenges faced by minority students in today's educational environment and review principles of self advocacy. Competencies for developing self-advocacy awareness, knowledge, and skills…

  9. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  10. 75 FR 9028 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 15, 2010 through April 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  11. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  12. 76 FR 12418 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 14, 2011 through April 29, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  13. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Small Business/Self-Employed Decreasing Non-Filers Project... meeting is cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER...

  14. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  15. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  16. Aging Action: A Course in Senior Advocacy in Kansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Advisory Council on Aging, Topeka.

    Skills useful in advocacy of senior citizens' needs are discussed in this manual. The topics included are: (1) the meaning of advocacy; (2) assertiveness training for aging-action; (3) identifying issues; (4) choosing issues; (5) developing a plan of action; (6) organizing; (7) legislative advocacy; (8) criteria to evaluate potential legislative…

  17. Separation and Relating in a Parent-Toddler Group Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navridi, Evanthia; Navridis, Klimis; Midgley, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Parent-toddler groups constitute a primary intervention programme whose target is to support and encourage the parent-toddler relationship. Toddlerhood is a developmental period when major, crucial changes take place regarding how children function, as well as their relationship to their parents (especially to their mother). The present paper…

  18. Brief Report: The Feasibility and Effectiveness of an Advocacy Program for Latino Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Burke, Meghan M; Magaña, Sandra; Garcia, Marlene; Mello, Maria P

    2016-07-01

    Latino, Spanish-speaking families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face unique barriers in special education advocacy. Although advocacy programs are becoming more common in the United States, none of these programs target Latino families. This is a pilot study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an advocacy program for Latino families of children with ASD. Using a quasi-experimental design, 40 Latino family members of children with ASD participated in this study. Results demonstrated consistent attendance, low attrition, and high participant satisfaction. Intervention (versus control) group participants demonstrated significantly increased empowerment and special education knowledge, and stronger family-school partnerships. Findings provide preliminary support for advocacy programs for Latino families of children with ASD.

  19. Circus monkeys or change agents? Civil society advocacy for HIV/AIDS in adverse policy environments.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Neil; Harmer, Andrew; Aleshkina, Julia; Bogdan, Daryna; Chkhatarashvili, Ketevan; Murzalieva, Gulgun; Rukhadze, Natia; Samiev, Arnol; Walt, Gill

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the factors enabling and undermining civil society efforts to advocate for policy reforms relating to HIV/AIDS and illicit drugs in three countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. It examines how political contexts and civil society actors' strengths and weaknesses inhibit or enable advocacy for policy change - issues that are not well understood in relation to specific policy areas such as HIV/AIDS, or particular regions of the world where national policies are believed to be major drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The study is based on in-depth interviews with representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) (n = 49) and national level informants including government and development partners (n = 22). Our policy analysis identified a culture of fear derived from concerns for personal safety but also risk of losing donor largesse. Relations between CSOs and government were often acrimonious rather than synergistic, and while we found some evidence of CSO collective action, competition for external funding - in particular for HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was often divisive. Development partners and government tend to construct CSOs as service providers rather than advocates. While some advocacy was tolerated by governments, CSO participation in the policy process was, ultimately, perceived to be tokenistic. This was because there are financial interests in maintaining prohibitionist legislation: efforts to change punitive laws directed at the behaviors of minority groups such as injecting drug users have had limited impact.

  20. Circus monkeys or change agents? Civil society advocacy for HIV/AIDS in adverse policy environments.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Neil; Harmer, Andrew; Aleshkina, Julia; Bogdan, Daryna; Chkhatarashvili, Ketevan; Murzalieva, Gulgun; Rukhadze, Natia; Samiev, Arnol; Walt, Gill

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the factors enabling and undermining civil society efforts to advocate for policy reforms relating to HIV/AIDS and illicit drugs in three countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan and Ukraine. It examines how political contexts and civil society actors' strengths and weaknesses inhibit or enable advocacy for policy change - issues that are not well understood in relation to specific policy areas such as HIV/AIDS, or particular regions of the world where national policies are believed to be major drivers of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The study is based on in-depth interviews with representatives of civil society organizations (CSOs) (n = 49) and national level informants including government and development partners (n = 22). Our policy analysis identified a culture of fear derived from concerns for personal safety but also risk of losing donor largesse. Relations between CSOs and government were often acrimonious rather than synergistic, and while we found some evidence of CSO collective action, competition for external funding - in particular for HIV/AIDS grants from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was often divisive. Development partners and government tend to construct CSOs as service providers rather than advocates. While some advocacy was tolerated by governments, CSO participation in the policy process was, ultimately, perceived to be tokenistic. This was because there are financial interests in maintaining prohibitionist legislation: efforts to change punitive laws directed at the behaviors of minority groups such as injecting drug users have had limited impact. PMID:22036298

  1. Endorsement of Growth Factors and Its Relation to Stage of Group Development in Experiential Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation utilized critical incidents methodology to examine participants' endorsement of twelve primary growth factors during a Master's level group counseling class. Additionally, the study examined whether some factors are more salient than others at each stage of development (i.e., forming, storming, norming, performing) as defined by…

  2. Advocacy and IEC strategies. Getting the most from the experience of others in promoting adolescent reproductive and sexual health.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    The UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Regional Clearing House on Population Education has commissioned a series of case studies on the promotion of adolescent reproductive and sexual health, with emphasis placed on advocacy and information, education and communication (IEC). The case studies will document the experiences of Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The advocacy activities include programs to gain the support of lawmakers and policymakers, the mass media and other influential groups. IEC activities, on the other hand, reach out to the youth, counselors, teachers and trainers, extension workers and motivators, and health personnel. Advocacy and IEC also differ in strategies. Political lobbying, high level meetings, seminars, mass media campaigns, and advocacy skills training are typical advocacy strategies; while, individual counseling, research, non-governmental organization involvement in communities, youth camps are of IEC strategies. The case studies also examine national policies, program responses and strategies, and factors that have contributed to best practices, and innovative approaches to advocacy and IEC. The impact of the target groups of the case studies will be evaluated and those with successful outcomes will be identified.

  3. Individual and Peer Group Normative Beliefs about Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Nicole E.; Hill, Laura G.

    2010-01-01

    Studies show that children who use relational aggression process social information in unique ways; however, findings have been inconsistent and limited by methodological weaknesses. This short-term longitudinal study examined developmental changes in 245 (49% female; ages 8-13) 3rd through 8th graders' normative beliefs about relational…

  4. Do we take self-advocacy seriously?

    PubMed

    Dawson, P

    A training pack has been developed to help staff introduce the concept of self-advocacy to patients who are disabled or have learning difficulties so that they may challenge service providers. It should be possible to provide working and living environments in which respect for one another's humanity can be shared.

  5. Parental Advocacy for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclift, Coriann

    2010-01-01

    Students attending schools in the United States who have autism would benefit from increased parental involvement to enhance their learning. There is a lack of research regarding parental advocacy on behalf of students with autism. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the lived experiences and perceptions of parents who have…

  6. Advocacy: the role of health professional associations.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2014-10-01

    The FIGO Leadership in Obstetrics and Gynecology for Impact and Change (LOGIC) Initiative in Maternal and Newborn Health was developed on the premise that organizational capacity strengthening in eight low- and middle-income countries would result in improved ability of member associations to take a leadership role in engaging a range of stakeholders in the health sector to discuss evidence and facilitate policy change and clinical practice in maternal and newborn health. Definitions of relevant terms, principles, and a framework for an advocacy plan are presented. The term advocacy is typically not well understood by health professionals, nor generally thought to be part of their role as a clinician, researcher, or educator. "Influence" based on expertise is often more consonant with a clinician's reality, especially where advocacy is perceived as a more political process that may present a barrier in some countries. The organizational capacity development of the FIGO member associations was integral to their ability to exert influence based on evidence, both internally in their associations and with other stakeholders, including the Ministry of Health. Examples of advocacy from each of the eight LOGIC countries are provided, noting that evaluation of impact can be challenging.

  7. Electronic Advocacy and Social Welfare Policy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Sung Seek; DeWeaver, Kevin L.

    2005-01-01

    The rapid increase in the number of low-cost computers, the proliferation of user-friendly software, and the development of electronic networks have created the "informatics era." The Internet is a rapidly growing communication resource that is becoming mainstream in the American society. Computer-based electronic political advocacy by social…

  8. Strengthening Music Programs While Avoiding Advocacy Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chad; Clauhs, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This article examines ways in which music education advocacy efforts have become disconnected from the unified visions and declarations of music educators espoused in the Tanglewood and Housewright declarations and are thus reifying the disconnect between what we value and what we say we value. We first analyze the policies posited by the recently…

  9. Composite Indicators between Analysis and Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltelli, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    We explore to what extent composite indicators, capable of aggregating multi-dimensional processes into simplified, stylised concepts, are up to the task of underpinning the development of data-based narratives for political advocacy. A recent OECD working paper (Nardo et al., 2005, Handbook on constructing composite indicators: methodology and…

  10. Organizing Your Parents for Effective Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elpus, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    In today's world of restrictive school budgets and increasing property taxes, it is an unfortunate reality that many school districts will be faced with a budget crunch crisis that unenlightened school boards may try to solve by cutting or eliminating funds for music. At the crisis stage, it is often only the effective advocacy of an organized…

  11. Child Care Advocacy: Making a Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Working for Change, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This journal issue highlights examples of state and local child care advocacy strategies that have resulted in positive legislative change or increased funding for low-income child care. Legal constraints on lobbying by nonprofit or public agencies due to limitations imposed by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and public and private funding…

  12. The Dance of Leadership and Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Leadership and advocacy often resemble a dance more than a straight-line march toward a goal. At times the leader advocate must work the process and lead the dance; at other times, the leader must stand back and let the process work, always ready to add a step or two to the dance when necessary. In this article, the author describes how librarians…

  13. Enhancing Advocacy Skills of Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Melissa A.; Herrera, Socorro G.

    2009-01-01

    This case study explores the dynamics of enhancing the capacities of teacher candidates in the Bilingual/Bicultural Education Students Interacting to Obtain Success (BESITOS) recruitment and retention program to advocate for culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students. Herrera and Murry's advocacy framework provides the theoretical…

  14. Obama Team's Advocacy Boosts Charter Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    President Barack Obama and U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan have been championing charter schools for months, creating what some advocates believe is the most forceful national momentum to expand the largely independent public schools since the first charter opened nearly 20 years ago. That high-profile advocacy is being matched, moreover,…

  15. CEC Handbook for Strengthening Grassroots Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bootel, Jaclyn A.

    This handbook is designed: (1) to empower individuals working with people who have disabilities to be a force for meeting the policy challenges in the communities in which they live and work; and (2) to help them to channel their strength, commitment, and knowledge of the special education field into effective advocacy efforts. The handbook…

  16. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  17. Educational Expertise, Advocacy, and Media Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malin, Joel R.; Lubienski, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The efforts of many advocacy organizations to advance their preferred policies despite conflicting evidence of the effectiveness of these policies raise questions about factors that shape successful policy promotion. While many may like to think that expertise on an issue in question is an essential prerequisite for influence in public policy…

  18. Objectivity and Its Discontents: Knowledge Advocacy in the Sally Hemings Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whooley, Owen

    2008-01-01

    The sociology of knowledge, derived from research on the hard sciences, overlooks the potential for outsiders to determine the content of knowledge within professional disciplines. Using the case of the Sally Hemings affair, I introduce the concept of "knowledge advocacy" to analyze how outside groups shape historical knowledge. The Hemings…

  19. Who's Involved with Hunger: An Organization Guide for Education and Advocacy. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Patricia L.

    This document presents an annotated bibliography of organizations that battle world hunger, seek to educate the public about the problem, and/or provide advocacy services. Among the groups that are described are the United Nations and other intergovernmental organizations, U.S. federal government agencies, U.S. congressional agencies, U.S.…

  20. The Development of an Instrument to Assess Advocacy Intentions for School Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Beth; Wallen, Michele; Birch, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: An overlooked group for school health education advocacy training is college students enrolled in personal health courses. They will be investors and stakeholders in the quality of public education, and the health and academic success of students. Purpose: In this article we present the process used to develop a theory-based instrument…

  1. Presentation for Panel on "Policy Advocacy for the Right To Learn of All Women and Men."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Maria Lourdes Almazan

    2001-01-01

    In the Asia-Pacific region, innovations in nonformal adult education rarely become mainstream policy and practice. Effective adult education policy advocacy requires assertion of a lifelong view and a common position of advancing learning for the most marginal groups. (SK)

  2. Intersectoral debate on social research strengthens alliances, advocacy and action for maternal survival in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Mary; Maimbolwa, Margaret; Muulu, Elson; Mulenga, Mary Mwange; O'Donovan, Diarmuid

    2009-03-01

    The Health Promotion Research Centre of the National University of Ireland, Galway and the University of Zambia's School of Medicine conducted operational research to understand and address the socio-cultural and gender contexts of maternal survival. Together with an analytical policy and programming review and qualitative research, the project process also involved the convening of 'Interest Group' meetings involving intersectoral stakeholders at Central (Lusaka) and Provincial (Kasama) levels. These meetings aimed to catalyse debate and stimulate advocacy on the project theme by using discussion of qualitative research as entry point. Participants came from government departments, civil society groups, the indigenous health system, academia, technical provider associations, and media, advocacy and human rights organisations. We found that engagement in Interest Groups was successful at Provincial level with lively participation from civil society, media and advocacy stakeholders and strong engagement by the health system. The process was welcomed as an opportunity to fill gaps in understanding about underlying social determinants of health and jointly explore intervention approaches. Overburdened government staff at central level faced with disease-focused interventions rather than underlying contextual determinants, and a weak culture of health sector engagement with civil society, academics and activists, contributed to less successful functioning in Lusaka. Final Dissemination and Discussion Events incorporated material from Interest Group Meetings to stimulate wider discussion and make recommendations. This project highlights the potential value of intersectoral stakeholder discussions from the inception stage of research to stimulate intersectoral exchange and alliance building, inform advocacy, and catalyse the process of research into action.

  3. Focus Group Study Exploring Factors Related to Frequent Sickness Absence

    PubMed Central

    van Rhenen, Willem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Research investigating frequent sickness absence (3 or more episodes per year) is scarce and qualitative research from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves is lacking. The aim of the current study is to explore awareness, determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence from the perspective of frequent absentees themselves. Methods We performed a qualitative study of 3 focus group discussions involving a total of 15 frequent absentees. Focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Results were analyzed with the Graneheim method using the Job Demands Resources (JD–R) model as theoretical framework. Results Many participants were not aware of their frequent sickness absence and the risk of future long-term sickness absence. As determinants, participants mentioned job demands, job resources, home demands, poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Managing these factors and improving communication (skills) were regarded as solutions to reduce frequent sickness absence. Conclusions The JD–R model provided a framework for determinants of and solutions to frequent sickness absence. Additional determinants were poor health, chronic illness, unhealthy lifestyles, and diminished feeling of responsibility to attend work in cases of low job resources. Frequent sickness absence should be regarded as a signal that something is wrong. Managers, supervisors, and occupational health care providers should advise and support frequent absentees to accommodate job demands, increase both job and personal resources, and improve health rather than express disapproval of frequent sickness absence and apply pressure regarding work attendance. PMID:26872050

  4. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making.

  5. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  6. Recognizing new opportunities: reconceptualizing policy advocacy in everyday organizational practice.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    Policy advocacy is a concept that is of both practical and historical importance to the profession of social work. To keep up with developments in how advocacy is practiced at the ground level, however, social work research on advocacy needs to expand in scope. Changes in government contracting and public management practices have reshaped the opportunity structure for policy advocacy, incentivizing a kind of advocacy that is routine, professionalized, and collaborative. At the same time, these practices have raised questions about democratic representation and the degree to which social work advocacy adequately reflects client concerns. This article presents a model for how policy advocacy can be usefully reconceptualized to account for changes in the policy and funding environment and concludes by suggesting ways that social work research and theory can better reflect practice realities.

  7. Recognizing new opportunities: reconceptualizing policy advocacy in everyday organizational practice.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    Policy advocacy is a concept that is of both practical and historical importance to the profession of social work. To keep up with developments in how advocacy is practiced at the ground level, however, social work research on advocacy needs to expand in scope. Changes in government contracting and public management practices have reshaped the opportunity structure for policy advocacy, incentivizing a kind of advocacy that is routine, professionalized, and collaborative. At the same time, these practices have raised questions about democratic representation and the degree to which social work advocacy adequately reflects client concerns. This article presents a model for how policy advocacy can be usefully reconceptualized to account for changes in the policy and funding environment and concludes by suggesting ways that social work research and theory can better reflect practice realities. PMID:24032304

  8. Relating quarks and leptons with the T7 flavour group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Morisi, Stefano; Peinado, Eduardo; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-03-01

    In this letter we present a model for quarks and leptons based on T7 as flavour symmetry, predicting a canonical mass relation between charged leptons and down-type quarks proposed earlier. Neutrino masses are generated through a Type-I seesaw mechanism, with predicted correlations between the atmospheric mixing angle and neutrino masses. Compatibility with oscillation results leads to lower bounds for the lightest neutrino mass as well as for the neutrinoless double beta decay rates, even for normal neutrino mass hierarchy.

  9. Family advocacy, support and education in children's mental health: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Green, Evelyn; Kelleher, Kelly; Schoenwald, Sonja; Rolls-Reutz, Jennifer; Landsverk, John; Glisson, Charles; Mayberg, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    In conjunction with the national survey of mental health service organizations (Schoenwald et al. this issue), a separate but complementary national survey was conducted of family advocacy, support and education organizations (FASEOs). Directors of FASEOs within the same localities as the mental health agencies responded to a survey and provided information in four areas: (1) structure and funding; (2) factors influencing advocacy decisions about children's mental health; (3) types of services provided by FASEOs and factors perceived as related to improved outcomes; and (4) the types of working relationships between FASEOs and local mental health clinics. Findings from a total of 226 (82% response rate) portray a network of family advocacy, support and education organizations that are strategically poised to effect substantive change and characterized by significant fiscal instability. Results from this survey and implications for delivery of family-based services are provided. PMID:17999176

  10. Internal psychosomatic medicine within the German Diagnosis Related Groups System

    PubMed Central

    Häuser, Winfried; Zimmer, Christoph; Wilhelm, Ruth; Klein, Walter; Krause-Wichmann, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    A model calculation was used to assess whether the G-DRG version 1.0 sufficiently represents integrated internal psychosomatic treatment of patients with psychosomatic disorders in relation to diagnosis and resource consumption. The DRGs of the Major Diagnostic Category "Mental Diseases" of the German DRG calculation sample 1.0 (diagnoses, procedures, cost weights) were analyzed. In a division of psychosomatic medicine within a general internal department, proceeds regarding 241 patients treated between 01 Jan and 31 Dec 2002, calculated according to the G-DRG version 1.0, were compared to the costs accrued. The G-DRG version 1.0 includes 7 DRGs of psychosomatic disorders in internal medicine (excluding disorders due to substance abuse). Assuming a base rate of € 2,900, the total proceeds of the G-DRG Version 1.0 exceeded the costs (+ € 57,971 /year). PMID:19742057

  11. Psychology of group relations: cultural and social dimensions.

    PubMed

    Berry, J W

    2004-07-01

    Cross-cultural psychology attempts to understand the development and expression of human behavior in relation to the cultural contexts in which it occurs. It adopts the perspective of "universalism," which assumes that all human beings share basic psychological processes, but which are then shaped by cultural influences. This perspective allows for the comparison of individuals from different cultures (based on the process commonality), but also accepts behavioral variability (based on the cultural shaping). In the case of behavior that takes place during interactions between individuals coming from two (or more) cultures, the task is more complex; we now need to understand at least two sets of culture-behavior phenomena, as well as a third set--those that arise at the intersection of their relationships. In cross-cultural psychology, we have adopted concepts and methods from sociology and political science to inform work on "ethnic relations," and from cultural anthropology we have been informed in our work on the process and outcomes of "acculturation." In the former domain are phenomena such as prejudice and discrimination; in the latter are the strategies people use when in daily contact with people from other cultures (such as assimilation, integration, separation, and marginalization). These phenomena take place in cultural contexts, which need to be understood in terms of the core dimensions of cultural difference (such as diversity, equality, and conformity). During prolonged and intimate contact between persons of different cultural backgrounds, all these psychological concepts and processes, and cultural influences need to be taken into account when selecting, training, and monitoring individuals during their intercultural interactions.

  12. Attitude Certainty and Attitudinal Advocacy: The Unique Roles of Clarity and Correctness.

    PubMed

    Cheatham, Lauren; Tormala, Zakary L

    2015-11-01

    When and why do people advocate on behalf of their attitudes? Past research suggests that attitude certainty is one important determinant. The current research seeks to provide more nuanced insight into this relationship by (a) exploring the unique roles of attitude clarity and attitude correctness, and (b) mapping clarity and correctness onto different forms of advocacy (sharing intentions and persuasion intentions). Across four studies, we find that correctness but not clarity plays an important role in promoting persuasion intentions, whereas both correctness and clarity help shape sharing intentions. Thus, this research unpacks the certainty-advocacy relation and helps identify experimental manipulations that uniquely drive persuasion and sharing intentions.

  13. Strong advocacy led to successful implementation of smokefree Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Eric; Sebrié, Ernesto M; Glantz, Stanton A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the approval process and implementation of the 100% smokefree law in Mexico City and a competing federal law between 2007 and 2010. Methods Reviewed smokefree legislation, published newspaper articles and interviewed key informants. Results Strong efforts by tobacco control advocacy groups and key policymakers in Mexico City in 2008 prompted the approval of a 100% smokefree law following the WHO FCTC. As elsewhere, the tobacco industry utilised the hospitality sector to block smokefree legislation, challenged the City law before the Supreme Court and promoted the passage of a federal law that required designated smoking areas. These tactics disrupted implementation of the City law by causing confusion over which law applied in Mexico City. Despite interference, the City law increased public support for 100% smokefree policies and decreased the social acceptability of smoking. In September 2009, the Supreme Court ruled in favour of the City law, giving it the authority to go beyond the federal law to protect the fundamental right of health for all citizens. Conclusions Early education and enforcement efforts by tobacco control advocates promoted the City law in 2008 but advocates should still anticipate continuing opposition from the tobacco industry, which will require continued pressure on the government. Advocates should utilise the Supreme Court’s ruling to promote 100% smokefree policies outside Mexico City. Strong advocacy for the City law could be used as a model of success throughout Mexico and other Latin American countries. PMID:21059606

  14. Small wins matter in advocacy movements: giving voice to patients.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the various players are delineated in a story of a contested illness and patient advocacy, played out within the corridors of federal power. It is suggested that the mistreatment and negative attitudes that health care providers and others have towards those with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is possibly due to the social construction of this illness as being a "Yuppie flu" disease. Institutional factors are identified that created these norms and attributions, as well as the multiple stakeholders and constituent groups invested in exerting pressure on policy makers to effect systemic change. This article also provides examples of how the field of Community Psychology, which is fundamentally committed to/based on listening to and giving voice to patients, is broadly relevant to patient activism communities. This approach focused, over time, on epidemiological studies, the name, the case definition, and ultimately the change in CFS leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Keys to this "small wins" approach were coalition building, use of "oppositional experts" (professionals in the scientific community who support patient advocacy goals) to challenge federal research, and taking advantage of developing events/shifts in power. Ultimately, this approach can result in significant scientific and policy gains, and changes in medical and public perception of an illness.

  15. Personal Breastfeeding Behavior of Physician Mothers Is Associated with Their Clinical Breastfeeding Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    Levine, David; Neal, Dan; Serwint, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite excellent breastfeeding initiation rates, physician mothers as a group are at risk of premature breastfeeding cessation. The main obstacles and reasons for breastfeeding cessation among physician mothers are work-related. We conducted this study to further explore physician mothers' personal infant feeding decisions and behavior as well as their clinical breastfeeding advocacy. Subjects and Methods We interviewed 80 physician mothers, mainly affiliated with the University of Florida College of Medicine (Gainesville, FL), using a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were calculated with SPSS software version 16 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Results The 80 mothers had a total of 152 children and were able to successfully initiate breastfeeding for 97% of the infants. Although maternal goal for duration of breastfeeding had been 12 months or more for 57% of the infants, only 34% of the children were actually still breastfeeding at 12 months. In 43% of cases, physician mothers stated that breastfeeding cessation was due to demands of work. Furthermore, physician mothers who reported actively promoting breastfeeding among their female patients and housestaff had significantly longer personal breastfeeding duration compared with physician mothers who denied actively promoting breastfeeding. Conclusions Our findings not only emphasize the discrepancy between physician mothers' breastfeeding duration goal and their actual breastfeeding duration, but also highlight the association between their personal breastfeeding success and their own active breastfeeding advocacy. Whether this association is causal cannot be determined by the current study and can be examined further by prospective studies. Our results support developing and implementing workplace strategies and programs to promote breastfeeding duration among physician mothers returning to work. PMID:23373434

  16. Educators' Reports on Incidence of Harassment and Advocacy toward LGBTQ Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dragowski, Eliza A.; McCabe, Paul C.; Rubinson, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on a national survey investigation of 968 educators, who reported the incidence of LGBTQ harassment in schools, and their advocacy efforts on behalf of this population. LGBTQ-related knowledge, attitudes, norms, and perceived ability to advocate were also assessed. Ninety percent of educators reported observing LGBTQ harassment…

  17. Conflict Management: From Adversary to Advocate. Peer Review and Employee Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauer, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The successful organization of the 1990s will fundamentally remake its employee relationship, especially through increased employee influence on the nature of work, organizational context, and quality of product/service. An employee advocacy peer review conflict resolution process has been useful in improving labor relations and enhancing the…

  18. The Personal Is Political: School Counselors' Use of Self in Social Justice Advocacy Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahan, Eleanor H.; Singh, Anneliese A.; Urbano, Alessandra; Haston, Meg

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the aspects of "self" school counselors (N = 16) described as central to advocating for social justice in their school systems. Using grounded theory, this study explored racial, feminist, and advocacy identity development in relation to the personhood of the counselor, and how these elements coalesced around action…

  19. Relationship between a Belief in a Just World and Social Justice Advocacy Attitudes of School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sejal B.; Post, Phyllis; Flowers, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how belief in a just world (BJW), political ideology, religious ideology, socioeconomic status of origin, and race relate to social justice advocacy attitudes among school counseling professionals. A sequential multiple regression indicated that political ideology and BJW were statistically significant…

  20. Disability advocacy and reproductive choice: engaging with the expressivist objection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Madelyn

    2012-02-01

    This professional issues paper outlines the experience and value of engagement with disability advocates, philosophy scholars and bioethicists for spirited debate of issues such as modern eugenics, the expressivist objection and reproductive choice. This process for one group of individuals, undoubtedly prompted deeper examination and questioning of some long held personal and professional views, for all participants. For this author, engagement in the "Disability Rights-Genetic Counseling Interest Group" over a full year resulted in several positive changes in genetic counselling practice as well as the development of meaningful, robust philosophical defence of the dual roles in genetic counseling; advocacy for those with disabilities, and facilitation of a full range of reproductive choices.

  1. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community. PMID:19061060

  2. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    PubMed

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community.

  3. Relational-Cultural Theory: A Framework for Relational Competencies and Movement in Group Work with Female Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Kristi B.; Hammer, Tonya R.; Reicherzer, Stacee; Gilliam, Billie J.

    2012-01-01

    Relational-cultural theory (RCT) is an evolving feminist model of human development that places emphasis on growth-fostering relationships as building blocks for wellness. This article demonstrates the use of RCT in addressing relational aggression, including cyberbullying, in counseling a group of adolescent girls. The group counselor's…

  4. Advocacy to address disabling diseases: TDR holds brainstorming session.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    The UN Development Program/World Bank/World Health Organization's Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases hosted a meeting in January 1998 to discuss new ways of generating sustained commitment to combat disabling tropical diseases, such as filariasis and onchocerciasis. The participants agreed that advocacy should be targeted to a wider audience than the health sector, including international donors, industry, national governments, and endemic communities themselves. Advocacy efforts will be supported by development of a standard protocol that will 1) identify and present the type of evidence that generates sustainable commitment, 2) develop and use appropriate messages for each audience, 3) evaluate new advocacy approaches for their impact on behavioral change and disease control, and 4) evaluate advocacy campaigns. Advocacy about lymphatic filariasis will target all levels, while advocacy about onchocerciasis will target national and local levels.

  5. Patient advocacy in the USA: key communication role functions.

    PubMed

    Martin, Donald R; Tipton, Bryan K

    2007-09-01

    Researchers have long documented the importance of patient advocacy programs as a means of providing customer service in health-care organizations. Yet, while effective communication is often acknowledged as key to effective patient advocacy, knowledge of the specific communication role functions enacted by patient advocates remains limited, as does our understanding of the function of patient advocacy at the organizational level. This qualitative investigation not only provides a typology of communication roles enacted by patient advocates while solving problems on behalf of patients and their family members, but also integrates scholarly research on "boundary-spanning" as a means of theoretically contextualizing the advocacy role at the organizational level. PMID:17688476

  6. Advocacy, Efficacy, and Engagement in an Online Network for Latino Childhood Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Gallion, Kipling J; Despres, Cliff; Aguilar, Rosalie P; Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Seidel, Sarah E; McAlister, Alfred L

    2015-11-01

    Salud America! is a national network created to engage Latino researchers, health professionals and community leaders in actions to reduce Latino childhood obesity. An online survey of 148 Salud America! network members investigated relationships between (1) their levels of engagement with the network, (2) self- and collective-efficacy, and (3) behavioral intentions to engage in advocacy for policies that can help reduce Latino childhood obesity. Analyses of these data found that higher levels of Salud America! engagement was associated with collective-advocacy efficacy-greater confidence in organized group advocacy as a way of advancing policies to reduce Latino childhood obesity. A multiple regression analysis found that this sense of collective-efficacy moderately predicted intentions to engage in advocacy behaviors. Salud America! engagement levels were less strongly associated with members' confidence in their personal ability to be an effective advocate, yet this sense of self-efficacy was a very strong predictor of a behavioral intention to advocate. Based on these findings, new online applications aimed at increasing self- and collective-efficacy through peer modeling are being developed for Salud America! in order to help individuals interested in Latino childhood obesity prevention to connect with each other and with opportunities for concerted local actions in their communities.

  7. Innovation in stem cell advocacy: you only get what you can measure.

    PubMed

    Jakimo, Alan L; Fernandez, Alan C

    2011-11-01

    We propose that stem cell advocacy must engage in self-analysis to determine how to be maximally effective. For this analysis, eight advocacy elements can be measured: agitation, legislation, regulation, litigation, policy development, collaboration, education and innovation. For several of these elements, we show that stem cell advocates, particularly advocates for human embryonic stem cell research, have been matched by their opponents. This demonstrates the need for combining innovation and collaboration with advocacy-oriented education. To pursue innovative and collaborative education, we propose a 'bench-to-public knowledge' model and present some preliminary observations made with this model for different stem cell types. We also propose development of a semantic web information system to be operated within Internet Cloud/Apps/Social Media. We call this system the 'Stem Cell Information Technology Accelerator Platform'. Toward its construction, we propose formation of a working group to conceive semantic web ontology for stem cell science and its clinical translation into medicine. This ontology would function as a map of the relationships between and among the various informational components comprising discourse on stem cell research and its clinical translation, and would allow various stakeholders to contribute to evolving models of that science and translation. These models could, in turn, support an innovative and collaborative approach to education in furtherance of stem cell advocacy. PMID:21999275

  8. Advocacy, Efficacy, and Engagement in an Online Network for Latino Childhood Obesity Prevention.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Amelie G; Gallion, Kipling J; Despres, Cliff; Aguilar, Rosalie P; Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Seidel, Sarah E; McAlister, Alfred L

    2015-11-01

    Salud America! is a national network created to engage Latino researchers, health professionals and community leaders in actions to reduce Latino childhood obesity. An online survey of 148 Salud America! network members investigated relationships between (1) their levels of engagement with the network, (2) self- and collective-efficacy, and (3) behavioral intentions to engage in advocacy for policies that can help reduce Latino childhood obesity. Analyses of these data found that higher levels of Salud America! engagement was associated with collective-advocacy efficacy-greater confidence in organized group advocacy as a way of advancing policies to reduce Latino childhood obesity. A multiple regression analysis found that this sense of collective-efficacy moderately predicted intentions to engage in advocacy behaviors. Salud America! engagement levels were less strongly associated with members' confidence in their personal ability to be an effective advocate, yet this sense of self-efficacy was a very strong predictor of a behavioral intention to advocate. Based on these findings, new online applications aimed at increasing self- and collective-efficacy through peer modeling are being developed for Salud America! in order to help individuals interested in Latino childhood obesity prevention to connect with each other and with opportunities for concerted local actions in their communities. PMID:26220280

  9. Innovation in stem cell advocacy: you only get what you can measure.

    PubMed

    Jakimo, Alan L; Fernandez, Alan C

    2011-11-01

    We propose that stem cell advocacy must engage in self-analysis to determine how to be maximally effective. For this analysis, eight advocacy elements can be measured: agitation, legislation, regulation, litigation, policy development, collaboration, education and innovation. For several of these elements, we show that stem cell advocates, particularly advocates for human embryonic stem cell research, have been matched by their opponents. This demonstrates the need for combining innovation and collaboration with advocacy-oriented education. To pursue innovative and collaborative education, we propose a 'bench-to-public knowledge' model and present some preliminary observations made with this model for different stem cell types. We also propose development of a semantic web information system to be operated within Internet Cloud/Apps/Social Media. We call this system the 'Stem Cell Information Technology Accelerator Platform'. Toward its construction, we propose formation of a working group to conceive semantic web ontology for stem cell science and its clinical translation into medicine. This ontology would function as a map of the relationships between and among the various informational components comprising discourse on stem cell research and its clinical translation, and would allow various stakeholders to contribute to evolving models of that science and translation. These models could, in turn, support an innovative and collaborative approach to education in furtherance of stem cell advocacy.

  10. 75 FR 66125 - Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... National Park Service Federal Land Managers' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) AGENCY: National...' Air Quality Related Values Work Group (FLAG) was formed (1) to develop a more consistent and objective... their air quality related values (AQRVs); and (2) to provide State permitting authorities and...

  11. 75 FR 33893 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  12. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  13. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  14. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  15. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  16. 75 FR 47348 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  17. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  18. 76 FR 10941 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  19. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  20. 76 FR 37196 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  1. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  2. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  3. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  4. 75 FR 7540 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  5. 76 FR 2194 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  6. 75 FR 4140 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. 75 FR 62629 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  8. 76 FR 45005 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  9. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. 75 FR 55404 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  11. 77 FR 47165 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  12. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  13. 76 FR 17993 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  14. 78 FR 64064 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  15. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  16. 75 FR 10864 - Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  17. New Education Advocacy Organizations in the U.S. States: National Snapshot and a Case Study of Advance Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manna, Paul; Moffitt, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This Wallace-commissioned report identifies the emergence of a new kind of education advocacy organization in the U.S., assesses how these groups influence education policy, provides an overview of their work across the country, and offers a case study of one, Advance Illinois. The report argues that these groups, and their potential foundation…

  18. Facebook and Health Information: Content Analysis of Groups Related to Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, Christina; Sakellari, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Facebook Groups is a space for connecting people with common interests. People with a psychiatric diagnosis use social networking sites. However Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia have not been investigated before. We aimed to examine Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia. Deductive content analysis was applied. Out of the included groups (N=32), the majority's principal objective was awareness creation (n=11, 34%) and support to those with schizophrenia and their caregivers (n=9, 28%). Monitoring the Facebook Groups' content related to schizophrenia and other mental disorders is essential, since it could be an important communication and support platform for people with the disorder and their caregivers.

  19. Facebook and Health Information: Content Analysis of Groups Related to Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulou, Christina; Sakellari, Evanthia

    2015-01-01

    Facebook Groups is a space for connecting people with common interests. People with a psychiatric diagnosis use social networking sites. However Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia have not been investigated before. We aimed to examine Facebook Groups related to schizophrenia. Deductive content analysis was applied. Out of the included groups (N=32), the majority's principal objective was awareness creation (n=11, 34%) and support to those with schizophrenia and their caregivers (n=9, 28%). Monitoring the Facebook Groups' content related to schizophrenia and other mental disorders is essential, since it could be an important communication and support platform for people with the disorder and their caregivers. PMID:26153008

  20. Improving pedestrian access to transit. An advocacy handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-19

    This report was written as a teaching tool for ordinary citizens, and for transportation and urban planners working with citizen groups, who advocate for public transit and walkable neighborhoods. It illustrates key steps that activists can take to ensure that mass transit supports community needs and creates livable communities through improved pedestrian access. The authors present their personal experience in case studies that detail advocacy techniques and strategies. They also identify some failures and setbacks. The report discussed several public transit modes (e.g., bus, light rail, and subway) used in different kinds of communities (low-income urban neighborhoods, upper- and middle-income inner suburb). The authors are from WalkBoston, a nonprofit organization that promotes walking and transit.

  1. Training self-advocacy skills to adults with mild handicaps.

    PubMed Central

    Sievert, A L; Cuvo, A J; Davis, P K

    1988-01-01

    We developed and empirically evaluated an instructional program to teach self-advocacy skills to eight young adults with mild handicaps. Participants were taught to discriminate whether or not possible violations of legal rights occurred in socially validated scenarios and, if so, to role-play how to redress rights violations. Experimental control was demonstrated with a multiple probe design across four general legal rights categories for the discrimination component of training, and a multiple probe across groups of subjects for the redressing legal rights component of training. Participants' behavior was probed in simulations and deceptions of legal rights violations in natural settings. There were marked increases in dependent measures after instruction. Difficulties in assessing generalization and maintenance of low-rate behaviors and suggestions for future research are presented. PMID:3198550

  2. Gay-Straight Alliances vary on dimensions of youth socializing and advocacy: factors accounting for individual and setting-level differences.

    PubMed

    Poteat, V Paul; Scheer, Jillian R; Marx, Robert A; Calzo, Jerel P; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu

    2015-06-01

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based youth settings that could promote health. Yet, GSAs have been treated as homogenous without attention to variability in how they operate or to how youth are involved in different capacities. Using a systems perspective, we considered two primary dimensions along which GSAs function to promote health: providing socializing and advocacy opportunities. Among 448 students in 48 GSAs who attended six regional conferences in Massachusetts (59.8 % LGBQ; 69.9 % White; 70.1 % cisgender female), we found substantial variation among GSAs and youth in levels of socializing and advocacy. GSAs were more distinct from one another on advocacy than socializing. Using multilevel modeling, we identified group and individual factors accounting for this variability. In the socializing model, youth and GSAs that did more socializing activities did more advocacy. In the advocacy model, youth who were more actively engaged in the GSA as well as GSAs whose youth collectively perceived greater school hostility and reported greater social justice efficacy did more advocacy. Findings suggest potential reasons why GSAs vary in how they function in ways ranging from internal provisions of support, to visibility raising, to collective social change. The findings are further relevant for settings supporting youth from other marginalized backgrounds and that include advocacy in their mission.

  3. Gay-Straight Alliances Vary on Dimensions of Youth Socializing and Advocacy: Factors Accounting for Individual and Setting-Level Differences

    PubMed Central

    Poteat, V. Paul; Scheer, Jillian R.; Marx, Robert A.; Calzo, Jerel P.; Yoshikawa, Hiro

    2016-01-01

    Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based youth settings that could promote health. Yet, GSAs have been treated as homogenous without attention to variability in how they operate or to how youth are involved in different capacities. Using a systems perspective, we considered two primary dimensions along which GSAs function to promote health: providing socializing and advocacy opportunities. Among 448 students in 48 GSAs who attended six regional conferences in Massachusetts (59.8% LGBQ; 69.9% White; 70.1% cisgender female), we found substantial variation among GSAs and youth in levels of socializing and advocacy. GSAs were more distinct from one another on advocacy than socializing. Using multilevel modeling, we identified group and individual factors accounting for this variability. In the socializing model, youth and GSAs that did more socializing activities did more advocacy. In the advocacy model, youth who were more actively engaged in the GSA as well as GSAs whose youth collectively perceived greater school hostility and reported greater social justice efficacy did more advocacy. Findings suggest potential reasons why GSAs vary in how they function in ways ranging from internal provisions of support, to visibility raising, to collective social change. The findings are further relevant for settings supporting youth from other marginalized backgrounds and that include advocacy in their mission. PMID:25855133

  4. Salt reduction in Australia: from advocacy to action

    PubMed Central

    Trieu, Kathy; Dunford, Elizabeth; Nowson, Caryl; Jolly, Kellie-Ann; Greenland, Rohan; Reimers, Jenny; Bolam, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background As part of its endorsement of the World Health Organization’s Global Action Plan to prevent non-communicable diseases, the Federal Government of Australia has committed to a 30% reduction in average population salt intake by 2025. Currently, mean daily salt intake levels are 8-9 g, varying by sex, region and population group. A number of salt reduction initiatives have been established over the last decade, but key elements for a co-ordinated population-level strategy are still missing. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of existing population-level salt reduction activities in Australia and identify opportunities for further action. Methods A review of the published literature and stakeholder activities was undertaken to identify and document current activities. The activities were then assessed against a pre-defined framework for salt reduction strategies. Results A range of initiatives were identified from the review. The Australian Division of World Action on Salt and Health (AWASH) was established in 2005 and in 2007 launched its Drop the Salt! Campaign. This united non-governmental organisations (NGOs), health and medical and food industry organisations in a co-ordinated advocacy effort to encourage government to develop a national strategy to reduce salt. Subsequently, in 2010 the Federal Government launched its Food and Health Dialogue (FHD) with a remit to improve the health of the food supply in Australia through voluntary partnerships with food industry, government and non-government public health organisations. The focus of the FHD to date has been on voluntary reformulation of foods, primarily through salt reduction targets. More recently, in December 2014, the government’s Health Star Rating system was launched. This front of pack labelling scheme uses stars to highlight the nutritional profile of packaged foods. Both government initiatives have clear targets or criteria for industry to meet, however

  5. Mental health as an advocacy priority in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Anand

    2014-05-01

    This column reviews the evolution of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) mental health advocacy in relation to modern mental health advocacy efforts. In addition to developments in organized psychiatry (e.g., American Psychiatric Association's LGBT caucus), grassroots LGBT community initiatives are playing an important role (e.g., Trevor Project providing crisis intervention/suicide prevention services to LGBT youth, face-to-face mental health services in LGBT community centers). Studies have found that LGBT individuals are at increased risk for mental health problems (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance misuse, suicidal ideation, self-harm). Mental health advocacy in the LGBT community has been slowed by the long-standing association of the concept of homosexuality with psychopathology in mainstream psychiatry (e.g., homosexuality was only removed from the DSM in 1973, ego dystonic homosexuality still appears in the ICD-10). However, positive developments in LGBT mental health advocacy have been fostered by the proposed minority stress model (i.e., that elevated risk of mental illness in LGBT individuals is a consequence of a hostile stressful environment). A particularly encouraging initiative is the It Gets Better Project, in which thousands of videos, some by prominent individuals, have been posted online to send a message of hope to LGBT youth facing harassment and low self-esteem.

  6. Mental health as an advocacy priority in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Anand

    2014-05-01

    This column reviews the evolution of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) mental health advocacy in relation to modern mental health advocacy efforts. In addition to developments in organized psychiatry (e.g., American Psychiatric Association's LGBT caucus), grassroots LGBT community initiatives are playing an important role (e.g., Trevor Project providing crisis intervention/suicide prevention services to LGBT youth, face-to-face mental health services in LGBT community centers). Studies have found that LGBT individuals are at increased risk for mental health problems (e.g., depression, anxiety, substance misuse, suicidal ideation, self-harm). Mental health advocacy in the LGBT community has been slowed by the long-standing association of the concept of homosexuality with psychopathology in mainstream psychiatry (e.g., homosexuality was only removed from the DSM in 1973, ego dystonic homosexuality still appears in the ICD-10). However, positive developments in LGBT mental health advocacy have been fostered by the proposed minority stress model (i.e., that elevated risk of mental illness in LGBT individuals is a consequence of a hostile stressful environment). A particularly encouraging initiative is the It Gets Better Project, in which thousands of videos, some by prominent individuals, have been posted online to send a message of hope to LGBT youth facing harassment and low self-esteem. PMID:24847996

  7. Advocacy resource: engaging the media and promoting your cancer program in Africa.

    PubMed

    Reams, R Renee; Odedina, Folakemi T; Pressey, Shannon

    2013-07-15

    To address the need for a significant increase in cancer advocacy programs in Africa, the University of Florida (UF), the Prostate Net, and the African Organization for Research and Training in Cancer (AORTIC) co-hosted the first biennial International Workshop on Cancer Advocacy for African Countries (CAAC) on November 29, 2011, one-day prior to AORTIC's 8th International Cancer Conference in Cairo, Egypt. Over 70 African cancer advocates representing about 12 African countries participated in this workshop.The primary goal of the one-day workshop was to inform, educate and empower African cancer advocates to increase the promotion of their cancer programs. The first half of the workshop consisted of five formal PowerPoint presentations focused on the following topics: (a) Understanding Your Community and Assessing your Community Health Assets and Needs; (b) Developing a successful advocacy model for your cancer program; (c) Developing a Relationship with your Elected Officials to Advocate Cancer-related Policies; (d) Engaging the Media and promoting your cancer program; and (e) Developing advocacy plans for sustainability. In this article we summarize the informational content given in the PowerPoint presentation entitled "Engaging the Media and promoting your cancer program". The content given in this article is useful as a how-to guide for both the beginner and the experienced cancer advocate who wants to establish/promote a cancer awareness program.

  8. Group behavioral therapy for adolescents with tic-related and non-tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Himle, Joseph A; Fischer, Daniel J; Van Etten, Michelle L; Janeck, Amy S; Hanna, Gregory L

    2003-01-01

    Prior research supports the distinction between tic-related and non-tic-related obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) based on phenomenologic, etiologic, and neurobehavioral data. The present study examines whether response to psychosocial treatment differs in adolescents, depending on the presence of comorbid tics. Nineteen adolescents, 12-17 years of age, participated in 7-week, uncontrolled trial of group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for OCD. Eight of the patients had tic-related and eleven had non-tic-related OCD. The group CBT program included psycho-education, exposure and response prevention, cognitive strategies, and family involvement. Significant improvement was observed for all subjects on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale ratings of obsessions, compulsions, and total OCD symptoms. Outcomes were similar for subjects with tic-related and non-tic-related OCD. These preliminary results suggest that the presence of comorbid tic disorders may not attenuate response to behavioral group treatment among adolescents.

  9. Huntington's disease: advocacy driving science.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Nancy S

    2012-01-01

    My mother, Leonore, was diagnosed with Huntington's disease (HD) in 1968 at age 53. I was 23, my sister Alice 26, and our father, Milton Wexler, 60 years old. The same year, our father created the Hereditary Disease Foundation (HDF), dedicated to finding treatments and cures for HD. HD is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder. Alice and I each have a 50% chance of inheriting and dying from the disorder. Over the past 43 years, we have been proud to change the face of science. Through Milton Wexler Interdisciplinary Workshops, judicious funding, and focusing on innovation and creativity, the HDF is an integral partner in key discoveries. The HDF recruited and supported >100 scientists worldwide who worked together as the Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group in a successful ten-year search for the HD gene. We found a DNA marker for the HD gene in 1983-the first marker to be found when the chromosomal location was unknown. We isolated the HD gene itself a decade later. These breakthroughs helped launch the Human Genome Project. We supported creating the first mouse model of HD and many other model systems. Currently, we focus on gene silencing, among other approaches, to create new treatments and cures.

  10. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  11. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    PubMed

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  12. Advocacy groups dismayed by lack of funding in president's budget.

    PubMed

    Schuler, A; Salazar, J G; Johnson, R; Silver, J

    2001-06-01

    HIV/AIDS advocates have expressed dismay, if not surprise, over the proposed funding for domestic HIV programs outlined in the budget submitted in the spring by President George W. Bush. Despite the reality of rising drug costs and increasing numbers of newly infected Americans, the Ryan White CARE Program was flat-funded in the proposal. Other programs fared no better, except for research and international HIV funding.

  13. Promoting Social Justice in the Multigroup Society: A Casebook for Group Relations Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jack, Ed.

    This volume represents a modest effort to meet the critical need for teaching materials of all sorts relating to work with racial and ethnic groups, both in social work and other human service professions. The approach taken here is to produce a range of source materials which illustrate and illuminate aspects of group relations practice. Such a…

  14. Having a Voice: An Exploration of Children's Rights and Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, Jane, Ed.; Hough, Jan, Ed.

    This book explores the concept of advocacy in British society with regard to children and young people, examining advocacy from a number of different perspectives, and taking into account the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and legislation that affects children and young people. The three parts of the book examine why young people need an…

  15. Exploring Nonoffending Caregiver Satisfaction with a Children's Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonach, Kathryn; Mabry, J. Beth; Potts-Henry, Candice

    2010-01-01

    This study is a case evaluation research report on one Children's Advocacy Center that provides a coordinated response to allegations of child maltreatment, particularly sexual abuse. The data come from a mailed survey of nonoffending caregivers measuring their satisfaction with services provided through the Children's Advocacy Center. The results…

  16. Promoting Systemic Change through the ACA Advocacy Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toporek, Rebecca L.; Lewis, Judith A.; Crethar, Hugh C.

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the American Counseling Association (ACA) adopted the ACA Advocacy Competencies (J. A. Lewis, M. S. Arnold, R. House, & R. L. Toporek, 2002) to provide guidance to counselors and acknowledge advocacy as an ethical aspect of service to clients. This article provides a foundation for this special section by sharing a historical perspective…

  17. Participation, Decentralization, and Advocacy Planning, Resource Paper No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasperson, Roger E.; Breitbart, Myrna

    This resource paper on the subject of citizen participation, decentralization, and advocacy planning is part of a series designed to supplement undergraduate geography courses. The approach of the paper de-emphasizes inventory or case study reviews of specific participation or advocacy planning projects for a more general conceptual discussion of…

  18. Advocacy for Child Wellness in High-Poverty Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Child wellness needs to be understood holistically so that children and youth from high-poverty environments can succeed in schooling and life. Teachers who foster advocacy in themselves are well equipped to teach students to take ownership of their own well-being. Such advocacy can enrich the classroom curriculum and mitigate the negative effects…

  19. A Media Advocacy Intervention Linking Health Disparities and Food Insecurity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related…

  20. The Big Picture of Advocacy: Counselor, Heal Society and Thyself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roysircar, Gargi

    2009-01-01

    This article, motivational in purpose, encourages counselors to be engaged in the growing movement for social justice advocacy in counseling. Analyses of a macrolevel framework of advocacy extend to microlevel operations of recruitment, sociopolitical education, diversity management, and self-care of counselor-advocates. Case studies and exemplars…

  1. Using Week of the Young Child as an Advocacy Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Week of the Young Child 2009, April 19-25, presents a public policy advocacy opportunity for early childhood programs, faculty, and families. This article offers some ways one can use Week of the Young Child (WOYC) events specifically to further advocacy efforts.

  2. Using the Decision Case Method to Teach Legislative Policy Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfer, Terry A.; Gray, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    Social work educators have long struggled with making policy practice real "more", especially to micro-oriented students (Sundet & Kelly, 2002). The decision case method can generate excitement about social policy advocacy while educating students about current advocacy work, particularly if the case involves state or local efforts to influence…

  3. Kids Speaking Up for Kids: Advocacy by Children, for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zygmunt-Fillwalk, Eva; Staley, Lynn; Kumar, Rashmi; Lin, Cecilia Lingfen; Moore, Catherine; Salakaya, Manana; Szecsi, Tunde

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a project called "Kids Speaking Up for Kids: Advocacy by Children, for Children". The project was simple in scope. The authors sought to collect stories of child advocacy--ways in which children were working on behalf of other children. They also sought to collect and profile children's voices and vision and so they issued a…

  4. Speaking up about Advocacy: Findings from a Partnership Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Melanie; Bannister, Susan; Davies, Julie; Fleming, Simon; Graham, Claire; Mcmaster, Andrea; Seddon, Angela; Wheldon, Anita; Whittell, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a partnership research project carried out by a research team consisting of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities. The research explored people's understandings of advocacy and identified gaps in advocacy provision for people with learning disabilities and their families. Four focus…

  5. Disability Identity of Leaders in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Life stories and perspectives of leaders in the self-advocacy movement were explored to enhance knowledge about disability identity formation. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 leaders in the self-advocacy movement. Five major themes emerged: (a) resistance-claiming personhood and voice; (b) connection with disability…

  6. Protective Services and Citizen Advocacy. Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol K., Ed.

    Presented are seven papers given at a conference on deinstitutionalization of the mentally handicapped which focus on protective services and citizen advocacy. Carol Sigelman stresses the following four concepts: follow-along (the monitoring of the developmentally disabled person in the community), advocacy, protection, and shelter, Alternatives…

  7. Social Justice Advocacy among Graduate Students: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linnemeyer, Rachel McQuown

    2009-01-01

    Although social justice advocacy has increasingly been acknowledged as important in the field of psychology (e.g., Goodman et al., 2004; Toporek et al., 2006a, Vera & Speight, 2003), there is a dearth of empirical research examining social justice advocacy across graduate psychology students. This mixed-methods study examined demographic and…

  8. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  9. Environment, advocacy, and community participation: MOPAWI in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Brehm, V M

    2000-02-01

    This paper analyzes the work of Mosquitia Pawisa (MOPAWI) in relation to the development of its strategic linkages among the grassroots, the state, and ultimately the international level of politics in practice. Over the years, MOPAWI has developed a large and complex program addressing many aspects of development in La Mosquitia. Working strategically at two levels, MOPAWI has endeavored to change government policy for the region through continued lobbying and advocacy. It has also worked alongside with local communities to find ways of improving livelihoods without harming the environment. The key strength of the MOPAWI work has been the high level of community participation and mobilization by managing their own development in a time of profound change. Overall, the experience of MOPAWI suggests that nongovernmental organizations can play a strategic role in obtaining environmental protection, government recognition of ethnic diversity, and rights for indigenous people.

  10. Reducing violent injuries: priorities for pediatrician advocacy.

    PubMed

    Dolins, J C; Christoffel, K K

    1994-10-01

    A basic framework for developing an advocacy plan must systematically break down the large task of policy development implementation into manageable components. The basic framework described in detail in this paper includes three steps: Setting policy objectives by narrowing the scope of policy, by reviewing policy options, and by examining options against selected criteria. Developing strategies for educating the public and for approaching legislative/regulatory bodies. Evaluating the effectiveness of the advocacy action plan as a process and as an agent for change. To illustrate the variety of ways in which pediatricians can be involved in the policy process to reduce violent injuries among children and adolescents, we apply this systematic approach to three priority areas. Prohibiting the use of corporal punishment in schools is intended to curb the institutionalized legitimacy of violence that has been associated with future use of violence. Efforts to remove handguns from the environments of children and adolescents are aimed at reducing the numbers of firearm injuries inflicted upon and by minors. Comprehensive treatment of adolescent victims of assault is intended to decrease the reoccurrence of violent injuries.

  11. Medical advocacy on behalf of detained immigrants.

    PubMed

    Venters, Homer D; Foote, Mary; Keller, Allen S

    2011-06-01

    Detention of immigrants by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is a rapidly growing form of incarceration in the U.S. with almost 400,000 people detained in 2008 (Schriro in Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 2009, http://www.ice.gov/doclib/091005_ice_detention_report-final.pdf ). ICE detainees are predominantly from Mexico and Latin America and only a small minority of detainees are asylum seekers. Immigrant detainees lack a legal guarantee of medical care (unlike criminal arrestees and prisoners) and face challenges in receiving medical care, particularly those with chronic medical conditions (Venters and Keller in J Health Care Poor Underserved 20:951-957, 2009). Although we and others have long been involved in advocating for detained asylum seekers, few resources are dedicated to medical advocacy for the broader population of ICE detainees. At the NYU Center for Health and Human Rights (CHHR), a program of medical advocacy was initiated in 2007 on behalf of ICE detainees focused on improvement of care in detention and medical parole. Our preliminary efforts reveal a pressing need for more involvement by physicians and other health advocates in this area.

  12. Colored Extensions of GLq(2) Quantum Group and Related Noncommutative Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu-Mallick, B.

    An infinite-dimensional quantum group, containing the standard GLq(2) and GLp,q(2) cases as different subalgebras, is constructed by using a colored braid group representation. It turns out that all algebraic relations occurring in this “colored” quantum group can be expressed in the Heisenberg-Weyl form, for a nontrivial choice of corresponding basis elements. Moreover a novel quadratic algebra, defined through Kac-Moody-like generators, is obtained by making some power series expansion of related monodromy matrix elements. The structure of invariant noncommutative planes associated with this “colored” quantum group has also been investigated.

  13. Unexpected Sources of Information in Industrial Relations: A Current Awareness Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagin, Katherine I.; Barry, Kevin P.

    1984-01-01

    Offers practical approach to locating and understanding sources of current information in industrial relations from four groups: non-profit, policy research associations; professional and trade associations; advocacy and lobby organizations; and private, profit-making agencies. A method for enriching library collection development and a new…

  14. A Hospital-Based Interdisciplinary Model for Increasing Nurses' Engagement in Legislative Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Ashley; Audette, Kathryn; DeLong, Amy; Brostoff, Marcie

    2016-02-01

    The Legislative Action Interest Group (LAIG) is a hospital-based health policy forum that engages nurses in exploring clinical implications of existing and pending health policies and regulations, while also creating a feedback loop to inform policy makers about the realities nursing practice and patient care. The LAIG is a collaborative effort between the hospital's Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services and the Office of Government Relations at an academic children's hospital. Nurses participating in the LAIG forums build a working knowledge of health policy and can articulate the practice realities for policy decision makers. Participants explore the political context of nursing and pediatric policies while learning about the state legislative process. Beyond the monthly meetings, members build policy advocacy skills and have testified at public hearings, met with state and federal legislators, and led tours for policy makers through the hospital. The LAIG model also benefits the government relations staff by providing time for them to discuss clinical implications of pending policies with nurses from practice settings in the hospital. Forum discussions enhance the ability of the hospital's lobbyists to articulate practice implications of health policy to lawmakers. This case study, describing the origin, structure, operations, and outcomes of the LAIG model, and has implications for nurses in hospitals and academic settings who are interested in engaging in policy work. Opportunities to research the sustainability, replicability, and patient-centered outcomes of LAIG forums represent future work needed to advance nursing's participation in policy. PMID:26880725

  15. Dynamics of Inter-Group Relations in Israel: 1967-2002 (In Memory of Louis Guttman)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Shlomit; Katz, Elihu

    2005-01-01

    Apart from the conflict between Arabs and Jews, two types of inter-group relations are the foci of social strain within the Jewish community of Israel: (1) inter-ethnic relations between Ashkenazim and Sephardim, and (2) relations between the religious and the nonreligious. Since 1967, the continuing survey of the Guttman Institute has been…

  16. On the relation between phase path, group path and attenuation in a cold absorbing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. A.; Dyson, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to a cold absorbing plasma in which the collision frequency is zero. Expressions are developed which relate the attenuation and the group and phase refractive indices. It is found that because the expressions for the group and phase refractive indices and the imaginary part of the refractive index are closely related in form, the attenuation is related to the difference between the group and phase paths. Numerical calculations have derived approximations which significantly increase the range of known approximations of this type.

  17. Child Advocacy in the United States: The Work of the Children's Defense Fund. Innocenti Essays No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weill, James D.

    This essay provides an overview of the goals and activities of the Children's Defense Fund (CDF), an advocacy group headquartered in Washington, D.C. that works to improve the well-being of American children through systemic change and whose goal is to make it unacceptable for any child in the United States to grow up homeless, hungry, sick,…

  18. An Exploration of the Self-Advocacy Support Role through Collaborative Research: "There Should Never Be a Them and Us"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Rohhss

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of the support worker in self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability is pivotal in setting the scene for empowerment. However, despite the growing importance of the role, it has attracted very little scrutiny. Method: The study developed an inclusive team approach working alongside researchers labelled with…

  19. Sugar-sweetened beverages coverage in the British media: an analysis of public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging

    PubMed Central

    Elliott-Green, Alex; Hyseni, Lirije; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Bromley, Helen; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the extent of media-based public health advocacy versus pro-industry messaging regarding sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). Design We conducted a systematic analysis to identify and examine all articles regarding SSBs published in all mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014. We initially conducted a brief literature search to develop appropriate search terms and categorisations for grouping and analysing the articles. Articles were then coded according to the publishing newspaper, article type, topic, prominence and slant (pro-SSB or anti-SSB). A contextual analysis was undertaken to examine key messages in the articles. Results We identified 374 articles published during 2014. The majority of articles (81%) suggested that SSBs are unhealthy. Messaging from experts, campaign groups and health organisations was fairly consistent about the detrimental effects of SSB on health. However, relatively few articles assessed any approaches or solutions to potentially combat the problems associated with SSBs. Only one-quarter (24%) suggested any policy change. Meanwhile, articles concerning the food industry produced consistent messages emphasising consumer choice and individual responsibility for making choices regarding SSB consumption, and promoting and advertising their products. The food industry thus often managed to avoid association with the negative press that their products were receiving. Conclusions SSBs were frequently published in mainstream British print newspapers and their online news websites during 2014. Public health media advocacy was prominent throughout, with a growing consensus that sugary drinks are bad for people's health. However, the challenge for public health will be to mobilise supportive public opinion to help implement effective regulatory policies. Only then will our population's excess consumption of SSBs come under control. PMID:27436666

  20. To What Question(s) Is Music Education Advocacy the Answer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Advocacy can be a useful tool. But like all tools it has its limitations and potential dangers, its proper and improper uses. Understanding the difference is critical. Advocacy and philosophy are very different processes, serving very divergent ends. Philosophy is suited poorly to advocacy's political purposes, and advocacy arguments are seldom of…

  1. 75 FR 40033 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax...: Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check Waiver. OMB Number: 1545-2092. Abstract: Taxpayer Advocacy...

  2. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  3. 42 CFR 476.110 - Use of immediate advocacy to resolve oral beneficiary complaints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use of immediate advocacy to resolve oral... § 476.110 Use of immediate advocacy to resolve oral beneficiary complaints. (a) Immediate advocacy. A QIO may offer the option of resolving an oral complaint through the use of immediate advocacy if:...

  4. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  5. 75 FR 18957 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement...

  6. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  7. Advocacy for Art Education: Beyond Tee-Shirts and Bumper Stickers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobick, Bryna; DiCindio, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy is not new to art education. Over the years, Goldfarb (1979), Hodsoll (1985), and Erickson and Young (1996) have written about the importance of arts advocacy, but the concept of advocacy has evolved with the times. For example, in the 1970s, arts advocacy was described as a "movement" and brought together art educators, administrators,…

  8. Inhibition of proliferation of normal and transformed neural cells by blood group-related oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic tetrasaccharide structurally related to blood groups and selectin ligands inhibited division of astrocytes, gliomas, and neuroblastomas at micromolar concentrations. The compound was cytostatic for primary astrocytes in culture, but cytotoxic for fast proliferating cell lines. PMID:1512552

  9. Generalized Jack polynomials and the AGT relations for the SU(3) group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, S.; Morozov, A.; Zenkevich, Y.

    2014-03-01

    We find generalized Jack polynomials for the SU(3) group and verify that their Selberg averages for several first levels are given by Nekrasov functions. To compute the averages, we derive recurrence relations for the Selberg integrals.

  10. The Relative Effects of Group Size on Reading Progress of Older Students with Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Wanzek, Jeanne; Wexler, Jade; Barth, Amy; Cirino, Paul T.; Fletcher, Jack; Romain, Melissa; Denton, Carolyn A.; Roberts, Greg; Francis, David

    2010-01-01

    This study reports findings on the relative effects from a yearlong secondary intervention contrasting large-group, small-group, and school-provided interventions emphasizing word study, vocabulary development, fluency, and comprehension with seventh- and eighth-graders with reading difficulties. Findings indicate that few statistically…

  11. Physicians Mutual Aid Group: A Response to AIDS-Related Burnout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garside, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Describes origins and functioning of physician's mutual aid group for physicians providing primary care to people with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Offers suggestions related to overcoming resistance physicians might have to participating in such a group and reviews modalities that were helpful in facilitating participants' ability…

  12. Divergence of function in sequence-related groups of Escherichia coli proteins.

    PubMed

    Nahum, L A; Riley, M

    2001-08-01

    The most prominent mechanism of molecular evolution is believed to have been duplication and divergence of genes. Proteins that belong to sequence-related groups in any one organism are candidates to have emerged from such a process and to share a common ancestor. Groups of proteins in Escherichia coli having sequence similarity are mostly composed of proteins with closely related function, but some groups comprise proteins with unrelated functions. In order to understand how function can change while sequences remain similar, we have examined some of these groups in detail. The enzymes analyzed in this work include representatives of amidotransferases, phosphotransferases, decarboxylases, and others. Most sequence-related groups contain enzymes that are in the same classes of Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. We have concentrated on groups that are heterogeneous in that respect, and also on groups containing more than one enzyme of any pathway. We find that although the EC number may differ, the reaction chemistry of these sequence-related proteins is the same or very similar. Some of these families illustrate how diversification has taken place in evolution, using common features of either reaction chemistry or ligand specificity, or both, to create catalysts for different kinds of biochemical reactions. This information has relevance to the area of functional genomics in which the activities of gene products of unknown reading frames are attributed by analogy to the functions of sequence-related proteins of known function.

  13. Consistency and consensus models for group decision-making with uncertain 2-tuple linguistic preference relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Guo, Chonghui

    2016-08-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the decision environment and the lack of knowledge, decision-makers may use uncertain linguistic preference relations to express their preferences over alternatives and criteria. For group decision-making problems with preference relations, it is important to consider the individual consistency and the group consensus before aggregating the preference information. In this paper, consistency and consensus models for group decision-making with uncertain 2-tuple linguistic preference relations (U2TLPRs) are investigated. First of all, a formula which can construct a consistent U2TLPR from the original preference relation is presented. Based on the consistent preference relation, the individual consistency index for a U2TLPR is defined. An iterative algorithm is then developed to improve the individual consistency of a U2TLPR. To help decision-makers reach consensus in group decision-making under uncertain linguistic environment, the individual consensus and group consensus indices for group decision-making with U2TLPRs are defined. Based on the two indices, an algorithm for consensus reaching in group decision-making with U2TLPRs is also developed. Finally, two examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  14. Belief in the immutability of attitudes both increases and decreases advocacy.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Omair; Wheeler, S Christian

    2016-10-01

    People with an entity theory of attitudes (i.e., the belief that attitudes are relatively unchanging) are more certain of their attitudes than are people with an incremental theory (i.e., the belief that attitudes are relatively malleable), and people with greater attitude certainty are generally more willing to try to persuade others. Combined, these findings suggest that an entity theory should foster greater advocacy. Yet, people with entity theories may be less willing to advocate because they also perceive others' attitudes as unchanging. Across 5 studies, we show that both of these countervailing effects occur simultaneously and cancel each other out. However, by manipulating how advocacy is framed (as standing up for one's views or exchanging one's views with others), whom people focus on (themselves or others), or which implicit theory applies to oneself versus others, each implicit theory can either increase or decrease willingness to advocate. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27668892

  15. Translating research into political advocacy to improve infant and child health.

    PubMed

    Kt, Albert Aynsley-Green

    2014-11-01

    Dramatic improvements have occurred in the overall health of our children driven by rigorous research translated into clinical practice. However, all is not well for too many, not only for their health but for other outcomes of their lives. These outcomes reflect poorly on how professional groups in child life and health have advocated effectively at the political level for the needs of children and for the services to support them. Professional staff in child health, including those involved in neonatal care, must become more effective in translating research into political advocacy for the best interests of children. A scientific approach to political advocacy is needed that is equivalent in its rigour to the best of bio-medical research. Above all, the care of the newly born infant should not be seen in isolation, but in the overall context of childhood and the services to support children today.

  16. THE RELATION BETWEEN MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF POOR GROUPS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Tovmassian, Hrant M.; Plionis, M. E-mail: mplionis@astro.noa.gr

    2009-05-10

    We investigate the relation between the projected morphology and the velocity dispersion of groups of galaxies using two recently compiled group catalogs, one based on the Two Micron All Sky Survey redshift survey (Crook et al.) and the other on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 galaxy catalog (Tago et al.). We analyze a suitable subsample of groups from each catalog selected such that it minimizes possible systematic effects. We find that the velocity dispersion of groups is strongly correlated with the group-projected shape and size, with elongated and larger groups having a lower velocity dispersion. Such a correlation could be attributed to the dynamical evolution of groups, with groups in the initial stages of formation, before virialization is complete, having small velocity dispersion, a large size, and an elongated shape that reflects the anisotropic accretion of galaxies along filamentary structures. However, we show that the same sort of correlations could also be reproduced in prolatelike groups, irrespective of their dynamical state, if the net galaxy motion is preferentially along the group elongation, since then the groups oriented close to the line of sight will appear more spherical, will have a small projected size and high-velocity dispersion, while groups oriented close to the sky plane will appear larger in projection, more elongated, and will have smaller velocity dispersion. Although both factors must play a role in shaping the observed correlations, we attempt to disentangle them by performing tests that relate only to the dynamical evolution of groups (i.e., calculating the fraction of early-type galaxies in groups and the projected group compactness). Indeed we find a strong positive (negative) correlation between the group velocity dispersion (group-projected major axis) with the fraction of early-type galaxy members. We conclude that (1) the observed dependences of the group velocity dispersion on the group-projected size and

  17. MANN: empowered and oppressed? Men's Advocacy Network of the National Hemophilia Foundation.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D

    1995-04-01

    The author describes the purpose and the development of MANN (Men's Advocacy Network of the NHF), a complementary response for men to the women's advocacy group WONN (Women's Outreach Network of NHF), and discusses its potency as an advocacy group. MANN's initial platform demanded changes in the NHF that required more consumer input and leadership to the NHF Board. MANN had also demanded that forty percent of the NHF Board and Executive Board be comprised of persons with hemophilia and/or HIV, and that the NHF pursue conflict-of-interest guidelines, and a Congressional Investigation. The author states that these demands had never materialized because the leadership of the NHF refused to allow them to be implemented, and that MANN is being manipulated by the NHF old guard. Further, the author claims that COTT (The Committee of Ten Thousand) is not influenced by NHF, and has made significant impacts in educating the government, media, and public, regarding the history leading to the HIV infection of persons with hemophilia. COTT also has profound influence on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and on the safety of the nation's blood supply, including the progress of investigations and litigations.

  18. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    PubMed

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies. PMID:25751826

  19. Minority Women and Advocacy for Women's Health

    PubMed Central

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Morssink, Christiaan B.; Nestle, Marion

    2001-01-01

    US minority health issues involve racial/ethnic disparities that affect both women and men. However, women's health advocacy in the United States does not consistently address problems specific to minority women. The underlying evolution and political strength of the women's health and minority health movements differ profoundly. Women of color comprise only one quarter of women's health movement constituents and are, on average, socioeconomically disadvantaged. Potential alliances may be inhibited by vestiges of historical racial and social divisions that detract from feelings of commonality and mutual support. Nevertheless, insufficient attention to minority women's issues undermines the legitimacy of the women's health movement and may prevent important advances that can be achieved only when diversity is fully considered. PMID:11527764

  20. Minority women and advocacy for women's health.

    PubMed

    Kumanyika, S K; Morssink, C B; Nestle, M

    2001-09-01

    US minority health issues involve racial/ethnic disparities that affect both women and men. However, women's health advocacy in the United States does not consistently address problems specific to minority women. The underlying evolution and political strength of the women's health and minority health movements differ profoundly. Women of color comprise only one quarter of women's health movement constituents and are, on average, socioeconomically disadvantaged. Potential alliances may be inhibited by vestiges of historical racial and social divisions that detract from feelings of commonality and mutual support. Nevertheless, insufficient attention to minority women's issues undermines the legitimacy of the women's health movement and may prevent important advances that can be achieved only when diversity is fully considered.

  1. Are clownfish groups composed of close relatives? An analysis of microsatellite DNA variation in Amphiprion percula.

    PubMed

    Buston, Peter M; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Wong, Alex; Harrison, Richard G

    2007-09-01

    A central question of evolutionary ecology is: why do animals live in groups? Answering this question requires that the costs and benefits of group living are measured from the perspective of each individual in the group. This, in turn, requires that the group's genetic structure is elucidated, because genetic relatedness can modulate the individuals' costs and benefits. The clown anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, lives in groups composed of a breeding pair and zero to four nonbreeders. Both breeders and nonbreeders stand to gain by associating with relatives: breeders might prefer to tolerate nonbreeders that are relatives because there is little chance that relatives will survive to breed elsewhere; nonbreeders might prefer to associate with breeders that are relatives because of the potential to accrue indirect genetic benefits by enhancing anemone and, consequently, breeder fitness. Given the potential benefits of associating with relatives, we use microsatellite loci to investigate whether or not individuals within groups of A. percula are related. We develop seven polymorphic microsatellite loci, with a number of alleles (range 2-24) and an observed level of heterozygosity (mean = 0.5936) sufficient to assess fine-scale genetic structure. The mean coefficient of relatedness among group members is 0.00 +/- 0.10 (n = 9 groups), and there are no surprising patterns in the distribution of pairwise relatedness. We conclude that A. percula live in groups of unrelated individuals. This study lays the foundation for further investigations of behavioural, population and community ecology of anemonefishes which are emerging as model systems for evolutionary ecology in the marine environment.

  2. Genetic structure in relation to the history of Hungarian ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Guglielmino, C R; Béres, J

    1996-06-01

    The present analysis continues the study of 12 samples of 11 Hungarian ethnic groups and a collection of data from 8 foreign reference populations. The origin of these groups is entangled with the history of Hungary and specifically with the conquest of the Carpathian basin in the ninth century A.D. Given that each of the 11 groups has preserved its ethnic identity and assuming that genetic drift has played a major role, we expect that similarities and differences between the different Hungarian groups and between the Hungarian groups and the eight reference populations can be interpreted with respect to the controversial origin of the groups. The reference populations are those whose ancestors had high involvement in Hungarian history. We use multivariate statistical methods to analyze the gene frequencies of 22 loci. The results show that the Hungarian ethnic groups are genetically separate and that this separation is related to different migration waves. According to our results, Gypsies and Jews, who migrated relatively recently to Hungary, are distant from the other groups and, as predicted, appear to be genetically close to the North Indian and Ashkenazi reference populations, respectively. The Oriental population is least related to the Hungarian groups, but the distance diminishes when the P1 locus, which shows particularly high variability, is included. Some ethnic groups, especially Orség and Csángó, show genetic isolation and specific affinities with the reference populations that are related to their origin, namely, Slavs and Finns-Turks-Iranians, respectively. Other affinities were less striking than tradition would lead us to expect. Gene flow and admixture, as revealed by the significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances, may have played an important role in smoothing genetic differences between groups.

  3. Treatment of the mentally ill: legal advocacy enters the second generation.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, L S

    1986-10-01

    In the past, the legal and medical perspectives on issues relating to compulsory treatment focused on the individual's interest in liberty on the one hand and the physician's authority to treat on the other. Neither of these perspectives addresses the contemporary realities of treatment of chronically mentally ill people in the United States. The author suggests an emerging advocacy perspective that focuses on the quality of treatment.

  4. Young people with intellectual disability—The role of self-advocacy in a transformed Swedish welfare system

    PubMed Central

    Tideman, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of young people in Sweden with intellectual disability have organized themselves during the last 15 years in self-advocacy groups for socializing, empowerment, and expressing opposition to the norms and attitudes in a society that labels them as disabled. At the same time, the Swedish welfare system has transformed dramatically with processes of far-reaching individualization, closure of the major institutions, decentralization of responsibility from the state to local governments, and an emerging welfare market where service users are turned into customers. The aim of this article is to analyse and discuss the significance of self-advocacy in the new welfare context. Data were collected over a period of more than 10 years using repeated interviews with members of two self-advocacy groups and participation observations. Findings suggest that participation in self-advocacy groups opens up members for increasing health and well-being through new roles and identities, and it strengthens their control over everyday life. Support is still needed, however, but in new ways; otherwise, the restrictions of the institutions will simply be reconstructed in the new welfare system. PMID:25819844

  5. Reactions of heavier main-group compounds with hydrogen, ammonia, ethylene and related small molecules.

    PubMed

    Power, Philip P

    2012-04-01

    The first reaction between hydrogen and a main-group compound under ambient conditions was reported in 2005. This unexpected result has been followed by numerous others which show that such reactivity is widespread in unsaturated and multiple bonded main-group species. These may react spontaneously not only with hydrogen, but also with ethylene, ammonia and related molecules. This account focuses on results from the author's laboratory but also on parallel work by other groups. The link between HOMO-LUMO separations, symmetry considerations and reactivity of the main-group species is emphasized as is their similarity in reactivity to transition-metal organometallic compounds.

  6. Macroevolutionary trends of atomic composition and related functional group proportion in eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chun-Lin; Hao, You-Jin; Li, Ying; Chen, Bin; Wen, Jian-Fan

    2014-01-25

    To fully explore the trends of atomic composition during the macroevolution from prokaryote to eukaryote, five atoms (oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen) and related functional groups in prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins were surveyed and compared. Genome-wide analysis showed that eukaryotic proteins have more oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen atoms than prokaryotes do. Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG) analysis revealed that oxygen, sulfur, carbon and hydrogen frequencies are higher in eukaryotic proteins than in their prokaryotic orthologs. Furthermore, functional group analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic proteins tend to have higher proportions of sulfhydryl, hydroxyl and acylamino, but lower of sulfide and carboxyl. Taken together, an apparent trend of increase was observed for oxygen and sulfur atoms in the macroevolution; the variation of oxygen and sulfur compositions and their related functional groups in macroevolution made eukaryotic proteins carry more useful functional groups. These results will be helpful for better understanding the functional significances of atomic composition evolution.

  7. Religion and intergroup conflict: findings from the Global Group Relations Project.

    PubMed

    Neuberg, Steven L; Warner, Carolyn M; Mistler, Stephen A; Berlin, Anna; Hill, Eric D; Johnson, Jordan D; Filip-Crawford, Gabrielle; Millsap, Roger E; Thomas, George; Winkelman, Michael; Broome, Benjamin J; Taylor, Thomas J; Schober, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    How might religion shape intergroup conflict? We tested whether religious infusion-the extent to which religious rituals and discourse permeate the everyday activities of groups and their members-moderated the effects of two factors known to increase intergroup conflict: competition for limited resources and incompatibility of values held by potentially conflicting groups. We used data from the Global Group Relations Project to investigate 194 groups (e.g., ethnic, religious, national) at 97 sites around the world. When religion was infused in group life, groups were especially prejudiced against those groups that held incompatible values, and they were likely to discriminate against such groups. Moreover, whereas disadvantaged groups with low levels of religious infusion typically avoided directing aggression against their resource-rich and powerful counterparts, disadvantaged groups with high levels of religious infusion directed significant aggression against them-despite the significant tangible costs to the disadvantaged groups potentially posed by enacting such aggression. This research suggests mechanisms through which religion may increase intergroup conflict and introduces an innovative method for performing nuanced, cross-societal research.

  8. Increased Pain Communication following Multiple Group Memberships Salience Leads to a Relative Reduction in Pain-Related Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, Jolanda; Molenberghs, Pascal; Bastian, Brock; Karnadewi, Fika

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a fundamental human experience that triggers a range of social and psychological responses. In this study, we present behavioral and fMRI data to examine the effect of multiple group memberships salience on reported and neural indices of pain. We found that participants expressed higher levels of pain when more social group memberships were salient. This is consistent with the notion that pain itself motivates people to communicate their pain, and more so when multiple psychological resources are salient. In addition, fMRI results reveal an interesting twist: when participants increased their pain reporting as group memberships increased (from one group to four), there was a corresponding relative reduction in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula activation. These results provide evidence for an adaptive response to pain: the more people make use of the social resources at their disposal when experiencing pain, the less pain areas are activated. PMID:27657917

  9. A cross-cultural study of colour grouping: evidence for weak linguistic relativity.

    PubMed

    Davies, I R; Corbett, G G

    1997-08-01

    We report a cross-cultural study of colour grouping carried out as a test of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (linguistic relativity theory). Speakers of English, Russian and Setswana-languages that differ in their number of basic colour terms, and in how the blue-green region is categorized--were compared on a colour sorting task. Informants sorted a representative set of 65 colours into groups so that members of the groups looked similar to each other, with no restriction on the number of groups formed. If linguistic relativity theory is true, then there should be reliable differences between the three samples in the composition of the groups they formed associated with the differing positions of colour category boundaries in the languages. The most striking feature of the results, inconsistent with linguistic relativity theory, was the similarity amongst the patterns of choice of the three samples. However, there were also significant differences amongst the samples. Setswana speakers (who have a single basic term for BLUE or GREEN) were more likely to group BLUE colours with GREEN colours than either English or Russian speakers. But Russian speakers (who have two basic colour terms for BLUE) were no more likely than English speakers to group light and dark BLUE separately. In addition there were general structural differences in grouping among the samples: they differed in the level of consensus in grouping, the number of groups formed and in the distribution of the number of colours placed in a group. These structural differences may reflect differences in the availability and salience of the colour categories across the languages. Our data support perceptual universalism modulated by weaker linguistic effects. PMID:9290238

  10. A cross-cultural study of colour grouping: evidence for weak linguistic relativity.

    PubMed

    Davies, I R; Corbett, G G

    1997-08-01

    We report a cross-cultural study of colour grouping carried out as a test of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (linguistic relativity theory). Speakers of English, Russian and Setswana-languages that differ in their number of basic colour terms, and in how the blue-green region is categorized--were compared on a colour sorting task. Informants sorted a representative set of 65 colours into groups so that members of the groups looked similar to each other, with no restriction on the number of groups formed. If linguistic relativity theory is true, then there should be reliable differences between the three samples in the composition of the groups they formed associated with the differing positions of colour category boundaries in the languages. The most striking feature of the results, inconsistent with linguistic relativity theory, was the similarity amongst the patterns of choice of the three samples. However, there were also significant differences amongst the samples. Setswana speakers (who have a single basic term for BLUE or GREEN) were more likely to group BLUE colours with GREEN colours than either English or Russian speakers. But Russian speakers (who have two basic colour terms for BLUE) were no more likely than English speakers to group light and dark BLUE separately. In addition there were general structural differences in grouping among the samples: they differed in the level of consensus in grouping, the number of groups formed and in the distribution of the number of colours placed in a group. These structural differences may reflect differences in the availability and salience of the colour categories across the languages. Our data support perceptual universalism modulated by weaker linguistic effects.

  11. [Molecular evolution of ciliates (Ciliophora) and some related groups of protozoans].

    PubMed

    Lukashenko, N P

    2009-08-01

    The review summarizes current evidence, including the findings related to molecular phylogeny of ciliates (type Ciliophora) and some related groups of protozoans. Based on comparison of the sequences of genes encoding various ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), the phylogenetic relationships in seven out of eight known classes of ciliates are discussed. The events related to early branching of the eukaryotic tree are briefly presented. The evolutionary history of amitochondrial protists ids considered with regard to reductionistic evolution and archeozoic hypothesis. The phylogenetic relationships among ciliates and sister groups of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates are considered.

  12. Physicians mutual aid group: a response to AIDS-related burnout.

    PubMed

    Garside, B

    1993-11-01

    Physicians providing primary health care to people with AIDS are exposed to the same stressful experiences as other AIDS caregivers. Although mutual aid groups have proved useful in relieving stress for AIDS caregivers in general, physicians as a professional group present particular problems that impede their access to mutual aid. This article describes the origins and functioning of a physician's mutual aid group facilitated by the author. It offers suggestions related to overcoming resistance physicians might have to participating in such a group and reviews modalities that were found helpful in facilitating participants' ability to share emotional stresses within the group. The commitment of the physicians to the group over a prolonged period and their own testimony indicate that with appropriate facilitation, physicians under stress from providing care to people with AIDS can benefit from the experience of mutual aid that has been so beneficial to other caregivers.

  13. A Group Decision Framework with Intuitionistic Preference Relations and Its Application to Low Carbon Supplier Selection

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiayu; Wang, Zhou-Jing

    2016-01-01

    This article develops a group decision framework with intuitionistic preference relations. An approach is first devised to rectify an inconsistent intuitionistic preference relation to derive an additive consistent one. A new aggregation operator, the so-called induced intuitionistic ordered weighted averaging (IIOWA) operator, is proposed to aggregate individual intuitionistic fuzzy judgments. By using the mean absolute deviation between the original and rectified intuitionistic preference relations as an order inducing variable, the rectified consistent intuitionistic preference relations are aggregated into a collective preference relation. This treatment is presumably able to assign different weights to different decision-makers’ judgments based on the quality of their inputs (in terms of consistency of their original judgments). A solution procedure is then developed for tackling group decision problems with intuitionistic preference relations. A low carbon supplier selection case study is developed to illustrate how to apply the proposed decision model in practice. PMID:27657097

  14. Group Psychoeducation for Relatives of Persons With Bipolar Disorder: Perceived Benefits for Participants and Patients.

    PubMed

    Gex-Fabry, Marianne; Cuénoud, Sandrine; Stauffer-Corminboeuf, Marie-Joëlle; Aillon, Nancy; Perroud, Nader; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    Psychoeducation is a key element in the management of patients with bipolar disorders. The present study explored the perception of patients and family members with respect to group psychoeducation for relatives. Patients (n = 20) and relatives (n = 26) were assessed with questionnaires about perceived benefits and quality of life (median 4 years after participation). A large majority (>80%) of relatives acknowledged benefits with respect to easier detection of the early warning signs of relapse, improved quality of life, feeling more involved, and engaging in higher quality caregiving activities. Patients were less positive in general, but agreed that the program had helped them deal with crises, increased their feeling of being understood by relatives, and promoted positive changes in the family (>60%). Perceived positive changes in the family were associated with higher quality of life for relatives and patients. The present study highlights the importance of communication enhancement in group psychoeducation for relatives. PMID:26313039

  15. Boundaries of American Identity: Relations between Ethnic Group Prototypicality and Policy Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Que-Lam; Devos, Thierry; Altman, Hannah R.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to document that the extent to which different ethnic groups are perceived as embodying the American identity is more strongly linked to anti-minority policy attitudes and acculturation ideologies among majority group members (European Americans) than among minority group members (Asian Americans or Latino/as). Participants rated 13 attributes of the American identity as they pertain to different ethnic groups, and reported their endorsement of policy attitudes and acculturation ideologies. We found a relative consensus across ethnic groups regarding defining components of the American identity. However, European Americans were perceived as more prototypical of this American identity than ethnic minorities, especially by European American raters. Moreover, for European Americans but not for ethnic minorities, relative ingroup prototypicality was related to anti-minority policy attitudes and acculturation ideologies. These findings suggest that for European Americans, perceptions of ethnic group prototypicality fulfill an instrumental function linked to preserving their group interests and limiting the rights afforded to ethnic minorities. PMID:26347578

  16. Advocacy for strengthening civil registration and vital statistics.

    PubMed

    Upham, Susan; Mikkelsen, Lene

    2012-04-01

    This article has presented the key elements of the advocacy process and the steps to consider in developing an advocacy campaign. There are compelling reasons for engaging in advocacy, particularly as civil registration systems in many countries have progressed very little over the past 50 years. Lack of awareness of the benefits for individuals and governments has contributed to a vicious cycle of under development of civil registration and vital statistics systems. Advocates are needed across a range of sectors to persuade governments to make CRVS a priority and to work towards a greater political commitment and allocation of resources for establishing and improving systems. Advocating for better legal frameworks and policies that fully support a functioning and well-used CRVS system is needed. A selection of tools and resources has been included in this module to get you started in advocating for improvements in your CRVS system. Box 4 summarises some key considerations when developing your advocacy campaign.

  17. Advocacy communication, vaccines and the role of scientific societies.

    PubMed

    Signorelli, C; Odone, A

    2015-01-01

    In 1986 the Ottawa Charter underlined the importance of advocacy in health. This article analyzes the role of advocacy in Public Health making the case of immunization, whose coverage rates are decreasing in many countries. An effective advocacy action could counteract the growing phenomenon of the vaccine hesitancy within both the general population and an increasing share of healthcare providers as well as contrast antivax movements' action. We identify who are the advocates focusing on Italy and on the crucial role of scientific societies which share the responsibility of making the latest scientific evidence and most effective infectious diseases' control strategies available to health policy makers. The Italian Society of Hygiene (SItI) has been actively engaged for several years in a number of initiatives of advocacy communication and vaccines including research, training, media exposure and a dedicated website portal (vaccinarSì).

  18. Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling and Advocacy: An Analysis of Dissonant Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Stephen T.

    1980-01-01

    The article identifies and discusses the inherent differences that exist between vocational rehabilitation practice and client advocacy for the handicapped, and provides some recommendations as to how rehabilitation professionals may legitimately serve as advocates for handicapped persons. (DLS)

  19. Handicapped Infants and Euthanasia: A Challenge to Our Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, J. David

    1985-01-01

    The issue of pediatric euthanasia for handicapped newborns is examined and contrasting viewpoints emphasizing the quality and the sanctity of life are considered. The author asserts that advocacy for handicapped children involves decisions regarding the euthanasia question. (CL)

  20. Professional development through policy advocacy: communicating and advocating for health and health equity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lydia Berenice; Hernandez, Kristen Eileen; Mata, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Communicating and advocating for evidence-based public health policy is a key component of health promotion practice, but public health professionals often lack experience in policy advocacy. This article provides perspectives from public health professionals who participated in successful public health policy advocacy efforts in their community. Their experiences using evidence-based research to advocate for policies that promote health equity contributed significantly to their career development, and also contributed to community capacity to reduce tobacco-related disparities. This article builds on previous work emphasizing the value of career development opportunities that enhance and diversify the public health workforce, and provides practical tips and "lessons learned" that are relevant to a wide range of public health professionals. PMID:25416310

  1. Advancing Your Citizenship: An Annotated Bibliography on Consumerism/Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities. Advancing Your Citizenship Series Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip; And Others

    The annotated bibliography lists 289 references which relate to the advocacy consumer movement for disabled people. Initial sections contain a listing of the periodicals, books and monographs/reports/proceedings from which the annotated references are derived; an author index; and a subject index. Among the subjects covered are the following:…

  2. Effectiveness of a community-based advocacy and learning program for hmong refugees.

    PubMed

    Goodkind, Jessica R

    2005-12-01

    The effectiveness of a community-based advocacy and learning intervention for Hmong refugees was assessed using a comprehensive, multi-method strategy, which included a within-group longitudinal design with four data collection points and in-depth qualitative recruitment and post-intervention interviews. The intervention's impact on five aspects of refugee well-being was examined: Participants' psychological well-being, quality of life, access to resources, English proficiency, and knowledge for the U.S. citizenship exam. Twenty-eight Hmong adults and 27 undergraduate students participated together in the intervention, which had two major components: (1) Learning Circles, which involved cultural exchange and one-on-one learning opportunities for Hmong adults, and (2) an advocacy component that involved undergraduates advocating for and transferring advocacy skills to Hmong families to increase their access to resources in their communities. Undergraduate paraprofessionals and Hmong participants worked together for 6-8 hr per week for 6 months. Growth trajectory analysis revealed promising quantitative findings. Participants' quality of life, satisfaction with resources, English proficiency, and knowledge for the U.S. citizenship test increased and their levels of distress decreased over the course of the intervention. Mediating analyses suggested that participants' increased quality of life could be explained by their improved satisfaction with resources. Qualitative data helped to support and explain the quantitative data, as well as providing insight into other outcomes and processes of the intervention. Policy, practice, and research implications are discussed.

  3. Psychotropic medication from an object relations theory perspective: an analysis of vignettes from group psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fain, Dana Shindel; Sharon, Amos; Moscovici, Lucian; Schreiber, Shaul

    2008-07-01

    In this article we explore the content and dynamics of patients' verbalizations within a "living with medications" group. Patients' perceptions of their psychotropic medications are interpreted and classified within the framework of object relations theory. One's perception of the role of medication in one's life can serve as a gateway to one's inner world and the way that he or she perceives authority figures, peers, and oneself. We suggest that working through patients' relationships with their medications can help them to achieve better integration of internal object relations. Discussing patients' views about medications should therefore be seen as an important part of psychotherapy with many individuals. Such a discussion may enhance and improve efficacy of both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. It is of particular importance in group therapy, within milieu environments and with individuals reluctant to explicitly discuss interpersonal matters. Vignettes from the group sessions illustrate the way in which discussing medication advances group process.

  4. Group treatment for race-related stresses among minority Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed

    Loo, Chalsa M; Ueda, Salvador S; Morton, Robert K

    2007-03-01

    Treatment for symptoms arising from exposure to adverse race-related events is critical to culturally competent healthcare delivery to ethnic minorities, particularly in light of recent findings demonstrating significant relationships between adverse race-related events and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general psychiatric distress. This article offers a developmental model consisting of stages by which psychological symptoms develop in response to race-related stressors in the military. This article also describes a model of group treatment for ethnic minority veterans related to psychological symptoms arising from exposure to race-related stressors. Both models were used in a race-related support group for Pacific Islander Vietnam veterans diagnosed with PTSD. A combined approach of group intervention, psychosocial education, identity reframing, cognitive differentiation, and cognitive restructuring, which included 'depersonalizing discrimination' and rejection of faulty beliefs, appear to offer an effective approach to treating psychological sequelae arising from adverse race-related events. This article offers an intervention model that is linked to a developmental model of race-related stressors for Asian American Pacific Islander minority personnel in the military.

  5. Two ways related to performance in elite sport: the path of self-confidence and competitive anxiety and the path of group cohesion and group goal-clarity.

    PubMed

    Kjørmo, Odd; Halvari, Hallgeir

    2002-06-01

    A model tested among 136 Norwegian Olympic-level athletes yielded two paths related to performance. The first path indicated that self-confidence, modeled as an antecedent of competitive anxiety, is negatively correlated with anxiety. Competitive anxiety in turn is negatively correlated with performance. The second path indicated that group cohesion is positively correlated with group goal-clarity, which in turn is positively correlated with performance. Competitive anxiety mediates the relation between self-confidence and performance, whereas group goal-clarity mediates the relation between group cohesion and performance. Results from multiple regression analyses supported the model in the total sample and among individual sport athletes organized in training groups (n = 100). Among team sport athletes (n = 36), personality and group measures are more strongly intercorrelated than among individual sport athletes, and the relation with performance is more complex for the former group. The interaction of self-confidence and competitive anxiety is related to performance among team sport athletes.

  6. The impacts of racial group membership on people's distributive justice: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Deng, Yuqin

    2014-04-16

    How individuals and societies distribute benefits has long been studied by psychologists and sociologists. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social identity on people's justice concerns. However, it is not entirely clear how racial in-group/out-group relationship affects the brain activity in distributive justice. In this study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants made their decisions about donation allocation. Behavioral results showed that racial in-group factor affected participants' decisions on justice consideration. Participants were more likely to make relatively equity decisions when racial in-group factor was congruent with equity compared with the corresponding incongruent condition. Moreover, this incongruent condition took longer response times than congruent condition. Meanwhile, less equity decisions were made when efficiency was larger in the opposite side to equity than it was equal between the two options. Scalp event-related potential analyses revealed that greater P300 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited by the incongruent condition compared with the congruent condition. These findings suggest that the decision-making of distributive justice could be modulated by racial group membership, and greater attentional resources or cognitive efforts are required when racial in-group factor and equity conflict with each other.

  7. The impacts of racial group membership on people's distributive justice: an event-related potential study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Tang, Yi-Yuan; Deng, Yuqin

    2014-04-16

    How individuals and societies distribute benefits has long been studied by psychologists and sociologists. Previous work has highlighted the importance of social identity on people's justice concerns. However, it is not entirely clear how racial in-group/out-group relationship affects the brain activity in distributive justice. In this study, event-related potentials were recorded while participants made their decisions about donation allocation. Behavioral results showed that racial in-group factor affected participants' decisions on justice consideration. Participants were more likely to make relatively equity decisions when racial in-group factor was congruent with equity compared with the corresponding incongruent condition. Moreover, this incongruent condition took longer response times than congruent condition. Meanwhile, less equity decisions were made when efficiency was larger in the opposite side to equity than it was equal between the two options. Scalp event-related potential analyses revealed that greater P300 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited by the incongruent condition compared with the congruent condition. These findings suggest that the decision-making of distributive justice could be modulated by racial group membership, and greater attentional resources or cognitive efforts are required when racial in-group factor and equity conflict with each other. PMID:24394904

  8. Group effects of instrumentality and name relation on action naming in bilingual anomic aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kambanaros, Maria

    2009-07-01

    Verb production in sentences was investigated in two groups of late bilingual Greek-English speakers: individuals with anomic aphasia and a control group. Verb retrieval in sentences was significantly impaired in both languages for the individuals with anomic aphasia. Additional results revealed no effect of instrumentality on action naming in sentences in either language. However, there was a negative effect of verb-noun name relation on instrumental verb production in English only. Results confirm intact verb lemma retrieval for this group of bilingual individuals with anomic aphasia, but a breakdown at the level of accessing the phonological or lexical form.

  9. EEGIFT: Group Independent Component Analysis for Event-Related EEG Data

    PubMed Central

    Eichele, Tom; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Brakedal, Brage; Eikeland, Rune; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a powerful method for source separation and has been used for decomposition of EEG, MRI, and concurrent EEG-fMRI data. ICA is not naturally suited to draw group inferences since it is a non-trivial problem to identify and order components across individuals. One solution to this problem is to create aggregate data containing observations from all subjects, estimate a single set of components and then back-reconstruct this in the individual data. Here, we describe such a group-level temporal ICA model for event related EEG. When used for EEG time series analysis, the accuracy of component detection and back-reconstruction with a group model is dependent on the degree of intra- and interindividual time and phase-locking of event related EEG processes. We illustrate this dependency in a group analysis of hybrid data consisting of three simulated event-related sources with varying degrees of latency jitter and variable topographies. Reconstruction accuracy was tested for temporal jitter 1, 2 and 3 times the FWHM of the sources for a number of algorithms. The results indicate that group ICA is adequate for decomposition of single trials with physiological jitter, and reconstructs event related sources with high accuracy. PMID:21747835

  10. Why we need to move beyond diagnosis-related groups and how we might do so.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Marie-Louise Kirchhoff; Burau, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis-related groups are widespread across Europe and they are meant to be a central instrument to improve the activity and efficiency of hospitals. However, there are many examples of diagnosis-related groups having adverse effects which are difficult to control and which endanger the goals of health care systems in terms of efficiency, equity and quality. Political and administrative decision makers therefore need to fundamentally rethink hospital governance and consider new systems of budgeting and performance measurement. Central Denmark Region is currently piloting a system, based on the Triple Aim approach, which may offer inspiration. PMID:25972360

  11. Self-advocacy in health care decision-making among elderly African Americans.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Jean Spann

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence the self-advocacy expressions of elderly African Americans. The sample consisted of 100 elderly African Americans who responded to a series of questions about the characters in seven vignettes. Each vignette told a story about an elderly African American in a health care dilemma. The health care dilemma became more complex as the age of the main character increased. In addition, each participant completed the Multi-dimensional Health Locus of Control Scale and the Philadelphia Geriatric Morale Scale. Statistically significant differences were found between males and females and educational levels on the Powerful Others Subscale. A statistically significant relationship was found between high self advocacy expressions and marital status. Twenty-four percent (24.1%) of the participants rated as having high self-advocacy expressed dissatisfaction with their health status. The findings demonstrate some of the complexities involved in the study of elderly African Americans particularly related to the major impact of life experiences on their lives today.

  12. Social work advocacy in the post-TANF environment: lessons from early TANF research studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Steven G; Gryzlak, Brian M

    2002-07-01

    This study examined early research findings concerning the well-being of people who leave Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs and then applies these findings in the development of TANF-related advocacy strategies. Based on secondary data analysis of TANF leaver studies from 12 states with large TANF caseloads, the authors focus on the employment and earnings experiences of leavers; TANF recidivism and its relationship to job stability; and the use of support services. State studies typically have found employment levels among leavers in the 55 percent to 65 percent range, but average earnings fall below the poverty level. Although those who remain employed can expect earnings growth, job instability is a significant problem and contributes to TANF recidivism rates of 21 percent to 35 percent within the first year. Available support services such as Medicaid, food stamps, and child care subsidies are underused, often because leavers do not understand that they are eligible. Recommended advocacy strategies include policy interventions to improve the economic well-being of low-income working people, as well as administrative and direct practice strategies to improve the implementation of existing policies. The authors argue that attention to such advocacy efforts is both critical and opportune for social work, given the profession's historical mission, impending federal TANF reauthorization, and unspent TANF allocations.

  13. From Advocacy to Action in Global Adolescent Health.

    PubMed

    Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Ross, David A; Viner, Russell M; Santelli, John S

    2016-10-01

    In May 2016, The Lancet published a report titled, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," the culmination of three years of work from a geographically diverse interdisciplinary group. The report argued that healthy growth across adolescence and young adulthood shapes life course and intergenerational trajectories so that health investments yield a "triple dividend." With current global interest in adolescent health at an unprecedented level, it outlines three next steps to advance from advocacy to effective action: (1) there is a pressing need for comprehensive and integrated strategies, inclusive of, but extending beyond, sexual and reproductive health, and HIV; (2) interventions should address both adolescent health service coverage and determinants of health that lie in sectors such as education, justice, transport, and industry and employment, as well as families and local communities; and (3) scale-up of responses will require not only investments in country-level capacities for measuring need and responding with evidence-based practice but also the establishment of processes for accountability and meaningful youth engagement. PMID:27664465

  14. From Advocacy to Action in Global Adolescent Health.

    PubMed

    Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Ross, David A; Viner, Russell M; Santelli, John S

    2016-10-01

    In May 2016, The Lancet published a report titled, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," the culmination of three years of work from a geographically diverse interdisciplinary group. The report argued that healthy growth across adolescence and young adulthood shapes life course and intergenerational trajectories so that health investments yield a "triple dividend." With current global interest in adolescent health at an unprecedented level, it outlines three next steps to advance from advocacy to effective action: (1) there is a pressing need for comprehensive and integrated strategies, inclusive of, but extending beyond, sexual and reproductive health, and HIV; (2) interventions should address both adolescent health service coverage and determinants of health that lie in sectors such as education, justice, transport, and industry and employment, as well as families and local communities; and (3) scale-up of responses will require not only investments in country-level capacities for measuring need and responding with evidence-based practice but also the establishment of processes for accountability and meaningful youth engagement.

  15. Relations between high and low power groups: the importance of legitimacy.

    PubMed

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Spears, Russell; Cremers, Iris; Hogg, Michael A

    2003-02-01

    Using a social identity perspective, two experiments examined the effects of power and the legitimacy of power differentials on intergroup bias. In Experiment 1, 125 math-science students were led to believe that they had high or low representation in a university decision-making body relative to social-science students and that this power position was either legitimate or illegitimate. Power did not have an independent effect on bias; rather, members of both high and low power groups showed more bias when the power hierarchy was illegitimate than when it was legitimate. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (N = 105). In addition, Experiment 2 showed that groups located within an unfair power hierarchy expected the superordinate power body to be more discriminatory than did those who had legitimately high or low power. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for group relations.

  16. Smoking and Adolescence: Exploring Tobacco Consumption and Related Attitudes in Three Different Adolescent Groups in Switzerland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosson, Marlene; Maggiori, Christian; Gygax, Pascal Mark; Gay, Christelle

    2012-01-01

    The present study constitutes an investigation of tobacco consumption, related attitudes and individual differences in smoking or non-smoking behaviors in a sample of adolescents of different ages in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. We investigated three school-age groups (7th-grade, 9th-grade, and the second-year of high school) for…

  17. The Relative Instructional Efficiency of Small Group Computer-Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlechter, Theodore M.

    1990-01-01

    Describes three experiments which examined the relative instructional effectiveness of using small group computer-based training (CBT) and individual CBT in a military setting. Retention abilities are tested in two of the experiments, pretests and posttests are described, cost effectiveness is discussed, and cooperative learning is considered. (25…

  18. Changing HIV and AIDS-Related Behavior: Promising Approaches at the Individual, Group, and Community Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinhardt, Lance S.

    2005-01-01

    In this special issue, six groups of clinician-researchers focusing on HIV and AIDS-related behavior present their most recent intervention strategies. The articles included represent interventions for a range of target behaviors, including sexual activity, injection drug use, and HIV medication adherence. The interventions described were designed…

  19. Training and Deriving Precalculus Relations: A Small-Group, Web-Interactive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinty, Jenny; Ninness, Chris; McCuller, Glen; Rumph, Robin; Goodwin, Andrea; Kelso, Ginger; Lopez, Angie; Kelly, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A small-group, web-interactive approach to teaching precalculus concepts was investigated. Following an online pretest, 3 participants were given a brief (15 min) presentation on the details of reciprocal math relations and how they operate on the coordinate axes. During baseline, participants were tested regarding their ability to construct…

  20. Assessment of Groups Influence on Management Style as Related to University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2010-01-01

    The study was undertaken with the objective of assessing groups influence on management style as related to University governance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study from academic staff perspective. The management style of the Vice Chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the period September 3, 1996 to…

  1. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  2. Cooperative Learning in Small Groups: Recent Methods and Effects on Achievement, Attitudes, and Ethnic Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharan, Shlomo

    1980-01-01

    Three peer tutoring methods and two group investigation approaches are examined for effects on academic achievement, students' attitudes, and ethnic relations. The five methods are: Jigsaw classroom (Aronson), Teams-Games-Tournaments (DeVries), Student Teams and Academic Division (Slavin), cooperative learning approach (Johnson), and small-group…

  3. Adolescents' Motivation for Reading: Group Differences and Relation to Standardized Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolters, Christopher A.; Denton, Carolyn A.; York, Mary J.; Francis, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend the research on adolescents' motivation for reading by examining important group differences and the relation of motivation to standardized achievement. Adolescents (N = 406) ranging from grade 7 to grade 12 completed a self-report survey that assessed 13 different aspects of their reading motivation…

  4. The Effect of Group Differences among Church-Related Youth in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Examines the influence of nationality, ethnicity, language, and beliefs on priority concerns among church related college students in Indonesia (N=122), Malaysia and Singapore (N=341). Results confirm the importance of traditional values with less agreement between groups about peers and adults. Implications for counselors are discussed. (JAC)

  5. The Roots of Social Justice in Group Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Anneliese A.; Salazar, Carmen F.

    2010-01-01

    This article revisits the history of group work, highlighting elements of empowerment and advocacy in the work of some key figures, and noting events and movements that nourished group work's social justice roots.

  6. Neighborhoods, Family, and Substance Use: Comparisons of the Relations across Racial and Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoonsun; Harachi, Tracy W.; Catalano, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how substance use among adolescents is related to several risk and protective factors derived from two ecological contexts: the neighborhood and the family. It explicitly investigates how the relationships between substance use and the factors vary across different racial and ethnic groups. Findings suggest many common correlates and processes of substance use for adolescents, regardless of race or ethnicity, including that neighborhood safety is associated with substance use. There are also some racial and ethnic group differences in relationships, including that low attachment to and lack of social opportunities in neighborhoods more strongly predict substance use among whites than among other racial and ethnic groups and that family management decreases the relationship between neighborhood safety and substance use among African Americans. A better understanding of the associations among factors that influence substance use across racial and ethnic subgroups can help effectively target preventive interventions for different groups. PMID:18461154

  7. The relationship between relational models and individualism and collectivism: evidence from culturally diverse work groups.

    PubMed

    Vodosek, Markus

    2009-04-01

    Relational models theory (Fiske, 1991 ) proposes that all thinking about social relationships is based on four elementary mental models: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. Triandis and his colleagues (e.g., Triandis, Kurowski, & Gelfand, 1994 ) have suggested a relationship between the constructs of horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism and Fiske's relational models. However, no previous research has examined this proposed relationship empirically. The objective of the current study was to test the association between the two frameworks in order to further our understanding of why members of culturally diverse groups may prefer different relational models in interactions with other group members. Findings from this study support a relationship between Triandis' constructs and Fiske's four relational models and uphold Fiske's ( 1991 ) claim that the use of the relational models is culturally dependent. As hypothesized, horizontal collectivism was associated with a preference for equality matching and communal sharing, vertical individualism was related to a preference for authority ranking, and vertical collectivism was related to a preference for authority ranking and communal sharing. However, contrary to expectations, horizontal individualism was not related to a preference for equality matching and market pricing, and vertical individualism was not associated with market pricing. By showing that there is a relationship between Triandis' and Fiske's frameworks, this study closes a gap in relational models theory, namely how culture relates to people's preferences for relational models. Thus, the findings from this study will enable future researchers to explain and predict what relational models are likely to be used in a certain cultural context.

  8. Oral health-related cultural beliefs for four racial/ethnic groups: Assessment of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Butani, Yogita; Weintraub, Jane A; Barker, Judith C

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess information available in the dental literature on oral health-related cultural beliefs. In the US, as elsewhere, many racial/ethnic minority groups shoulder a disproportionate burden of oral disease. Cultural beliefs, values and practices are often implicated as causes of oral health disparities, yet little is known about the breadth or adequacy of literature about cultural issues that could support these assertions. Hence, this rigorous assessment was conducted of work published in English on cultural beliefs and values in relation to oral health status and dental practice. Four racial/ethnic groups in the US (African-American, Chinese, Filipino and Hispanic/Latino) were chosen as exemplar populations. Methods The dental literature published in English for the period 1980–2006 noted in the electronic database PUBMED was searched, using keywords and MeSH headings in different combinations for each racial/ethnic group to identify eligible articles. To be eligible the title and abstract when available had to describe the oral health-related cultural knowledge or orientation of the populations studied. Results Overall, the majority of the literature on racial/ethnic groups was epidemiologic in nature, mainly demonstrating disparities in oral health rather than the oral beliefs or practices of these groups. A total of 60 relevant articles were found: 16 for African-American, 30 for Chinese, 2 for Filipino and 12 for Hispanic/Latino populations. Data on beliefs and practices from these studies has been abstracted, compiled and assessed. Few research-based studies were located. Articles lacked adequate identification of groups studied, used limited methods and had poor conceptual base. Conclusion The scant information available from the published dental and medical literature provides at best a rudimentary framework of oral health related ideas and beliefs for specific populations. PMID:18793438

  9. Social justice advocacy in nursing: what is it? How do we get there?

    PubMed

    Paquin, Siobhan O'Mahony

    2011-01-01

    Social justice advocacy is an expectation of all nurses as expressed in the professional codes that guide nursing practice. Nursing literature reflects this shift in the focus of nursing advocacy, providing insight into the potentials and challenges associated with nursing's evolution toward a broader social justice advocacy model. This article describes the concept of social justice advocacy as currently reflected in professional codes and nursing literature and contrasts this with the individual patient-nurse advocacy model, which continues to dominate in nursing practice today. Challenges associated with movement toward a social justice advocacy model and options for addressing these hurdles are also discussed.

  10. Content-related interactions and methods of reasoning within self-initiated organic chemistry study groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-12-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of content processing, and types of reasoning processes used by students within their groups. Our analysis showed that groups engaged in predominantly three types of interactions when discussing chemistry content: co-construction, teaching, and tutoring. Although each group engaged in each of these types of interactions at some point, their prevalence varied between groups and group members. Our analysis suggests that the types of interactions that were most common depended on the relative content knowledge of the group members as well as on the difficulty of the tasks in which they were engaged. Additionally, we were interested in characterizing the reasoning methods used by students within their study groups. We found that students used a combination of three content-relevant methods of reasoning: model-based reasoning, case-based reasoning, or rule-based reasoning, in conjunction with one chemically-irrelevant method of reasoning: symbol-based reasoning. The most common way for groups to reason was to use rules, whereas the least common way was for students to work from a model. In general, student reasoning correlated strongly to the subject matter to which students were paying attention, and was only weakly related to student interactions. Overall, results from this study may help instructors to construct appropriate tasks to guide what and how students study outside of the classroom. We found that students had a decidedly strategic approach in their study groups, relying heavily on material provided by their instructors, and using the reasoning strategies that resulted in the lowest levels of content processing. We suggest

  11. Effect of ethnic group membership on ethnic identity, race-related stress, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Utsey, Shawn O; Chae, Mark H; Brown, Christa F; Kelly, Deborah

    2002-11-01

    This study examined the effect of ethnic group membership on ethnic identity, race-related stress, and quality of life (QOL). The Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure, the Index of Race Related Stress--Brief Version, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life--Brief Version were administered to 160 male and female participants from 3 ethnic groups (African American, Asian American, and Latino American). Results indicated that African American participants had significantly higher race-related stress, ethnic identity, and psychological QOL scores than did Asian and Latino American participants. A stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that ethnic identity and cultural racism were significant predictors of QOL and accounted for 16% of the total variance for the entire sample.

  12. How Does Biological Belief in Race Relate to Our Feelings towards In-Group and Out-Groups?: A Cognitive Dissonance Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawa, John; Kim, Grace S.

    2011-01-01

    This study considered the effect of belief in race as a biological construct (RACEBIO) and inter-group anxiety (IGA) on in-group racial salience (IGRS) and out-group discomfort (OGD). Participants included 66 racially and ethnically diverse high school boarding students. As hypothesized, RACEBIO was positively related to both IGRS and OGD. In…

  13. Malaysian cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction: focus group discussions.

    PubMed

    Low, W Y; Wong, Y L; Zulkifli, S N; Tan, H M

    2002-12-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction (ED) utilizing focus group discussion. Six focus groups consisting of 66 men, 45-70-y-old were conducted-two Malay groups (n=18), two Chinese groups (n=25) and two Indian groups (n=23). Participants were purposely recruited from the general public on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative data analysis software ATLASti. The Malay and Chinese traditional remedies for preventing or treating ED are commonly recognized among all races. Many have a negative perception of someone with ED. Malay and Chinese men tended to blame their wife for their problem and thought that the problem might lead to extra-marital affairs, unlike the Indian men who attributed their condition to fate. Malays would prefer traditional medicine for the problem. The Chinese felt they would be more comfortable with a male doctor whilst this is not so with the Malays or Indians. Almost all prefer the doctor to initiate discussion on sexual issues related to their medical condition. There is a need for doctors to consider cultural perspectives in a multicultural society as a lack of understanding of this often contributes to an inadequate consultation.

  14. Oral Health Related Quality of Life in a Group of Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Pegah Mosannen; Moeintaghavi, Amir; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Dorri, Mojtaba; Koohestanian, Niloufar; Abasianhoseini, Leila Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background A good quality of life in elderly population is related to different aspects of health including oral health. The aim of this study was to determine oral health-related quality of life (OHR-QoL) in elderly patients referred for dental or oro-maxillo-facial complaints to Mashhad dental school (MDS) and compare them with a group of normal population Materials and Methods A total of 99 patients from MDS (as case group) and 114 elderly people as control were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group were chosen among the pilgrims who had come to the holy shrine of Imam Reza (Haram). Persian version of OIDP (Oral Impact of Daily Performance) index was used. Data were entered to SPSS 11.5 and Statistical analysis was performed. Results A total of 213 (case =99, control=114) cases were enrolled. Mean Performance score (MPS) was 6.27±10.47 (7.96±11.95 in case group, and 4.80±8.77 in control group) and the difference was significant (p=0.015). Age was conversely correlated with MPS (r=0.0125, p=0.24) although this correlation was not significant. We found, in oro-maxillofacial functions, ill-fit dentures, oral ulcers, pain and tooth mobility were major determinants of OHR-QoL. Number of impaired functions was directly and significantly correlated with MPS (r=0.92, p<0.001). Conclusion Some daily functions like speaking, emotional status, cleaning teeth, physical activity were impaired in case group. Oral and maxillofacial diseases were more prevalent in case group and can be an important impairing issue in OHR-QoL. PMID:26675293

  15. Optimizing pediatric clinical care and advocacy in an online era

    PubMed Central

    Dollin, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To help busy FPs find useful current information and keep up to date on pediatric infectious disease and immunization topics by highlighting the work of one excellent source of reliable information in this area, the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee. Composition of the committee Committee members were appointed to represent the Canadian Paediatric Society, the College of Family Physicians of Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization. Methods This article highlights important pediatric practice points generated by the Canadian Paediatric Society Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee at a typical meeting in January 2013 from the perspective of an FP liaison. It also describes the committee’s work methods and its background thinking related to the most current and changing issues. Report Learn specific online links to updated pediatric infectious disease topics from the detailed content of this report. Topics include caring for kids new to Canada, vaccine-hesitant parents, influenza, human papillomavirus, pertussis, sexually transmitted infections, multidrug-resistant bacteria, and advocacy, among others. Conclusion Learn where to find this new and continuously changing information and how to stay evergreen in your knowledge. PMID:25022634

  16. Fetal alcohol syndrome related knowledge assessment and comparison in New Jersey health professional groups.

    PubMed

    Brimacombe, M; Nayeem, A; Adubato, S; Dejoseph, M; Zimmerman-Bier, B

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is a need to educate health professionals in regard to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders across many health and allied health fields. OBJECTIVE Conduct evaluations of educational programs designed to assess knowledge, attitudes and beliefs in relation to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) among health and allied health professionals in the northeastern United States. METHODS FASD related educational efforts were carried out and evaluated in New Jersey for various health-related professional groups over a four-month period using a common set of materials. Pre and post-test evaluation comprised 20 questions on FASD recognition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Groups surveyed included nurses, social workers, counselors, therapists, clinicians and allied health professionals comprising physician assistants, dieticians, physical therapists, occupational therapists. RESULTS Results showed that a majority of health care professionals in New Jersey possess basic knowledge related to FASD and the effects of alcohol on a child in utero. They also had significant awareness of the importance of early diagnosis and the importance of reducing secondary disabilities. The study did however reveal areas for improvement in some professional groups. CONCLUSIONS FASD is the most important preventable cause of mental retardation. Health professionals attending workshops typically had a good basic understanding of FASD, though with some weaknesses specific to their discipline. Educational efforts in regard to FASD should be sensitive to the various health professionals engaged in preventing, diagnosing and treating FASD.

  17. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  18. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  19. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients’ health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  20. SARCS strong-lensing galaxy groups. II. Mass-concentration relation and strong-lensing bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foëx, G.; Motta, V.; Jullo, E.; Limousin, M.; Verdugo, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Various studies have shown a lensing bias in the mass-concentration relation of cluster-scale structures that is the result of an alignment of the major axis and the line of sight. In this paper, we aim to study this lensing bias through the mass-concentration relation of galaxy groups, thus extending observational constraints to dark matter haloes of mass ~1013-1014 M⊙. Methods: Our work is based on the stacked weak-lensing analysis of a sample of 80 strong-lensing galaxy groups. By combining several lenses, we significantly increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the lensing signal, thus providing constraints on the mass profile that cannot be obtained for individual objects. The resulting shear profiles were fitted with various mass models, among them the Navarro-Frank-White (NFW) profile, which provides an estimate of the total mass and of the concentration of the composite galaxy groups. Results: The main results of our analysis are the following: (i) the lensing signal does not allow us to firmly distinguish between a simple singular isothermal sphere mass distribution and the expected NFW mass profile; (ii) we obtain an average concentration c200 = 8.6-1.3+2.1 that is much higher than the value expected from numerical simulations for the corresponding average mass M200 = 0.73-0.10+0.11 × 1014 M⊙; (iii) the combination of our results with those at larger mass scales gives a mass-concentration relation c(M) of more than two decades in mass, whose slope disagrees with predictions from numerical simulations using unbiased populations of dark matter haloes; (iv) our combined c(M) relation matches results from simulations that only used haloes with a large strong-lensing cross-section, that is, elongated with a major axis close to the line of sight; (v) for the simplest case of prolate haloes, we estimate a lower limit on the minor-to-major axis ratio a/c = 0.5 for the average SARCS galaxy group with a toy model. Conclusions: Our analysis based on galaxy

  1. Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group: A developmentally informed intervention for at-risk mothers

    PubMed Central

    Luthar, Suniya S.; Suchman, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    The Relational Psychotherapy Mothers’ Group (RPMG), a developmentally informed, supportive psychotherapy designed to serve heroin-addicted mothers with children up to 16 years of age, aims at addressing psychosocial vulnerabilities, and facilitating optimal parenting, among at-risk mothers. We present preliminary evidence on the efficacy of RPMG as an “add on” treatment in comparison with standard methadone counseling alone. At the end of the 24-week treatment period, mothers receiving RPMG plus standard methadone counseling demonstrated lower levels of risk for child maltreatment, greater involvement with their children, and more positive psychosocial adjustment than women who received methadone counseling alone. Children of RPMG participants also reflected fewer problems in multiple areas. At 6 months posttreatment, RPMG recipients continued to be at a relative advantage, although the magnitude of group differences was often attenuated. Notably, urinalyses indicated that RPMG mothers showed greater improvements in levels of opioid use over time than comparison mothers. PMID:10847626

  2. The link between identification and in-group favouritism: effects of threat to social identity and trust-related emotions.

    PubMed

    Voci, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    The relation between identification and in-group favouritism was analysed across two studies, in which the relevance of three intervening factors was demonstrated: (a) the moderating role of social identity threat, (b) the mediating role of trust-related emotions experienced towards in-group and out-group members, and (c) the importance of the distinction between in-group and out-group evaluations. When the in-group was not threatened, the link between identification and in-group bias was unreliable. The effect of in-group identification on in-group bias was stronger when either the value or the distinctiveness of the in-group were threatened. A value threat strengthened the influence of identification on in-group evaluation and, via out-group distrust, on out-group derogation. Under a distinctiveness threat, identification affected out-group evaluation and intergroup differentiation. These results demonstrate that the relation between identification and in-group favouritism is reliable only in a clear intergroup context. Moreover, they show that the role and the strength of in-group and out-group trust are altered by the type of social identity threat introduced. Finally, they clarify that in-group love and out-group hate phenomena are not zero-sum, and that their presence may be simultaneous when the value of the in-group is threatened by out-group members.

  3. Weak lensing calibrated M-T scaling relation of galaxy groups in the cosmos field

    SciTech Connect

    Kettula, K.; Finoguenov, A.; Massey, R.; Rhodes, J.; Hoekstra, H.; Taylor, J. E.; Spinelli, P. F.; Tanaka, M.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; McCracken, H. J.; Koekemoer, A.

    2013-11-20

    The scaling between X-ray observables and mass for galaxy clusters and groups is instrumental for cluster-based cosmology and an important probe for the thermodynamics of the intracluster gas. We calibrate a scaling relation between the weak lensing mass and X-ray spectroscopic temperature for 10 galaxy groups in the COSMOS field, combined with 55 higher-mass clusters from the literature. The COSMOS data includes Hubble Space Telescope imaging and redshift measurements of 46 source galaxies per arcminute{sup 2}, enabling us to perform unique weak lensing measurements of low-mass systems. Our sample extends the mass range of the lensing calibrated M-T relation an order of magnitude lower than any previous study, resulting in a power-law slope of 1.48{sub −0.09}{sup +0.13}. The slope is consistent with the self-similar model, predictions from simulations, and observations of clusters. However, X-ray observations relying on mass measurements derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium have indicated that masses at group scales are lower than expected. Both simulations and observations suggest that hydrostatic mass measurements can be biased low. Our external weak lensing masses provide the first observational support for hydrostatic mass bias at group level, showing an increasing bias with decreasing temperature and reaching a level of 30%-50% at 1 keV.

  4. The challenge of evaluating complex interventions: a framework for evaluating media advocacy.

    PubMed

    Stead, Martine; Hastings, Gerard; Eadie, Douglas

    2002-06-01

    New health promotion and public health approaches such as media advocacy pose particular evaluation challenges. Evaluation is important to provide feedback to media advocacy practitioners on how to enhance their efforts, and to funders and researchers seeking to assess media advocacy's effectiveness as a health promotion strategy. The media advocacy evaluation literature contains some examples of promising evaluation approaches but is still evolving. A comprehensive framework for the evaluation of media advocacy is presented. Building on existing approaches to evaluation in media advocacy and on current thinking regarding evaluation in health promotion, it proposes a series of indicators and research methods for evaluating media advocacy at the levels of formative, process and outcome evaluation. The framework can be used to encourage strategic reflection on the media advocacy process, to guide evaluation of specific interventions, and to demonstrate to funders the importance and complexity of evaluation in this promising field.

  5. 77 FR 55525 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  6. 77 FR 2611 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  7. 77 FR 37101 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  8. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  9. 77 FR 21158 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Refund Processing Communications Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  11. 78 FR 69940 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

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    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Refund Processing Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  14. 78 FR 48230 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

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    2013-03-08

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  16. 77 FR 21157 - Internal Revenue Service; Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Refund Processing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Refund Processing Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  17. Testing DNA barcoding in closely related groups of Lysimachia L. (Myrsinaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Yun; Wang, Feng-Ying; Yan, Hai-Fei; Hao, Gang; Hu, Chi-Ming; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that rbcL and matK are the core barcodes in plants, but they are not powerful enough to distinguish between closely related plant groups. Additional barcodes need to be evaluated to improve the level of discrimination between plant species. Because of their well-studied taxonomy and extreme diversity, we used Chinese Lysimachia (Myrsinaceae) species to test the performance of core barcodes (rbcL and matK) and two additional candidate barcodes (trnH-psbA and the nuclear ribosomal ITS); 97 accessions from four subgenus representing 34 putative Lysimachia species were included in this study. And many closely related species pairs in subgen. Lysimachia were covered to detect their discriminatory power. The inefficiency of rbcL and matK alone or combined in closely related plant groups was validated in this study. TrnH-psbA combined with rbcL + matK did not yet perform well in Lysimachia groups. In contrast, ITS, alone or combined with rbcL and/or matK, revealed high resolving ability in Lysimachia. We support ITS as a supplementary barcode on the basis of core barcode rbcL and matK. Besides, this study also illustrates several mistakes or underlying evolutionary events in Lysimachia detected by DNA barcoding. PMID:21967641

  18. Conservation Through Different Lenses: Reflection, Responsibility, and the Politics of Participation in Conservation Advocacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrash Walton, Abigail

    2010-01-01

    This essay considers the arenas of advocacy, politics, and self-reflection in strengthening conservation and resource management initiatives. It frames key questions that reflective conservation practitioners may address in seeking to enhance the results of conservation projects, including equity and more inclusive participation by nonprivileged groups. The essay touches on the importance of understanding conservation work within particular political and historic dynamics, including the need to understand non-Western and/or indigenous or traditional perspectives on conservation. The author makes the case that Western or privileged conservation practitioners are uniquely situated to advocate effectively for change.

  19. The effects of group monitoring on fatigue-related einstellung during mathematical problem solving.

    PubMed

    Frings, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Fatigue resulting from sleep deficit can lead to decreased performance in a variety of cognitive domains and can result in potentially serious accidents. The present study aimed to test whether fatigue leads to increased Einstellung (low levels of cognitive flexibility) in a series of mathematical problem-solving tasks. Many situations involving fatigue and problem solving also involve people working in teams. However, little research has considered the role of social processes in managing the effects of fatigue. Research into the group monitoring hypothesis suggests that membership in a team can offset the effects of impairing factors such as fatigue upon performance. Thus, the present study also aimed to test whether group membership exacerbates or ameliorates the negative effects of fatigue. During the course of a weekend military training exercise, participants (N = 171) attempted to solve a series of problems either alone or in a team, and while either reasonably alert (nonfatigued) or fatigued through sleep deficit. Fatigued problem solvers working alone showed increased Einstellung. In contrast, and in line with the group monitoring hypothesis, teams of fatigued problem solvers did not experience increased Einstellung. The present study also showed that teams with a group member who was relatively less fatigued experienced less Einstellung than other groups. These effects persisted even once participants were cued toward more direct strategies. These findings highlight the risk of Einstellung when fatigued and also the importance of team membership with reference to problem solving in an occupational context.

  20. A Novel Education and Training Program to Enhance Student Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alex J; Matzke, Gary R; McCall, Kenneth L

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a unique student advocacy program to train student pharmacists to be effective advocates for the profession of pharmacy and the patients it serves. Design. The Academy is a 2-day program hosted annually in Washington, DC, that combines didactic presentations on the legislative process, communication with policymakers, current legislation, and active-learning exercises such as mock congressional visits. The Academy culminates with visits to Capitol Hill where students meet with legislators and their staff to discuss pending legislation. Assessment. Nearly 350 students from 43 schools and colleges of pharmacy completed the program in its 4 years. Students are assessed following the active-learning exercises and meetings with legislators. Conclusion. Advocacy has been listed as a competency that requires more attention in pharmacy education. The Academy provides a model that schools may replicate to enhance their advocacy offerings.

  1. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge.

  2. Breast cancer advocacy internships: student motivations, intentions, and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Trump, Tasha; Henderson, Jessica

    2011-03-01

    Currently, there are no published studies about the impact on students of a structured, breast-cancer-specific advocacy internship. Our goal was to provide the student perspective of participation in a national breast cancer advocacy conference in Washington, D.C. as part of an internship. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected in three waves: 1 month before the training, during the training, and 1 month post-training. Four themes emerged: (1) empowerment, (2) connection with breast cancer patients and advocates, (3) learning outside the classroom, and (4) action through advocacy and civilian lobbying. This study found strong support for the internship model described here and is recommended for replication at other universities and institutions.

  3. A Novel Education and Training Program to Enhance Student Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alex J; Matzke, Gary R; McCall, Kenneth L

    2015-09-25

    Objective. To develop and implement a unique student advocacy program to train student pharmacists to be effective advocates for the profession of pharmacy and the patients it serves. Design. The Academy is a 2-day program hosted annually in Washington, DC, that combines didactic presentations on the legislative process, communication with policymakers, current legislation, and active-learning exercises such as mock congressional visits. The Academy culminates with visits to Capitol Hill where students meet with legislators and their staff to discuss pending legislation. Assessment. Nearly 350 students from 43 schools and colleges of pharmacy completed the program in its 4 years. Students are assessed following the active-learning exercises and meetings with legislators. Conclusion. Advocacy has been listed as a competency that requires more attention in pharmacy education. The Academy provides a model that schools may replicate to enhance their advocacy offerings. PMID:27168608

  4. International Dengue Vaccine Communication and Advocacy: Challenges and Way Forward.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana; Van Roy, Rebecca; Andrus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Dengue vaccine introduction will likely occur soon. However, little has been published on international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy. More effort at the international level is required to review, unify and strategically disseminate dengue vaccine knowledge to endemic countries' decision makers and potential donors. Waiting to plan for the introduction of new vaccines until licensure may delay access in developing countries. Concerted efforts to communicate and advocate for vaccines prior to licensure are likely challenged by unknowns of the use of dengue vaccines and the disease, including uncertainties of vaccine impact, vaccine access and dengue's complex pathogenesis and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the international community has the opportunity to apply previous best practices for vaccine communication and advocacy. The following key strategies will strengthen international dengue vaccine communication and advocacy: consolidating existing coalitions under one strategic umbrella, urgently convening stakeholders to formulate the roadmap for integrated dengue prevention and control, and improving the dissemination of dengue scientific knowledge. PMID:26855170

  5. Fossil group origins - VI. Global X-ray scaling relations of fossil galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundert, A.; Gastaldello, F.; D'Onghia, E.; Girardi, M.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrena, R.; Corsini, E. M.; De Grandi, S.; Jiménez-Bailón, E.; Lozada-Muñoz, M.; Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Wilcots, E.; Zarattini, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the first pointed X-ray observations of 10 candidate fossil galaxy groups and clusters. With these Suzaku observations, we determine global temperatures and bolometric X-ray luminosities of the intracluster medium (ICM) out to r500 for six systems in our sample. The remaining four systems show signs of significant contamination from non-ICM sources. For the six objects with successfully determined r500 properties, we measure global temperatures in the range 2.8 ≤ TX ≤ 5.3 keV, bolometric X-ray luminosities of 0.8 × 1044 ≤ LX, bol ≤ 7.7 × 1044 erg s-1, and estimate masses, as derived from TX, of M500 ≳ 1014 M⊙. Fossil cluster scaling relations are constructed for a sample that combines our Suzaku observed fossils with fossils in the literature. Using measurements of global X-ray luminosity, temperature, optical luminosity, and velocity dispersion, scaling relations for the fossil sample are then compared with a control sample of non-fossil systems. We find the fits of our fossil cluster scaling relations are consistent with the relations for normal groups and clusters, indicating fossil clusters have global ICM X-ray properties similar to those of comparable mass non-fossil systems.

  6. Relative group size and minority school success: the role of intergroup friendship and discrimination experiences.

    PubMed

    Baysu, Gülseli; Phalet, Karen; Brown, Rupert

    2014-06-01

    From an intergroup relations perspective, relative group size is associated with the quantity and quality of intergroup contact: more positive contact (i.e., intergroup friendship) supports, and negative contact (i.e., experienced discrimination) hampers, minority identity, and school success. Accordingly, we examined intergroup contact as the process through which perceived relative proportions of minority and majority students in school affected minority success (i.e., school performance, satisfaction, and self-efficacy). Turkish minorities (N = 1,060) were compared in four Austrian and Belgian cities which differ in their typical school ethnic composition. Across cities, minority experiences of intergroup contact fully mediated the impact of perceived relative group size on school success. As expected, higher minority presence impaired school success through restricting intergroup friendship and increasing experienced discrimination. The association between minority presence and discrimination was curvilinear, however, so that schools where minority students predominated offered some protection from discrimination. To conclude, the comparative findings reveal positive and negative intergroup contact as key processes that jointly explain when and how higher proportions of minority students affect school success.

  7. 76 FR 17995 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  8. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit...

  9. 75 FR 10864 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be conducted. The...) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be held...

  10. 75 FR 18955 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee.

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    2010-05-07

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  1. 75 FR 11998 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Issue Committee

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    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Issue Committee will be conducted. The... Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax...

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  4. 76 FR 32021 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project Committee

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  5. 76 FR 6189 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project Committee

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  7. 76 FR 37199 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  8. 75 FR 33895 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be conducted. The...) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be held...

  9. 76 FR 22171 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  10. 76 FR 63716 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance... open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Project Committee will be....C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance...

  11. 75 FR 47349 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The.... (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project...

  12. 75 FR 4140 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned ] Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  13. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  14. 75 FR 55406 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be conducted. The.... (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be...

  15. 76 FR 32024 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  16. 76 FR 2197 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  17. 75 FR 62631 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be conducted. The.... (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be...

  18. 75 FR 62632 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...

  19. 75 FR 4139 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Issue... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be conducted. The.... (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Volunteer Income Tax Issue Committee will be...

  20. 76 FR 6188 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project... Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will be conducted. The...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Earned Income Tax Credit Project Committee will...